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Sample records for pepper bzip transcription

  1. Expression and Functional Roles of the Pepper Pathogen-Induced bZIP Transcription Factor CabZIP2 in Enhanced Disease Resistance to Bacterial Pathogen Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lim, Sohee; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-07-01

    A pepper bZIP transcription factor gene, CabZIP2, was isolated from pepper leaves infected with a virulent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Transient expression analysis of the CabZIP2-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the CabZIP2 protein is localized in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. The acidic domain in the N-terminal region of CabZIP2 that is fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain is required to activate the transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Transcription of CabZIP2 is induced in pepper plants inoculated with virulent or avirulent strains of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CabZIP2 gene is also induced by defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. To elucidate the in vivo function of the CabZIP2 gene in plant defense, virus-induced gene silencing in pepper and overexpression in Arabidopsis were used. CabZIP2-silenced pepper plants were susceptible to infection by the virulent strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, which was accompanied by reduced expression of defense-related genes such as CaBPR1 and CaAMP1. CabZIP2 overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Together, these results suggest that CabZIP2 is involved in bacterial disease resistance.

  2. In vivo binding of hot pepper bZIP transcription factor CabZIP1 to the G-box region of pathogenesis-related protein 1 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-26

    We find that salicylic acid and ethephon treatment in hot pepper increases the expression of a putative basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene, CabZIP1. CabZIP1 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously in various organs. The green fluorescent protein-fused transcription factor, CabZIP1::GFP, can be specifically localized to the nucleus, an action that is consistent with the presence of a nuclear localization signal in its protein sequence. Transient overexpression of the CabZIP1 transcription factor results in an increase in PR-1 transcripts level in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that CabZIP1 binds to the G-box elements in native promoter of the hot pepper pathogenesis-related protein 1 (CaPR-1) gene in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that CabZIP1 plays a role as a transcriptional regulator of the CaPR-1 gene.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors bZIP19 and bZIP23 regulate the adaptation to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ana G L; Herrero, Eva; Lin, Ya-Fen; Huettel, Bruno; Talukdar, Sangita; Smaczniak, Cezary; Immink, Richard G H; van Eldik, Mandy; Fiers, Mark; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G M

    2010-06-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms. When facing a shortage in zinc supply, plants adapt by enhancing the zinc uptake capacity. The molecular regulators controlling this adaptation are not known. We present the identification of two closely related members of the Arabidopsis thaliana basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene family, bZIP19 and bZIP23, that regulate the adaptation to low zinc supply. They were identified, in a yeast-one-hybrid screening, to associate to promoter regions of the zinc deficiency-induced ZIP4 gene of the Zrt- and Irt-related protein (ZIP) family of metal transporters. Although mutation of only one of the bZIP genes hardly affects plants, we show that the bzip19 bzip23 double mutant is hypersensitive to zinc deficiency. Unlike the wild type, the bzip19 bzip23 mutant is unable to induce the expression of a small set of genes that constitutes the primary response to zinc deficiency, comprising additional ZIP metal transporter genes. This set of target genes is characterized by the presence of one or more copies of a 10-bp imperfect palindrome in their promoter region, to which both bZIP proteins can bind. The bZIP19 and bZIP23 transcription factors, their target genes, and the characteristic cis zinc deficiency response elements they can bind to are conserved in higher plants. These findings are a significant step forward to unravel the molecular mechanism of zinc homeostasis in plants, allowing the improvement of zinc bio-fortification to alleviate human nutrition problems and phytoremediation strategies to clean contaminated soils.

  4. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Carles M; Potschin, Maren; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor (TF) families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two TF families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other's transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization.

  5. Functional characterization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP29 reveals its role in leaf and root development

    PubMed Central

    Van Leene, Jelle; Blomme, Jonas; Kulkarni, Shubhada R; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Heyndrickx, Ken S; Vanneste, Steffen; Goossens, Alain; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk; De Jaeger, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Plant bZIP group I transcription factors have been reported mainly for their role during vascular development and osmosensory responses. Interestingly, bZIP29 has been identified in a cell cycle interactome, indicating additional functions of bZIP29 in plant development. Here, bZIP29 was functionally characterized to study its role during plant development. It is not present in vascular tissue but is specifically expressed in proliferative tissues. Genome-wide mapping of bZIP29 target genes confirmed its role in stress and osmosensory responses, but also identified specific binding to several core cell cycle genes and to genes involved in cell wall organization. bZIP29 protein complex analyses validated interaction with other bZIP group I members and provided insight into regulatory mechanisms acting on bZIP dimers. In agreement with bZIP29 expression in proliferative tissues and with its binding to promoters of cell cycle regulators, dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 altered the cell number in leaves and in the root meristem. A transcriptome analysis on the root meristem, however, indicated that bZIP29 might regulate cell number through control of cell wall organization. Finally, ectopic dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 and redundant factors led to a seedling-lethal phenotype, pointing to essential roles for bZIP group I factors early in plant development. PMID:27660483

  6. System-wide characterization of bZIP transcription factor proteins involved in infection-related morphogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Ru, Yanyan; Hong, Li; Zhu, Qian; Zuo, Rongfang; Guo, Xianxian; Wang, Jingzhen; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2014-01-01

    The basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors (TFs) function as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation in eukaryotic organisms including fungi. We have previously identified MoAp1 and MoAtf1 as bZIP TFs in Magnaporthe oryzae and demonstrated that they regulate the oxidative stress response and are critical in conidiogenesis and pathogenicity. Studies of bZIP proteins could provide a novel strategy for controlling rice blast, but a systematic examination of the bZIP proteins has not been carried out. Here, we identified 19 additional bZIP TFs and characterized their functions. We found that the majority of these TFs exhibit active functions, most notably, in conidiogenesis. We showed that MoHac1 regulates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress response through a conserved unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, MoMetR controls amino acid metabolism to govern growth and differentiation, and MoBzip10 governs appressorium function and invasive hyphal growth. Moreover, MoBzip5 participates in appressorium formation through a pathway distinct from that MoBzip10, and MoMeaB appears to exert a regulatory role through nutrient uptake and nitrogen utilization. Collectively, our results provide insights into shared and specific functions associated with each of these TFs and link the regulatory roles to the fungal growth, conidiation, appressorium formation, host penetration, and pathogenicity. PMID:25186614

  7. Abscisic-acid-dependent basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors in plant abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2017-01-01

    One of the major causes of significant crop loss throughout the world is the myriad of environmental stresses including drought, salinity, cold, heavy metal toxicity, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays. Plants as sessile organisms have evolved various effective mechanism which enable them to withstand this plethora of stresses. Most of such regulatory mechanisms usually follow the abscisic-acid (ABA)-dependent pathway. In this review, we have primarily focussed on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) activated by the ABA-mediated signalosome. Upon perception of ABA by specialized receptors, the signal is transduced via various groups of Ser/Thr kinases, which phosphorylate the bZIP TFs. Following such post-translational modification of TFs, they are activated so that they bind to specific cis-acting sequences called abscisic-acid-responsive elements (ABREs) or GC-rich coupling elements (CE), thereby influencing the expression of their target downstream genes. Several in silico techniques have been adopted so far to predict the structural features, recognize the regulatory modification sites, undergo phylogenetic analyses, and facilitate genome-wide survey of TF under multiple stresses. Current investigations on the epigenetic regulation that controls greater accessibility of the inducible regions of DNA of the target gene to the bZIP TFs exclusively under stress situations, along with the evolved stress memory responses via genomic imprinting mechanism, have been highlighted. The potentiality of overexpression of bZIP TFs, either in a homologous or in a heterologous background, in generating transgenic plants tolerant to various abiotic stressors have also been addressed by various groups. The present review will provide a coherent documentation on the functional characterization and regulation of bZIP TFs under multiple environmental stresses, with the major goal of generating multiple-stress-tolerant plant cultivars in near future.

  8. The loss of circadian PAR bZip transcription factors results in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gachon, Frédéric; Fonjallaz, Philippe; Damiola, Francesca; Gos, Pascal; Kodama, Tohru; Zakany, Jozsef; Duboule, Denis; Petit, Brice; Tafti, Mehdi; Schibler, Ueli

    2004-01-01

    DBP (albumin D-site-binding protein), HLF (hepatic leukemia factor), and TEF (thyrotroph embryonic factor) are the three members of the PAR bZip (proline and acidic amino acid-rich basic leucine zipper) transcription factor family. All three of these transcriptional regulatory proteins accumulate with robust circadian rhythms in tissues with high amplitudes of clock gene expression, such as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the liver. However, they are expressed at nearly invariable levels in most brain regions, in which clock gene expression only cycles with low amplitude. Here we show that mice deficient for all three PAR bZip proteins are highly susceptible to generalized spontaneous and audiogenic epilepsies that frequently are lethal. Transcriptome profiling revealed pyridoxal kinase (Pdxk) as a target gene of PAR bZip proteins in both liver and brain. Pyridoxal kinase converts vitamin B6 derivatives into pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), the coenzyme of many enzymes involved in amino acid and neurotransmitter metabolism. PAR bZip-deficient mice show decreased brain levels of PLP, serotonin, and dopamine, and such changes have previously been reported to cause epilepsies in other systems. Hence, the expression of some clock-controlled genes, such as Pdxk, may have to remain within narrow limits in the brain. This could explain why the circadian oscillator has evolved to generate only low-amplitude cycles in most brain regions. PMID:15175240

  9. The transcription factor bZIP14 regulates the TCA cycle in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Michiel; Fabris, Michele; Obata, Toshihiro; Foubert, Imogen; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Solano, Roberto; Fernie, Alisdair R; Vyverman, Wim; Goossens, Alain

    2017-06-01

    Diatoms are amongst the most important marine microalgae in terms of biomass, but little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms that regulate their versatile metabolism. Here, the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was studied at the metabolite and transcriptome level during nitrogen starvation and following imposition of three other stresses that impede growth. The coordinated upregulation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle during the nitrogen stress response was the most striking observation. Through co-expression analysis and DNA binding assays, the transcription factor bZIP14 was identified as a regulator of the TCA cycle, also beyond the nitrogen starvation response, namely in diurnal regulation. Accordingly, metabolic and transcriptional shifts were observed upon overexpression of bZIP14 in transformed P. tricornutum cells. Our data indicate that the TCA cycle is a tightly regulated and important hub for carbon reallocation in the diatom cell during nutrient starvation and that bZIP14 is a conserved regulator of this cycle. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Exploring the bZIP transcription factor regulatory network in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chaoguang; Li, Jingyi; Glass, N. Louise

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key nodes of regulatory networks in eukaryotic organisms, including filamentous fungi such as Neurospora crassa. The 178 predicted DNA-binding TFs in N. crassa are distributed primarily among six gene families, which represent an ancient expansion in filamentous ascomycete genomes; 98 TF genes show detectable expression levels during vegetative growth of N. crassa, including 35 that show a significant difference in expression level between hyphae at the periphery versus hyphae in the interior of a colony. Regulatory networks within a species genome include paralogous TFs and their respective target genes (TF regulon). To investigate TF network evolution in N. crassa, we focused on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TF family, which contains nine members. We performed baseline transcriptional profiling during vegetative growth of the wild-type and seven isogenic, viable bZIP deletion mutants. We further characterized the regulatory network of one member of the bZIP family, NCU03905. NCU03905 encodes an Ap1-like protein (NcAp-1), which is involved in resistance to multiple stress responses, including oxidative and heavy metal stress. Relocalization of NcAp-1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was associated with exposure to stress. A comparison of the NcAp-1 regulon with Ap1-like regulons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus showed both conservation and divergence. These data indicate how N. crassa responds to stress and provide information on pathway evolution. PMID:21081763

  11. Genome-wide analysis and expression profile of the bZIP transcription factor gene family in grapevine (Vitis vinifera)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene family is one of the largest and most diverse families in plants. Current studies have shown that the bZIP proteins regulate numerous growth and developmental processes and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Nonetheless, knowledge concerning the specific expression patterns and evolutionary history of plant bZIP family members remains very limited. Results We identified 55 bZIP transcription factor-encoding genes in the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome, and divided them into 10 groups according to the phylogenetic relationship with those in Arabidopsis. The chromosome distribution and the collinearity analyses suggest that expansion of the grapevine bZIP (VvbZIP) transcription factor family was greatly contributed by the segment/chromosomal duplications, which may be associated with the grapevine genome fusion events. Nine intron/exon structural patterns within the bZIP domain and the additional conserved motifs were identified among all VvbZIP proteins, and showed a high group-specificity. The predicted specificities on DNA-binding domains indicated that some highly conserved amino acid residues exist across each major group in the tree of land plant life. The expression patterns of VvbZIP genes across the grapevine gene expression atlas, based on microarray technology, suggest that VvbZIP genes are involved in grapevine organ development, especially seed development. Expression analysis based on qRT-PCR indicated that VvbZIP genes are extensively involved in drought- and heat-responses, with possibly different mechanisms. Conclusions The genome-wide identification, chromosome organization, gene structures, evolutionary and expression analyses of grapevine bZIP genes provide an overall insight of this gene family and their potential involvement in growth, development and stress responses. This will facilitate further research on the bZIP gene family regarding their evolutionary history and

  12. The Role of bZIP Transcription Factors in Green Plant Evolution: Adaptive Features Emerging from Four Founder Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schrago, Carlos Guerra; dos Santos, Renato Vicentini; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Vincentz, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs). The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments. PMID:18698409

  13. Expression analysis of bZIP transcription factor encoding genes in response to water deficit stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Rai, R D; Tyagi, Aruna

    2016-05-01

    In plants, basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factors regulate several developmental processes and activate genes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Role of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was studied in paddy in relation to different stages of development and water deficit stress (WDS) in a drought tolerant cultivar N22 and susceptible IR 64. Further, relative water content (RWC), membrane stability index (MSI) and abscisic acid (ABA) content were measured as indices of WDS at different stages of development and levels of stress. Expression of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was directly correlated to developmental stage and WDS and indirectly to RWC, MSI and ABA content.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Transcription Factors in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Baloglu, Mehmet Cengiz; Eldem, Vahap; Hajyzadeh, Mortaza; Unver, Turgay

    2014-01-01

    bZIP proteins are one of the largest transcriptional regulators playing crucial roles in plant development, physiological processes, and biotic/abiotic stress responses. Despite the availability of recently published draft genome sequence of Cucumis sativus, no comprehensive investigation of these family members has been presented for cucumber. We have identified 64 bZIP transcription factor-encoding genes in the cucumber genome. Based on structural features of their encoded proteins, CsbZIP genes could be classified into 6 groups. Cucumber bZIP genes were expanded mainly by segmental duplication rather than tandem duplication. Although segmental duplication rate of the CsbZIP genes was lower than that of Arabidopsis, rice and sorghum, it was observed as a common expansion mechanism. Some orthologous relationships and chromosomal rearrangements were observed according to comparative mapping analysis with other species. Genome-wide expression analysis of bZIP genes indicated that 64 CsbZIP genes were differentially expressed in at least one of the ten sampled tissues. A total of 4 CsbZIP genes displayed higher expression values in leaf, flowers and root tissues. The in silico micro-RNA (miRNA) and target transcript analyses identified that a total of 21 CsbZIP genes were targeted by 38 plant miRNAs. CsbZIP20 and CsbZIP22 are the most targeted by miR165 and miR166 family members, respectively. We also analyzed the expression of ten CsbZIP genes in the root and leaf tissues of drought-stressed cucumber using quantitative RT-PCR. All of the selected CsbZIP genes were measured as increased in root tissue at 24th h upon PEG treatment. Contrarily, the down-regulation was observed in leaf tissues of all analyzed CsbZIP genes. CsbZIP12 and CsbZIP44 genes showed gradual induction of expression in root tissues during time points. This genome-wide identification and expression profiling provides new opportunities for cloning and functional analyses, which may be used in

  15. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-07-26

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions.

  16. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  17. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors involved in abiotic stresses: A molecular model of a wheat bZIP factor and implications of its structure in function.

    PubMed

    Sornaraj, Pradeep; Luang, Sukanya; Lopato, Sergiy; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) genes encode transcription factors (TFs) that control important biochemical and physiological processes in plants and all other eukaryotic organisms. Here we present (i) the homo-dimeric structural model of bZIP consisting of basic leucine zipper and DNA binding regions, in complex with the synthetic Abscisic Acid-Responsive Element (ABREsyn); (ii) discuss homo- and hetero-dimerisation patterns of bZIP TFs; (iii) summarise the current progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function of bZIP TFs, including features determining the specificity of their binding to DNA cis-elements, and (iv) review information on interaction partners of bZIPs during plant development and stress response, as well as on types and roles of post-translational modifications, and regulatory aspects of protein-degradation mediated turn-over. Finally, we (v) recapitulate on the recent advances regarding functional roles of bZIP factors in major agricultural crops, and discuss the potential significance of bZIP-based genetic engineering in improving crop yield and tolerance to abiotic stresses. An accurate analysis and understanding of roles of plant bZIP TFs in different biological processes requires the knowledge of interacting partners, time and location of expression in plant organs, and the information on mechanisms of homo- and hetero-dimerisation of bZIP TFs. Studies on molecular mechanisms of plant bZIP TFs at the atomic levels will provide novel insights into the regulatory processes during plant development, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Arabidopsis bZIP16 Transcription Factor Integrates Light and Hormone Signaling Pathways to Regulate Early Seedling Development[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptomic adjustment plays an important role in Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination and deetiolation in response to environmental light signals. The G-box cis-element is commonly present in promoters of genes that respond positively or negatively to the light signal. In pursuing additional transcriptional regulators that modulate light-mediated transcriptome changes, we identified bZIP16, a basic region/Leu zipper motif transcription factor, by G-box DNA affinity chromatography. We confirmed that bZIP16 has G-box–specific binding activity. Analysis of bzip16 mutants revealed that bZIP16 is a negative regulator in light-mediated inhibition of cell elongation but a positive regulator in light-regulated seed germination. Transcriptome analysis supported that bZIP16 is primarily a transcriptional repressor regulating light-, gibberellic acid (GA)–, and abscisic acid (ABA)–responsive genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that bZIP16 could directly target ABA-responsive genes and RGA-LIKE2, a DELLA gene in the GA signaling pathway. bZIP16 could also indirectly repress the expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE5, which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix protein coordinating hormone responses during seed germination. By repressing the expression of these genes, bZIP16 functions to promote seed germination and hypocotyl elongation during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. PMID:23104829

  19. Transformation of cone precursors to functional rod photoreceptors by bZIP transcription factor NRL.

    PubMed

    Oh, Edwin C T; Khan, Naheed; Novelli, Elena; Khanna, Hemant; Strettoi, Enrica; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-01-30

    Networks of transcriptional regulatory proteins dictate specification of neural lineages from multipotent retinal progenitors. Rod photoreceptor differentiation requires the basic motif-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor NRL, because loss of Nrl in mice (Nrl-/-) results in complete transformation of rods to functional cones. To examine the role of NRL in cell fate determination, we generated transgenic mice that express Nrl under the control of Crx promoter in postmitotic photoreceptor precursors of WT and Nrl-/- retina. We show that NRL expression, in both genetic backgrounds, leads to a functional retina with only rod photoreceptors. The absence of cones does not alter retinal lamination, although cone synaptic circuitry is now recruited by rods. Ectopic expression of NRL in developing cones can also induce rod-like characteristics and partially suppress cone-specific gene expression. We show that NRL is associated with specific promoter sequences in Thrb (encoding TRbeta2 transcription factor required for M-cone differentiation) and S-opsin and may, therefore, directly participate in transcriptional suppression of cone development. Our studies establish that NRL is not only essential but is sufficient for rod differentiation and that postmitotic photoreceptor precursors are competent to make binary decisions during early retinogenesis.

  20. Molecular cloning of a putative novel human bZIP transcription factor on chromosome 17q22

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, L.; Johnsen, O.; Skartlien, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized cDNA clones representing several mRNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing of a single gene localized to chromosome 17q22. Sequence analysis showed that the predicted translational product of the longest open reading frame (2316 nucleotides, 772 amino acids) is related to transcription factors of the basic elucine zipper (bZIP) class. The sequence contained several regions characteristic of transcriptional regulatory domains. A cluster of amino acids flanking the bZIP region on both sides was highly conserved between TCF11 and p45 NF-E2, a subunit of the human globin locus control region-binding protein, NF-E2. These same regions showed remarkable homology to two invertebrate proteins, CNC and skn-1, postulated to regulate embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The bZIP Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA: A Multifunctional Hub for Meristem Control

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Annette T.; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Offenburger, Sarah-Lena; Lohmann, Jan U.

    2011-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. Since plants grow and initiate new organs continuously, they have to modulate the underlying developmental program accordingly to cope with this challenge. At the heart of this extraordinary developmental plasticity are pluripotent stem cells, which are maintained during the entire life-cycle of the plant and that are embedded within dynamic stem cell niches. While the complex regulatory principles of plant stem cell control under artificial constant growth conditions begin to emerge, virtually nothing is known about how this circuit adapts to variations in the environment. In addition to the local feedback system constituted by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) and the CLAVATA signaling cascade in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), the bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA (PAN) not only has a broader expression domain in SAM and flowers, but also carries out more diverse functions in meristem maintenance: pan mutants show alterations in environmental response, shoot meristem size, floral organ number, and exhibit severe defects in termination of floral stem cells in an environment dependent fashion. Genetic and genomic analyses indicate that PAN interacts with a plethora of developmental pathways including light, plant hormone, and meristem control systems, suggesting that PAN is as an important regulatory node in the network of plant stem cell control. PMID:22645551

  2. Interaction between optineurin and the bZIP transcription factor NRL.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxia; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ohishi, Kentaro; Gao, Jie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Hikoya, Akiko; Sato, Miho; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Minoshima, Shinsei

    2014-01-01

    Although the gene encoding optineurin (OPTN) is a causative gene for glaucoma and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, it is ubiquitously expressed in all body tissues, including the retina. To study the function of OPTN in retinal ganglion cells as well as the whole retina, we previously isolated OPTN-interacting proteins and identified the gene encoding the bZIP transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), which is a causative gene for retinitis pigmentosa. Herein, we investigated the binding between OPTN and NRL proteins in HeLaS3 cells. Co-expression of HA-tagged NRL and FLAG-tagged OPTN in HeLaS3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting with anti-tag antibodies demonstrated the binding of these proteins in HeLaS3 cells, which was confirmed by proximity ligation assay. NRL is the first OPTN-binding protein to show eye-specific expression. A series of partial-deletion OPTN plasmids demonstrated that the tail region (423-577 amino acids [aa]) of OPTN was necessary for binding with NRL. Immunostaining showed that Optn (rat homologue of OPTN) was expressed in rat photoreceptors and localised in the cytoplasm of photoreceptor cells. This is a novel demonstration of Optn expression in photoreceptor cells. OPTN was not detected in photoreceptor nuclei under our experimental conditions. Further analyses are necessary to elucidate the function of OPTN and the significance of its possible binding with NRL in photoreceptor cells. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. The rice bZIP transcriptional activator RITA-1 is highly expressed during seed development.

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, T; Foster, R; Nakajima, M; Shimamoto, K; Chua, N H

    1994-01-01

    Systematic protein-DNA binding studies have shown that plant basic leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins exhibit a differential binding specificity for ACGT motifs. Here, we show that the rice transcription activator-1 (RITA-1) displays a broad binding specificity for palindromic ACGT elements, being able to bind A-, C-, and G-box but not T-box elements. By using gel mobility shift assays with probes differing in sequences flanking the hexameric core, we identified high-affinity A-, C-, and G-box binding sites. Quantitative and competition DNA binding studies confirmed RITA-1 specificity for these sites. Using rice protoplasts as a transient expression system, we demonstrated that RITA-1 can transactivate reporter genes possessing high-affinity but not low-affinity RITA-1 binding sites. Our results established a direct relationship between in vivo transactivation and in vitro binding activity. Transient expression assays that demonstrated the ability of RITA-1 to transactivate a construct containing rita-1 5' flanking sequences suggest that the factor may be autoregulated. Histochemical analysis of transgenic rice plants showed that a rita-1-beta-glucuronidase transgene is expressed in aleurone and endosperm cells of developing rice seeds. We propose that RITA-1 plays a role in the regulation of rice genes expressed in developing rice seeds. PMID:7919992

  4. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  5. Enhancement of biomass and lipid productivity by overexpression of a bZIP transcription factor in Nannochloropsis salina.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sohee; Kang, Nam Kyu; Koh, Hyun Gi; Shin, Sung-Eun; Lee, Bongsoo; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool; Chang, Yong Keun

    2017-10-04

    Microalgae are considered as excellent platforms for biomaterial production that can replace conventional fossil fuel-based fuels and chemicals. Genetic engineering of microalgae is prerequisite to maximize production of materials and to reduce costs for the production. Transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as key regulators of metabolic pathways to enhance production of molecules for biofuels and other materials. TFs with the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain have been known as stress regulators and are associated with lipid metabolism in plants. We overexpressed a bZIP TF, NsbZIP1, in Nannochloropsis salina, and found that transformants showed enhanced growth with concomitant increase in lipid contents. The improved phenotypes were also notable under stress conditions including N limitation and high salt. To understand the mechanism underlying improved phenotypes, we analyzed expression patterns of predicted target genes involved in lipid metabolism via quantitative RT-PCR, confirming increases transcript levels. NsbZIP1 appeared to be one of type C bZIPs in plants that has been known to regulate lipid metabolism under stress. Taken together, we demonstrated that NsbZIP1 could improve both growth and lipid production, and TF engineering can serve as an excellent genetic engineering tool for production of biofuels and biomaterials in microalgae. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Retinopathy mutations in the bZIP protein NRL alter phosphorylation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Friedman, James S; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Swaroop, Anand

    2007-06-01

    The transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (NRL) is required for rod photoreceptor differentiation during mammalian retinal development. NRL interacts with CRX, NR2E3, and other transcription factors and synergistically regulates the activity of photoreceptor-specific genes. Mutations in the human NRL gene are associated with retinal degenerative diseases. Here we report functional analyses of 17 amino acid variations and/or mutations of NRL. We show that 13 of these lead to changes in NRL phosphorylation. Six mutations at residues p.S50 (c.148T>A, c.148T>C, and c.149C>T) and p.P51 (c.151C>A, c.151C>T, and c.152C>T), identified in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, result in a major NRL isoform that exhibits reduced phosphorylation but enhanced activation of the rhodopsin promoter. The truncated NRL mutant proteins-p.L75fs (c.224_225insC) and p.L160fs (c.459_477dup)-do not localize to the nucleus because of the absence of bZIP domain. The p.L160P (c.479T>C), p.L160fs, and p.R218fs (c.654delC) mutant proteins do not bind to the NRL-response element, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. These three and p.S225N (c.674G>A) mutant show reduced transcriptional activity and may contribute to recessive disease. The p.P67S (c.199C>T) and p.L235F (c.703C>T) variations in NRL do not appear to directly cause retinitis pigmentosa, while p.E63K (c.187G>A), p.A76V (c.227C>T), p.G122E (c.365G>A), and p.H125Q (c.375C>G) are of uncertain significance. Our results support the notion that gain-of-function mutations in the NRL gene cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa while loss-of-function NRL mutations lead to autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. We propose that differential phosphorylation of NRL fine-tunes its transcriptional regulatory activity, leading to a more precise control of gene expression. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Transcriptional control of aspartate kinase expression during darkness and sugar depletion in Arabidopsis: involvement of bZIP transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ufaz, Shai; Shukla, Vijaya; Soloveichik, Yulia; Golan, Yelena; Breuer, Frank; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Galili, Gad; Koncz, Csaba; Zilberstein, Aviah

    2011-05-01

    Initial steps of aspartate-derived biosynthesis pathway (Asp pathway) producing Lys, Thr, Met and Ile are catalyzed by bifunctional (AK/HSD) and monofunctional (AK-lys) aspartate kinase (AK) enzymes. Here, we show that transcription of all AK genes is negatively regulated under darkness and low sugar conditions. By using yeast one-hybrid assays and complementary chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses in Arabidopsis cells, the bZIP transcription factors ABI5 and DPBF4 were identified, capable of interacting with the G-box-containing enhancer of AK/HSD1 promoter. Elevated transcript levels of DPBF4 and ABI5 under darkness and low sugar conditions coincide with the repression of AK gene expression. Overexpression of ABI5, but not DPBF4, further increases this AK transcription suppression. Concomitantly, it also increases the expression of asparagines synthetase 1 (ASN1) that shifts aspartate utilization towards asparagine formation. However, in abi5 or dpbf4 mutant and abi5, dpbf4 double mutant the repression of AK expression is maintained, indicating a functional redundancy with other bZIP-TFs. A dominant-negative version of DPBF4 fused to the SRDX repressor domain of SUPERMAN could counteract the repression and stimulate AK expression under low sugar and darkness in planta. This effect was verified by showing that DPBF4-SRDX fails to recognize the AK/HSD1 enhancer sequence in yeast one-hybrid assays, but increases heterodimmer formation with DPBF4 and ABI5, as estimated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Hence it is likely that heterodimerization with DPBF4-SRDX inhibits the binding of redundantly functioning bZIP-TFs to the promoters of AK genes and thereby releases the repressing effect. These data highlight a novel transcription control of the chloroplast aspartate pathway that operates under energy limiting conditions.

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses. PMID:27314020

  9. bZIP transcription factors in the oomycete phytophthora infestans with novel DNA-binding domains are involved in defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs.

  10. bZIP Transcription Factors in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans with Novel DNA-Binding Domains Are Involved in Defense against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs. PMID:23975888

  11. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene family in Ustilaginoidea virens.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weixiao; Cui, Peng; Wei, Wei; Lin, Yang; Luo, Chaoxi

    2017-08-25

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor (TF) family is one of the largest and most diverse TF families widely distributed across the eukaryotes. The bZIP TF family play important roles in growth, development, and response to abiotic or biotic stresses, which have been well characterized in plants, but not in plant pathogenic fungi. In this study, we performed genome-wide and systematic bioinformatics analysis of bZIP genes in the fungus Ustilaginoidea virens, the causal agent of rice false smut disease. We identified 28 bZIP family members in the U. virens genome by searching for the bZIP domain in predicted genes. The gene structures, motifs and phylogenetic relationships were analyzed for bZIP genes in U. virens (UvbZIPs). Together with bZIPs from other two fungi, the bZIP genes can be divided into eight groups according to the phylogenetic relationship. Based on RNA-Seq data, the expression profiles of UvbZIPs at different infection stages were evaluated. Results showed that 17 of the UvbZIPs were up-regulated expression during the infection period. Furthermore, 11 infection-related UvbZIPs was investigated under H2O2 stress and the expression level of eight genes have changed, which confirmed their roles in stress tolerance and pathogenicity. In summary, our genome wide systematic characterization and expression analysis of UvbZIPs provided insights into the molecular functions of these genes in U. virens and provides a reference for other pathogens.

  12. A novel wheat bZIP transcription factor, TabZIP60, confers multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Lichao; Xia, Chuan; Zhao, Guangyao; Liu, Ji; Jia, Jizeng; Kong, Xiuying

    2015-04-01

    The basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) play vital roles in the response to abiotic stress. However, little is known about the function of bZIP genes in wheat abiotic stress. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of the TabZIP60 gene. Three homologous genome sequences of TabZIP60 were isolated from hexaploid wheat and mapped to the wheat homoeologous group 6. A subcellular localization analysis indicated that TabZIP60 is a nuclear-localized protein that activates transcription. Furthermore, TabZIP60 gene transcripts were strongly induced by polyethylene glycol, salt, cold and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. Further analysis showed that the overexpression of TabZIP60 in Arabidopsis resulted in significantly improved tolerances to drought, salt, freezing stresses and increased plant sensitivity to ABA in seedling growth. Meanwhile, the TabZIP60 was capable of binding ABA-responsive cis-elements that are present in promoters of many known ABA-responsive genes. A subsequent analysis showed that the overexpression of TabZIP60 led to enhanced expression levels of some stress-responsive genes and changes in several physiological parameters. Taken together, these results suggest that TabZIP60 enhances multiple abiotic stresses through the ABA signaling pathway and that modifications of its expression may improve multiple stress tolerances in crop plants.

  13. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  14. Genome-wide systematic characterization of the bZIP transcriptional factor family in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Dayong; Fu, Fuyou; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming

    2015-10-12

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family represent exclusively in eukaryotes and have been shown to regulate diverse biological processes in plant growth and development as well as in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the bZIP family in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). The SlbZIP genes were identified using local BLAST and hidden Markov model profile searches. The phylogenetic trees, conserved motifs and gene structures were generated by MEGA6.06, MEME tool and gene Structure Display Server, respectively. The syntenic block diagrams were generated by the Circos software. The transcriptional gene expression profiles were obtained using Genevestigator tool and quantitative RT-PCR. In the present study, we carried out a genome-wide identification and systematic analyses of 69 SlbZIP genes that distributes unevenly on the tomato chromosomes. This family can be divided into 9 groups according to the phylogenetic relationship among the SlbZIP proteins. Six kinds of intron patterns (a-f) within the basic and hinge regions are defined. The additional conserved motifs and their presence of the group specificity were also identified. Further, we predicted the DNA-binding patterns and the dimerization property on the basis of the characteristic features in the basic and hinge regions and the leucine zipper, respectively, which supports our classification greatly and helps to classify 24 distinct subfamilies. Within the SlbZIP family, a total of 40 SlbZIP genes are located in the segmental duplicate regions in the tomato genome, suggesting that the segment chromosomal duplications contribute greatly to the expansion of the tomato SlbZIP family. Expression profiling analyses of 59 SlbZIP genes using quantitative RT-PCR and publicly available microarray data indicate that the tomato SlbZIP genes have distinct and diverse expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages and many of the tomato bZIP genes

  15. The function and transcriptome analysis of a bZIP transcription factor CgAP1 in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yateng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Chenghui

    2017-04-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is an important pathogen of anthracnose, which is able to infect numerous crops in tropical and subtropical regions, causing great economic losses. To investigate the fungal response to host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), we cloned and characterized the CgAP1 gene of C. gloeosporioides. CgAP1 encoded a bZIP transcription factor which had a bZIP DNA-binding domain and two cysteine-rich domains structurally and functionally related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae YAP1. Deletion of CgAP1 in C. gloeosporioides resulted in increasing sensitivity to H2O2, changes in cell wall integrity and loss of pathogenicity. To understand the regulatory network of CgAP1, RNA sequencing was used to identify differentially expressed genes in the CgAP1 mutant. It was shown that several genes involved in ROS detoxification and cell wall integrity were affected by CgAP1. Moreover, CgAP1 was also involved in many biological processes especially ribosome, cellular transport and amino acid metabolism. In conclusion, CgAP1 is an important transcription factor involved in oxidative stress, cell wall integrity and pathogenicity in C. gloeosporioides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Unfolding of bZIP dimers formed by the ATF-2 and c-Jun transcription factors is not a simple two-state transition.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, R J; Privalov, P L

    2010-10-01

    The varied selectivity of bZIP transcription factors stems from the fact that they are dimers consisting of two not necessarily identical subunits held together by a leucine zipper dimerization domain. Determining their stability is therefore important for understanding the mechanism of formation of these transcription factors. The most widely used approach for this problem consists of observing temperature-induced dissociation of the bZIPs by any means sensitive to their structural changes, particularly optical methods. In calculating thermodynamic characteristics of this process from such data it is usually assumed that it represents a two-state transition. However, scanning micro-calorimetric study of the temperature-induced unfolding/dissociation of the three bZIPs formed by the ATF-2 and c-Jun proteins, i.e. the two homodimers (ATF-2/ATF-2) and (c-Jun/c-Jun) and the heterodimer (ATF-2/c-Jun), showed that this process does not represent a two-state transition, as found previously with the GCN4 homodimeric bZIP protein. This raises doubt about all indirect estimates of bZIP thermodynamic characteristics based on analysis of their optically-observed temperature-induced changes. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered expression of the bZIP transcription factor DRINK ME affects growth and reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Chávez Montes, Ricardo A; Silvestre-Vañó, Marina; Herrera-Ubaldo, Humberto; Greco, Raffaella; Pablo-Villa, Jeanneth; Galliani, Bianca M; Diaz-Ramirez, David; Weemen, Mieke; Boutilier, Kim; Pereira, Andy; Colombo, Lucia; Madueño, Francisco; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe an uncharacterized gene that negatively influences Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development. DRINK ME (DKM; bZIP30) is a member of the bZIP transcription factor family, and is expressed in meristematic tissues such as the inflorescence meristem (IM), floral meristem (FM), and carpel margin meristem (CMM). Altered DKM expression affects meristematic tissues and reproductive organ development, including the gynoecium, which is the female reproductive structure and is determinant for fertility and sexual reproduction. A microarray analysis indicates that DKM overexpression affects the expression of cell cycle, cell wall, organ initiation, cell elongation, hormone homeostasis, and meristem activity genes. Furthermore, DKM can interact in yeast and in planta with proteins involved in shoot apical meristem maintenance such as WUSCHEL, KNAT1/BP, KNAT2 and JAIBA, and with proteins involved in medial tissue development in the gynoecium such as HECATE, BELL1 and NGATHA1. Taken together, our results highlight the relevance of DKM as a negative modulator of Arabidopsis growth and reproductive development.

  18. GhABF2, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought and salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengzhen; Meng, Zhaohong; Meng, Zhigang; Malik, Waqas; Yan, Rong; Lwin, Khin Myat; Lin, Fazhuang; Wang, Yuan; Sun, Guoqing; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Li, Jianying; Jin, Shuangxia; Guo, Sandui; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor (TF) act as an important regulator for the abscisic acid (ABA) mediated abiotic stresses signaling pathways in plants. Here, we reported the cloning and characterization of GhABF2, encoding for typical cotton bZIP TF. Overexpression of GhABF2 significantly improved drought and salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and cotton. However, silencing of GhABF2 made transgenic cotton sensitive to PEG osmotic and salt stress. Expression of GhABF2 was induced by drought and ABA treatments but repressed by high salinity. Transcriptome analysis indicated that GhABF2 increases drought and salt tolerance by regulating genes related to ABA, drought and salt response. The proline contents, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also significantly increased in GhABF2-overexpression cottons in comparison to wild type after drought and salt treatment. Further, an increase in fiber yield under drought and saline-alkali wetland exhibited the important role of GhABF2 in enhancing the drought and salt tolerance in transgenic lines. In conclusion, manipulation of GhABF2 by biotechnological tools could be a sustainable strategy to deploy drought and salt tolerance in cotton. PMID:27713524

  19. A Ramie bZIP Transcription Factor BnbZIP2 Is Involved in Drought, Salt, and Heavy Metal Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengjian; Zhou, Jinghua; Jie, Yucheng; Xing, Hucheng; Zhong, Yingli; Yu, Weilin; She, Wei; Ma, Yushen; Liu, Zehang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-12-01

    bZIP transcription factors play key roles in plant growth, development, and stress signaling. A bZIP gene BnbZIP2 (GenBank accession number: KP642148) was cloned from ramie. BnbZIP2 has a 1416 base pair open reading frame, encoding a 471 amino acid protein containing a characteristic bZIP domain and a leucine zipper. BnbZIP2 shares high sequence similarity with bZIP factors from other plants. The BnbZIP2 protein is localized to both nuclei and cytoplasm. Transcripts of BnbZIP2 were found in various tissues in ramie, with significantly higher levels in female and male flowers. Its expression was induced by drought, high salinity, and abscisic acid treatments. Analysis of the cis-elements in promoters of BnbZIP2 identified cis-acting elements involved in growth, developmental processes, and a variety of stress responses. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants' overexpression of BnbZIP2 exhibited more sensitivity to drought and heavy metal Cd stress during seed germination, whereas more tolerance to high-salinity stress than the wild type during both seed germination and plant development. Thus, BnbZIP2 may act as a positive regulator in plants' response to high-salinity stress and be an important candidate gene for molecular breeding of salt-tolerant plants.

  20. The bZIP transcription factor MdHY5 regulates anthocyanin accumulation and nitrate assimilation in apple

    PubMed Central

    An, Jian-Ping; Qu, Feng-Jia; Yao, Ji-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Na; You, Chun-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor HY5 plays a multifaceted role in plant growth and development. Here the apple MdHY5 gene was cloned based on its homology with Arabidopsis HY5. Expression analysis demonstrated that MdHY5 transcription was induced by light and abscisic acid treatments. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transient expression assays subsequently showed that MdHY5 positively regulated both its own transcription and that of MdMYB10 by binding to E-box and G-box motifs, respectively. Furthermore, we obtained transgenic apple calli that overexpressed the MdHY5 gene, and apple calli coloration assays showed that MdHY5 promoted anthocyanin accumulation by regulating expression of the MdMYB10 gene and downstream anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. In addition, the transcript levels of a series of nitrate reductase genes and nitrate uptake genes in both wild-type and transgenic apple calli were detected. In association with increased nitrate reductase activities and nitrate contents, the results indicated that MdHY5 might be an important regulator in nutrient assimilation. Taken together, these results indicate that MdHY5 plays a vital role in anthocyanin accumulation and nitrate assimilation in apple. PMID:28611922

  1. The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth

    PubMed Central

    Weiste, Christoph; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Muralidhara, Prathibha; Ljung, Karin; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants’ low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant’s energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources. PMID:28158182

  2. The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth.

    PubMed

    Weiste, Christoph; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Selvanayagam, Jebasingh; Muralidhara, Prathibha; Fröschel, Christian; Novák, Ondřej; Ljung, Karin; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants' low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant's energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources.

  3. Identification of Two bZIP Transcription Factors Interacting with the Promoter of Soybean Rubisco Activase Gene (GmRCAα)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyu; Du, Hongyang; Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Yang, Hui; Li, Yakai; Huang, Fang; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA), a key photosynthetic protein, catalyses the activation of Rubisco and thus plays an important role in photosynthesis. Although the RCA gene has been characterized in a variety of species, the molecular mechanism regulating its transcription remains unclear. Our previous studies on RCA gene expression in soybean suggested that expression of this gene is regulated by trans-acting factors. In the present study, we verified activity of the GmRCAα promoter in both soybean and Arabidopsis and used a yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system for screening a leaf cDNA expression library to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the GmRCAα promoter. Four basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TFs, GmbZIP04g, GmbZIP07g, GmbZIP1, and GmbZIP71, were isolated, and GmbZIP04g and GmbZIP07g were confirmed as able to bind to a 21-nt G-box-containing sequence. Additionally, the expression patterns of GmbZIP04g, GmbZIp07g, and GmRCAα were analyzed in response to abiotic stresses and during a 24-h period. Our study will help to advance elucidation of the network regulating GmRCAα transcription. PMID:27242832

  4. Ectopic expression of a hot pepper bZIP-like transcription factor in potato enhances drought tolerance without decreasing tuber yield.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok-Jun; Han, Se-Youn; Kim, Dool-Yi; Yoon, In Sun; Shin, Dongjin; Byun, Myung-Ok; Kwon, Hawk-Bin; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2015-11-01

    Over-expression of group A bZIP transcription factor genes in plants improves abiotic stress tolerance but usually reduces yields. Thus, there have been several efforts to overcome yield penalty in transgenic plants. In this study, we characterized that expression of the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) gene CaBZ1, which encodes a group S bZIP transcription factor, was induced by salt and osmotic stress as well as abscisic acid (ABA). Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants over-expressing CaBZ1 exhibited reduced rates of water loss and faster stomatal closure than non transgenic potato plants under drought and ABA treatment conditions. CaBZ1 over-expression in transgenic potato increased the expression of ABA- and stress-related genes (such as CYP707A1, CBF and NAC-like genes) and improved drought stress tolerance. Interestingly, over-expression of CaBZ1 in potato did not produce undesirable growth phenotypes in major agricultural traits such as plant height, leaf size and tuber formation under normal growth conditions. The transgenic potato plants also had higher tuber yields than non transgenic potato plants under drought stress conditions. Thus, CaBZ1 may be useful for improving drought tolerance in tuber crops. This might be the first report of the production of transgenic potato with improved tuber yields under drought conditions.

  5. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  6. FASCIATED EAR4 Encodes a bZIP Transcription Factor That Regulates Shoot Meristem Size in Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pautler, Michael; Eveland, Andrea L.; LaRue, Therese; Yang, Fang; Weeks, Rebecca; Lunde, China; Je, Byoung Il; Meeley, Robert; Komatsu, Mai; Vollbrecht, Erik; Sakai, Hajime; Jackson, David

    2015-01-01

    Plant architecture is dictated by precise control of meristematic activity. In the shoot, an imbalance in positive or negative maintenance signals can result in a fasciated or enlarged meristem phenotype. fasciated ear4 (fea4) is a semidwarfed mutant with fasciated ears and tassels as well as greatly enlarged vegetative and inflorescence meristems. We identified FEA4 as a bZIP transcription factor, orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana PERIANTHIA. FEA4 was expressed in the peripheral zone of the vegetative shoot apical meristem and in the vasculature of immature leaves and conspicuously excluded from the stem cell niche at the tip of the shoot apical meristem and from incipient leaf primordia. Following the transition to reproductive fate, FEA4 was expressed throughout the entire inflorescence and floral meristems. Native expression of a functional YFP:FEA4 fusion recapitulated this pattern of expression. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing to identify 4060 genes proximal to FEA4 binding sites, including ones that were potentially bound and modulated by FEA4 based on transcriptional changes in fea4 mutant ears. Our results suggest that FEA4 promotes differentiation in the meristem periphery by regulating auxin-based responses and genes associated with leaf differentiation and polarity, potentially in opposition to factors such as KNOTTED1 and WUSCHEL. PMID:25616871

  7. Rite of passage: a bZIP transcription factor must transit the cell apex to become competent.

    PubMed

    Momany, Michelle

    2015-11-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans BrlA triggers the central developmental pathway that controls the transition from vegetative growth to asexual reproduction. Upstream regulators including the bZIP transcription factor FlbB activate the expression of brlA. Previous work has established that FlbB localizes to both the apex of the hypha, where it interacts with and is anchored by FlbE, and to nuclei, with highest levels in the nucleus closest to the apex and successively lower levels in nuclei further away from the apex. In this issue, Herrero-Garcia et al. dissect the roles of these two FlbB pools and the mechanisms underlying their localization and activity. Using a photoactivatable tag, they demonstrate that FlbB moves from the tip into the apical nucleus. Through a series of deletion constructs, they show that import of FlbB into the nucleus requires a bipartite NLS, that FlbB localization at the tip requires actin and that the FlbB tip-high gradient appears to be mass action dependent as the gradient is lost with FlbB constitutive upregulation. They show that while the pool of FlbB at the apex is required for triggering asexual development, the tip high nuclear gradient is not required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The yapA Encodes bZIP Transcription Factor Involved in Stress Tolerance in Pathogenic Fungus Talaromyces marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Dankai, Wiyada; Pongpom, Monsicha; Youngchim, Sirida; Cooper, Chester R.; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces marneffei, formerly Penicillium marneffei, is a thermally dimorphic fungus. It causes a fatal disseminated disease in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Studies on the stress defense mechanism of T. marneffei can lead to a better understanding of the pathogenicity and the progression of the disease due to this fungus. The basic leucine-zipper (bZip) transcription factor gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, named yap1 (yeast activating protein-1), is known as a crucial central regulator of stress responses including those caused by oxidative agents, cadmium, and drugs. An ortholog of yap1, designated yapA, was identified in T. marneffei. We found that the yapA gene was involved in growth and fungal cell development. The yapA deletion mutant exhibited delays in the rate of growth, germination, and conidiation. Surprisingly, the yapA gene was also involved in the pigmentation of T. marneffei. Moreover, the mutant was sensitive to oxidative stressors such as H2O2 and menadione, similar to S. cerevisiae yap1 mutant, as well as the nitrosative stressor NaNO2. In addition, the yapA mutant demonstrated significantly decreased survival in human macrophage THP-1 compared to wild-type and complemented strains. This study reveals the role of yapA in fungal growth, cell development, stress response, and potential virulence in T. marneffei. PMID:27706212

  9. Tribbles ortholog NIPI-3 and bZIP transcription factor CEBP-1 regulate a Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal immune surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Deborah L; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Stroustrup, Nicholas; Haas, Wilhelm; Conery, Annie L; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2016-12-07

    Many pathogens secrete toxins that target key host processes resulting in the activation of immune pathways. The secreted Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exotoxin A (ToxA) disrupts intestinal protein synthesis, which triggers the induction of a subset of P. aeruginosa-response genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show here that one ToxA-induced C. elegans gene, the Tribbles pseudokinase ortholog nipi-3, is essential for host survival following exposure to P. aeruginosa or ToxA. We find that NIPI-3 mediates the post-developmental expression of intestinal immune genes and proteins and primarily functions in parallel to known immune pathways, including p38 MAPK signaling. Through mutagenesis screening, we identify mutants of the bZIP C/EBP transcription factor cebp-1 that suppress the hypersusceptibility defects of nipi-3 mutants. NIPI-3 is a negative regulator of CEBP-1, which in turn negatively regulates protective immune mechanisms. This pathway represents a previously unknown innate immune signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells that is involved in the surveillance of cellular homeostasis. Because NIPI-3 and CEBP-1 are also essential for C. elegans development, NIPI-3 is analogous to other key innate immune signaling molecules such as the Toll receptors in Drosophila that have an independent role during development.

  10. High-Yield Expression in E. coli and Refolding of the bZIP Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Moreno, Matthew L.; Bauer, Rachel L.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) recently has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting the survival of human glioblastoma cells. Interference with the function of ATF5 in an in vivo rat model caused glioma cell death in primary tumors but did not affect the status of normal cells surrounding the tumor, suggesting ATF5 may prove an ideal target for anti-cancer therapy. In order to examine ATF5 as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified to sufficient quantity to begin analyses. Here, a procedure for expressing and refolding the bZIP domain of ATF5 in sufficient yield and final concentration to permit assay development and structural characterization of this target using solution NMR is reported. Two-dimensional NMR and circular dichrosim analyses indicate the protein exists in the partially α-helical, monomeric x-form conformation with only a small fraction of ATF5 participating in formation of higher-order structure, presumably coiled-coil homodimerization. Despite the persistence of monomers in solution even at high concentration, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that ATF5 is able to bind to the cAMP response element (CRE) DNA motif. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to confirm that ATF5 can participate in homodimer formation and that this dimerization is mediated by disulfide bond formation. PMID:18718539

  11. The bZIP transcription factor PfZipA regulates secondary metabolism and oxidative stress response in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuna; Wu, Fan; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xingzhong; Che, Yongsheng; Keller, Nancy P; Guo, Liyun; Yin, Wen-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The bZIP transcription factors are conserved in all eukaryotes and play critical roles in organismal responses to environmental challenges. In filamentous fungi, several lines of evidence indicate that secondary metabolism (SM) is associated with oxidative stress mediated by bZIP proteins. Here we uncover a connection with a bZIP protein and oxidative stress induction of SM in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici. A homology search of the P. fici genome with the bZIP protein RsmA, involved in SM and the oxidative stress response in Aspergillus nidulans, identified PfZipA. Deletion of PfzipA resulted in a strain that displayed resistant to the oxidative reagents tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBOOH), diamide, and menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB), but increased sensitivity to H2O2 as compared to wild type (WT). Secondary metabolite production presented a complex pattern dependent on PfzipA and oxidative reagents. Without oxidative treatment, the ΔPfzipA strain produced less isosulochrin and ficipyroneA than WT; addition of tBOOH further decreased production of iso-A82775C and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA; diamide treatment resulted in equivalent production of isosulochrin and ficipyroneA in the two strains; MSB treatment further decreased production of RES1214-1 and iso-A82775C but increased pestaloficiol M production in the mutant; and H2O2 treatment resulted in enhanced production of isosulochrin, RES1214-1 and pestheic acid but decreased ficipyroneA and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA compared to WT. Our results suggest that PfZipA regulation of SM is modified by oxidative stress pathways and provide insights into a possible role of PfZipA in mediating SM synthesis in the endophytic lifestyle of P. fici.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a gene from Medicago sativa L., encoding a bZIP transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qingchuan; Fang, Feng; Kang, Junmei; Zhang, Tiejun

    2013-02-01

    A full-length cDNA of 1,537 nucleotides was cloned from Medicago sativa L. cv. "Zhongmu No. 1" by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It was designated as MsZIP, encoding a protein of 340 amino acids. The protein molecular weight was 36.43 kDa, and the theoretical isoelectric point was 5.72. The MsZIP preferentially localized in nucleus and have signal peptide. Blast analysis revealed that MsZIP shared the highest homology with some bZIP proteins of M. truncatula. The transcript of MsZIP was strongly enriched in leaf compared with root and stem of mature alfalfa plants. MsZIP was strongly induced by 15 % PEG6000 (polyethylene glycol), 50 μM abscisic acid, 200 mM NaCl, 70 μM gibberellic acid, 5 mM salicylic acid and 200 μM methyl jasmonate. Physiological resistance parameters were measured in the transgenic tobacco. Malondialdehyde content, relative water content, soluble sugar content, soluble protein content and proline content in transgenic tobacco increased compared with non-transgenic tobacco under salt stress or drought stress. The results showed that accumulation of the MsZIP protein in the vegetative tissues of transgenic plants enhanced their tolerance to osmotic pressure stress. These results demonstrate a role for the MsZIP protein in stress protection and suggest the potential of the MsZIP gene for genetic engineering of salt tolerance and drought tolerance.

  13. Sumoylation of bZIP transcription factor NRL modulates target gene expression during photoreceptor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roger, Jerome E; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-08-13

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl(-/-) mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl(-/-) phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis.

  14. Sumoylation of bZIP Transcription Factor NRL Modulates Target Gene Expression during Photoreceptor Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Jerome E.; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl−/− mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl−/− phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis. PMID:20551322

  15. Natural antioxidants exhibit chemopreventive characteristics through the regulation of CNC b-Zip transcription factors in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Singh, Bhupendra; Bhat, Nimee K; Chen, Jie; Bhat, Hari K

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the role of resveratrol (Res) and vitamin C (VC) in prevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer through regulation of cap "n"collar (CNC) b-zip transcription factors. Human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A was treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and VC or Res with or without E2. mRNA and protein expression levels of CNC b-zip transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1), nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 3 (Nrf3), and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) were quantified. The treatment with E2 suppressed, whereas VC and Res prevented E2-mediated decrease in the expression levels of SOD3, NQO1, Nrf2 mRNA, and protein in MCF-10A cells. The treatment with E2, Res, or VC significantly increased mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf1. 17β-Estradiol treatment significantly increased but VC or Res decreased Nrf3 mRNA and protein expression levels. Our studies demonstrate that estrogen-induced breast cancer might be prevented through upregulation of antioxidant enzymes via Nrf-dependent pathways. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Direct targets of the transcription factors ABA-Insensitive(ABI)4 and ABI5 reveal synergistic action by ABI4 and several bZIP ABA response factors.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Wendy M; Lynch, Tim J; Mobin, Raisa; Finkelstein, Ruth R

    2011-03-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a key regulator of seed development. In addition to promoting seed maturation, ABA inhibits seed germination and seedling growth. Many components involved in ABA response have been identified, including the transcription factors ABA insensitive (ABI)4 and ABI5. The genes encoding these factors are expressed predominantly in developing and mature seeds, and are positive regulators of ABA mediated inhibition of seed germination and growth. The direct effects of ABI4 and ABI5 in ABA response remain largely undefined. To address this question, plants over-expressing ABI4 or ABI5 were used to allow identification of direct transcriptional targets. Ectopically expressed ABI4 and ABI5 conferred ABA-dependent induction of slightly over 100 genes in 11 day old plants. In addition to effector genes involved in seed maturation and reserve storage, several signaling proteins and transcription factors were identified as targets of ABI4 and/or ABI5. Although only 12% of the ABA- and ABI-dependent transcriptional targets were induced by both ABI factors in 11 day old plants, 40% of those normally expressed in seeds had reduced transcript levels in both abi4 and abi5 mutants. Surprisingly, many of the ABI4 transcriptional targets do not contain the previously characterized ABI4 binding motifs, the CE1 or S box, in their promoters, but some of these interact with ABI4 in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, suggesting that sequence recognition by ABI4 may be more flexible than known canonical sequences. Yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrated synergistic action of ABI4 with ABI5 or related bZIP factors in regulating these promoters, and mutant analyses showed that ABI4 and these bZIPs share some functions in plants.

  17. The bZIP transcription factor Rca1p is a central regulator of a novel CO₂ sensing pathway in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cottier, Fabien; Raymond, Martine; Kurzai, Oliver; Bolstad, Marianne; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Jiménez-López, Claudia; Lorenz, Michael C; Sanglard, Dominique; Váchová, Libuše; Pavelka, Norman; Palková, Zdena; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2012-01-01

    Like many organisms the fungal pathogen Candida albicans senses changes in the environmental CO(2) concentration. This response involves two major proteins: adenylyl cyclase and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Here, we demonstrate that CA expression is tightly controlled by the availability of CO(2) and identify the bZIP transcription factor Rca1p as the first CO(2) regulator of CA expression in yeast. We show that Rca1p upregulates CA expression during contact with mammalian phagocytes and demonstrate that serine 124 is critical for Rca1p signaling, which occurs independently of adenylyl cyclase. ChIP-chip analysis and the identification of Rca1p orthologs in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Cst6p) point to the broad significance of this novel pathway in fungi. By using advanced microscopy we visualize for the first time the impact of CO(2) build-up on gene expression in entire fungal populations with an exceptional level of detail. Our results present the bZIP protein Rca1p as the first fungal regulator of carbonic anhydrase, and reveal the existence of an adenylyl cyclase independent CO(2) sensing pathway in yeast. Rca1p appears to regulate cellular metabolism in response to CO(2) availability in environments as diverse as the phagosome, yeast communities or liquid culture.

  18. The transcriptional integrator CREB-binding protein mediates positive cross talk between nuclear hormone receptors and the hematopoietic bZip protein p45/NF-E2.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, X; Reginato, M J; Andrews, N C; Lazar, M A

    1997-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) and retinoic acid (RA) play important roles in erythropoiesis. We found that the hematopoietic cell-specific bZip protein p45/NF-E2 interacts with T3 receptor (TR) and RA receptor (RAR) but not retinoid X receptor. The interaction is between the DNA-binding domain of the nuclear receptor and the leucine zipper region of p45/NF-E2 but is markedly enhanced by cognate ligand. Remarkably, ligand-dependent transactivation by TR and RAR is markedly potentiated by p45/NF-E2. This effect of p45/NF-E2 is prevented by maf-like protein p18, which functions positively as a heterodimer with p45/NF-E2 on DNA. Potentiation of hormone action by p45/NF-E2 requires its activation domain, which interacts strongly with the multifaceted coactivator cyclic AMP response element protein-binding protein (CBP). The region of CBP which interacts with p45/NF-E2 is the same interaction domain that mediates inhibition of hormone-stimulated transcription by AP1 transcription factors. Overexpression of the bZip interaction domain of CBP specifically abolishes the positive cross talk between TR and p45/NF-E2. Thus, positive cross talk between p45/NF-E2 and nuclear hormone receptors requires direct protein-protein interactions between these factors and with CBP, whose integration of positive signals from two transactivation domains provides a novel mechanism for potentiation of hormone action in hematopoietic cells. PMID:9032267

  19. HTF: A b-ZIP transcription factor that is closely related to the human XBP/TREB5 and is activated by hepatocellular carcinoma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, T; Kokura, K; Kumagai, Y; Wakamatsu, T; Makino, Y; Tamura, T

    1996-06-25

    We screened for rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related genes by a novel cDNA subtraction method and obtained one gene. This gene was transcribed as 2.0- and 2.5-kb mRNAs, and its transcription was specifically enhanced in HCC. These cDNAs had the same open reading frame, but the 2.5 kb transcript had an extra 495 bases of 5'-UTR at the 5'-terminus. The deduced aa sequence revealed a basic-leucine zipper (b-ZIP) and proline/glutamine-rich structures, both of which are characteristic motifs for transcription factors. We designated the translation product of this gene HTF (Hepatocarcinogenesis-related Transcription Factor). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the DNA-binding ability of the recombinant HTF. It is most interesting that HTF had a considerable homology with human XBP/TREB5, which has been reported to be a binding factor for the X-box of the MHC class II gene and for the 21-bp enhancer of the HTLV-1 LTR. Genomic Southern analysis suggested that the 2.0- and 2.5-kb mRNAs are transcribed by a dual promoter of a single gene. Our results may suggest that HTF is a b-ZIP-type transcription factor involved in rat hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Efficient sweet pepper transformation mediated by the BABY BOOM transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Heidmann, Iris; de Lange, Brenda; Lambalk, Joep; Angenent, Gerco C; Boutilier, Kim

    2011-06-01

    Pepper (Capsicum L.) is a nutritionally and economically important crop that is cultivated throughout the world as a vegetable, condiment, and food additive. Genetic transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agrobacterium) is a powerful biotechnology tool that could be used in pepper to develop community-based functional genomics resources and to introduce important agronomic traits. However, pepper is considered to be highly recalcitrant for agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and current transformation protocols are either inefficient, cumbersome or highly genotype dependent. The main bottleneck in pepper transformation is the inability to generate cells that are competent for both regeneration and transformation. Here, we report that ectopic expression of the Brassica napus BABY BOOM AP2/ERF transcription factor overcomes this bottleneck and can be used to efficiently regenerate transgenic plants from otherwise recalcitrant sweet pepper (C. annuum) varieties. Transient activation of BABY BOOM in the progeny plants induced prolific cell regeneration and was used to produce a large number of somatic embryos that could be converted readily to seedlings. The data highlight the utility of combining biotechnology and classical plant tissue culture approaches to develop an efficient transformation and regeneration system for a highly recalcitrant vegetable crop.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage. PMID:27414644

  2. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of bZIP transcription factors in wheat and its relatives and expression profiles of anther development related TabZIP genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyin; Gao, Shiqing; Tang, Yimiao; Li, Lei; Zhang, Fengjie; Feng, Biane; Fang, Zhaofeng; Ma, Lingjian; Zhao, Changping

    2015-11-18

    Among the largest and most diverse transcription factor families in plants, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family participate in regulating various processes, including floral induction and development, stress and hormone signaling, photomorphogenesis, seed maturation and germination, and pathogen defense. Although common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world, there is no comprehensive analysis of bZIPs in wheat, especially those involved in anther development. Previous studies have demonstrated wheat, T. urartu, Ae. tauschii, barley and Brachypodium are evolutionarily close in Gramineae family, however, the real evolutionary relationship still remains mysterious. In this study, 187 bZIP family genes were comprehensively identified from current wheat genome. 98, 96 and 107 members of bZIP family were also identified from the genomes of T.urartu, Ae.tauschii and barley, respectively. Orthology analyses suggested 69.4 % of TubZIPs were orthologous to 68.8 % of AetbZIPs and wheat had many more in-paralogs in the bZIP family than its relatives. It was deduced wheat had a closer phylogenetic relationship with barley and Brachypodium than T.urartu and Ae.tauschii. bZIP proteins in wheat, T.urartu and Ae.tauschii were divided into 14 subgroups based on phylogenetic analyses. Using Affymetrix microarray data, 48 differentially expressed TabZIP genes were identified to be related to anther development from comparison between the male sterility line and the restorer line. Genes with close evolutionary relationship tended to share similar gene structures. 15 of 23 selected TabZIP genes contained LTR elements in their promoter regions. Expression of 21 among these 23 TabZIP genes were obviously responsive to low temperature. These 23 TabZIP genes all exhibited distinct tissue-specific expression pattern. Among them, 11 TabZIP genes were predominantly expressed in anther and most of them showed over

  3. Stability and DNA-binding ability of the bZIP dimers formed by the ATF-2 and c-Jun transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, R J; Dragan, A I; Privalov, P L

    2010-02-19

    The dimer formed by the ATF-2 and c-Jun transcription factors is one of the main components of the human interferon-beta enhanceosome. Although these two transcription factors are able to form two homodimers and one heterodimer, it is mainly the heterodimer that participates in the formation of this enhanceosome, binding specifically to the positive regulatory domain IV (PRDIV) site of the enhancer DNA. To understand this surprising advantage of the heterodimer, we investigated the association of these transcription factors using fragments containing the basic DNA-recognition segment and the basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP). It was found that the probability of forming the hetero-bZIP significantly exceeds the probability of forming homo-bZIPs, and that the hetero-bZIP interacts more strongly with the PRDIV site of the interferon-beta enhancer, especially in the orientation that places the folded ATF-2 basic segment in the upstream half of this asymmetric site. The effect of salt on the formation of the ATF-2/c-Jun dimer and on its ability to bind the target PRDIV site showed that electrostatic interactions between the charged groups of these proteins and with DNA play an essential role in the formation of the asymmetric ATF-2/c-Jun/PRDIV complex. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microarray hybridization analysis of light-dependent gene expression in Penicillium chrysogenum identifies bZIP transcription factor PcAtfA.

    PubMed

    Wolfers, Simon; Kamerewerd, Jens; Nowrousian, Minou; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Kück, Ulrich; Bloemendal, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The fungal velvet complex is a light-dependent master regulator of secondary metabolism and development in the major penicillin producer, Penicillium chrysogenum. However, the light-dependent mechanism is unclear. To identify velvet-dependent transcriptional regulators that show light-regulated expression, we performed microarray hybridizations with RNA isolated from P. chrysogenum ΔPcku70 cultures grown under 13 different long-term, light-dependent growth conditions. We compared these expression data to data from two velvet complex deletion mutants; one lacked a subunit of the velvet complex (ΔPcvelA), and the other lacked a velvet-associated protein (ΔPclaeA). We sought to identify genes that were up-regulated in light, but down-regulated in ΔPcvelA and ΔPclaeA. We identified 148 co-regulated genes that displayed this regulatory pattern. In silico analyses of the co-regulated genes identified six proteins with fungal-specific transcription factor domains. Among these, we selected the bZIP transcription factor, PcAtfA, for functional characterization in deletion and complementation strains. Our data clearly indicates that PcAtfA governs spore germination. This comparative analysis of different microarray hybridization data sets provided results that may be useful for identifying genes for future functional analyses.

  5. A novel bZIP transcription factor ClrC positively regulates multiple stress responses, conidiation and cellulase expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunfeng; Liu, Guodong; Yao, Guangshan; Li, Zhonghai; Qin, Yuqi; Qu, Yinbo

    2016-06-01

    Cellulase production in filamentous fungi is largely regulated at the transcriptional level, and several transcription factors have been reported to be involved in this process. In this study, we identified ClrC, a novel transcription factor in cellulase production in Penicillium oxalicum. ClrC and its orthologs have a highly conserved basic leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domain, and their biological functions have not been explored. Deletion of clrC resulted in pleiotropic effects, including altered growth, reduced conidiation and increased sensitivity to oxidative and cell wall stresses. In particular, the clrC deletion mutant ΔclrC showed 46.1% ± 8.1% and 58.0% ± 8.7% decreases in production of filter paper enzyme and xylanase activities in cellulose medium, respectively. In contrast, 57.4% ± 10.0% and 70.9% ± 19.4% increased production of filter paper enzyme, and xylanase was observed in the clrC overexpressing strain, respectively. The transcription levels of major cellulase genes, as well as two cellulase transcriptional activator genes, clrB and xlnR, were significantly downregulated in ΔclrC, but substantially upregulated in clrC overexpressing strains. Furthermore, we observed that the absence of ClrC reduced full induction of cellulase expression even in the clrB overexpressing strain. These results indicated that ClrC is a novel and efficient engineering target for improving cellulolytic enzyme production in filamentous fungi.

  6. UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Binkert, Melanie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Terecskei, Kata; De Veylder, Lieven; Nagy, Ferenc; Ulm, Roman

    2014-01-01

    In plants subjected to UV-B radiation, responses are activated that minimize damage caused by UV-B. The bZIP transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) acts downstream of the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and promotes UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and acclimation. Expression of HY5 is induced by UV-B; however, the transcription factor(s) that regulate HY5 transcription in response to UV-B and the impact of UV-B on the association of HY5 with its target promoters are currently unclear. Here, we show that HY5 binding to the promoters of UV-B-responsive genes is enhanced by UV-B in a UVR8-dependent manner in Arabidopsis thaliana. In agreement, overexpression of REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS2, a negative regulator of UVR8 function, blocks UV-B-responsive HY5 enrichment at target promoters. Moreover, we have identified a T/G-box in the HY5 promoter that is required for its UV-B responsiveness. We show that HY5 and its homolog HYH bind to the T/GHY5-box cis-acting element and that they act redundantly in the induction of HY5 expression upon UV-B exposure. Therefore, HY5 is enriched at target promoters in response to UV-B in a UVR8 photoreceptor-dependent manner, and HY5 and HYH interact directly with a T/G-box cis-acting element of the HY5 promoter, mediating the transcriptional activation of HY5 in response to UV-B. PMID:25351492

  7. AtTGA4, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought resistance by enhancing nitrate transport and assimilation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li; Chen, Dandan; Min, Donghong; Li, Weiwei; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhou, Yongbin; Li, Liancheng; Chen, Ming; Ma, Youzhi

    2015-02-13

    To cope with environmental stress caused by global climate change and excessive nitrogen application, it is important to improve water and nitrogen use efficiencies in crop plants. It has been reported that higher nitrogen uptake could alleviate the damaging impact of drought stress. However, there is scant evidence to explain how nitrogen uptake affects drought resistance. In this study we observed that bZIP transcription factor AtTGA4 (TGACG motif-binding factor 4) was induced by both drought and low nitrogen stresses, and that overexpression of AtTGA4 simultaneously improved drought resistance and reduced nitrogen starvation in Arabidopsis. Following drought stress there were higher nitrogen and proline contents in transgenic AtTGA4 plants than in wild type controls, and activity of the key enzyme nitrite reductase (NIR) involved in nitrate assimilation processes was also higher. Expressions of the high-affinity nitrate transporter genes NRT2.1 and NRT2.2 and nitrate reductase genes NIA1 and NIA2 in transgenic plants were all higher than in wild type indicating that higher levels of nitrate transport and assimilation activity contributed to enhanced drought resistance of AtTGA4 transgenic plants. Thus genetic transformation with AtTGA4 may provide a new approach to simultaneously improve crop tolerance to drought and low nitrogen stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain Transcription Factor MBZ1 Regulates Cell Wall Integrity, Spore Adherence, and Virulence in Metarhizium robertsii *

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. PMID:25673695

  9. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Expression of a grape (Vitis vinifera) bZIP transcription factor, VlbZIP36, in Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance of drought stress during seed germination and seedling establishment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Mingxing; Wang, Xianhang; Feng, Tongying; Sun, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yaqiong; Huang, Li; Gao, Min; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2016-11-01

    Drought is one of the most serious factors that limit agricultural productivity and there is considerable interest in understanding the molecular bases of drought responses and their regulation. While numbers of basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are known to play key roles in response of plants to various abiotic stresses, only a few group K bZIP TFs have been functionally characterized in the context of stress signaling. In this study, we characterized the expression of the grape (Vitis vinifera) group K bZIP gene, VlbZIP36, and found evidence for its involvement in response to drought and the stress-associated phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines over-expressing VlbZIP36 under the control of a constitutive promoter showed enhanced dehydration tolerance during the seed germination stage, as well as in the seedling and mature plant stages. The results indicated that VlbZIP36 plays a role in drought tolerance by improving the water status, through limiting water loss, and mitigating cellular damage. The latter was evidenced by reduced cell death, lower electrolyte leakage in the transgenic plants, as well as by increased activities of antioxidant enzymes. We concluded that VlbZIP36 enhances drought tolerance through the transcriptional regulation of ABA-/stress-related genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibitory effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum) extracts and compounds on human tumor cell proliferation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nuclear transcription factor-kappa-B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbao; Yadev, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2010-08-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) and hot pepper (Capsicum spp.) are widely used in traditional medicines. Although hot Capsicum spp. extracts and its active principles, capsaicinoids, have been linked with anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities, whether black pepper and its active principle exhibit similar activities is not known. In this study, we have evaluated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extracts and compounds from black pepper by using proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, COX-1 and -2 enzymes, human tumor cell proliferation and lipid peroxidation (LPO). The capsaicinoids, the alkylamides, isolated from the hot pepper Scotch Bonnet were also used to compare the bioactivities of alkylamides and piperine from black pepper. All compounds derived from black pepper suppressed TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation, but alkyl amides, compound 4 from black pepper and 5 from hot pepper, were most effective. The human cancer cell proliferation inhibitory activities of piperine and alklyl amides in Capsicum and black pepper were dose dependant. The inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50) of the alklylamides were in the range 13-200 microg/mL. The extracts of black pepper at 200 microg/mL and its compounds at 25 microg/mL inhibited LPO by 45-85%, COX enzymes by 31-80% and cancer cells proliferation by 3.5-86.8%. Overall, these results suggest that black pepper and its constituents like hot pepper, exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activities.

  12. Bioinformatic Analyses of Subgroup-A Members of the Wheat bZIP Transcription Factor Family and Functional Identification of TabZIP174 Involved in Drought Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueyin; Feng, Biane; Zhang, Fengjie; Tang, Yimiao; Zhang, Liping; Ma, Lingjian; Zhao, Changping; Gao, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies in Arabidopsis and rice have demonstrated that Subgroup-A members of the bZIP transcription factor family play important roles in plant responses to multiple abiotic stresses. Although common wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world, there are limited investigations into Subgroup A of the bZIP family in wheat. In this study, we performed bioinformatic analyses of the 41 Subgroup-A members of the wheat bZIP family. Phylogenetic and conserved motif analyses showed that most of the Subgroup-A bZIP proteins involved in abiotic stress responses of wheat, Arabidopsis, and rice clustered in Clade A1 of the phylogenetic tree, and shared a majority of conserved motifs, suggesting the potential importance of Clade-A1 members in abiotic stress responses. Gene structure analysis showed that TabZIP genes with close phylogenetic relationships tended to possess similar exon–intron compositions, and the positions of introns in the hinge regions of the bZIP domains were highly conserved, whereas introns in the leucine zipper regions were at variable positions. Additionally, eleven groups of homologs and two groups of tandem paralogs were also identified in Subgroup A of the wheat bZIP family. Expression profiling analysis indicated that most Subgroup-A TabZIP genes were responsive to abscisic acid and various abiotic stress treatments. TabZIP27, TabZIP74, TabZIP138, and TabZIP174 proteins were localized in the nucleus of wheat protoplasts, whereas TabZIP9-GFP fusion protein was simultaneously present in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell membrane. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing TabZIP174 displayed increased seed germination rates and primary root lengths under drought treatments. Overexpression of TabZIP174 in transgenic Arabidopsis conferred enhanced drought tolerance, and transgenic plants exhibited lower water loss rates, higher survival rates, higher proline, soluble sugar, and leaf chlorophyll

  13. Bioinformatic Analyses of Subgroup-A Members of the Wheat bZIP Transcription Factor Family and Functional Identification of TabZIP174 Involved in Drought Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyin; Feng, Biane; Zhang, Fengjie; Tang, Yimiao; Zhang, Liping; Ma, Lingjian; Zhao, Changping; Gao, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies in Arabidopsis and rice have demonstrated that Subgroup-A members of the bZIP transcription factor family play important roles in plant responses to multiple abiotic stresses. Although common wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world, there are limited investigations into Subgroup A of the bZIP family in wheat. In this study, we performed bioinformatic analyses of the 41 Subgroup-A members of the wheat bZIP family. Phylogenetic and conserved motif analyses showed that most of the Subgroup-A bZIP proteins involved in abiotic stress responses of wheat, Arabidopsis, and rice clustered in Clade A1 of the phylogenetic tree, and shared a majority of conserved motifs, suggesting the potential importance of Clade-A1 members in abiotic stress responses. Gene structure analysis showed that TabZIP genes with close phylogenetic relationships tended to possess similar exon-intron compositions, and the positions of introns in the hinge regions of the bZIP domains were highly conserved, whereas introns in the leucine zipper regions were at variable positions. Additionally, eleven groups of homologs and two groups of tandem paralogs were also identified in Subgroup A of the wheat bZIP family. Expression profiling analysis indicated that most Subgroup-A TabZIP genes were responsive to abscisic acid and various abiotic stress treatments. TabZIP27, TabZIP74, TabZIP138, and TabZIP174 proteins were localized in the nucleus of wheat protoplasts, whereas TabZIP9-GFP fusion protein was simultaneously present in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell membrane. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing TabZIP174 displayed increased seed germination rates and primary root lengths under drought treatments. Overexpression of TabZIP174 in transgenic Arabidopsis conferred enhanced drought tolerance, and transgenic plants exhibited lower water loss rates, higher survival rates, higher proline, soluble sugar, and leaf chlorophyll

  14. A novel strategy to produce sweeter tomato fruits with high sugar contents by fruit-specific expression of a single bZIP transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Sagor, G H M; Berberich, Thomas; Tanaka, Shun; Nishiyama, Manabu; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Kojima, Seiji; Muramoto, Koji; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of sugar content and sweetness is desirable in some vegetables and in almost all fruits; however, biotechnological methods to increase sugar content are limited. Here, a completely novel methodological approach is presented that produces sweeter tomato fruits but does not have any negative effects on plant growth. Sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT), which is mediated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs), was initially reported in Arabidopsis AtbZIP11, a class S basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene. Here, two AtbZIP11 orthologous genes, SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2 contained four and three uORFs, respectively, in the cDNA 5'-leader regions. The second uORFs from the 5' cDNA end were conserved and involved in SIRT. Tomato plants were transformed with binary vectors in which only the main open reading frames (ORFs) of SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, without the SIRT-responsive uORFs, were placed under the control of the fruit-specific E8 promoter. Growth and morphology of the resulting transgenic tomato plants were comparable to those of wild-type plants. Transgenic fruits were approximately 1.5-fold higher in sugar content (sucrose/glucose/fructose) than nontransgenic tomato fruits. In addition, the levels of several amino acids, such as asparagine and glutamine, were higher in transgenic fruits than in wild-type fruits. This was expected because SlbZIP transactivates the asparagine synthase and proline dehydrogenase genes. This 'sweetening' technology is broadly applicable to other plants that utilize sucrose as a major translocation sugar.

  15. Feedback Regulation of ABA Signaling and Biosynthesis by a bZIP Transcription Factor Targets Drought-Resistance-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei; Tang, Ning; Yang, Jun; Peng, Lei; Ma, Siqi; Xu, Yan; Li, Guoliang; Xiong, Lizhong

    2016-08-01

    The OsbZIP23 transcription factor has been characterized for its essential role in drought resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), but the mechanism is unknown. In this study, we first investigated the transcriptional activation of OsbZIP23. A homolog of SnRK2 protein kinase (SAPK2) was found to interact with and phosphorylate OsbZIP23 for its transcriptional activation. SAPK2 also interacted with OsPP2C49, an ABI1 homolog, which deactivated the SAPK2 to inhibit the transcriptional activation activity of OsbZIP23. Next, we performed genome-wide identification of OsbZIP23 targets by immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses in the OsbZIP23-overexpression, osbzip23 mutant, and wild-type rice under normal and drought stress conditions. OsbZIP23 directly regulates a large number of reported genes that function in stress response, hormone signaling, and developmental processes. Among these targets, we found that OsbZIP23 could positively regulate OsPP2C49, and overexpression of OsPP2C49 in rice resulted in significantly decreased sensitivity of the abscisic acid (ABA) response and rapid dehydration. Moreover, OsNCED4 (9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase4), a key gene in ABA biosynthesis, was also positively regulated by OsbZIP23. Together, our results suggest that OsbZIP23 acts as a central regulator in ABA signaling and biosynthesis, and drought resistance in rice. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Cis-regulatory signatures of orthologous stress-associated bZIP transcription factors from rice, sorghum and Arabidopsis based on phylogenetic footprints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The potential contribution of upstream sequence variation to the unique features of orthologous genes is just beginning to be unraveled. A core subset of stress-associated bZIP transcription factors from rice (Oryza sativa) formed ten clusters of orthologous groups (COG) with genes from the monocot sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and dicot Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The total cis-regulatory information content of each stress-associated COG was examined by phylogenetic footprinting to reveal ortholog-specific, lineage-specific and species-specific conservation patterns. Results The most apparent pattern observed was the occurrence of spatially conserved ‘core modules’ among the COGs but not among paralogs. These core modules are comprised of various combinations of two to four putative transcription factor binding site (TFBS) classes associated with either developmental or stress-related functions. Outside the core modules are specific stress (ABA, oxidative, abiotic, biotic) or organ-associated signals, which may be functioning as ‘regulatory fine-tuners’ and further define lineage-specific and species-specific cis-regulatory signatures. Orthologous monocot and dicot promoters have distinct TFBS classes involved in disease and oxidative-regulated expression, while the orthologous rice and sorghum promoters have distinct combinations of root-specific signals, a pattern that is not particularly conserved in Arabidopsis. Conclusions Patterns of cis-regulatory conservation imply that each ortholog has distinct signatures, further suggesting that they are potentially unique in a regulatory context despite the presumed conservation of broad biological function during speciation. Based on the observed patterns of conservation, we postulate that core modules are likely primary determinants of basal developmental programming, which may be integrated with and further elaborated by additional intrinsic or extrinsic signals in conjunction with lineage

  17. bZIP transcription factor SmJLB1 regulates autophagy-related genes Smatg8 and Smatg4 and is required for fruiting-body development and vegetative growth in Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Oliver; Herzog, Britta; Jakobshagen, Antonia; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2013-12-01

    Autophagy is a precisely controlled degradation process in eukaryotic cells, during which the bulk of the cytoplasm is engulfed by a double membrane vesicle, the autophagosome. Fusion of the autophagosome with the vacuole leads to breakdown of its contents, such as proteins and organelles, and the recycling of nutrients. Earlier studies of autophagic genes of the core autophagic machinery in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora elucidated the impact of autophagy on fungal viability, vegetative growth and fruiting-body development. To gain further knowledge about the regulation of autophagy in S. macrospora, we analyzed the function of the bZIP transcription factor SmJLB1, a homolog of the Podospora anserina basic zipper-type transcription factor induced during incompatibility 4 (IDI-4) and the Aspergillus nidulans transcription factor jun-like bZIP A (JlbA). Generation of the homokaryotic deletion mutant demonstrated S. macrospora Smjlb1 is associated with autophagy-dependent processes. Deletion of Smjlb1 abolished fruiting-body formation and impaired vegetative growth. SmJLB1 is localized to the cytoplasm and to nuclei. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed an upregulated expression of autophagy-related genes Smatg8 and Smatg4 in the Smjlb1 deletion mutant, suggesting a transcriptional repression function of SmJLB1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear localization of a putative Phytophthora sojae bZIP1 transcription factor is mediated by multiple targeting motifs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-18

    Oomycetes are fungal-like eukaryotic microbes in the kingdom Stramenopila. We recently found that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses nuclear localization signals (NLSs) for translocation of proteins into the nucleus that differ from conventional well-characterized NLSs from mammals and yeast. Here we have characterized in depth the nuclear localization signals of a P. sojae basic leucine zipper transcription factor, PsbZIP1. Nuclear localization of PsbZIP1 was determined by a central conserved region overlapping the DNA binding domain. Mutational analysis of this region identified four distinct elements that contributed multiplicatively to nuclear localization, but the conserved DNA binding residues were not required. Three of the elements showed autonomous NLS activity and the fourth served as a nuclear localization enhancer. Sequences within two of the nuclear localization elements defined a new form of bipartite NLS consisting of a triplet of basic residues followed by a tail of scattered basic amino acids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. A tomato bZIP transcription factor, SlAREB, is involved in water deficit and salt stress response.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsai-Hung; Li, Chia-Wen; Su, Ruey-Chih; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Sanjaya; Tsai, Yi-Chien; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2010-05-01

    Abiotic stresses such as cold, water deficit, and salt stresses severely reduce crop productivity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important economic crop; however, not much is known about its stress responses. To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in tomato plants, we identified transcription factors from a tomato cDNA microarray. An ABA-responsive element binding protein (AREB) was identified and named SlAREB. In tomato protoplasts, SlAREB transiently transactivated luciferase reporter gene expression driven by AtRD29A (responsive to dehydration) and SlLAP (leucine aminopeptidase) promoters with exogenous ABA application, which was suppressed by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine, indicating that an ABA-dependent post-translational modification is required for the transactivation ability of SlAREB protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the recombinant DNA-binding domain of SlAREB protein is able to bind AtRD29A and SlLAP promoter regions. Constitutively expressed SlAREB increased tolerance to water deficit and high salinity stresses in both Arabidopsis and tomato plants, which maintained PSII and membrane integrities as well as water content in plant bodies. Overproduction of SlAREB in Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato plants regulated stress-related genes AtRD29A, AtCOR47, and SlCI7-like dehydrin under ABA and abiotic stress treatments. Taken together, these results show that SlAREB functions to regulate some stress-responsive genes and that its overproduction improves plant tolerance to water deficit and salt stress.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of OsAREB8 from rice, a member of the AREB/ABF family of bZIP transcription factors, in complex with its cognate DNA.

    PubMed

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Koura, Tsubasa; Kubota, Keiko; Yoshida, Takuya; Fujita, Yasunari; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-04-01

    The AREB/ABF family of bZIP transcription factors play a key role in drought stress response and tolerance during the vegetative stage in plants. To reveal the DNA-recognition mechanism of the AREB/ABF family of proteins, the bZIP domain of OsAREB8, an AREB/ABF-family protein from Oryza sativa, was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized with its cognate DNA. Crystals of the OsAREB8-DNA complex were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 277 K with a reservoir solution consisting of 50 mM MES pH 6.4, 29% MPD, 2 mM spermidine, 20 mM magnesium acetate and 100 mM sodium chloride. A crystal diffracted X-rays to 3.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 155.1, b = 206.7, c = 38.5 Å. The crystal contained one OsAREB8-DNA complex in the asymmetric unit.

  1. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  2. Bioinformatic cis-element analyses performed in Arabidopsis and rice disclose bZIP- and MYB-related binding sites as potential AuxRE-coupling elements in auxin-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In higher plants, a diverse array of developmental and growth-related processes is regulated by the plant hormone auxin. Recent publications have proposed that besides the well-characterized Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) that bind Auxin Response Elements (AuxREs), also members of the bZIP- and MYB-transcription factor (TF) families participate in transcriptional control of auxin-regulated genes via bZIP Response Elements (ZREs) or Myb Response Elements (MREs), respectively. Results Applying a novel bioinformatic algorithm, we demonstrate on a genome-wide scale that singular motifs or composite modules of AuxREs, ZREs, MREs but also of MYC2 related elements are significantly enriched in promoters of auxin-inducible genes. Despite considerable, species-specific differences in the genome structure in terms of the GC content, this enrichment is generally conserved in dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana) and monocot (Oryza sativa) model plants. Moreover, an enrichment of defined composite modules has been observed in selected auxin-related gene families. Consistently, a bipartite module, which encompasses a bZIP-associated G-box Related Element (GRE) and an AuxRE motif, has been found to be highly enriched. Making use of transient reporter studies in protoplasts, these findings were experimentally confirmed, demonstrating that GREs functionally interact with AuxREs in regulating auxin-mediated transcription. Conclusions Using genome-wide bioinformatic analyses, evolutionary conserved motifs have been defined which potentially function as AuxRE-dependent coupling elements to establish auxin-specific expression patterns. Based on these findings, experimental approaches can be designed to broaden our understanding of combinatorial, auxin-controlled gene regulation. PMID:22852874

  3. Bioinformatic cis-element analyses performed in Arabidopsis and rice disclose bZIP- and MYB-related binding sites as potential AuxRE-coupling elements in auxin-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Berendzen, Kenneth W; Weiste, Christoph; Wanke, Dierk; Kilian, Joachim; Harter, Klaus; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    In higher plants, a diverse array of developmental and growth-related processes is regulated by the plant hormone auxin. Recent publications have proposed that besides the well-characterized Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) that bind Auxin Response Elements (AuxREs), also members of the bZIP- and MYB-transcription factor (TF) families participate in transcriptional control of auxin-regulated genes via bZIP Response Elements (ZREs) or Myb Response Elements (MREs), respectively. Applying a novel bioinformatic algorithm, we demonstrate on a genome-wide scale that singular motifs or composite modules of AuxREs, ZREs, MREs but also of MYC2 related elements are significantly enriched in promoters of auxin-inducible genes. Despite considerable, species-specific differences in the genome structure in terms of the GC content, this enrichment is generally conserved in dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana) and monocot (Oryza sativa) model plants. Moreover, an enrichment of defined composite modules has been observed in selected auxin-related gene families. Consistently, a bipartite module, which encompasses a bZIP-associated G-box Related Element (GRE) and an AuxRE motif, has been found to be highly enriched. Making use of transient reporter studies in protoplasts, these findings were experimentally confirmed, demonstrating that GREs functionally interact with AuxREs in regulating auxin-mediated transcription. Using genome-wide bioinformatic analyses, evolutionary conserved motifs have been defined which potentially function as AuxRE-dependent coupling elements to establish auxin-specific expression patterns. Based on these findings, experimental approaches can be designed to broaden our understanding of combinatorial, auxin-controlled gene regulation.

  4. Interaction of retinal bZIP transcription factor NRL with Flt3-interacting zinc-finger protein Fiz1: possible role of Fiz1 as a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Mitton, Kenneth P; Swain, Prabodh K; Khanna, Hemant; Dowd, Mary; Apel, Ingrid J; Swaroop, Anand

    2003-02-15

    NRL (neural retina leucine zipper) is a basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor of the Maf-subfamily. Multiple phosphorylated isoforms of NRL are detected specifically in rod photoreceptors. NRL regulates the expression of several rod-specific genes, including rhodopsin and cGMP phosphodiesterase beta-subunit, in synergy with other transcription factors (e.g. the homeodomain protein CRX). Missense mutations in the human NRL gene are associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the loss of its function leads to rodless retina in Nrl-knockout mice that exhibit enhanced S-cone function. To further elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying NRL-mediated transcriptional regulation, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to isolate NRL-interacting proteins in the retina and report the identification of Flt3-interacting zinc-finger protein, Fiz1. Interaction of Fiz1 and NRL-leucine zipper was validated by GST pulldown assays and co-immunoprecipitation from bovine retinal nuclear extracts. Fiz1 suppressed NRL- but not CRX-mediated transactivation of rhodopsin promoter activity in transiently transfected CV1 cells. The mRNA and the protein for both Fiz1 and its only other known interacting protein Flt3, a receptor tyrosine kinase, are expressed in the retina. Our results indicate potential cross-talk among signaling pathways in the retina and suggest that the function of NRL is modulated by its interaction with specific repressor proteins.

  5. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper.

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper. PMID:27200047

  7. GmFT2a and GmFT5a Redundantly and Differentially Regulate Flowering through Interaction with and Upregulation of the bZIP Transcription Factor GmFDL19 in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sijia; Tang, Lili; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Baohui; Kong, Fanjiang

    2014-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is the key flowering integrator in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and its homologs encode florigens in many plant species regardless of their photoperiodic response. Two FT homologs, GmFT2a and GmFT5a, are involved in photoperiod-regulated flowering and coordinately control flowering in soybean. However, the molecular and genetic understanding of the roles played by GmFT2a and GmFT5a in photoperiod-regulated flowering in soybean is very limited. In this study, we demonstrated that GmFT2a and GmFT5a were able to promote early flowering in soybean by overexpressing these two genes in the soybean cultivar Williams 82 under noninductive long-day (LD) conditions. The soybean homologs of several floral identity genes, such as GmAP1, GmSOC1 and GmLFY, were significantly upregulated by GmFT2a and GmFT5a in a redundant and differential pattern. A bZIP transcription factor, GmFDL19, was identified as interacting with both GmFT2a and GmFT5a, and this interaction was confirmed by yeast two-hybridization and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). The overexpression of GmFDL19 in soybean caused early flowering, and the transcription levels of the flowering identity genes were also upregulated by GmFDL19, as was consistent with the upregulation of GmFT2a and GmFT5a. The transcription of GmFDL19 was also induced by GmFT2a. The results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that GmFDL19 was able to bind with the cis-elements in the promoter of GmAP1a. Taken together, our results suggest that GmFT2a and GmFT5a redundantly and differentially control photoperiod-regulated flowering in soybean through both physical interaction with and transcriptional upregulation of the bZIP transcription factor GmFDL19, thereby inducing the expression of floral identity genes. PMID:24845624

  8. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper.

    PubMed

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-09-22

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species. PMID:27653666

  10. AtMyb7, a subgroup 4 R2R3 Myb, negatively regulates ABA-induced inhibition of seed germination by blocking the expression of the bZIP transcription factor ABI5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyeok; Hyun, Woo Young; Nguyen, Hoai Nguyen; Jeong, Chan Young; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Hojoung

    2015-03-01

    Various Myb proteins have been shown to play crucial roles in plants, including primary and secondary metabolism, determination of cell fate and identity, regulation of development and involvement in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The 126 R2R3 Myb proteins (with two Myb repeats) have been found in Arabidopsis; however, the functions of most of these proteins remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we characterized the function of AtMyb7 using molecular biological and genetic analyses. We used qRT-PCR to determine the levels of stress-response gene transcripts in wild-type and atmyb7 plants. We showed that Arabidopsis AtMyb7 plays a critical role in seed germination. Under abscisic acid (ABA) and high-salt stress conditions, atmyb7 plants showed a lower germination rate than did wild-type plants. Furthermore, AtMyb7 promoter:GUS seeds exhibited different expression patterns in response to variations in the seed imbibition period. AtMyb7 negatively controls the expression of the gene encoding bZIP transcription factor, ABI5, which is a key transcription factor in ABA signalling and serves as a crucial regulator of germination inhibition in Arabidopsis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. bZIP17 and bZIP60 Regulate the Expression of BiP3 and Other Salt Stress Responsive Genes in an UPR-Independent Manner in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Henriquez-Valencia, Carlos; Moreno, Adrian A; Sandoval-Ibañez, Omar; Mitina, Irina; Blanco-Herrera, Francisca; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Orellana, Ariel

    2015-08-01

    Plants can be severely affected by salt stress. Since these are sessile organisms, they have developed different cellular responses to cope with this problem. Recently, it has been described that bZIP17 and bZIP60, two ER-located transcription factors, are involved in the cellular response to salt stress. On the other hand, bZIP60 is also involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signaling pathway that up-regulates the expression of ER-chaperones. Coincidentally, salt stress produces the up-regulation of BiP, one of the main chaperones located in this organelle. Then, it has been proposed that UPR is associated to salt stress. Here, by using insertional mutant plants on bZIP17 and bZIP60, we show that bZIP17 regulate the accumulation of the transcript for the chaperone BiP3 under salt stress conditions, but does not lead to the accumulation of UPR-responding genes such as the chaperones Calnexin, Calreticulin, and PDIL under salt treatments. In contrast, DTT, a known inducer of UPR, leads to the up-regulation of all these chaperones. On the other hand, we found that bZIP60 regulates the expression of some bZIP17 target genes under conditions were splicing of bZIP60 does not occur, suggesting that the spliced and unspliced forms of bZIP60 play different roles in the physiological response of the plant. Our results indicate that the ER-located transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP60 play a role in salt stress but this response goes through a signaling pathway that is different to that triggered by the unfolded protein response.

  12. The alpha-helical D1 domain of the tobacco bZIP transcription factor BZI-1 interacts with the ankyrin-repeat protein ANK1 and is important for BZI-1 function, both in auxin signaling and pathogen response.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Markus; Horvay, Katja; Strathmann, Anne; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Fischer, Ute; Böttner, Stefan; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2003-03-07

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) bZIP transcription factor BZI-1 is involved in auxin-mediated growth responses and in establishing pathogen defenses. Transgenic plants expressing a dominant-negative BZI-1-DeltaN derivative, which lacks the N-terminal activation domain, showed altered vegetative growth. In particular auxin-induced rooting and formation of tobacco mosaic virus-induced hypersensitive response lesions are affected. BZI-1-related proteins described in various plant species share the conserved domains D1, D2, BD, and D4. To define those BZI-1 domains involved in transcription factor function, BZI-1 deletion derivatives were expressed in transgenic plants. The domains D1 or BD are crucial for BZI-1-DeltaN function in planta. The basic BD domain is mediating DNA binding of BZI-1. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding studies reveal the ankyrin-repeat protein ANK1, which specifically interacts with a part of the BZI-1 protein (amino acids 73-222) encoding the D1 domain. ANK1 does not bind DNA or act as a co-activator of BZI-1-mediated transcription. Moreover, green fluorescence protein localization studies propose that ANK1 is acting mainly inside the cytosol. Transcription analysis reveals that ANK1 is ubiquitously expressed, but after pathogen attack transcription is transiently down-regulated. Along these lines, ANK1 homologous proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to function in pathogen defense. We therefore propose that the D1 domain serves as an interaction surface for ANK1, which appears to regulate BZI-1 function in auxin signaling as well as pathogen response.

  13. HTLV-I Tax protein stimulation of DNA binding of bZIP proteins by enhancing dimerization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Green, M R

    1993-10-15

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  14. Integrative Comparative Analyses of Transcript and Metabolite Profiles from Pepper and Tomato Ripening and Development Stages Uncovers Species-Specific Patterns of Network Regulatory Behavior[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Sonia; Alba, Rob; Nikoloski, Zoran; Kochevenko, Andrej; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Giovannoni, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite levels from climacteric and nonclimacteric fruits can be employed to unravel the similarities and differences of the underlying regulatory processes. To this end, we conducted combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and heterologous microarray hybridization assays in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; climacteric) and pepper (Capsicum chilense; nonclimacteric) fruits across development and ripening. Computational methods from multivariate and network-based analyses successfully revealed the difference between the covariance structures of the integrated data sets. Moreover, our results suggest that both fruits have similar ethylene-mediated signaling components; however, their regulation is different and may reflect altered ethylene sensitivity or regulators other than ethylene in pepper. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis were not induced in pepper fruits. Nevertheless, genes downstream of ethylene perception such as cell wall metabolism genes, carotenoid biosynthesis genes, and the never-ripe receptor were clearly induced in pepper as in tomato fruit. While signaling sensitivity or actual signals may differ between climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit, the evidence described here suggests that activation of a common set of ripening genes influences metabolic traits. Also, a coordinate regulation of transcripts and the accumulation of key organic acids, including malate, citrate, dehydroascorbate, and threonate, in pepper fruit were observed. Therefore, the integrated analysis allows us to uncover additional information for the comprehensive understanding of biological events relevant to metabolic regulation during climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit development. PMID:22685169

  15. A hot pepper gene encoding WRKY transcription factor is induced during hypersensitive response to Tobacco mosaic virus and Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; Shin, Yun-Chul; Lee, Boo-Ja; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Jeong-Kook; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors were previously implicated in the alteration of gene expression in response to various pathogens. The WRKY proteins constitute a large family of plant transcription factors, whose precise functions have yet to be elucidated. Using a domain-specific differential display procedure, we isolated a WRKY gene, which is rapidly induced during an incompatible interaction between hot pepper and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) or Xanthomonas campestris pv . vesicatoria (Xcv). The full-length cDNA of CaWRKY-a (Capsicum annuum WRKY-a) encodes a putative polypeptide of 546 amino acids, containing two WRKY domains with a zinc finger motif. The expression of CaWRKY-a could be rapidly induced by not only chemical elicitor such as salicylic acid (SA) or ethephon but also wounding treatments. The nuclear localization of CaWRKY-a was determined in transient expression system using tobacco BY-2 cells by polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation experiment. With oligonucleotide molecules containing the putative W-box sequences as a probe, we confirmed that CaWRKY-a protein had W-box-binding activity. These results suggest that CaWRKY-a might be involved as a transcription factor in plant defense-related signal transduction pathways.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana bZIP44: a transcription factor affecting seed germination and expression of the mannanase-encoding gene AtMAN7.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Carrillo-Barral, Néstor; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis; Carbonero, Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Endo-β-mannanases (MAN; EC. 3.2.1.78) catalyze the cleavage of β1→4 bonds in mannan polymers and have been associated with the process of weakening the tissues surrounding the embryo during seed germination. In germinating Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, the most highly expressed MAN gene is AtMAN7 and its transcripts are restricted to the micropylar endosperm and to the radicle tip just before radicle emergence. Mutants with a T-DNA insertion in AtMAN7 have a slower germination than the wild type. To gain insight into the transcriptional regulation of the AtMAN7 gene, a bioinformatic search for conserved non-coding cis-elements (phylogenetic shadowing) within the Brassicaceae MAN7 gene promoters has been done, and these conserved motifs have been used as bait to look for their interacting transcription factors (TFs), using as a prey an arrayed yeast library from A. thaliana. The basic-leucine zipper TF AtbZIP44, but not the closely related AtbZIP11, has thus been identified and its transcriptional activation upon AtMAN7 has been validated at the molecular level. In the knock-out lines of AtbZIP44, not only is the expression of the AtMAN7 gene drastically reduced, but these mutants have a significantly slower germination than the wild type, being affected in the two phases of the germination process, both in the rupture of the seed coat and in the breakage of the micropylar endosperm cell walls. In the over-expression lines the opposite phenotype is observed. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Role of the bZIP transcription factor IREBF1 in the NGF induction of stromelysin-1 (transin) gene expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    deSouza, S; Nordstrom, L A; Ciment, G

    1997-06-01

    Stromelysin-1 (ST-1) is one of the most nerve growth factor-(NGF) responsive gene products expressed in PC12 cells. In previous work, we identified a novel NGF-responsive element in the proximal promoter region of the ST-1 gene that participates in this induction, and showed that it bound a protein present in the nuclei of PC12 cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor that specifically recognizes this regulatory element-the interferon-response element binding factor-1 (IREBF1), a member of the basic leucine zipper gene family. We show that IREBF1 is constitutively expressed in PC12 cells and that overexpression of IREBF1 augments NGF-responsive ST-1 gene regulation, but does not affect basal levels of expression. On the other hand, expression of a mutated form of this transcription factor lacking the DNA binding domain attenuated NGF responsiveness, without affecting basal levels of expression. These data suggest that IREBF1 is part of the NGF-responsive transcriptional machinery necessary for the expression of ST-1 in PC12 cells.

  18. The bZIP Transcription Factor MoAP1 Mediates the Oxidative Stress Response and Is Critical for Pathogenicity of the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Chen, Yue; Du, Yan; Dong, Yanhan; Guo, Wang; Zhai, Su; Zhang, Haifeng; Dong, Suomeng; Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Yuanchao; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yap1 protein is an AP1-like transcription factor involved in the regulation of the oxidative stress response. An ortholog of Yap1, MoAP1, was recently identified from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae genome. We found that MoAP1 is highly expressed in conidia and during invasive hyphal growth. The Moap1 mutant was sensitive to H2O2, similar to S. cerevisiae yap1 mutants, and MoAP1 complemented Yap1 function in resistance to H2O2, albeit partially. The Moap1 mutant also exhibited various defects in aerial hyphal growth, mycelial branching, conidia formation, the production of extracellular peroxidases and laccases, and melanin pigmentation. Consequently, the Moap1 mutant was unable to infect the host plant. The MoAP1-eGFP fusion protein is localized inside the nucleus upon exposure to H2O2, suggesting that MoAP1 also functions as a redox sensor. Moreover, through RNA sequence analysis, many MoAP1-regulated genes were identified, including several novel ones that were also involved in pathogenicity. Disruption of respective MGG_01662 (MoAAT) and MGG_02531 (encoding hypothetical protein) genes did not result in any detectable changes in conidial germination and appressorium formation but reduced pathogenicity, whereas the mutant strains of MGG_01230 (MoSSADH) and MGG_15157 (MoACT) showed marketed reductions in aerial hyphal growth, mycelial branching, and loss of conidiation as well as pathogenicity, similar to the Moap1 mutant. Taken together, our studies identify MoAP1 as a positive transcription factor that regulates transcriptions of MGG_01662, MGG_02531, MGG_01230, and MGG_15157 that are important in the growth, development, and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. PMID:21383978

  19. bZIP transcription factor CgAP1 is essential for oxidative stress tolerance and full virulence of the poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjiao; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Chengming

    2016-10-01

    Yeast AP1 transcription factor is a regulator of oxidative stress response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of CgAP1, an ortholog of YAP1 in poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. The expression of CgAP1 was highly induced by reactive oxygen species. CgAP1 deletion mutants displayed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain, and their poplar leaf virulence was obviously reduced. However, the mutants exhibited no obvious defects in aerial hyphal growth, conidia production, and appressoria formation. CgAP1::eGFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus after TBH (tert-Butyl hydroperoxide) treatment, suggesting that CgAP1 functions as a redox sensor in C. gloeosporioides. In addition, CgAP1 prevented the accumulation of ROS during early stages of biotrophic growth. CgAP1 also acted as a positive regulator of several ROS-related genes (i.e., Glr1, Hyr1, and Cyt1) involved in the antioxidative response. These results highlight the key regulatory role of CgAP1 transcription factor in oxidative stress response and provide insights into the function of ROS detoxification in virulence of C. gloeosporioides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of a novel isoform of Receptor Expression Enhancing Protein REEP6 in rod photoreceptors by bZIP transcription factor NRL

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hong; Veleri, Shobi; Sun, Bo; Kim, Douglas S.; Keeley, Patrick W.; Kim, Jung-Woong; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Yadav, Sharda P.; Manjunath, Souparnika H.; Sood, Raman; Liu, Paul; Reese, Benjamin E.; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The Maf-family leucine zipper transcription factor NRL is essential for rod photoreceptor development and functional maintenance in the mammalian retina. Mutations in NRL are associated with human retinopathies, and loss of Nrl in mice leads to a cone-only retina with the complete absence of rods. Among the highly down-regulated genes in the Nrl−/− retina, we identified receptor expression enhancing protein 6 (Reep6), which encodes a member of a family of proteins involved in shaping of membrane tubules and transport of G-protein coupled receptors. Here, we demonstrate the expression of a novel Reep6 isoform (termed Reep6.1) in the retina by exon-specific Taqman assay and rapid analysis of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) ends (5′-RACE). The REEP6.1 protein includes 27 additional amino acids encoded by exon 5 and is specifically expressed in rod photoreceptors of developing and mature retina. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay identified NRL binding within the Reep6 intron 1. Reporter assays in cultured cells and transfections in retinal explants mapped an intronic enhancer sequence that mediated NRL-directed Reep6.1 expression. We also demonstrate that knockdown of Reep6 in mouse and zebrafish resulted in death of retinal cells. Our studies implicate REEP6.1 as a key functional target of NRL-centered transcriptional regulatory network in rod photoreceptors. PMID:24691551

  1. Regulation of a novel isoform of Receptor Expression Enhancing Protein REEP6 in rod photoreceptors by bZIP transcription factor NRL.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hong; Veleri, Shobi; Sun, Bo; Kim, Douglas S; Keeley, Patrick W; Kim, Jung-Woong; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Yadav, Sharda P; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Sood, Raman; Liu, Paul; Reese, Benjamin E; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-08-15

    The Maf-family leucine zipper transcription factor NRL is essential for rod photoreceptor development and functional maintenance in the mammalian retina. Mutations in NRL are associated with human retinopathies, and loss of Nrl in mice leads to a cone-only retina with the complete absence of rods. Among the highly down-regulated genes in the Nrl(-/-) retina, we identified receptor expression enhancing protein 6 (Reep6), which encodes a member of a family of proteins involved in shaping of membrane tubules and transport of G-protein coupled receptors. Here, we demonstrate the expression of a novel Reep6 isoform (termed Reep6.1) in the retina by exon-specific Taqman assay and rapid analysis of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) ends (5'-RACE). The REEP6.1 protein includes 27 additional amino acids encoded by exon 5 and is specifically expressed in rod photoreceptors of developing and mature retina. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay identified NRL binding within the Reep6 intron 1. Reporter assays in cultured cells and transfections in retinal explants mapped an intronic enhancer sequence that mediated NRL-directed Reep6.1 expression. We also demonstrate that knockdown of Reep6 in mouse and zebrafish resulted in death of retinal cells. Our studies implicate REEP6.1 as a key functional target of NRL-centered transcriptional regulatory network in rod photoreceptors. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Smriti A.; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D.; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A.; Dang, Christine A.; Terrell, Anne M.; Waters, Stephanie M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A.

    2015-01-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4-months, Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarrays-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− lens-DRGs with 1) binding-motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, 2) iSyTE lens-expression data, and 3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravels a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and mis-regulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  3. The bZIP Transcription Factor HAC-1 Is Involved in the Unfolded Protein Response and Is Necessary for Growth on Cellulose in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Larrondo, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    High protein secretion capacity in filamentous fungi requires an extremely efficient system for protein synthesis, folding and transport. When the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is exceeded, a pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered, allowing cells to mitigate and cope with this stress. In yeast, this pathway relies on the transcription factor Hac1, which mediates the up-regulation of several genes required under these stressful conditions. In this work, we identified and characterized the ortholog of the yeast HAC1 gene in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that its mRNA undergoes an ER stress-dependent splicing reaction, which in N. crassa removes a 23 nt intron and leads to a change in the open reading frame. By disrupting the N. crassa hac-1 gene, we determined it to be crucial for activating UPR and for proper growth in the presence of ER stress-inducing chemical agents. Neurospora is naturally found growing on dead plant material, composed primarily by lignocellulose, and is a model organism for the study of plant cell wall deconstruction. Notably, we found that growth on cellulose, a substrate that requires secretion of numerous enzymes, imposes major demands on ER function and is dramatically impaired in the absence of hac-1, thus broadening the range of physiological functions of the UPR in filamentous fungi. Growth on hemicellulose however, another carbon source that necessitates the secretion of various enzymes for its deconstruction, is not impaired in the mutant nor is the amount of proteins secreted on this substrate, suggesting that secretion, as a whole, is unaltered in the absence of hac-1. The characterization of this signaling pathway in N. crassa will help in the study of plant cell wall deconstruction by fungi and its manipulation may result in important industrial biotechnological applications. PMID:26132395

  4. Differential expression of four soybean bZIP genes during Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection.

    PubMed

    Alves, Murilo S; Soares, Zamira G; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Barros, Everaldo G; Poddanosqui, Adriana M P; Aoyagi, Luciano N; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Fietto, Luciano G

    2015-11-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the obligate biotrophic fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of most important diseases in the soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) agribusiness. The identification and characterization of genes related to plant defense responses to fungal infection are essential to develop ASR-resistant plants. In this work, we describe four soybean genes, GmbZIP62, GmbZIP105, GmbZIPE1, and GmbZIPE2, which encode transcription factors containing a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain from two divergent classes, and that are responsive to P. pachyrhizi infection. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these genes encode proteins similar to bZIP factors responsive to pathogens. Yeast transactivation assays showed that only GmbZIP62 has strong transactivation activity in yeast. In addition, three of the bZIP transcription factors analyzed were also differentially expressed by plant defense hormones, and all were differentially expressed by fungal attack, indicating that these proteins might participate in response to ASR infection. The results suggested that these bZIP proteins are part of the plant defense response to P. pachyrhizi infection, by regulating the gene expression related to ASR infection responses. These bZIP genes are potential targets to obtain new soybean genotypes resistant to ASR.

  5. Expression and functional roles of the pepper pathogen-induced transcription factor RAV1 in bacterial disease resistance, and drought and salt stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Lee, Sung Chul; Jung, Ho Won; Hong, Jeum Kyu; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2006-08-01

    A novel pathogen-induced gene encoding the RAV (Related to ABI3/VP1) transcription factor, CARAV1, was isolated from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. CARAV1 contains two distinct DNA-binding domains AP2 and B3 uniquely found in higher plants. Transient expression analysis of the smGFP:CARAV1 fusion construct in Arabidopsis protoplasts and pepper epidermal cells revealed the CARAV1 protein to be localized in the nucleus. The N-terminal region of CARAV1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain was required to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast. In yeast one-hybrid, the recognition of CAACA and CACCTG motifs also were essential for the CARAV1 protein to bind to a specific target gene and activate the reporter gene. The expression of the CARAV1 gene was strongly induced early in pepper leaves during the pathogen infection, abiotic elicitors and environmental stresses. CARAV1 transcripts were localized in the phloem cells of leaf tissues during pathogen infection and ethylene treatment. Ectopic expression of the CARAV1 gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants induced some PR genes and enhanced resistance against infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and osmotic stresses by high salinity and dehydration. The CARAV1 promoter activation was induced by P. syringae pv. tabaci, salicylic acid and abscisic acid. These data suggest that pathogen- and abiotic stress-inducible CARAV1 functions as a transcriptional activator triggering resistance to bacterial infection and tolerance to osmotic stresses.

  6. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J.; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  7. Overexpression of the pepper transcription factor CaPF1 in transgenic Virginia pine (Pinus Virginiana Mill.) confers multiple stress tolerance and enhances organ growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Charles, Thomas M; Newton, Ronald J

    2005-11-01

    Transcription factors play an important role in regulating gene expression in response to stress and pathogen tolerance. We describe here that overexpression of an ERF/AP2 pepper transcription factor (CaPF1) in transgenic Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana Mill.) confers tolerance to heavy metals Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc, to heat, and to pathogens Bacillus thuringiensis and Staphylococcus epidermidis, as by the survival rate of transgenic plants and the number of decreasing pathogen cells in transgenic tissues. Measurement of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APOX), glutathione reductase (GR), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities demonstrated that the level of the enzyme activities was higher in transgenic Virginia pine plants overexpressing the CaPF1 gene, which may protect cells from the oxidative damage caused by stresses, compared to the controls. Constitutive overexpression of CaPF1 gene enhanced organ growth by increasing organ size and cell numbers in transgenic Virginia pine plants over those in control plants.

  8. The Elucidation of the Interactome of 16 Arabidopsis bZIP Factors Reveals Three Independent Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, Carles Marco; Berendzen, Kenneth Wayne; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Mahn, Stefan; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    The function of the bZIP transcription factors is strictly dependent on their ability to dimerize. Heterodimerization has proven to be highly specific and is postulated to operate as a combinatorial mechanism allowing the generation of a large variety of dimers with unique qualities by specifically combining a small set of monomers; an assumption that has not yet been tested systematically. Here, the interaction pattern and the transactivation properties of 16 Arabidopsis thaliana bZIPs are examined in transiently transformed Arabidopsis protoplasts to deliver a perspective on the relationship between bZIP dimerization and function. An interaction matrix of bZIPs belonging to the C, G, H, and S1 bZIP groups was resolved by Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) coupled to quantitative flow cytometric analysis, while an extensive GUS reporter gene assay was carried out to determine the effect of different bZIP pairs on the expression of four different known bZIP-targeted promoters. Statistical data treatment and complementary bioinformatic analysis were performed to substantiate the biological findings. According to these results, the 16 bZIPs interact in three isolated networks, within which their members dimerize non-specifically and exhibit a significant level of functional redundancy. A coherent explanation for these results is supported by in silico analysis of differences in the length, structure and composition of their leucine zippers and appears to explain their dimerization specificity and dynamics observed in vivo quite well. A model in which the bZIP networks act as functional units is proposed. PMID:26452049

  9. CaWRKY6 transcriptionally activates CaWRKY40, regulates Ralstonia solanacearum resistance, and confers high-temperature and high-humidity tolerance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Yang, Sheng; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Cheng, Junbin; Wu, Ji; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Mou, Shaoliang; Guan, Deyi; Huang, Ronghua; He, Shuilin

    2015-06-01

    High temperature (HT), high humidity (HH), and pathogen infection often co-occur and negatively affect plant growth. However, these stress factors and plant responses are generally studied in isolation. The mechanisms of synergistic responses to combined stresses are poorly understood. We isolated the subgroup IIb WRKY family member CaWRKY6 from Capsicum annuum and performed quantitative real-time PCR analysis. CaWRKY6 expression was upregulated by individual or simultaneous treatment with HT, HH, combined HT and HH (HTHH), and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation, and responded to exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA), ethephon, and abscisic acid (ABA). Virus-induced gene silencing of CaWRKY6 enhanced pepper plant susceptibility to R. solanacearum and HTHH, and downregulated the hypersensitive response (HR), JA-, ethylene (ET)-, and ABA-induced marker gene expression, and thermotolerance-associated expression of CaHSP24, ER-small CaSHP, and Chl-small CaHSP. CaWRKY6 overexpression in pepper attenuated the HTHH-induced suppression of resistance to R. solanacearum infection. CaWRKY6 bound to and activated the CaWRKY40 promoter in planta, which is a pepper WRKY that regulates heat-stress tolerance and R. solanacearum resistance. CaWRKY40 silencing significantly blocked HR-induced cell death and reduced transcriptional expression of CaWRKY40. These data suggest that CaWRKY6 is a positive regulator of R. solanacearum resistance and heat-stress tolerance, which occurs in part by activating CaWRKY40. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Combinatorial bZIP dimers display complex DNA-binding specificity landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A; Reinke, Aaron W; Bhimsaria, Devesh; Keating, Amy E; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2017-01-01

    How transcription factor dimerization impacts DNA-binding specificity is poorly understood. Guided by protein dimerization properties, we examined DNA binding specificities of 270 human bZIP pairs. DNA interactomes of 80 heterodimers and 22 homodimers revealed that 72% of heterodimer motifs correspond to conjoined half-sites preferred by partnering monomers. Remarkably, the remaining motifs are composed of variably-spaced half-sites (12%) or ‘emergent’ sites (16%) that cannot be readily inferred from half-site preferences of partnering monomers. These binding sites were biochemically validated by EMSA-FRET analysis and validated in vivo by ChIP-seq data from human cell lines. Focusing on ATF3, we observed distinct cognate site preferences conferred by different bZIP partners, and demonstrated that genome-wide binding of ATF3 is best explained by considering many dimers in which it participates. Importantly, our compendium of bZIP-DNA interactomes predicted bZIP binding to 156 disease associated SNPs, of which only 20 were previously annotated with known bZIP motifs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19272.001 PMID:28186491

  11. Recognition of bZIP proteins by the human T-cell leukaemia virus transactivator Tax.

    PubMed

    Perini, G; Wagner, S; Green, M R

    1995-08-17

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax protein increases the DNA binding of many cellular transcription factors that contain a basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding domain. bZIP domains comprise a leucine-rich dimerization motif and a basic region that mediates DNA contact. How Tax recognizes diverse bZIPs is not understood. Here we show that no specific sequence of the leucine zipper is required for a Tax response. In contrast, the basic region is essential for the Tax-mediated DNA-binding increase, which can be eliminated by single substitutions of several conserved amino acids. Surprisingly, Tax alters the relative affinity of a bZIP for different DNA binding sites. Thus, through recognition of the conserved basic region. Tax increases DNA binding and modifies DNA site selection. Tax provides a model for how a single auxiliary factor can regulate multiple sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins.

  12. Data-Driven Prediction and Design of bZIP Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B.; Keating, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology. PMID:25695764

  13. Data-driven prediction and design of bZIP coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B; Keating, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology.

  14. Pepper Oil Surprise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli perform the Pepper Oil Surprise experiment from Potlatch Elementary School in Potlatch, Idaho. This research investigates the interaction of liquid pepper/...

  15. Pepper's Ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-09-01

    Without applications of physics such as counter-weighted sets and backdrops, inclined planes, stage lighting instruments, and other mechanisms for deus ex machina, dramatic productions would revert to the words only—fine for Shakespeare and Becket, but not good for audiences who are accustomed to experiencing plays with the eye as well as the ear. Pepper's Ghost is a 19th-century stage illusion, based on basic optical principles, that can find its way into your introductory classroom.

  16. SnRK1-triggered switch of bZIP63 dimerization mediates the low-energy response in plants

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Andrea; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Anrather, Dorothea; Simeunovic, Andrea; Weiste, Christoph; Valerio, Concetta; Dietrich, Katrin; Kirchler, Tobias; Nägele, Thomas; Vicente Carbajosa, Jesús; Hanson, Johannes; Baena-González, Elena; Chaban, Christina; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic adjustment to changing environmental conditions, particularly balancing of growth and defense responses, is crucial for all organisms to survive. The evolutionary conserved AMPK/Snf1/SnRK1 kinases are well-known metabolic master regulators in the low-energy response in animals, yeast and plants. They act at two different levels: by modulating the activity of key metabolic enzymes, and by massive transcriptional reprogramming. While the first part is well established, the latter function is only partially understood in animals and not at all in plants. Here we identified the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP63 as key regulator of the starvation response and direct target of the SnRK1 kinase. Phosphorylation of bZIP63 by SnRK1 changed its dimerization preference, thereby affecting target gene expression and ultimately primary metabolism. A bzip63 knock-out mutant exhibited starvation-related phenotypes, which could be functionally complemented by wild type bZIP63, but not by a version harboring point mutations in the identified SnRK1 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05828.001 PMID:26263501

  17. An Aspergillus nidulans bZIP response pathway hardwired for defensive secondary metabolism operates through aflR

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenbing; Amaike, Saori; Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C.; Bok, JinWoo; Rohlfs, Marko; Keller, Nancy P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic bZIP transcription factors are critical players in organismal response to environmental challenges. In fungi, the production of secondary metabolites (SMs) is hypothesized as one of the responses to environmental insults, e.g. attack by fungivorous insects, yet little data to support this hypothesis exists. Here we establish a mechanism of bZIP regulation of SMs through RsmA, a recently discovered YAP-like bZIP protein. RsmA greatly increases SM production by binding to two sites in the A. nidulans AflR promoter region, a C6 transcription factor known for activating production of the carcinogenic and anti-predation SM, sterigmatocystin (ST). Deletion of aflR in an overexpression rsmA (OE::rsmA) background not only eliminates ST production but also significantly reduces asperthecin synthesis. Furthermore, the fungivore, Folsomia candida, exhibited a distinct preference for feeding on wild type rather than an OE::rsmA strain. RsmA may thus have a critical function in mediating direct chemical resistance against predation. Taken together, these results suggest RsmA represents a bZIP pathway hardwired for defensive SM production. PMID:22283524

  18. The interaction of the Arabidopsis response regulator ARR18 with bZIP63 mediates the regulation of PROLINE DEHYDROGENASE expression.

    PubMed

    Veerabagu, Manikandan; Kirchler, Tobias; Elgass, Kirstin; Stadelhofer, Bettina; Stahl, Mark; Harter, Klaus; Mira-Rodado, Virtudes; Chaban, Christina

    2014-10-01

    As the first and rate-limiting enzyme of proline degradation, PROLINE DEHYDROGENASE1 (PDH1) is tightly regulated during plant stress responses, including induction under hypoosmolarity and repression under water deficit. The plant receptor histidine kinases AHKs, elements of the two-component system (TCS) in Arabidopsis thaliana, are proposed to function in water stress responses by regulating different stress-responsive genes. However, little information is available concerning AHK phosphorelay-mediated downstream signaling. Here we show that the Arabidopsis type-B response regulator 18 (ARR18) functions as a positive osmotic stress response regulator in Arabidopsis seeds and affects the activity of the PDH1 promoter, known to be controlled by C-group bZIP transcription factors. Moreover, direct physical interaction of ARR18 with bZIP63 was identified and shown to be dependent on phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue in the ARR18 receiver domain. We further show that bZIP63 itself functions as a negative regulator of seed germination upon osmotic stress. Using reporter gene assays in protoplasts, we demonstrated that ARR18 interaction negatively interferes with the transcriptional activity of bZIP63 on the PDH1 promoter. Our findings provide new insight into the function of ARR18 and bZIP63 as antagonistic regulators of gene expression in Arabidopsis.

  19. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  20. Ultra-High Density, Transcript-Based Genetic Maps of Pepper Define Recombination in the Genome and Synteny Among Related Species.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Chin-Wo, Sebastian Reyes; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard; Van Deynze, Allen

    2015-09-08

    Our ability to assemble complex genomes and construct ultradense genetic maps now allows the determination of recombination rates, translocations, and the extent of genomic collinearity between populations, species, and genera. We developed two ultradense genetic linkage maps for pepper from single-position polymorphisms (SPPs) identified de novo with a 30,173 unigene pepper genotyping array. The Capsicum frutescens × C. annuum interspecific and the C. annuum intraspecific genetic maps were constructed comprising 16,167 and 3,878 unigene markers in 2108 and 783 genetic bins, respectively. Accuracies of marker groupings and orders are validated by the high degree of collinearity between the two maps. Marker density was sufficient to locate the chromosomal breakpoint resulting in the P1/P8 translocation between C. frutescens and C. annuum to a single bin. The two maps aligned to the pepper genome showed varying marker density along the chromosomes. There were extensive chromosomal regions with suppressed recombination and reduced intraspecific marker density. These regions corresponded to the pronounced nonrecombining pericentromeric regions in tomato, a related Solanaceous species. Similar to tomato, the extent of reduced recombination appears to be more pronounced in pepper than in other plant species. Alignment of maps with the tomato and potato genomes shows the presence of previously known translocations and a translocation event that was not observed in previous genetic maps of pepper. Copyright © 2015 Hill et al.

  1. The IRE1/bZIP60 pathway and Bax inhibitor 1 suppress systemic accumulation of potyviruses and potexviruses in Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The inositol requiring enzyme (IRE1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor and when activated it splices the bZIP60 mRNA producing a truncated transcription factor that upregulates expression of genes involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR). Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1) is another ER stre...

  2. Human bZIP transcription factor gene NRL: structure, genomic sequence, and fine linkage mapping at 14q11.2 and negative mutation analysis in patients with retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Q; Jackson, A; Pieke-Dahl, S; Scott, K; Kimberling, W J; Sieving, P A; Richards, J E; Swaroop, A

    1997-10-15

    The NRL gene encodes an evolutionarily conserved basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor that is implicated in regulating the expression of the photoreceptor-specific gene rhodopsin. NRL is expressed in postmitotic neuronal cells and in lens during embryonic development, but exhibits a retina-specific pattern of expression in the adult. To understand regulation of NRL expression and to investigate its possible involvement in retinopathies, we have determined the complete sequence of the human NRL gene, identified a polymorphic (CA)n repeat (identical to D14S64) within the NRL-containing cosmid, and refined its location by linkage analysis. Since a locus for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) has been linked to markers at 14q11 and since mutations in rhodopsin can lead to RP, we sequenced genomic PCR products of the NRL gene and of the rhodopsin-Nrl response element from a panel of patients representing independent families with inherited retinal degeneration. The analysis did not reveal any causative mutations in this group of patients. These investigations provide the basis for delineating the DNA sequence elements that regulate NRL expression in distinct neuronal cell types and should assist in the analysis of NRL as a candidate gene for inherited diseases/syndromes affecting visual function. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  3. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. ATF-7, a novel bZIP protein, interacts with the PRL-1 protein-tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Peters, C S; Liang, X; Li, S; Kannan, S; Peng, Y; Taub, R; Diamond, R H

    2001-04-27

    We have identified a novel basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, designated ATF-7, that physically interacts with the PRL-1 protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase). PRL-1 is a predominantly nuclear, farnesylated PTPase that has been linked to the control of cellular growth and differentiation. This interaction was initially found using the yeast two-hybrid system. ATF-7 is most closely related to members of the ATF/CREB family of bZIP proteins, with highest homology to ATF-4. ATF-7 homodimers can bind specifically to CRE elements. ATF-7 is expressed in a number of different tissues and is expressed in association with differentiation in the Caco-2 cell model of intestinal differentiation. We have confirmed the PRL-1.ATF-7 interaction and mapped the regions of ATF-7 and PRL-1 important for interaction to ATF-7's bZIP region and PRL-1's phosphatase domain. Finally, we have determined that PRL-1 is able to dephosphorylate ATF-7 in vitro. Further insight into ATF-7's precise cellular roles, transcriptional function, and downstream targets are likely be of importance in understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex processes of maintenance, differentiation, and turnover of epithelial tissues.

  5. Sucrose sensing through nascent peptide-meditated ribosome stalling at the stop codon of Arabidopsis bZIP11 uORF2.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yui; Takamatsu, Seidai; Glasbrenner, Michael; Becker, Thomas; Naito, Satoshi; Beckmann, Roland

    2017-05-01

    Arabidopsis bZIP11 is a transcription factor that modulates amino acid metabolism under high-sucrose conditions. Expression of bZIP11 is downregulated in a sucrose-dependent manner during translation. Previous in vivo studies have identified the second upstream open reading frame (uORF2) as an essential regulatory element for the sucrose-dependent translational repression of bZIP11. However, it remains unclear how uORF2 represses bZIP11 expression under high-sucrose conditions. Through biochemical experiments using cell-free translation systems, we report on sucrose-mediated ribosome stalling at the stop codon of uORF2. The C-terminal 10 amino acids (29-SFSVxFLxxLYYV-41) of uORF2 are important for ribosome stalling. Our results demonstrate that uORF2 encodes a regulatory nascent peptide that functions to sense intracellular sucrose abundance. This is the first biochemical identification of the intracellular sucrose sensor. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Spacing Studies in Peppers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Higher plant stand densities usually result in greater pepper fruit yields. While the impact of stand density on yield has been studied for bell and non-bell peppers, but very little information exists regarding implications on pesticide efficacy. The objective of these studies was to determine th...

  7. The dynamic of the splicing of bZIP60 and the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced mRNAs reveals some unique features during the activation of UPR in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, Juan; Moreno, Adrian A; Mitina, Irina; Orellana, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling pathway that is activated when the workload of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is surpassed. IRE1 is a sensor involved in triggering the UPR and plays a key role in the unconventional splicing of an mRNA leading to the formation of a transcription factor that up-regulates the transcription of genes that play a role in restoring the homeostasis in the ER. In plants, bZIP60 is the substrate for IRE1; however, questions such as what is the dynamics of the splicing of bZIP60 and the fate of the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced forms of the mRNA, remain unanswered. In the present work, we analyzed the processing of bZIP60 by determining the levels of the spliced form mRNA in plants exposed to different conditions that trigger UPR. The results show that induction of ER stress increases the content of the spliced form of bZIP60 (bZIP60s) reaching a maximum, that depending on the stimuli, varied between 30 min or 2 hrs. In most cases, this was followed by a decrease in the content. In contrast to other eukaryotes, the splicing never occurred to full extent. The content of bZIP60s changed among different organs upon induction of the UPR suggesting that splicing is regulated differentially throughout the plant. In addition, we analyzed the distribution of a GFP-tagged version of bZIP60 when UPR was activated. A good correlation between splicing of bZIP60 and localization of the protein in the nucleus was observed. No fluorescence was observed under basal conditions, but interestingly, the fluorescence was recovered and found to co-localize with an ER marker upon treatment with an inhibitor of the proteasome. Our results indicate that the dynamics of bZIP60, both the mRNA and the protein, are highly dynamic processes which are tissue-specific and stimulus-dependent.

  8. The bZIP dimer localizes at DNA full-sites where each basic region can alternately translocate and bind to subsites at the half-site

    PubMed Central

    Chan, I-San; Al-Sarraj, Taufik; Shahravan, S. Hesam; Fedorova, Anna V.; Shin, Jumi A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of the GCN4 bZIP (basic region/leucine zipper) with the AP-1 or CRE site show how each GCN4 basic region binds to a 4-bp cognate half-site as a single DNA target; however, this may not always fully describe how bZIP proteins interact with their target sites. Previously, we showed that the GCN4 basic region interacts with all 5 bp in half-site TTGCG (termed 5H-LR), and that 5H-LR comprises two 4-bp subsites, TTGC and TGCG, which individually are also target sites of the basic region. In this work, we explored how the basic region interacts with 5H-LR when the bZIP dimer localizes to full-sites. Using AMBER molecular modeling, we simulated GCN4 bZIP complexes with full-sites containing 5H-LR to investigate in silico the interface between the basic region and 5H-LR. We also performed in vitro investigation of bZIP–DNA interactions at a number of full-sites that contain 5H-LR vs. either subsite: we analyzed results from DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and from EMSA titrations to quantify binding affinities. Our computational and experimental results together support a highly dynamic DNA-binding model: when a bZIP dimer localizes to its target full-site, the basic region can alternately recognize either subsite as a distinct target at 5H-LR and translocate between the subsites, potentially by sliding and hopping. This model provides added insights into how α-helical DNA-binding domains of transcription factors can localize to their gene regulatory sequences in vivo. PMID:22856882

  9. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  10. Characterization of a bZIP gene highly expressed during ripening of the peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Guzzo, Flavia; Tadiello, Alice; Confortin, Enrico; Pavanello, Anna; Botton, Alessandro; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    A ripening specific bZIP gene of peach was studied by ectopically expressing it in tomato. Two lines, with either a mild or a strong phenotype, respectively, were analyzed in detail. Transgenic fruit morphology was normal, yet the time spent to proceed through the various ripening stages was longer compared to wild type. In agreement with this finding the transgenic berries produced less ethylene, and also had a modified expression of some ripening-related genes that was particularly evident in berries with a strong phenotype. In particular, in the latter fruits polygalacturonase and lipoxygenase genes, but also genes coding for transcription factors (TFs) important for tomato ripening (i.e. TAGL1, CNR, APETALA2a, NOR) did not show the expected decreased expression in the red berries. As regards the RIN gene, its expression continued to increase in both mild and strong lines, and this is in agreement with the dilated ripening times. Interestingly, a metabolomic analysis of berries at various stages of ripening showed that the longer time spent by the transgenic berries to proceed from a stage to another was not due to a slackened metabolism. In fact, the differences in amount of stage-specific marker metabolites indicated that the transgenic berries had a very active metabolism. Therefore, the dilated ripening and the enhanced metabolism of the berries over-expressing the bZIP gene suggest that such gene might regulate ripening by acting as a pacemaker for some of the ripening metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. HTLV-1 bZIP factor enhances TGF-β signaling through p300 coactivator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Sugata, Kenji; Miyazato, Paola; Green, Patrick L; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2011-08-18

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that is etiologically associated with adult T-cell leukemia. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the provirus, is involved in both regulation of viral gene transcription and T-cell proliferation. We showed in this report that HBZ interacted with Smad2/3, and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad transcriptional responses in a p300-dependent manner. The N-terminal LXXLL motif of HBZ was responsible for HBZ-mediated TGF-β signaling activation. In a serial immunoprecipitation assay, HBZ, Smad3, and p300 formed a ternary complex, and the association between Smad3 and p300 was markedly enhanced in the presence of HBZ. In addition, HBZ could overcome the repression of the TGF-β response by Tax. Finally, HBZ expression resulted in enhanced transcription of Pdgfb, Sox4, Ctgf, Foxp3, Runx1, and Tsc22d1 genes and suppression of the Id2 gene; such effects were similar to those by TGF-β. In particular, HBZ induced Foxp3 expression in naive T cells through Smad3-dependent TGF-β signaling. Our results suggest that HBZ, by enhancing TGF-β signaling and Foxp3 expression, enables HTLV-1 to convert infected T cells into regulatory T cells, which is thought to be a critical strategy for virus persistence.

  12. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature–high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature–high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63 (pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40 (pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper’s response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper’s response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  13. Local and systemic hormonal responses in pepper leaves during compatible and incompatible pepper-tobamovirus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dziurka, Michał; Janeczko, Anna; Juhász, Csilla; Gullner, Gábor; Oklestková, Jana; Novák, Ondrej; Saja, Diana; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Tóbiás, István; Barna, Balázs

    2016-12-01

    Phytohormone levels and the expression of genes encoding key enzymes participating in hormone biosynthetic pathways were investigated in pepper leaves inoculated with two different tobamoviruses. Obuda pepper virus (ObPV) inoculation led to the development of hypersensitive reaction (incompatible interaction), while Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) inoculation resulted in a systemic, compatible interaction. ObPV-inoculation markedly increased not only the levels of salicylic acid (SA) (73-fold) and jasmonic acid (8-fold) but also those of abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, cis-zeatin, cis-zeatin-9-riboside and trans-zeatin-9-riboside in the inoculated pepper leaves 3 days post inoculation. PMMoV infection increased only the contents of gibberellic acid and SA. Hormone contents did not change significantly after ObPV or PMMoV infection in non-infected upper leaves 20 days post inoculation. Concentrations of some brassinosteroids (BRs) and progesterone increased both in ObPV- and PMMoV inoculated leaves. ObPV inoculation markedly induced the expression of three phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) genes, while that of an isochorismate synthase (ICS) gene was not modified. PMMoV inoculation did not alter the expression of PAL and ICS genes but induced the transcript abundance of ACO although later than ObPV. Pre-treatment of pepper leaves with exogenous 24-epi-brassinolide (24-epi-BR) prior to ObPV-inoculation strongly mitigated the visible symptoms caused by ObPV. In addition, 24-epi-BR pre-treatment markedly altered the level of several hormones in pepper leaves following ObPV-inoculation. These data indicate that ObPV- and PMMoV-inoculations lead to intricate but well harmonized hormonal responses that are largely determined by the incompatible or compatible nature of plant-virus interactions.

  14. Basic leucine zipper domain transcription factors: the vanguards in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Noman, Ali; Liu, Zhiqin; Aqeel, Muhammad; Zainab, Madiha; Khan, Muhammad Ifnan; Hussain, Ansar; Ashraf, Muhammad Furqan; Li, Xia; Weng, Yahong; He, Shuilin

    2017-09-06

    Regulation of spatio-temporal expression patterns of stress tolerance associated plant genes is an essential component of the stress responses. Eukaryotes assign a large amount of their genome to transcription with multiple transcription factors (TFs). Often, these transcription factors fit into outsized gene groups which, in several cases, exclusively belong to plants. Basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors regulate vital processes in plants and animals. In plants, bZIPs are implicated in numerous fundamental processes like seed development, energy balance, and responses to abiotic or biotic stresses. Systematic analysis of the information obtained over the last two decades disclosed a constitutive role of bZIPs against biotic stress. bZIP TFs are vital players in plant innate immunity due to their ability to regulate genes associated with PAMP-triggered immunity, effector-triggered immunity, and hormonal signaling networks. Expression analysis of studied bZIP genes suggests that exploration and functional characterization of novel bZIP TFs in planta is helpful in improving crop resistance against pathogens and environmental stresses. Our review focuses on major advancements in bZIP TFs and plant responses against different pathogens. The integration of genomics information with the functional studies provides new insights into the regulation of plant defense mechanisms and engineering crops with improved resistance to invading pathogens. Conclusively, succinct functions of bZIPs as positive or negative regulator mediate resistance to the plant pathogens and lay a foundation for understanding associated genes and TFs regulating different pathways. Moreover, bZIP TFs may offer a comprehensive transgenic gizmo for engineering disease resistance in plant breeding programs.

  15. A novel bZIP gene from Tamarix hispida mediates physiological responses to salt stress in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yucheng; Gao, Caiqiu; Liang, Yenan; Wang, Chao; Yang, Chuanping; Liu, Guifeng

    2010-02-15

    Basic leucine zipper proteins (bZIPs) are transcription factors that bind abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive elements (ABREs) and enable plants to withstand adverse environmental conditions. In the present study, a novel bZIP gene, ThbZIP1 was cloned from Tamarix hispida. Expression studies in T. hispida showed differential regulation of ThbZIP1 in response to treatment with NaCl, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, NaHCO(3), and CdCl(2), suggesting that ThbZIP1 is involved in abiotic stress responses. To identify the physiological responses mediated by ThbZIP1, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing exogenous ThbZIP1 were generated. Various physiological parameters related to salt stress were measured and compared between transgenic and wild type (WT) plants. Our results indicate that overexpression of ThbZIP1 can enhance the activity of both peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and increase the content of soluble sugars and soluble proteins under salt stress conditions. These results suggest that ThbZIP1 contributes to salt tolerance by mediating signaling through multiple physiological pathways. Furthermore, ThbZIP1 confers stress tolerance to plants by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, facilitating the accumulation of compatible osmolytes, and inducing and/or enhancing the biosynthesis of soluble proteins.

  16. Conserved ETS domain arginines mediate DNA binding, nuclear localization, and a novel mode of bZIP interaction.

    PubMed

    Listman, James A; Wara-aswapati, Nawarat; Race, JoAnne E; Blystone, Lisa W; Walker-Kopp, Nancy; Yang, Zhiyong; Auron, Philip E

    2005-12-16

    The DNA-binding ETS transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is of central importance in determining the myeloid-erythroid developmental switch and is required for monocyte and osteoclast differentiation. Many monocyte genes are dependent upon this factor, including the gene that codes for interleukin-1beta. It has long been known that the conserved ETS DNA-binding domain of Spi-1/PU.1 functionally cooperates via direct association with a diverse collection of DNA-binding proteins, including members of the basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) family. However, the molecular basis for this interaction has long been elusive. Using a combination of approaches, we have mapped a single residue on the surface of the ETS domain critical for protein tethering by the C/EBPbeta carboxyl-terminal bZIP domain. This residue is also important for nuclear localization and DNA binding. In addition, dependence upon the leucine zipper suggests a novel mode for both protein-DNA interaction and functional cooperativity.

  17. Aleurotrachelus trachoides (pepper whitefly)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aleurotrachelus trachoides Back also known as solanum or pepper whitefly is a new addition to the list of serious whitefly pests found in Florida. According to EPPO global database, it is a pest of over 70 different crops worldwide, which include a combination of edibles, ornamentals, palms, and wee...

  18. Pepper harvest technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) include a diverse collection of cultivars produced for a wide variety of end uses. This specialty crop and its processing industry are in the midst of a dual transition driven by labor cost and unavailability. Production and post-harvest processing is either converting to m...

  19. PEPPER HARVESTER DEVELOPMENT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) include a diverse collection of cultivars produced for a wide variety of end uses. This specialty crop and its processing industry are in the midst of a transition driven by labor cost and unavailability. Production and post-harvest processing is either converting to mechan...

  20. Characterization of pollen-expressed bZIP protein interactions and the role of ATbZIP18 in the male gametophyte.

    PubMed

    Gibalová, Antónia; Steinbachová, Lenka; Hafidh, Said; Bláhová, Veronika; Gadiou, Zuzana; Michailidis, Christos; Műller, Karel; Pleskot, Roman; Dupľáková, Nikoleta; Honys, David

    2017-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : bZIP TF network in pollen. Transcriptional control of gene expression represents an important mechanism guiding organisms through developmental processes and providing plasticity towards environmental stimuli. Because of their sessile nature, plants require effective gene regulation for rapid response to variation in environmental and developmental conditions. Transcription factors (TFs) provide such control ensuring correct gene expression in spatial and temporal manner. Our work reports the interaction network of six bZIP TFs expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen and highlights the potential functional role for AtbZIP18 in pollen. AtbZIP18 was shown to interact with three other pollen-expressed bZIP TFs-AtbZIP34, AtbZIP52, and AtbZIP61 in yeast two-hybrid assays. AtbZIP18 transcripts are highly expressed in pollen, and at the subcellular level, an AtbZIP18-GFP fusion protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm/ER. To address the role of AtbZIP18 in the male gametophyte, we performed phenotypic analysis of a T-DNA knockout allele, which showed slightly reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. Some of the phenotype defects in atbzip18 pollen, although observed at low penetrance, were similar to those seen at higher frequency in the T-DNA knockout of the interacting partner, AtbZIP34. To gain deeper insight into the regulatory role of AtbZIP18, we analysed atbzip18/- pollen microarray data. Our results point towards a potential repressive role for AtbZIP18 and its functional redundancy with AtbZIP34 in pollen.

  1. The IRE1/bZIP60 Pathway and Bax Inhibitor 1 Suppress Systemic Accumulation of Potyviruses and Potexviruses in Arabidopsis and Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Gaguancela, Omar Arias; Zúñiga, Lizbeth Peña; Arias, Alexis Vela; Halterman, Dennis; Flores, Francisco Javier; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth; Wang, Aiming; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2016-10-01

    The inositol requiring enzyme (IRE1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor. When activated, it splices the bZIP60 mRNA, producing a truncated transcription factor that upregulates genes involved in the unfolded protein response. Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1) is another ER stress sensor that regulates cell death in response to environmental assaults. The potyvirus 6K2 and potexvirus TGB3 proteins are known to reside in the ER, serving, respectively, as anchors for the viral replicase and movement protein complex. This study used green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV), Potato virus Y (PVY), and Potato virus X (PVX) to determine that the IRE1/bZIP60 pathway and BI-1 machinery are induced early in virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, and Solanum tuberosum. Agrodelivery of only the potyvirus 6K2 or TGB3 genes into plant cells activated bZIP60 and BI-1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, N. benthamiana, and S. tuberosum. Homozygous ire1a-2, ire1b-4, and ire1a-2/ire1b-4 mutant Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with TuMV-GFP or PlAMV-GFP. PlAMV accumulates to a higher level in ire1a-2 or ire1a-2/ire1b-4 mutant plants than in ire1b-4 or wild-type plants. TuMV-GFP accumulates to a higher level in ire1a-2, ire1b-4, or ire1a-2/ire1b-4 compared with wild-type plants, suggesting that both isoforms contribute to TuMV-GFP infection. Gene silencing was used to knock down bZIP60 and BI-1 expression in N. benthamiana. PVX-GFP and PVY-GFP accumulation was significantly elevated in these silenced plants compared with control plants. This study demonstrates that two ER stress pathways, namely IRE1/bZIP60 and the BI-1 pathway, limit systemic accumulation of potyvirus and potexvirus infection. Silencing BI-1 expression also resulted in systemic necrosis. These data suggest that ER stress-activated pathways, led by IRE1 and BI-1, respond to invading potyvirus and potexviruses to restrict virus

  2. An arginine to lysine substitution in the bZIP domain of an opaque-2 mutant in maize abolishes specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J; Burr, B; Burr, F A

    1991-02-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) locus in maize encodes a transcription factor involved in the regulation of zein storage proteins. We have shown previously that the O2 protein contains a leucine zipper domain that binds to promoters of 22-kD zein genes. In this paper we characterize an EMS-induced o2 allele, o2-676, that causes a 50% reduction in zein. We have found that the o2-676 mutant protein does not show specific recognition of zein promoter fragments because of the substitution of a lysine residue for an arginine residue within the bZIP domain of o2-676. This particular arginine is conserved within the bZIP domains of all mammalian, fungal, and plant DNA binding proteins of this class. The correlation between this mutation in o2 and the altered pattern of zein expression strongly suggests that O2 regulates transcription of certain members of the zein multigene family through direct interaction with the zein promoters and not through the transcriptional activation of some other regulator of zein gene expression.

  3. Direct interactions of ABA-insensitive(ABI)-clade protein phosphatase(PP)2Cs with calcium-dependent protein kinases and ABA response element-binding bZIPs may contribute to turning off ABA response.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Tim; Erickson, B Joy; Finkelstein, Ruth R

    2012-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) signaling via the pyrabactin-resistant and related (PYR/PYL/RCAR) receptors begins with ABA-dependent inactivation of the ABA-insensitive(ABI)-clade protein phosphatases(PP)2Cs, thereby permitting phosphorylation and activation of the Snf1-related (SnRK)2 clade of protein kinases, and activation of their downstream targets such as ABA-response element binding basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (ABF/AREB/ABI5 clade). Several of these are also activated by calcium-dependent protein kinases such as CPK11. Turning off ABA response requires turnover and/or inactivation of these transcription factors, which could result from their dephosphorylation. To address the hypothesis that the ABI-clade PP2Cs regulate the bZIPs directly, in addition to their indirect effects via SnRKs, we have assayed interactions between multiple members of the ABF/AREB clade and the PP2Cs by yeast two-hybrid, in vitro phosphatase, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. In addition, we have expanded the list of documented specific interactions among these bZIP proteins and the kinases that could activate them and found that some PP2Cs can also interact directly with CPK11. These studies support specific interactions among kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors that are co-expressed in early seedling development.

  4. Determinants of half-site spacing preferences that distinguish AP-1 and ATF/CREB bZIP domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Struhl, K

    1995-01-01

    The AP-1 and ATF/CREB families of eukaryotic transcription factors are dimeric DNA-binding proteins that contain the bZIP structural motif. The AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins are structurally related and recognize identical half-sites (TGAC), but they differ in their requirements for half-site spacing. AP-1 proteins such as yeast GCN4 preferentially bind to sequences with overlapping half-sites, whereas ATF/CREB proteins bind exclusively to sequences with adjacent half-sites. Here we investigate the distinctions between AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins by determining the DNA-binding properties of mutant and hybrid proteins. First, analysis of GCN4-ATF1 hybrid proteins indicates that a short surface spanning the basic and fork regions of the bZIP domain is the major determinant of half-site spacing. Replacement of two GCN4 residues on this surface (Ala244 and Leu247) by their ATF1 counterparts largely converts GCN4 into a protein with ATF/CREB specificity. Secondly, analysis of a Fos derivative containing the GCN4 leucine zipper indicates that Fos represents a novel intermediate between AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins. Thirdly, we examine the effects of mutations in the invariant arginine residue of GCN4 (Arg243) that contacts the central base pair(s) of the target sites. While most mutations abolish DNA binding, substitution of a histidine residue results in a GCN4 derivative with ATF/CREB binding specificity. These results suggest that the AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins differ in positioning a short surface that includes the invariant arginine and that AP-1 proteins may represent a subclass (and perhaps evolutionary offshoot) of ATF/CREB proteins that can tolerate overlapping half-sites. Images PMID:7630732

  5. Identification of the cis-element and bZIP DNA binding motifs for the autogenous negative control of mouse NOSTRIN.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong-Ho; Choi, Young-Joon; Kim, Kyung-hyun; Park, Sung-Soo

    2014-01-17

    mNOSTRIN is the mouse ortholog of hNOSTRIN. Unlike hNOSTRIN, which is alternatively spliced to produce two isoforms (α and β), only a single isoform of mNOSTRIN has been detected in either the nucleus or cytoplasm/membrane. Because mNOSTRIN represses its own transcription through direct binding onto its own promoter, this protein is constantly expressed in a temporally regulated pattern during differentiation of F9 embryonic carcinoma cells. In this study, we identified the specific cis-element in the mNOSTRIN regulatory region that is responsible for negative autogenous control. This element exhibits inverted dyad symmetry. Furthermore, we identified a putative bZIP motif in the middle region of mNOSTRIN, which is responsible for DNA binding, and showed that disruption of the leucine zippers abolished the DNA-binding activity of mNOSTRIN. Here, we report that a single form of mNOSTRIN functions in both the nucleus and cytoplasm/membrane. In the nucleus, mNOSTRIN acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to the cis-element through its bZIP motif. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genomic identification of bZIP family genes involved in drought and heat stresses in strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) genes are known to play dominant roles in plant response to development signals, as well as abiotic or biotic stress stimuli. Fifty bZIP genes across the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome were identified and analyzed. They can be divided into 10 clades according...

  7. Characterization of Citrus sinensis transcription factors closely associated with the non-host response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Daurelio, Lucas D; Romero, María S; Petrocelli, Silvana; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Orellano, Elena G

    2013-07-01

    Plants, when exposed to certain pathogens, may display a form of genotype-independent resistance, known as non-host response. In this study, the response of Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) leaves to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), a pepper and tomato pathogenic bacterium, was analyzed through biochemical assays and cDNA microarray hybridization and compared with Asiatic citrus canker infection caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Citrus leaves exposed to the non-host bacterium Xcv showed hypersensitive response (HR) symptoms (cell death), a defense mechanism common in plants but poorly understood in citrus. The HR response was accompanied by differentially expressed genes that are associated with biotic stress and cell death. Moreover, 58 transcription factors (TFs) were differentially regulated by Xcv in citrus leaves, including 26 TFs from the stress-associated families AP2-EREBP, bZip, Myb and WRKY. Remarkably, in silico analysis of the distribution of expressed sequence tags revealed that 10 of the 58 TFs, belonging to C2C2-GATA, C2H2, CCAAT, HSF, NAC and WRKY gene families, were specifically over-represented in citrus stress cDNA libraries. This study identified candidate TF genes for the regulation of key steps during the citrus non-host HR. Furthermore, these TFs might be useful in future strategies of molecular breeding for citrus disease resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  9. A new selection method for pepper transformation: callus-mediated shoot formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Kim, H S; Kim, J Y; Jung, M; Park, Y S; Lee, J S; Choi, S H; Her, N H; Lee, J H; Hyung, N I; Lee, C H; Yang, S G; Harn, C H

    2004-08-01

    We used two genes, TMV-CP and PPI1 (pepper-PMMV interaction 1 transcription factor), to transform commercially important chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) inbred lines (P915, P409) by means of Agrobacterium co-culture. Eighteen independently transformed T0 plants were obtained. The most critical point in the pepper transformation protocol was the selection of shoots growing on calli--referred to as callus-mediated shoot formation (indirect shooting)--because shoots not grown from the callus (direct shooting from the wounded surface) developed into non-transformants. Selection of the correct right callus type also proved to be an important requirement for obtaining transformed peppers. Six different types of callus developed during the selection process. Shoots regenerated from two of these types, while one type regenerated significantly more shoots than the other types, suggesting that the capacity for shoot formation is callus type-specific. Although the transformation rate was low, transformation via callus-mediated shoot formation proved to be reproducible and was confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analyses. Based on the experimental data, we have succeeded in developing a new protocol for the selection and transformation of pepper and expect that it will be used in the future for pepper transformation.

  10. Severe pepper allergy in a young child.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Leslie; Zacharisen, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Spices are ingredients to confer improved taste to foods. As they are derived from plants, they have the potential for inducing allergic reactions. There is a lack of studies to accurately determine the rate of pepper allergy in children. Allergic reactions to pepper in children are rare. This case illustrates such a reaction. Patient is a 17-month-old boy with mild eczema who developed urticaria, conjunctivitis, facial swelling, and severe cough immediately after ingesting venison prepared in a Southwest/mesquite marinade containing a variety of spices including black and cayenne pepper. His food was not routinely peppered. A similar but less severe reaction with facial urticaria and conjunctivitis occurred after eating roast beef in the same marinade while reintroduction of venison without marinade did not result in recurrence of symptoms. Skin tests to cayenne and black pepper extracts were positive. Skin testing to crude extracts of the food marinades was negative as well as commercial extracts of onion, garlic, paprika, thyme, and tomato. IgE radioallergosorbent results showed undetectable levels to black pepper, chili pepper, lemon, tomato, garlic, onion, green pepper, and white pepper. Specific IgE to cayenne pepper was detected at 0.11 kU/L.

  11. CaGLK2 regulates natural variation of chlorophyll content and fruit color in pepper fruit.

    PubMed

    Brand, Arnon; Borovsky, Yelena; Hill, Theresa; Rahman, Khalis Afnan Abdul; Bellalou, Aharon; Van Deynze, Allen; Paran, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    We provide multiple evidences that CaGLK2 underlies a quantitative trait locus controlling natural variation in chlorophyll content and immature fruit color of pepper via modulating chloroplast compartment size. Pepper fruit quality is attributed to a variety of traits, affecting visual appearance, flavor, chemical composition and nutritional value. Among the quality traits, fruit color is of primary importance because the pigments that confer color are associated with nutrition, health and flavor. Although gene models have been proposed for qualitative aspects of fruit color, large natural variation in quantitative pigment content and fruit color exists in pepper. However, its genetic basis is largely unknown which hampers its utilization for plant improvement. We studied the role of GLK2, a GOLDEN2-like transcription factor that regulates chloroplast development in controlling natural variation for chlorophyll content and immature fruit color of pepper. The role of GLK2 in regulating fruit development has been studied previously in tomato using ectopic expression and the uniform ripening mutant analyses. However, pepper provides a unique opportunity to further study the function of this gene because of the wide natural variation of fruit colors in this species. Segregation, sequencing and expression analyses indicated that pepper GLK2 (CaGLK2) corresponds to the recently reported pc10 QTL that controls chloroplast development and chlorophyll content in pepper. CaGLK2 exerts its effect on chloroplast compartment size predominantly during immature fruit development. We show that the genetic background, sequence variation and expression pattern confer a complex and multi-level regulation of CaGLK2 and fruit color in Capsicum. The positive effect on fruit quality predominantly at the green stage conferred by CaGLK2 can be utilized to breed green pepper varieties with improved nutritional values and taste.

  12. The role of a basic amino acid cluster in target site selection and non-specific binding of bZIP peptides to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, S J; Paolella, D N; Schepartz, A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of a transcription factor to locate and bind its cognate DNA site in the presence of closely related sites and a vast array of non-specific DNA is crucial for cell survival. The CREB/ATF family of transcription factors is an important group of basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins that display high affinity for the CRE site and low affinity for the closely related AP-1 site. Members of the CREB/ATF family share in common a cluster of basic amino acids at the N-terminus of their bZIP element. This basic cluster is necessary and sufficient to cause the CRE site to bend upon binding of a CREB/ATF protein. The possibility that DNA bending and CRE/AP-1 specificity were linked in CREB/ATF proteins was investigated using chimeric peptides derived from human CRE-BP1 (a member of the CREB/ATF family) and yeast GCN4, which lacks both a basic cluster and CRE/AP-1 specificity. Gain of function and loss of function experiments demonstrated that the basic cluster was not responsible for the CRE/AP-1 specificity displayed by all characterized CREB/ATF proteins. The basic cluster was, however, responsible for inducing very high affinity for non- specific DNA. It was further shown that basic cluster-containing peptides bind non-specific DNA in a random coil conformation. We postulate that the high non- specific DNA affinities of basic cluster-containing peptides result from cooperative electrostatic interactions with the phosphate backbone that do not require peptide organization. PMID:9224594

  13. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  14. BACH transcription factors in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Roychoudhuri, Rahul

    2017-07-01

    BTB and CNC homology (BACH) proteins are transcriptional repressors of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family. Recent studies indicate widespread roles of BACH proteins in controlling the development and function of the innate and adaptive immune systems, including the differentiation of effector and memory cells of the B and T cell lineages, CD4(+) regulatory T cells and macrophages. Here, we emphasize similarities at a molecular level in the cell-type-specific activities of BACH factors, proposing that competitive interactions of BACH proteins with transcriptional activators of the bZIP family form a common mechanistic theme underlying their diverse actions. The findings contribute to a general understanding of how transcriptional repressors shape lineage commitment and cell-type-specific functions through repression of alternative lineage programmes.

  15. Transcription factor interaction with COMPASS-like complex regulates histone H3K4 trimethylation for specific gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ze-Ting; Sun, Le; Lu, Sun-Jie; Tian, Yongke; Ding, Yong; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which activates a set of ER membrane-associated transcription factors for protein homeostasis regulation. Previous genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows a strong correlation between histone H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and active gene expression. However, how the histone modification complex is specifically and timely recruited to the active promoters remains unknown. Using ER stress responsive gene expression as a model system, we demonstrate that sequence-specific transcription factors interact with COMPASS-like components and affect H3K4me3 formation at specific target sites in Arabidopsis. Gene profiling analysis reveals that membrane-associated basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors bZIP28 and bZIP60 regulate most of the ER stress responsive genes. Loss-of-functions of bZIP28 and bZIP60 impair the occupancy of H3K4me3 on promoter regions of ER stress responsive genes. Further, in vitro pull-down assays and in vivo bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments show that bZIP28 and bZIP60 interact with Ash2 and WDR5a, both of which are core COMPASS-like components. Knockdown expression of either Ash2 or WDR5a decreased the expression of several ER stress responsive genes. The COMPASS-like complex is known to interact with histone methyltransferase to facilitate preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly and generate H3K4me3 during transcription elongation. Thus, our data shows that the ER stress stimulus causes the formation of PIC and deposition of H3K4me3 mark at specific promoters through the interaction between transcription factor and COMPASS-like components. PMID:25730865

  16. Transcription factor interaction with COMPASS-like complex regulates histone H3K4 trimethylation for specific gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Song, Ze-Ting; Sun, Le; Lu, Sun-Jie; Tian, Yongke; Ding, Yong; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-03-03

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which activates a set of ER membrane-associated transcription factors for protein homeostasis regulation. Previous genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows a strong correlation between histone H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and active gene expression. However, how the histone modification complex is specifically and timely recruited to the active promoters remains unknown. Using ER stress responsive gene expression as a model system, we demonstrate that sequence-specific transcription factors interact with COMPASS-like components and affect H3K4me3 formation at specific target sites in Arabidopsis. Gene profiling analysis reveals that membrane-associated basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors bZIP28 and bZIP60 regulate most of the ER stress responsive genes. Loss-of-functions of bZIP28 and bZIP60 impair the occupancy of H3K4me3 on promoter regions of ER stress responsive genes. Further, in vitro pull-down assays and in vivo bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments show that bZIP28 and bZIP60 interact with Ash2 and WDR5a, both of which are core COMPASS-like components. Knockdown expression of either Ash2 or WDR5a decreased the expression of several ER stress responsive genes. The COMPASS-like complex is known to interact with histone methyltransferase to facilitate preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly and generate H3K4me3 during transcription elongation. Thus, our data shows that the ER stress stimulus causes the formation of PIC and deposition of H3K4me3 mark at specific promoters through the interaction between transcription factor and COMPASS-like components.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification of bZIP Family Genes Involved in Drought and Heat Stresses in Strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Chen, Xinlu; Yang, Tian-Bao; Cheng, Qunkang; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) genes are known to play a crucial role in response to various processes in plant as well as abiotic or biotic stress challenges. We have performed an identification and characterization of 50 bZIP genes across the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome, which were divided into 10 clades according to the phylogenetic relationship of the strawberry bZIP proteins with those in Arabidopsis and rice. Five categories of intron patterns were observed within basic and hinge regions of the bZIP domains. Some additional conserved motifs have been found with the group specificity. Further, we predicted DNA-binding specificity of the basic and hinge regions as well as dimerization properties of leucine zipper regions, which was consistent with our phylogenetic clade and classified into 20 subfamilies. Across the different developmental stages of 15 organs and two types of fruits, the clade A bZIP members showed different tissue-specific expression patterns and the duplicated genes were differentially regulated, indicating a functional diversification coupled with the expansion of this gene family in strawberry. Under normal growth conditions, mrna11837 and mrna30280 of clade A showed very weak expression levels in organs and fruits, respectively; but higher expression was observed with different set of genes following drought and heat treatment, which may be caused by the separate response pathway between drought and heat treatments.

  20. An active Mitochondrial Complex II Present in Mature Seeds Contains an Embryo-Specific Iron-Sulfur Subunit Regulated by ABA and bZIP53 and Is Involved in Germination and Seedling Establishment.

    PubMed

    Restovic, Franko; Espinoza-Corral, Roberto; Gómez, Isabel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Jordana, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) is an essential mitochondrial enzyme involved in both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory chain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, its iron-sulfur subunit (SDH2) is encoded by three genes, one of them (SDH2.3) being specifically expressed during seed maturation in the embryo. Here we show that seed SDH2.3 expression is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and we define the promoter region (-114 to +49) possessing all the cis-elements necessary and sufficient for high expression in seeds. This region includes between -114 and -32 three ABRE (ABA-responsive) elements and one RY-enhancer like element, and we demonstrate that these elements, although necessary, are not sufficient for seed expression, our results supporting a role for the region encoding the 5' untranslated region (+1 to +49). The SDH2.3 promoter is activated in leaf protoplasts by heterodimers between the basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP53 (group S1) and bZIP10 (group C) acting through the ABRE elements, and by the B3 domain transcription factor ABA insensitive 3 (ABI3). The in vivo role of bZIP53 is further supported by decreased SDH2.3 expression in a knockdown bzip53 mutant. By using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and sdh2 mutants we have been able to conclusively show that complex II is already present in mature embryos before imbibition, and contains mainly SDH2.3 as iron-sulfur subunit. This complex plays a role during seed germination sensu-stricto since we have previously shown that seeds lacking SDH2.3 show retarded germination and now we demonstrate that low concentrations of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a complex II inhibitor, also delay germination. Furthermore, complex II inhibitors completely block hypocotyl elongation in the dark and seedling establishment in the light, highlighting an essential role of complex II in the acquisition of photosynthetic competence and the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy.

  1. An active Mitochondrial Complex II Present in Mature Seeds Contains an Embryo-Specific Iron–Sulfur Subunit Regulated by ABA and bZIP53 and Is Involved in Germination and Seedling Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Restovic, Franko; Espinoza-Corral, Roberto; Gómez, Isabel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Jordana, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) is an essential mitochondrial enzyme involved in both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory chain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, its iron–sulfur subunit (SDH2) is encoded by three genes, one of them (SDH2.3) being specifically expressed during seed maturation in the embryo. Here we show that seed SDH2.3 expression is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and we define the promoter region (-114 to +49) possessing all the cis-elements necessary and sufficient for high expression in seeds. This region includes between -114 and -32 three ABRE (ABA-responsive) elements and one RY-enhancer like element, and we demonstrate that these elements, although necessary, are not sufficient for seed expression, our results supporting a role for the region encoding the 5’ untranslated region (+1 to +49). The SDH2.3 promoter is activated in leaf protoplasts by heterodimers between the basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP53 (group S1) and bZIP10 (group C) acting through the ABRE elements, and by the B3 domain transcription factor ABA insensitive 3 (ABI3). The in vivo role of bZIP53 is further supported by decreased SDH2.3 expression in a knockdown bzip53 mutant. By using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and sdh2 mutants we have been able to conclusively show that complex II is already present in mature embryos before imbibition, and contains mainly SDH2.3 as iron–sulfur subunit. This complex plays a role during seed germination sensu-stricto since we have previously shown that seeds lacking SDH2.3 show retarded germination and now we demonstrate that low concentrations of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a complex II inhibitor, also delay germination. Furthermore, complex II inhibitors completely block hypocotyl elongation in the dark and seedling establishment in the light, highlighting an essential role of complex II in the acquisition of photosynthetic competence and the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy. PMID

  2. Visualizing Capsaicinoids: Colorimetric Analysis of Chili Peppers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert Q.; Chu, Christopher; Gent, Robin; Gould, Alexandra P.; Rios, Laura; Vertigan, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    A colorimetric method for total capsaicinoids in chili pepper ("Capsicum") fruit is described. The placental material of the pepper, containing 90% of the capsaicinoids, was physically separated from the colored materials in the pericarp and extracted twice with methanol, capturing 85% of the remaining capsaicinoids. The extract, evaporated and…

  3. Demonstrating Integrated Pest Management of Hot Peppers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  4. DEMONSTRATING INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF HOT PEPPERS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  5. Visualizing Capsaicinoids: Colorimetric Analysis of Chili Peppers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert Q.; Chu, Christopher; Gent, Robin; Gould, Alexandra P.; Rios, Laura; Vertigan, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    A colorimetric method for total capsaicinoids in chili pepper ("Capsicum") fruit is described. The placental material of the pepper, containing 90% of the capsaicinoids, was physically separated from the colored materials in the pericarp and extracted twice with methanol, capturing 85% of the remaining capsaicinoids. The extract, evaporated and…

  6. Capsicum Annuum L. Lil' Pumpkin and Pepper Jack

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA, ARS announces the release of two new pepper cultivars 05C37-3 (trademarked as Lil’ Pumpkin) and 05C69-12 (trademarked as Pepper Jack). Lil’ Pumpkin and Pepper Jack are intended for ornamental applications. Lil’ Pumpkin’s unique black foliage and orange pumpkin-like fruit and Pepper Jack’s ...

  7. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor RNA and Protein Impart Distinct Functions on T-cell Proliferation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Furuta, Rie; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Infection of T cells with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces clonal proliferation and is closely associated with the onset of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and inflammatory diseases. Although Tax expression is frequently suppressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, the accessory gene, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), is continuously expressed and has been implicated in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Here, we report that transduction of mouse T cells with specific mutants of HBZ that distinguish between its RNA and protein activity results in differential effects on T-cell proliferation and survival. HBZ RNA increased cell number by attenuating apoptosis, whereas HBZ protein induced apoptosis. However, both HBZ RNA and protein promoted S-phase entry of T cells. We further identified that the first 50 bp of the HBZ coding sequence are required for RNA-mediated cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of T cells expressing wild-type HBZ, RNA, or protein revealed that HBZ RNA is associated with genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and survival, while HBZ protein is more closely related to immunological properties of T cells. Specifically, HBZ RNA enhances the promoter activity of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, to upregulate its expression. Inhibition of survivin using YM155 resulted in impaired proliferation of several ATL cell lines as well as a T-cell line expressing HBZ RNA. The distinct functions of HBZ RNA and protein may have several implications for the development of strategies to control the proliferation and survival mechanisms associated with HTLV-1 infection and ATL.

  8. [HTLV-1 bZIP Factor (HBZ): Roles in HTLV-1 Oncogenesis].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wencai; Cheng, Wenzhao; Chen, Mengyun; Xu, Lingling; Zhao, Tiejun

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus demonstrated to be associated with human disease. Infection by the HTLV-1 can cause T-cell leukemia (ATL) in adults. HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is a viral protein encoded by the minus strand of the HTLV-1 provirus. Among the regulatory and accessory genes of HTLV-1, HBZ is the only gene that remains intact and which is expressed consistently in all patients with ATL. Moreover, HBZ has a critical role in the leukemogenesis of ATL. Here, we review the function of HBZ in the oncogenesis of HTLV-1 and its molecular mechanism of action.

  9. Ornithine decarboxylase gene (CaODC1) is specifically induced during TMV-mediated but salicylate-independent resistant response in hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae Hyoung; Park, Chang-Jin; Ham, Byung-Kook; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-10-01

    A gene encoding putative ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) has been isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from the resistant hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) inoculated with avirulent tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) pathotype P0. In hot pepper plants, transcripts of the CaODC1 (C. annuum ODC1) gene started to accumulate at 24 h post-inoculation of TMV-P0 and the signal was spread systemically. The transcript level of CaODC1 was increased rapidly in a hot pepper resistant to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) but not in a susceptible hot pepper after inoculation. These results suggest possible role(s) for CaODC1 in plant defense against a broad range of pathogens including viruses and bacteria.

  10. In silico identification of Bell pepper endornavirus from pepper transcriptomes and their phylogenetic and recombination analyses.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Cho, Won Kyong

    2016-01-10

    Here, we identified eight Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolates from nine different pepper transcriptomes. BPEV was present with low copy numbers ranging from 0.01% to 0.18% in the host transcriptome. Phylogenetic identified two different groups of BPEV isolates. Sequence alignment of the five BPEV genomes revealed conservation of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Recombination analysis identified two possible recombinant events in the isolate Yolo Wonder. Single nucleotide variation profiles revealed the presence of BPEV variants within a single pepper cultivar. Taken together, this study provides phylogenetic and recombination analyses of the genus Endornavirus using pepper transcriptome data.

  11. Effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on the microbial community during nukadoko fermentation

    PubMed Central

    ONO, Hiroshi; NISHIO, Shoko; TSURII, Jun; KAWAMOTO, Tetsuhiro; SONOMOTO, Kenji; NAKAYAMA, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Nukadoko is a fermented rice bran bed traditionally used for pickling vegetables in Japan. To date, the production of both homemade and commercial nukadoko has depended on natural fermentation without using starter cultures. Spices, Japanese pepper, and red pepper, are added to nukadoko empirically, but the functions of spices in nukadoko have not been fully elucidated. To investigate the effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on nukadoko fermentation, we compared the chemical and microbiological changes during 2 months of fermentation of a laboratory model nukadoko with or without spices. The successive pH values and colony counts in the first 10 days showed that the spices promoted lactic acid bacteria (LAB) growth and fermentation in the nukadoko niche. The successive bacterial communities during natural fermentation of nukadoko were carefully monitored by pyrotag 16S rRNA analysis, and the effect of spices on the development and maintenance of the nukadoko microbiota was investigated. It was shown that addition of Japanese peppers and red peppers shortened the pre-lactic acid fermentation phase, during which Staphylococcus saprophyticus grew dominantly, and promoted the development of a microbiota that LAB dominated. Notably, the growth of the dominant LAB, Pediococcus pentosaceus, was improved by adding either Japanese pepper or red pepper. The differences in the LAB species, which were associated with the differences in chemical composition of the nukadoko, were dependent on the type of pepper used. We conclude that the spices used can affect the bacterial community and modulate its metabolic profile in nukadoko. PMID:25625032

  12. Transcriptome analysis of symptomatic and recovered leaves of geminivirus-infected pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are a large and important family of plant viruses that infect a wide range of crops throughout the world. The Begomovirus genus contains species that are transmitted by whiteflies and are distributed worldwide causing disease on an array of horticultural crops. Symptom remission, in which newly developed leaves of systemically infected plants exhibit a reduction in symptom severity (recovery), has been observed on pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants infected with Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV). Previous studies have shown that transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms are involved in the reduction of viral nucleic acid concentration in recovered tissue. In this study, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods to assess transcriptional variation in healthy (mock), symptomatic, and recovered pepper leaves following PepGMV infection. Results Differential expression analyses of the pepper leaf transcriptome from symptomatic and recovered stages revealed a total of 309 differentially expressed genes between healthy (mock) and symptomatic or recovered tissues. Computational prediction of differential expression was validated using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR confirming the robustness of our bioinformatic methods. Within the set of differentially expressed genes associated with the recovery process were genes involved in defense responses including pathogenesis-related proteins, reactive oxygen species, systemic acquired resistance, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and ethylene signaling. No major differences were found when compared the differentially expressed genes in symptomatic and recovered tissues. On the other hand, a set of genes with novel roles in defense responses was identified including genes involved in histone modification. This latter result suggested that post-transcriptional and transcriptional gene silencing may be one of the major mechanisms involved in the recovery process. Genes

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the SBP-Box Family Genes under Phytophthora capsici Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huai-Xia; Jin, Jing-Hao; He, Yu-Mei; Lu, Bo-Ya; Li, Da-Wei; Chai, Wei-Guo; Khan, Abid; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that are extensively involved in many physiological and biochemical processes, including growth, development, and signal transduction. However, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SBP-box family genes have not been well characterized. We investigated SBP-box family genes in the pepper genome and characterized these genes across both compatible and incompatible strain of Phytophthora capsici, and also under different hormone treatments. The results indicated that total 15 members were identified and distributed on seven chromosomes of pepper. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SBP-box genes of pepper can be classified into six groups. In addition, duplication analysis within pepper genome, as well as between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes demonstrated that there are four pairs of homology of SBP-box genes in the pepper genome and 10 pairs between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the CaSBP genes demonstrated their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. The expression profiles were similarly analyzed following exposure to P. capsici inoculation and hormone treatments. It was shown that nine of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) exhibited a dramatic up-regulation after compatible HX-9 strain (P. capsici) inoculation, while CaSBP09 and CaSBP15 were down-regulated. In case of PC strain (P. capsici) infection six of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP02, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) were arose while CaSBP14 was down regulated. Furthermore, Salicylic acid, Methyl jasmonate and their biosynthesis inhibitors treatment indicated that some of the CaSBP genes are potentially involved in these hormone regulation pathways. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles of the pepper CaSBP genes, will help to improve pepper stress tolerance in the future. PMID:27148327

  14. Quality Characteristics of Stirred Yoghurt Added with Fermented Red Pepper.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mi-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Mee; Lee, Chi-Ho; Son, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Pungency of hot pepper has limited its usage even though it shows various health beneficial effects. This study was conducted to develop the novel yoghurt containing hot pepper with diminishing pungency and aimed to examine the quality characteristics of yoghurt prepared with fermented red pepper. Hot pepper was first fermented with Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 to reduce the pungency of capsaicin. We then examined the quality, sensory characteristics, and antioxidant activity of yoghurt containing the fermented red pepper. The titratable acidity of this yoghurt increased whereas the viscosity decreased with increasing amounts of added red pepper. The total polyphenol content increased in proportion to the amount of added red pepper. The antioxidant activity significantly increased with the addition of red pepper (p<0.05). Color evaluation showed that the L value decreased whereas the a and b values increased significantly with the amount of red pepper added (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, yoghurt prepared with higher amounts of fermented red pepper received lower scores. However, yoghurt containing fermented red pepper at a concentration of 0.05% received higher scores for taste, flavor, and overall acceptability than yoghurt prepared with non-fermented pepper. Therefore, it can be concluded that the application of red pepper fermented by Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 gives beneficial feature to the preparation of yoghurt.

  15. Quality Characteristics of Stirred Yoghurt Added with Fermented Red Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Mee; Lee, Chi-Ho; Son, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Pungency of hot pepper has limited its usage even though it shows various health beneficial effects. This study was conducted to develop the novel yoghurt containing hot pepper with diminishing pungency and aimed to examine the quality characteristics of yoghurt prepared with fermented red pepper. Hot pepper was first fermented with Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 to reduce the pungency of capsaicin. We then examined the quality, sensory characteristics, and antioxidant activity of yoghurt containing the fermented red pepper. The titratable acidity of this yoghurt increased whereas the viscosity decreased with increasing amounts of added red pepper. The total polyphenol content increased in proportion to the amount of added red pepper. The antioxidant activity significantly increased with the addition of red pepper (p<0.05). Color evaluation showed that the L value decreased whereas the a and b values increased significantly with the amount of red pepper added (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, yoghurt prepared with higher amounts of fermented red pepper received lower scores. However, yoghurt containing fermented red pepper at a concentration of 0.05% received higher scores for taste, flavor, and overall acceptability than yoghurt prepared with non-fermented pepper. Therefore, it can be concluded that the application of red pepper fermented by Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 gives beneficial feature to the preparation of yoghurt. PMID:26761278

  16. Induction of pepper cDNA encoding a lipid transfer protein during the resistance response to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; Lee, Gil-Je; You, Jin-Sam; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-02-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibit hypersensitive response (HR) against infection by many tobamoviruses. A clone encoding a putative nonspecific lipid transfer protein (CaLTP1) was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from resistant pepper leaves when inoculated with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) pathotype P0. The predicted amino acid sequence of CaLTP1 is highly similar to that of the other plant LTPs. Southern blot analysis showed that a small gene family of LTP-related sequences was present in the pepper genome. Transcripts homologous to CaLTP1 accumulated abundantly in old leaves and flowers. CaLTP1 expression was induced in the incompatible interaction with TMV-P0 but was not induced in the compatible interaction with TMV-P1.2. In correlation with the temporal progression of HR in the inoculated leaves, CaLTP1 transcripts started to accumulate at 24 h after TMV-P0 inoculation, reaching a maximal level at 48 h. A strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) that carries the bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2, was infiltrated into leaves of a pepper cultivar containing the Bs2 resistance gene. A marked induction of CaLTP1 expression was observed in Xcv-infiltrated leaves. Effects of exogenously applied abiotic elicitors on CaLTP1 expression were also examined. Salicylic acid caused a rapid accumulation of CaLTP1 transcripts in pepper leaves and ethephon treatment also induced the expression of the CaLTP1 gene. Transient expression in the detached pepper leaves by biolistic gene bombardment indicated that CaLTP1 is localized mostly at the plant cell surface, possibly in the cell wall. These results suggest possible role(s) for LTPs in plant defense against pathogens including viruses.

  17. Application of complex demodulation on bZIP and bHLH-PAS protein domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Smith, Charles E; Atchley, William R

    2007-06-01

    Proteins are built with molecular modular building blocks such as an alpha-helix, beta-sheet, loop region and other structures. This is an economical way of constructing complex molecules. Periodicity analysis of protein sequences has allowed us to obtain meaningful information concerning their structure, function and evolution. In this work, complex demodulation (CDM) is introduced to detect functional regions in protein sequences data. More specifically, we analyzed bZIP and bHLH-PAS protein domains. Complex demodulation provided insightful information about changing amplitudes of periodic components in protein sequences. Furthermore, it was found that the local amplitude minimum or local amplitude maximum of the 3.6-aa periodic component is associated with protein structural or functional information due to the observation that the extrema are mainly located in the boundary area of two structural or functional regions.

  18. The UPR Branch IRE1-bZIP60 in Plants Plays an Essential Role in Viral Infection and Is Complementary to the Only UPR Pathway in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingrui; Chen, Hui; Brandizzi, Federica; Verchot, Jeanmarie; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling network encompasses two pathways in plants, one mediated by inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1)-bZIP60 mRNA and the other by site-1/site-2 proteases (S1P/S2P)-bZIP17/bZIP28. As the major sensor of UPR in eukaryotes, IRE1, in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, catalyzes the unconventional splicing of HAC1 in yeast, bZIP60 in plants and XBP1 in metazoans. Recent studies suggest that IRE1p and HAC1 mRNA, the only UPR pathway found in yeast, evolves as a cognate system responsible for the robust UPR induction. However, the functional connectivity of IRE1 and its splicing target in multicellular eukaryotes as well as the degree of conservation of IRE1 downstream signaling effectors across eukaryotes remains to be established. Here, we report that IRE1 and its substrate bZIP60 function as a strictly cognate enzyme-substrate pair to control viral pathogenesis in plants. Moreover, we show that the S1P/S2P-bZIP17/bZIP28 pathway, the other known branch of UPR in plants, does not play a detectable role in virus infection, demonstrating the distinct function of the IRE1-bZIP60 pathway in plants. Furthermore, we provide evidence that bZIP60 and HAC1, products of the enzyme-substrate duet, rather than IRE1, are functionally replaceable to cope with ER stress in yeast. Taken together, we conclude that the downstream signaling of the IRE1-mediated splicing is evolutionarily conserved in yeast and plants, and that the IRE1-bZIP60 UPR pathway not only confers overlapping functions with the other UPR branch in fundamental biology but also may exert a unique role in certain biological processes such as virus-plant interactions. PMID:25875739

  19. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  2. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31... from Spain. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) may be imported into the United States from Spain only... subpart: (a) The peppers must be grown in the Alicante or Almeria Province of Spain in...

  3. Identification of the pepper SAR8.2 gene as a molecular marker for pathogen infection, abiotic elicitors and environmental stresses in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2003-01-01

    Pepper ( Capsicum annuum L.) SAR8.2 genes, designated CASAR82A, B and C, which are induced by all the biotic and abiotic stresses, were isolated from a pepper cDNA library constructed with the mRNAs from pepper plants infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The pepper CASAR82A, B and C gene products, which are very similar to each other in amino acid sequences, have 43-50% homology with those of tobacco SAR8.2 genes. The CASAR8.2 genes were not constitutively expressed in any of the organs of healthy pepper plants. In contrast, the CASAR82A gene was locally or systemically induced in pepper plants infected by X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, Colletotrichum coccodes or Phytophthora capsici. Strong induction of the CASAR82A gene also was found in pepper leaves treated with ethylene, methyl jasmonate, indole-3-acetic acid, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, benzothiadiazole, DL-beta- n-amino butyric acid or hydrogen peroxide. Interestingly, the transcription of the CASAR82A gene was rapidly triggered by high salinity, drought or low-temperature stresses, but not by mechanical wounding. In situ hybridization results revealed that the CASAR82A mRNAs were localized in phloem and epidermal cells of pepper leaf and stem tissues infected by C. coccodes and P. capsici, or treated with salicylic acid. These results thus suggest that pepper SAR8.2 genes may be valuable as a molecular marker for the detection of various pathogen infections, abiotic elicitors and environmental stresses.

  4. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly in Chili Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) to Identify Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Capsaicinoids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoqun; Li, Wanshun; Wu, Yimin; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    The capsaicinoids are a group of compounds produced by chili pepper fruits and are used widely in many fields, especially in medical purposes. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has not yet been established clearly. To understand more knowledge in biosynthesis of capsaicinoids, we applied RNA-seq for the mixture of placenta and pericarp of pungent pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.). We have assessed the effect of various assembly parameters using different assembly software, and obtained one of the best strategies for de novo assembly of transcriptome data. We obtained a total 54,045 high-quality unigenes (transcripts) using Trinity software. About 92.65% of unigenes showed similarity to the public protein sequences, genome of potato and tomato and pepper (C. annuum) ESTs databases. Our results predicted 3 new structural genes (DHAD, TD, PAT), which filled gaps of the capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway predicted by Mazourek, and revealed new candidate genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis based on KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis. A significant number of SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) and SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) markers were predicted in C. frutescens and C. annuum sequences, which will be helpful in the identification of polymorphisms within chili pepper populations. These data will provide new insights to the pathway of capsaicinoid biosynthesis and subsequent research of chili peppers. In addition, our strategy of de novo transcriptome assembly is applicable to a wide range of similar studies. PMID:23349661

  5. De novo transcriptome assembly in chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens) to identify genes involved in the biosynthesis of capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoqun; Li, Wanshun; Wu, Yimin; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    The capsaicinoids are a group of compounds produced by chili pepper fruits and are used widely in many fields, especially in medical purposes. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has not yet been established clearly. To understand more knowledge in biosynthesis of capsaicinoids, we applied RNA-seq for the mixture of placenta and pericarp of pungent pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.). We have assessed the effect of various assembly parameters using different assembly software, and obtained one of the best strategies for de novo assembly of transcriptome data. We obtained a total 54,045 high-quality unigenes (transcripts) using Trinity software. About 92.65% of unigenes showed similarity to the public protein sequences, genome of potato and tomato and pepper (C. annuum) ESTs databases. Our results predicted 3 new structural genes (DHAD, TD, PAT), which filled gaps of the capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway predicted by Mazourek, and revealed new candidate genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis based on KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis. A significant number of SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) and SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) markers were predicted in C. frutescens and C. annuum sequences, which will be helpful in the identification of polymorphisms within chili pepper populations. These data will provide new insights to the pathway of capsaicinoid biosynthesis and subsequent research of chili peppers. In addition, our strategy of de novo transcriptome assembly is applicable to a wide range of similar studies.

  6. Ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhances host resistance to viral, bacterial, and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-10-01

    In many plants, including hot pepper plants, productivity is greatly affected by pathogen attack. We reported previously that tobacco stress-induced gene 1 (Tsi1) may play an important role in regulating stress responsive genes and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. In this study, we demonstrated that overexpression of Tsi1 gene in transgenic hot pepper plants induced constitutive expression of several PR genes in the absence of stress or pathogen treatment. The transgenic hot pepper plants expressing Tsi1 exhibited resistance to Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Furthermore, these transgenic plants showed increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and also an oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. These results suggested that ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhanced the resistance of the plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and oomycete. These results suggest that using transcriptional regulatory protein genes may contribute to developing broad-spectrum resistance in crop plants.

  7. Esophageal Rupture After Ghost Pepper Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Arens, Ann; Ben-Youssef, Leila; Hayashi, Sandra; Smollin, Craig

    2016-12-01

    The ghost pepper, or "bhut jolokia," is one of the hottest chili peppers in the world. Ghost peppers have a measured "heat" of > 1,000,000 Scoville heat units (SHU), more than twice the strength of a habanero pepper. To our knowledge, no significant adverse effects of ghost pepper ingestion have been reported. A 47-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with severe abdominal and chest pain subsequent to violent retching and vomiting after eating ghost peppers as part of a contest. A subsequent chest x-ray study showed evidence of a left-sided pleural effusion and patchy infiltrates. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed pneumomediastinum with air around the distal esophagus, suggestive of a spontaneous esophageal perforation and a left-sided pneumothorax. The patient was intubated and taken immediately to the operating room, where he was noted to have a 2.5-cm tear in the distal esophagus, with a mediastinal fluid collection including food debris, as well as a left-sided pneumothorax. The patient was extubated on hospital day 14, and was discharged home with a gastric tube in place on hospital day 23. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Spontaneous esophageal rupture, Boerhaave syndrome, is a rare condition encountered by emergency physicians, with a high mortality rate. This case serves as an important reminder of a potentially life- threatening surgical emergency initially interpreted as discomfort after a large spicy meal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Beliefs about chili pepper consumption and health in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, L; Fernández-Ortega M, C; Costa-Dias, R; Franco-Marina, J; Alejandre-Badillo, T

    1995-01-01

    Eating chili peppers is a cultural tradition in Mexico. Controversial characteristics have been empirically associated to chili pepper consumption and human health. In this paper, the beliefs about the health impacts of chili pepper consumption in two independent groups of Mexico City residents are described. The results confirm, on the one hand, that there is a wide variety of health benefits and damages associated with chili pepper consumption, but on the other hand, that the levels of chili pepper consumption are not related to beliefs about its human health impact.

  9. Characterization of the bZip-type transcription factor NapA with reference to oxidative stress response in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Yamashino, Takafumi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2007-07-01

    Microorganisms growing in natural habitats are constantly confronted with a wide variety of external stresses. Here we provide several lines of experimental evidence for the thesis that the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has a homolog of the AP-1-like bZip transcription factor, which is known to play general roles in oxidative responses in many types of yeast.

  10. Production and Testing of Transgenic Cotton that Expresses Transcription Factors for Enhanced Seed and Fiber Traits and Productivity Under Drought Stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in abiotic and biotic stress adaptation and seed development. We have previously shown that Basic3 (B3) domain and basic leucine zipper (b-ZIP) transcription factors from the model plant species maize and Arabidopsis thaliana can transactivate monocot...

  11. Anther culture of chili pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum spp.) is a very important horticultural crop around the world and is especially important for Mexicans because of its impact in the culture and the cuisine. Biotechnological tools such as tissue culture techniques and specifically anther culture may be applied successfully for plant breeding and genetic improvement in order to generate isogenic lines (100% homozygous) in a shorter time in comparison with the classic breeding methods. In this chapter, a protocol for efficient recovery of chili pepper haploid plants from in vitro cultured anthers is described.

  12. Anther Culture in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Anther culture is the most popular of the techniques used to induce microspore embryogenesis. This technique is well set up in a wide range of crops, including pepper. In this chapter, a protocol for anther culture in pepper is described. The protocol presented hereby includes the steps from the selection of buds from donor plants to the regeneration and acclimatization of doubled haploid plants derived from the embryos, as well as a description of how to analyze the ploidy level of the regenerated plants.

  13. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  14. Divergence and Conservation of the Major UPR Branch IRE1-bZIP Signaling Pathway across Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingrui; Zhang, Changwei; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is crucial to life by regulating the cellular response to the stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) imposed by abiotic and biotic cues such as heat shock and viral infection. The inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) signaling pathway activated by the IRE1-mediated unconventional splicing of HAC1 in yeast, bZIP60 in plants and XBP1 in metazoans, is the most ancient branch of the UPR. In this study, we systematically examined yeast IRE1p-HAC1, plant IRE1A/IRE1B-bZIP60 and human hIRE1-XBP1 pairs. We found that, unlike bZIP60, XBP1 is unable to functionally swap HAC1p in yeast, and that the inter-species heterotypic interactions among HAC1p, bZIP60 and XBP1 are not permitted. These data demonstrate evolutionary divergence of the downstream signaling of IRE1-bZIP. We also discovered that the dual cytosolic domains of plant IRE1s act in vivo in a mechanism consistent with IRE1p and hIRE1, and that plant IRE1B not only interacts with IRE1p but also forms typical IRE1 dynamic foci in yeast. Thus, the upstream components of the IRE1 signaling branch including IRE1 activation and action mechanisms are highly conserved. Taken together these data advance the molecular understanding of evolutionary divergence and conservation of the IRE1 signaling pathway across kingdoms. PMID:27256815

  15. Pepper gene encoding a basic class II chitinase is inducible by pathogen and ethephon.

    PubMed

    Hong; Jung; Kim; Hwang

    2000-10-16

    A chitinase cDNA clone (designated CAChi2) was isolated from the cDNA library of pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The 1004-bp full-length CAChi2 cDNA encodes a basic chitinase with an N-terminal 24 amino acid signal peptide followed by a catalytic region. An analysis of its sequence indicates that CAChi2 is a class II chitinase, because it does not have chitin-binding domain and C-terminal extension sequences. The deduced amino acid sequence of CAChi2 has a high level of identity with class II chitinases from potato, tomato, tobacco and petunia. Southern analysis demonstrated that the CAChi2 chitinase is encoded by a single or two copy genes in the pepper genome. Following X. campestris pv. vesicatoria or Phytophthora capsici infection, the CAChi2 chitinase mRNA was more highly expressed in the incompatible interaction, compared to expression in the compatible interaction. Treatment with ethylene-releasing ethephon resulted in a strong accumulation of the transcripts in the leaves. In contrast, DL-beta-amino-n-butyric acid, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate were not effective in inducing CAChi2 transcripts in pepper leaves.

  16. The Arabidopsis bZIP Gene AtbZIP63 Is a Sensitive Integrator of Transient Abscisic Acid and Glucose Signals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Matiolli, Cleverson Carlos; Tomaz, Juarez Pires; Duarte, Gustavo Turqueto; Prado, Fernanda Manso; Del Bem, Luiz Eduardo Vieira; Silveira, Amanda Bortolini; Gauer, Luciane; Corrêa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Drumond, Rodrigo Duarte; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Di Mascio, Paolo; Meyer, Christian; Vincentz, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Glucose modulates plant metabolism, growth, and development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Hexokinase1 (HXK1) is a glucose sensor that may trigger abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis and sensitivity to mediate glucose-induced inhibition of seedling development. Here, we show that the intensity of short-term responses to glucose can vary with ABA activity. We report that the transient (2 h/4 h) repression by 2% glucose of AtbZIP63, a gene encoding a basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor partially involved in the Snf1-related kinase KIN10-induced responses to energy limitation, is independent of HXK1 and is not mediated by changes in ABA levels. However, high-concentration (6%) glucose-mediated repression appears to be modulated by ABA, since full repression of AtbZIP63 requires a functional ABA biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the combination of glucose and ABA was able to trigger a synergistic repression of AtbZIP63 and its homologue AtbZIP3, revealing a shared regulatory feature consisting of the modulation of glucose sensitivity by ABA. The synergistic regulation of AtbZIP63 was not reproduced by an AtbZIP63 promoter-5′-untranslated region::β-glucuronidase fusion, thus suggesting possible posttranscriptional control. A transcriptional inhibition assay with cordycepin provided further evidence for the regulation of mRNA decay in response to glucose plus ABA. Overall, these results indicate that AtbZIP63 is an important node of the glucose-ABA interaction network. The mechanisms by which AtbZIP63 may participate in the fine-tuning of ABA-mediated abiotic stress responses according to sugar availability (i.e., energy status) are discussed. PMID:21844310

  17. Occurrence and distribution of pepper veinal mottle virus and cucumber mosaic virus in pepper in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Viral diseases constitute obstacles to pepper production in the world. In Nigeria, pepper plants are primarily affected by pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Pepper leaf curl Virus (TLCV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Pepper mottle virus (PMV) and a host of other viruses. The experiment was carried out with a diagnostic survey on the experimental field of the National Horticultural Research Institute, Ibadan, Nigeria and on pepper farms in six local government areas within Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria, forty samples were collected from each of the farms. Diseased samples were obtained from the field and taken to the laboratory for indexing. In ELISA test some of the samples from the pepper farms showed positive reaction to single infection with PVMV (36.79%), CMV (22.14%) while some others showed positive reaction to mixed infection of the two viruses (10%) but some also negative reaction to PVMV and CMV antisera (31.07). PMID:22495040

  18. Irrigation timing and fertilizer rate in peppers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excessive rain fall might leach nutrients from the soil or cause producers to not supply irrigation to pepper (Capsicum sp.). Fertilizer at 150 or 300 lb/acre of triple 17 NPK, the lower rate is the recommended rate, was supplied to either bell, cv. Jupiter, or non-pungent jalapeno, cv. Pace 105, pe...

  19. Antimutagenic properties of bell and black peppers.

    PubMed

    El Hamss, R; Idaomar, M; Alonso-Moraga, A; Muñoz Serrano, A

    2003-01-01

    The wing Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster was used to study the modulating action of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) in combination with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the promutagen agent ethyl carbamate (EC). Larvae trans-heterozygous for the third chromosome recessive markers multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare-3 [flr(3)] were fed genotoxins alone or in combination with each of the two spices. Genetic changes induced in somatic cells of the wing's imaginal discs lead to the formation of mutant clones on the wing blade. Our results showed that bell pepper was effective in reducing the mutational events induced by EC and MMS and black pepper was only effective against EC. Pretreatment of 2-day-old larvae with the spices for 24 h followed by a treatment with EC and MMS was only effective in reducing mutations induced by EC. Suppression of metabolic activation or interaction with the active groups of mutagens could be mechanisms by which the spices exert their antimutagenic action.

  20. Conservation Biological Control in Pepper and Eggplant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several important factors contribute to low productivity in pepper and eggplant due to western flower thrips. Research has been conducted to develop an understanding of flower thrips population dynamics and insecticide efficacy studies have allowed us to direct recommendations for biological contro...

  1. Distinct roles of the pepper pathogen-induced membrane protein gene CaPIMP1 in bacterial disease resistance and oomycete disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Sang Hee; Yi, Seung Yeon; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2008-08-01

    Plant integral membrane proteins have essential roles in diverse internal and external physiological processes as signal receptors or ion transporters. The pepper CaPIMP1 gene encoding a putative integral membrane protein with four transmembrane domains was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with the avirulent strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPIMP1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) fusions localized to the plasma membrane in onion cells, as observed by confocal microscopy. CaPIMP1 was expressed in an organ-specific manner in healthy pepper plants. Infection with Xcv induced differential accumulation of CaPIMP1 transcripts in pepper leaf tissues during compatible and incompatible interactions. The function of CaPIMP1 was examined by using the virus-induced gene silencing technique in pepper plants and by overexpression in Arabidopsis. CaPIMP1-silenced pepper plants were highly susceptible to Xcv infection and expressed lower levels of the defense-related gene CaSAR82A. CaPIMP1 overexpression (CaPIMP1-OX) in transgenic Arabidopsis conferred enhanced resistance to P. syringae pv. tomato infection, accompanied by enhanced AtPDF1.2 gene expression. In contrast, CaPIMP1-OX plants were highly susceptible to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Taken together, we propose that CaPIMP1 plays distinct roles in both bacterial disease resistance and oomycete disease susceptibility.

  2. PePPER: a webserver for prediction of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of DNA motifs that are targets of RNA polymerases, sigma factors and transcription factors (TFs) in prokaryotes is a difficult mission mainly due to as yet undiscovered features in DNA sequences or structures in promoter regions. Improved prediction and comparison algorithms are currently available for identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and their accompanying TFs and regulon members. Results We here extend the current databases of TFs, TFBSs and regulons with our knowledge on Lactococcus lactis and developed a webserver for prediction, mining and visualization of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons via a novel concept. This new approach includes an all-in-one method of data mining for TFs, TFBSs, promoters, and regulons for any bacterial genome via a user-friendly webserver. We demonstrate the power of this method by mining WalRK regulons in Lactococci and Streptococci and, vice versa, use L. lactis regulon data (CodY) to mine closely related species. Conclusions The PePPER webserver offers, besides the all-in-one analysis method, a toolbox for mining for regulons, promoters and TFBSs and accommodates a new L. lactis regulon database in addition to already existing regulon data. Identification of putative regulons and full annotation of intergenic regions in any bacterial genome on the basis of existing knowledge on a related organism can now be performed by biologists and it can be done for a wide range of regulons. On the basis of the PePPER output, biologist can design experiments to further verify the existence and extent of the proposed regulons. The PePPER webserver is freely accessible at http://pepper.molgenrug.nl. PMID:22747501

  3. New Insights on Eggplant/Tomato/Pepper Synteny and Identification of Eggplant and Pepper Orthologous QTL

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Riccardo; Van Deynze, Allen; Portis, Ezio; Rotino, Giuseppe L.; Toppino, Laura; Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant, pepper, and tomato are the most exploited berry-producing vegetables within the Solanaceae family. Their genomes differ in size, but each has 12 chromosomes which have undergone rearrangements causing a redistribution of loci. The genome sequences of all three species are available but differ in coverage, assembly quality and percentage of anchorage. Determining their syntenic relationship and QTL orthology will contribute to exploit genomic resources and genetic data for key agronomic traits. The syntenic analysis between tomato and pepper based on the alignment of 34,727 tomato CDS to the pepper genome sequence, identified 19,734 unique hits. The resulting synteny map confirmed the 14 inversions and 10 translocations previously documented, but also highlighted 3 new translocations and 4 major new inversions. Furthermore, each of the 12 chromosomes exhibited a number of rearrangements involving small regions of 0.5–0.7 Mbp. Due to high fragmentation of the publicly available eggplant genome sequence, physical localization of most eggplant QTL was not possible, thus, we compared the organization of the eggplant genetic map with the genome sequence of both tomato and pepper. The eggplant/tomato syntenic map confirmed all the 10 translocations but only 9 of the 14 known inversions; on the other hand, a newly detected inversion was recognized while another one was not confirmed. The eggplant/pepper syntenic map confirmed 10 translocations and 8 inversions already detected and suggested a putative new translocation. In order to perform the assessment of eggplant and pepper QTL orthology, the eggplant and pepper sequence-based markers located in their respective genetic map were aligned onto the pepper genome. GBrowse in pepper was used as reference platform for QTL positioning. A set of 151 pepper QTL were located as well as 212 eggplant QTL, including 76 major QTL (PVE ≥ 10%) affecting key agronomic traits. Most were confirmed to cluster in orthologous

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in black pepper and red pepper by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Sung, Hye-Jung; Kim, Sung-Youn; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-17

    This study evaluated the efficacy of gamma irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in black pepper (Piper nigrum) and red pepper (dried Capsicum annuum). Black pepper and red pepper inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation in the range of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy, and color change was evaluated after treatment. Pathogen populations decreased with increasing treatment doses. A gamma irradiation dose of 5 kGy decreased E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium populations >4.4 to >5.2 log CFU/g in black pepper without causing color change. Similarly, 5 kGy of gamma irradiation yielded reduction of 3.8 to >5.2 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in red pepper. During gamma irradiation treatment, L*, a* and b* values of red pepper were not significantly changed except for 297 μm to 420 μm size red pepper treated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation. Based on the D-value of pathogens in black pepper and red pepper, S. Typhimurium showed more resistant to gamma irradiation than did E. coli O157:H7. These results show that gamma irradiation has potential as a non-thermal process for inactivating foodborne pathogens in spices with minimal color changes.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Pepper (Capsicum annuum) Revealed a Role of 24-Epibrassinolide in Response to Chilling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jungen; Gan, Yantai; Yu, Jihua; Calderón-Urrea, Alejandro; Lyu, Jian; Zhang, Guobin; Feng, Zhi; Xie, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have positive effects on many processes during plant growth, development, and various abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available regarding the global gene expression of BRs in response to chilling stress in pepper. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to determine the molecular roles of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) during a chilling stress response. There were 39,829 transcripts, and, among them, 656 were differently-expressed genes (DEGs) following EBR treatment (Chill+EBR) compared with the control (Chill only), including 335 up-regulated and 321 down-regulated DEGs. We selected 20 genes out of the 656 DEGs for RT-qPCR analysis to confirm the RNA-Seq. Based on GO enrich and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that photosynthesis was significantly up-enriched in biological processes, accompanied by significant increases in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), Fv/Fm, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the results indicate that EBR enhanced endogenous levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) while suppressing the ethylene (ETH) biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that BRs function via a synergistic cross-talk with SA, JA, and ETH signaling pathways in response to chilling stress. In addition, EBR induced cellulose synthase-like protein and UDP-glycosyltransferase, suggesting a contribution to the formation of cell wall and hormone metabolism. EBR also triggered the calcium signaling transduction in cytoplasm, and activated the expression of cellular redox homeostasis related genes, such as GSTX1, PER72, and CAT2. This work, therefor, identified the specific genes showed different expression patterns in EBR-treated pepper and associated with the processes of hormone metabolism, redox, signaling, transcription, and defense. Our study provides the first evidence of the potent roles of BRs, at the transcription level, to induce the tolerance to chilling stress in pepper as a function of the combination of the

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Pepper (Capsicum annuum) Revealed a Role of 24-Epibrassinolide in Response to Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jungen; Gan, Yantai; Yu, Jihua; Calderón-Urrea, Alejandro; Lyu, Jian; Zhang, Guobin; Feng, Zhi; Xie, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have positive effects on many processes during plant growth, development, and various abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available regarding the global gene expression of BRs in response to chilling stress in pepper. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to determine the molecular roles of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) during a chilling stress response. There were 39,829 transcripts, and, among them, 656 were differently-expressed genes (DEGs) following EBR treatment (Chill+EBR) compared with the control (Chill only), including 335 up-regulated and 321 down-regulated DEGs. We selected 20 genes out of the 656 DEGs for RT-qPCR analysis to confirm the RNA-Seq. Based on GO enrich and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that photosynthesis was significantly up-enriched in biological processes, accompanied by significant increases in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), Fv/Fm, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the results indicate that EBR enhanced endogenous levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) while suppressing the ethylene (ETH) biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that BRs function via a synergistic cross-talk with SA, JA, and ETH signaling pathways in response to chilling stress. In addition, EBR induced cellulose synthase-like protein and UDP-glycosyltransferase, suggesting a contribution to the formation of cell wall and hormone metabolism. EBR also triggered the calcium signaling transduction in cytoplasm, and activated the expression of cellular redox homeostasis related genes, such as GSTX1, PER72, and CAT2. This work, therefor, identified the specific genes showed different expression patterns in EBR-treated pepper and associated with the processes of hormone metabolism, redox, signaling, transcription, and defense. Our study provides the first evidence of the potent roles of BRs, at the transcription level, to induce the tolerance to chilling stress in pepper as a function of the combination of the

  7. Isolation and analysis of bioactive compounds in Capsicum peppers.

    PubMed

    Asnin, L; Park, S W

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the state of the art in the extraction, isolation, and analytical determination of bioactive compounds in peppers of the genus Capsicum is presented. The review is structured by classes of phytochemicals. Both major and minor constituents of peppers are considered. Modern trends in analytical chemistry of nutrients in regard to pepper analysis with particular focus on chromatographic and related methods are discussed. Attention was paid to controversial questions of pepper analysis, including but not limited to problems of sample degradation and the completeness of extraction of target analytes. The rationale for choosing an optimal strategy of analysis is given.

  8. In silico identification and characterization of the WRKY gene superfamily in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Yao, Z P; Ruan, M Y; Ye, Q J; Wang, R Q; Zhou, G Z; Luo, J

    2016-09-23

    The WRKY family is one of the most important transcription factor families in plants, involved in the regulation of a broad range of biological roles. The recent releases of whole-genome sequences of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) allow us to perform a genome-wide identification and characterization of the WRKY family. In this study, 61 CaWRKY proteins were identified in the pepper genome. Based on protein structural and phylogenetic analyses, these proteins were classified into four main groups (I, II, III, and NG), and Group II was further divided into five subgroups (IIa to IIe). Chromosome mapping analysis indicated that CaWRKY genes are distributed across all 12 chromosomes, although the location of four CaWRKYs (CaWRKY58-CaWRKY61) could not be identified. Two pairs of CaWRKYs located on chromosome 01 appear to be tandem duplications. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree showed a close evolutionary relationship of WRKYs in three species from Solanaceae. In conclusion, this comprehensive analysis of CaWRKYs will provide rich resources for further functional studies in pepper.

  9. A hot pepper cDNA encoding ascorbate peroxidase is induced during the incompatible interaction with virus and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae Hyoung; Park, Chang-Jin; Lee, Gil-Je; Shin, Ryoung; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Rhee, Ki-Hyeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-08-31

    Capsicum annuum L. is infected by a number of viruses, including the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). To study the defense-related genes that are induced by TMV in hot peppers, the pepper plant, which is susceptible to P1.2 but resistant to the P0 pathotype of TMV, was inoculated with TMV-P0. Differential screening isolated the genes that were specifically up- or down-regulated during the hypersensitive response (HR). The CaAPX1 cDNA clone that putatively encodes a polypeptide of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was selected as an up-regulated gene. It was isolated for further study. The full-length cDNA for CaAPX1, which is 972 bp long, contained the open-reading frame of 250-amino acid residues. A genomic Southern blot analysis showed that there were only limited copies of the CaAPX1 gene in the hot pepper genome. In hot pepper cv. Bugang, which is resistant to TMV-P0 and susceptible to TMV-P1.2, the CaAPX1 gene transcript was accumulated by TMV-P0, but not by TMV-P1.2 inoculation. CaAPX1 transcripts began to accumulate 24 h post-inoculation of TMV-P0, and increased gradually until 96 h. To investigate whether each transcript is induced by other stimuli, the plants were treated with various chemicals and wounding. A striking induction of the CaAPX1 transcript was observed at 2 h. It subsided 12 h after salicylic acid (SA), ethephon, and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatments. The response of the gene upon other pathogen infection was also examined by a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria race 3) inoculation. The CaAPX1 gene was induced in a hot pepper (C. annuum cv. ECW 20R) that was resistant to this bacterial pathogen, but not in a susceptible hot pepper (C. annuum cv. ECW). These results suggest the possible role(s) for the CaAPX1 gene in plant defense against viral and bacterial pathogen.

  10. Detection of pepper mild mottle virus in pepper sauce in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiejun; Shi, Bingbin; Zheng, Hongying; Lu, Yuwen; Lin, Lin; Jiang, Tong; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-08-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) was detected by RT-PCR in all 42 pepper sauce samples from the 10 main manufacturing provinces in China at concentrations ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 (Log10 copies/mL). Their coat protein nucleotide sequences had 97.4 to 100 % identity to each other and 92.4 to 100 % to other published isolates. The samples remained infectious to N. benthamiana, indicating that commercial trade in sauce could contribute to the natural spread of PMMoV.

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea.

  12. Putative WRKYs associated with regulation of fruit ripening revealed by detailed expression analysis of the WRKY gene family in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; JalalAhammed, Golam; Yu, Jiahong; Yao, Zhuping; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Li, Zhimiao; Wang, Rongqing; Feng, Kun; Zhou, Guozhi; Yang, Yuejian; Diao, Weiping; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in plant development and stress responses. Here, global expression patterns of pepper CaWRKYs in various tissues as well as response to environmental stresses and plant hormones were systematically analyzed, with an emphasis on fruit ripening. The results showed that most CaWRKYs were expressed in at least two of the tissues tested. Group I, a subfamily of the entire CaWRKY gene family, had a higher expression level in vegetative tissues, whereas groups IIa and III showed relatively lower expression levels. Comparative analysis showed that the constitutively highly expressed WRKY genes were conserved in tomato and pepper, suggesting potential functional similarities. Among the identified 61 CaWRKYs, almost 60% were expressed during pepper fruit maturation, and the group I genes were in higher proportion during the ripening process, indicating an as-yet unknown function of group I in the fruit maturation process. Further analysis suggested that many CaWRKYs expressed during fruit ripening were also regulated by abiotic stresses or plant hormones, indicating that these CaWRKYs play roles in the stress-related signaling pathways during fruit ripening. This study provides new insights to the current research on CaWRKY and contributes to our knowledge about the global regulatory network in pepper fruit ripening. PMID:27991526

  13. First report of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" on pepper in Honduras

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2012, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibiting symptoms that resembled those of the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” infection were observed in commercial pepper fields in several departments in Honduras, including Francisco Morazán, Ocotepeque, El Paraíso, and Olancho. Man...

  14. "Measuring by the bushel": reweighing the Indian Ocean pepper trade.

    PubMed

    Prange, Sebastian R

    2011-01-01

    Of all the oriental spices, black pepper was the most important until the eighteenth century. The historiography of the pepper trade is characterized by a strong focus on Europe in terms of both its economic significance in the ancient and medieval periods and the struggle for its control in the early modern period. This article, by contrast, seeks to situate the pepper trade firmly in its Asian contexts. It examines the Indian Ocean pepper trade from three perspectives. First, it places the trade in its supply-side context by focusing on the Malabar coast as the primary source of pepper. Second, it examines the relative importance of the different branches of Malabar's pepper trade and highlights the central role played by Muslim mercantile networks. Third, it considers the reconfiguration of these pepper networks in the sixteenth century in the face of aggressive competition from the Portuguese. In their sum, these arguments advocate the need for rethought balances of trade and a reweighted scholarly focus on the pepper trade in its global dimensions.

  15. Toward Valid Measurement of Stephen Pepper's World Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    Two measures of the "world hypotheses" of Stephen Pepper were mailed to 100 sociobiologists, 87 behaviorists, 79 personality psychologists, and 45 human developmentalists. The World Hypothesis Scale (WHS) was designed to measure Pepper's four world views: (1) formism; (2) mechanism; (3) organicism; and (4) contextualism. The…

  16. Analysis of sequences from field samples reveals the presence of the recently described pepper vein yellows virus (genus Polerovirus) in six additional countries.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Dennis; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Kenyon, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    Polerovirus infection was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 29 pepper plants (Capsicum spp.) and one black nightshade plant (Solanum nigrum) sample collected from fields in India, Indonesia, Mali, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. At least two representative samples for each country were selected to generate a general polerovirus RT-PCR product of 1.4 kb length for sequencing. Sequence analysis of the partial genome sequences revealed the presence of pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) in all 13 samples. A 1990 Australian herbarium sample of pepper described by serological means as infected with capsicum yellows virus (CYV) was identified by sequence analysis of a partial CP sequence as probably infected with a potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) isolate.

  17. Detection of gamma irradiated pepper and papain by chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, Abdus; Delincée, H.; Diehl, J. F.

    Chemiluminescence (CL) measurements of black pepper and of papain using luminol and lucigenin reactions were studied. Effects of grinding, irradiation (5-20 kGy) and particle size (750-140 μm) on CL of pepper, and of irradiation (10-30 kGy) on CL of papain, were investigated. All the tested treatments affected the luminescence response in both the luminol and lucigenin reactions; however, the pattern of changes in each case, was inconsistent. Optimum pepper size for maximum luminescence was 560 μm, and optimum irradiation doses were >15 kGy for pepper and >20 kGy for papain. Chemiluminescence may possibly be used as an indicator or irradiation treatment for pepper and papain at a dose of 10 kGy or higher, but further research is needed to establish the reliability of this method.

  18. Antihyperglucolipidaemic and anticarbonyl stress properties in green, yellow and red sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Shukla, Srishti; Kumar, Dommati Anand; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Effect of aqueous methanol extract of different colour sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) on parameters of diabesity and carbonyl stress was analysed in vitro. Yellow pepper displayed significantly (p < 0.001) higher intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than green and red pepper. Porcine pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity was significantly (p < 0.01) high in yellow and red pepper than in green pepper. Green and red pepper inhibited vesperlysine-type advanced glycation end products (AGEs) more potently than yellow pepper; however, pentosidine-type AGEs were similarly inhibited by all three peppers. Yellow and red pepper inhibited lipid peroxidation more potently (p < 0.01) than green pepper. Total polyphenol content and free radicals scavenging activities in yellow and red bell peppers were higher than in green pepper. Total flavonoid content was high in green pepper than that present in yellow and red peppers. Green pepper displayed presence of proanthocyanins; however, oligomeric anthocyanins were detected in yellow and red peppers.

  19. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capscicum species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hot pepper is an important spice crop the world-over and is closely related to sweet peppers that represent an important vegetable crop in many cultures. Both hot and mild peppers are important sources of dietary nutrients and hot pepper is a source of the medicinal compound capsaicin, which is wide...

  20. ‘TigerPaw-NR’, a New Root-knot Nematode Resistant Habanero-type Pepper

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most peppers grown in the United States belong to the species Capsicum annuum. However, the increasing popularity of hot peppers has created intense interest in the Habanero, a type of pepper that belongs to another domesticated Capsicum species, C. chinense. Habanero-type peppers are some of the ...

  1. The contribution of the methyl groups on thymine bases to binding specificity and affinity by alanine-rich mutants of the bZIP motif.

    PubMed

    Kise, K J; Shin, J A

    2001-09-01

    We have used fluorescence anisotropy to measure in situ the thermodynamics of binding of alanine-rich mutants of the GCN4 basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) to short DNA duplexes, in which thymines were replaced with uracils, in order to quantify the contributions of the C5 methyl group on thymines with alanine methyl side chains. We simplified the alpha-helical GCN4 bZIP by alanine substitution: 4A, 11A, and 18A contain four, 11, and 18 alanine mutations in their DNA-binding basic regions, respectively. Titration of fluorescein-labeled duplexes with increasing amounts of protein yielded dissociation constants in the low-to-mid nanomolar range for all bZIP mutants in complex with the AP-1 target site (5'-TGACTCA-3'); binding to the nonspecific control duplex was >1000-fold weaker. Small changes of <1 kcal/mol in binding free energies were observed for wild-type bZIP and 4A mutant to uracil-containing AP-1, whereas 11A and 18A bound almost equally well to native AP-1 and uracil-containing AP-1. These modest changes in binding affinities may reflect the multivalent nature of protein-DNA interactions, as our highly mutated proteins still exhibit native-like behavior. These protein mutations may compensate for changes in enthalpic and entropic contributions toward DNA-binding in order to maintain binding free energies similar to that of the native protein-DNA complex.

  2. EST and microarray analyses of pathogen-responsive genes in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) non-host resistance against soybean pustule pathogen (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Soo-Yong; Chung, Eunjoo; Joung, Young-Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Choi, Doil

    2004-07-01

    Large-scale single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries and microarray analysis have proven to be useful tools for discovering new genes and studying gene expression. As a first step in elucidating the defense mechanisms in hot pepper plants, a total of 8,525 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated and analyzed in silico. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 613 hot pepper genes that were transcriptionally responsive to the non-host soybean pustule pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines ( Xag). Several functional types of genes, including those involved in cell wall modification/biosynthesis, transport, signaling pathways and divergent defense reactions, were induced at the early stage of Xag infiltration. In contrast, genes encoding proteins that are involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis of chloroplast biogenetic proteins were down-regulated at the late stage of Xag infiltration. These expression profiles share common features with the expression profiles elicited by other stresses, such as fungal challenge, wounding, cold, drought and high salinity. However, we also identified several novel transcription factors that may be specifically involved in the defense reaction of the hot pepper. We also found that the defense reaction of the hot pepper may involve the deactivation of gibberellin. Furthermore, many genes encoding proteins with unknown function were identified. Functional analysis of these genes may broaden our understanding of non-host resistance. This study is the first report of large-scale sequencing and non-host defense transcriptome analysis of the hot pepper plant species. (The sequence data in this paper have been submitted to the dbEST and GenBank database under the codes 10227604-10236595 and BM059564-BM068555, respectively. Additional information is available at http://plant.pdrc.re.kr/ks200201/pepper.html).

  3. Antioxidants in hot pepper: variation among accessions.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Kochhar, Tejinder S; Jarret, Robert L; Snyder, John C

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) pepper (Capsicum spp.) germplasm collection contains several thousand members or accessions. Many of these species and cultivars have not been analyzed for their concentrations of ascorbic acid, capsaicin, and total phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidants having a number of benefits for human health. The objective of this investigation was to select candidate accessions of hot pepper having high concentrations of ascorbic acid, capsaicin, free sugars, and total phenols for use as parents in breeding for these compounds. Seventeen accessions of pepper from the core Capsicum germplasm collection (four accessions of Capsicum chinense; five accessions of C. baccatum; six accessions of C. annuum; and two of C. frutescens) were field grown and their mature fruits were analyzed for their antioxidant composition. Concentrations of these compounds tended to be higher in C. chinense and C. baccatum, than in C. annuum and C. frutescens. Across all accessions the concentration of total phenols was correlated with ascorbic acid (r = 0.97) and free sugars (r = 0.80). Concentrations of total phenols (1.4, 1.3, and 1.3 mg g-1 fruit) and ascorbic acid (1.6, 1.2, and 1.3 mg g-1 fruit) were significantly greater in PI-633757, PI-387833, and PI-633754, respectively, compared to other accessions analyzed. Total capsaicinoids concentrations were greatest (1.3 mg g-1 fruit) in PI-438622 and lowest (0.002 mg g-1 fruit) in Grif-9320. The great variability within and among Capsicum species for these phytochemicals suggests that these selected accessions may be useful as parents in hybridization programs to produce fruits with value-added traits.

  4. The pepper patatin-like phospholipase CaPLP1 functions in plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Jeun, Yongchull; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-02-01

    Phospholipases hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and other lipophilic substances. Phospholipid signaling is crucial for diverse cellular processes in plants. However, the precise role of phospholipases in plant cell death and defense signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) patatin-like phospholipase (CaPLP1) gene that is transcriptionally induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaPLP1 containing an N-terminal signal peptide localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane, leading to the secretion into the apoplastic regions. Silencing of CaPLP1 in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Defense responses to Xcv, including the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death and the expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1, were compromised in the CaPLP1-silenced pepper plants. Transient expression of CaPLP1 in pepper leaves induced the accumulation of fluorescent phenolics, expression of the defense marker genes CaPR1 and CaSAR82A, and generation of ROS, ultimately leading to the hypersensitive cell death response. Overexpression (OX) of CaPLP1 in Arabidopsis also conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPLP1-OX leaves showed reduced Pst growth, enhanced ROS burst and electrolyte leakage, induction of the defense response genes AtPR1, AtRbohD and AtGST, as well as constitutive activation of both the SA-dependent gene AtPR1 and the JA-dependent gene AtPDF1.2. Together, these results suggest that CaPLP1 is involved in plant defense and cell death signaling in response to microbial pathogens.

  5. Growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants amended with two sanitized sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Immaculada; Azcona, Iñaki; Aguirreolea, Jone; Morales, Fermín; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Palma, José Manuel; Rellán-Alvarez, Rubén; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-06-09

    Organic wastes such as sewage sludge have been successfully used to increase crop productivity of horticultural soils. Nevertheless, considerations of the impact of sludges on vegetable and fruit quality have received little attention. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to investigate the impact of two sanitized sewage sludges, autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) and compost sludge, on the growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants ( Capsicum annuum L. cv. Piquillo) grown in the greenhouse. Two doses of ATAD (15 and 30% v/v) and three of composted sludge (15, 30, and 45%) were applied to a peat-based potting mix. Unamended substrate was included as control. ATAD and composted sludge increased leaf, shoot, and root dry matter, as well as fruit yield, mainly due to a higher number of fruits per plant. There was no effect of sludge on fruit size (dry matter per fruit and diameter). The concentrations of Zn and Cu in fruit increased with the addition of sewage sludges. Nevertheless, the levels of these elements remained below toxic thresholds. Pepper fruits from sludge-amended plants maintained low concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, thus indicating low pungency level, in accordance with the regulations prescribed by the Control Board of "Lodosa Piquillo peppers" Origin Denomination. The application of sludges did not modify the concentration of vitamin C (ASC) in fruit, whereas the highest doses of composted sludge tended to increase the content of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, without change in the GSH/GSSG ratio. There were no effects of sludge on the transcript levels of enzymes involved in the synthesis of vitamin C, l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) or in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR). Results suggest that the synthesis and degradation of ASC and GSH were compensated for in most of the

  6. Two separate regions in the genome of the tobacco etch virus contain determinants of the wilting response of Tabasco pepper.

    PubMed

    Chu, M; Lopez-Moya, J J; Llave-Correas, C; Pirone, T P

    1997-05-01

    Infection of Tabasco pepper by the tobacco etch virus (TEV) typically causes wilting associated with root necrosis. However, a strain of TEV, designated TEV nonwilting (TEV NW), is able to infect Tabasco pepper plants but does not cause wilting. In order to locate the genetic determinants responsible for the wilting response, a full-length cDNA clone of TEV NW from which infectious transcripts can be derived was made. A number of chimeric constructs were prepared by substituting cDNA fragments between TEV HAT (which causes wilting) and TEV NW clones. This approach was used to identify two wilting determinants in TEV HAT: one encompasses the 3' one-third of the P3 encoding region; the other spans the 3' end of the CI, the 6-kDa protein, and the 5' end of the VPg-NIa coding regions. Substitutions of both these TEV NW fragments into TEV HAT resulted in infection but not wilting of Tabasco pepper, while the replacement of either of the fragments alone did not alter the wilting response. This indicates that both TEV NW regions contain determinants necessary but not sufficient to alter the wilting response and that both must be present in order to avoid the wilting response. There was no difference between the in vitro transcription-translation products derived from constructs containing these regions from TEV HAT and TEV NW.

  7. Reduction of mycotoxins in white pepper.

    PubMed

    Jalili, M; Jinap, S

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for the reduction of aflatoxins B₁ (AFB₁), B₂ (AFB₂), G₁ (AFG₁), G₂ (AFG₂) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in white pepper was studied. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the effect of four variables, which included time (20-60 min), temperature (30-70°C), calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)₂) (0-1%) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) (1-3%) during the washing step of white pepper. The efficacy of the method was evaluated by the determination of mycotoxins by HPLC with fluorescence detection (FD). Statistical analysis showed that the experimental data could be adequately fitted into a second-order polynomial model, with a multiple regression coefficient (R²) in the range of 0.805-0.907 for AFG₂ and AFG₁, respectively. The optimal condition was 57.8 min, 62.0°C, of 0.6% (w/v) and 2.8% (v/v) for time, temperature, Ca(OH)₂ and H₂O₂ respectively. By applying the optimum condition, the mycotoxins reduction was found to be in the range of 68.5-100% for AFB₂ and AFG₁ respectively.

  8. [Severe type 1-allergy to raw bell pepper].

    PubMed

    Rüger, R D; Wagner, S; Simon, J C; Treudler, R

    2010-04-01

    We report on a patient with rare anaphylaxis after ingestion of raw bell pepper. A complex cluster of sensitization including grass and birch pointed out a possible pollen-associated food allergy. We suggest that the severe reaction is due to cross-reactivity towards Bet v 1. Western blot showed binding of the patient's serum to an 11 kDa protein, which has not been described yet and might be a new allergenic structure of the bell pepper plant or a fragment of the Bet v 1-homologous bell pepper protein.

  9. Conditions of viscosity measurement for detecting irradiated peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Okadome, Hiroshi; Kohyama, Kaoru

    1995-04-01

    Viscosity of gelatinized suspensions of black and white peppers decreased depending upon dose. The viscosity was influenced by gelatinization and viscosity measurement conditions. The difference between unirradiated pepper and an irradiated one was larger at a higher pH and temperature for gelatinization. A viscosity parameter normalized with the starch content of pepper sample and the viscosity of a 5% suspension of corn starch could get rid of the influence of the conditions for viscosity measurement such as a type of viscometer, shear rate and temperature.

  10. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  11. Antioxidant activities of different colored sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Xu, Z; Wu, C-T; Janes, M; Prinyawiwatkul, W; No, H K

    2007-03-01

    Antioxidant compounds and their antioxidant activity in 4 different colored (green, yellow, orange, and red) sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) were investigated. The total phenolics content of green, yellow, orange, and red peppers determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method were 2.4, 3.3, 3.4, and 4.2 micromol catechin equivalent/g fresh weight, respectively. The red pepper had significantly higher total phenolics content than the green pepper. Among the 4 different colored peppers, red pepper contained a higher level of beta-carotene (5.4 microg/g), capsanthin (8.0 microg/g), quercetin (34.0 microg/g), and luteolin (11.0 microg/g). The yellow pepper had the lowest beta-carotene content (0.2 microg/g), while the green one had undetectable capsanthin and the lowest content of luteolin (2.0 microg/g). The free radical scavenging abilities of peppers determined by the 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method were lowest for the green pepper (2.1 micromol Trolox equivalent/g) but not significantly different from the other 3 peppers. All 4 colored peppers exhibited significant abilities in preventing the oxidation of cholesterol or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6) during heating. However, these 4 peppers did not show significant differences in their abilities in preventing cholesterol oxidation. The green pepper showed slightly higher capability in preventing the oxidation of DHA compared to the other 3 peppers.

  12. Electroporetic transfection of pepper protoplasts with plant potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Nubia; Murphy, John F; Suh, Sang-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Potyviruses are a persistent threat to bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) production worldwide. Much effort has been expended to study the resistance response of pepper cultivars at whole plant levels but with only limited effort at the cellular level using protoplasts. A pepper protoplast isolation procedure is available but an inoculation procedure is needed that provides consistent and highly efficient infection. An electroporation-based procedure for inoculation of potyviruses was developed using a base procedure developed for Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The final parameters identified for efficient potyvirus infection of pepper protoplasts involves two 25ms pulses, 200V each pulse with a 10s interval between pulses. Depending on the method of detection, e.g., ELISA versus RT-PCR, potyvirus RNA inoculum ranged from 10 to 40μg with infection detection occurring with samples of 50,000-100,000 protoplasts.

  13. Heterogeneity in pepper isolates of cucumber mosaic virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez-Alvarado, G.; Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) field isolates from pepper crops in Cali-fornia were characterized and compared by nucleic acid hybridization subgrouping, virion electrophoresis, and biological effects in several hosts. Isolates, belonging to subgroup I or subgroup II, were found that induced severe symptoms in mechanically inoculated bell pep-pers. Only two isolates, both from subgroup II, were mild. A group of 19 isolates collected from a single field were all in subgroup II and appeared identical by virion electrophoresis, but they exhibited varying degrees of symptom severity in peppers. As a more detailed indicator of heterogeneity, these 19 isolates were examined by RNase protection assays to delect sequence variation in the coat protein gene region of their genomes. The patterns of bands observed were complex and a high degree of genomic heterogeneity was detected between isolates, with no apparent correlation to symptomatology in bell pepper.

  14. Hot Chili Peppers: Extraction, Cleanup, and Measurement of Capsaicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping; Mabury, Scott A.; Sagebiel, John C.

    2000-12-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the red pepper or Capsicum annuum, is widely used in food preparation. The purpose of this experiment was to acquaint students with the active ingredients of hot chili pepper (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin), the extraction, cleanup, and analysis of these chemicals, as a fun and informative analytical exercise. Fresh peppers were prepared and extracted with acetonitrile, removing plant co-extractives by addition to a C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridge. Elution of the capsaicinoids was accomplished with a methanol-acetic acid solution. Analysis was completed by reverse-phase HPLC with diode-array or variable wavelength detection and calibration with external standards. Levels of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin were typically found to correlate with literature values for a specific hot pepper variety. Students particularly enjoyed relating concentrations of capsaicinoids to their perceived valuation of "hotness".

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-32 Peppers... Agriculture and Forestry (MAF). (b) The greenhouses must be equipped with double self-closing doors, and any...

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-32 Peppers... Agriculture and Forestry (MAF). (b) The greenhouses must be equipped with double self-closing doors, and any...

  17. 75 FR 30303 - Importation of Peppers From Panama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... introduced into the United States via peppers, including 8 insect pests, 1 bacterium, 1 fungus, and 2 viruses...). Melon thrips (Thrips palmi). Bacterium: Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2). Fungus...

  18. A simple method for screening of plant NBS-LRR genes that confer a hypersensitive response to plant viruses and its application for screening candidate pepper genes against Pepper mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-06-01

    Plant NBS-LRR genes are abundant and have been increasingly cloned from plant genomes. In this study, a method based on agroinfiltration and virus inoculation was developed for the simple and inexpensive screening of candidate R genes that confer a hypersensitive response to plant viruses. The well-characterized resistance genes Rx and N, which confer resistance to Potato virus X (PVX) and tobamovirus, respectively, were used to optimize a transient expression assay for detection of hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Infectious sap of PVX and Tobacco mosaic virus were used to induce hypersensitive response in Rx- and N-infiltrated leaves, respectively. The transient expression of the N gene induced local hypersensitive response upon infection of another tobamovirus, Pepper mild mottle virus, through both sap and transcript inoculation. When this method was used to screen 99 candidate R genes from pepper, an R gene that confers hypersensitive response to the potyvirus Pepper mottle virus was identified. The method will be useful for the identification of plant R genes that confer resistance to viruses.

  19. Complete sequencing and comparative analyses of the pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plastome revealed high frequency of tandem repeats and large insertion/deletions on pepper plastome.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeong Deuk; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Jungeun; Song, Wonho; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2011-02-01

    Plants in the family Solanaceae are used as model systems in comparative and evolutionary genomics. The complete chloroplast genomes of seven solanaceous species have been sequenced, including tobacco, potato and tomato, but not peppers. We analyzed the complete chloroplast genome sequence of the hot pepper, Capsicum annuum. The pepper chloroplast genome was 156,781 bp in length, including a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,783 bp. The content and the order of 133 genes in the pepper chloroplast genome were identical to those of other solanaceous plastomes. To characterize pepper plastome sequence, we performed comparative analysis using complete plastome sequences of pepper and seven solanaceous plastomes. Frequency and contents of large indels and tandem repeat sequences and distribution pattern of genome-wide sequence variations were investigated. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis using concatenated alignments of coding sequences was performed to determine evolutionary position of pepper in Solanaceae. Our results revealed two distinct features of pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Firstly, large indels, including insertions on accD and rpl20 gene sequences, were predominantly detected in the pepper plastome compared to other solanaceous plastomes. Secondly, tandem repeat sequences were particularly frequent in the pepper plastome. Taken together, our study represents unique features of evolution of pepper plastome among solanaceous plastomes.

  20. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  1. CaHDZ27, a Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper I (HD-Zip I) Protein, Positively Regulates the Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum Infection in Pepper.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shaoliang; Liu, Zhiqin; Gao, Feng; Yang, Sheng; Su, Meixia; Shen, Lei; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2017-08-25

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper class I (HD-Zip I) transcription factors (TFs) have been functionally characterized in plant responses to abiotic stresses, but their roles in plant immunity are poorly understood. Here, a HD-Zip I gene, CaHZ27, was isolated from pepper (Capsicum annum) and characterized for its role in pepper immunity. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that CaHDZ27 was transcriptionally induced by Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation and exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), or ethephon (ETH). The CaHDZ27-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fused protein was targeted exclusively to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that CaHDZ27 bound to the 9-bp pseudopalindromic element (CAATAATTG) and triggered GUS expression in a CAATAATTG-dependent manner. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaHDZ27 significantly attenuated the resistance of pepper plants against R. solanacearum and downregulated defense-related marker genes including CaHIR1, CaACO1, CaPR1, CaPR4, CaPO2, and CaBPR1. By contrast, transient overexpression of CaHDZ27 triggered strong cell death mediated by the hypersensitive response (HR), and upregulated the tested immunity-associated marker genes. Ectopic CaHDZ27 expression in tobacco enhances its resistance against R. solanacearum. These results collectively suggest that CaHDZ27 functions as a positive regulator in pepper resistance against R. solanacearum. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays indicate that CaHDZ27 monomers bind with each other, and this binding is enhanced significantly by R. solanacearum inoculation. We speculate that homodimerization of CaHZ27 might play a role in pepper response to R. solanacearum, further direct evidence is required to confirm it.

  2. Induction of a pepper cDNA encoding SAR8.2 protein during the resistance response to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, G J; Shin, R; Park, C J; Yoo, T H; Paek, K H

    2001-10-31

    A cDNA library was constructed with mRNA extracted from TMV resistant hot pepper plants 24 and 48 h after inoculation by TMV. The library was screened differentially with radio-labeled cDNA synthesized with mRNA from the leaves of either TMV-inoculated or mock-inoculated hot pepper plants. CaSAR8.2 clone was one of the clones isolated by this differential screening. The predicted amino acid sequence of CaSAR8.2 has a homology of 52% similarity to that of tobacco SAR8.2 genes. Southern blot analysis showed that a multigene family of CaSAR8.2 was present in the hot pepper genome. Transcripts homologous to CaSAR8.2 accumulated abundantly in the leaves and the flowers, but little in other tissues. CaSAR8.2 gene expression was induced by avirulent pathotype TMV-P0 inoculation but not by virulent TMV-P1.2 inoculation. Effects of exogenously applied abiotic elicitors on CaSAR8.2 expression were also examined. Salicylic acid and ethephon treatments caused a rapid accumulation of CaSAR8.2 transcripts in pepper leaves and methyl jasmonate treatment slightly induced the expression of CaSAR8.2. A strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) that contains an avirulence gene avrBs2, was infiltrated into the leaves of a pepper cultivar containing the Bs2 resistance gene. A marked induction of CaSAR8.2 gene expression was observed in Xcv-infiltrated leaves. These results suggest possible roles of CaSAR8.2 as pathogenesis-related protein against varieties of pathogens including virus and bacteria.

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of CaPIP1-1 gene in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Xu; Wang, Shu-Bin; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Xiao, Huai-Juan; Jin, Jing-Hao; Ji, Jiao-Jiao; Jing, Hua; Chen, Ru-Gang; Arisha, Mohamed Hamed; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-05-25

    Plant aquaporins are responsible for water transmembrane transport, which play an important role on abiotic and biotic stresses. A novel plasma membrane intrinsic protein of CaPIP1-1 was isolated from the pepper P70 according to transcriptome databases of Phytophthora capsici inoculation and chilling stress library. CaPIP1-1, which is 1155 bp in length with an open reading frame of 861 bp, encoded 286 amino acids. Three introns, exhibited CT/AC splice junctions, were observed in CaPIP1-1. The numbers and location of introns in CaPIP1-1 were the same as observed in tomato and potato. CaPIP1-1 was abundantly expressed in pepper fruit. Increased transcription levels of CaPIP1-1 were found in the different stresses, including chilling stress, salt stress, mannitol stress, salicylic acid, ABA treatment and Phytophthora capsici infection. The expression of CaPIP1-1 was downregulated by 50 μM HgCl2 and 100 μM fluridone. The pepper plants silenced CaPIP1-1 in cv. Qiemen showed growth inhibition and decreased tolerance to salt and mannitol stresses using detached leaf method.

  4. Overexpression of the CaTIP1-1 pepper gene in tobacco enhances resistance to osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Xu; Wang, Shu-Bin; Xiao, Huai-Juan; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Zhang, Zhen; Jing, Hua; Zhang, Ying-Li; Chen, Ru-Gang; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-11-04

    Both the gene expression and activity of water channel protein can control transmembrane water movement. We have reported the overexpression of CaTIP1-1, which caused a decrease in chilling tolerance in transgenic plants by increasing the size of the stomatal pore. CaTIP1-1 expression was strongly induced by salt and mannitol stresses in pepper (Capsicum annuum). However, its biochemical and physiological functions are still unknown in transgenic tobacco. In this study, transient expression of CaTIP1-1-GFP in tobacco suspension cells revealed that the protein was localized in the tonoplast. CaTIP1-1 overexpressed in radicle exhibited vigorous growth under high salt and mannitol treatments more than wild-type plants. The overexpression of CaTIP1-1 pepper gene in tobacco enhanced the antioxidant enzyme activities and increased transcription levels of reactive oxygen species-related gene expression under osmotic stresses. Moreover, the viability of transgenic tobacco cells was higher than the wild-type after exposure to stress. The pepper plants with silenced CaTIP1-1 in P70 decreased tolerance to salt and osmotic stresses using the detached leaf method. We concluded that the CaTIP1-1 gene plays an important role in response to osmotic stresses in tobacco.

  5. The Pun1 gene for pungency in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Liu, Kede; Mazourek, Michael; Moore, Shanna L; Yoo, Eun Young; Kim, Byung-Dong; Paran, Ilan; Jahn, Molly M

    2005-06-01

    Pungency in Capsicum fruits is due to the accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs. The biosynthesis of capsaicin is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of an aromatic moiety, vanillylamine, by a branched-chain fatty acid. Many of the enzymes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis are not well characterized and the regulation of the pathway is not fully understood. Based on the current pathway model, candidate genes were identified in public databases and the literature, and genetically mapped. A published EST co-localized with the Pun1 locus which is required for the presence of capsaicinoids. This gene, AT3, has been isolated and its nucleotide sequence has been determined in an array of genotypes within the genus. AT3 showed significant similarity to acyltransferases in the BAHD superfamily. The recessive allele at this locus contains a deletion spanning the promoter and first exon of the predicted coding region in every non-pungent accession tested. Transcript and protein expression of AT3 was tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Virus-induced gene silencing of AT3 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of capsaicinoids, a phenotype consistent with pun1. In conclusion, gene mapping, allele sequence data, expression profile and silencing analysis collectively indicate that the Pun1 locus in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase, and the pun1 allele, used in pepper breeding for nearly 50 000 years, results from a large deletion at this locus.

  6. Organ-specific defence strategies of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) during early phase of water deficit.

    PubMed

    Sziderics, Astrid Heide; Oufir, Mouhssin; Trognitz, Friederike; Kopecky, Dieter; Matusíková, Ildikó; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Wilhelm, Eva

    2010-03-01

    Drought is one of the major factors that limits crop production and reduces yield. To understand the early response of plants under nearly natural conditions, pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown in a greenhouse and stressed by withholding water for 1 week. Plants adapted to the decreasing water content of the soil by adjustment of their osmotic potential in root tissue. As a consequence of drought, strong accumulation of raffinose, glucose, galactinol and proline was detected in the roots. In contrast, in leaves the levels of fructose, sucrose and also galactinol increased. Due to the water deficit cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine accumulated in leaves, whereas the concentration of polyamines was reduced in roots. To study the molecular basis of these responses, a combined approach of suppression subtractive hybridisation and microarray technique was performed on the same material. A total of 109 unique ESTs were detected as responsive to drought, while additional 286 ESTs were selected from the bulk of rare transcripts on the array. The metabolic profiles of stressed pepper plants are discussed with respect to the transcriptomic changes detected, while attention is given to the differences between defence strategies of roots and leaves.

  7. Susceptibility of ornamental pepper banker plant candidates to common greenhouse pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Susceptibility of four potential ornamental pepper banker plant candidates [Black Pearl (BP), Explosive Ember (EE), Masquerade (MA), Red Missile (RM), and a commercial pepper cultivar Blitz (BL)] were evaluated against three common greenhouse pests - Bemisia tabaci, Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Fra...

  8. A differentially expressed proteomic analysis in placental tissues in relation to pungency during the pepper fruit development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Min; Kim, Seyoon; Lee, Ji Young; Yoo, Eun Young; Cho, Myeong Cheoul; Cho, Min Rae; Kim, Byung-Dong; Bahk, Young Yil

    2006-10-01

    Using proteomic analysis including 2-DE, image analysis, and protein identification with LC-MS/MS, an investigation aimed at a better understanding of the differentially expressed proteins and/or gene products was carried out with total cell extracts from placental tissues in nonpungent (Capsicum annuum cv. Saeng-Ryeog #213) and pungent peppers (C. annuum cv. Saeng-Ryeog #211). Mobilization of the most abundant proteins, which were on the gels of pH ranges of 4-7, 4.5-5.5, 5.5-6.7, and 6-9, and showed very similar profiles in the two tissues, revealing approximately 2600 protein spots consisting of 1200 on pH 4-7, 600 on 4.5-5.5, 550 on 5.5-6.7, 250 on 6-9. Of these, 37 protein spots, which appeared in only pungent tissues but not in nonpungent tissues or markedly increased in their staining intensities on the gels from pungent tissue, were selected, excised, in-gel trypsin digested, and analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Peptide MS/MS data were searched against publicly available protein and EST databases, and 22 proteins were identified. Based on this result, we tested and compared the differential expression during fruit development on the 2-DE gels with total cell extracts from placental tissues of pungent and nonpungent peppers at an interval of 10 days from 10 to 40 days after flowering. In addition, this differential protein expression was further confirmed for some subsets of candidates by Northern-blot analysis with RNA samples from placental tissues harvested from each pepper fruit at the same sampling intervals. In this study, the physiological implications, revealed from the experimental data in the levels of proteome and transcripts, are discussed in the context of a complex biosynthesis network of capsaicinoids in pepper cells responsive to pungency.

  9. The pepper RNA-binding protein CaRBP1 functions in hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression via post-transcriptional modification by RNA-binding proteins is crucial for plant disease and innate immunity. Here, we report the identification of the pepper (Capsicum annuum) RNA-binding protein1 gene (CaRBP1) as essential for hypersensitive cell death and defense signaling in the cytoplasm. CaRBP1 contains an RNA recognition motif and is rapidly and strongly induced in pepper by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaRBP1 displays in vitro RNA- and DNA-binding activity and in planta nucleocytoplasmic localization. Transient expression of CaRBP1 in pepper leaves triggers cell-death and defense responses. Notably, cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1, mediated by the N-terminal region of CaRBP1, is essential for the hypersensitive cell-death response. Silencing of CaRBP1 in pepper plants significantly enhances susceptibility to avirulent Xcv infection. This is accompanied by compromised hypersensitive cell death, production of reactive oxygen species in oxidative bursts, expression of defense marker genes and accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Over-expression of CaRBP1 in Arabidopsis confers reduced susceptibility to infection by the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Together, these results suggest that cytoplasmic localization of CaRBP1 is required for plant signaling of hypersensitive cell-death and defense responses. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections.

  11. The salicylic acid-induced protection of non-climacteric unripe pepper fruit against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is similar to the resistance of ripe fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyeob; Hong, Jong-Chan; Jeon, Woong Bae; Chung, Young-Soo; Sung, Soonkee; Choi, Doil; Joung, Young Hee; Oh, Boung-Jun

    2009-10-01

    The anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides deleteriously affects unripe pepper fruit, but not ripe fruit. Here, we show that the induction of local acquired resistance (LAR) by salicylic acid (SA), 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, or benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester pretreatment protects unripe pepper fruit against the fungus, while jasmonic acid (JA) does not. The SA-mediated LAR in the unripe fruit inhibited the fungal appressoria, resulting in protection against fungal infection. Microarray analysis revealed that 177 of 7,900 cDNA clones showed more than fourfold transcriptional accumulation in SA-treated unripe fruit. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that most of the SA-responsive genes (SRGs) were regulated by SA, but not by JA or ethylene-releasing ethephon. Furthermore, most of the SRGs were preferentially expressed in the ripe fruit. These results suggest that the SA-mediated transcriptional regulation of SRGs has a critical role in the resistance of ripe pepper fruit to fungal infection.

  12. Authentication of bell peppers using boron and strontium isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Vogl, Jochen; Voerkelius, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    The wrong declaration of food in terms of geographical origin and production method is a major problem for the individual consumer and public regulatory authorities. The authentication of food matrices using H-C-N-O-S isotopic compositions is already well established. However, specific questions require additional isotopic systems, which are more diagonstic for the source reservoires involved or production methods used. Here we present B and Sr isotopic compositions of bell peppers from Europe (Germany, Austria, Netherlands, Spain) and Israel to verfiy their origin. The bell peppers' B isotopic compositions between different locations are highly variable (d11BNISTSRM951 -8 to +35 ‰), whereas the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are all close to modern seawater Sr isotopic composition of about 0.7092 (0.7078 to 0.7107), but still can reliably be distinguished. Distinct isotopically heavy and light B isotopic fingerprints are obtained for bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands. Samples from Germany, Austria, and Spain display overlapping d11B values between 0 and +12 ‰. Bell peppers from Israel show high d11B values (+28 to +35 ‰) combined with 87Sr/86Sr ratios slightly more unradiogenic than modern seawater (ca 0.7079). Bell peppers from the Netherlands, however, show low d11B values (-8 ‰) combinded with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of modern seawater (approx. 0.7085). Mainly based on diagnostic B isotopic compositions bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands can be related to a specific geographical growing environment (Israel) or production method (Netherlands). The isotope fingerprints of bell peppers from the Netherlands are consistent with growing conditions in greenhouses typical for the Netherlands vegetable farming. Using optimized production methods crops in greenhouses were supplied with nutritients by liquid fertilizers on artificial substrates. As most fertilizers derive from non-marine salt deposits, fertilization typically imprints invariant d11B values close

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peppers from the Republic of Korea. 319.56-42 Section... Peppers from the Republic of Korea. Peppers (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) from the Republic of Korea... Republic of Korea in insect-proof greenhouses approved by and registered with the National Plant Quarantine...

  14. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peppers from the Republic of Korea. 319.56-42 Section... Peppers from the Republic of Korea. Peppers (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) from the Republic of Korea... Republic of Korea in insect-proof greenhouses approved by and registered with the National Plant Quarantine...

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peppers from the Republic of Korea. 319.56-42 Section... Peppers from the Republic of Korea. Peppers (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) from the Republic of Korea... Republic of Korea in insect-proof greenhouses approved by and registered with the National Plant Quarantine...

  16. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Five root-knot nematode resistant pepper genotypes and three susceptible pepper genotypes were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be pathogenic to bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The pepp...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bell Pepper Endornavirus Isolate from Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2015-08-20

    Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) is a double-stranded RNA virus infecting economically important crops, such as peppers. Next-generation sequencing of small RNAs extracted from the leaves of a pepper plant showing mild viral symptoms, along with subsequent analysis, identified BPEV. The complete genome of this isolate was cloned and sequenced.

  18. Electronic Nose Based Alternative Method for the Determination of Capsaicin in Hot Chili Pepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, E. I.; Andreoli, A.; Martinelli, E.; Candeloro, N.; Mantini, A.; di Natale, C.; de Lorenzo, A.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the EN aptitude to evaluate different pepper brands' freshness by repeated measurements of chosen pepper samples. This, in addition to study the possibility of differentiation and classification of Bell, Thai and Scotch Bonnet pepper brands, available in the Italian market.

  19. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiyan; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from the Republic of Korea. 319.56-42 Section... Peppers from the Republic of Korea. Peppers (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) from the Republic of Korea... Republic of Korea in insect-proof greenhouses approved by and registered with the National Plant...

  1. Antimutagenic activity of carotenoids in green peppers against some nitroarenes.

    PubMed

    Gonzáez de Mejía, E; Quintanar-Hernández, A; Loarca-Piña, G

    1998-08-07

    In Mexico, as well as in Central and South American countries, the consumption of peppers (Capsicum annuum) has been tradition for thousands of years; the per capita dietary intake of peppers is about 40 g/day. Peppers are an important source of beta-carotene and vitamin A, which have antimutagenic and/or anticarcinogenic properties. In the present study, Salmonella typhimurium tester strain YG1024 in the plate-incorporation test was used to examine the antimutagenicity of carotenois extracted from five different types of Capsicum spp. ('Chilaca', 'Poblano', 'Serrano', 'Jalapeño' and 'Pimiento') which were chosen, based on their consumption and availability on the local market. Extracts from these peppers were tested against 1-6-dinitropyrene (1,6-DNP) and 1,8-dinitropyrene (1,8-DNP) mutagenicity. Dose-response mutagenicity curves of 1-NP; 1,6-DNP and 1,8-DNP were obtained. For the antimutagenicity studies, doses of 0.05 microgram/plate, 0.20 ng/plate and 0.06 ng/plate for 1-NP, 1,6-DPN and 1,8-DNP respectively were chosen, and the number of net revertants/plate were 1008 for 1-NP, 512 for 1,6-DNP, and 712 for 1,8-DPN. Trans-beta-carotene and the extracts were not toxic to the bacteria at the concentrations tested. The extracts obtained from the peppers showed more inhibition than pure trans-beta-carotene on 1-NP; 1,6-DNP and 1,8-DNP mutagenicity. Chilaca pepper extract required 0.36 g (34 nmol expressed as trans-beta-carotene equivalents) of fresh pepper to inhibit 94% on 1-NP mutagenicity, 78% on 1,6-DNP mutagenicity and 84% on 1,8-DNP mutagenicity. Bell pepper ('Pimiento') extract required 1.53 g (50 nmol expressed as trans-beta-carotene) to obtain 87%, 79% and 73% inhibition on 1-NP; 1,6-DNP and 1,8-DNP mutagenicity respectively. Since pure beta-carotene inhibited only approximately 50% the mutagenicity of nitroarenes, these results suggest that each one of the pepper extracts have more than one antimutagenic compound (e.g., beta-carotene and xanthophylls) and

  2. Postharvest quality and shelf life of some hot pepper varieties.

    PubMed

    Samira, Awole; Woldetsadik, Kebede; Workneh, Tilahun S

    2013-10-01

    Five hot pepper varieties were grown at Haramaya University Research Farm, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. The experiment was undertaken using completely randomized block design (RCBD) with three replications. Green peppers were stored under ambient and evaporatively cooled conditions. Significant (P ≤ 0.05) differences were observed among cultivars and storage conditions in changes in quality of pepper. Storage at ambient conditions resulted in high weight loss and rapid deterioration in chemical composition. The highest and lowest moisture contents were recorded in Melka Eshet and PBC 600, respectively. Evaporative cooler reduced weight loss and maintained higher levels of pH, ascorbic acid and marketability. The highest weight loss was recorded in Melka Dima stored at ambient condition. The lowest weight loss and highest ascorbic acid content was obtained in Mareko Fana stored in evaporative cooler. After 16 days of storage, all pepper fruits stored at ambient condition were unmarketable while those stored in evaporative cooler were kept up to 28 days. The highest pungency level was observed in ambient storage environment than in evaporative cooler. Evaporative cooling was shown to improve shelf life by four-fold compared to the ambient condition. The shelf life of pepper was improved in all varieties tested while the quality characteristics were maintained better in Mareko Fana than in the other varieties when harvested at mature-green stage and stored under evaporatively cooled storage.

  3. Pungency Quantitation of Hot Pepper Sauces Using HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Thomas A.

    1999-02-01

    A class of compounds known as capsaicinoids are responsible for the "heat" of hot peppers. To determine the pungency of a particular pepper or pepper product, one may quantify the capsaicinoids and relate those concentrations to the perceived heat. The format of the laboratory described here allows students to collectively develop an HPLC method for the quantitation of the two predominant capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) in hot-pepper products. Each small group of students investigated one of the following aspects of the method: detector wavelength, mobile-phase composition, extraction of capsaicinoids, calibration, and quantitation. The format of the lab forced students to communicate and cooperate to develop this method. The resulting HPLC method involves extraction with acetonitrile followed by solid-phase extraction clean-up, an isocratic 80:20 methanol-water mobile phase, a 4.6 mm by 25 cm C-18 column, and UV absorbance detection at 284 nm. The method developed by the students was then applied to the quantitation of capsaicinoids in a variety of hot pepper sauces. Editor's Note on Hazards in our April 2000 issue addresses the above.

  4. Biochemical properties of polysaccharides from black pepper.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hyug; Shin, Dong Hoon; Hong, Bum Shik; Cho, Won Dai; Cho, Hong Yon; Yang, Han Chul

    2002-09-01

    The purified polysaccharides from Piper nigrum were prepared as follows: a hot water extract of pepper seeds was fractionated by ultrafiltration with a 5-kDa-membrane cartridge. A fraction with 5 kDa or bigger molecules was successively purified by open column chromatography on DEAE-Toyopearl 650C and Bio-gel P-60 with each active fraction, resulting in PN-Ib and PN-IIa, purified anti-complementary polysaccharides. None of the anti-complementary activity of any polysaccharide was changed by pronase digestion or polymyxin B treatment, but they were decreased by periodate oxidation. Analysis of component sugar and molecular mass determination of the anti-complementary polysaccharides indicated that PN-Ib with an average molecular mass of 21 kDa contained 88.5% glucose and other negligible minor monosaccharides, while PN-IIa showed a different monosaccharide composition, which contained a significant proportion of galactose, arabinose, galacturonic acid and rhamnose. The molar ratio of galactose and arabinose of PN-IIa (48 kDa) was 1.93:1. PN-1 did not react with beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent, however, PN-IIa did react, which indicated that PN-IIa might be an arabinogalactan. Based upon these results, the usefulness of purified anti-complementary polysaccharides from Piper nigrum is suggested as a supplement for immune enhancement.

  5. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  6. Development of T cell lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP factor and Tax double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL cells possess a CD4+ CD25+ phenotype, similar to that of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genomic RNA, is expressed in all ATL cases and induces neoplastic and inflammatory disease in vivo. To test whether HBZ and Tax are both required for T cell malignancy, we generated HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice in which HBZ and Tax are expressed exclusively in CD4+ T cells. Survival was much reduced in HBZ/Tax double-transgenic mice compared with wild type littermates. Transgenic expression of HBZ and Tax induced skin lesions and T-cell lymphoma in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, Tax single transgenic mice did not develop major health problems. In addition, memory CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Treg cells counts were increased in HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice, and their proliferation was enhanced. There was very little difference between HBZ single and HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice. Taken together, these results show that HBZ, in addition to Tax, plays a critical role in T-cell lymphoma arising from HTLV-1 infection.

  7. Pepper beta-galactosidase 1 (PBG1) plays a significant role in fruit ripening in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Nakajima, Tasuku

    2007-02-01

    During bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit ripening, beta-galactosidase activity increased markedly as compared with other glycosidases. We purified 77.5 kDa exo-1,4-beta-D-galactanase from red bell pepper fruit classified as beta-galactosidase II. A marked decrease in galactose content appeared during fruit ripening, especially in the pectic fraction. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed a considerable amount of galactose residues in this fraction. We isolated bell pepper beta-galactosidase (PBG1) cDNA. This PBG1 protein contained the putative active site, G-G-P-[LIVM]-x-Q-x-E-N-E-[FY], belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 35. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of PBG1 in red fruit was significantly stronger than that from any other tissues. Moreover, expression of PBG1 occurred prior to that of pepper endo-polygalacturonase 1 (PPG1), the major fruit-ripening enzyme. Based on these results, it appears that the hydrolysis of galactose residues in pectic substances is the first event in the ripening process in bell pepper fruit.

  8. Characterization of a new potyvirus infecting pepper crops in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Janzac, Bérenger; Fabre, Marie-Françoise; Palloix, Alain; Moury, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Sequencing 2,951 nucleotides of the 3' proximal region of the genome of a potyvirus isolate collected from Capsicum pubescens (rocoto) pepper in Ecuador revealed that this was the first representative of a new species tentatively named Ecuadorian rocoto virus (ERV). Phylogeny reconstruction showed that this isolate clustered with potato virus V (PVV), Peru tomato virus and wild potato mosaic virus into a monophyletic group, and was closest to PVV. The isolate was shown to be infectious in tobacco, tomato and, contrary to PVV, in pepper. The pvr2(1), pvr2(2), and Pvr4 genes present in many pepper cultivars conferred resistance toward this isolate and could help control ERV.

  9. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-07-15

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity.

  10. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-02-01

    The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed.

  11. Virus diseases of peppers (Capsicum spp.) and their control.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Kumar, Sanjeet; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Hughes, Jacqueline d'A

    2014-01-01

    The number of virus species infecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) crops and their incidences has increased considerably over the past 30 years, particularly in tropical and subtropical pepper production systems. This is probably due to a combination of factors, including the expansion and intensification of pepper cultivation in these regions, the increased volume and speed of global trade of fresh produce (including peppers) carrying viruses and vectors to new locations, and perhaps climate change expanding the geographic range suitable for the viruses and vectors. With the increased incidences of diverse virus species comes increased incidences of coinfection with two or more virus species in the same plant. There is then greater chance of synergistic interactions between virus species, increasing symptom severity and weakening host resistance, as well as the opportunity for genetic recombination and component exchange and a possible increase in aggressiveness, virulence, and transmissibility. The main virus groups infecting peppers are transmitted by aphids, whiteflies, or thrips, and a feature of many populations of these vector groups is that they can develop resistance to some of the commonly used insecticides relatively quickly. This, coupled with the increasing concern over the impact of over- or misuse of insecticides on the environment, growers, and consumers, means that there should be less reliance on insecticides to control the vectors of viruses infecting pepper crops. To improve the durability of pepper crop protection measures, there should be a shift away from the broadscale use of insecticides and the use of single, major gene resistance to viruses. Instead, integrated and pragmatic virus control measures should be sought that combine (1) cultural practices that reduce sources of virus inoculum and decrease the rate of spread of viruliferous vectors into the pepper crop, (2) synthetic insecticides, which should be used judiciously and only when the

  12. Evolution of total and individual capsaicinoids in peppers during ripening of the Cayenne pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Barbero, Gerardo F; Ruiz, Aurora G; Liazid, Ali; Palma, Miguel; Vera, Jesús C; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2014-06-15

    The evolution of total capsaicinoids and the individual contents of the five major capsaicinoids: nordihydrocapsaicin, capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, homocapsaicin and homodihydrocapsaicin present in the Cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), during fruit ripening, has been established. Capsaicinoids begin to accumulate gradually in the peppers from the beginning of its development up to a maximum concentration (1,789 μmol/Kg FW). From this time there is initially a sharp decrease in the total capsaicinoid content (32%), followed by a gradual decrease until day 80 of ripening. The two major capsaicinoids present in the Cayenne pepper are capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, which represent between 79% and 90%, respectively, of total capsaicinoids depending on fruit ripening. The relative content of capsaicin differs from the evolution of the other four capsaicinoids studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transgenic peppers that are highly tolerant to a new CMV pathotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Hee; Jung, Min; Shin, Sun Hee; Lee, Ji Hee; Choi, Soon Ho; Her, Nam Han; Lee, Jang Ha; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Paek, Kee Yoeup; Harn, Chee Hark

    2009-02-01

    The CMV (cucumber mosaic virus) is the most frequently occurring virus in chili pepper farms. A variety of peppers that are resistant to CMVP0 were developed in the middle of 1990s through a breeding program, and commercial cultivars have since been able to control the spread of CMVP0. However, a new pathotype (CMVP1) that breaks the resistance of CMVP0-resistant peppers has recently appeared and caused a heavy loss in productivity. Since no genetic source of this new pathotype was available, a traditional breeding method cannot be used to generate a CMVP1-resistant pepper variety. Therefore, we set up a transformation system of pepper using Agrobacterium that had been transfected with the coat protein gene, CMVP0-CP, with the aim of developing a new CMVP1-resistant pepper line. A large number of transgenic peppers (T(1), T(2) and T(3)) were screened for CMVP1 tolerance using CMVP1 inoculation. Transgenic peppers tolerant to CMVP1 were selected in a plastic house as well as in the field. Three independent T(3) pepper lines highly tolerant to the CMVP1 pathogen were found to also be tolerant to the CMVP0 pathogen. These selected T(3) pepper lines were phenotypically identical or close to the non-transformed lines. However, after CMVP1 infection, the height and fruit size of the non-transformed lines became shorter and smaller, respectively, while the T(3) pepper lines maintained a normal phenotype.

  14. Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream Containing Fermented Pepper Powder.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Su-Jung; Kim, Ji-Han; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, Woojoon; Kim, Soo-Ki; Seo, Han-Geuk; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the physical and sensory properties of ice cream containing fermented pepper powder. Three ice cream formulas were manufactured: 1, control; 2, supplemented with 0.1% fermented pepper powder; and 3, supplemented with 0.2% fermented pepper powder. Formulas 2 and 3 had significantly higher viscosity and lower overrun than formula 1 (p<0.05). Additionally, ice creams supplemented with fermented pepper powder were harder and maintained their forms longer than the controls. 0.2% fermented pepper powder added ice cream had no pungency as much as that of control and overall sensory attribute was not significantly different from control. Therefore, ice cream containing fermented pepper powder maintained physical and sensory properties similar to the controls, and maintenance was better. It means fermented pepper powder ice cream can be utilized as the material of functional food (dessert).

  15. Physical and Sensory Properties of Ice Cream Containing Fermented Pepper Powder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Seo, Han-Geuk

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the physical and sensory properties of ice cream containing fermented pepper powder. Three ice cream formulas were manufactured: 1, control; 2, supplemented with 0.1% fermented pepper powder; and 3, supplemented with 0.2% fermented pepper powder. Formulas 2 and 3 had significantly higher viscosity and lower overrun than formula 1 (p<0.05). Additionally, ice creams supplemented with fermented pepper powder were harder and maintained their forms longer than the controls. 0.2% fermented pepper powder added ice cream had no pungency as much as that of control and overall sensory attribute was not significantly different from control. Therefore, ice cream containing fermented pepper powder maintained physical and sensory properties similar to the controls, and maintenance was better. It means fermented pepper powder ice cream can be utilized as the material of functional food (dessert). PMID:28316469

  16. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing.

    PubMed

    Seal, Dakshina R; Martin, Cliff G

    2016-03-04

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin "Habanero" was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars "SY" and "SR" were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (<1.5 cm). However based on proportions of fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation.

  17. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Dakshina R.; Martin, Cliff G.

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin “Habanero” was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars “SY” and “SR” were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (<1.5 cm). However based on proportions of fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation. PMID:26959066

  18. Comparative analysis of pepper and tomato reveals euchromatin expansion of pepper genome caused by differential accumulation of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Among the Solanaceae plants, the pepper genome is three times larger than that of tomato. Although the gene repertoire and gene order of both species are well conserved, the cause of the genome-size difference is not known. To determine the causes for the expansion of pepper euchromatic regions, we compared the pepper genome to that of tomato. Results For sequence-level analysis, we generated 35.6 Mb of pepper genomic sequences from euchromatin enriched 1,245 pepper BAC clones. The comparative analysis of orthologous gene-rich regions between both species revealed insertion of transposons exclusively in the pepper sequences, maintaining the gene order and content. The most common type of the transposon found was the LTR retrotransposon. Phylogenetic comparison of the LTR retrotransposons revealed that two groups of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements (Tat and Athila) were overly accumulated in the pepper genome. The FISH analysis of the pepper Tat elements showed a random distribution in heterochromatic and euchromatic regions, whereas the tomato Tat elements showed heterochromatin-preferential accumulation. Conclusions Compared to tomato pepper euchromatin doubled its size by differential accumulation of a specific group of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements. Our results could provide an insight on the mechanism of genome evolution in the Solanaceae family. PMID:21276256

  19. The minimal transactivation domain of the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL interacts with TATA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Friedman, James S; Khanna, Hemant; Swain, Prabodh K; Denicola, Raphael; Cheng, Hong; Mitton, Kenneth P; Weber, Christian H; Hicks, David; Swaroop, Anand

    2004-11-05

    The basic motif-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor NRL controls the expression of rhodopsin and other phototransduction genes and is a key mediator of photoreceptor differentiation. To delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional initiation of rod-specific genes, we characterized different regions of the NRL protein using yeast-based autoactivation assays. We identified 35 amino acid residues in the proline- and serine-rich N-terminal region (called minimal transactivation domain, MTD), which, when combined with LexA or Gal4 DNA binding domains, exhibited activation of target promoters. Because this domain is conserved in all proteins of the large Maf family, we hypothesized that NRL-MTD played an important role in assembling the transcription initiation complex. Our studies showed that the NRL protein, including the MTD, interacted with full-length or the C-terminal domain of TATA-binding protein (TBP) in vitro. NRL and TBP could be co-immunoprecipitated from bovine retinal nuclear extract. TBP was also part of c-Maf and MafA (two other large Maf proteins)-containing complex(es) in vivo. Our data suggest that the function of NRL-MTD is to activate transcription by recruiting or stabilizing TBP (and consequently other components of the general transcription complex) at the promoter of target genes, and a similar function may be attributed to other bZIP proteins of the large Maf family.

  20. streamgap-pepper: Effects of peppering streams with many small impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo; Erkal, Denis; Sanders, Jason

    2017-02-01

    streamgap-pepper computes the effect of subhalo fly-bys on cold tidal streams based on the action-angle representation of streams. A line-of-parallel-angle approach is used to calculate the perturbed distribution function of a given stream segment by undoing the effect of all impacts. This approach allows one to compute the perturbed stream density and track in any coordinate system in minutes for realizations of the subhalo distribution down to 10^5 Msun, accounting for the stream's internal dispersion and overlapping impacts. This code uses galpy (ascl:1411.008) and the streampepperdf.py galpy extension, which implements the fast calculation of the perturbed stream structure.

  1. Activation of pepper basic PR-1 gene promoter during defense signaling to pathogen, abiotic and environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2005-08-15

    The basic PR-1 gene, CABPR1, accumulates in pepper leaf tissues during pathogen infection as well as after ethylene treatment. We isolated and functionally characterized the CABPR1 promoter region in tobacco leaves to identify the cis-acting regulatory sequences that are involved in CABPR1 gene expression. Constructs harboring the 5'-serially deleted CABPR1 promoter, which was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene, were evaluated for their promoter activity in the tobacco leaves. The CABPR1 promoter of 1670 bp in size was locally or systemically induced during a compatible interaction with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. The CABPR1 promoter also was differentially activated by treatment with ethylene, salicylic acid, nitric oxide, high salinity, drought and low temperature. The expression of the pepper transcription factors, CAZFP1 and CARAV1, activated the CABPR1 promoter. Analyses of a series of 5'-deletions of the CABPR1 promoter indicated that novel cis-acting elements essential for induction by pathogen and abiotic elicitors are localized in the region between -1670 bp and -1466 bp upstream from the translation start site. These results suggest that CABPR1 promoter is essential for regulating CABPR1 gene expression in response to pathogen, abiotic and environmental stresses, possibly by transactivating the CAZFP1 and CARAV1 transcription factors.

  2. Characterization of the galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase from pepper fruits and its modulation in the ascorbate biosynthesis. Role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Mateos, Rosa M; Codesido, Verónica; Corpas, Francisco J; Palma, José M

    2017-08-01

    Pepper fruit is one of the highest vitamin C sources of plant origin for our diet. In plants, ascorbic acid is mainly synthesized through the L-galactose pathway, being the L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH) the last step. Using pepper fruits, the full GalLDH gene was cloned and the protein molecular characterization accomplished. GalLDH protein sequence (586 residues) showed a 37 amino acids signal peptide at the N-terminus, characteristic of mitochondria. The hydrophobic analysis of the mature protein displayed one transmembrane helix comprising 20 amino acids at the N-terminus. By using a polyclonal antibody raised against a GalLDH internal sequence and immunoblotting analysis, a 56kDa polypeptide cross-reacted with pepper fruit samples. Using leaves, flowers, stems and fruits, the expression of GalLDH by qRT-PCR and the enzyme activity were analyzed, and results indicate that GalLDH is a key player in the physiology of pepper plants, being possibly involved in the processes which undertake the transport of ascorbate among different organs. We also report that an NO (nitric oxide)-enriched atmosphere enhanced ascorbate content in pepper fruits about 40% parallel to increased GalLDH gene expression and enzyme activity. This is the first report on the stimulating effect of NO treatment on the vitamin C concentration in plants. Accordingly, the modulation by NO of GalLDH was addressed. In vitro enzymatic assays of GalLDH were performed in the presence of SIN-1 (peroxynitrite donor) and S-nitrosoglutahione (NO donor). Combined results of in vivo NO treatment and in vitro assays showed that NO provoked the regulation of GalLDH at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, but not post-translational modifications through nitration or S-nitrosylation events promoted by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) took place. These results suggest that this modulation point of the ascorbate biosynthesis could be potentially used for biotechnological purposes to

  3. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  4. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  6. Genome assembly of bell pepper endornavirus from small RNA.

    PubMed

    Sela, Noa; Luria, Neta; Dombrovsky, Aviv

    2012-07-01

    The family Endornaviridae infects diverse hosts, including plants, fungi, and oomycetes. Here we report for the first time the assembly of bell pepper endornavirus by next-generation sequencing of viral small RNA. Such a population of small RNA indicates the activation of the viral immunity silencing machinery by this cryptic virus, which probably encodes a novel silencing suppressor.

  7. Post-directed weed control in bell peppers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, an...

  8. Analysis of the January 2006 Pepper-Pot Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G; Chambers, F; Bieniosek, F; Henestroza, E

    2006-03-22

    Between January 9-12, 2006 a series of experiments were performed on the DARHT-II injector to measure the beam's emittance. Part of these experiments were pepper-pot measurements. This note describes the analysis of the data, and our conclusions from the experiments.

  9. I'm Not a Chili Pepper: Are You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franciosi, Rob

    2006-01-01

    RateMyProfessors.com helps students rank their professors using a five-point rating scale in three areas, namely, helpfulness, clarity, and easiness. A college professor finds himself addicted to the site, which is rather low on substance and rates professors with a smiley face to indicate "good quality" and a red hot chili pepper to indicate the…

  10. I'm Not a Chili Pepper: Are You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franciosi, Rob

    2006-01-01

    RateMyProfessors.com helps students rank their professors using a five-point rating scale in three areas, namely, helpfulness, clarity, and easiness. A college professor finds himself addicted to the site, which is rather low on substance and rates professors with a smiley face to indicate "good quality" and a red hot chili pepper to indicate the…

  11. High-throughput sequencing of black pepper root transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Sheila M C; Pinheiro, Daniel G; Moreira, Edith C O; Rodrigues, Simone M; Poltronieri, Marli C; de Lemos, Oriel F; da Silva, Israel Tojal; Ramos, Rommel T J; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Horacio; Silva, Wilson A; Sampaio, Iracilda; Darnet, Sylvain

    2012-09-17

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) is one of the most popular spices in the world. It is used in cooking and the preservation of food and even has medicinal properties. Losses in production from disease are a major limitation in the culture of this crop. The major diseases are root rot and foot rot, which are results of root infection by Fusarium solani and Phytophtora capsici, respectively. Understanding the molecular interaction between the pathogens and the host's root region is important for obtaining resistant cultivars by biotechnological breeding. Genetic and molecular data for this species, though, are limited. In this paper, RNA-Seq technology has been employed, for the first time, to describe the root transcriptome of black pepper. The root transcriptome of black pepper was sequenced by the NGS SOLiD platform and assembled using the multiple-k method. Blast2Go and orthoMCL methods were used to annotate 10338 unigenes. The 4472 predicted proteins showed about 52% homology with the Arabidopsis proteome. Two root proteomes identified 615 proteins, which seem to define the plant's root pattern. Simple-sequence repeats were identified that may be useful in studies of genetic diversity and may have applications in biotechnology and ecology. This dataset of 10338 unigenes is crucially important for the biotechnological breeding of black pepper and the ecogenomics of the Magnoliids, a major group of basal angiosperms.

  12. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  13. CaAlaAT1 catalyzes the alanine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase reaction during the resistance response against Tobacco mosaic virus in hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jeong; Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Ham, Byung-Kook; Lee, Boo-Ja; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2005-08-01

    Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bugang) plants exhibit a hypersensitive response (HR) upon infection by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) pathotype P0. To elucidate molecular mechanism that underlies this resistance, hot pepper cv. Bugang leaves were inoculated with TMV-P0 and genes specifically up-regulated during the HR were isolated by differential screening. One of the clones, CaAlaAT1 encoding a putative alanine aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.2) exhibited organ-specific expression pattern and the transcript accumulated abundantly in red (ripe) fruit tissues. CaAlaAT1 transcript was also induced in older leaves during senescence. The expression of CaAlaAT1 gene was increased in the incompatible interaction with TMV-P0 but was not in the compatible interaction with TMV-P1.2. When a strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) carrying an AvrBs2 gene was infiltrated into the leaves of a pepper cv. ECW 20R carrying Bs2 resistance gene, a marked induction and maintenance of CaAlaAT1 gene expression was observed. The expression of CaAlaAT1 gene was triggered by salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene but not by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). CaAlaAT1 seemed to be localized mostly at the cytosol from the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation experiment. CaAlaAT1 seemed to catalyze alanine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (AKT) reaction, which was a main activity among the four activities in vitro, during the resistance response against TMV in hot pepper. These results suggest that CaAlaAT1, a protein known to be involved in metabolic reactions, might be one of the components in the plant's defense signal pathway against pathogens.

  14. The HTLV-1 HBZ protein inhibits cyclin D1 expression through interacting with the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zheng, Shangen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zang, Wenqiao; Li, Min; Wang, Na; Li, Ping; Jin, Jing; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that can cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, interacts with several transcription factors and is involved in T cell proliferation, viral gene transcription and cellular transformation. Cyclin D1 is a pivotal regulatory protein involved in cell cycle progression, and its depressed expression correlates with cell cycle prolongation or arrested at the G1/S transition. In our present study, we observed that HBZ expression suppressed cyclin D1 level. To investigate the role of HBZ on cyclin D1 depression, we transduced HBZ with lentivirus vector into 293T cells, CEM cells and Jurkat cells. The results of Western blot, RT-PCR and luciferase assays showed that transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter was suppressed by the bZIP domain of HBZ (HBZ-bZIP) through cyclic AMP response element (CRE) site. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed the binding of HBZ-bZIP to CRE-binding protein (CREB), which confirmed that the cyclin D1 promoter activity inhibition via the CRE-site was mediated by HBZ-bZIP. The results suggested that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 transcription through interactions with CREB and along with other viral protein, HBZ may play a causal role for leukemogenesis.

  15. Antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory effects of carotenoids extracted from dried pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH(+) cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief.

  16. Key Microbiota Identification Using Functional Gene Analysis during Pepper (Piper nigrum L.) Peeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiachao; Hu, Qisong; Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-01-01

    Pepper pericarp microbiota plays an important role in the pepper peeling process for the production of white pepper. We collected pepper samples at different peeling time points from Hainan Province, China, and used a metagenomic approach to identify changes in the pericarp microbiota based on functional gene analysis. UniFrac distance-based principal coordinates analysis revealed significant changes in the pericarp microbiota structure during peeling, which were attributed to increases in bacteria from the genera Selenomonas and Prevotella. We identified 28 core operational taxonomic units at each time point, mainly belonging to Selenomonas, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Anaerovibrio, and Clostridium genera. The results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the functional level, we observed significant increases in microbial features related to acetyl xylan esterase and pectinesterase for pericarp degradation during peeling. These findings offer a new insight into biodegradation for pepper peeling and will promote the development of the white pepper industry.

  17. Key Microbiota Identification Using Functional Gene Analysis during Pepper (Piper nigrum L.) Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-01-01

    Pepper pericarp microbiota plays an important role in the pepper peeling process for the production of white pepper. We collected pepper samples at different peeling time points from Hainan Province, China, and used a metagenomic approach to identify changes in the pericarp microbiota based on functional gene analysis. UniFrac distance-based principal coordinates analysis revealed significant changes in the pericarp microbiota structure during peeling, which were attributed to increases in bacteria from the genera Selenomonas and Prevotella. We identified 28 core operational taxonomic units at each time point, mainly belonging to Selenomonas, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Anaerovibrio, and Clostridium genera. The results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the functional level, we observed significant increases in microbial features related to acetyl xylan esterase and pectinesterase for pericarp degradation during peeling. These findings offer a new insight into biodegradation for pepper peeling and will promote the development of the white pepper industry. PMID:27768750

  18. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief. PMID:23091348

  19. Structural analysis of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E gene controlling potyvirus resistance in pepper: exploitation of a BAC library.

    PubMed

    Ruffel, Sandrine; Caranta, Carole; Palloix, Alain; Lefebvre, Véronique; Caboche, Michel; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2004-09-01

    The pvr2 locus in pepper codes for a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) gene that confers resistance to viruses belonging to the potyvirus genus. In this work, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the genomic sequence carrying the pvr2 locus. A Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library that consisted of 239,232 clones with an average insert size of 123 kilobases (kb) was constructed from a Capsicum annuum line with the pvr2(+) allele for susceptibility to potato virus Y (PVY) and tobacco etch virus (TEV). Based on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screen with single-copy markers, three to seven positive BAC clones per markers were identified, indicating that the BAC library is suitable for pepper genome analysis. To determine the genomic organization of the pepper eIF4E gene, the library was screened with primers designed from the cDNA sequence and four positive BAC clones carrying the pvr2 locus were identified. A 7-kb DNA fragment containing the complete eIF4E gene was sub-cloned from the positive BAC clones and analysed. The eIF4E gene is organised into five exons and four introns and showed a strictly conserved exon/intron structure with eIF4E genes from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. Moreover, the splice sites between plant exons 1/2 and 2/3 are conserved among eukaryotes including human, Drosophila and yeast. Several potential binding sites for MADS box transcription factors within the 5' flanking region of eIF4E genes from the three plant species were also predicted.

  20. Differential regulation of TGA transcription factors by post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Dominique; Privat, Isabelle; Trifa, Youssef; Zhou, Jun-Ma; Klessig, Daniel F; Lam, Eric

    2002-12-01

    Transcription factors often belong to multigene families and their individual contribution in a particular regulatory network remains difficult to assess. We show here that specific members from a family of conserved Arabidopsis bZIP transcription factors, the TGA proteins, are regulated in their protein stability by developmental stage-specific proteolysis. Using GFP fusions of three different Arabidopsis TGA factors that represent members of distinct subclasses of the TGA factor family, we demonstrate that two of these TGA proteins are specifically targeted for proteolysis in mature leaf cells. Using a supershift gel mobility assay, we found evidence for similar regulation of the cognate proteins as compared to the GFP fusion proteins expressed under the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Using various inhibitors, we showed that the expression of at least one of these three TGA factors could be stabilized by inhibition of proteasome-mediated proteolysis. This study indicates that TGA transcription factors may be regulated by distinct pathways of targeted proteolysis that can serve to modulate the contribution of specific members of a multigene family in complex regulatory pathways.

  1. Detection of irradiated peppers by viscosity measurement at extremely high pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko

    1996-07-01

    The viscosities of aqueous suspensions of irradiated peppers determined after heat gelatinization were influenced by the pH of the suspension to a greater degree than those of unirradiated ones. Viscosity measurement under an extremely alkaline condition (pH 13.8) resulted in a significant difference between irradiated peppers and unirradiated ones, irrespective of the planting locality and storage period. All of the pepper samples irradiated at 5 kGy showed viscosity values significantly lower than unirradiated ones.

  2. The importance of being flexible: the case of basic region leucine zipper transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Miller, Maria

    2009-06-01

    Large volumes of protein sequence and structure data acquired by proteomic studies led to the development of computational bioinformatic techniques that made possible the functional annotation and structural characterization of proteins based on their primary structure. It has become evident from genome-wide analyses that many proteins in eukaryotic cells are either completely disordered or contain long unstructured regions that are crucial for their biological functions. The content of disorder increases with evolution indicating a possibly important role of disorder in the regulation of cellular systems. Transcription factors are no exception and several proteins of this class have recently been characterized as premolten/molten globules. Yet, mammalian cells rely on these proteins to control expression of their 30,000 or so genes. Basic region:leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding proteins constitute a major class of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. This review discusses how conformational flexibility "built" into the amino acid sequence allows bZIP proteins to interact with a large number of diverse molecular partners and to accomplish their manifold cellular tasks in a strictly regulated and coordinated manner.

  3. The Importance of Being Flexible: The Case of Basic Region Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Large volumes of protein sequence and structure data acquired by proteomic studies led to the development of computational bioinformatic techniques that made possible the functional annotation and structural characterization of proteins based on their primary structure. It has become evident from genome-wide analyses that many proteins in eukaryotic cells are either completely disordered or contain long unstructured regions that are crucial for their biological functions. The content of disorder increases with evolution indicating a possibly important role of disorder in the regulation of cellular systems. Transcription factors are no exception and several proteins of this class have recently been characterized as premolten/molten globules. Yet, mammalian cells rely on these proteins to control expression of their 30,000 or so genes. Basic region:leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding proteins constitute a major class of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. This review discusses how conformational flexibility “built” into the amino acid sequence allows bZIP proteins to interact with a large number of diverse molecular partners and to accomplish their manifold cellular tasks in a strictly regulated and coordinated manner. PMID:19519454

  4. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  5. Primary sensitization to sweet bell pepper pollen in greenhouse workers with occupational allergy.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A M; Groenewoud, G C M; de Jong, N W; de Groot, H; Gerth van Wijk, R; van Toorenenbergen, A W

    2003-10-01

    In a previous investigation, a high prevalence of allergy to sweet bell pepper pollen was found among exposed horticulture workers. Allergy to plant-derived food is often the consequence of primary sensitization to common pollen allergens. We therefore investigated the cross-reactivity between sweet bell pepper pollen and pollen from grass, birch or mugwort. We selected 10 sera from greenhouse workers who had, besides specific IgE against sweet bell pepper pollen, also IgE to grass, birch or mugwort pollen. Cross-reactivity was tested by the inhibition of IgE binding to solid-phase coupled sweet bell pepper pollen extract. The 10 sera were also analysed for IgE binding to sweet bell pepper pollen by immunoblotting. With these sera, no or small inhibition of IgE binding to sweet bell pepper pollen extract was observed with grass, birch and mugwort pollen. With immunoblotting, major IgE-binding structures were seen at 14, 29 and 69 kDa in sweet bell pepper pollen extract. The results of our study demonstrate that sweet bell pepper pollen contains allergens that have no or limited cross-reactivity with common pollen allergens. With sera from the 10 patients tested, sensitization to sweet bell pepper pollen was not the consequence of primary sensitization to common pollen allergens.

  6. The Dynamic Microbiota Profile During Pepper (Piper nigrum L.) Peeling by Solid-State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qisong; Zhang, Jiachao; Xu, Chuanbiao; Li, Congfa; Liu, Sixin

    2017-06-01

    White pepper (Piper nigrum L.), a well-known spice, is the main pepper processing product in Hainan province, China. The solid-state method of fermentation can peel pepper in a highly efficient manner and yield high-quality white pepper. In the present study, we used next-generation sequencing to reveal the dynamic changes in the microbiota during pepper peeling by solid-state fermentation. The results suggested that the inoculated Aspergillus niger was dominant throughout the fermentation stage, with its strains constituting more than 95% of the fungi present; thus, the fungal community structure was relatively stable. The bacterial community structure fluctuated across different fermentation periods; among the bacteria present, Pseudomonas, Tatumella, Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Lactococcus, and Enterobacter accounted for more than 95% of all bacteria. Based on the correlations among the microbial community, we found that Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were significantly positively related with A. niger, which showed strong synergy with them. In view of the microbial functional gene analysis, we found that these three bacteria and fungi were closely related to the production of pectin esterase (COG4677) and acetyl xylan esterase (COG3458), the key enzymes for pepper peeling. The present research clarifies the solid-state fermentation method of pepper peeling and lays a theoretical foundation to promote the development of the pepper peeling process and the production of high-quality white pepper.

  7. Antibacterial mechanism and activities of black pepper chloroform extract.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lan; Hu, Yue-Ying; Chen, Wen-Xue

    2015-12-01

    Black pepper extracts reportedly inhibit food spoilage and food pathogenic bacteria. This study explored the antimicrobial activity of black pepper chloroform extract (BPCE) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial mechanism of BPCE was elucidated by analyzing the cell morphology, respiratory metabolism, pyruvic acid content, and ATP levels of the target bacteria. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the bacterial cells were destroyed and that plasmolysis was induced. BPCE inhibited the tricarboxylic acid pathway of the bacteria. The extract significantly increased pyruvic acid concentration in bacterial solutions and reduced ATP level in bacterial cells. BPCE destroyed the permeability of the cell membrane, which consequently caused metabolic dysfunction, inhibited energy synthesis, and triggered cell death.

  8. Identification and deletion analysis of the promoter of the pepper SAR8.2 gene activated by bacterial infection and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2006-07-01

    The pepper SAR8.2 gene, CASAR82A, was locally and systemically induced in pepper plants which had been infected by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria or by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The DNA 1,283 bp sequence upstream of the CASAR82A gene was assessed with regard to the activity of the CASAR82A promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, via an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assay. In tobacco leaves which transiently expressed the -831 bp CASAR82A promoter, GUS activity was locally and systemically induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. GUS activity, which was driven by the -831 promoter, was also differentially activated in the leaves as the result of treatment with salicylic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, NaCl, and low temperatures. The -831 bp sequence upstream of the CASAR82A gene elicited full promoter activity in response to pathogen infection, abiotic elicitors, and environmental stresses. The expression of the pepper transcription factor, CARAV1, was shown to activate the CASAR82A promoter. Analyses of a series of 5'-deletions of the CASAR82A promoter revealed that novel cis-acting elements necessary for the induction of gene expression as the result of exposure to pathogen and abiotic elicitors appear to be localized in the promoter region between -831 and -759 bp.

  9. A Novel F-Box Protein CaF-Box Is Involved in Responses to Plant Hormones and Abiotic Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rugang; Guo, Weili; Yin, Yanxu; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The F-box protein family is characterized by an F-box motif that has been shown to play an important role in regulating various developmental processes and stress responses. In this study, a novel F-box-containing gene was isolated from leaves of pepper cultivar P70 (Capsicum annuum L.) and designated CaF-box. The full-length cDNA is 2088 bp and contains an open reading frame of 1914 bp encoding a putative polypeptide of 638 amino acids with a mass of 67.8 kDa. CaF-box was expressed predominantly in stems and seeds, and the transcript was markedly upregulated in response to cold stress, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) treatment, and downregulated under osmotic and heavy metal stress. CaF-box expression was dramatically affected by salt stress, and was rapidly increased for the first hour, then sharply decreased thereafter. In order to further assess the role of CaF-box in the defense response to abiotic stress, a loss-of-function experiment in pepper plants was performed using a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique. Measurement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage revealed stronger lipid peroxidation and cell death in the CaF-box-silenced plants than in control plants, suggesting CaF-box plays an important role in regulating the defense response to abiotic stress resistance in pepper plants. PMID:24518684

  10. Mycobiota of ground red pepper and their aflatoxigenic potential.

    PubMed

    Ham, Hyeonheui; Kim, Sosoo; Kim, Min-Hee; Lee, Soohyung; Hong, Sung Kee; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Lee, Theresa

    2016-12-01

    To investigate contamination of ground red pepper with fungi and mycotoxin, we obtained 30 ground red pepper samples from 15 manufacturers in the main chili-pepper-producing areas in Korea. Fungal contamination was evaluated by spreading diluted samples on potato dextrose agar plates. The total fungi counts ranged from 0 to 7.3 × 10(3) CFU/g. In the samples, the genus Aspergillus had the highest incidence, while Paecilomyces was isolated most frequently. The next most frequent genera were Rhizopus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Alternaria. Within Aspergillus, A. ruber was predominant, followed by A. niger, A. amstelodami, A. ochraceus, A. terreus, A. versicolor, A. flavus, and A. fumigatus. The samples were analyzed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, and citrinin by ultra-perfomance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with a fluorescence detector. Ochratoxin A was detected from three samples at 1.03‒2.08 μg/kg, whereas no aflatoxins or citrinin were detected. To test the potential of fungal isolates to produce aflatoxin, we performed a PCR assay that screened for the norB-cypA gene for 64 Aspergillus isolates. As a result, a single 800-bp band was amplified from 10 A. flavus isolates, and one Aspergillus sp. isolate. UPLC analyses confirmed aflatoxin production by nine A. flavus isolates and one Aspergillus sp. isolate, which produced total aflatoxins at 146.88‒909.53 μg/kg. This indicates that continuous monitoring of ground red pepper for toxigenic fungi is necessary to minimize mycotoxin contamination.

  11. Pepper weevil attraction to volatiles from host and nonhost plants.

    PubMed

    Addesso, Karla M; McAuslane, Heather J

    2009-02-01

    The location of wild and cultivated host plants by pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii Cano) may be aided by visual cues, the male-produced aggregation pheromone, herbivore-induced, or constitutive host plant volatiles. The attractiveness of constitutive plant volatiles to pioneer weevils is important in understanding, and perhaps controlling, dispersal of this insect between wild and cultivated hosts. Ten-day-old male and 2- and 10-day-old female weevils were tested in short-range Y-tube assays. Ten-day-old male and female weevils were attracted to the volatiles released by whole plants of three known oviposition hosts, 'Jalapeno' pepper, American black nightshade, and eggplant, as well as tomato, a congener, which supports feeding but not oviposition. Two-day-old females were attracted to all plants tested, including lima bean, an unrelated, nonhost plant. Fruit volatiles from all three hosts and flower volatiles from nightshade and eggplant were also attractive. In choice tests, weevils showed different preferences for the oviposition hosts, depending on age and sex. Upwind response of 10-day-old male and female weevils to host plant volatiles was also tested in long-range wind tunnel assays. Weevils responded to pepper, nightshade, and eggplant volatiles by moving upwind. There was no difference in the observed upwind response of the weevils to the three host plants under no-choice conditions. Reproductively mature pepper weevils can detect, orient to, and discriminate between the volatile plumes of host plants in the absence of visual cues, conspecific feeding damage, or the presence of their aggregation pheromone.

  12. Influence of agricultural practices on fruit quality of bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zahra, T R

    2011-09-15

    An experiment was carried out under plastic house conditions to compare the effect of four fermented organic matter sources (cattle, poultry and sheep manure in addition to 1:1:1 mixture of the three organic matter sources) in which 4 kg organic matter m(-2) were used, with that of the conventional agriculture (chemical fertilizers) treatments on Marvello red pepper fruit quality, by using a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replicates. Pepper fruits characteristics cultivated in soil supplemented with manure were generally better than those from plants grown in soil only. Addition of animal manure increased bell pepper fruit content of soluble solids, ascorbic acid, total phenols, crude fibre and intensity of red color as compare with conventional agriculture that produced fruits with higher titratable acidity, water content, lycopene and bigger fruit size. In most cases of animal manure treatments, best results were obtained by the sheep manure treatment that produced the highest TSS, while the worst results were obtained by the poultry manure treatment that produced the smallest fruit and lowest fruit lycopene content.

  13. Effects of pepper grenade explosions on non-combatant bystanders.

    PubMed

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Shah, Tajamul H; Bagdadi, Farhana; Khan, Umar Hafiz

    2014-11-01

    Pepper gas is used for riot control in many parts of the world. Yet, its effects on bystanders are largely unreported. We fielded a questionnaire-based survey of 500 bystanders exposed to gas when police used pepper grenades against belligerent 'stone-pelters' in the northern Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir. Of 294 non-combatants who consented to participate in our survey, 97 per cent developed cough and irritation of the throat within few seconds of breathing the pungent smelling gas. They reported respiratory problems, dermatologic symptoms, sleep disturbances, and mood changes with varying frequency. Sixteen reported exacerbations of underlying respiratory disorders, with one temporally related to death. Symptoms led 51 to get medical attention. Nearly all respondents reported that symptoms recurred on re-exposure. We conclude that use of pepper grenades can cause serious acute symptoms in non-combatants accidentally exposed. We recommend alternate methods of riot control - water cannons, baton charges, tasers, plastic or rubber bullets, and so on - that have no collateral side effects on non-combatants be considered for routine use.

  14. Molecular biology of capsaicinoid biosynthesis in chili pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Aza-González, Cesar; Núñez-Palenius, Hector G; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2011-05-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate unique hot compounds known as capsaicinoids in placental tissues. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has been established, but the enzymes and genes participating in this process have not been extensively studied or characterized. Capsaicinoids are synthesized through the convergence of two biosynthetic pathways: the phenylpropanoid and the branched-chain fatty acid pathways, which provide the precursors phenylalanine, and valine or leucine, respectively. Capsaicinoid biosynthesis and accumulation is a genetically determined trait in chili pepper fruits as different cultivars or genotypes exhibit differences in pungency; furthermore, this characteristic is also developmentally and environmentally regulated. The establishment of cDNA libraries and comparative gene expression studies in pungent and non-pungent chili pepper fruits has identified candidate genes possibly involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis. Genetic and molecular approaches have also contributed to the knowledge of this biosynthetic pathway; however, more studies are necessary for a better understanding of the regulatory process that accounts for different accumulation levels of capsaicinoids in chili pepper fruits.

  15. Functional Analysis of Regulatory Elements in the Gene Promoter for an Abscission-Specific Cellulase from Bean and Isolation, Expression, and Binding Affinity of Three TGA-Type Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Mark L.; Whitelaw, Catherine A.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Nath, Pravendra

    2002-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify cis-acting elements that control hormonal and abscission-specific expression of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) abscission cellulase (BAC) promoter. Auxin inhibition of BAC promoter expression is at least in part controlled by a negatively regulated element and ethylene induction by a positively regulated element. One of a series of 15 different 10-bp mutations created in a 2.9-kb BAC promoter reduced reporter gene expression by 60%. The native sequence for this 10-bp mutation includes a TGA-type basic leucine zipper (bZIP) motif. Tandem ligation of three 18-bp BAC elements (Z-BAC), which includes the bZIP motif to a minimal −50 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter, enhanced expression in abscission zones (AZs) 13-fold over that of the minimal promoter alone. The native forward orientation of the Z-BAC elements was essential for high expression levels. Expression of the Z-BAC minimal construct was 3-fold greater in AZ than stems when compared with the expression levels of an internal control with an enhanced 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. Polymerase chain reaction was used to identify three TGA-type bZIP transcription factors in an AZ cDNA library. One of these factors was of the class I type and two of the class II type. RNA-blot analysis was completed for these genes and electrophoretic mobility shift assays used to confirm their binding to the Z-BAC element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay-binding affinity was greatest for the class I TGA-type bZIP factor. The results indicate a complex interaction of negative and positive regulating transcription factors that control BAC gene expression. PMID:12428013

  16. Deregulation of Sucrose-Controlled Translation of a bZIP-Type Transcription Factor Results in Sucrose Accumulation in Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Shin; Yang, Seung Hwan; Zhu, XuJun; Imai, Ryozo; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2012-01-01

    Sucrose is known to repress the translation of Arabidopsis thaliana AtbZIP11 transcript which encodes a protein belonging to the group of S (S - stands for small) basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP)-type transcription factor. This repression is called sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT). It is mediated through the sucrose-controlled upstream open reading frame (SC-uORF) found in the AtbZIP11 transcript. The SIRT is reported for 4 other genes belonging to the group of S bZIP in Arabidopsis. Tobacco tbz17 is phylogenetically closely related to AtbZIP11 and carries a putative SC-uORF in its 5′-leader region. Here we demonstrate that tbz17 exhibits SIRT mediated by its SC-uORF in a manner similar to genes belonging to the S bZIP group of the Arabidopsis genus. Furthermore, constitutive transgenic expression of tbz17 lacking its 5′-leader region containing the SC-uORF leads to production of tobacco plants with thicker leaves composed of enlarged cells with 3–4 times higher sucrose content compared to wild type plants. Our finding provides a novel strategy to generate plants with high sucrose content. PMID:22457737

  17. ABI-like transcription factor gene TaABL1 from wheat improves multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Bei; Gao, Shi-Qing; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Tang, Yi-Miao; Li, Xue-Yin; Li, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Yao-Feng; Chen, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in adaptive responses of plants to abiotic stresses. ABA-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic leucine zipper transcription factors that regulate the expression of downstream genes containing ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in promoter regions. A novel ABI-like (ABA-insensitive) transcription factor gene, named TaABL1, containing a conserved basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain was cloned from wheat. Southern blotting showed that three copies were present in the wheat genome. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that TaABL1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP transcription factor family and was most closely related to ZmABI5 in maize and OsAREB2 in rice. Expression of TaABL1 was highly induced in wheat roots, stems, and leaves by ABA, drought, high salt, and low temperature stresses. TaABL1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed wheat mesophyll protoplast. Overexpression of TaABL1 enhanced responses of transgenic plants to ABA and hastened stomatal closure under stress, thereby improving tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of TaABL1 upregulated or downregulated the expression of some stress-related genes controlling stomatal closure in transgenic plants under ABA and drought stress conditions, suggesting that TaABL1 might be a valuable genetic resource for transgenic molecular breeding.

  18. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV) and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, Aviv; Glanz, Eyal; Lachman, Oded; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Antignus, Yehezkel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV). PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV) and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV) (both poleroviruses). The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs), which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93%) and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%). Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV) contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP), may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2) were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5) and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3) with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s) between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s), resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper: comprehensive sequence and expression profile analysis under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Lu, Jin-Ping; Zhai, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Shu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are present in all plant species and play important roles in alleviating heat stress and enhancing plant thermotolerance by preventing the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. However, very little is known about the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), an important vegetable crop with character of temperate but thermosensitive. In this study, a total of 35 putative pepper Hsp20 genes (CaHsp20s) were identified and renamed on the basis of their molecular weight, and then their gene structure, genome location, gene duplication, phylogenetic relationship, and interaction network were also analyzed. The expression patterns of CaHsp20 genes in four different tissues (root, stem, leaf, and flower) from the thermotolerant line R9 under heat stress condition were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The transcripts of most CaHsp20 genes maintained a low level in all of the four tissues under normal temperature condition, but were highly induced by heat stress, while the expression of CaHsp16.6b, 16.7, and 23.8 were only detected in specific tissues and were not so sensitive to heat stress like other CaHsp20 genes. In addition, compared to those in thermotolerant line R9, the expression peak of most CaHsp20 genes in thermosensitive line B6 under heat stress was hysteretic, and several CaHsp20 genes (CaHsp16.4, 18.2a, 18.7, 21.2, 22.0, 25.8, and 25.9) showed higher expression levels in both line B6 and R9. These data suggest that the CaHsp20 genes may be involved in heat stress and defense responses in pepper, which provides the basis for further functional analyses of CaHsp20s in the formation of pepper acquired thermotoleance. PMID:26483820

  20. Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Kunz, Sabine; Gardestrom, Per; Pesquet, Edouard; ...

    2015-07-14

    Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (bZIP63, At5g22920, BT2, MGD2, and TPS9) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardlymore » impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/ transporting proteins (adg1, sex1, sus1-4, sus5/6, and tpt2), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—gin2.1 and oe3.2, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying pbZIP63::GUS showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced pbZIP63::GUS repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown gin2.1 and oe3.2 seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in oe3.2 plants for bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Altogether, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression« less

  1. The pepper cysteine/histidine-rich DC1 domain protein CaDC1 binds both RNA and DNA and is required for plant cell death and defense response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Sun; Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-01-01

    Plant defense against microbial pathogens is coordinated by a complex regulatory network. Cysteine/histidine-rich DC1 domain proteins mediate a variety of cellular processes involved in plant growth, development and stress responses. We identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) cysteine/histidine-rich DC1 domain protein gene, CaDC1, which positively regulates plant defense during microbial infection, based on gene silencing and transient expression in pepper, as well as ectopic expression in Arabidopsis. Induction of CaDC1 by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection was pronounced at both transcriptional and translational levels in pepper leaves. Purified CaDC1 protein bound to both DNA and RNA in vitro, especially in the presence of Zn(2+). CaDC1 was localized to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which was required for plant cell death signaling. The nuclear localization of CaDC1 was dependent on the divergent C1 (DC1) domain. CaDC1 silencing in pepper conferred increased susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by reduced salicylic acid accumulation and defense-related gene expression. Ectopic expression of CaDC1 in Arabidopsis enhanced resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. CaDC1 binds both RNA and DNA and functions as a positive regulator of plant cell death and SA-dependent defense responses. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Overexpression of CaWRKY27, a subgroup IIe WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, positively regulates tobacco resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fengfeng; Wang, Yuna; She, Jianju; Lei, Yufen; Liu, Zhiqin; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Lin, Jing; Yu, Lu; Lei, Dan; Guan, Deyi; Li, Xia; Yuan, Qian; He, Shuilin

    2014-03-01

    WRKY proteins are encoded by a large gene family and are linked to many biological processes across a range of plant species. The functions and underlying mechanisms of WRKY proteins have been investigated primarily in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice. The roles of these transcription factors in non-model plants, including pepper and other Solanaceae, are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the expression and function of a subgroup IIe WRKY protein from pepper (Capsicum annuum), denoted as CaWRKY27. The protein localized to nuclei and activated the transcription of a reporter GUS gene construct driven by the 35S promoter that contained two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. Inoculation of pepper cultivars with Ralstonia solanacearum induced the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in 76a, a bacterial wilt-resistant pepper cultivar, whereas it downregulated the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in Gui-1-3, a bacterial wilt-susceptible pepper cultivar. CaWRKY27 transcript levels were also increased by treatments with salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethephon (ETH). Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY27 exhibited resistance to R. solanacearum infection compared to that of wild-type plants. This resistance was coupled with increased transcript levels in a number of marker genes, including hypersensitive response genes, and SA-, JA- and ET-associated genes. By contrast, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaWRKY27 increased the susceptibility of pepper plants to R. solanacearum infection. These results suggest that CaWRKY27 acts as a positive regulator in tobacco resistance responses to R. solanacearum infection through modulation of SA-, JA- and ET-mediated signaling pathways. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  3. CaWRKY58, encoding a group I WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, negatively regulates resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuna; Dang, Fengfeng; Liu, Zhiqin; Wang, Xu; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Yu, Lu; She, Jianju; Shi, Youliang; Lin, Jinhui; Chen, Chengcong; Guan, Deyi; Qiu, Ailian; He, Shuilin

    2013-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by large gene families across the plant kingdom. So far, their biological and molecular functions in nonmodel plants, including pepper (Capsicum annuum) and other Solanaceae, remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the functional characterization of a new group I WRKY protein from pepper, termed CaWRKY58. Our data indicate that CaWRKY58 can be localized to the nucleus and can activate the transcription of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the 35S core promoter with two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. In pepper plants infected with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, CaWRKY58 transcript levels showed a biphasic response, manifested in an early/transient down-regulation and late up-regulation. CaWRKY58 transcripts were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid. Tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY58 did not show any obvious morphological phenotypes, but exhibited disease symptoms of greater severity than did wild-type plants. The enhanced susceptibility of CaWRKY58-overexpressing tobacco plants correlated with the decreased expression of hypersensitive response marker genes, as well as various defence-associated genes. Consistently, CaWRKY58 pepper plants silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) displayed enhanced resistance to the highly virulent R. solanacearum strain FJC100301, and this was correlated with enhanced transcripts of defence-related pepper genes. Our results suggest that CaWRKY58 acts as a transcriptional activator of negative regulators in the resistance of pepper to R. solanacearum infection. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  4. Transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of CSLA9 encoding mannan synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Chan; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kim, Yongsig; Park, Sunchung; Thomashow, Michael F; Keegstra, Kenneth; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have a structural role and serve as storage reserves during plant growth and development. Previous studies led to the conclusion that mannan synthase enzymes in several plant species are encoded by members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) gene family. Arabidopsis has nine members of the CSLA gene family. Earlier work has shown that CSLA9 is responsible for the majority of glucomannan synthesis in both primary and secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. Little is known about how expression of the CLSA9 gene is regulated. Sequence analysis of the CSLA9 promoter region revealed the presence of multiple copies of a cis-regulatory motif (M46RE) recognized by transcription factor MYB46, leading to the hypothesis that MYB46 (At5g12870) is a direct regulator of the mannan synthase CLSA9. We obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. First, the expression of CSLA9 was substantially upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. Second, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to demonstrate the direct binding of MYB46 to the promoter of CSLA9 in vitro. This interaction was further confirmed in vivo by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, over-expression of MYB46 resulted in a significant increase in mannan content. Considering the multifaceted nature of MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, we reasoned that additional transcription factors are involved in the CSLA9 regulation. This hypothesis was tested by carrying out yeast-one hybrid screening, which identified ANAC041 and bZIP1 as direct regulators of CSLA9. Transcriptional activation assays and EMSA were used to confirm the yeast-one hybrid results. Taken together, we report that transcription factors ANAC041, bZIP1 and MYB46 directly regulate the expression of CSLA9.

  5. Cloning and molecular analysis of HlbZip1 and HlbZip2 transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of the lupulin metabolome in hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Matousek, Jaroslav; Kocábek, Tomás; Patzak, Josef; Stehlík, Jan; Füssy, Zoltan; Krofta, Karel; Heyerick, Arne; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Maloukh, Lina; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2010-01-27

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.), the essential source of beer flavor is of interest from a medicinal perspective in view of its high content in health-beneficial terpenophenolics including prenylflavonoids. The dissection of biosynthetic pathway(s) of these compounds in lupulin glands, as well as its regulation by transcription factors (TFs), is important for efficient biotechnological manipulation of the hop metabolome. TFs of the bZIP class were preselected from the hop transcriptome using a cDNA-AFLP approach and cloned from a cDNA library based on glandular tissue-enriched hop cones. The cloned TFs HlbZIP1A and HlbZIP2 have predicted molecular masses of 27.4 and 34.2 kDa, respectively, and both are similar to the group A3 bZIP TFs according to the composition of characteristic domains. While HlbZIP1A is rather neutral (pI 6.42), HlbZIP2 is strongly basic (pI 8.51). A truncated variant of HlbZIP1 (HlbZIP1B), which is strongly basic but lacks the leucine zipper domain, has also been cloned from hop. Similar to the previously cloned HlMyb3 from hop, both bZIP TFs show a highly specific expression in lupulin glands, although low expression was observed also in other tissues including roots and immature pollen. Comparative functional analyses of HlbZip1A, HlbZip2, and subvariants of HlMyb3 were performed in a transient expression system using Nicotiana benthamiana leaf coinfiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains bearing hop TFs and selected promoters fused to the GUS reference gene. Both hop bZIP TFs and HlMyb3 mainly activated the promoters of chalcone synthase chs_H1 and the newly cloned O-methyl transferase 1 genes, while the response of the valerophenone synthase promoter to the cloned hop TFs was very low. These analyses also showed that the cloned bZIP TFs are not strictly G-box-specific. HPLC analysis of secondary metabolites in infiltrated Petunia hybrida showed that both hop bZIP TFs interfere with the accumulation and the composition of flavonol

  6. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and ‘Carolina Cayenne’ (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense. PMID:22791917

  7. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense.

  8. Tospoviruses and Thrips and Integrated Resistance Management Strategies in Pepper in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Florida ranks second in the production and value of bell pepper in the U.S. In 2015, Florida produced over one-half billion pounds of bell pepper on over 12,000 acres, valued at over 220 million dollars. In recent years, several invasive species of thrips and thrips-vectored tospoviruses have beco...

  9. Lack of influence of Meloidogyne incognita on resistance of bell pepper cultivars to Phytophthora capsici

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Mi), and the Phytophthora blight pathogen, Phytophthora capsici (Pc), cause root diseases in bell pepper under natural field conditions. However, the interactions between these two pathogens on different bell pepper genotypes are not clear. Greenhouse e...

  10. Selection of genetically diverse trichoderma spp. isolates for suppression of phytophthora capsici on bell pepper

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmentally compatible control measures are needed for suppression of Phytophthora capsici on pepper. Twenty-four isolates of Trichoderma were screened for suppression of this pathogen on bell pepper in greenhouse pot assays. Of these twenty-four isolates, GL12, GL13, and Th23 provided signifi...

  11. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... plant pests and diseases, and that the screens are intact. (d) The peppers must be packed within 24 hours of harvest in a pest-exclusionary packinghouse. During the time the packinghouse is in use for... approved production sites. The peppers must be safeguarded by an insect-proof mesh screen or plastic...

  12. Yield in nonpungent jalapeno pepper established at different in-row spacings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Doubling the plant density in transplanted non-pungent jalapeno peppers (Capsicum annuum Mill.) improves yield. However, it is not known how other spacings affect yield. In-row plant spacing was examined to determine how it affects development of these peppers. Transplants of a non-pungent jalapen...

  13. An application of METRIC to estimate evapotranspiration of red pepper under four different irrigation levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, the METRIC model was used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) of red pepper under fully irrigated and water stress conditions, in the semi-humid Bafra Plains located in northern Turkey. Field experiments were conducted under four different irrigation levels for red pepper from rainfed...

  14. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... applicable provisions of this subpart. (1) Growing conditions. (i) The lettuce must be grown in...

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... applicable provisions of this subpart. (1) Growing conditions. (i) The lettuce must be grown in...

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... applicable provisions of this subpart. (1) Growing conditions. (i) The lettuce must be grown in...

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... applicable provisions of this subpart. (1) Growing conditions. (i) The lettuce must be grown in...

  18. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... applicable provisions of this subpart. (1) Growing conditions. (i) The lettuce must be grown in...

  19. Influence of combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder on production traits of the broilers.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, A; Moorthy, M; Chitra, R; Prabakar, G

    2016-05-01

    To study the effects of combinations of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.), garlic (Allium sativum), and black pepper (Piper nigrum) powder supplementation on production traits of broiler chickens. A total of 288 commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1-9 groups with 4 replicates each. An experiment was conducted in broilers with different feed formulations; control feed, with no added fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder; and 8 treatment groups receiving feed supplemented with different combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder. The individual broilers' body weight and feed consumption were recorded and calculate the body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Broiler's weight gain and FCR were significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). Cumulative feed consumption was significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). The combination of garlic and black pepper powder supplemented broiler feed fed groups showed higher production performance. The 5 g/kg garlic powder+1 g/kg black pepper powder and 10 g/kg garlic powder+2 g/kg black pepper powder significantly improved the weight gain and FCR.

  20. Pepper banker plant systems and predatory mitespepper banker plant systems and predatory mites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While developing the ornamental pepper banker plant system for greenhouse grown vegetables and ornamental crops we discovered that the predatory mites we were using could survive and reproduce on ornamental pepper without their prey especially if they were provided supplemental pollen or if the bank...

  1. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and water loss in a diverse collection of pepper (capsicum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruits are covered by a relatively thick coating of cuticle that limits fruit water loss, a trait previously associated with maintenance of post-harvest fruit quality during commercial marketing. We’ve examined the fruit cuticles from 50 diverse pepper genotypes from a world c...

  2. Effects of vermicomposts produced from food waste on the growth and yields of greenhouse peppers.

    PubMed

    Arancon, Norman Q; Edwards, Clive A; Atiyeh, Rola; Metzger, James D

    2004-06-01

    Vermicomposts, produced commercially from food wastes, were substituted at a range of different concentrations into a soil-less commercial bedding plant container medium, Metro-Mix 360 (MM360), to evaluate their effects on the growth and yields of peppers in the greenhouse. Six-week-old peppers (Capsicum annum L. var. California) were transplanted into 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, 20% or 10% MM360 substituted with 0%, 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% vermicompost. All plants were watered three times weekly with 200 ppm Peter's Nutrient Solution from the time of transplanting up to 107 days. Peppers grown in potting mixtures containing 40% food waste vermicomposts and 60% MM360 yielded 45% more fruit weights and had 17% greater mean number of fruits than those grown in MM360 only. The mean heights, numbers of buds and numbers of flowers of peppers grown in potting mixtures containing 10-80% vermicompost although greater did not differ significantly from those of peppers grown in MM360. There were no positive correlations between the increases in pepper yields, and the amounts of mineral-N and microbial biomass-N in the potting mixtures, or the concentrations of nitrogen in the shoot tissues of peppers. Factors such as: an improvement of the physical structure of the potting medium, increases in populations of beneficial microorganisms and the potential availability of plant growth-influencing-substances produced by microorganisms in vermicomposts, could have contributed to the increased pepper yields obtained.

  3. Influence of combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder on production traits of the broilers

    PubMed Central

    Kirubakaran, A.; Moorthy, M.; Chitra, R.; Prabakar, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of combinations of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.), garlic (Allium sativum), and black pepper (Piper nigrum) powder supplementation on production traits of broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: A total of 288 commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1-9 groups with 4 replicates each. An experiment was conducted in broilers with different feed formulations; control feed, with no added fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder; and 8 treatment groups receiving feed supplemented with different combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder. The individual broilers’ body weight and feed consumption were recorded and calculate the body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Results: Broiler’s weight gain and FCR were significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). Cumulative feed consumption was significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). Conclusion: The combination of garlic and black pepper powder supplemented broiler feed fed groups showed higher production performance. The 5 g/kg garlic powder+1 g/kg black pepper powder and 10 g/kg garlic powder+2 g/kg black pepper powder significantly improved the weight gain and FCR. PMID:27284222

  4. 509-45-1: A C. annuum Pepper germplasm containing high concentrations of capsinoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This publication reports the public release of pepper (Capsicum annuum) germplasm ‘509-45-1’. Pepper germplasm 509-45-1 is a small-fruited, non-pungent single plant selection from PI 645509. Fruit of ‘509-45-1’ contain high concentrations of capsinoids [capsiate ((4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl (E)-8...

  5. Pungent spices, ground red pepper, and synthetic capsaicin as onion fly ovipositional deterrents.

    PubMed

    Cowles, R S; Keller, J E; Miller, J R

    1989-02-01

    In laboratory choice experiments, the spices dill, paprika, black pepper, chili powder, ginger, and red pepper deterredDelia antiqua oviposition by 88-100%. Dose-response choice tests demonstrated that 1 mg of ground cayenne pepper (GCP) placed within 1 cm of artificial onion foliage reduced oviposition by 78%. A synthetic analog of capsaicin, the principal flavor ingredient of red peppers, deterred oviposition by 95% when present at 320 ppm in the top centimeter of sand (the ovipositional substrate). However, in no-choice conditions 10 mg GCP was not an effective deterrent. Sevana Bird Repellent and Agrigard Insect Repellent both use red pepper as a principal ingredient; at recommended field rates, neither of these materials was an effective ovipositional deterrent either in laboratory or field. Capsaicin-based materials do not appear to be candidates for onion maggot control via behavioral modification.

  6. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Park, Minkyu; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Yong-Min; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eunyoung; Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Kyongyong; Lee, Gir-Won; Oh, Sang-Keun; Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Shin-Young; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Yang, Hee-Bum; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Won-Hee; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Shin, Chanseok; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, June Hyun; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Byung-Dong; Cohen, Oded; Paran, Ilan; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Saet Buyl; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Shin, Younhee; Noh, Seung-Jae; Park, Junhyung; Seo, Young Sam; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyun A; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Sang-Bong; Bosland, Paul W; Reeves, Gregory; Jo, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Bong-Woo; Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Choi, Hee-Seung; Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Yeisoo; Do Choi, Yang; Park, Beom-Seok; van Deynze, Allen; Ashrafi, Hamid; Hill, Theresa; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Yeam, Inhwa; Giovannoni, James J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Sørensen, Iben; Lee, Sang-Jik; Kim, Ryan W; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Beom-Soon; Lim, Jong-Sung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-03-01

    Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the Americas, is the most widely grown spice crop in the world. We report whole-genome sequencing and assembly of the hot pepper (Mexican landrace of Capsicum annuum cv. CM334) at 186.6× coverage. We also report resequencing of two cultivated peppers and de novo sequencing of the wild species Capsicum chinense. The genome size of the hot pepper was approximately fourfold larger than that of its close relative tomato, and the genome showed an accumulation of Gypsy and Caulimoviridae family elements. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses suggested that change in gene expression and neofunctionalization of capsaicin synthase have shaped capsaicinoid biosynthesis. We found differential molecular patterns of ripening regulators and ethylene synthesis in hot pepper and tomato. The reference genome will serve as a platform for improving the nutritional and medicinal values of Capsicum species.

  7. Exposure to ozone reduces postharvest quality loss in red and green chilli peppers.

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Marcin; Rees, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    The effect of continuous exposure to ozone at 0.45, 0.9 and 2μmolmol(-1) on quality changes during the storage of red and green chilli peppers at 10°C was investigated. Ozone at 0.45 and 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced disease incidence in red peppers, with no further benefits at 2μmolmol(-1). Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced weight loss during storage and improved firmness maintenance. Skin colour was bleached in red peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), and in green ones at all tested doses. Total phenolic content was not affected by ozone but antioxidant activity was reduced in green chilli peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), due to lower ascorbic acid content in those samples. Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) extended the shelf-life of chilli peppers.

  8. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M.; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder. PMID:25582173

  9. Production of methanol from heat-stressed pepper and corn leaf disks

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.A. . Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture)

    1994-05-01

    Early Calwonder'' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and Jubilee'' corn (Zea mays L.) leaf disks exposed to high temperature stress produced ethylene, ethane, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol based on comparison of retention times during gas chromatography to authentic standards. Methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde were also identified by mass spectroscopy. Corn leaf disks produced lower levels of ethylene, ethane, and methanol, but more acetaldehyde and ethanol than pepper. Production of ethane, a by-product of lipid peroxidation, coincided with an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) in pepper but not in corn. Compared with controls, pepper leaf disks infiltrated with linolenic acid evolved significantly greater amounts of ethane, acetaldehyde, and methanol and similar levels of ethanol. EL and volatile hydrocarbon production were not affected by fatty acid infiltration in corn. Infiltration of pepper leaves with buffers increasing in pH from 5.5 to 9.5 increased methanol production.

  10. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-05-01

    Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

  11. Capsaicin and tocopherol in red pepper seed oil enhances the thermal oxidative stability during frying.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheul-Young; Mandal, Prabhat K; Han, Kyu-Ho; Fukushima, Michihiro; Choi, Kangduk; Kim, Cheon-Jei; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2010-03-01

    Thermal oxidative stability of red pepper (Capsicum annuum) seed oil added with different levels of capsaicin or tocopherol as antioxidant during heating up to 48 h at 140±5°C was studied. Lipid oxidation of soy and pepper oil with different levels of capsaicin (0.12, 0.24%) and tocopherol (0.3, 0.6%) were evaluated during storage at 1400C for 0, 12, 24 and 48 h by monitoring peroxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and chemiluminiscence (CL). Capsaicin content of crude pepper oil (0.16 mg/ml) was much higher than that of commercial brands (0.004-0.02 mg/ml). Oleate content was significantly (p<0.05) higher in soy oil (53.7%) than pepper oil (9.5%), however, linoleate and linolenate contents were significantly (p<0.05) higher in pepper oil (70.6, 5.8%) than in soy oil (25.9, 5.8%). TBARS, PV, and CL of pepper oil were significantly (p<0.05) lower than soy oil after frying. TBARS and CL values of pepper oil with different levels of capsaicin or tocopherol showed significantly (p<0.05) lower values than untreated pepper oil during frying and storage. TBARS and CL values of 0.6% tocopherol treated pepper oil showed significantly (p<0.05) lower values than those of soy oil. The study suggests that capsaicin and tocopherol may play a key role to prevent the thermal oxidation of pepper oil during frying.

  12. Life history and life tables of Bactericera cockerelli (Homoptera: Psyllidae) on eggplant and bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Bing; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2009-12-01

    The development, survivorship, and fecundity of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), fed on eggplant (Solanum melongena L., variety Special Hibush) and bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L., variety Capsitrano) were studied in the laboratory at 26.7 +/- 2 degrees C, 70 +/- 5% RH, and at a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. Immature B. cockerelli developed faster (24.1 d) when fed on eggplant than on bell pepper (26.2 d). Survival rates of immature stages from egg to adult emergence were higher on eggplant (50.2%) than on bell pepper (34.6%). The longevity of B. cockerelli female adults fed on bell pepper was similar to that of females fed on eggplant (62.2 versus 55.0 d), but the male adults fed on eggplant lived shorter lives (39.4 d) than those fed on bell pepper (53.9 d). However, the preoviposition and oviposition periods, fecundity, and sex ratio of B. cockerelli fed on eggplant were not different from those fed on bell pepper. The r(m ) value and the finite rate of increase (lambda) of B. cockerelli were higher on eggplant (0.1099 and 1.116, respectively) than on bell pepper (0.0884 and 1.0924, respectively). Mean generation time and doubling time of B. cockerelli were shorter on eggplant (40.4 and 6.3 d, respectively) than on bell pepper (46.1 and 7.8 d, respectively). In contrast, lifetime fecundity of B. cockerelli was greater on bell pepper (227.3 offspring) than on eggplant (186.5 offspring). Based on these life history parameters, we concluded that B. cockerelli performed better on eggplant than on bell pepper.

  13. Pepper seed variety identification based on visible/near-infrared spectral technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Meng, Zhijun; Fan, Pengfei; Cai, Jichen

    2016-11-01

    Pepper is a kind of important fruit vegetable, with the expansion of pepper hybrid planting area, detection of pepper seed purity is especially important. This research used visible/near infrared (VIS/NIR) spectral technology to detect the variety of single pepper seed, and chose hybrid pepper seeds "Zhuo Jiao NO.3", "Zhuo Jiao NO.4" and "Zhuo Jiao NO.5" as research sample. VIS/NIR spectral data of 80 "Zhuo Jiao NO.3", 80 "Zhuo Jiao NO.4" and 80 "Zhuo Jiao NO.5" pepper seeds were collected, and the original spectral data was pretreated with standard normal variable (SNV) transform, first derivative (FD), and Savitzky-Golay (SG) convolution smoothing methods. Principal component analysis (PCA) method was adopted to reduce the dimension of the spectral data and extract principal components, according to the distribution of the first principal component (PC1) along with the second principal component(PC2) in the twodimensional plane, similarly, the distribution of PC1 coupled with the third principal component(PC3), and the distribution of PC2 combined with PC3, distribution areas of three varieties of pepper seeds were divided in each twodimensional plane, and the discriminant accuracy of PCA was tested through observing the distribution area of samples' principal components in validation set. This study combined PCA and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to identify single pepper seed varieties, results showed that with the FD preprocessing method, the discriminant accuracy of pepper seed varieties was 98% for validation set, it concludes that using VIS/NIR spectral technology is feasible for identification of single pepper seed varieties.

  14. Temporal kinetics of the transcriptional response to carbon depletion and sucrose readdition in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Sarah Jane; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Klie, Sebastian; Morcuende, Rosa; Usadel, Björn; Lunn, John Edward; Stitt, Mark

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether the transcriptional response to carbon (C) depletion and sucrose resupply depends on the duration and severity of the C depletion, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown in liquid culture and harvested 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after removing sucrose from the medium and 30 min after resupplying sucrose at each time. Expression profiling revealed early transcriptional inhibition of cell wall synthesis and remodelling of signalling, followed by induction of C recycling and photosynthesis and general inhibition of growth. The temporal sequence differed from the published response to progressive exhaustion of C during a night and extended night in vegetatively growing plants. The response to sucrose readdition was conserved across the C-depletion time course. Intriguingly, the vast majority of rapidly responding transcripts decreased rather than increased. The majority of transcripts that respond rapidly to sucrose and many transcripts that respond during C depletion also decrease after treating seedlings with the transcriptional inhibitor cordycepin A. Comparison with published responses to overexpression of otsA, AKIN10 and bZIP11 revealed that many genes that respond to C depletion, and especially sucrose resupply, respond to one or more of these C-signalling components. Thus, multiple factors contribute to C responsiveness, including many signalling components, transcriptional regulation and transcript turnover. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effects of grilling on luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) content in sweet green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Durucasu, Inci; Tokuşoğlu, Ozlem

    2007-10-01

    The content of luteloin in green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) produced in Turkey were determined by RP-HPLC with DAD detection. The luteloin (3',4',5,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone) content of green pepper samples were 46.00 +/- 0.76 mg kg(-1) f.w. (average). The alterations of luteloin concentrations with heating process (grilling, közleme) and the loss of luteloin amount were also determined. Luteolin contents of grilled peppers were found as 29.96 +/- 0.96 mg kg(-1) f.w. The method was objective and reproducible for accurate detection of luteloin in green pepper and other pepper varieties.

  16. Compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsicion pepper in potting trials.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Marenco, M; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of soil-borne plant diseases with composts has been widely studied. Composts suppressive to soil-borne pathogens have been detected in various cropping systems. Vegetable plants are generally propagated in pots, allowing the use of suppressive substrates to control zoospore-producing pathogens, like Phytophthora sp. The objective of the present work was to assess compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsici on pepper (cv. Corno di Toro). A municipal compost showing a good suppressive activity in previous trials on vegetable crops was used. Compost was mixed at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) with a commercial peat substrate, used as control. Substrates have been inoculated at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/l with wheat and hemp kernels infested with P. capsici and after one week 10 plants were transplanted for each treatment in 4 trays of 10 liters volume capacity and placed in greenhouse at 20 degrees C. Diseased plants were assessed weekly after transplanting and above-ground biomass of plants was assessed at the end of the trials. Compost applied at 80% significantly controlled the disease at high inoculum density (1 g/l), while at lower inoculums density, 0.25 and 0.5 g/l, reduced compost applications, 40% and 60% respectively, were sufficient to significantly control the disease. The application of compost at 20%, in absence of the pathogen, increased the biomass of pepper plants compared to control. The use of compost based substrates can be a suitable strategy for controlling soil-borne diseases on pepper, but results depends on application rates.

  17. Prehispanic Use of Chili Peppers in Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Terry G.; Gallaga Murrieta, Emiliano; Lesure, Richard; Lopez Bravo, Roberto; Grivetti, Louis; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin). No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE–300 CE). Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids. PMID:24236083

  18. Potato virus yisolated from pepper fields in Tehran Province.

    PubMed

    Mostafae, S; Mosahebi, Gh; Habibi, M Koohi

    2006-01-01

    Potato Virus Y was known as the main cause of yellowing and vein necrosis of pepper in Tehran Province, using Double Antibody Sandwich Elisa (DAS-ELISA). Biological properties including host range of the isolate was determined after biological purification. Host range studies showed that pepper isolate of PVY caused vein clearing and mosaic symptoms on Datura metel and Capsicum annum, mosaic on Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Barley, N. tabacum cv. Samsun and N. rustica but didn't show any symptoms on Physalis floridana, Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa and Solanum tuberosum. Also the virus was physically purified from propagative hosts: Datura metel, Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Barley and Capsicum annum using Leiser & Richter (1978) method. The A260/280 absorbance ratio of the isolate was 1.16, 1.50 and 1.04 for purified preparations from D. metel, N. tabacum cv. White Barley and C. annum respectively. SDS-PAGE of the coat protein extracted from purified virus preparations gave bands at position of about 34 KD and Western Blotting (using PVY antiserum with 1/1000 dilution, obtained from DSMZ, Germany) confirmed its as the PVY coat protein. In order to prepare antiserum, five injections were given at 7-10 days intervals to rabbit. A week after the last injection the rabbit was bled and the antiserum collected. The primer pairs NIA/F and NIA/R (Glais et al., 2005) were used in IC-RT-PCR and the length of the amplified fragment was 752 bp. This is the first report of PVY incidence in pepper fields in Iran.

  19. Prehispanic use of chili peppers in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Powis, Terry G; Gallaga Murrieta, Emiliano; Lesure, Richard; Lopez Bravo, Roberto; Grivetti, Louis; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2013-01-01

    The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin). No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE-300 CE). Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids.

  20. Role of a novel pathogen-induced pepper C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein gene, CaRFPI, in disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2007-03-01

    Limited information is available about the roles of RING-finger proteins in plant defense. A pepper CaRFP1 encoding the C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein that physically interacted with the basic PR-1 protein CABPR1 was isolated from pepper leaves infected by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CaRFP1 protein has VWFA domain, and N-terminal serine-rich and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions. The CaRFP1 transcripts accumulated earlier than did those of the basic PR-1 gene CABPR1 during the incompatible interaction of pepper leaves with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, as well as in the systemic, uninoculated pepper leaf tissues. The CaRFP1 gene also was induced in pepper leaf tissues infected by Colletotrichum coccodes. The CaRFP1 gene was strongly induced much earlier by salicylic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate treatments, as well as environmental stresses including methyl viologen, mannitol and NaCl treatments. Overexpression of the CaRFP1 gene in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred disease susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato infection, accompanied by reduced PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression, suggesting that the CaRFP1 acts as an E3 ligase for polyubiquitination of target PR proteins. Exogenous salicylic acid treatment also abolished PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression in the transgenic plants. Differential osmotic stress tolerance was induced by high salt and drought in the CaRFPI-overexpressing plants during germination and seedling development, which was closely correlated with abscisic acid sensitivity of Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that the CaRFP1 gene functions as an early defense regulator controlling bacterial disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

  1. Effect of Red Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) Powder or Red Pepper Pigment on the Performance and Egg Yolk Color of Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huaqiang; Jin, Liji; Wu, Feifei; Thacker, Philip; Li, Xiaoyu; You, Jiansong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Sizhao; Li, Shuying; Xu, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of red pepper (Capsicum frutescens) powder or red pepper pigment on the performance and egg yolk color of laying hens. In Exp. 1, 210, thirty-wk old, Hy-line Brown laying hens were fed one of seven diets containing 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.0, 4.8 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment or 0.3 ppm carophyll red. Each diet was fed to three replicate batteries of hens with each battery consisting of a row of five cages of hens with two hens per cage (n = 3). In Exp. 2, 180, thirty-wk old, Hyline Brown laying hens, housed similarly to those in Exp. 1, were fed an unsupplemented basal diet as well as treatments in which the basal diet was supplemented with 0.8% red pepper powder processed in a laboratory blender to an average particle size of 300 μm, 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill (44 μm) and finally 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill but mixed with 5% Na2CO3 either before or after grinding. A diet supplemented with 0.3 ppm carophyll red pigment was also included (n = 3). In both experiments, hens were fed the red pepper powder or pigment for 14 days. After feeding of the powder or pigment was terminated, all hens were fed the basal diet for eight more days to determine if the dietary treatments had any residual effects. In Exp. 1, there were no differences in egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio due to inclusion of red pepper pigment in the diet. Average egg weight was higher (p<0.05) for birds fed 1.2, 2.4 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment than for birds fed the diet containing 0.3 ppm red pepper pigment. On d 14, egg color scores increased linearly as the level of red pepper pigment in the diet increased. In Exp. 2, feeding red pepper powder did not affect egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio (p>0.05). However, compared with the control group, supplementation with all of the red pepper

  2. Effect of Red Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) Powder or Red Pepper Pigment on the Performance and Egg Yolk Color of Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqiang; Jin, Liji; Wu, Feifei; Thacker, Philip; Li, Xiaoyu; You, Jiansong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Sizhao; Li, Shuying; Xu, Yongping

    2012-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of red pepper (Capsicum frutescens) powder or red pepper pigment on the performance and egg yolk color of laying hens. In Exp. 1, 210, thirty-wk old, Hy-line Brown laying hens were fed one of seven diets containing 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.0, 4.8 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment or 0.3 ppm carophyll red. Each diet was fed to three replicate batteries of hens with each battery consisting of a row of five cages of hens with two hens per cage (n = 3). In Exp. 2, 180, thirty-wk old, Hyline Brown laying hens, housed similarly to those in Exp. 1, were fed an unsupplemented basal diet as well as treatments in which the basal diet was supplemented with 0.8% red pepper powder processed in a laboratory blender to an average particle size of 300 μm, 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill (44 μm) and finally 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill but mixed with 5% Na2CO3 either before or after grinding. A diet supplemented with 0.3 ppm carophyll red pigment was also included (n = 3). In both experiments, hens were fed the red pepper powder or pigment for 14 days. After feeding of the powder or pigment was terminated, all hens were fed the basal diet for eight more days to determine if the dietary treatments had any residual effects. In Exp. 1, there were no differences in egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio due to inclusion of red pepper pigment in the diet. Average egg weight was higher (p<0.05) for birds fed 1.2, 2.4 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment than for birds fed the diet containing 0.3 ppm red pepper pigment. On d 14, egg color scores increased linearly as the level of red pepper pigment in the diet increased. In Exp. 2, feeding red pepper powder did not affect egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio (p>0.05). However, compared with the control group, supplementation with all of the red pepper

  3. Differential expression of three catalase genes in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ho; An, Chung Sun

    2005-10-31

    Three different catalase cDNA clones (CaCat1, CaCat2, and CaCat3) were isolated from hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), and their expression patterns were analyzed at the levels of mRNA and enzyme activity. Northern hybridization showed that the three catalase genes were differentially expressed in various organs, and that expression of CaCat1 and CaCat2 was regulated differently by the circadian rhythm. In situ hybridization revealed different spatial distributions of CaCat1 and CaCat2 transcripts in leaf and stem. In response to wounding and paraquat treatment, CaCat1 mRNA increased at 4-12 h in both paraquat-treated and systemic leaves. In contrast, wounding had no significant effect on expression of the catalase genes. The increase of catalase activity in the paraquat-treated and systemic leaves paralleled that of CaCat1 mRNA, but did not match that of CaCat1 mRNA in paraquat-treated stems. Our results suggest that CaCat1 may play a role in responses to environmental stresses.

  4. Dynamics of the chili pepper transcriptome during fruit development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The set of all mRNA molecules present in a cell constitute the transcriptome. The transcriptome varies depending on cell type as well as in response to internal and external stimuli during development. Here we present a study of the changes that occur in the transcriptome of chili pepper fruit during development and ripening. Results RNA-Seq was used to obtain transcriptomes of whole Serrano-type chili pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L.; ‘Tampiqueño 74’) collected at 10, 20, 40 and 60 days after anthesis (DAA). 15,550,468 Illumina MiSeq reads were assembled de novo into 34,066 chili genes. We classified the expression patterns of individual genes as well as genes grouped into Biological Process ontologies and Metabolic Pathway categories using statistical criteria. For the analyses of gene groups we added the weighted expression of individual genes. This method was effective in interpreting general patterns of expression changes and increased the statistical power of the analyses. We also estimated the variation in diversity and specialization of the transcriptome during chili pepper development. Approximately 17% of genes exhibited a significant change of expression in at least one of the intervals sampled. In contrast, significant differences in approximately 63% of the Biological Processes and 80% of the Metabolic Pathways studied were detected in at least one interval. Confirming previous reports, genes related to capsaicinoid and ascorbic acid biosynthesis were significantly upregulated at 20 DAA while those related to carotenoid biosynthesis were highly expressed in the last period of fruit maturation (40–60 DAA). Our RNA-Seq data was validated by examining the expression of nine genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis by qRT-PCR. Conclusions In general, more profound changes in the chili fruit transcriptome were observed in the intervals between 10 to 20 and 40 to 60 DAA. The last interval, between 40 to 60 DAA, included 49% of all

  5. Expression analysis of transcription factors from the interaction between cacao and Moniliophthora perniciosa (Tricholomataceae).

    PubMed

    Lopes, M A; Hora, B T; Dias, C V; Santos, G C; Gramacho, K P; Cascardo, J C M; Gesteira, A S; Micheli, F

    2010-07-06

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is one of the most important tropical crops; however, production is threatened by numerous pathogens, including the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, which causes witches' broom disease. To understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of this disease in cacao, we focused our attention on cacao transcription factors (TFs), which act as master regulators of cellular processes and are important for the fine-tuning of plant defense responses. We developed a macroarray with 88 TF cDNA from previously obtained cacao-M. perniciosa interaction libraries. Seventy-two TFs were found differentially expressed between the susceptible (Catongo) and resistant (TSH1188) genotypes and/or during the disease time course--from 24 h to 30 days after infection. Most of the differentially expressed TFs belonged to the bZIP, MYB and WRKY families and presented opposite expression patterns in susceptible and resistant cacao-M. perniciosa interactions (i.e., up-regulated in Catongo and down-regulated in TSH1188). The results of the macroarray were confirmed for bZIP and WRKY TFs by real-time PCR. These differentially expressed TFs are good candidates for subsequent functional analysis as well as for plant engineering. Some of these TFs could also be localized on the cacao reference map related to witches' broom resistance, facilitating the breeding and selection of resistant cacao trees.

  6. Identification and characterization a novel transcription factor activator protein-1 in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limeng; Li, Chenghua; Chang, Yaqing; Gao, Yinxue; Wang, Yi; Wei, Jing; Song, Jian; Sun, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important gene expression regulator with typical Jun and region-leucine zipper (bZIP) domains and can respond to a plethora of physiological and pathological stimulus. In this study, we identified a novel AP-1 gene in Apostichopus japonicus by transcriptome sequencing and RACE approaches (designated as AjAP-1). The full-length of AjAP-1 was of 2944 bp including a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 201 bp, a 3' UTR of 1753 bp and a putative open reading frame of 990 bp encoding a polypeptide of 329 amino acid residues. Two representative domains of Jun and bZIP as well as two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were also detected in deduced amino acid of AjAP-1. Spatial distribution expression indicated that AjAP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues with predominant expression in the body wall, moderate in the tube feet, respiratory tree and colemocytes and slightly weak in the intestine and longitudinal muscle. Time-course expression analysis in intestine and coelomocytes revealed that AjAP-1 both reached its peak expression at 4 h after Vibrio splendidus challenge with a 2.6 and 8.2-fold increase compared to their control groups, respectively. Taken together, all these results suggested that AjAP-1 was a novel immune factor and might be involved in the processes of anti-bacteria response in sea cucumber.

  7. Neuronal expression of nuclear transcription factor MafG in the rat medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Iku; Yang, Dawei; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takayama, Kiyoshige

    2006-03-06

    The medulla oblongata is the site of central baroreceptive neurons in mammals. These neurons express specific basic-leucine zipper transcription factors (bZIP) after baroreceptor stimulation. Previously we showed that activation of baroreceptors induced expression of nuclear transcription factors c-Fos and FosB in central baroreceptive neurons. Here we studied the effects of baroreceptor stimulation on induction of MafG, a member of small Maf protein family that functions as dimeric partners for various bZIP transcription factors by forming transcription-regulating complexes, in the rat medulla oblongata. To determine whether gene expression of MafG is induced by stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, we examined the expression of its mRNA by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method and its gene product by immunohistochemistry. We found that the number of MafG transcripts increased significantly in the medulla oblongata after baroreceptor stimulation. MafG-immunoreactive neurons were distributed in the nucleus tractus solitarii, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, the ambiguous nucleus and the ventrolateral medulla. The numbers of MafG-immunoreactive neurons in these nuclei were significantly greater in test rats than in saline-injected control rats. We also found approximately 20% of MafG-immunoreactive neurons coexpress FosB after baroreceptor stimulation. Our results suggest that MafG cooperates with FosB to play critical roles as an immediate early gene in the signal transduction of cardiovascular regulation mediated by baroreceptive signals in the medulla oblongata.

  8. Characterization of a new curtovirus, pepper yellow dwarf virus, from chile pepper and distribution in weed hosts in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nhan; Creamer, Rebecca; Rascon, Jaime; Belfon, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Over 4,950 asymptomatic weed samples from more than 20 weed species that are host plants for curtoviruses were collected from ten chile pepper fields in southern New Mexico (NM) during 2003, 2004 and 2005 to identify whether they were infected with curtoviruses and to determine which curtoviruses were distributed in the weed population. Polymerase chain reaction using primers designed to detect a portion of the coat protein (cp) gene were used to detect curtoviruses, and infected plants were further tested for specific curtoviruses using primers designed to detect to a portion of the replication-associated protein (rep) gene. Amplification of the cp gene was successful from 3.7, 1.17, and 1.9% of the weed samples in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively. Seventy-three amplicons from those samples were sequenced and compared to well-characterized curtoviruses. Analysis of the rep nucleotide sequences showed that approximately 32.9% of the weed isolates tested were closely related to beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV). Approximately 12.4% were closely related to beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV). The rest of the weed isolates (54.7%), which shared a very high level of nucleotide sequence identity to each other, represent a new curtovirus species. Using eight primers designed for PCR, complete genomes of three curtoviruses isolated from chile pepper samples representing the three groups of curtoviruses in southern New Mexico were sequenced. Comparisons of whole sequences of the genomes revealed that the DG2SW171601 isolate (2,929 nucleotides) was nearly identical to BMCTV-W4 (approximately 98% nucleotide sequence identity). The LRME27601 isolate (2,927 nucleotides) was most closely related to BSCTV (approximately 92% nucleotide sequence identity). The LJN17601 isolate (2,959 nucleotides) shared only from 49.9 to 88.8% nucleotide sequence identity with other well-characterized curtoviruses. Based on the accepted cut-off of 89%, we propose that the LJN17601 isolate is a

  9. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-08-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15:1, 9:7 or 3:1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability.

  10. Whole-genome sequencing of cultivated and wild peppers provides insights into Capsicum domestication and specialization

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Yu, Changshui; Shen, Yaou; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lang; Min, Jiumeng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Shancen; Xu, Meng; Luo, Yong; Yang, Yulan; Wu, Zhiming; Mao, Likai; Wu, Haiyang; Ling-Hu, Changying; Zhou, Huangkai; Lin, Haijian; González-Morales, Sandra; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L.; Tian, Hao; Tang, Xin; Zhao, Maojun; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Anwei; Yao, Xiaoming; Cui, Junjie; Li, Wenqi; Chen, Zhe; Feng, Yongqiang; Niu, Yongchao; Bi, Shimin; Yang, Xiuwei; Li, Weipeng; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Xirong; Montes-Hernández, Salvador; Leyva-González, Marco A.; Xiong, Zhiqiang; He, Xiujing; Bai, Lijun; Tan, Shu; Tang, Xiangqun; Liu, Dan; Liu, Jinwen; Zhang, Shangxing; Chen, Maoshan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Liao, Weiqin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Min; Lv, Xiaodan; Wen, Bo; Liu, Hongjun; Luan, Hemi; Zhang, Yonggang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaodian; Xu, Jiaohui; Li, Xueqin; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Junyi; Palloix, Alain; Bosland, Paul W.; Li, Yingrui; Krogh, Anders; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Yin, Ye; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    As an economic crop, pepper satisfies people’s spicy taste and has medicinal uses worldwide. To gain a better understanding of Capsicum evolution, domestication, and specialization, we present here the genome sequence of the cultivated pepper Zunla-1 (C. annuum L.) and its wild progenitor Chiltepin (C. annuum var. glabriusculum). We estimate that the pepper genome expanded ∼0.3 Mya (with respect to the genome of other Solanaceae) by a rapid amplification of retrotransposons elements, resulting in a genome comprised of ∼81% repetitive sequences. Approximately 79% of 3.48-Gb scaffolds containing 34,476 protein-coding genes were anchored to chromosomes by a high-density genetic map. Comparison of cultivated and wild pepper genomes with 20 resequencing accessions revealed molecular footprints of artificial selection, providing us with a list of candidate domestication genes. We also found that dosage compensation effect of tandem duplication genes probably contributed to the pungent diversification in pepper. The Capsicum reference genome provides crucial information for the study of not only the evolution of the pepper genome but also, the Solanaceae family, and it will facilitate the establishment of more effective pepper breeding programs. PMID:24591624

  11. Artificial substrates for oviposition and larval development of the pepper weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Addesso, K M; McAuslane, H J; Stansly, P A; Slansky, F; Schuster, D J

    2009-02-01

    The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a major pest of cultivated peppers (Capsicum spp.) and other cultivated and wild species within the family Solanaceae. Laboratory study of this insect, as well as its biological control agents, will be greatly facilitated by an artificial rearing system that does not rely on pepper fruit. An egg collection method and amendments to a standard larval diet were investigated for use in the rearing of this weevil. Spherical sachets made of Parafilm or netting enclosing leaves of pepper, American black nightshade, eggplant, tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco induced oviposition. Tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco leaves were accepted despite the fact that these are not oviposition hosts for pepper weevils in the wild. A standard larval diet formula was modified in an attempt to improve egg hatch, larval survival, developmental time, and adult mass. The diet formula was modified with the addition of freeze-dried jalapeño pepper powder, an additional lipid source, alternate protein sources, and the removal of methyl paraben. None of the aforementioned treatments resulted in a significant improvement over the standard diet. Egg hatch was greater when eggs were incubated on moist paper towels rather than in diet; thus, placement of neonates rather than eggs into diet improved production of adults. Suggestions for more efficient rearing of weevils on the currently available diet and future directions for the development of an artificial rearing system for pepper weevil are discussed.

  12. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15 : 1, 9 : 7 or 3 : 1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability. PMID:24889686

  13. Transcription Factor Functional Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Murilo S.; Dadalto, Silvana P.; Gonçalves, Amanda B.; de Souza, Gilza B.; Barros, Vanessa A.; Fietto, Luciano G.

    2014-01-01

    Responses to biotic stress in plants lead to dramatic reprogramming of gene expression, favoring stress responses at the expense of normal cellular functions. Transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression at the transcriptional level, and controlling the activity of these factors alters the transcriptome of the plant, leading to metabolic and phenotypic changes in response to stress. The functional analysis of interactions between transcription factors and other proteins is very important for elucidating the role of these transcriptional regulators in different signaling cascades. In this review, we present an overview of protein-protein interactions for the six major families of transcription factors involved in plant defense: basic leucine zipper containing domain proteins (bZIP), amino-acid sequence WRKYGQK (WRKY), myelocytomatosis related proteins (MYC), myeloblastosis related proteins (MYB), APETALA2/ ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS (AP2/EREBP) and no apical meristem (NAM), Arabidopsis transcription activation factor (ATAF), and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC) (NAC). We describe the interaction partners of these transcription factors as molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of signal transduction pathways that take place during plant defense responses. These interactions determine the activation or repression of response pathways and are crucial to understanding the regulatory networks that modulate plant defense responses. PMID:28250372

  14. High-affinity K+ uptake in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cordero, M Angeles; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    High-affinity K+ uptake is an essential process for plant nutrition under K+-limiting conditions. The results presented here demonstrate that pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants grown in the absence of NH4+ and starved of K+ show an NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake that allows plant roots to deplete external K+ to values below 1 microM. When plants are grown in the presence of NH4+, high-affinity K+ uptake is not inhibited by NH4+. Although NH4+-grown plants deplete external K+ below 1 microM in the absence of NH4+, when 1 mM NH4+ is present they do not deplete external K+ below 10 microM. A K+ transporter of the HAK family, CaHAK1, is very likely mediating the NH4+-sensitive component of the high-affinity K+ uptake in pepper roots. CaHAK1 is strongly induced in the roots that show the NH4+-sensitive high-affinity K+ uptake and its induction is reduced in K+-starved plants grown in the presence of NH4+. The NH4+-insensitive K+ uptake may be mediated by an AKT1-like K+ channel.

  15. Genotype x environment interaction on experimental hybrids of chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Cabral, N S S; Medeiros, A M; Neves, L G; Sudré, C P; Pimenta, S; Coelho, V J; Serafim, M E; Rodrigues, R

    2017-04-20

    In Brazil, cultivation of hybrid plants comprise near 40% of the area grown with vegetables. For Capsicum, hybrids of bell and chili peppers have already exceeded 50% and over 25% of all are commercialized seeds. This study aimed to evaluate new pepper hybrids in two environments, Cáceres, MT, and Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil. Nine experimental hybrids of C. baccatum var. pendulum were tested and trials were performed in a randomized block design, with three replications and eight plants per plot. In each environment, plants were assessed for canopy diameter, plant height, number of fruit per plant, mean fruit mass per plant, fruit length and diameter, pulp thickness, and content of soluble solids. Seven of the eight traits have differed significantly due to environment variation. Furthermore, genotype and environment interaction was highly significant for number of fruit per plant, mean fruit mass per plant, fruit length, and fruit diameter. Choosing a hybrid to be grown in one of the studied locations must be in accordance with the sought characteristics since there is a complex interaction for some studied traits.

  16. Characterization of cross-reactive bell pepper allergens involved in the latex-fruit syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Radauer, C; Hafner, C; Fuchs, H; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Wüthrich, B; Scheiner, O; Breiteneder, H

    2004-11-01

    Between 30% and 50% of individuals who are allergic to latex products are also allergic to specific plant foods, a fact that is well documented as the latex-fruit syndrome. Simultaneous sensitization to latex and bell pepper has been previously reported. Although bell pepper fruits are frequently consumed raw, cooked or as a spice, little is known about the cross-reactive allergens. In this study we wished to identify bell pepper allergens involved in the latex-fruit syndrome. Sera of four patients who displayed clinical symptoms to latex and bell pepper were used in immunoblot studies on protein extracts of three different cultivars of fresh bell pepper and fresh Hevea latex. Cross-reactive allergens were identified by inhibition experiments using recombinant Hev b 8 (latex profilin), and natural Hev b 2 (latex beta-1,3-glucanase) in addition to the protein extracts. A novel cross-reactive IgE-reactive 30 kDa protein was subjected to sequence analysis. Three patients displayed IgE to profilins from bell pepper fruits and latex. Two patients possessed IgE to Hev b 2, a latex beta-1,3-glucanase, and a homologous protein in bell pepper. One patient possessed IgE reactive with a protein of 30 kDa identified by N-terminal sequencing as an l-ascorbate peroxidase and another patient to a protein of 38 kDa. Additionally, IgE binding proteins in two higher molecular weight ranges showed cross-reactive capacities. Our findings show on the molecular level that bell pepper is part of the latex-fruit syndrome. For the first time we have identified the major latex allergen Hev b 2, a beta-1,3-glucanase, and the bell pepper l-ascorbate peroxidase as cross-reactive allergens. We were also able to show that profilins are responsible for some of the IgE cross-reactivity.

  17. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10°C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach. Results Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10°C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters. Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2 spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters. Conclusion Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. PMID:20100339

  18. Ground red peppers: capsaicinoids content, Scoville scores, and discrimination by an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Korel, Figen; Bagdatlioglu, Neriman; Balaban, Murat O; Hişil, Yaşar

    2002-05-22

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and total capsaicinoids levels of different ground red pepper samples obtained from local retail markets in Izmir, Turkey. Scoville scores were determined using sensory tests. An electronic nose (EN) was used to discriminate ground red pepper samples by headspace volatiles. EN data were analyzed using discriminant function analysis (DFA). An overall correct classification rate of pepper varieties by EN of 91% was obtained. A linear correlation between capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and total capsaicinoids and Scoville scores was also observed, and R (2) values of 0.89, 0.85, and 0.91 were obtained, respectively.

  19. Pick and Eat Crop Testing: Dwarf Tomato and Pepper as Candidate Space Crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Massa, G. D.; Stutte, G. W.; Spencer, L. E.; Hummerick, M. E.; Sirmons, T.; Douglas, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf tomato and pepper plants were grown in controlled environment chambers to assess their potential as space crops for supplementing the crew's diet. Six cultivars of each species were compared in initial tests and then down-selected to three cultivars of each. Initial selection criteria included fruit yield, growth height, and nutritional value. Following completion of a second production test with the three best performing cultivars, sample fruits of both tomato and peppers were then assessed for acceptance using tasting panels. Based on the criteria considered in these studies, Red Robin tomato and Pompeii pepper were recommended for consideration for use in space.

  20. The soybean GmbZIP1 transcription factor enhances multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi-Qing; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Hui-jun; Tang, Yi-miao; Zhao, Xin; Ma, You-Zhi

    2011-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic domain/leucine zipper transcription factors that bind to the ABA-responsive element (ABRE) in the promoter regions of ABA-inducible genes in plants. A novel bZIP transcription factor gene, GmbZIP1, encoding 438 amino acids with a conserved bZIP domain composed of 60 amino acids was isolated from salt-tolerant soybean cv. Tiefeng 8. Southern blotting showed that only one copy was present in the soybean genome. Phylogenetic analyses showed that GmbZIP1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP family and was most closely related to AtABF2 and OsTRAB1. The expression of GmbZIP1 was highly induced by ABA, drought, high salt and low temperature; and GmbZIP1 was expressed in soybean roots, stems and leaves under different stress conditions. GmbZIP1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed onion epidermal cells. Overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the responses of transgenic plants to ABA and triggered stomatal closure under stresses, potentially leading to improved tolerances to several abiotic stresses such as high salt, low temperature and drought in transgenic plants. Furthermore, overexpression of GmbZIP1 affected the expression of some ABA or stress-related genes involved in regulating stomatal closure in Arabidopsis under ABA, drought and high salt stress conditions. A few AREB elements were detected in the promoter region of those ABA or stress-related genes, suggesting that GmbZIP1 regulates the ABA response or stomatal closure mediated by those downstream genes in transgenic Arabidopsis. Moreover, GmbZIP1 was used to improve the drought tolerance trait of Chinese wheat varieties BS93. Functional analysis showed that overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the drought tolerance of transgenic wheat, and transcripts of GmbZIP1 were detected in transgenic wheat using RT-PCR. In addition, GmbZIP1 overexpression did not result in growth retardation in all transgenic plants, suggesting that Gmb

  1. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy.

  2. The hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) microRNA transcriptome reveals novel and conserved targets: a foundation for understanding MicroRNA functional roles in hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dong-Gyu; Park, June Hyun; Lim, Jae Yun; Kim, Donghyun; Choi, Yourim; Kim, Soyoung; Reeves, Gregory; Yeom, Seon-In; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Doil; Shin, Chanseok

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs approximately 21 nt in length which play important roles in regulating gene expression in plants. Although many miRNA studies have focused on a few model plants, miRNAs and their target genes remain largely unknown in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide. Here, we employed high-throughput sequencing technology to identify miRNAs in pepper extensively from 10 different libraries, including leaf, stem, root, flower, and six developmental stage fruits. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we successfully identified 29 and 35 families of conserved and novel miRNAs, respectively. Northern blot analysis was used to validate further the expression of representative miRNAs and to analyze their tissue-specific or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, we computationally predicted miRNA targets, many of which were experimentally confirmed using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis. One of the validated novel targets of miR-396 was a domain rearranged methyltransferase, the major de novo methylation enzyme, involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation in plants. This work provides the first reliable draft of the pepper miRNA transcriptome. It offers an expanded picture of pepper miRNAs in relation to other plants, providing a basis for understanding the functional roles of miRNAs in pepper.

  3. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-01-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy. PMID:25580027

  4. Transactivation activity of Meq, a Marek's disease herpesvirus bZIP protein persistently expressed in latently infected transformed T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Z; Brunovskis, P; Rauscher, F; Lee, L; Kung, H J

    1995-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that induces a variety of diseases, including T-cell lymphomas, in chickens. In latently infected, transformed lymphoid cells, very few viral transcripts or proteins are detected. We previously described a gene, meq (MDV EcoQ), which is persistently expressed in MDV-transformed tumor samples and cell lines. meq codes for a 339-amino-acid protein with a basic-leucine zipper domain near its N terminus and a proline-rich domain near its C terminus. The basic-leucine zipper domain shows homology with Jun/Fos family proteins, whereas the proline-rich domain resembles that of the WT-1 tumor suppressor protein. These structural features raise the possibility that Meq functions as a transcription factor in regulating viral latency or oncogenesis. In this report, we show that the proline-rich domain is a potent transcription activator when fused to the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Gal4(1-147) DNA-binding domain. The transactivation activity maps to the C-terminal 130 amino acids, with the last 33 amino acids essential. In the absence of these 33 amino acids, a two-and-one-half proline-rich repeat structure was found to exhibit repression activity. We further show that Meq is able to dimerize not only with itself but also with c-Jun. Meq/c-Jun heterodimers bind to an AP1-like sequence in the meq promoter region with an affinity much greater than that of Meq/Meq or c-Jun/c-Jun homodimers. Cotransfection chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays suggest that the Meq/c-Jun heterodimers can up-regulate Meq expression in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and F9 cells. Our data provide the first biochemical evidence that Meq is a transcriptional factor and identify c-Jun as one of Meq's interacting partners. PMID:7769661

  5. Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial spot of tomato and pepper is caused by four Xanthomonas species and is a major plant disease in warm humid climates. The four species are distinct from each other based on physiological and molecular characteristics. The genome sequence of strain 85-10, a member of one of the species, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) has been previously reported. To determine the relationship of the four species at the genome level and to investigate the molecular basis of their virulence and differing host ranges, draft genomic sequences of members of the other three species were determined and compared to strain 85-10. Results We sequenced the genomes of X. vesicatoria (Xv) strain 1111 (ATCC 35937), X. perforans (Xp) strain 91-118 and X. gardneri (Xg) strain 101 (ATCC 19865). The genomes were compared with each other and with the previously sequenced Xcv strain 85-10. In addition, the molecular features were predicted that may be required for pathogenicity including the type III secretion apparatus, type III effectors, other secretion systems, quorum sensing systems, adhesins, extracellular polysaccharide, and lipopolysaccharide determinants. Several novel type III effectors from Xg strain 101 and Xv strain 1111 genomes were computationally identified and their translocation was validated using a reporter gene assay. A homolog to Ax21, the elicitor of XA21-mediated resistance in rice, and a functional Ax21 sulfation system were identified in Xcv. Genes encoding proteins with functions mediated by type II and type IV secretion systems have also been compared, including enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction, as contributors to pathogenicity. Conclusions Comparative genomic analyses revealed considerable diversity among bacterial spot pathogens, providing new insights into differences and similarities that may explain the diverse nature of these strains. Genes specific to pepper pathogens, such as the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide cluster, and genes

  6. Sensory properties of chile pepper heat - and its importance to food quality and cultural preference.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Ivette; Bosland, Paul W

    2017-10-01

    Chile peppers are one of the most important vegetable and spice crops in the world. They contain capsaicinoids that are responsible for the characteristic burning (pungency) sensation. Currently, there are 22 known naturally occurring capsaicinoids that can cause the heat sensation when consumed. Each produces a different heat sensation effect in the mouth. A need exists for a standard and new terminology to describe the complex heat sensation one feels when eating a chile pepper. A comprehensive set of descriptors to describe the sensory characteristics of chile pepper heat was developed. It was validated with trained panelists tasting samples representing the five domesticated species and 14 pod-types within these species. Five key attributes that define and reference a lexicon for describing the heat sensation of chile peppers were determined to describe the heat sensation in any product, and importantly, can be used in the food industry worldwide. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. GRAFTING FOR CONTROL OF MELOIDOGYNE INCOGNITA ON BELL PEPPER, TOMATO, AND MELONS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greenhouse, microplot, and field trials were conducted over three-years to evaluate rootstocks for root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) resistance. Rootstocks were evaluated for bell pepper (Capsicum annuum), tomato (Solanum esculentum), cantaloupe (Cucumis melo), and watermelon (Citrullus lan...

  8. A Sprinkle of Pepper: The State of Black Influence in White Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Frank W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of Blacks in white institutions of higher education is no more than a sprinkling of pepper. The article discusses some problems facing the Black students, Black faculty and Black administrators at these schools. (Author/HMV)

  9. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from C.M. Pepper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from C.M. Pepper, Everyday Life in Washington (1900, p. 371) - Robert P. Dodge House, 1534 Twenty-eighth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. Physicochemical and microbiological qualities of steamed and irradiated ground black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Waje, Catherine K; Kim, Hyun-Ku; Kim, Kyong-Su; Todoriki, Setsuko; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2008-06-25

    The effects of steam and irradiation treatments on the physicochemical properties (moisture content, pH, extractable yield, reducing sugar, soluble pigment, antioxidant activity, piperine, Hunter's color, and sensory attributes) and microbiological quality (total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and yeasts and molds) of ground black pepper stored at refrigerated and room temperatures for 6 months were compared and evaluated. Irradiation resulted in a higher microbial reduction in pepper, with minimal effects on the proximate composition, functional components, color, and sensory attributes of the spice. Steamed peppers appeared darker, and a considerable decrease in the piperine content was observed after treatment and storage. This study illustrates that irradiation is a better decontamination method than steam treatment in eliminating microorganisms without apparently affecting the quality of the powdered spice. Storage at 4 degrees C enhanced the microbial quality and minimized the loss of piperine content in ground black peppers.

  11. Melatonin content of pepper and tomato fruits: effects of cultivar and solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Riga, Patrick; Medina, Sonia; García-Flores, Libia Alejandra; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of cultivar and solar radiation on the melatonin content of Capsicum annuum (pepper) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruits. The melatonin content of red pepper fruits ranged from 31 to 93ngg(-1) (dry weight). The melatonin content of tomato ranged from 7.5 to 250ngg(-1) (dry weight). We also studied the effect of ripeness on melatonin content and identified one group of pepper cultivars in which the melatonin content increased as the fruit ripened and another in which it decreased as the fruit ripened. Under shade conditions, the melatonin content in most of tomato cultivars tended to increase (up to 135%), whereas that of most pepper cultivars decreased (to 64%). Overall, the results also demonstrated that the melatonin content of the fruits was not related to carbon fluxes from leaves.

  12. Assessment of hot peppers for aflatoxin and mold proliferation during storage.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Qumer; Amjad, Muhammad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Ariño, Agustin

    2011-05-01

    Aflatoxin contamination and mold proliferation in three hot pepper hybrids (Sky Red, Maha, and Wonder King) were studied during 5 months of storage at three temperatures (20, 25, and 30°C) and under different packaging conditions (low-density polyethylene bags and jute bags). The presence of aflatoxins in hot pepper samples was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with a UV-Vis detector. Sampling for analysis of aflatoxins, total mold counts, and Aspergillus counts was carried out at 0, 50, 100, and 150 days of storage. Hot peppers packed in jute bags were more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination than those packed in polyethylene bags; aflatoxin concentrations were 75% higher in peppers stored in jute bags. The effect of storage temperature resulted in aflatoxin concentrations that were 61% higher in hot peppers stored at 25 and 30°C than in those stored at 20°C. Of the three pepper hybrids, Wonder King was more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, with a maximum of 1.50 μg/kg when packed in jute bags and stored at 25°C for 150 days. However, no sample exceeded the maximum permitted level for total aflatoxins in spices established by European Union regulations (10 μg/kg). Total mold counts and Aspergillus counts increased with storage duration, but all counts were significantly lower in peppers stored in polyethylene bags. A gradual increase in temperature during prolonged storage of hot peppers in combination with aeration may be the main reasons for increases in fungal biomass and Aspergillus proliferation with the subsequent aflatoxin production.

  13. Transcription factories

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  14. Tinea nigra presenting speckled or "salt and pepper" pattern.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, André Luiz; Cruz, Rosana Cé Bella; Haddad, Vidal Junior

    2014-06-01

    A 7-year-old Caucasian female resident of the southern coast of Brazil presented dark spots on the left palm that converged to a unique macule with speckled pattern at about 1 month. The mycological exam and the fungi culture were typical of Hortaea werneckii, the agent of the superficial mycosis Tinea nigra. The patient received butenafine hydrochloride 1% for 30 days, resulting in a complete remission of the lesion. At a follow-up visit 12 months after treatment, there was no lesion recurrence. We describe a form of rare geographical Tinea nigra with a speckled pattern. The "salt and pepper" aspect should be taken into consideration when the mycosis was suspected.

  15. Pathotypes of Bacterial Spot Pathogen Infecting Capsicum Peppers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Khin Pa Pa; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Mo, Hwang-Sung; Yoo, Hee Ju; Byeon, Si-Eun; Jegal, Yoonhyuk; Mekuriaw, Alebel A.; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-seven isolates of bacterial spot pathogen (Xanthomonas spp.) collected from six provinces of Korea were tested for the identification of their pathotypes and determination of their distribution throughout Korea in an effort to genetically manage the disease. Near isogenic lines of Early Calwonder (Capsicum annuum) pepper plants carrying Bs1, Bs2 and Bs3, and PI235047 (C. pubescens) were used as differential hosts. Race P1 was found to be predominant, followed by race P7, and races P3 and P8 were also observed. This is the first report of races P7 and P8 in Korea. The races P7 and P8 were differentiated from the former races P1 and P3, respectively, on the basis of their ability to elicit hypersensitive reactions to PI235047. PMID:26674555

  16. The effect of domestic processing on the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from chili peppers (Capsicum species).

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Alessandro; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; O'Callaghan, Yvonne; Galvin, Karen; Menichini, Francesco; O'Brien, Nora

    2013-12-01

    The content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from different chili peppers were analysed and the effects of typical domestic processing were investigated. Peppers were analysed before and after cooking by conventional boiling (10 min in 100 °C water) and also following a freezing period of four months in a domestic freezer (-20 °C). The content and bioaccessibility of the eight carotenoids quantified varied, depending on cultivar, species, colour and processing. Provitamin A carotenoids (β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) and capsanthin were present at highest concentrations in the samples before and after processing. In general, yellow and orange peppers were the best sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and neoxanthin. Xanthophyll carotenoids were more efficiently transferred to the micelles and, therefore, were also more bioavailable. Processing decreased the carotenoid content in certain samples; however, the micellar content was generally not lower for processed peppers; therefore the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from processed peppers is enhanced relative to unprocessed peppers.

  17. Salt and Pepper Pigmentation - Skin Manifestation of Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraju, D; Prakash, G; Yoganandh, T; Subramanian, S R; Ramkumar, S

    2015-09-01

    A 50 year old male presented with progressive difficulty in swallowing both liquid and solid food with no history of Raynaud's phenomenon. A general examination revealed skin changes in the form of thickening, hyperpigmentation and tightening of skin of fingers, hand, forearm and legs. The patient had painless skin induration over the legs, forearm and hand. Salt and pepper pigmentation was seen on the upper back (Figure 1a), over mastoid process (Figure 1b) and the concha of pinna (Figure 1c). Anti-Scl 70 was positive. Anti-centromere antibodies were negative. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) revealed very severe restrictive lung disease. Barium swallow study was normal. Despite being advised to undergo oesophageal manometry test in view of dysphagia, patient was not willing for the same. Diagnosis of systemic sclerosis was made. Systemic sclerosis is a disease in which extensive fibrosis, vascular alterations and autoantibodies against various cellular antigens being the principal features with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Skin pigmentation changes among other features of skin involvement include a salt-and-pepper appearance due to diffuse hyperpigmentation with sparing of the perifollicular areas. This may be due to the richer capillary network that may warm the perifollicular skin and preserve melanogenesis producing the perifollicular pigment retention in systemic sclerosis.1,2 Both cellular and humoral immune factors in combination with external factors such as trauma or inflammation may trigger the destruction of melanocytes.3 Moreover, various physical factors like temperature changes as well as genetic, hormonal factors may influence pigment formation. Such changes in pigmentation is also seen during repigmentation around hair follicles in vitiligo. Clinically, both vitiligo and depigmented lesions of systemic sclerosis present as chalk-white macules with well-defined borders. However, mucosal involvement is commonly seen in vitiligo while depigmented

  18. Washing effects of limonene on pesticide residues in green peppers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai-Yan; Shen, Yan; Sun, Xing; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Xian-Jin

    2013-09-01

    The presence of pesticide residues in food has caused much concern. The low health risks and environmental impacts of limonene make it a very interesting solvent for use in green chemistry. Washing effects of limonene on pesticide residues of methyl chlorpyrifos, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, fenpropathrin and deltamethrin were investigated in green pepper. Results showed that washing with a low concentration of limonene for 5 min (where LOQ is limit of quantitation) caused 53.67%, pepper, considering effect and treatment time as well as cost. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Dissipation and residue of metalaxyl and cymoxanil in pepper and soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyun; Yang, Yan; Cui, Ying; Zhu, Huijun; Li, Xiong; Li, Zhining; Zhang, Kankan; Hu, Deyu

    2014-08-01

    A simple and accurate method of determining metalaxyl and cymoxanil in pepper and soil was developed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection. The limits of detection were 0.015 mg/kg for metalaxyl and 0.003 mg/kg for cymoxanil. The limits of quantification were 0.05 mg/kg for metalaxyl in pepper and soil as well as 0.01 mg/kg for cymoxanil in pepper and soil. Recoveries of pepper and soil were investigated at three spiking levels and ranged within 77.52 to 102.05 % for metalaxyl and 87.15 to 103.21 % for cymoxanil, with relative standard deviations below 9.30 %. For field experiments, the half-lives of metalaxyl were 3.2 to 3.9 days in pepper and 4.4 to 9.5 days in soil at the three experimental locations in China. At harvest, pepper samples were found to contain metalaxyl and cymoxanil well below the maximum residue limit MRLs of the European Union (EU) following the recommended dosage and the interval of 21 days after last application.

  20. Color and illuminance level of lighting can modulate willingness to eat bell peppers.

    PubMed

    Hasenbeck, Aimee; Cho, Sungeun; Meullenet, Jean-François; Tokar, Tonya; Yang, Famous; Huddleston, Elizabeth A; Seo, Han-Seok

    2014-08-01

    Food products are often encountered under colored lighting, particularly in restaurants and retail stores. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether the color of ambient lighting can affect consumers' motivation for consumption. This study aimed to determine whether color (Experiment 1) and illuminance level (Experiment 2) of lighting can influence consumers' liking of appearance and their willingness to eat bell peppers. For red, green, and yellow bell peppers, yellow and blue lighting conditions consistently increased participants' liking of appearance the most and the least, respectively. Participants' willingness to consume bell peppers increased the most under yellow lighting and the least under blue lighting. In addition, a dark condition (i.e. low level of lighting illuminance) decreased liking of appearance and willingness to eat the bell peppers compared to a bright condition (i.e. high level of lighting illuminance). Our findings demonstrate that lighting color and illuminance level can influence consumers' hedonic impression and likelihood to consume bell peppers. Furthermore, the influences of color and illuminance level of lighting appear to be dependent on the surface color of bell peppers. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Transpiration Rate for Chile Peppers Irrigated with Brackish Groundwater and ro Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, M. K.; Baath, G.

    2016-12-01

    Fresh water availability is declining in most of the semi-arid and arid regions across the world including southwestern United States. Use of marginal quality groundwater has been increasing for sustaining agriculture in these arid regions. Reverse Osmosis (RO) can treat brackish groundwater but the possibility of using RO concentrate for irrigation needs further exploration. This greenhouse study evaluates the transpiration rate, water use, leaching fraction and yield responses of five selected chile pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars irrigated with natural brackish groundwater and RO concentrate. The four saline water treatments used for irrigation were tap water of EC 0.6 (control), ground water of EC 3 and 5 dS/m and RO concentrate of EC 8 dS/m. The transpiration of all chile peppers cultivars decreased and leaching fraction increased with increasing irrigation water salinity. Based on the water use efficiency (WUEY) of selected chile pepper cultivars, brackish water of EC ≤ 3 dS/m can be used for irrigation. The average yield of chile peppers was stable up to a saturated soil paste extract electrical conductivity (ECe) of about 2 dS/m, although further increases in ECe resulted in an exponential yield decline. This study showed that yield reductions in chile peppers irrigated with Ca rich brackish groundwater were less than those reported using NaCl dominant saline solution studies. Environmentally safe reuse of RO concentrate could stimulate implementation of inland desalination in water scarce areas and increase greenhouse chile pepper cultivation.

  2. Sunflower as a Potential Trap Crop of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Pepper Fields.

    PubMed

    Soergel, D C; Ostiguy, N; Fleischer, S J; Troyer, R R; Rajotte, E G; Krawczyk, G

    2015-12-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), feeds on a variety of fruits and vegetables, and is an economically important invasive hemipteran pest. Trap cropping of H. halys was examined at the Pennsylvania State University Southeast Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SEAREC) in Lancaster Co., PA, from 2012 to 2013, with sunflowers used as a trap crop to protect bell pepper. H. halys were observed frequently on sunflowers planted surrounding the pepper field, and in both years of this experiment significantly more H. halys were observed in sunflowers than peppers. Both adults and nymphs were observed with equal frequency, with higher numbers of both observed in September. A 2:1 ratio of females to males was observed throughout both years. While sunflowers were attractive to H. halys, no difference in fruit damage was observed in peppers surrounded by the sunflower trap crop versus those peppers surrounded by peppers. While sunflowers present an interesting potential trap crop for H. halys, future research is needed to clarify the feasibility of this crop protection technique.

  3. Inhalation of vapor from black pepper extract reduces smoking withdrawal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Behm, F M

    1994-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sensory cues associated with cigarette smoking can suppress certain smoking withdrawal symptoms, including craving for cigarettes. In this study we investigated the subjective effects of a cigarette substitute delivering a vapor of black pepper essential oil. Forty-eight cigarette smokers participated in a 3-h session conducted after overnight deprivation from smoking. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: one group of smokers puffed on a device that delivered a vapor from essential oil of black pepper; a second group puffed on the device with a mint/menthol cartridge, and a third group used a device containing an empty cartridge. Subjects puffed and inhaled ad libitum from the device throughout the session during which no smoking was allowed. Reported craving for cigarettes was significantly reduced in the pepper condition relative to each of the two control conditions. In addition, negative affect and somatic symptoms of anxiety were alleviated in the pepper condition relative to the unflavored placebo. The intensity of sensations in the chest was also significantly higher for the pepper condition. These results support the view that respiratory tract sensations are important in alleviating smoking withdrawal symptoms. Cigarette substitutes delivering pepper constituents may prove useful in smoking cessation treatment.

  4. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    del Rocío Gómez-García, María; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  5. Hydrodynamics study on drying of pepper in swirling fluidized bed dryer (SFBD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaif Haron, Nazrul; Hazri Zakaria, Jamal; Faizal Mohideen Batcha, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Malaysia is one of the pepper producer with exports quantity reaching more than 90000 tonnes between 2010 until 2016. Drying of pepper is mandatory before their export and at present, pepper was dried by sun drying to reduce cost. This conventional drying method was time consuming and may take four days during rainy season, which retards the production of pepper. This paper proposes the swirling fluidized bed drying (SFBD) method, which was known to have high mixing ability and improved solid-gas contact to shorten the drying time of products. A lab scale SFBD system was constructed to carry out this study. Hydrodynamic study was conducted for three beds loadings of 1.0 kg, 1.4 kg at a drying temperature of 90°C. The SFBD has shown excellent potential to dry the pepper with a relatively short drying time compared to the conventional method. Batch drying for the bed loads studied only took 3 hours of drying time only. It was found that bed higher bed loading of wet pepper requires longer drying time due to higher amount of moisture content in the bed. Four distinct regimes of operation were found during drying in the SFBD and these regimes offer flexibility of operation. The total bed pressure drop was relatively low during drying.

  6. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-09-16

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  7. Physicochemical properties and sensory evaluation for the heat level (hot taste) of korean red pepper powder.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kyung-Hyung; Lee, Kyung-A; Park, Jae-Bok

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the heat level rating of several varieties of Korean red peppers. The chemical constitution of Korean red pepper samples were as follows: 0.54∼290.15 mg% capsaicinoids, 79.22∼139.09 ASTA value, and 16.76∼29.92% free sugar content. The heat level of the Korean red pepper samples was evaluated by trained panelists and the correlation coefficient and F value (0.001%) of the panelist's results were determined to be significant. In the principle component analysis (PCA), PC1 (capsaicinoids) and PC2 (free sugar) were shown to represent 31.98% and 25.77% of the total variance, respectively. The results of panelists trained for red pepper heat rating were evaluated using analysis of variance and correlation analysis. The trained panelists showed a high F value (p=0.05) and high correlation coefficient. A high correlation efficient of 0.84∼0.93 for the test samples with a 40 Scoville heat unit (32,000 SHU red pepper powder) was reported in the sensory evaluation of the Korean red pepper heat level by a trained panel. However, the panel showed a low correlation efficiency of 0.70 R(2) when the 60 SHU test samples were included in the analysis.

  8. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after “lights on”) and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h). Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils. PMID:26462948

  9. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Eller, Fred J; Palmquist, Debra E

    2014-11-18

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after "lights on") and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h). Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils.

  10. Capsaicin accumulation is related to nitrate content in placentas of habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Monforte-González, Miriam; Guzmán-Antonio, Adolfo; Uuh-Chim, Francisco; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe

    2010-04-15

    The presence of capsaicin, the pungent principle of peppers, is restricted to the fruits of hot cultivars. This compound, which is produced in the fruits' placenta, requires 3 mol of nitrogen to be formed. Hence nitrogen availability may affect pepper pungency through its content in the fruit tissues. On the other hand, potassium may also affect pepper pungency given its positive effect on fruit development. In order to address this issue, plants of habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) were hydroponically cultured with various doses of nitrate and potassium and the contents of these ions and capsaicin were analyzed in the different fruit tissues. Treatments did not produce major effects on pod yield or size during the experimental period, and pepper pods from plants growing under low nitrate concentrations presented no significant differences in total nitrate content. However, lower nitrate, as well as low capsaicin contents, were found in the isolated placentas from peppers grown on the lowest nitrate doses. Variations in potassium availability resulted in differences in pod production per plant, but not in capsaicinoid accumulation. Under the assayed conditions, nitrate content in the placenta affects capsaicin synthesis. (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Biological control and plant growth promoting capacity of rhizobacteria on pepper under greenhouse and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Mi-Seon; Sumayo, Marilyn; Hwang, Ye-Ji; Jeon, Seon-Ae; Park, Sung-Jin; Lee, Jai Youl; Ahn, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Byung-Soo; Ryu, Choong-Min; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-06-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 and Novosphingobium pentaromativorans KUDC1065 isolated from Dokdo Island, S. Korea are capable of eliciting induced systemic resistance (ISR) in pepper against bacterial spot disease. The present study aimed to determine whether plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains including strain KUDC1013, strain KUDC1065, and Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 either singly or in combinations were evaluated to have the capacity for potential biological control and plant growth promotion effect in the field trials. Under greenhouse conditions, the induced systemic resistance (ISR) effect of treatment with strains KUDC1013 and KUDC1065 differed according to pepper growth stages. Drenching of 3-week-old pepper seedlings with the KUDC-1013 strain significantly reduced the disease symptoms. In contrast, treatment with the KUDC1065 strain significantly protected 5-week-old pepper seedlings. Under field conditions, peppers treated with PGPR mixtures containing E681 and KUDC1013, either in a two-way combination, were showed greater effect on plant growth than those treated with an individual treatment. Collectively, the application of mixtures of PGPR strains on pepper might be considered as a potential biological control under greenhouse and field conditions.

  12. A Nitrogen Response Pathway Regulates Virulence Functions in Fusarium oxysporum via the Protein Kinase TOR and the bZIP Protein MeaB[C][W

    PubMed Central

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Rispail, Nicolas; Prados-Rosales, Rafael C.; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    During infection, fungal pathogens activate virulence mechanisms, such as host adhesion, penetration and invasive growth. In the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Fmk1 is required for plant infection and controls processes such as cellophane penetration, vegetative hyphal fusion, or root adhesion. Here, we show that these virulence-related functions are repressed by the preferred nitrogen source ammonium and restored by treatment with l-methionine sulfoximine or rapamycin, two specific inhibitors of Gln synthetase and the protein kinase TOR, respectively. Deletion of the bZIP protein MeaB also resulted in nitrogen source–independent activation of virulence mechanisms. Activation of these functions did not require the global nitrogen regulator AreA, suggesting that MeaB-mediated repression of virulence functions does not act through inhibition of AreA. Tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) supplied with ammonium rather than nitrate showed a significant reduction in vascular wilt symptoms when infected with the wild type but not with the ΔmeaB strain. Nitrogen source also affected invasive growth in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae and the wheat head blight pathogen Fusarium graminearum. We propose that a conserved nitrogen-responsive pathway might operate via TOR and MeaB to control virulence in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:20639450

  13. The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase CaPIK1 is involved in plant signaling of defense and cell-death responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-05-01

    Certain protein kinases have been shown to be crucial for plant cell signaling pathways associated with plant immune responses. Here we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase (RLCK) gene (CaPIK1) that is transcriptionally activated by infection with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). Silencing of CaPIK1 in pepper plants confers enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Salicylic acid-dependent defense responses are attenuated in the CaPIK1-silenced plants, including expression of salicylic acid-dependent genes, but not of a jasmonic acid-regulated gene. Induction of salicylic acid accumulation by Xcv infection is compromised in CaPIK1-silenced plants. The functional CaPIK1 protein not only autophosphorylates, but also phosphorylates myelin basic protein. CaPIK1 exists in the cytoplasm and also localizes to the plasma membrane of plant cells via its N-terminus. Transient expression of CaPIK1 in pepper leaves leads to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ultimately leading to hypersensitive cell death. Over-expression (OX) of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhances the basal resistance to infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, associated with elevated ROS bursts. Salicylic acid levels in CaPIK1-OX plants are higher than those in wild-type plants. Together, these results suggest that CaPIK1 modulates the signaling required for the salicylic acid-dependent defense response to pathogen infection. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Genetic mapping of semi-polar metabolites in pepper fruits (Capsicum sp.): towards unravelling the molecular regulation of flavonoid quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Wahyuni, Yuni; Stahl-Hermes, Vanessa; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; de Vos, Ric C H; Voorrips, Roeland E; Maharijaya, Awang; Molthoff, Jos; Zamora, Marcela Viquez; Sudarmonowati, Enny; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; Bino, Raoul J; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2014-01-01

    Untargeted LCMS profiling of semi-polar metabolites followed by metabolite quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis was performed in ripe pepper fruits of 113 F2 plants derived from a cross between Capsicum annuum AC1979 (no. 19) and Capsicum chinense No. 4661 Selection (no. 18). The parental accessions were selected based on their variation in fruit morphological characteristics and fruit content of some target phytonutrients. Clear segregation of fruit colour and fruit metabolite profiles was observed in the F2 population. The F2 plants formed three clusters based on their metabolite profiles. Of the total of 542 metabolites, 52 could be annotated, including a range of flavonoids, such as flavone C-glycosides, flavonol O-glycosides and naringenin chalcone, as well as several phenylpropanoids, a capsaicin analogue, fatty acid derivatives and amino acid derivatives. Interval mapping revealed 279 mQTLs in total. Two mQTL hotspots were found on chromosome 9. These two chromosomal regions regulated the relative levels of 35 and 103 metabolites, respectively. Analysis also revealed an mQTL for a capsaicin analogue, located on chromosome 7. Confirmation of flavonoid mQTLs using a set of six flavonoid candidate gene markers and their corresponding expression data (expression QTLs) indicated the Ca-MYB12 transcription factor gene on chromosome 1 and the gene encoding flavone synthase (FS-2) on chromosome 6 as likely causative genes determining the variation in naringenin chalcone and flavone C-glycosides, respectively, in this population. The combination of large-scale metabolite profiling and QTL analysis provided valuable insight into the genomic regions and genes important for the production of (secondary) metabolites in pepper fruit. This will impact breeding strategies aimed at optimising the content of specific metabolites in pepper fruit.

  15. The pepper MLO gene, CaMLO2, is involved in the susceptibility cell-death response and bacterial and oomycete proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2012-12-01

    Loss-of-function alleles of the mildew resistance locus O (MLO) gene provide broad-spectrum powdery mildew disease resistance. Here, we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) MLO gene (CaMLO2) that is transcriptionally induced by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Topology and subcellular localization analyses reveal that CaMLO2 is a plasma membrane-anchored and amphiphilic Ca²⁺-dependent calmodulin-binding protein. CaMLO2 expression is up-regulated by Xcv and salicylic acid, as well as abiotic stresses. Silencing of CaMLO2 in pepper plants confers enhanced resistance against virulent Xcv, but not against avirulent Xcv. This resistance is accompanied by a compromised susceptibility cell-death response and reduced bacterial growth, as well as an accelerated reactive oxygen species burst. Virulent Xcv infection drastically induces expression of the salicylic acid-dependent defense marker gene CaPR1 in CaMLO2-silenced leaves. CaMLO2 over-expression in Arabidopsis enhances susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Leaves of plants over-expressing CaMLO2 exhibit a susceptibility cell-death response and high bacterial growth during virulent Pst DC3000 infection. These are accompanied by enhanced electrolyte leakage but compromised induction of some defense response genes and the reactive oxygen species. Together, our results suggest that CaMLO2 is involved in the susceptibility cell-death response and bacterial and oomycete proliferation in pepper and Arabidopsis. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. CaRDR1, an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Plays a Positive Role in Pepper Resistance against TMV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Mo, Ning; Zhang, Yang; Muhammad, Tayeb; Zhao, Guiye; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as a major natural antiviral defense mechanism in plants. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) that catalyze the synthesis of double-stranded RNAs, are considered as a fundamental element in RNA silencing pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, RDR1, 2 and 6 play important roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. Expression of RDR1 can be elevated following plant treatment with defense hormones and virus infection. RDR1 has been studied in several crop species, but not in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Here, a RDR1 gene was isolated from Capsicum annuum L., designated as CaRDR1. The full-length cDNA of CaRDR1 was 3,351 bp, encoding a 1,116-amino acid protein, which contains conserved regions, such as the most remarkable motif DLDGD. The transcripts of CaRDR1 could be induced by salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Silencing of CaRDR1 in pepper resulted in increased susceptibility to TMV as evident by severe symptom, increased of TMV-CP transcript, higher malondialdehyde (MDA) content and lower antioxidant enzymes activities compared with that of control plants. CaRDR1-overexpressing in Nicotiana benthamiana showed mild disease symptom and reduced TMV-CP transcripts than that of empty vector (EV) following TMV inoculation. The RNA silencing related genes, including NbAGO2, NbDCL2, NbDCL3, and NbDCL4 elevated expression in overexpressed plants. Alternative oxidase (AOX), the terminal oxidase of the cyanide (CN)-resistant alternative respiratory pathway, catalyze oxygen-dependent oxidation of ubiquinol in plants. It has an important function in plant defense against TMV. In addition, CaRDR1 overexpression promoted the expression of NbAOX1a and NbAOX1b. In conclusion, these results suggest that CaRDR1 plays a positive role in TMV resistance by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities and RNA silencing-related genes expression to suppress the replication and movement of TMV.

  17. CaRDR1, an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Plays a Positive Role in Pepper Resistance against TMV

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Mo, Ning; Zhang, Yang; Muhammad, Tayeb; Zhao, Guiye; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as a major natural antiviral defense mechanism in plants. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) that catalyze the synthesis of double-stranded RNAs, are considered as a fundamental element in RNA silencing pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, RDR1, 2 and 6 play important roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. Expression of RDR1 can be elevated following plant treatment with defense hormones and virus infection. RDR1 has been studied in several crop species, but not in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Here, a RDR1 gene was isolated from Capsicum annuum L., designated as CaRDR1. The full-length cDNA of CaRDR1 was 3,351 bp, encoding a 1,116-amino acid protein, which contains conserved regions, such as the most remarkable motif DLDGD. The transcripts of CaRDR1 could be induced by salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Silencing of CaRDR1 in pepper resulted in increased susceptibility to TMV as evident by severe symptom, increased of TMV-CP transcript, higher malondialdehyde (MDA) content and lower antioxidant enzymes activities compared with that of control plants. CaRDR1-overexpressing in Nicotiana benthamiana showed mild disease symptom and reduced TMV-CP transcripts than that of empty vector (EV) following TMV inoculation. The RNA silencing related genes, including NbAGO2, NbDCL2, NbDCL3, and NbDCL4 elevated expression in overexpressed plants. Alternative oxidase (AOX), the terminal oxidase of the cyanide (CN)-resistant alternative respiratory pathway, catalyze oxygen-dependent oxidation of ubiquinol in plants. It has an important function in plant defense against TMV. In addition, CaRDR1 overexpression promoted the expression of NbAOX1a and NbAOX1b. In conclusion, these results suggest that CaRDR1 plays a positive role in TMV resistance by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities and RNA silencing-related genes expression to suppress the replication and movement of TMV. PMID:28702034

  18. NFATc2 recruits cJun homodimers to an NFAT site to synergistically activate interleukin-2 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Ryan D.; Drullinger, Linda F.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of interleukin-2 (IL-2), a pivotal cytokine in the mammalian immune response, is induced by NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional activators in stimulated T cells. NFATc2 and cJun drive high levels of synergistic human IL-2 transcription, which requires a unique interaction between the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 and cJun homodimers. Here we studied the mechanism by which this interaction contributes to synergistic activation of IL-2 transcription. We found that NFATc2 can recruit cJun homodimers to the −45 NFAT element, which lacks a neighboring AP-1 site. The bZip domain of cJun is sufficient to interact with the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 in the absence of DNA and this interaction is inhibited by AP-1 DNA. When the −45 NFAT site was replaced by either a NFAT/AP-1 composite site or a single AP-1 site the specificity for cJun homodimers in synergistically activating IL-2 transcription was lost, and cJun/cFos heterodimers strongly activated transcription. These studies support a model in which IL-2 transcriptional synergy is mediated by the unique recruitment of a cJun homodimer to the −45 NFAT site by NFATc2, where it acts as a co-activator for IL-2 transcription. PMID:23665382

  19. Effects of fermented pepper powder on body fat accumulation in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Su-Jung; Kim, Soo-Ki; Kim, Jong Moon; Lee, Si-Kyung; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of non-pungent pepper powder fermented by Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 on the fat accumulation in mice. Four weeks of feeding a high-fat diet with fermented pepper powder resulted in a significantly decreased hepatic total-lipid level and increased serum HDL-cholesterol, and tended to lower the fat weight. These results suggest that fermented pepper powder inhibited fat accumulation and improved lipid metabolism in mice fed the high-fat diet.

  20. A single residue in the 126-kDa protein of pepper mild mottle virus controls the severity of symptoms on infected green bell pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, T U; Nagaoka, E N; Hagiwara, K; Sasaya, T; Omura, T

    2009-01-01

    Infectious cDNA clones originally derived from a mild strain of Pepper mild mottle virus were constructed by replacing residue 649, a critical point for attenuation of this virus, with all possible amino acids. All clones were infectious to pepper plants and induced a variety of symptoms, including no visible symptoms. The results of this study showed that a single amino acid mutation at residue 649 could control the function of the 126- and 183-kDa proteins, replicases with multiple roles in the life cycle of this virus.

  1. Network inference analysis identifies an APRR2-like gene linked to pigment accumulation in tomato and pepper fruits.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Bradley, Glyn; Pyke, Kevin; Ball, Graham; Lu, Chungui; Fray, Rupert; Marshall, Alexandra; Jayasuta, Subhalai; Baxter, Charles; van Wijk, Rik; Boyden, Laurie; Cade, Rebecca; Chapman, Natalie H; Fraser, Paul D; Hodgman, Charlie; Seymour, Graham B

    2013-03-01

    Carotenoids represent some of the most important secondary metabolites in the human diet, and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a rich source of these health-promoting compounds. In this work, a novel and fruit-related regulator of pigment accumulation in tomato has been identified by artificial neural network inference analysis and its function validated in transgenic plants. A tomato fruit gene regulatory network was generated using artificial neural network inference analysis and transcription factor gene expression profiles derived from fruits sampled at various points during development and ripening. One of the transcription factor gene expression profiles with a sequence related to an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR2-LIKE gene (APRR2-Like) was up-regulated at the breaker stage in wild-type tomato fruits and, when overexpressed in transgenic lines, increased plastid number, area, and pigment content, enhancing the levels of chlorophyll in immature unripe fruits and carotenoids in red ripe fruits. Analysis of the transcriptome of transgenic lines overexpressing the tomato APPR2-Like gene revealed up-regulation of several ripening-related genes in the overexpression lines, providing a link between the expression of this tomato gene and the ripening process. A putative ortholog of the tomato APPR2-Like gene in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) was associated with pigment accumulation in fruit tissues. We conclude that the function of this gene is conserved across taxa and that it encodes a protein that has an important role in ripening.

  2. Transcription factors regulating the progression of monocot and dicot seed development.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pinky; Kapoor, Sanjay; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2011-03-01

    Seed development in this paper has been classified into the three landmark stages of cell division, organ initiation and maturation, based on morphological changes, and the available literature. The entire process proceeds at the behest of an interplay of various specific and general transcription factors (TFs). Monocots and dicots utilize overlapping, as well as distinct, TF networks during the process of seed development. The known TFs in rice and Arabidopsis have been chronologically categorized into the three stages. The main regulators of seed development contain B3 or HAP3 domains. These interact with bZIP and AP2 TFs. Other TFs that play an indispensable role during the process contain homeobox-, NAC-, MYB-, or ARF-domains. This paper is a comprehensive analysis of the TFs essential for seed development and their interactions. An understanding of this interplay will not only help unravel an integrated developmental process, but will also pave the way for biotechnological applications.

  3. Occurrence of Pepper Mild Mottle Virus in Drinking Water Sources in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Masaaki; Kishida, Naohiro; Konno, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Asami, Mari; Akiba, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is a plant virus that has been recently proposed as a potential indicator of human fecal contamination of environmental waters; however, information on its geographical occurrence in surface water is still limited. We aimed to determine the seasonal and geographic occurrence of PMMoV in drinking water sources all over Japan. Between July 2008 and February 2011, 184 source water samples were collected from 30 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs); viruses from 1 to 2 liters of each sample were concentrated by using an electronegative membrane, followed by RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Using quantitative PCR, PMMoV was detected in 140 (76%) samples, with a concentration ranging from 2.03 × 103 to 2.90 × 106 copies/liter. At least one of the samples from 27 DWTPs (n = 4 or 8) was positive for PMMoV; samples from 10 of these DWTPs were always contaminated. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PMMoV among geographical regions but not a seasonal difference. PMMoV was frequently detected in samples that were negative for human enteric virus or Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis based on the partial nucleotide sequences of the PMMoV coat protein gene in 12 water samples from 9 DWTPs indicated that there are genetically diverse PMMoV strains present in drinking water sources in Japan. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the occurrence of PMMoV in environmental waters across wide geographical regions. PMID:24056461

  4. Occurrence of pepper mild mottle virus in drinking water sources in Japan.

    PubMed

    Haramoto, Eiji; Kitajima, Masaaki; Kishida, Naohiro; Konno, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Asami, Mari; Akiba, Michihiro

    2013-12-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is a plant virus that has been recently proposed as a potential indicator of human fecal contamination of environmental waters; however, information on its geographical occurrence in surface water is still limited. We aimed to determine the seasonal and geographic occurrence of PMMoV in drinking water sources all over Japan. Between July 2008 and February 2011, 184 source water samples were collected from 30 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs); viruses from 1 to 2 liters of each sample were concentrated by using an electronegative membrane, followed by RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Using quantitative PCR, PMMoV was detected in 140 (76%) samples, with a concentration ranging from 2.03×10(3) to 2.90×10(6) copies/liter. At least one of the samples from 27 DWTPs (n=4 or 8) was positive for PMMoV; samples from 10 of these DWTPs were always contaminated. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PMMoV among geographical regions but not a seasonal difference. PMMoV was frequently detected in samples that were negative for human enteric virus or Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis based on the partial nucleotide sequences of the PMMoV coat protein gene in 12 water samples from 9 DWTPs indicated that there are genetically diverse PMMoV strains present in drinking water sources in Japan. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the occurrence of PMMoV in environmental waters across wide geographical regions.

  5. Natural antioxidants exhibit chemopreventive characteristics through the regulation of CNC-bZip transcription factors in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Singh, Bhupendra; Bhat, Nimee K.; Chen, Jie; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the role of resveratrol (Res) and vitamin C (VC) in prevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer through regulation of CNC b-zip transcription factors. Human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A was treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and VC or Res with or without E2. mRNA and protein expression levels of CNC b-zip transcription factors: Nrf1, Nrf2, Nrf3 and Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes SOD3 and NQO1 were quantified. Treatment with E2 suppressed while VC and Res prevented E2-mediated decrease in the expression levels of SOD3, NQO1, Nrf2 mRNA and protein in MCF-10A cells. Treatment with E2, Res or VC significantly increased mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf1. 17β-estradiol treatment significantly increased but VC or Res decreased Nrf3 mRNA and protein expression levels. Our studies demonstrate that estrogen-induced breast cancer might be prevented through up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes via Nrf-dependent pathways. PMID:25130429

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the Hsp70 family genes in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and functional identification of CaHsp70-2 involvement in heat stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Zhai, Yu-Fei; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Hsp70s function as molecular chaperones and are encoded by a multi-gene family whose members play a crucial role in plant response to stress conditions, and in plant growth and development. Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is an important vegetable crop whose genome has been sequenced. Nonetheless, no overall analysis of the Hsp70 gene family is reported in this crop plant to date. To assess the functionality of Capsicum annuum Hsp70 (CaHsp70) genes, pepper genome database was analyzed in this research. A total of 21 CaHsp70 genes were identified and their characteristics were also described. The promoter and transcript expression analysis revealed that CaHsp70s were involved in pepper growth and development, and heat stress response. Ectopic expression of a cytosolic gene, CaHsp70-2, regulated expression of stress-related genes and conferred increased thermotolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Taken together, our results provide the basis for further studied to dissect CaHsp70s' function in response to heat stress as well as other environmental stresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The grapevine VvibZIPC22 transcription factor is involved in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Malacarne, Giulia; Coller, Emanuela; Czemmel, Stefan; Vrhovsek, Urska; Engelen, Kristof; Goremykin, Vadim; Bogs, Jochen; Moser, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In grapevine, flavonoids constitute one of the most abundant subgroups of secondary metabolites, influencing the quality, health value, and typicity of wines. Their synthesis in many plant species is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level by modulation of flavonoid pathway genes either by single regulators or by complexes of different regulators. In particular, bZIP and MYB factors interact synergistically in the recognition of light response units present in the promoter of some genes of the pathway, thus mediating light-dependent flavonoid biosynthesis. We recently identified VvibZIPC22, a member of clade C of the grapevine bZIP family, in a quantitative trait locus (QTL) specifically associated with kaemperol content in mature berries. Here, to validate the involvement of this candidate gene in the fine regulation of flavonol biosynthesis, we characterized its function by in vitro and in vivo experiments. A role for this gene in the control of flavonol biosynthesis was indeed confirmed by its highest expression at flowering and during UV light-mediated induction, paralleled by accumulation of the flavonol synthase 1 transcript and flavonol compounds. The overexpression of VvibZIPC22 in tobacco caused a significant increase in several flavonoids in the flower, via induction of general and specific genes of the pathway. In agreement with this evidence, VvibZIPC22 was able to activate the promoters of specific genes of the flavonoid pathway, alone or together with other factors, as revealed by transient reporter assays. These findings, supported by in silico indications, allowed us to propose VvibZIPC22 as a new regulator of flavonoid biosynthesis in grapevine. PMID:27194742

  8. A single point mutation in Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein is sufficient to overcome Tsw-gene-mediated resistance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Almási, Asztéria; Nemes, Katalin; Csömör, Zsófia; Tóbiás, István; Palkovics, László; Salánki, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    The nonstructural protein (NSs) of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was previously identified as an avirulence determinant for Tsw-based resistance on pepper. The NSs of wild-type (WT) and resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains isolated in Hungary had only two amino acid substitutions (104, 461). We have analysed the ability of the NSs and their point mutant variants to trigger Tsw-mediated hypersensitive responses and RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity in patch assays. We identified a single amino acid change at position 104 (T-A) that was responsible for the necrosis induction or loss, while a significant difference was not detected in the RSS activity of the two parental strains. We have successfully complemented the infection of the WT strain on resistant pepper cultivar with the infectious S RNA transcript of the RB strain and the WT-T104A point mutant. Our work provides direct evidence that a single amino acid change can induce an RB phenotype.

  9. Antioxidant activity and content of chlorophylls and carotenoids in raw and heat-processed Jalapeño peppers at intermediate stages of ripening.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Yahia, Elhadi M; de Jesús Ornelas-Paz, José; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ibarra-Junquera, Vrani; Pérez-Martínez, Jaime David; Escalante-Minakata, Pilar

    2014-03-01

    Jalapeño peppers at intermediate ripening stages (IRS) are typically discarded at the packinghouse because they are not demanded for fresh consumption or industrial processing. These peppers have been scarcely studied in terms of pigment composition and bioactivity. In this study, the profile of pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) and antioxidant activity were determined in raw and heat-processed Jalapeño peppers at three IRS (brown, 50% red, and 75% red). Peppers contained 64 different pigments. Chlorophylls were the most abundant pigments in raw brown peppers while capsanthin was the most abundant at the other IRS. The content of most pigments decreased due to heat treatments. Several pheophytins and cis isomers of carotenoids were generated by heat processing. Boiling and grilling consistently decreased and increased the antioxidant activity of peppers, respectively. Tested peppers showed a more complex/abundant pigment content and higher antioxidant activity than those typically reported for green and red peppers.

  10. Management of blight of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) caused by Drechslera bicolor.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Kuldeep Singh; Shah, Rakesh; Gour, Hari Narayan; Sharma, Pankaj

    Sweet or bell pepper is a member of the Solanaceae family and is regarded as one of the most popular and nutritious vegetable. Blight, in the form of leaf and fruit blight, has been observed to infect bell pepper crops cultivated at the horticulture farm in Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Udaipur, India. Based on disease severity, we attempted to curb this newly emerged problem using different fungicides, plant extracts, bio-control agents, and commercial botanicals against the fungus in laboratory and pot experiments. Bio-control agent Trichoderma viride and plant growth promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolate Neist-2 were found to be quite effective against bell pepper blight. All evaluated fungicides, botanicals, commercial botanicals, and bio-control agents in vitro were further studied as seed dressers and two foliar sprays at ten days interval in pot experiments. The combinations of Vitavax, PGPR isolate Neist-2, and Mehandi extract were found to be very effective against bell pepper blight followed by Vitavax, T. viride, and Mehandi extract used individually. All treatments in the pot experiments were found to significantly reduce seedling mortality and enhance plant biomass of bell pepper. Thus, these experimental findings suggest that a better integrated management of bell pepper blight could be achieved by conducting field trials in major bell pepper- and chilli-cultivated areas of the state. Besides fungicides, different botanicals and commercial botanicals also seem to be promising treatment options. Therefore, the outcome of the present study provides an alternate option of fungicide use in minimizing loss caused by Drechslera bicolor.

  11. Effects of biochar amendment on relieving cadmium stress and reducing cadmium accumulation in pepper.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyu; Zhao, Ye; Zhou, Huaidong; Gao, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Biochar is widely used in agricultural soils or heavy metal-polluted soils to improve the quality of the soils, which would affect the growth of the plant. However, the information of biochars' effect on the plant growth was still lacking, especially for the physiological response of the plant. Pot experiments were used to examine the effect of willow-derived biochars at two temperatures (450 and 600 °C) on cadmium (Cd) accumulation in pepper and to reveal the response of physiological parameters to exogenous Cd stress (1 and 5 mg/kg). The results showed that the accumulation of Cd in pepper roots was higher than that in pepper shoots. For low level of Cd treatments, high additional rates of the biochars could obviously reduce the accumulation of Cd in the pepper roots. Moreover, there was a negative correlation between the C content of the biochar-amended soils and the Cd content of the pepper root, suggesting that the application of biochar to the soil decreased the Cd accumulation in the root. A positive relationship between the H/C ratios of biochar-amended soils and their corresponding Cd concentrations in pepper root indicated that low thermal temperature-derived biochar could play an important role in immobilizing Cd in the soil. Furthermore, on the condition of low Cd level of treatments, the malondialdehyde content decreased in biochar-amended soils, especially at high biochar application rate. The chlorophyll content increased with increasing the rates of the biochar application. The physiological parameters indirectly proved that the application of biochar did not always alleviate the toxic effects of Cd on pepper leaves at high Cd concentration.

  12. Application of microwaves for microbial load reduction in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Jeevitha, G Chengaiyan; Sowbhagya, H Bogegowda; Hebbar, H Umesh

    2016-09-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) is exposed to microbial contamination which could potentially create public health risk and also rejection of consignments in the export market due to non-adherance to microbial safety standards. The present study investigates the use of microwave (MW) radiation for microbial load reduction in black pepper and analyses the effect on quality. Black pepper was exposed to MWs at two different power levels (663 and 800 W) at an intensity of 40 W g(-1) for different time intervals (1-15 min) and moisture content (110 and 260 g kg(-1) on a wet basis). The exposure of black pepper to MWs at 663 W for 12.5 min was found to be sufficient to reduce the microbial load to the permissible level suggested by the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods and the European Spice Association. The retention of volatile oil, piperine and resin was 91.3 ± 0.03, 87.6 ± 0.02 and 90.7 ± 0.05%, respectively, in MW-treated black pepper. The final moisture content after MW treatment was found to be 100 ± 1 g kg(-1) for black pepper containing initial moisture of 260 ± 3 g kg(-1) . These results suggest that MW heating can be effectively used for microbial load reduction of black pepper without a significant loss in product quality. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Peroxisomes from pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L.): purification, characterisation and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Rosa M; León, Ana M; Sandalio, Luisa M; Gómez, Manuel; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M

    2003-12-01

    Pepper is a vegetable of importance in human nutrition. Currently, one of the most interesting properties of natural products is their antioxidant content. In this work, the purification and characterisation of peroxisomes from fruits of a higher plant was carried out, and their antioxidative enzymatic and non-enzymatic content was investigated. Green and red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L., type Lamuyo) were used in this study. The analysis by electron microscopy showed that peroxisomes from both types of fruits contained crystalline cores which varied in shape and size, and the presence of chloroplasts and chromoplasts in green and red pepper fruits, respectively, was confirmed. Peroxisomes were purified by differential and sucrose density-gradient centrifugations. In the peroxisomal fractions, the activity of the photorespiration, beta-oxidation and glyoxylate cycle enzymes, and the ROS-related enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, xanthine oxidase, glutathione reductase and NADP(+)-dehydrogenases, was determined. Most enzymes studied had higher specific activity and protein content in green than in red fruits. By native PAGE and western blot analysis, the localisation of a Mn-SOD in fruit peroxisomes was demonstrated. The ascorbate and glutathione levels were also determined in crude extracts and in peroxisomes purified from both green and red peppers. The total ascorbate content (200-220 mg per 100 g FW) was similar in crude extracts from the two types of fruits, but higher in peroxisomes from red peppers. The glutathione concentration was 2-fold greater in green pepper crude extracts than in red fruits, whereas peroxisomes from both tissues showed similar values. The presence in pepper peroxisomes of different antioxidative enzymes and their corresponding metabolites implies that these organelles might be an important pool of antioxidants in fruit cells, where these enzymes could also act as modulators of signal molecules (O2*-, H202) during fruit

  14. Prevalence of occupational allergy to bell pepper pollen in greenhouses in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Groenewoud, G C M; de Jong, N W; van Oorschot-van Nes, A J; Vermeulen, A M; van Toorenenbergen, A W; Mulder, P G H; Burdorf, A; de Groot, H; van Wijk, R Gerth

    2002-03-01

    An increasing number of allergic complaints appear to have occurred among bell pepper greenhouse employees. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of work-related allergic symptoms and the prevalence of sensitization to specific occupational allergens and its determinants. We studied 472 employees who were invited to answer an extensive questionnaire and to be tested on location with inhalant allergens and home-made extracts of the bell pepper plant. In addition, peak expiratory flow monitoring and RASTs were performed. Work-related symptoms were reported in 53.8% of all cases. Sensitization to the bell pepper plant was found in 35.4%. Positive reactions to leaf, stem and/or juice, however, were associated in nearly 90% with sensitization to pollen, which appeared to be most important allergen of the plant. Sensitization to the bell pepper plant and inhalant atopy were considered the most important risk factors for the occurrence of work-related symptoms of the upper airways (PRR 2.63, CI 2.11-3.25 and PRR 2.25, CI 1.82-2.79) as well as of the lower airways (PRR 4.08, CI 2.38-7.00 and PRR 3.16, CI 1.87-5.33). There is a surprisingly high prevalence of work-related respiratory symptoms (53.8%) in bell pepper horticulture. In two-thirds of the employees, symptoms at work were associated with an IgE-mediated allergy due to the high and chronic exposure to bell pepper pollen. Complaints at work without specific sensitization to bell pepper pollen can be caused by non-specific hyper-reactivity or atopy to other occupational allergens. The extent of this occupational allergy has important consequences for the health care of this large, still growing occupational group.

  15. Biocontrol activity and primed systemic resistance by compost water extracts against anthracnoses of pepper and cucumber.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Kim, Ki Deok

    2011-06-01

    We investigated direct and indirect effects of compost water extracts (CWEs) from Iljuk-3, Iljuk-7, Shinong-8, and Shinong-9 for the control of anthracnoses caused by Colletotrichum coccodes on pepper and C. orbiculare on cucumber. All tested CWEs significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited in vitro conidial germination and appressorium formation of the fungal pathogens; however, DL-β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA) failed to inhibit the conidial development of the pathogens. Direct treatments of the CWEs and BABA on pepper and cucumber leaves at 1 and 3 days before or after inoculation significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose severities; Iljuk-3, Shinong-9, and BABA for pepper and Iljuk-7 for cucumber had more protective activities than curative activities. In addition, root treatment of CWEs suppressed anthracnoses on the plants by the pathogens; however, CWE treatment on lower leaves failed to reduce the diseases on the upper leaves of the plants. The CWE root treatments enhanced not only the expression of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes CABPR1, CABGLU, CAChi2, CaPR-4, CAPO1, and CaPR-10 in pepper and PR1-1a, PR-2, PR-3, and APOX in cucumber but also the activity of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and peroxidase and the generation of hydrogen peroxide in pepper and cucumber under pathogen-inoculated conditions. However, the CWE treatments failed to induce the plant responses under pathogen-free conditions. These results indicated that the CWEs had direct effects, reducing anthracnoses by C. coccodes on pepper leaves and C. orbiculare on cucumber leaves through protective and curative effects. In addition, CWE root treatments could induce systemic resistance in the primed state against pathogens on plant leaves that enhanced PR gene expression, defense-related enzyme production, and hydrogen peroxide generation rapidly and effectively immediately after pathogen infection. Thus, the CWEs might suppress anthracnoses on leaves of both pepper and cucumber through primed

  16. Isolation and functional characterization of the Ca-DREBLP1 gene encoding a dehydration-responsive element binding-factor-like protein 1 in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Pukang).

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong-Pil; Kim, Woo Taek

    2005-04-01

    Through the use of subtractive hybridization analysis, we have identified 14 partial cDNA clones (pCa-DSRs) that are rapidly induced by dehydration in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) roots. The predicted proteins encoded by Ca-DSRs are putatively involved in processes as diverse as primary and secondary metabolism, protein degradation, and stress responses, indicating the complexity of cellular responses to water deficit in hot pepper roots. Particularly, we investigated the detailed structural properties and expression profiles of Ca-DSR2 (Ca-DREBLP1: dehydration-responsive element binding-factor-like protein 1) encoding a protein that contains a single ERF/AP2 DNA-binding domain. Based on the conserved 14th valine and 19th glutamic acid residues in the ERF/AP2 domain, a basic amino acid stretch (PKKPAGRKKFR) near its N-terminal region, and DSAW signature sequence at the end of its ERF/AP2 domain, Ca-DREBLP1 was classified as a member of a DREB1-type subfamily. Gel retardation assays revealed that Ca-DREBLP1 was able to form a specific complex with the DRE/CRT motif, but not with the GCC box. When fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain, the Ca-DREBLP1(190-215) mutant could effectively function as a trans-activator in yeast. This suggests that the extreme C-terminal region plays an essential role in transcription activation. In hot pepper plants, Ca-DREBLP1 was rapidly induced by dehydration, high salinity and, to a lesser extent, mechanical wounding, but not by cold stress. Thus, although the structural features of Ca-DREBLP1 resemble those of the DREB1-type proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice plants, its induction patterns are reminiscent of the DREB2-type proteins, indicating that Ca-DREBLP1 is a novel class DREB subfamily in hot pepper.

  17. SSR markers in transcripts of genes linked to post-transcriptional and transcriptional regulatory functions during vegetative and reproductive development of Elaeis guineensis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a perennial monocotyledonous tropical crop species that is now the world's number one source of edible vegetable oil, and the richest dietary source of provitamin A. While new elite genotypes from traditional breeding programs provide steady yield increases, the long selection cycle (10-12 years) and the large areas required to cultivate oil palm make genetic improvement slow and labor intensive. Molecular breeding programs have the potential to make significant impacts on the rate of genetic improvement but the limited molecular resources, in particular the lack of molecular markers for agronomic traits of interest, restrict the application of molecular breeding schemes for oil palm. Results In the current study, 6,103 non-redundant ESTs derived from cDNA libraries of developing vegetative and reproductive tissues were annotated and searched for simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Primer pairs from sequences flanking 289 EST-SSRs were tested to detect polymorphisms in elite breeding parents and their crosses. 230 of these amplified PCR products, 88 of which were polymorphic within the breeding material tested. A detailed analysis and annotation of the EST-SSRs revealed the locations of the polymorphisms within the transcripts, and that the main functional category was related to transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Indeed, SSR polymorphisms were found in sequences encoding AP2-like, bZIP, zinc finger, MADS-box, and NAC-like transcription factors in addition to other transcriptional regulatory proteins and several RNA interacting proteins. Conclusions The identification of new EST-SSRs that detect polymorphisms in elite breeding material provides tools for molecular breeding strategies. The identification of SSRs within transcripts, in particular those that encode proteins involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, will allow insight into the functional roles of these proteins by

  18. SSR markers in transcripts of genes linked to post-transcriptional and transcriptional regulatory functions during vegetative and reproductive development of Elaeis guineensis.

    PubMed

    Tranbarger, Timothy John; Kluabmongkol, Wanwisa; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Morcillo, Fabienne; Tregear, James W; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Billotte, Norbert

    2012-01-03

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a perennial monocotyledonous tropical crop species that is now the world's number one source of edible vegetable oil, and the richest dietary source of provitamin A. While new elite genotypes from traditional breeding programs provide steady yield increases, the long selection cycle (10-12 years) and the large areas required to cultivate oil palm make genetic improvement slow and labor intensive. Molecular breeding programs have the potential to make significant impacts on the rate of genetic improvement but the limited molecular resources, in particular the lack of molecular markers for agronomic traits of interest, restrict the application of molecular breeding schemes for oil palm. In the current study, 6,103 non-redundant ESTs derived from cDNA libraries of developing vegetative and reproductive tissues were annotated and searched for simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Primer pairs from sequences flanking 289 EST-SSRs were tested to detect polymorphisms in elite breeding parents and their crosses. 230 of these amplified PCR products, 88 of which were polymorphic within the breeding material tested. A detailed analysis and annotation of the EST-SSRs revealed the locations of the polymorphisms within the transcripts, and that the main functional category was related to transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Indeed, SSR polymorphisms were found in sequences encoding AP2-like, bZIP, zinc finger, MADS-box, and NAC-like transcription factors in addition to other transcriptional regulatory proteins and several RNA interacting proteins. The identification of new EST-SSRs that detect polymorphisms in elite breeding material provides tools for molecular breeding strategies. The identification of SSRs within transcripts, in particular those that encode proteins involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, will allow insight into the functional roles of these proteins by studying the phenotypic traits

  19. Attachment of 13 Types of Foodborne Bacteria to Jalapeño and Serrano Peppers and Antibacterial Effect of Roselle Calyx Extracts, Sodium Hypochlorite, Colloidal Silver, and Acetic Acid against These Foodborne Bacteria on Peppers.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Falfan-Cortes, Reyna N; Rodríguez-Marín, María L; Godínez-Oviedo, Angélica; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2017-03-01

    Chili peppers are a very important crop in Mexico. However, these peppers have been associated with Salmonella infection outbreaks in the United States, and Salmonella and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes have been isolated from jalapeño and serrano peppers in Mexico. To decrease microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables, chemical agents are commonly used; however, chemical agents used to eliminate pathogenic bacteria on vegetables have a limited antimicrobial effect. Roselle ( Hibiscus sabdariffa ) calyces have been reported to have an antimicrobial effect on pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the antibacterial effect of four roselle calyx extracts (water, methanol, acetone, and ethyl acetate), sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid against foodborne bacteria was evaluated on contaminated jalapeño and serrano peppers. The 13 types of foodborne bacteria evaluated were Listeria monocytogenes , Shigella flexneri , Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Montevideo, Staphylococcus aureus , E. coli O157:H7, five E. coli pathotypes (Shiga toxin producing, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic, enteroinvasive, and enteroaggregative), and Vibrio cholerae O1. All 13 types attached to both pepper types, with no significant differences in attachment between jalapeño and serrano peppers. Roselle calyx extract treatment resulted in a greater reduction in levels of all foodborne bacteria than did treatment with sodium hypochlorite, colloidal silver, and acetic acid on both pepper types. Roselle calyx extracts may be a useful for disinfection of chili peppers in the field, processing plants, restaurants, and homes.

  20. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Enhances T-Cell Proliferation by Impeding the Suppressive Signaling of Co-inhibitory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Kazuya; Onishi, Chiho; Iyoda, Tomonori; Inaba, Kayo

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and inflammatory diseases. To enhance cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1, the virus increases the number of infected cells in vivo. HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1 infected cells and ATL cells and promotes T-cell proliferation. However, the detailed mechanism by which it does so remains unknown. Here, we show that HBZ enhances the proliferation of expressing T cells after stimulation via the T-cell receptor. HBZ promotes this proliferation by influencing the expression and function of multiple co-inhibitory receptors. HBZ suppresses the expression of BTLA and LAIR-1 in HBZ expressing T cells and ATL cells. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT) and Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) was enhanced, but their suppressive effect on T-cell proliferation was functionally impaired. HBZ inhibits the co-localization of SHP-2 and PD-1 in T cells, thereby leading to impaired inhibition of T-cell proliferation and suppressed dephosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3ζ. HBZ does this by interacting with THEMIS, which associates with Grb2 and SHP-2. Thus, HBZ interacts with the SHP containing complex, impedes the suppressive signal from PD-1 and TIGIT, and enhances the proliferation of T cells. Although HBZ was present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of T cells, HBZ was localized largely in the nucleus by suppressed expression of THEMIS by shRNA. This indicates that THEMIS is responsible for cytoplasmic localization of HBZ in T cells. Since THEMIS is expressed only in T-lineage cells, HBZ mediated inhibition of the suppressive effects of co-inhibitory receptors accounts for how HTLV-1 induces proliferation only of T cells in vivo. This study reveals that HBZ targets co-inhibitory receptors to cause the proliferation of infected cells. PMID:28046066

  1. Heterochiral Jun and Fos bZIP peptides form a coiled-coil heterodimer that is competent for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Rui; Nakagawa, Natsumi; Oyama, Taiji; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Coiled coils, consisting of at least two α-helices, have important roles in the regulation of transcription, cell differentiation, and cell growth. Peptides composed of d-amino acids (d-peptides) have received great attention for their potential in biomedical applications, because they give large diversity for the design of peptidyl drug and are more resistant to proteolytic digestion than l-peptides. However, the interactions between l-peptides/l-protein and d-peptides in the formation of complex are poorly understood. In this study, stereoisomer-specific peptides were constructed corresponding to regions of the basic-leucine-zipper domains of Jun and Fos proteins. basic-leucine-zipper domains consist of an N-terminal basic domain, which is responsible for DNA binding, and a C-terminal domain that enables homodimerization or heterodimerization via formation of a coiled-coil. By combining peptides with different stereochemistries, the d-l heterochiral Jun-Fos heterodimer formation induced DNA binding by the basic domains of Jun-Fos. Our study provides new insight into the interaction between l-peptide and d-peptide enantiomers for developing d-peptide materials and drugs. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Complete genome sequence of a novel endornavirus isolated from hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Kil Hyun; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-12-01

    The complete genome of a putative new endornavirus infecting hot peppers (Capsicum annuum) was determined to be 14,729 nt in size, including 12 cytosines at the 3' end. The hot pepper-infecting virus has the highest nucleotide sequence similarity (94% query cover and 72% identity) to bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolated from the cultivar Yolo Wonder in the USA (GenBank accession no. JN019858). The putative single, large open reading frame encodes a 4,884-amino-acid-long polyprotein that contains four putative functional domains: a viral methyltransferase, a viral RNA helicase, a glycosyltransferase, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. A phylogenetic tree based on whole polyprotein sequences confirmed the close evolutionary relationship of the studied endornavirus to BPEV. The hot pepper-infecting virus also has a nick at nt position 975. Taken together, these results suggest that this virus belongs to a new species in the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), for which the name hot pepper endornavirus (HPEV) is proposed.

  3. Wound-Inducible Proteinase Inhibitors in Pepper. Differential Regulation upon Wounding, Systemin, and Methyl Jasmonate1

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniel S.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2001-01-01

    Seven small (approximately 6,000 D) wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor proteins were isolated from leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants that are members of the potato inhibitor II family. N-terminal sequences obtained indicated that the pepper leaf proteinase inhibitors (PLPIs) exhibit homology to two GenBank accessions that code for preproteins containing three isoinhibitors domains each that, when post-translationally processed, can account for the mixture of isoinhibitors that are reported herein from pepper leaves. A constitutive level of PLPI proteins was found in pepper leaves, and these levels increased up to 2.6-fold upon wounding of the lower leaves. Exposing intact plants to methyl jasmonate vapors induced the accumulation of PLPIs. Supplying excised young pepper plants with water through the cut stems induced PLPI proteins to levels higher than those found in intact plants, but with high variability. Supplying the excised plants with systemin did not result in an increase of PLPI levels that were statistically higher than levels found in excised plants. Gel-blot analyses of PLPI induction revealed the presence of two mRNA bands, having slightly different mobilities in agarose gels. Only the low Mr mRNA is present in untreated control plants, and it appears to be responsible for the constitutive levels of PLPI found in leaves. Both mRNA species are wound- and methyl jasmonate-inducible. Only the low- Mr species is weakly induced by systemin, indicating a differential expression of the two PLPI species. PMID:11351092

  4. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-06-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit.

  5. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit. PMID:25288942

  6. Alleviation of Salt Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annum L.) Plants by Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Mi-Seon; Son, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Ye-Ji; Kwon, Duk-Ki; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2017-08-08

    In the present study, we demonstrate that the growth of salt-stressed pepper plants is improved by inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Three PGPR strains (Microbacterium oleivorans KNUC7074, Brevibacterium iodinum KNUC7183, and Rhizobium massiliae KNUC7586) were isolated from the rhizosphere of pepper plants growing in saline soil, and pepper plants inoculated with these PGPR strains exhibited significantly greater plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and total chlorophyll content than non-inoculated plants. In addition, salt-stressed pepper plants that were inoculated with B. iodinum KNUC7183 and R. massiliae KNUC7586 possessed significantly different total soluble sugar and proline contents from non-inoculated controls, and the activity of several antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and catalase) was also elevated in PGPR-treated plants under salt stress. Overall, these results suggest that the inoculation of pepper plants with M. oleivorans KNUC7074, B. iodinum KNUC7183, and R. massiliae KNUC7586 can alleviate the harmful effects of salt stress on plant growth.

  7. Chili pepper consumption and gastric cancer in Mexico: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, L; Hernández Avila, M; Dubrow, R

    1994-02-01

    Laboratory studies indicate that capsaicin, the hot-tasting component of chili peppers, may be carcinogenic. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Mexico City during 1989-1990 to evaluate the relation between chili pepper consumption and gastric cancer risk. The study included 220 incident cases and 752 controls randomly selected from the general population. Information was collected by interview. Chili pepper consumers were at high risk for gastric cancer compared with nonconsumers (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio = 5.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.72-11.06). Among consumers, there was a highly significant trend of increasing risk with increasing self-rated level of consumption (low, medium, and high) (p = 2 x 10(-7). The odds ratio for high-level consumers compared with nonconsumers was 17.11 (95% CI 7.78-37.59). However, when consumption was measured as frequency per day, a significant trend among consumers was not observed. Multivariable adjustment increased the magnitude of the chili pepper-gastric cancer association, but a significant trend among consumers (measured as frequency per day) was still not observed. Chili pepper consumption may be a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, but further studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  8. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. capsici subsp. nov., causing bacterial canker disease in pepper.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eom-Ji; Bae, Chungyun; Lee, Han-Beoyl; Hwang, In Sun; Lee, Hyok-In; Yea, Mi Chi; Yim, Kyu-Ock; Lee, Seungdon; Heu, Sunggi; Cha, Jae-Soon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-10-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis is a Gram-stain-positive bacterium with eight subspecies. One of these subspecies is C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, which causes bacterial canker disease in tomato. Bacterial strains showing very similar canker disease symptoms to those of a strain originally classified as C. michiganensis have been isolated from pepper. In this paper, we reclassified strains isolated from pepper. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis with 16S rRNA gene sequences, the strains isolated from pepper were grouped in a separate clade from other subspecies of C. michiganensis. Biochemical, physiological and genetic characteristics of strain PF008T, which is the representative strain of the isolates from pepper, were examined in this study. Based on multi-locus sequence typing and other biochemical and physiological features including colony color, utilization of carbon sources and enzyme activities, strain PF008T was categorically differentiated from eight subspecies of C. michiganensis. Moreover, genome analysis showed that the DNA G+C content of strain PF008T is 73.2 %. These results indicate that PF008T is distinct from other known subspecies of C. michiganensis. Therefore, we propose a novel subspecies, C. michiganensis subsp. capsici, causing bacterial canker disease in pepper, with a type strain of PF008T (=KACC 18448T=LMG 29047T).

  9. A sequential binomial sampling plan for potato psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on bell pepper (Capsicum annum).

    PubMed

    Prager, Sean M; Butler, Casey D; Trumble, John T

    2013-10-01

    Potato psyllids (Bactericera cockerelli Sulc) are a pest on solanaceous crop plants, including bell peppers. Potato psyllids vector Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous, but bell peppers (Capsicum annum L.) do not exhibit symptoms from infection. Potato psyllids show variation in spatial patterns and host choice with cultivar and plant species. Consequently, a study of spatial distribution and sampling plan specific to bell peppers is necessary for management of this insect pest, as those developed for other crops are unlikely to transfer among crops. Potato psyllids were evenly distributed on both sides of leaves but prefer the top two-thirds of pepper plants. Within fields, psyllids demonstrated an aggregated spatial distribution, but the edge effect observed in other crop plants was absent. Eggs and nymphs had similar spatial distributions that differed from adults. A series of nymph-based sampling plans were examined. Sampling plans based on an infestation of less than 41% of plants infested (5 nymphs plant(-1)) were statistically unacceptable, while little difference was found between the 41% infestation plan and 56% (20 nymphs plant(-1)) infestation plan. At 41%, an average of 11 and maximum of 49 samples would be necessary to make a treatment decision. The binomial sequential sampling plan presented here offers an important yet simple tool for managing potato psyllids in bell pepper. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Physiological quality and gene expression during the development of habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) seeds.

    PubMed

    Santos, H O; Von Pinho, E V R; Von Pinho, I V; Dutra, S M F; Andrade, T; Guimarães, R M

    2015-05-12

    Phytohormones have different characteristics and functions, and they may be subject to changes in their gene expression and synthesis during seed development. In this study, we evaluated the physiological qualities of habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) during seed development and the expression of genes involved in germination. Seeds were obtained from fruits harvested at different stages of development [i.e., 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days after anthesis (DAA)]. Immediately after harvesting, the seeds were subjected to various tests to determine moisture content, germination, first count germination, and seedling emergence. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the expression of various genes, including MAN2, NCED, B73, ICL6, and GA3ox. Electrophoresis was used to assess the expression of various enzymes, including α-amylase, isocitrate-lyase, and endo-β-mannanase. Habanero peppers harvested at 70 DAA and subjected to 7 days of rest exhibited higher germination rates and vigor compared to those harvested at all other developmental stages. Peppers harvested at 63 DAA without drying exhibited higher α amylase and AmyB73 gene expression levels. Peppers harvested at 70 DAA with 7 days of rest exhibited higher endo-β-mannanase expression levels. MAN2 gene expression increased during the development of non-dried seeds until 70 DAA. Peppers harvested at 42 DAA exhibited the highest isocitrate-lyase and ICL6 gene activity levels in comparison to those at all other developmental stages.

  11. Natural occurrence of mycotoxins and toxigenic capacity of Alternaria strains from mouldy peppers.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Cabral, Lucía; Terminiello, Laura; Fernández Pinto, Virginia; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Patriarca, Andrea

    2016-11-07

    Sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an important crop cultivated worldwide, with Argentina being one of the major producers in South America. The fruit is susceptible to several fungal diseases, leading to severe economic losses for producers. In this study, Alternaria was found as the prevalent genus in mouldy peppers (50% fruits infected). Morphological identification revealed that all 64 Alternaria isolates belonged to small-spored species, most of them corresponding to A. tenuissima, A. arborescens and A. alternata species-groups. Their secondary metabolite profile was evaluated in vitro; alternariols were synthesized by most of the isolates (91% for alternariol and 92% for alternariol monomethyl ether). A high number of Alternaria spp. also produced tenuazonic acid (64%), altenuene (84%) and tentoxin (72%). In addition, damaged pepper fruits were analysed for the presence of tenuazonic acid and alternariols. A total 32 out of 48 spoiled pepper fruits were contaminated with at least one of these metabolites. Half of the samples were positive for tenuazonic acid (range 8-11,422μg/kg), while alternariol and its monomethyl ether were less frequently detected (21 and 29%, respectively) and at lower concentrations. This is the first report on the natural occurrence of Alternaria mycotoxins in Argentinean sweet pepper, and highlights a consumer risk when mouldy fruits are used in industrialized products because these compounds are not destroyed by conventional heat treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 'Caro-Tex 312’ – An F1 Hybrid, High Yielding, Multiple Disease Resistant, Orange Habanero Pepper Cultivar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Texas A&M University and the USDA-ARS U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC, have developed a new, F1 hybrid Habanero pepper cultivar. ‘Caro-Tex 312’ produces a large, orange-fruited Habanero pepper with typical shape and high pungency. It also possesses unique yield, early maturity and dise...

  13. Development of a sweet cherry pepper line with resistance to the southern root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) is a major pathogen of pepper (Capsicum spp.), causing significant yield losses in heavily infected plants. The N-gene confers resistance to M. incognita, and has been successfully used to mitigate nematode damage in specific pepper varieties f...

  14. Non-destructive quality evaluation of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seeds using LED-induced hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we develop a viability evaluation method for pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seed based on hyperspectral reflectance imaging. The reflectance spectra of pepper seeds in the 400–700 nm range are collected from hyperspectral reflectance images obtained using blue, green, and red LED illumin...

  15. Capsicum and capsaicin--a review: case report of the use of hot peppers in child abuse.

    PubMed

    Tominack, R L; Spyker, D A

    1987-01-01

    Capsaicin, the active principle of hot peppers of the genus Capsicum, exhibits broad bioactivity. It targets neuronal structures which contain substance P, clinically seen as gastrointestinal and dermatologic irritation, bronchospasm and fibrinolysis. As a research tool, capsaicin profoundly alters neurologic anatomy and function. We review the toxicity of capsaicin and comment briefly on the use of hot peppers in child abuse.

  16. Predator-In-First: A novel biocontrol strategy for managing thrips and other key pests in pepper crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Predator-In-First (PIF) is a novel biological-based approach for sustainable control of thrips and other key pests that threaten pepper production in protected and outdoor culture. In the current study pepper plants were used as a model crop system and the key component of this method involves the r...

  17. Proteome analysis of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Muhammad Asim; Grossmann, Jonas; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baginsky, Sacha

    2006-12-01

    We report a comprehensive proteome analysis of chromoplasts from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The combination of a novel strategy for database-independent detection of proteins from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data with standard database searches allowed us to identify 151 proteins with a high level of confidence. These include several well-known plastid proteins but also novel proteins that were not previously reported from other plastid proteome studies. The majority of the identified proteins are active in plastid carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among the most abundant individual proteins are capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillin, which are involved in the synthesis and storage of carotenoids that accumulate to high levels in chromoplasts. The relative abundances of the identified chromoplast proteins differ remarkably compared with their abundances in other plastid types, suggesting a chromoplast-specific metabolic network. Our results provide an overview of the major metabolic pathways active in chromoplasts and extend existing knowledge about prevalent metabolic activities of different plastid types.

  18. Phytotoxicity of sarmentine isolated from long pepper (Piper longum) fruit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huazhang; Morgan, Christy M; Asolkar, Ratnakar N; Koivunen, Marja E; Marrone, Pamela G

    2010-09-22

    Discovery of novel natural herbicides has become crucial to overcome increasing weed resistance and environmental issues. In this article, we describe the finding that a methanol extract of dry long pepper (Piper longum L.) fruits is phytotoxic to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. The bioassay-guided fractionation and purification of the crude extract led to isolation of sarmentine (1), a known compound, as the active principle. Phytotoxicity of 1 was examined with a variety of seedlings of field crops and weeds. Results indicated that 1 was a contact herbicide and possessed broad-spectrum herbicidal activity. Moreover, a series of sarmentine analogues were then synthesized to study the structure-activity relationship (SAR). SAR studies suggested that phytotoxicity of sarmentine and its analogues was specific due to chemical structures, i.e., the analogues of the acid moiety of 1 were active, but the amine and its analogues were inactive; the ester analogues and amide analogues with a primary amine of 1 were also inactive. In addition, quantification of 1 from different resources of the dry P. longum fruits using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed a wide variation, ranging from almost zero to 0.57%. This study suggests that 1 has potential as an active lead molecule for synthesized herbicides as well as for bioherbicides derived from natural resources.

  19. Distribution of seven heavy metals among hot pepper plant parts.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to monitor concentrations of seven metals (Cd, Pb, Ni, Mo, Cu, Zn, and Cr) in the fruits, leaves, stem, and roots of Capsicum annuum L. (cv. Xcatic) plants grown under four soil management practices: yard waste (YW), sewage sludge (SS), chicken manure (CM), and no-much (NM) bare soil. Elemental analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Pb and Cd concentrations in soil amended with YW, SS, and CM were not significantly different (P < 0.05) compared to NM soil, whereas Mo and Cu concentrations were significantly greater in YW compared to SS, CM, and NM treatments. Concentrations of Cd in the fruits of plants grown in NM soil were greater compared to the fruits of plants grown in other treatments. Total Ni concentration (sum of Ni in all plant parts) in plants grown in NM bare soil was greater than in plants grown in SS-, YW-, and CM-amended soils. Values of the bioaccumulation factor indicated that pepper fruits of plants grown in YW, SS, and CM did not show any tendency to accumulate Pb, Cr, and Ni in their edible fruits.

  20. Nitrogen metabolism in pepper plants applied with different bioregulators.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Castilla, N; Romero, L

    2000-07-01

    Certain bioregulators were studied in relation to nitrogen metabolism of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Lamuyo). Plants were grown under controlled conditions and submitted to regular fertilization with macro- and micronutrients. Treatments were as follows: nontreated control (T0); fosfonutren [essential amino acids and micronutrients (46.9 mg L(-)(1))] (T1); biozyme [GA(3) (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus IAA (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus zeatin (83.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus chelated micronutrients] (T2); and GA(3) [16 mg L(-)(1)] (T3). The concentrations of NO(3)(-), organic N, amino acids, and proteins, the activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), and finally the foliar dry weight and yield were analyzed. The results indicated that the application of certain bioregulators, such as fosfonutren (T1), which contain amino acids can cause a negative effect on the efficiency and utilization of NO(3)(-), resulting in a drastic loss in growth and yield, even under the control treatment, in which no bioregulator was applied. On the contrary, the application of certain bioregulators based principally on the combination of different hormones, as in the case of biozyme (T2), increased NO(3)(-) assimilation under our experimental conditions, due possibly to a greater availability of these bioregulators in the leaves and increased NR and NiR activities. This appears to explain why the T2 treatment gave the greatest foliar dry weight and fruit yield per plant in the experiment.

  1. Transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  2. Evidence that a transcription factor regulatory network coordinates oxidative stress response and secondary metabolism in aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V; Wee, Josephine; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin is a secondary metabolite and potent human carcinogen. We investigated one mechanism that links stress response with coordinate activation of genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that AtfB, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, is a master co-regulator that binds promoters of early (fas-1), middle (ver-1), and late (omtA) aflatoxin biosynthetic genes as well as stress-response genes (mycelia-specific cat1 and mitochondria-specific Mn sod) at cAMP response element motifs. A novel conserved motif 5′-T/GNT/CAAG CCNNG/AA/GC/ANT/C-3′ was identified in promoters of the aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes. A search for transcription factors identified SrrA as a transcription factor that could bind to the motif. Moreover, we also identified a STRE motif (5′-CCCCT-3′) in promoters of aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes, and competition EMSA suggested that MsnA binds to this motif. Our study for the first time provides strong evidence to suggest that at least four transcription factors (AtfB, SrrA, AP-1, and MsnA) participate in a regulatory network that induces aflatoxin biosynthesis as part of the cellular response to oxidative stress in A. parasiticus. PMID:23281343

  3. Inheritance and expression of transgenes through anther culture of transgenic hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Kuk, Yong In; Kim, Kyung-Moon

    2007-01-01

    Anther cultures have been developed from transgenic donor peppers carrying HPT/J1-1. Eight out of sixteen plants produced from an anther culture set pepper fruits. Southern blot analysis of donors revealed two independent plants with a single copy of the integrated transgene. PCR and RT-PCR results showed the inheritance of HPT/J1-1 and expression of J1-1 in A1. All A1 progeny derived from transgenic anthers had resistance to hygromycin. They grew normally and showed similar phenotypes to the wild-type. Therefore, the use of an anther culture system coupled with genetic transformation in breeding programs will greatly facilitate the genetic improvement of pepper plants.

  4. Phytyl Fatty Acid Esters in the Pulp of Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Krauß, Stephanie; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2016-08-17

    Phytyl fatty acid esters (PFAE) are esters of fatty acids with the isoprenoid alcohol phytol (3,7R,11R,15-tetramethylhexadec-2E-enol). In this study, PFAE were identified and quantified in bell pepper using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All red (n = 14) and yellow (n = 6) samples contained six or seven PFAE at 0.9-11.2 mg/100 g fresh weight. By contrast, PFAE were not detected in green bell pepper samples (n = 3). PFAE might eventually be a source for bioavailable phytol, which can be transformed into phytanic acid by humans. Phytanic acid cannot be properly degraded by patients who suffer from Refsum's disease (tolerable daily intake (TDI) ≤ 10 mg of phytanic acid). The phytol moiety of the PFAE (0.4-5.4 mg/100 g fresh weight) would contribute up to ∼50% to the TDI with the consumption of only one portion of bell pepper fruit pulp.

  5. Quantitative analysis of sanshool compounds in Japanese pepper (Xanthoxylum piperitum DC.) and their pungent characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Etsuko; Morimitsu, Yasujiro; Kubota, Kikue

    2005-10-01

    The distributions of each sanshool in the Japanese pepper plant grown in various regions and the change in composition of sanshools during maturation of the fruit were investigated. The degree of pungency, defined as the amount of a sanshool/the threshold value, was calculated, and the pungent qualities of the products were evaluated and compared. The degree of pungency and amount of a sanshool showed a positive correlation. In young leaves and flowers, the degree of pungency was less than that in the fruits, the main compound being alpha-sanshool, while the two hydroxy sanshools were detected only in trace amounts. The main compound in fruits was hydroxy alpha-sanshool, whose threshold value was higher than that of alpha-sanshool. It is concluded that the pungency of Japanese pepper should be evaluated not only by the threshold values, but also by the pungent qualities, the composition of sanshools, and the usage of each product of Japanese pepper.

  6. Rapid biodiesel synthesis from waste pepper seeds without lipid isolation step.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jechan; Kim, Jieun; Ok, Yong Sik; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-09-01

    In situ transformation of lipid in waste pepper seeds into biodiesel (i.e., fatty acid methyl esters: FAMEs) via thermally-induced transmethylation on silica was mainly investigated in this study. This study reported that waste pepper seeds contained 26.9wt% of lipid and that 94.1% of the total lipid in waste pepper seeds could be converted into biodiesel without lipid extraction step for only ∼1min reaction time. This study also suggested that the optimal temperature for in situ transmethylation was identified as 390°C. Moreover, comparison of in situ process via the conventional transmethylation catalyzed by H2SO4 showed that the introduced biodiesel conversion in this study had a higher tolerance against impurities, thereby being technically feasible. The in situ biodiesel production from other oil-bearing food wastes can be studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mobility of heavy metals from soil into hot pepper fruits: a field study.

    PubMed

    Antonious, G F; Kochhar, T S

    2009-01-01

    Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin contribute to pungency as well as having health-promoting properties, in peppers. Twenty-three genotypes (four spp.) of hot pepper from the USDA germplasm collection were grown in the field to identify accessions having increased concentrations of these two compounds and determine the concentrations of heavy metals, in mature fruits. Concentrations and relative proportions of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and seven heavy metals varied between and within pepper species. Plant Introduction 547069 (C. annuum) contained the greatest concentrations of the two pungent compounds. Fruits of PI-439381 and PI-267729 (C. baccatum) accumulated the greatest concentrations of Pb, while PI-246331 (C. annuum) accumulated the greatest concentration of Cd among accessions tested.

  8. Analysis of the blackening of green pepper (Piper nigrum Linnaeus) berries.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fenglin; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong; Fang, Yiming; Wang, Qinghuang

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, reduced weight percentage after sun drying, and the changes in colour and appearance of green pepper (Piper nigrum Linnaeus) berries after blanching and sun drying. The results show that the degree of reduced weight percentage and browning in green pepper berries after blanching for 10 min is greater at 100°C than at 90 and 80°C. Moreover, the samples blanched at 100°C for 10 min had the fastest water loss, but the lowest PPO activity. Thus, the PPO enzymatic oxidation of polyphenols might not be the only reason for the browning of green pepper berries. This result is significantly different from that of Variyar, Pendharkar, Banerjeea, and Bandyopadhyay (1988) and therefore deserves further study.

  9. Antiglycation, antioxidant and toxicological potential of polyphenol extracts of alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kazeem, MI; Akanji, MA; Hafizur, Rahman M; Choudhary, MI

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antioxidant and antiglycation potential of polyphenols from three spices; alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg. Methods Polyphenol extracts of these spices were subjected to brine-shrimp lethality assay, phytotoxicity test, DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging as well as BSA-glucose antiglycation assay. Results Results obtained showed that polyphenol extract of ginger has the highest antioxidant potential with IC50 0.075 and 0.070 mg/mL for DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging assay while alligator pepper displayed highest antiglycation activity with IC50 0.125 mg/mL. However, nutmeg extract exhibited weakest cytotoxic and phytotoxic potential with LD50 4359.70 and 1490 µg/mL respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the polyphenol extracts of alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg displayed good antioxidant as well as antiglycation potential and are safe for consumption. PMID:23570003

  10. Antiglycation, antioxidant and toxicological potential of polyphenol extracts of alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kazeem, M I; Akanji, M A; Hafizur, Rahman M; Choudhary, M I

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant and antiglycation potential of polyphenols from three spices; alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg. Polyphenol extracts of these spices were subjected to brine-shrimp lethality assay, phytotoxicity test, DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging as well as BSA-glucose antiglycation assay. Results obtained showed that polyphenol extract of ginger has the highest antioxidant potential with IC50 0.075 and 0.070 mg/mL for DPPH and superoxide anion radical scavenging assay while alligator pepper displayed highest antiglycation activity with IC50 0.125 mg/mL. However, nutmeg extract exhibited weakest cytotoxic and phytotoxic potential with LD50 4359.70 and 1490 µg/mL respectively. It can be concluded that the polyphenol extracts of alligator pepper, ginger and nutmeg displayed good antioxidant as well as antiglycation potential and are safe for consumption.

  11. Bioflavour production from tomato and pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Güneşer, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Karagül Yüceer, Yonca; Özmen Toğay, Sine; İşleten Hoşoğlu, Müge; Elibol, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Bioflavours are called natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds which are produced using metabolic pathway of the microorganism and/or plant cells or their enzyme systems with bioengineering approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate bioflavour production from tomato and red pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii. Obtained specific growth rates of K. marxianus and D. hansenii in tomato pomace were 0.081/h and 0.177/h, respectively. The bioflavour profile differed between the yeasts. Both yeasts can produce esters and alcohols such as phenyl ethyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isoamyl acetate, phenyl ethyl acetate and isovaleric acid. "Tarhana" and "rose" were descriptive flavour terms for tomato and pepper pomaces fermented by K. marxianus, respectively. Tomato pomace fermented by D. hansenii had the most intense "green bean" flavour while "fermented vegetable" and "storage/yeast" were defined as characteristic flavour terms for pepper pomaces fermented by D. hansenii.

  12. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  13. Seasonal Abundance and Phenology of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) on Different Pepper Cultivars in the Mid-Atlantic (United States).

    PubMed

    Philips, C R; Kuhar, T P; Dively, G P; Hamilton, G; Whalen, J; Kamminga, K

    2017-02-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is an invasive stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) introduced into the United States in the mid-1990s. Since its initial establishment, it has spread throughout the east coast as far south as Georgia, and as far north as New Hampshire. While information is available regarding H. halys behavior and life history in some crops, relatively little information is available for vegetables such as peppers. Key questions include understanding when H. halys enters pepper fields to feed and how best to predict infestations, what population levels create economic damage, and if peppers that vary in capsaicin levels also vary in susceptibility to attack. To answer these questions, replicated plots were set up across four mid-Atlantic states using three types of peppers: sweet bell, sweet banana, and hot chili. We found that there was no difference in the overall abundance of all life stages of H. halys on all pepper varieties tested. However, there were differences in bug density by site, but these differences did not translate to differences in the proportion of damaged fruit. The presence of adult H. halys is a better predictor of damage in banana peppers, whereas nymphs are a better predictor in bell pepper. In addition, across all sites, the presence of egg masses was low in pepper crops and densities of both adults and immatures tend to peak on pepper plants in early August. Altogether, this information can be used to help develop a pest management program in peppers that will reduce crop losses to this new devastating pest, while reducing the reliance on insecticides to manage this pest at the same time.

  14. Antioxidant activities of two sweet pepper Capsicum annuum L. varieties phenolic extracts and the effects of thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Yazdizadeh Shotorbani, Narmin; Jamei, Rashid; Heidari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Sweet peppers Capsicum annuum L. (C. annuum) are an excellent source of vitamins A and C as well as phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidant components that may reduce the risk of diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate their antioxidant activity under various temperatures. To compare the antioxidant activity in various temperatures (20, 35, 50, and 65 °C), two different types of colored (red and green) sweet bell peppers C annuum were selected. The red peppers were selected from those cultivated in Shahreza, Esfahan and the green peppers with the local name of Gijlar were selected from those cultivated in Urmia, West Azarbayjan. The experiments were carried out to measure the total phenolic and flavonoid content, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), chain-breaking activity, scavenging activities of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of pepper extracts were enhanced with increasing temperature to 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of DPPH radical of red pepper extract was enhanced because of putting at 50 °C for 30 min and for Gijlar pepper extract scavenging capacity was increased at 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of hydrogen peroxide radical of extracts was the highest at 35 °C. Chain-breaking activity of red pepper extract was increased for 60 min at 35 °C. FRAP (C) of red pepper extract was significantly different (p<0.05) in compare with Gijlar pepper. An appropriate temperature maintained a high antioxidant activity of phenolic compound, which could be due to the combined effect of non enzymatic reaction and phenolic compound stability.

  15. Antioxidant activities of two sweet pepper Capsicum annuum L. varieties phenolic extracts and the effects of thermal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yazdizadeh Shotorbani, Narmin; Jamei, Rashid; Heidari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Sweet peppers Capsicum annuum L. (C. annuum) are an excellent source of vitamins A and C as well as phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidant components that may reduce the risk of diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate their antioxidant activity under various temperatures. Materials and Methods: To compare the antioxidant activity in various temperatures (20, 35, 50, and 65 °C), two different types of colored (red and green) sweet bell peppers C annuum were selected. The red peppers were selected from those cultivated in Shahreza, Esfahan and the green peppers with the local name of Gijlar were selected from those cultivated in Urmia, West Azarbayjan. The experiments were carried out to measure the total phenolic and flavonoid content, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), chain-breaking activity, scavenging activities of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Results: Total phenol and flavonoid contents of pepper extracts were enhanced with increasing temperature to 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of DPPH radical of red pepper extract was enhanced because of putting at 50 °C for 30 min and for Gijlar pepper extract scavenging capacity was increased at 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of hydrogen peroxide radical of extracts was the highest at 35 °C. Chain-breaking activity of red pepper extract was increased for 60 min at 35 °C. FRAP (C) of red pepper extract was significantly different (p<0.05) in compare with Gijlar pepper. Conclusion: An appropriate temperature maintained a high antioxidant activity of phenolic compound, which could be due to the combined effect of non enzymatic reaction and phenolic compound stability. PMID:25050256

  16. Physiology of pepper fruit and the metabolism of antioxidants: chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, José M.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana; del Río, Luis A.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Álvarez de Morales, Paz; Camejo, Daymi M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Pepper (Capsicum annuum) contains high levels of antioxidants, such as vitamins A and C and flavonoids. However, information on the role of these beneficial compounds in the physiology of pepper fruit remains scarce. Recent studies have shown that antioxidants in ripe pepper fruit play a key role in responses to temperature changes, and the redox state at the time of harvest affects the nutritional value for human consumption. In this paper, the role of antioxidant metabolism of pepper fruit during ripening and in the response to low temperature is addressed, paying particular attention to ascorbate, NADPH and the superoxide dismutase enzymatic system. The participation of chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes in the ripening process is also investigated. Scope and Results Important changes occur at a subcellular level during ripening of pepper fruit. Chloroplasts turn into chromoplasts, with drastic conversion of their metabolism, and the role of the ascorbate–glutathione cycle is essential. In mitochondria from red fruits, higher ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and Mn-SOD activities are involved in avoiding the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in these organelles during ripening. Peroxisomes, whose antioxidant capacity at fruit ripening is substantially affected, display an atypical metabolic pattern during this physiological stage. In spite of these differences observed in the antioxidative metabolism of mitochondria and peroxisomes, proteomic analysis of these organelles, carried out by 2-D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF and provided here for the first time, reveals no changes between the antioxidant metabolism from immature (green) and ripe (red) fruits. Conclusions Taken together, the results show that investigation of molecular and enzymatic antioxidants from cell compartments, especially chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes, is a useful tool to study the physiology of pepper fruit, particularly in the context of

  17. Physiology of pepper fruit and the metabolism of antioxidants: chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Palma, José M; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana; del Río, Luis A; Corpas, Francisco J; Álvarez de Morales, Paz; Camejo, Daymi M

    2015-09-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum) contains high levels of antioxidants, such as vitamins A and C and flavonoids. However, information on the role of these beneficial compounds in the physiology of pepper fruit remains scarce. Recent studies have shown that antioxidants in ripe pepper fruit play a key role in responses to temperature changes, and the redox state at the time of harvest affects the nutritional value for human consumption. In this paper, the role of antioxidant metabolism of pepper fruit during ripening and in the response to low temperature is addressed, paying particular attention to ascorbate, NADPH and the superoxide dismut