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Sample records for pepper bzip transcription

  1. Expression and Functional Roles of the Pepper Pathogen-Induced bZIP Transcription Factor CabZIP2 in Enhanced Disease Resistance to Bacterial Pathogen Infection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Baek, Woonhee; Lim, Sohee; Han, Sang-Wook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-07-01

    A pepper bZIP transcription factor gene, CabZIP2, was isolated from pepper leaves infected with a virulent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. Transient expression analysis of the CabZIP2-GFP fusion protein in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the CabZIP2 protein is localized in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus. The acidic domain in the N-terminal region of CabZIP2 that is fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain is required to activate the transcription of reporter genes in yeast. Transcription of CabZIP2 is induced in pepper plants inoculated with virulent or avirulent strains of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CabZIP2 gene is also induced by defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethylene. To elucidate the in vivo function of the CabZIP2 gene in plant defense, virus-induced gene silencing in pepper and overexpression in Arabidopsis were used. CabZIP2-silenced pepper plants were susceptible to infection by the virulent strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, which was accompanied by reduced expression of defense-related genes such as CaBPR1 and CaAMP1. CabZIP2 overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Together, these results suggest that CabZIP2 is involved in bacterial disease resistance.

  2. In vivo binding of hot pepper bZIP transcription factor CabZIP1 to the G-box region of pathogenesis-related protein 1 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boo-Ja; Park, Chang-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-26

    We find that salicylic acid and ethephon treatment in hot pepper increases the expression of a putative basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene, CabZIP1. CabZIP1 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously in various organs. The green fluorescent protein-fused transcription factor, CabZIP1::GFP, can be specifically localized to the nucleus, an action that is consistent with the presence of a nuclear localization signal in its protein sequence. Transient overexpression of the CabZIP1 transcription factor results in an increase in PR-1 transcripts level in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate that CabZIP1 binds to the G-box elements in native promoter of the hot pepper pathogenesis-related protein 1 (CaPR-1) gene in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that CabZIP1 plays a role as a transcriptional regulator of the CaPR-1 gene.

  3. Plant bZIP Transcription Factors Responsive to Pathogens: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Murilo S.; Dadalto, Silvana P.; Gonçalves, Amanda B.; De Souza, Gilza B.; Barros, Vanessa A.; Fietto, Luciano G.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are master regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes, including morphogenesis, seed formation, abiotic and biotic stress responses. Modulation of the expression patterns of bZIP genes and changes in their activity often contribute to the activation of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks of different physiological processes. However, most advances in the study of plant bZIP transcription factors are related to their involvement in abiotic stress and development. In contrast, there are few examples of functional research with regard to biotic stress, particularly in the defense against pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress revealing the role of bZIP transcription factors in the biotic stress responses of several plant species, from Arabidopsis to cotton. Moreover, we summarize the interacting partners of bZIP proteins in molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of the signal transduction pathways with which they physically interact during plant defense responses. Lastly, we focus on the recent advances regarding research on the functional role of bZIPs in major agricultural cultivars and examine the studies performed in this field. PMID:23574941

  4. Functional characterization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP29 reveals its role in leaf and root development

    PubMed Central

    Van Leene, Jelle; Blomme, Jonas; Kulkarni, Shubhada R; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Heyndrickx, Ken S; Vanneste, Steffen; Goossens, Alain; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk; De Jaeger, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Plant bZIP group I transcription factors have been reported mainly for their role during vascular development and osmosensory responses. Interestingly, bZIP29 has been identified in a cell cycle interactome, indicating additional functions of bZIP29 in plant development. Here, bZIP29 was functionally characterized to study its role during plant development. It is not present in vascular tissue but is specifically expressed in proliferative tissues. Genome-wide mapping of bZIP29 target genes confirmed its role in stress and osmosensory responses, but also identified specific binding to several core cell cycle genes and to genes involved in cell wall organization. bZIP29 protein complex analyses validated interaction with other bZIP group I members and provided insight into regulatory mechanisms acting on bZIP dimers. In agreement with bZIP29 expression in proliferative tissues and with its binding to promoters of cell cycle regulators, dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 altered the cell number in leaves and in the root meristem. A transcriptome analysis on the root meristem, however, indicated that bZIP29 might regulate cell number through control of cell wall organization. Finally, ectopic dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 and redundant factors led to a seedling-lethal phenotype, pointing to essential roles for bZIP group I factors early in plant development. PMID:27660483

  5. Transcriptional regulation of secretory capacity by bZip transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    FOX, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of specialized secretory organs expand their secretory pathways to accommodate the increased protein load necessary for their function. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the Golgi apparatus and the secretory vesicles, expand not only the membrane components but also the protein machinery required for increased protein production and transport. Increased protein load causes an ER stress response akin to the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Recent work has implicated several bZip transcription factors in the regulation of protein components of the early secretory pathway necessary to alleviate this stress. Here, we highlight eight bZip transcription factors in regulating secretory pathway component genes. These include components of the three canonical branches of the UPR–ATF4, XBP1, and ATF6, as well as the five members of the Creb3 family of transcription factors. We review findings from both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems suggesting that all of these proteins increase secretory capacity in response to increased protein load. Finally, we propose that the Creb3 family of factors may have a dual role in secretory cell differentiation by also regulating the pathways necessary for cell cycle exit during terminal differentiation. PMID:25821458

  6. Expression analysis of bZIP transcription factor encoding genes in response to water deficit stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kishwar; Rai, R D; Tyagi, Aruna

    2016-05-01

    In plants, basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP) transcription factors regulate several developmental processes and activate genes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Role of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was studied in paddy in relation to different stages of development and water deficit stress (WDS) in a drought tolerant cultivar N22 and susceptible IR 64. Further, relative water content (RWC), membrane stability index (MSI) and abscisic acid (ABA) content were measured as indices of WDS at different stages of development and levels of stress. Expression of stress responsive bZIP transcription factors was directly correlated to developmental stage and WDS and indirectly to RWC, MSI and ABA content. PMID:27319052

  7. The Role of bZIP Transcription Factors in Green Plant Evolution: Adaptive Features Emerging from Four Founder Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schrago, Carlos Guerra; dos Santos, Renato Vicentini; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Vincentz, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs). The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments. PMID:18698409

  8. Functional dissection of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor from tomato.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A small anaerobically induced tomato transcription factor was isolated from a subtractive library. This factor, designated ABZ1 (anaerobic basic leucine zipper), is anaerobically induced in fruits, leaves and roots and encodes a nuclear localized protein. ABZ1 shares close structural and sequence homology with the S-family of small basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors that are implicated in stress response. Nuclear localization of ABZ1 is mediated by the basic region and occurs under normoxic conditions. ABZ1 binds to G-box-like target sites as a dimer. Binding can be abolished by heterodimerization with a truncated protein retaining the leucine zipper but lacking the DNA binding domain. The protein binds in a sequence specific manner to the CaMV 35S promoter which is down regulated when ABZ1 is coexpressed. This correlates with the anaerobic down regulation of the 35S promoter in tomato and tobacco. These results may suggest that small bZIP proteins are involved in the negative regulation of gene expression under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15560794

  9. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  10. Transcriptome analysis of newly classified bZIP transcription factors of Brassica rapa in cold stress response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2014-09-01

    Plant bZIP transcription factors play crucial roles in biological processes. In this study, 136 putative bZIP transcription members were identified in Brassica rapa. The bZIP family can be divided into nine groups according to the specific amino acid rich domain in B. rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana. To screen the cold stress responsive BrbZIP genes, we evaluated whether the transcription patterns of the BrbZIP genes were enhanced by cold treatment in the inbred lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, by microarray data analysis and qRT-PCR. The expression level of six genes increased significantly in Kenshin, but these genes were unchanged in Chiifu. These findings suggest that the six genes that encoded proteins containing N-rich regions might be involved in cold stress response. The results presented herein provide valuable information regarding the molecular basis of the bZIP transcription factors and their potential function in regulation growth and development, particularly in cold stress response.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of newly classified bZIP transcription factors of Brassica rapa in cold stress response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2014-09-01

    Plant bZIP transcription factors play crucial roles in biological processes. In this study, 136 putative bZIP transcription members were identified in Brassica rapa. The bZIP family can be divided into nine groups according to the specific amino acid rich domain in B. rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana. To screen the cold stress responsive BrbZIP genes, we evaluated whether the transcription patterns of the BrbZIP genes were enhanced by cold treatment in the inbred lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, by microarray data analysis and qRT-PCR. The expression level of six genes increased significantly in Kenshin, but these genes were unchanged in Chiifu. These findings suggest that the six genes that encoded proteins containing N-rich regions might be involved in cold stress response. The results presented herein provide valuable information regarding the molecular basis of the bZIP transcription factors and their potential function in regulation growth and development, particularly in cold stress response. PMID:25075938

  12. Molecular cloning of a putative novel human bZIP transcription factor on chromosome 17q22

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, L.; Johnsen, O.; Skartlien, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized cDNA clones representing several mRNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing of a single gene localized to chromosome 17q22. Sequence analysis showed that the predicted translational product of the longest open reading frame (2316 nucleotides, 772 amino acids) is related to transcription factors of the basic elucine zipper (bZIP) class. The sequence contained several regions characteristic of transcriptional regulatory domains. A cluster of amino acids flanking the bZIP region on both sides was highly conserved between TCF11 and p45 NF-E2, a subunit of the human globin locus control region-binding protein, NF-E2. These same regions showed remarkable homology to two invertebrate proteins, CNC and skn-1, postulated to regulate embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  14. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-03-07

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response.

  15. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  16. Genomic identification of group A bZIP transcription factors and their responses to abiotic stress in carrot.

    PubMed

    Que, F; Wang, G L; Huang, Y; Xu, Z S; Wang, F; Xiong, A S

    2015-01-01

    The basic-region/leucine-zipper (bZIP) family is one of the major transcription factor (TF) families associated with responses to abiotic stresses. Many members of group A in this family have been extensively examined and are reported to perform significant functions in ABA signaling as well as in responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 10 bZIP factors in carrot were classified into group A based on their DNA-binding domains. The cis-acting regulatory elements and folding states of these 10 factors were analyzed. Evolutionary analysis of the group A members suggested their importance during the course of evolution in plants. In addition, cis-acting elements and the folding state of proteins were important for DNA binding and could affect gene expression. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to investigate the stress response of 10 genes encoding the group A factors. Six genes showed responses to abiotic stresses, while four genes showed other special phenomenon. The current analysis on group A bZIP family TFs in carrot is the first to investigate the TFs of Apiaceae via genome analysis. These results provide new information for future studies on carrot. PMID:26535641

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses. PMID:27314020

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses. PMID:27314020

  20. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  1. REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH, a bZIP Transcriptional Activator, Regulates Cell Elongation by Controlling the Level of Gibberellins

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Jutarou; Sakai, Tatsuya; Ishida, Sarahmi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Kamiya, Yuji; Takahashi, Yohsuke

    2000-01-01

    Cell expansion, a developmental process regulated by both endogenous programs and environmental stimuli, is critically important for plant growth. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of RSG (for repression of shoot growth), a transcriptional activator with a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. To examine the role of RSG in plant development, we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing a dominant-negative form of RSG, which repressed the activity of full-length RSG. In transgenic plants, this expression severely inhibited stem internode growth, specifically cell elongation. These plants also had less endogenous amounts of the major active gibberellin (GA) in tobacco, GA1. Applying GAs restored the dwarf phenotypes of transgenic tobacco plants that expressed the dominant-negative form of RSG. To investigate the function of RSG in the regulation of the endogenous amounts of GAs, we identified a target for RSG. RSG bound and activated the promoter of Arabidopsis GA3, one of the genes encoding enzymes involved in GA biosynthesis. Moreover, the dominant-negative form of RSG decreased expression of the GA3 homolog in transgenic tobacco plants. Our results show that RSG, a bZIP transcriptional activator, regulates the morphology of plants by controlling the endogenous amounts of GAs. PMID:10852936

  2. GhABF2, a bZIP transcription factor, confers drought and salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengzhen; Meng, Zhaohong; Meng, Zhigang; Malik, Waqas; Yan, Rong; Lwin, Khin Myat; Lin, Fazhuang; Wang, Yuan; Sun, Guoqing; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Li, Jianying; Jin, Shuangxia; Guo, Sandui; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The bZIP transcription factor (TF) act as an important regulator for the abscisic acid (ABA) mediated abiotic stresses signaling pathways in plants. Here, we reported the cloning and characterization of GhABF2, encoding for typical cotton bZIP TF. Overexpression of GhABF2 significantly improved drought and salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and cotton. However, silencing of GhABF2 made transgenic cotton sensitive to PEG osmotic and salt stress. Expression of GhABF2 was induced by drought and ABA treatments but repressed by high salinity. Transcriptome analysis indicated that GhABF2 increases drought and salt tolerance by regulating genes related to ABA, drought and salt response. The proline contents, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also significantly increased in GhABF2-overexpression cottons in comparison to wild type after drought and salt treatment. Further, an increase in fiber yield under drought and saline-alkali wetland exhibited the important role of GhABF2 in enhancing the drought and salt tolerance in transgenic lines. In conclusion, manipulation of GhABF2 by biotechnological tools could be a sustainable strategy to deploy drought and salt tolerance in cotton. PMID:27713524

  3. Redox-mediated Mechanisms Regulate DNA Binding Activity of the G-group of Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Shaikhali, Jehad; Norén, Louise; de Dios Barajas-López, Juan; Srivastava, Vaibhav; König, Janine; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wingsle, Gunnar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Strand, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Plant genes that contain the G-box in their promoters are responsive to a variety of environmental stimuli. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome data revealed that the G-box element is significantly enriched in promoters of high light-responsive genes. From nuclear extracts of high light-treated Arabidopsis plants, we identified the AtbZIP16 transcription factor as a component binding to the G-box-containing promoter fragment of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein2.4 (LHCB2.4). AtbZIP16 belongs to the G-group of Arabidopsis basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factors. Although AtbZIP16 and its close homologues AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 bind the G-box, they do not bind the mutated half-sites of the G-box palindrome. In addition, AtbZIP16 interacts with AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. A conserved Cys residue was shown to be necessary for redox regulation and enhancement of DNA binding activity in all three proteins. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the wild type version of bZIP16 and T-DNA insertion mutants for bZIP68 and GBF1 demonstrated impaired regulation of LHCB2.4 expression. Finally, overexpression lines for the mutated Cys variant of bZIP16 provided support for the biological significance of Cys330 in redox regulation of gene expression. Thus, our results suggest that environmentally induced changes in the redox state regulate the activity of members of the G-group of bZIP transcription factors. PMID:22718771

  4. Identification of Two bZIP Transcription Factors Interacting with the Promoter of Soybean Rubisco Activase Gene (GmRCAα)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyu; Du, Hongyang; Chao, Maoni; Yin, Zhitong; Yang, Hui; Li, Yakai; Huang, Fang; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA), a key photosynthetic protein, catalyses the activation of Rubisco and thus plays an important role in photosynthesis. Although the RCA gene has been characterized in a variety of species, the molecular mechanism regulating its transcription remains unclear. Our previous studies on RCA gene expression in soybean suggested that expression of this gene is regulated by trans-acting factors. In the present study, we verified activity of the GmRCAα promoter in both soybean and Arabidopsis and used a yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) system for screening a leaf cDNA expression library to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the GmRCAα promoter. Four basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TFs, GmbZIP04g, GmbZIP07g, GmbZIP1, and GmbZIP71, were isolated, and GmbZIP04g and GmbZIP07g were confirmed as able to bind to a 21-nt G-box-containing sequence. Additionally, the expression patterns of GmbZIP04g, GmbZIp07g, and GmRCAα were analyzed in response to abiotic stresses and during a 24-h period. Our study will help to advance elucidation of the network regulating GmRCAα transcription. PMID:27242832

  5. FASCIATED EAR4 encodes a bZIP transcription factor that regulates shoot meristem size in maize.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Michael; Eveland, Andrea L; LaRue, Therese; Yang, Fang; Weeks, Rebecca; Lunde, China; Je, Byoung Il; Meeley, Robert; Komatsu, Mai; Vollbrecht, Erik; Sakai, Hajime; Jackson, David

    2015-01-01

    Plant architecture is dictated by precise control of meristematic activity. In the shoot, an imbalance in positive or negative maintenance signals can result in a fasciated or enlarged meristem phenotype. fasciated ear4 (fea4) is a semidwarfed mutant with fasciated ears and tassels as well as greatly enlarged vegetative and inflorescence meristems. We identified FEA4 as a bZIP transcription factor, orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana PERIANTHIA. FEA4 was expressed in the peripheral zone of the vegetative shoot apical meristem and in the vasculature of immature leaves and conspicuously excluded from the stem cell niche at the tip of the shoot apical meristem and from incipient leaf primordia. Following the transition to reproductive fate, FEA4 was expressed throughout the entire inflorescence and floral meristems. Native expression of a functional YFP:FEA4 fusion recapitulated this pattern of expression. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing to identify 4060 genes proximal to FEA4 binding sites, including ones that were potentially bound and modulated by FEA4 based on transcriptional changes in fea4 mutant ears. Our results suggest that FEA4 promotes differentiation in the meristem periphery by regulating auxin-based responses and genes associated with leaf differentiation and polarity, potentially in opposition to factors such as KNOTTED1 and WUSCHEL. PMID:25616871

  6. Nuclear Import of the Parsley bZIP Transcription Factor CPRF2 Is Regulated by Phytochrome Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Stefan; Wellmer, Frank; Nick, Peter; Rügner, Alexander; Schäfer, Eberhard; Harter, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    In plants, light perception by photoreceptors leads to differential expression of an enormous number of genes. An important step for differential gene expression is the regulation of transcription factor activities. To understand these processes in light signal transduction we analyzed the three well-known members of the common plant regulatory factor (CPRF) family from parsley (Petroselinum crispum). Here, we demonstrate that these CPRFs, which belong to the basic- region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain-containing transcription factors, are differentially distributed within parsley cells, indicating different regulatory functions within the regulatory networks of the plant cell. In particular, we show by cell fractionation and immunolocalization approaches that CPRF2 is transported from the cytosol into the nucleus upon irradiation due to action of phytochrome photoreceptors. Two NH2-terminal domains responsible for cytoplasmic localization of CPRF2 in the dark were characterized by deletion analysis using a set of CPRF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusion constructs transiently expressed in parsley protoplasts. We suggest that light-induced nuclear import of CPRF2 is an essential step in phytochrome signal transduction. PMID:9922448

  7. The yapA Encodes bZIP Transcription Factor Involved in Stress Tolerance in Pathogenic Fungus Talaromyces marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Dankai, Wiyada; Pongpom, Monsicha; Youngchim, Sirida; Cooper, Chester R.; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces marneffei, formerly Penicillium marneffei, is a thermally dimorphic fungus. It causes a fatal disseminated disease in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Studies on the stress defense mechanism of T. marneffei can lead to a better understanding of the pathogenicity and the progression of the disease due to this fungus. The basic leucine-zipper (bZip) transcription factor gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, named yap1 (yeast activating protein-1), is known as a crucial central regulator of stress responses including those caused by oxidative agents, cadmium, and drugs. An ortholog of yap1, designated yapA, was identified in T. marneffei. We found that the yapA gene was involved in growth and fungal cell development. The yapA deletion mutant exhibited delays in the rate of growth, germination, and conidiation. Surprisingly, the yapA gene was also involved in the pigmentation of T. marneffei. Moreover, the mutant was sensitive to oxidative stressors such as H2O2 and menadione, similar to S. cerevisiae yap1 mutant, as well as the nitrosative stressor NaNO2. In addition, the yapA mutant demonstrated significantly decreased survival in human macrophage THP-1 compared to wild-type and complemented strains. This study reveals the role of yapA in fungal growth, cell development, stress response, and potential virulence in T. marneffei. PMID:27706212

  8. Rite of passage: a bZIP transcription factor must transit the cell apex to become competent.

    PubMed

    Momany, Michelle

    2015-11-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans BrlA triggers the central developmental pathway that controls the transition from vegetative growth to asexual reproduction. Upstream regulators including the bZIP transcription factor FlbB activate the expression of brlA. Previous work has established that FlbB localizes to both the apex of the hypha, where it interacts with and is anchored by FlbE, and to nuclei, with highest levels in the nucleus closest to the apex and successively lower levels in nuclei further away from the apex. In this issue, Herrero-Garcia et al. dissect the roles of these two FlbB pools and the mechanisms underlying their localization and activity. Using a photoactivatable tag, they demonstrate that FlbB moves from the tip into the apical nucleus. Through a series of deletion constructs, they show that import of FlbB into the nucleus requires a bipartite NLS, that FlbB localization at the tip requires actin and that the FlbB tip-high gradient appears to be mass action dependent as the gradient is lost with FlbB constitutive upregulation. They show that while the pool of FlbB at the apex is required for triggering asexual development, the tip high nuclear gradient is not required. PMID:26387769

  9. Identification of an Arabidopsis transmembrane bZIP transcription factor involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiromi; Iwata, Yuji; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2008-09-19

    Among 75 bZIP transcription factors identified in Arabidopsis, 3 (AtbZIP17, AtbZIP28, and AtbZIP49) possess a putative transmembrane domain (TMD) in addition to AtbZIP60, which was characterized previously. In the present study, cDNAs of AtbZIP17 and AtbZIP28 were isolated. Truncated forms of AtbZIP17 and AtbZIP28 lacking the C-terminal domain including TMD were examined as putative active forms. One of them, AtbZIP28{delta}C, activated BiP1 and BiP3 promoters through the cis-elements P-UPRE and ERSE responsible for the ER stress response. Subsequently, a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and AtbZIP28 was expressed in Arabidopsis cultured cells. Under non-stress conditions, GFP fluorescence localization almost overlapped with an ER marker; however, tunicamycin and dithiothreitol treatment clearly increased GFP fluorescence in the nucleus suggesting that the N-terminal fragment of AtbZIP28 translocates to the nucleus in response to ER stress.

  10. The Vrille Gene of Drosophila Is a Maternal Enhancer of Decapentaplegic and Encodes a New Member of the Bzip Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    George, H.; Terracol, R.

    1997-01-01

    We report here the genetical and molecular characterization of a new Drosophila zygotic lethal locus, vrille (vri). vri alleles act not only as dominant maternal enhancers of embryonic dorsoventral patterning defects caused by easter and decapentaplegic (dpp) mutations, but also as dominant zygotic enhancers of dpp alleles for phenotypes in wing. The vri gene encodes a new member of the bZIP family of transcription factors closely related to gene 9 of Xenopus laevis; induced by thyroid hormone during the tadpole tail resorption program, and NF-IL3A, a human T cell transcription factor that transactivates the interleukin3 promoter. NF-IL3A shares 93% similarity and 60% identity with Vri for a stretch of 68 amino acids that includes the bZIP domain. Although all the alleles tested behave like antimorphs, the dominant enhancement is also seen with a nonsense mutation allele that prevents translation of the bZIP domain. Because of the strong dominant enhancement of dpp phenotypes by vri alleles in both embryo and wing, and also the similarity between the wing vein phenotypes caused by the vri and shortvein dpp alleles, we postualte that vri interacts either directly or indirectly with certain components of the dpp (a TGFβ homologue) signal transduction pathway. PMID:9258679

  11. Isolation and characterization of a gene from Medicago sativa L., encoding a bZIP transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qingchuan; Fang, Feng; Kang, Junmei; Zhang, Tiejun

    2013-02-01

    A full-length cDNA of 1,537 nucleotides was cloned from Medicago sativa L. cv. "Zhongmu No. 1" by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It was designated as MsZIP, encoding a protein of 340 amino acids. The protein molecular weight was 36.43 kDa, and the theoretical isoelectric point was 5.72. The MsZIP preferentially localized in nucleus and have signal peptide. Blast analysis revealed that MsZIP shared the highest homology with some bZIP proteins of M. truncatula. The transcript of MsZIP was strongly enriched in leaf compared with root and stem of mature alfalfa plants. MsZIP was strongly induced by 15 % PEG6000 (polyethylene glycol), 50 μM abscisic acid, 200 mM NaCl, 70 μM gibberellic acid, 5 mM salicylic acid and 200 μM methyl jasmonate. Physiological resistance parameters were measured in the transgenic tobacco. Malondialdehyde content, relative water content, soluble sugar content, soluble protein content and proline content in transgenic tobacco increased compared with non-transgenic tobacco under salt stress or drought stress. The results showed that accumulation of the MsZIP protein in the vegetative tissues of transgenic plants enhanced their tolerance to osmotic pressure stress. These results demonstrate a role for the MsZIP protein in stress protection and suggest the potential of the MsZIP gene for genetic engineering of salt tolerance and drought tolerance.

  12. Ectopic expression of a hot pepper bZIP-like transcription factor in potato enhances drought tolerance without decreasing tuber yield.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok-Jun; Han, Se-Youn; Kim, Dool-Yi; Yoon, In Sun; Shin, Dongjin; Byun, Myung-Ok; Kwon, Hawk-Bin; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2015-11-01

    Over-expression of group A bZIP transcription factor genes in plants improves abiotic stress tolerance but usually reduces yields. Thus, there have been several efforts to overcome yield penalty in transgenic plants. In this study, we characterized that expression of the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) gene CaBZ1, which encodes a group S bZIP transcription factor, was induced by salt and osmotic stress as well as abscisic acid (ABA). Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants over-expressing CaBZ1 exhibited reduced rates of water loss and faster stomatal closure than non transgenic potato plants under drought and ABA treatment conditions. CaBZ1 over-expression in transgenic potato increased the expression of ABA- and stress-related genes (such as CYP707A1, CBF and NAC-like genes) and improved drought stress tolerance. Interestingly, over-expression of CaBZ1 in potato did not produce undesirable growth phenotypes in major agricultural traits such as plant height, leaf size and tuber formation under normal growth conditions. The transgenic potato plants also had higher tuber yields than non transgenic potato plants under drought stress conditions. Thus, CaBZ1 may be useful for improving drought tolerance in tuber crops. This might be the first report of the production of transgenic potato with improved tuber yields under drought conditions.

  13. Ectopic expression of a hot pepper bZIP-like transcription factor in potato enhances drought tolerance without decreasing tuber yield.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok-Jun; Han, Se-Youn; Kim, Dool-Yi; Yoon, In Sun; Shin, Dongjin; Byun, Myung-Ok; Kwon, Hawk-Bin; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2015-11-01

    Over-expression of group A bZIP transcription factor genes in plants improves abiotic stress tolerance but usually reduces yields. Thus, there have been several efforts to overcome yield penalty in transgenic plants. In this study, we characterized that expression of the hot pepper (Capsicum annuum) gene CaBZ1, which encodes a group S bZIP transcription factor, was induced by salt and osmotic stress as well as abscisic acid (ABA). Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants over-expressing CaBZ1 exhibited reduced rates of water loss and faster stomatal closure than non transgenic potato plants under drought and ABA treatment conditions. CaBZ1 over-expression in transgenic potato increased the expression of ABA- and stress-related genes (such as CYP707A1, CBF and NAC-like genes) and improved drought stress tolerance. Interestingly, over-expression of CaBZ1 in potato did not produce undesirable growth phenotypes in major agricultural traits such as plant height, leaf size and tuber formation under normal growth conditions. The transgenic potato plants also had higher tuber yields than non transgenic potato plants under drought stress conditions. Thus, CaBZ1 may be useful for improving drought tolerance in tuber crops. This might be the first report of the production of transgenic potato with improved tuber yields under drought conditions. PMID:26394867

  14. The bZIP transcription factor PfZipA regulates secondary metabolism and oxidative stress response in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuna; Wu, Fan; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xingzhong; Che, Yongsheng; Keller, Nancy P; Guo, Liyun; Yin, Wen-Bing

    2015-08-01

    The bZIP transcription factors are conserved in all eukaryotes and play critical roles in organismal responses to environmental challenges. In filamentous fungi, several lines of evidence indicate that secondary metabolism (SM) is associated with oxidative stress mediated by bZIP proteins. Here we uncover a connection with a bZIP protein and oxidative stress induction of SM in the plant endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici. A homology search of the P. fici genome with the bZIP protein RsmA, involved in SM and the oxidative stress response in Aspergillus nidulans, identified PfZipA. Deletion of PfzipA resulted in a strain that displayed resistant to the oxidative reagents tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBOOH), diamide, and menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB), but increased sensitivity to H2O2 as compared to wild type (WT). Secondary metabolite production presented a complex pattern dependent on PfzipA and oxidative reagents. Without oxidative treatment, the ΔPfzipA strain produced less isosulochrin and ficipyroneA than WT; addition of tBOOH further decreased production of iso-A82775C and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA; diamide treatment resulted in equivalent production of isosulochrin and ficipyroneA in the two strains; MSB treatment further decreased production of RES1214-1 and iso-A82775C but increased pestaloficiol M production in the mutant; and H2O2 treatment resulted in enhanced production of isosulochrin, RES1214-1 and pestheic acid but decreased ficipyroneA and pestaloficiol M in ΔPfzipA compared to WT. Our results suggest that PfZipA regulation of SM is modified by oxidative stress pathways and provide insights into a possible role of PfZipA in mediating SM synthesis in the endophytic lifestyle of P. fici. PMID:25847004

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yili; Zhu, Wenbo; Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage.

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage. PMID:27414644

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of the bZIP Gene Family Identifies Two ABI5-Like bZIP Transcription Factors, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, as Positive Modulators of ABA Signalling in Chinese Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yili; Zhu, Wenbo; Hu, Xiaochen; Sun, Congcong; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Qinhu; Pei, Guoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Guo, Aiguang; Zhao, Huixian; Lu, Haibin; Mu, Xiaoqian; Hu, Jingjiang; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2016-01-01

    bZIP (basic leucine zipper) transcription factors coordinate plant growth and development and control responses to environmental stimuli. The genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) encodes 136 putative bZIP transcription factors. The bZIP transcription factors in Brassica rapa (BrbZIP) are classified into 10 subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that subfamily A consists of 23 BrbZIPs. Two BrbZIPs within subfamily A, Bra005287 and Bra017251, display high similarity to ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5). Expression of subfamily A BrbZIPs, like BrABI5a (Bra005287/BrbZIP14) and BrABI5b (Bra017251/BrbZIP13), are significantly induced by the plant hormone ABA. Subcellular localization assay reveal that both BrABI5a and BrABI5b have a nuclear localization. BrABI5a and BrABI5b could directly stimulate ABA Responsive Element-driven HIS (a HIS3 reporter gene, which confers His prototrophy) or LUC (LUCIFERASE) expression in yeast and Arabidopsis protoplast. Deletion of the bZIP motif abolished BrABI5a and BrABI5b transcriptional activity. The ABA insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 is completely suppressed in transgenic lines expressing BrABI5a or BrABI5b. Overall, these results suggest that ABI5 orthologs, BrABI5a and BrABI5b, have key roles in ABA signalling in Chinese cabbage. PMID:27414644

  18. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Sun, Tian-Hu; Zhao, Lei; Pan, Xi-Wu; Lu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, −421 bp from the translation initiation site) which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD) and constant dark (DD) conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC) driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant. PMID:25983739

  19. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Sun, Tian-Hu; Zhao, Lei; Pan, Xi-Wu; Lu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, -421 bp from the translation initiation site) which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD) and constant dark (DD) conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC) driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant. PMID:25983739

  20. UV-B-responsive association of the Arabidopsis bZIP transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with target genes, including its own promoter.

    PubMed

    Binkert, Melanie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Terecskei, Kata; De Veylder, Lieven; Nagy, Ferenc; Ulm, Roman

    2014-10-01

    In plants subjected to UV-B radiation, responses are activated that minimize damage caused by UV-B. The bZIP transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) acts downstream of the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and promotes UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and acclimation. Expression of HY5 is induced by UV-B; however, the transcription factor(s) that regulate HY5 transcription in response to UV-B and the impact of UV-B on the association of HY5 with its target promoters are currently unclear. Here, we show that HY5 binding to the promoters of UV-B-responsive genes is enhanced by UV-B in a UVR8-dependent manner in Arabidopsis thaliana. In agreement, overexpression of REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS2, a negative regulator of UVR8 function, blocks UV-B-responsive HY5 enrichment at target promoters. Moreover, we have identified a T/G-box in the HY5 promoter that is required for its UV-B responsiveness. We show that HY5 and its homolog HYH bind to the T/G(HY5)-box cis-acting element and that they act redundantly in the induction of HY5 expression upon UV-B exposure. Therefore, HY5 is enriched at target promoters in response to UV-B in a UVR8 photoreceptor-dependent manner, and HY5 and HYH interact directly with a T/G-box cis-acting element of the HY5 promoter, mediating the transcriptional activation of HY5 in response to UV-B.

  1. UV-B-Responsive Association of the Arabidopsis bZIP Transcription Factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 with Target Genes, Including Its Own Promoter[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Binkert, Melanie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Terecskei, Kata; De Veylder, Lieven; Nagy, Ferenc; Ulm, Roman

    2014-01-01

    In plants subjected to UV-B radiation, responses are activated that minimize damage caused by UV-B. The bZIP transcription factor ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) acts downstream of the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and promotes UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis and acclimation. Expression of HY5 is induced by UV-B; however, the transcription factor(s) that regulate HY5 transcription in response to UV-B and the impact of UV-B on the association of HY5 with its target promoters are currently unclear. Here, we show that HY5 binding to the promoters of UV-B-responsive genes is enhanced by UV-B in a UVR8-dependent manner in Arabidopsis thaliana. In agreement, overexpression of REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS2, a negative regulator of UVR8 function, blocks UV-B-responsive HY5 enrichment at target promoters. Moreover, we have identified a T/G-box in the HY5 promoter that is required for its UV-B responsiveness. We show that HY5 and its homolog HYH bind to the T/GHY5-box cis-acting element and that they act redundantly in the induction of HY5 expression upon UV-B exposure. Therefore, HY5 is enriched at target promoters in response to UV-B in a UVR8 photoreceptor-dependent manner, and HY5 and HYH interact directly with a T/G-box cis-acting element of the HY5 promoter, mediating the transcriptional activation of HY5 in response to UV-B. PMID:25351492

  2. Efficient sweet pepper transformation mediated by the BABY BOOM transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Heidmann, Iris; de Lange, Brenda; Lambalk, Joep; Angenent, Gerco C; Boutilier, Kim

    2011-06-01

    Pepper (Capsicum L.) is a nutritionally and economically important crop that is cultivated throughout the world as a vegetable, condiment, and food additive. Genetic transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agrobacterium) is a powerful biotechnology tool that could be used in pepper to develop community-based functional genomics resources and to introduce important agronomic traits. However, pepper is considered to be highly recalcitrant for agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and current transformation protocols are either inefficient, cumbersome or highly genotype dependent. The main bottleneck in pepper transformation is the inability to generate cells that are competent for both regeneration and transformation. Here, we report that ectopic expression of the Brassica napus BABY BOOM AP2/ERF transcription factor overcomes this bottleneck and can be used to efficiently regenerate transgenic plants from otherwise recalcitrant sweet pepper (C. annuum) varieties. Transient activation of BABY BOOM in the progeny plants induced prolific cell regeneration and was used to produce a large number of somatic embryos that could be converted readily to seedlings. The data highlight the utility of combining biotechnology and classical plant tissue culture approaches to develop an efficient transformation and regeneration system for a highly recalcitrant vegetable crop. PMID:21305301

  3. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  4. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  5. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels.

  6. Influence of the Valine Zipper Region on the Structure and Aggregation of the Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5)

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Reynolds, T. Steele; Middaugh, C. Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and non-reducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of alpha-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  7. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression reveals function of the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in the UV-B response of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ulm, Roman; Baumann, Alexander; Oravecz, Attila; Máté, Zoltán; Adám, Eva; Oakeley, Edward J; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2004-02-01

    The light environment is a key factor that governs a multitude of developmental processes during the entire life cycle of plants. An important and increasing part of the incident sunlight encompasses a segment of the UV-B region (280-320 nm) that is not entirely absorbed by the ozone layer in the stratosphere of the earth. This portion of the solar radiation, which inevitably reaches the sessile plants, can act both as an environmental stress factor and an informational signal. To identify Arabidopsis genes involved in the UV response, we monitored the gene expression profile of UV-B-irradiated seedlings by using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays comprising almost the full Arabidopsis genome (>24,000 genes). A robust set of early low-level UV-B-responsive genes, 100 activated and 7 repressed, was identified. In all cases analyzed, UV-B induction was found to be independent of known photoreceptors. This group of genes is suggested to represent the molecular readout of the signaling cascade triggered by the elusive UV-B photoreceptor(s). Moreover, our analysis identified interactions between cellular responses to different UV-B ranges that led us to postulate the presence of partially distinct but interacting UV-B perception and signaling mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 is required for UV-B-mediated regulation of a subset of genes.

  8. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. PMID:25673695

  9. Repression by RAZ of Epstein-Barr virus bZIP transcription factor EB1 is dimerization independent.

    PubMed

    Segouffin, C; Gruffat, H; Sergeant, A

    1996-07-01

    The hallmark of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the establishment of a viral genome transcription pattern called latency. The EBV BZLF1 gene product EB1 (also known as ZEBRA or Zta) is a transcription factor which is essential for the switch from latency to the lytic cycle. It has been proposed that latency is maintained (i) by the inhibition of EB1 translation via antisense hybridization of EBNA1 and EB1 hnRNAs, or (ii) by the inactivation of the EB1 activating function via the direct interaction of EB1 with RelA, the retinoic acid receptor and p53, or via the titration of EB1 in RAZ:EB1 inactive heterodimers that are unable to bind to DNA. RAZ, a fusion protein which contains the EB1 C-terminal dimerization and DNA-binding domains fused to the N-terminal 86 amino acids of the EBV BRLF1 gene product R, has been described as a trans-dominant negative regulator of EB1-activated transcription. We demonstrate here that although RAZ efficiently represses EB1-mediated transcriptional activation, the amount of RAZ protein expressed is incompatible with repression through the titration of EB1 in inactive EB1:RAZ heterodimers. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that RAZ efficiently represses transcription activated by an EB1 mutant carrying the GCN4 homodimerization domain (EB1 gcn4), despite the inability of RAZ and EB1 gcn4 to form stable heterodimers.

  10. Feedback Regulation of ABA Signaling and Biosynthesis by a bZIP Transcription Factor Targets Drought-Resistance-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei; Tang, Ning; Yang, Jun; Peng, Lei; Ma, Siqi; Xu, Yan; Li, Guoliang; Xiong, Lizhong

    2016-08-01

    The OsbZIP23 transcription factor has been characterized for its essential role in drought resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), but the mechanism is unknown. In this study, we first investigated the transcriptional activation of OsbZIP23. A homolog of SnRK2 protein kinase (SAPK2) was found to interact with and phosphorylate OsbZIP23 for its transcriptional activation. SAPK2 also interacted with OsPP2C49, an ABI1 homolog, which deactivated the SAPK2 to inhibit the transcriptional activation activity of OsbZIP23. Next, we performed genome-wide identification of OsbZIP23 targets by immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses in the OsbZIP23-overexpression, osbzip23 mutant, and wild-type rice under normal and drought stress conditions. OsbZIP23 directly regulates a large number of reported genes that function in stress response, hormone signaling, and developmental processes. Among these targets, we found that OsbZIP23 could positively regulate OsPP2C49, and overexpression of OsPP2C49 in rice resulted in significantly decreased sensitivity of the abscisic acid (ABA) response and rapid dehydration. Moreover, OsNCED4 (9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase4), a key gene in ABA biosynthesis, was also positively regulated by OsbZIP23. Together, our results suggest that OsbZIP23 acts as a central regulator in ABA signaling and biosynthesis, and drought resistance in rice. PMID:27325665

  11. Tobacco bZIP factor TGA10 is a novel member of the TGA family of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Schiermeyer, Andreas; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2003-04-01

    TGA factors constitute a family of conserved plant bZ1P transcription factors that regulate transcription from as-1-like elements in response to plant signalling molecules salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MJ) and auxin. Based on sequence similarities, two subclasses of TGA factors have been identified before in tobacco: class I factors (TGA1a and PG13) are preferentially expressed in root tip meristems, whereas class II factors (TGA2.1 and TGA2.2) are found in leaves and in roots. Here we describe a novel member of the tobacco TGA family (TGA10), which defines a distinct subclass of its own. TGA10 mRNA and TGA10 protein were found in roots but not in leaves of mature tobacco plants. TGA10 binds specifically to the as-1 element, interacts with TGA2.2, and activates transcription in yeast. When ectopically expressed in leaves, TGA10 enhanced SA-, auxin- and MJ-inducibility of target gene Nt103, which responds in the same manner to enhanced levels of TGA2.2. This indicates that TGA10, albeit normally not present in leaves, can interact with the leaf regulatory network controlling transcription from as-1-containing promoters. However, Nt103 expression was not affected in roots of TGA10-over-expressing plants, implying the existence of root-specific mechanisms which do not allow a positive effect of increased TGA10 levels on target gene expression.

  12. A novel strategy to produce sweeter tomato fruits with high sugar contents by fruit-specific expression of a single bZIP transcription factor gene.

    PubMed

    Sagor, G H M; Berberich, Thomas; Tanaka, Shun; Nishiyama, Manabu; Kanayama, Yoshinori; Kojima, Seiji; Muramoto, Koji; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of sugar content and sweetness is desirable in some vegetables and in almost all fruits; however, biotechnological methods to increase sugar content are limited. Here, a completely novel methodological approach is presented that produces sweeter tomato fruits but does not have any negative effects on plant growth. Sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT), which is mediated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs), was initially reported in Arabidopsis AtbZIP11, a class S basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene. Here, two AtbZIP11 orthologous genes, SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2 contained four and three uORFs, respectively, in the cDNA 5'-leader regions. The second uORFs from the 5' cDNA end were conserved and involved in SIRT. Tomato plants were transformed with binary vectors in which only the main open reading frames (ORFs) of SlbZIP1 and SlbZIP2, without the SIRT-responsive uORFs, were placed under the control of the fruit-specific E8 promoter. Growth and morphology of the resulting transgenic tomato plants were comparable to those of wild-type plants. Transgenic fruits were approximately 1.5-fold higher in sugar content (sucrose/glucose/fructose) than nontransgenic tomato fruits. In addition, the levels of several amino acids, such as asparagine and glutamine, were higher in transgenic fruits than in wild-type fruits. This was expected because SlbZIP transactivates the asparagine synthase and proline dehydrogenase genes. This 'sweetening' technology is broadly applicable to other plants that utilize sucrose as a major translocation sugar. PMID:26402509

  13. Overexpression of the bZIP transcription factor OsbZIP79 suppresses the production of diterpenoid phytoalexin in rice cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoko; Minami, Eiichi; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Okada, Kazunori

    2015-01-15

    Phytoalexins are antimicrobial specialised metabolites that are produced by plants in response to pathogen attack. Momilactones and phytocassanes are major diterpenoid phytoalexins in rice that are synthesised from geranylgeranyl diphosphate that is derived from the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. We have previously reported that rice cells overexpressing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor OsTGAP1 exhibit a hyperaccumulation of momilactones and phytocassanes, with hyperinductive expression of momilactone and phytocassane biosynthetic genes and MEP pathway genes, upon response to a chitin oligosaccharide elicitor. For a better understanding of OsTGAP1-mediated regulation of diterpenoid phytoalexin production, we identified OsTGAP1-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid screening. Among the OsTGAP1-interacting protein candidates, a TGA factor OsbZIP79 was investigated to verify its physical interaction with OsTGAP1 and involvement in the regulation of phytoalexin production. An in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated that OsTGAP1 and OsbZIP79 exhibited a heterodimeric as well as a homodimeric interaction. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis also showed the interaction between OsTGAP1 and OsbZIP79 in vivo. Intriguingly, whereas OsbZIP79 transactivation activity was observed in a transient reporter assay, the overexpression of OsbZIP79 resulted in suppression of the elicitor-inducible expression of diterpenoid phytoalexin biosynthetic genes, and thus caused a decrease in the accumulation of phytoalexin in rice cells. These results suggest that OsbZIP79 functions as a negative regulator of phytoalexin production triggered by a chitin oligosaccharide elicitor in rice cells, although it remains open under which conditions OsbZIP79 can work with OsTGAP1.

  14. Inhibitory effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum) extracts and compounds on human tumor cell proliferation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nuclear transcription factor-kappa-B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbao; Yadev, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2010-08-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) and hot pepper (Capsicum spp.) are widely used in traditional medicines. Although hot Capsicum spp. extracts and its active principles, capsaicinoids, have been linked with anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities, whether black pepper and its active principle exhibit similar activities is not known. In this study, we have evaluated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extracts and compounds from black pepper by using proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, COX-1 and -2 enzymes, human tumor cell proliferation and lipid peroxidation (LPO). The capsaicinoids, the alkylamides, isolated from the hot pepper Scotch Bonnet were also used to compare the bioactivities of alkylamides and piperine from black pepper. All compounds derived from black pepper suppressed TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation, but alkyl amides, compound 4 from black pepper and 5 from hot pepper, were most effective. The human cancer cell proliferation inhibitory activities of piperine and alklyl amides in Capsicum and black pepper were dose dependant. The inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50) of the alklylamides were in the range 13-200 microg/mL. The extracts of black pepper at 200 microg/mL and its compounds at 25 microg/mL inhibited LPO by 45-85%, COX enzymes by 31-80% and cancer cells proliferation by 3.5-86.8%. Overall, these results suggest that black pepper and its constituents like hot pepper, exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activities.

  15. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper.

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper. PMID:27200047

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper. PMID:27200047

  19. Characterization of StABF1, a stress-responsive bZIP transcription factor from Solanum tuberosum L. that is phosphorylated by StCDPK2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Muñiz García, María Noelia; Giammaria, Verónica; Grandellis, Carolina; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Ulloa, Rita María; Capiati, Daniela Andrea

    2012-04-01

    ABF/AREB bZIP transcription factors mediate plant abiotic stress responses by regulating the expression of stress-related genes. These proteins bind to the abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element (ABRE), which is the major cis-acting regulatory sequence in ABA-dependent gene expression. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress resistance in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), we have cloned and characterized an ABF/AREB-like transcription factor from potato, named StABF1. The predicted protein shares 45-57% identity with A. thaliana ABFs proteins and 96% identity with the S. lycopersicum SlAREB1 and presents all of the distinctive features of ABF/AREB transcription factors. Furthermore, StABF1 is able to bind to the ABRE in vitro. StABF1 gene is induced in response to ABA, drought, salt stress and cold, suggesting that it might be a key regulator of ABA-dependent stress signaling pathways in cultivated potato. StABF1 is phosphorylated in response to ABA and salt stress in a calcium-dependent manner, and we have identified a potato CDPK isoform (StCDPK2) that phosphorylates StABF1 in vitro. Interestingly, StABF1 expression is increased during tuber development and by tuber-inducing conditions (high sucrose/nitrogen ratio) in leaves. We also found that StABF1 calcium-dependent phosphorylation is stimulated by tuber-inducing conditions and inhibited by gibberellic acid, which inhibits tuberization.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of Dof transcription factors reveals functional characteristics during development and response to biotic stresses in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Won-Hee; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Yeom, Seon-In

    2016-01-01

    The DNA-binding with one zinc finger proteins (Dofs) are a plant-specific family of transcription factors. The Dofs are involved in a variety of biological processes such as phytohormone production, seed development, and environmental adaptation. Dofs have been previously identified in several plants, but not in pepper. We identified 33 putative Dof genes in pepper (CaDofs). To gain an overview of the CaDofs, we analyzed phylogenetic relationships, protein motifs, and evolutionary history. We divided the 33 CaDofs, containing 25 motifs, into four major groups distributed on eight chromosomes. We discovered an expansion of the CaDofs dated to a recent duplication event. Segmental duplication that occurred before the speciation of the Solanaceae lineages was predominant among the CaDofs. The global gene-expression profiling of the CaDofs by RNA-seq analysis showed distinct temporal and pathogen-specific variation during development and response to biotic stresses (two TMV strains, PepMoV, and Phytophthora capsici), suggesting functional diversity among the CaDofs. These results will provide the useful clues into the responses of Dofs in biotic stresses and promote a better understanding of their multiple function in pepper and other species. PMID:27653666

  1. Feedback Regulation of ABA Signaling and Biosynthesis by a bZIP Transcription Factor Targets Drought-Resistance-Related Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Yang, Jun; Peng, Lei; Ma, Siqi; Xu, Yan; Li, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    The OsbZIP23 transcription factor has been characterized for its essential role in drought resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), but the mechanism is unknown. In this study, we first investigated the transcriptional activation of OsbZIP23. A homolog of SnRK2 protein kinase (SAPK2) was found to interact with and phosphorylate OsbZIP23 for its transcriptional activation. SAPK2 also interacted with OsPP2C49, an ABI1 homolog, which deactivated the SAPK2 to inhibit the transcriptional activation activity of OsbZIP23. Next, we performed genome-wide identification of OsbZIP23 targets by immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses in the OsbZIP23-overexpression, osbzip23 mutant, and wild-type rice under normal and drought stress conditions. OsbZIP23 directly regulates a large number of reported genes that function in stress response, hormone signaling, and developmental processes. Among these targets, we found that OsbZIP23 could positively regulate OsPP2C49, and overexpression of OsPP2C49 in rice resulted in significantly decreased sensitivity of the abscisic acid (ABA) response and rapid dehydration. Moreover, OsNCED4 (9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase4), a key gene in ABA biosynthesis, was also positively regulated by OsbZIP23. Together, our results suggest that OsbZIP23 acts as a central regulator in ABA signaling and biosynthesis, and drought resistance in rice. PMID:27325665

  2. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  3. Tobacco bZIP transcription factor TGA2.2 and related factor TGA2.1 have distinct roles in plant defense responses and plant development.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Corinna; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Krawczyk, Stefanie; Butterbrodt, Thomas; Nickolov, Kaloian; Gatz, Christiane

    2005-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial internal signaling molecule needed for the induction of plant defense responses upon attack of a variety of pathogens. Basic leucine zipper transcription factors of the TGA family bind to activating sequence-1 (as-1)-like elements which are SA-responsive cis elements found in promoters of 'immediate early' and 'late' SA-inducible genes. TGA2.2 constitutes the main component of tobacco as-1-binding factor-1 (ASF-1). TGA2.1, which differs from TGA2.2 by being able to activate transcription in yeast, constitutes a minor fraction of the complex. Both proteins interact with NPR1, a protein essential for SA inducibility of 'late' genes. Here we demonstrate using dsRNAi mediated gene silencing that reducing the amount of TGA2.2 and TGA2.1 correlates with a significant decrease in ASF-1 activity and with a decreased inducibility of both 'immediate early' and 'late' genes. In contrast, reducing the amount of TGA2.1 alone had no effect on the expression of these target genes suggesting that TGA2.1 is dispensable for SA-inducible gene expression from the as-1 element. Expression of a TGA2.2 mutant unable to form heterodimers with the endogenous pool of TGA factors led to reduced SA-inducibility of 'immediate early' gene Nt103, indicating that the native leucine zipper is important for the protein to act positively on transcription. Plants with reduced amounts of TGA2.1 developed petal like stamens indicating a regulatory role of TGA2.1 in defining organ identity in tobacco flowers. A model is suggested that unifies conflicting results on the function of tobacco TGA factors with respect to activation of the 'late' PR-1a promoter.

  4. bZIP transcription factor CgAP1 is essential for oxidative stress tolerance and full virulence of the poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjiao; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Chengming

    2016-10-01

    Yeast AP1 transcription factor is a regulator of oxidative stress response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of CgAP1, an ortholog of YAP1 in poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. The expression of CgAP1 was highly induced by reactive oxygen species. CgAP1 deletion mutants displayed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain, and their poplar leaf virulence was obviously reduced. However, the mutants exhibited no obvious defects in aerial hyphal growth, conidia production, and appressoria formation. CgAP1::eGFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus after TBH (tert-Butyl hydroperoxide) treatment, suggesting that CgAP1 functions as a redox sensor in C. gloeosporioides. In addition, CgAP1 prevented the accumulation of ROS during early stages of biotrophic growth. CgAP1 also acted as a positive regulator of several ROS-related genes (i.e., Glr1, Hyr1, and Cyt1) involved in the antioxidative response. These results highlight the key regulatory role of CgAP1 transcription factor in oxidative stress response and provide insights into the function of ROS detoxification in virulence of C. gloeosporioides. PMID:27544415

  5. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Smriti A; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A; Dang, Christine A; Terrell, Anne M; Waters, Stephanie M; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A

    2015-07-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4 months, Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarray-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- lens-DRGs with (1) binding motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, (2) iSyTE lens expression data, and (3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravel a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and misregulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  6. The pepper oxidoreductase CaOXR1 interacts with the transcription factor CaRAV1 and is required for salt and osmotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Chul; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2010-07-01

    RAV1 (Related to ABI3/VP1) proteins function as a transcription factor in signal transduction pathways in plants. The yeast-two-hybrid and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation assays identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) oxidoreductase protein CaOXR1 that physically interacts with the pepper CaRAV1 transcription factor. The AP2 domain of CaRAV1 protein is essential for its direct interaction with CaOXR1. Both CaRAV1 and CaOXR1 proteins co-localize to the nuclei of plant cells. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRAV1 and CaRAV1/CAOXR1 confers enhanced susceptibility to high salinity and osmotic stresses, which is accompanied by altered expression of the stress marker genes in pepper. Expression of CaAMP1 (pepper antimicrobial protein) and CaOSM1 (pepper osmotin) is suppressed by 1.2-6.6-fold in silenced leaves upon treatment with NaCl or mannitol. Overexpression of CaRAV1, CaOXR1 and CaOXR1/CaRAV1 in Arabidopsis also confers enhanced resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. In addition, CaRAV1- and CaOXR1/CaRAV1-overexpression (OX) Arabidopsis plants are highly tolerant to high salinity and osmotic stress. Together, these results suggest that CaOXR1 protein positively controls CaRAV1-mediated plant defense during biotic and abiotic stresses.

  7. Integrative Comparative Analyses of Transcript and Metabolite Profiles from Pepper and Tomato Ripening and Development Stages Uncovers Species-Specific Patterns of Network Regulatory Behavior[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Sonia; Alba, Rob; Nikoloski, Zoran; Kochevenko, Andrej; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Giovannoni, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite levels from climacteric and nonclimacteric fruits can be employed to unravel the similarities and differences of the underlying regulatory processes. To this end, we conducted combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and heterologous microarray hybridization assays in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; climacteric) and pepper (Capsicum chilense; nonclimacteric) fruits across development and ripening. Computational methods from multivariate and network-based analyses successfully revealed the difference between the covariance structures of the integrated data sets. Moreover, our results suggest that both fruits have similar ethylene-mediated signaling components; however, their regulation is different and may reflect altered ethylene sensitivity or regulators other than ethylene in pepper. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis were not induced in pepper fruits. Nevertheless, genes downstream of ethylene perception such as cell wall metabolism genes, carotenoid biosynthesis genes, and the never-ripe receptor were clearly induced in pepper as in tomato fruit. While signaling sensitivity or actual signals may differ between climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit, the evidence described here suggests that activation of a common set of ripening genes influences metabolic traits. Also, a coordinate regulation of transcripts and the accumulation of key organic acids, including malate, citrate, dehydroascorbate, and threonate, in pepper fruit were observed. Therefore, the integrated analysis allows us to uncover additional information for the comprehensive understanding of biological events relevant to metabolic regulation during climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit development. PMID:22685169

  8. The bZIP Transcription Factor HAC-1 Is Involved in the Unfolded Protein Response and Is Necessary for Growth on Cellulose in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Larrondo, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    High protein secretion capacity in filamentous fungi requires an extremely efficient system for protein synthesis, folding and transport. When the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is exceeded, a pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered, allowing cells to mitigate and cope with this stress. In yeast, this pathway relies on the transcription factor Hac1, which mediates the up-regulation of several genes required under these stressful conditions. In this work, we identified and characterized the ortholog of the yeast HAC1 gene in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that its mRNA undergoes an ER stress-dependent splicing reaction, which in N. crassa removes a 23 nt intron and leads to a change in the open reading frame. By disrupting the N. crassa hac-1 gene, we determined it to be crucial for activating UPR and for proper growth in the presence of ER stress-inducing chemical agents. Neurospora is naturally found growing on dead plant material, composed primarily by lignocellulose, and is a model organism for the study of plant cell wall deconstruction. Notably, we found that growth on cellulose, a substrate that requires secretion of numerous enzymes, imposes major demands on ER function and is dramatically impaired in the absence of hac-1, thus broadening the range of physiological functions of the UPR in filamentous fungi. Growth on hemicellulose however, another carbon source that necessitates the secretion of various enzymes for its deconstruction, is not impaired in the mutant nor is the amount of proteins secreted on this substrate, suggesting that secretion, as a whole, is unaltered in the absence of hac-1. The characterization of this signaling pathway in N. crassa will help in the study of plant cell wall deconstruction by fungi and its manipulation may result in important industrial biotechnological applications. PMID:26132395

  9. The lumen-facing domain is important for the biological function and organelle-to-organelle movement of bZIP28 during ER stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Le; Lu, Sun-Jie; Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Ling; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2013-09-01

    The membrane-associated transcription factor, bZIP28, is relocated from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi and proteolytically released from the membrane mediated by two proteases, S1P and S2P, in response to ER stress in Arabidopsis. The activated N-terminal domain recruits nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) subunits in the nucleus to regulate ER stress downstream genes. Little is known about the functions of the bZIP28 C-terminal lumen-facing domain. Here, we provide novel insights into how the ER lumen-facing domain affects the biological function and organelle-to-organelle movement of bZIP28 in the ER stress response. First, we demonstrated the functional redundancy of bZIP28 and bZIP60 by generation and analysis of the bZIP28 and bZIP60 double mutant zip28zip60. Subsequent genetic complementation experiments in zip28zip60 background with deletions on bZIP28 lumen-facing domain highlighted the importance of lumen-facing domain for its in vivo function of bZIP28 in the ER stress response. The protein subcellular localization and Western blotting results further revealed that the bZIP28 lumen-facing domain contains ER retention signal which is important for the proteolytic activation of bZIP28. Thus, the bZIP28 lumen-facing C-terminus plays important roles in the ER-to-Golgi movement of bZIP28, which may contribute to the sensing of the ER stress.

  10. Differential expression of four soybean bZIP genes during Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection.

    PubMed

    Alves, Murilo S; Soares, Zamira G; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Barros, Everaldo G; Poddanosqui, Adriana M P; Aoyagi, Luciano N; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Fietto, Luciano G

    2015-11-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the obligate biotrophic fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of most important diseases in the soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) agribusiness. The identification and characterization of genes related to plant defense responses to fungal infection are essential to develop ASR-resistant plants. In this work, we describe four soybean genes, GmbZIP62, GmbZIP105, GmbZIPE1, and GmbZIPE2, which encode transcription factors containing a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain from two divergent classes, and that are responsive to P. pachyrhizi infection. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these genes encode proteins similar to bZIP factors responsive to pathogens. Yeast transactivation assays showed that only GmbZIP62 has strong transactivation activity in yeast. In addition, three of the bZIP transcription factors analyzed were also differentially expressed by plant defense hormones, and all were differentially expressed by fungal attack, indicating that these proteins might participate in response to ASR infection. The results suggested that these bZIP proteins are part of the plant defense response to P. pachyrhizi infection, by regulating the gene expression related to ASR infection responses. These bZIP genes are potential targets to obtain new soybean genotypes resistant to ASR.

  11. Identification of new ABA- and MEJA-activated sugarcane bZIP genes by data mining in the SUCEST database.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Paulo Sérgio; Nogueira, Fábio Tebaldi S; Drummond, Rodrigo; Felix, Juliana M; De Rosa, Vicente E; Vicentini, Renato; Leite, Adilson; Ulian, Eugênio C; Menossi, Marcelo

    2008-02-01

    Sugarcane is generally propagated by cuttings of the stalk containing one or more lateral buds, which will develop into a new plant. The transition from the dormant into the active stage constitutes a complex phenomenon characterized by changes in accumulation of phytohormones and several other physiological aspects. Abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) are major signaling molecules, which influence plant development and stress responses. These plant regulators modulate gene expression with the participation of many transcriptional factors. Basic leucine zipper proteins (bZIPs) form a large family of transcriptional factors involved in a variety of plant physiological processes, such as development and responses to stress. Query sequences consisting of full-length protein sequence of each of the Arabidopsis bZIP families were utilized to screen the sugarcane EST database (SUCEST) and 86 sugarcane assembled sequences (SAS) coding for bZIPs were identified. cDNA arrays and RNA-gel blots were used to study the expression of these sugarcane bZIP genes during early plantlet development and in response to ABA and MeJA. Six bZIP genes were found to be differentially expressed during development. ABA and MeJA modulated the expression of eight sugarcane bZIP genes. Our findings provide novel insights into the expression of this large protein family of transcriptional factors in sugarcane.

  12. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J.; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  13. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  14. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 produces a spliced antisense transcript encoding a protein that lacks a classic bZIP domain but still inhibits Tax2-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Halin, Marilène; Douceron, Estelle; Clerc, Isabelle; Journo, Chloé; Ko, Nga Ling; Landry, Sébastien; Murphy, Edward L.; Gessain, Antoine; Lemasson, Isabelle; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) retroviruses infect T lymphocytes. The minus strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a protein that could play a role in the development of leukemia in infected patients. Herein, we demonstrate that the complementary strand of the HTLV-2 genome also encodes a protein that we named APH-2 for “antisense protein of HTLV-2.” APH-2 mRNA is spliced, polyadenylated, and initiates in the 3′-long terminal repeat at different positions. This transcript was detected in all HTLV-2–infected cell lines and short-term culture of lymphocytes obtained from HTLV-2 African patients tested and in 4 of 15 HTLV-2–infected blood donors. The APH-2 protein is 183 amino acids long, is localized in the cell nucleus, and is detected in vivo. Despite the lack of a consensus basic leucine zipper domain, APH-2 interacts with cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB) and represses Tax2-mediated transcription in Tax2-expressing cells and in cells transfected with an HTLV-2 molecular clone. Altogether, our results demonstrate the existence of an antisense strand–encoded protein in HTLV-2, which could represent an important player in the development of disorders, such as lymphocytosis, which is frequently observed in HTLV-2 patients. PMID:19602711

  15. Pepper, sweet (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Heidmann, Iris; Boutilier, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Capsicum (pepper) species are economically important crops that are recalcitrant to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). A number of protocols for pepper transformation have been described but are not routinely applicable. The main bottleneck in pepper transformation is the low frequency of cells that are both susceptible for Agrobacterium infection and have the ability to regenerate. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient regeneration of transgenic sweet pepper (C. annuum) through inducible activation of the BABY BOOM (BBM) AP2/ERF transcription factor. Using this approach, we can routinely achieve a transformation efficiency of at least 0.6 %. The main improvements in this protocol are the reproducibility in transforming different genotypes and the ability to produce fertile shoots. An added advantage of this protocol is that BBM activity can be induced subsequently in stable transgenic lines, providing a novel regeneration system for clonal propagation through somatic embryogenesis.

  16. Pepper, sweet (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Heidmann, Iris; Boutilier, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Capsicum (pepper) species are economically important crops that are recalcitrant to genetic transformation by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens). A number of protocols for pepper transformation have been described but are not routinely applicable. The main bottleneck in pepper transformation is the low frequency of cells that are both susceptible for Agrobacterium infection and have the ability to regenerate. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient regeneration of transgenic sweet pepper (C. annuum) through inducible activation of the BABY BOOM (BBM) AP2/ERF transcription factor. Using this approach, we can routinely achieve a transformation efficiency of at least 0.6 %. The main improvements in this protocol are the reproducibility in transforming different genotypes and the ability to produce fertile shoots. An added advantage of this protocol is that BBM activity can be induced subsequently in stable transgenic lines, providing a novel regeneration system for clonal propagation through somatic embryogenesis. PMID:25300852

  17. Divergence of the bZIP Gene Family in Strawberry, Peach, and Apple Suggests Multiple Modes of Gene Evolution after Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Yan; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Xiong, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are the most diverse members of dimerizing transcription factors. In the present study, 50, 116, and 47 bZIP genes were identified in Malus domestica (apple), Prunus persica (peach), and Fragaria vesca (strawberry), respectively. Species-specific duplication was the main contributor to the large number of bZIPs observed in apple. After WGD in apple genome, orthologous bZIP genes corresponding to strawberry on duplicated regions in apple genome were retained. However, in peach ancestor, these syntenic regions were quickly lost or deleted. Maybe the positive selection contributed to the expansion of clade S to adapt to the development and environment stresses. In addition, purifying selection was mainly responsible for bZIP sequence-specific DNA binding. The analysis of orthologous pairs between chromosomes indicates that these orthologs derived from one gene duplication located on one of the nine ancient chromosomes in the Rosaceae. The comparative analysis of bZIP genes in three species provides information on the evolutionary fate of bZIP genes in apple and peach after they diverged from strawberry. PMID:26770968

  18. Development of infectious transcripts from full-length and GFP-tagged cDNA clones of Pepper mottle virus and stable systemic expression of GFP in tobacco and pepper.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Yeon; Song, Yeon Sook; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2011-02-01

    A full-length cDNA clone (pSP6PepMoV-Vb1) of the genomic RNA of a Korean isolate of Pepper mottle virus (PepMoV-Vb1) was constructed downstream of a bacteriophage SP6 RNA polymerase promoter in the plasmid. In vitro RNA transcripts generated from pSP6PepMoV-Vb1 corresponded to PepMoV-Vb1 RNA (9641nt) with an extra guanosine residue at the 5' terminus and a 15-nt, poly (A) tract at the 3' end. The RNAs synthesized from the pSP6PepMoV-Vb1 clone, by in vitro run-off transcription in the presence of the 5' cap analog m(7)GpppG, were highly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana and Capsicum annuum cv. Early Calwonder. Visible symptoms appeared at 4-5 days post-inoculation, at essentially the same time as occurred on these host plant species inoculated with wild-type PepMoV-Vb. Symptoms induced by progeny virus of the transcripts were indistinguishable from wild-type PepMoV-Vb on their experimental and natural hosts. The gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), turboGFP, was inserted between the coding regions for NIb and CP in the pSP6PepMoV-Vb1 clone. RNA transcripts of the resulting GFP-tagged clone, designated SP6PepMoV-Vb1/GFP, were highly infectious and symptoms were not different from those induced by either transcripts of pSP6PepMoV-Vb1 or wild-type PepMoV-Vb. However, GFP expression could be detected earlier than virus-induced symptom in plants infected by SP6PepMoV-Vb1/GFP. This study is the first report of the construction of a biologically active, full-length cDNA copy of the Pepper mottle virus RNA genome and the stable expression of a foreign gene within the modified virus.

  19. CaWRKY6 transcriptionally activates CaWRKY40, regulates Ralstonia solanacearum resistance, and confers high-temperature and high-humidity tolerance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Yang, Sheng; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Cheng, Junbin; Wu, Ji; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Mou, Shaoliang; Guan, Deyi; Huang, Ronghua; He, Shuilin

    2015-06-01

    High temperature (HT), high humidity (HH), and pathogen infection often co-occur and negatively affect plant growth. However, these stress factors and plant responses are generally studied in isolation. The mechanisms of synergistic responses to combined stresses are poorly understood. We isolated the subgroup IIb WRKY family member CaWRKY6 from Capsicum annuum and performed quantitative real-time PCR analysis. CaWRKY6 expression was upregulated by individual or simultaneous treatment with HT, HH, combined HT and HH (HTHH), and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation, and responded to exogenous application of jasmonic acid (JA), ethephon, and abscisic acid (ABA). Virus-induced gene silencing of CaWRKY6 enhanced pepper plant susceptibility to R. solanacearum and HTHH, and downregulated the hypersensitive response (HR), JA-, ethylene (ET)-, and ABA-induced marker gene expression, and thermotolerance-associated expression of CaHSP24, ER-small CaSHP, and Chl-small CaHSP. CaWRKY6 overexpression in pepper attenuated the HTHH-induced suppression of resistance to R. solanacearum infection. CaWRKY6 bound to and activated the CaWRKY40 promoter in planta, which is a pepper WRKY that regulates heat-stress tolerance and R. solanacearum resistance. CaWRKY40 silencing significantly blocked HR-induced cell death and reduced transcriptional expression of CaWRKY40. These data suggest that CaWRKY6 is a positive regulator of R. solanacearum resistance and heat-stress tolerance, which occurs in part by activating CaWRKY40.

  20. Data-Driven Prediction and Design of bZIP Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B.; Keating, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology. PMID:25695764

  1. Identification of a short interspersed repetitive element in partially spliced transcripts of the bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) PAP gene: new evolutionary and regulatory aspects on plant tRNA-related SINEs.

    PubMed

    Pozueta-Romero, J; Houlné, G; Schantz, R

    1998-07-01

    In bell pepper, a gene encoding a major plastid-lipid associated protein is expressed as both partially and totally spliced transcripts (respectively PAP2 and PAP1). Although PAP is present as a single-copy gene in the bell pepper genome, Southern blots using PAP2 as a probe revealed multiple homologous copies. Analyses of the intronic sequence of PAP2 showed the existence of a 206bp short interspersed repetitive element (SINE) belonging to the Ts family of retrotransposons (Yoshioka et al., 1993). Comparison with PAP sequences in other Solanaceae species suggested that the structure of the gene is highly conserved: the two introns are inserted at the same position. However, the Ts insertion found in bell pepper is absent in tobacco and tomato. Studies using RT-PCR showed that in these latter species only totally spliced transcripts of PAP are present. On the other hand, RNA analyses of tobacco plants transformed with the bell pepper PAP revealed the presence of both totally and incompletely spliced transcripts. Altogether our results support the hypothesis that the Ts insertion into the first intron of PAP results in a splicing defect of the corresponding pre-mRNA. Based on the presence of peculiar, previously unidentified Ts elements, a possible horizontal transmission of Ts elements from animals to plants is discussed.

  2. SnRK1-triggered switch of bZIP63 dimerization mediates the low-energy response in plants

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Andrea; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Anrather, Dorothea; Simeunovic, Andrea; Weiste, Christoph; Valerio, Concetta; Dietrich, Katrin; Kirchler, Tobias; Nägele, Thomas; Vicente Carbajosa, Jesús; Hanson, Johannes; Baena-González, Elena; Chaban, Christina; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic adjustment to changing environmental conditions, particularly balancing of growth and defense responses, is crucial for all organisms to survive. The evolutionary conserved AMPK/Snf1/SnRK1 kinases are well-known metabolic master regulators in the low-energy response in animals, yeast and plants. They act at two different levels: by modulating the activity of key metabolic enzymes, and by massive transcriptional reprogramming. While the first part is well established, the latter function is only partially understood in animals and not at all in plants. Here we identified the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP63 as key regulator of the starvation response and direct target of the SnRK1 kinase. Phosphorylation of bZIP63 by SnRK1 changed its dimerization preference, thereby affecting target gene expression and ultimately primary metabolism. A bzip63 knock-out mutant exhibited starvation-related phenotypes, which could be functionally complemented by wild type bZIP63, but not by a version harboring point mutations in the identified SnRK1 target sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05828.001 PMID:26263501

  3. Novel DNA binding specificities of a putative herpesvirus bZIP oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Z; Brunovskis, P; Lee, L; Vogt, P K; Kung, H J

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that can cause T lymphomas and peripheral nerve demyelination in chickens. meq, a candidate oncogene of Marek's disease virus, encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor which contains a large proline-rich domain in its C terminus. On the basis of its bZIP structural homology, meq is perhaps the only member of the jun-fos gene family completely viral in origin. We previously showed that Meq's C-terminal domain has potent transactivation activity and that its bZIP domain can dimerize with itself and with c-Jun also. In an effort to identify viral and cellular targets of Meq, we have determined the optimal binding sites for Meq-Jun heterodimers and Meq-Meq homodimers. By a PCR-based approach using cyclic amplification of selected targets, Meq-Jun heterodimers were found to optimally bind tetradecanoylphorbol acetate response element (TRE) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) consensus sequences. This result was consistent with the results of our previous functional analysis implicating Meq-Jun heterodimers in the transactivation of the Meq promoter through a TRE- or CRE-like sequence. Interestingly, Meq-Meq homodimers were found to bind two distinct motif elements. The first [GAGTGATG AC(G)TCATC] has a consensus which includes a TRE or CRE core flanked by additional nucleotides critical for tight binding. Methylation interference and mutational analyses confirmed the importance of the flanking residues. The sequences of a subset of TRE and CRE sites selected by Meq-Meq are closely related to the binding motif of Maf, another bZIP oncoprotein. The second putative Meq binding site (RACACACAY) bears a completely different consensus not shared by other bZIP proteins. Binding to this consensus sequence also requires secondary structure characteristics associated with DNA bending. CACA motifs are known to promote DNA curvature and function in a number of special biological processes. Our results lend

  4. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  5. Deciphering the Combinatorial DNA-binding Code of the CCAAT-binding Complex and the Iron-regulatory Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factor HapX*

    PubMed Central

    Hortschansky, Peter; Ando, Eriko; Tuppatsch, Katja; Arikawa, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    The heterotrimeric CCAAT-binding complex (CBC) is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and mammals. The CBC consists of three subunits, which are named in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans HapB, HapC, and HapE. HapX, a fourth CBC subunit, was identified exclusively in fungi, except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the closely related Saccharomycotina species. The CBC-HapX complex acts as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. HapX belongs to the class of basic region leucine zipper transcription factors. We demonstrated that the CBC and HapX bind cooperatively to bipartite DNA motifs with a general HapX/CBC/DNA 2:1:1 stoichiometry in a class of genes that are repressed by HapX-CBC in A. nidulans during iron limitation. This combinatorial binding mode requires protein-protein interaction between the N-terminal domain of HapE and the N-terminal CBC binding domain of HapX as well as sequence-specific DNA binding of both the CBC and HapX. Initial binding of the CBC to CCAAT boxes is mandatory for DNA recognition of HapX. HapX specifically targets the minimal motif 5′-GAT-3′, which is located at a distance of 11–12 bp downstream of the respective CCAAT box. Single nucleotide substitutions at the 5′- and 3′-end of the GAT motif as well as different spacing between the CBC and HapX DNA-binding sites revealed a remarkable promiscuous DNA-recognition mode of HapX. This flexible DNA-binding code may have evolved as a mechanism for fine-tuning the transcriptional activity of CBC-HapX at distinct target promoters. PMID:25589790

  6. The IRE1/bZIP60 pathway and Bax inhibitor 1 suppress systemic accumulation of potyviruses and potexviruses in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inositol requiring enzyme (IRE1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress sensor and when activated it splices the bZIP60 mRNA producing a truncated transcription factor that upregulates expression of genes involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR). Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1) is another ER stre...

  7. Simulations of temperature and salt concentration effects on bZIP, a basic region leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2012-05-31

    Basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are dimeric proteins that recognize DNA. The monomers consist of a leucine zipper subdomain responsible for dimerization and a highly basic DNA recognition subdomain. Twelve explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were run on the GCN4 bZIP transcriptional factor in the absence of DNA at three temperatures and two ion concentrations (0 mM with Cl(-) ions to neutralize the bZIP and 200 mM with additional Na(+) and Cl(-) ions) to probe the conformational ensemble that the basic region samples. In most trajectories, the basic region exhibits an alligator-jaw-like opening and closing (only one monomer moves), versus scissor-like motion, by a mainly rigid body, hinge motion centered on three "fork" residues that span the basic region to the coiled coil. In this motion, the α-helical character of the basic region monomers is mostly maintained. A broad range of distances is accessed, consistent with the absence of particular interactions for the basic region monomers. In two of the trajectories, the basic region monomers "collapse" to form a stable state. The coiled coil, leucine zipper subdomain is very stable for all of the trajectories. Ion solvation of the charged residue side chains is transient, on the scale of a few picoseconds. There is no evidence for persistent specific ion salt bridges to charged residues. For 0 mM, only certain basic region positively charged residues are substantially Cl(-) ion salt bridged. For 200 mM, in addition, some basic region negatively (positively) charged residues are salt bridged to Na(+) (Cl(-)) ions. The different ion solvation patterns at the two ion concentrations are not greatly temperature sensitive, and the conformational sampling found in the MD is remarkably unperturbed by ion concentration and/or temperature. PMID:22559083

  8. Pepper Oil Surprise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli perform the Pepper Oil Surprise experiment from Potlatch Elementary School in Potlatch, Idaho. This research investigates the interaction of liquid pepper/...

  9. Ultra-High Density, Transcript-Based Genetic Maps of Pepper Define Recombination in the Genome and Synteny Among Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Chin-Wo, Sebastian Reyes; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard; Van Deynze, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to assemble complex genomes and construct ultradense genetic maps now allows the determination of recombination rates, translocations, and the extent of genomic collinearity between populations, species, and genera. We developed two ultradense genetic linkage maps for pepper from single-position polymorphisms (SPPs) identified de novo with a 30,173 unigene pepper genotyping array. The Capsicum frutescens × C. annuum interspecific and the C. annuum intraspecific genetic maps were constructed comprising 16,167 and 3,878 unigene markers in 2108 and 783 genetic bins, respectively. Accuracies of marker groupings and orders are validated by the high degree of collinearity between the two maps. Marker density was sufficient to locate the chromosomal breakpoint resulting in the P1/P8 translocation between C. frutescens and C. annuum to a single bin. The two maps aligned to the pepper genome showed varying marker density along the chromosomes. There were extensive chromosomal regions with suppressed recombination and reduced intraspecific marker density. These regions corresponded to the pronounced nonrecombining pericentromeric regions in tomato, a related Solanaceous species. Similar to tomato, the extent of reduced recombination appears to be more pronounced in pepper than in other plant species. Alignment of maps with the tomato and potato genomes shows the presence of previously known translocations and a translocation event that was not observed in previous genetic maps of pepper. PMID:26355020

  10. Ultra-High Density, Transcript-Based Genetic Maps of Pepper Define Recombination in the Genome and Synteny Among Related Species.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Chin-Wo, Sebastian Reyes; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard; Van Deynze, Allen

    2015-09-08

    Our ability to assemble complex genomes and construct ultradense genetic maps now allows the determination of recombination rates, translocations, and the extent of genomic collinearity between populations, species, and genera. We developed two ultradense genetic linkage maps for pepper from single-position polymorphisms (SPPs) identified de novo with a 30,173 unigene pepper genotyping array. The Capsicum frutescens × C. annuum interspecific and the C. annuum intraspecific genetic maps were constructed comprising 16,167 and 3,878 unigene markers in 2108 and 783 genetic bins, respectively. Accuracies of marker groupings and orders are validated by the high degree of collinearity between the two maps. Marker density was sufficient to locate the chromosomal breakpoint resulting in the P1/P8 translocation between C. frutescens and C. annuum to a single bin. The two maps aligned to the pepper genome showed varying marker density along the chromosomes. There were extensive chromosomal regions with suppressed recombination and reduced intraspecific marker density. These regions corresponded to the pronounced nonrecombining pericentromeric regions in tomato, a related Solanaceous species. Similar to tomato, the extent of reduced recombination appears to be more pronounced in pepper than in other plant species. Alignment of maps with the tomato and potato genomes shows the presence of previously known translocations and a translocation event that was not observed in previous genetic maps of pepper.

  11. Characterization of a bZIP gene highly expressed during ripening of the peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Guzzo, Flavia; Tadiello, Alice; Confortin, Enrico; Pavanello, Anna; Botton, Alessandro; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    A ripening specific bZIP gene of peach was studied by ectopically expressing it in tomato. Two lines, with either a mild or a strong phenotype, respectively, were analyzed in detail. Transgenic fruit morphology was normal, yet the time spent to proceed through the various ripening stages was longer compared to wild type. In agreement with this finding the transgenic berries produced less ethylene, and also had a modified expression of some ripening-related genes that was particularly evident in berries with a strong phenotype. In particular, in the latter fruits polygalacturonase and lipoxygenase genes, but also genes coding for transcription factors (TFs) important for tomato ripening (i.e. TAGL1, CNR, APETALA2a, NOR) did not show the expected decreased expression in the red berries. As regards the RIN gene, its expression continued to increase in both mild and strong lines, and this is in agreement with the dilated ripening times. Interestingly, a metabolomic analysis of berries at various stages of ripening showed that the longer time spent by the transgenic berries to proceed from a stage to another was not due to a slackened metabolism. In fact, the differences in amount of stage-specific marker metabolites indicated that the transgenic berries had a very active metabolism. Therefore, the dilated ripening and the enhanced metabolism of the berries over-expressing the bZIP gene suggest that such gene might regulate ripening by acting as a pacemaker for some of the ripening metabolic pathways.

  12. Genomic surveys and expression analysis of bZIP gene family in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhengwei; Xu, Wei; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-02-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors comprise a family of transcriptional regulators present extensively in plants, involved in regulating diverse biological processes such as flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling and pathogen defense. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L. Euphorbiaceae) is one of the most important non-edible oilseed crops and its seed oil is broadly used for industrial applications. We performed a comprehensive genome-wide identification and analysis of the bZIP transcription factors that exist in the castor bean genome in this study. In total, 49 RcbZIP transcription factors were identified, characterized and categorized into 11 groups (I-XI) based on their gene structure, DNA-binding sites, conserved motifs, and phylogenetic relationships. The dimerization properties of 49 RcbZIP proteins were predicted on the basis of the characteristic features in the leucine zipper. Global expression profiles of 49 RcbZIP genes among different tissues were examined using high-throughput sequencing of digital gene expression profiles, and resulted in diverse expression patterns that may provide basic information to further reveal the function of the 49 RcbZIP genes in castor bean. The results obtained from this study would provide valuable information in understanding the molecular basis of the RcbZIP transcription factor family and their potential function in regulating the growth and development, particularly in seed filling of castor bean.

  13. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  14. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH.

  15. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  16. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  17. Mechanism of CREB recognition and coactivation by the CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator CRTC2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qianyi; Viste, Kristin; Urday-Zaa, Janny Concha; Senthil Kumar, Ganesan; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Talai, Afsaneh; Mayo, Kelly E; Montminy, Marc; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2012-12-18

    Basic leucine zipper (bZip) transcription factors regulate cellular gene expression in response to a variety of extracellular signals and nutrient cues. Although the bZip domain is widely known to play significant roles in DNA binding and dimerization, recent studies point to an additional role for this motif in the recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. For example, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC) family of transcriptional coactivators has been proposed to promote the expression of calcium and cAMP responsive genes, by binding to the CREB bZip in response to extracellular signals. Here we show that the CREB-binding domain (CBD) of CRTC2 folds into a single isolated 28-residue helix that seems to be critical for its interaction with the CREB bZip. The interaction is of micromolar affinity on palindromic and variant half-site cAMP response elements (CREs). The CBD and CREB assemble on the CRE with 2:2:1 stoichiometry, consistent with the presence of one CRTC binding site on each CREB monomer. Indeed, the CBD helix and the solvent-exposed residues in the dimeric CREB bZip coiled-coil form an extended protein-protein interface. Because mutation of relevant bZip residues in this interface disrupts the CRTC interaction without affecting DNA binding, our results illustrate that distinct DNA binding and transactivation functions are encoded within the structural constraints of a canonical bZip domain.

  18. A light-regulated bZIP module, photozipper, induces the binding of fused proteins to the target DNA sequence in a blue light-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Osamu; Furuya, Keigo

    2015-11-01

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) has been identified as a blue light (BL) receptor responsible for the BL-induced blanching of a stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. BL induces the dimerization of monomeric AUREO1, which subsequently increases its affinity for the target sequence. We made a synthetic gene encoding N-terminally truncated monomeric AUREO1 (Photozipper protein) containing a basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain and a light-oxygen-voltage-sensing domain. In the present study, yellow fluorescent protein or mCherry protein was fused with the Photozipper (PZ) protein, and their oligomeric structures and DNA-binding were compared in the dark and light states. Dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the hydrodynamic radii and molecular masses of the fusion proteins increased upon BL illumination, suggesting that fusion PZs underwent BL-induced dimerization. Moreover, BL-induced dimerization enhanced their affinities for the target sequence. Taken together, PZ likely functions as a BL-regulated bZIP module in fusion proteins, and can possibly provide a new approach for controlling bZIP transcription factors. PMID:26441326

  19. Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite profiles from pepper and tomato ripening and development stages uncovers species-specific patterns of network regulatory behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrative comparative analyses of transcript and metabolite levels from climacteric and nonclimacteric fruits can be employed to unravel the similarities and differences of the underlying regulatory processes. To this end, we conducted combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and heterologou...

  20. Pepper, chili (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Min, Jung; Shin, Sun Hee; Jeon, En Mi; Park, Jung Mi; Hyun, Ji Young; Harn, Chee Hark

    2015-01-01

    Pepper is a recalcitrant plant for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Several obstacles to genetic transformation remain such as extremely low transformation rates; the choice of correct genotype is critical; and there is a high frequency of false positives due to direct shoot formation. Here, we report a useful protocol with a suitable selection method. The most important aspect of the pepper transformation protocol is selecting shoots growing from the callus, which is referred to as callus-mediated shoot formation. This protocol is a reproducible and reliable system for pepper transformation. PMID:25300851

  1. Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis from white pepper.

    PubMed

    Arias Irigoyen, J; Talavera Fabuel, A; Maranon Lizana, F

    2003-01-01

    A 44-year-old subject developed rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms when she was exposed to white pepper while working in the food industry. A positive skin prick test for white and black pepper extracts (1:10 w/v) were obtained. Specific IgE antibodies to white and black pepper were demonstrated by ELISA. The immunoblot analysis showed two IgE-reactive protein bands able to bind to IgE from white pepper extract of 11.8 kDa and 13.6 kDa and one band from black pepper extract of 11.8 kDa. IgE binding to blotted white and black pepper extract were inhibited by preincubation of patient serum with black pepper extract. A conjunctival provocation test was positive with a white pepper extract dilution of 1:100 w/v. We describe a patient with occupational rhinoconjunctivitis caused by hypersensitivity to white pepper.

  2. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature–high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature–high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63 (pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40 (pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper’s response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper’s response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  3. Aleurotrachelus trachoides (pepper whitefly)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aleurotrachelus trachoides Back also known as solanum or pepper whitefly is a new addition to the list of serious whitefly pests found in Florida. According to EPPO global database, it is a pest of over 70 different crops worldwide, which include a combination of edibles, ornamentals, palms, and wee...

  4. The bZIP Protein MeaB Mediates Virulence Attributes in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Franke, Stephen; Choithani, Anjali; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    LaeA is a fungal specific virulence factor of both plant and human pathogenic fungi. Transcriptional profiles of laeA mutants have been successfully exploited to identify regulatory mechanisms of secondary metabolism in fungi; here we use laeA mutants as tools to elucidate virulence attributes in Aspergillus flavus. Microarray expression profiles of ΔlaeA and over-expression laeA (OE::laeA) were compared to wild type A. flavus. Strikingly, several nitrogen metabolism genes are oppositely mis-regulated in the ΔlaeA and OE::laeA mutants. One of the nitrogen regulatory genes, the bZIP encoding meaB, is up-regulated in ΔlaeA. Significantly, over-expression of meaB (OE::meaB) phenocopies the decreased virulence attributes of a ΔlaeA phenotype including decreased colonization of host seed, reduced lipase activity and loss of aflatoxin B1 production in seed. However, a double knock-down of laeA and meaB (KD::laeA,meaB) demonstrated that KD::laeA,meaB closely resembled ΔlaeA rather than wild type or ΔmeaB in growth, aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia production thus suggesting that meaB does not contribute to the ΔlaeA phenotype. MeaB and LaeA appear to be part of regulatory networks that allow them to have both shared and distinct roles in fungal biology. PMID:24040154

  5. [Allelopathy of decomposing pepper stalk on pepper growth].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yongxia; Zhou, Baoli; Wu, Xiaoling; Fu, Yawen; Wang, Yueying

    2006-04-01

    With decomposing pepper stalk as test material, this paper studied its allelopathy on the growth of pepper plants. The results showed that after 60 days of decomposition, the decomposed pepper stalk could decrease the plant height, stem diameter, dry weights of above-and underground biomass, leaf area, and chlorophyll content of pepper plants by 0.0374 - 0.0646, 0.0020 - 0.0097, 0.0050 - 0.0355 and 0.0916 - 0.3584, 0.0016 - 0.0251, and 0.0043 - 0.0242 respectively. These inhibitory effects were enhanced after 120 days of decomposition, but the difference with CK was not significant. The root vigor and its SOD, POD and CAT activities of pepper plants were decreased, while the MDA content and relative conductivity were increased with the increasing concentration of decomposed pepper stalk and with the prolong of treating time. The allelopathic effects of decomposed pepper stalk on the physiological indices of pepper root activity ranged from 0.0163 to 0.6507, which was significantly higher than that of plant growth index.

  6. Seed transmission of Cucumber mosaic virus in pepper.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Kobayashi, Michelle

    2010-02-01

    Infection caused by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is one of the most important viral diseases of pepper worldwide. Young pepper seedlings were inoculated mechanically with CMV-Fny (Fast New York) isolate and were kept in growth chambers at 20-25 degrees C for symptom and fruit development. All inoculated plants developed severe mosaic symptoms and produced fruit except one. Mature seeds were isolated from fruits harvested from CMV-infected plants. Total RNA was extracted from pepper seeds and analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using CMV sub-group IA specific primers. Analysis of individual whole seeds showed that seed-borne infection of CMV in pepper ranged from 95 to 100%. Further seed-growth tests were performed in Petri dishes and CMV was detected in both seed coat and embryo. Seed coat infection of CMV ranged from 53 to 83% while that of the embryo ranged from 10 to 46%. Seed-growth tests in pots were also performed and the rate of seed transmission was approximately 10 to 14%. This is the first report of CMV seed transmission in pepper.

  7. NADP-dehydrogenases from pepper fruits: effect of maturation.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Rosa M; Bonilla-Valverde, Daniel; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2009-02-01

    NADPH is an important molecule in the redox balance of the cell. Pepper fruits are the second worldwide consumable vegetables and exhibit different phenotypes after maturation. In this paper, two pepper cultivars were studied: Vergasa whose fruits shift from green to red after maturation, and Biela that shifts to yellow. Using fresh fruits from the same plants of the two cultivars at distinct maturation stages, the activity and gene expression of the main NADPH-generating dehydrogenases was studied. The activity analysis of the main NADP-dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), showed that, except for the G6PDH, all the activities were enhanced (54-100%) in the mature pepper fruits from both cultivars (red or yellow) with respect to green pepper fruits. The content of NADPH and NADP in the mature fruits of both cultivars showed a noteworthy increase with respect to green fruits. For the transcript analysis, a partial cDNA of each NADP-dehydrogenase was obtained, and the NADP-ME was the only NADP-dehydrogenase that showed a significant induction. The increase in the content of NADPH in mature fruits because of the enhanced activity of NADP-dehydrogenases suggests that these NADPH-generating enzymes could be involved in the maturation of pepper fruits.

  8. Characterization of Citrus sinensis transcription factors closely associated with the non-host response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Daurelio, Lucas D; Romero, María S; Petrocelli, Silvana; Merelo, Paz; Cortadi, Adriana A; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Orellano, Elena G

    2013-07-01

    Plants, when exposed to certain pathogens, may display a form of genotype-independent resistance, known as non-host response. In this study, the response of Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) leaves to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), a pepper and tomato pathogenic bacterium, was analyzed through biochemical assays and cDNA microarray hybridization and compared with Asiatic citrus canker infection caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Citrus leaves exposed to the non-host bacterium Xcv showed hypersensitive response (HR) symptoms (cell death), a defense mechanism common in plants but poorly understood in citrus. The HR response was accompanied by differentially expressed genes that are associated with biotic stress and cell death. Moreover, 58 transcription factors (TFs) were differentially regulated by Xcv in citrus leaves, including 26 TFs from the stress-associated families AP2-EREBP, bZip, Myb and WRKY. Remarkably, in silico analysis of the distribution of expressed sequence tags revealed that 10 of the 58 TFs, belonging to C2C2-GATA, C2H2, CCAAT, HSF, NAC and WRKY gene families, were specifically over-represented in citrus stress cDNA libraries. This study identified candidate TF genes for the regulation of key steps during the citrus non-host HR. Furthermore, these TFs might be useful in future strategies of molecular breeding for citrus disease resistance.

  9. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  10. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  11. A bZIP Protein, VIP1, Is a Regulator of Osmosensory Signaling in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Abscisic acid is a stress-related phytohormone that has roles in dehydration and rehydration. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes that inactivate abscisic acid, CYP707A1 and CYP707A3, are rapidly up-regulated upon rehydration. The factors that regulate CYP707A1/3 are not well characterized. We expressed a bZIP protein, VIP1, as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis and found that the nuclear localization of VIP1 was enhanced within 10 min after rehydration. A yeast one-hybrid assay revealed that the amino-terminal region of VIP1 has transcriptional activation potential. In a transient reporter assay using Arabidopsis protoplasts, VIP1 enhanced the promoter activities of CYP707A1/3. In gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, VIP1 directly bound to DNA fragments of the CYP707A1/3 promoters. Transgenic plants expressing VIP1-green fluorescent protein were found to overexpress CYP707A1/3 mRNAs. The time course of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of VIP1 was consistent with the time courses of the expression of CYP707A1/3. These results suggest that VIP1 functions as a regulator of osmosensory signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:22452852

  12. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  14. The bZIP Protein VIP1 Is Involved in Touch Responses in Arabidopsis Roots1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    VIP1 is a bZIP transcription factor in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). VIP1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus when cells are exposed to hypoosmotic conditions, but its physiological relevance is unclear. This is possibly because Arabidopsis has approximately 10 close homologs of VIP1 and they function redundantly. To examine their physiological roles, transgenic plants overexpressing a repression domain-fused form of VIP1 (VIP1-SRDXox plants), in which the gene activation mediated by VIP1 is expected to be repressed, were generated. Because hypoosmotic stress can mimic mechanical stimuli (e.g. touch), the touch-induced root-waving phenotypes and gene expression patterns in those transgenic plants were examined. VIP1-SRDXox plants exhibited more severe root waving and lower expression of putative VIP1 target genes. The expression of the VIP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein partially suppressed the VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving when expressed in the VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results suggest that VIP1 can suppress the touch-induced root waving. The VIP1-SRDX-induced increase in root waving was also suppressed when the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid or the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which is known to activate auxin biosynthesis, was present in the growth medium. Root cap cells with the auxin marker DR5rev::GFP were more abundant in the VIP1-SRDXox background than in the wild-type background. Auxin is transported via the root cap, and the conditions of outermost root cap layers were abnormal in VIP1-SRDXox plants. These results raise the possibility that VIP1 influences structures of the root cap and thereby regulates the local auxin responses in roots. PMID:27208231

  15. 7 CFR 457.148 - Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... six feet, the land area on which at least 7,260 linear feet of rows are planted. Bell pepper. An..., caused by low air temperatures. Harvest. The picking of peppers on the unit. Mature bell pepper. A pepper...-planted peppers. Potential production. The number of boxes of mature bell peppers that the pepper...

  16. 7 CFR 457.148 - Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... six feet, the land area on which at least 7,260 linear feet of rows are planted. Bell pepper. An..., caused by low air temperatures. Harvest. The picking of peppers on the unit. Mature bell pepper. A pepper...-planted peppers. Potential production. The number of boxes of mature bell peppers that the pepper...

  17. 7 CFR 457.148 - Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... six feet, the land area on which at least 7,260 linear feet of rows are planted. Bell pepper. An..., caused by low air temperatures. Harvest. The picking of peppers on the unit. Mature bell pepper. A pepper...-planted peppers. Potential production. The number of boxes of mature bell peppers that the pepper...

  18. Visualizing Capsaicinoids: Colorimetric Analysis of Chili Peppers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert Q.; Chu, Christopher; Gent, Robin; Gould, Alexandra P.; Rios, Laura; Vertigan, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    A colorimetric method for total capsaicinoids in chili pepper ("Capsicum") fruit is described. The placental material of the pepper, containing 90% of the capsaicinoids, was physically separated from the colored materials in the pericarp and extracted twice with methanol, capturing 85% of the remaining capsaicinoids. The extract, evaporated and…

  19. DNA binding of Jun and Fos bZip domains: homodimers and heterodimers induce a DNA conformational change in solution.

    PubMed Central

    John, M; Leppik, R; Busch, S J; Granger-Schnarr, M; Schnarr, M

    1996-01-01

    We constructed plasmids encoding the sequences for the bZip modules of c-Jun and c-Fos which could then be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. The purified bZip modules were tested for their binding capacities of synthetic oligonucleotides containing either TRE or CRE recognition sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and circular dichroism (CD). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that bZip Jun homodimers and bZip Jun/Fos heterodimers bind a collagenase-like TRE (CTGACTCAT) with dissociation constants of respectively 1.4 x 10(-7) M and 5 x 10(-8) M. As reported earlier [Patel et al. (1990) Nature 347, 572-575], DNA binding induces a marked change of the protein structure. However, we found that the DNA also undergoes a conformational change. This is most clearly seen with small oligonucleotides of 13 or 14 bp harboring respectively a TRE (TGACTCA) or a CRE (TGACGTCA) sequence. In this case, the positive DNA CD signal at 280 nm increases almost two-fold with a concomitant blue-shift of 3-4 nm. Within experimental error the same spectral changes are observed for TRE and CRE containing DNA fragments. The spectral changes observed with a non-specific DNA fragment are weaker and the signal of free DNA is recovered upon addition of much smaller salt concentrations than required for a specific DNA fragment. Surprisingly the spectral changes induced by Jun/Jun homodimers are not identical to those induced by Jun/Fos heterodimers. However, in both cases the increase of the positive CD band and the concomitant blue shift would be compatible with a B to A-transition of part of the binding site or a DNA conformation intermediate between the canonical A and B structures. PMID:8948639

  20. Divergence and Conservation of the Major UPR Branch IRE1-bZIP Signaling Pathway across Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingrui; Zhang, Changwei; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is crucial to life by regulating the cellular response to the stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) imposed by abiotic and biotic cues such as heat shock and viral infection. The inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) signaling pathway activated by the IRE1-mediated unconventional splicing of HAC1 in yeast, bZIP60 in plants and XBP1 in metazoans, is the most ancient branch of the UPR. In this study, we systematically examined yeast IRE1p-HAC1, plant IRE1A/IRE1B-bZIP60 and human hIRE1-XBP1 pairs. We found that, unlike bZIP60, XBP1 is unable to functionally swap HAC1p in yeast, and that the inter-species heterotypic interactions among HAC1p, bZIP60 and XBP1 are not permitted. These data demonstrate evolutionary divergence of the downstream signaling of IRE1-bZIP. We also discovered that the dual cytosolic domains of plant IRE1s act in vivo in a mechanism consistent with IRE1p and hIRE1, and that plant IRE1B not only interacts with IRE1p but also forms typical IRE1 dynamic foci in yeast. Thus, the upstream components of the IRE1 signaling branch including IRE1 activation and action mechanisms are highly conserved. Taken together these data advance the molecular understanding of evolutionary divergence and conservation of the IRE1 signaling pathway across kingdoms. PMID:27256815

  1. Transcriptome analysis of symptomatic and recovered leaves of geminivirus-infected pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are a large and important family of plant viruses that infect a wide range of crops throughout the world. The Begomovirus genus contains species that are transmitted by whiteflies and are distributed worldwide causing disease on an array of horticultural crops. Symptom remission, in which newly developed leaves of systemically infected plants exhibit a reduction in symptom severity (recovery), has been observed on pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants infected with Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV). Previous studies have shown that transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms are involved in the reduction of viral nucleic acid concentration in recovered tissue. In this study, we employed deep transcriptome sequencing methods to assess transcriptional variation in healthy (mock), symptomatic, and recovered pepper leaves following PepGMV infection. Results Differential expression analyses of the pepper leaf transcriptome from symptomatic and recovered stages revealed a total of 309 differentially expressed genes between healthy (mock) and symptomatic or recovered tissues. Computational prediction of differential expression was validated using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR confirming the robustness of our bioinformatic methods. Within the set of differentially expressed genes associated with the recovery process were genes involved in defense responses including pathogenesis-related proteins, reactive oxygen species, systemic acquired resistance, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and ethylene signaling. No major differences were found when compared the differentially expressed genes in symptomatic and recovered tissues. On the other hand, a set of genes with novel roles in defense responses was identified including genes involved in histone modification. This latter result suggested that post-transcriptional and transcriptional gene silencing may be one of the major mechanisms involved in the recovery process. Genes

  2. CD studies of interaction of a bZIP oligopeptide model with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votavová, Hana; Točík, Zdeněk; Šponar, Jaroslav

    1999-05-01

    A leucine zipper (bZIP) binding peptide BP1 was constructed based on the DNA binding sequence of the GCN4 protein, slightly modified to make it more similar to the sequence of other bZIP proteins (Jun) with related DNA binding specificity. Selfcomplementary DNA hexadecanucleotides containing modified ATF/CRE target sites were used to study peptide-DNA complex formation. Four oligonucleotides contained substitutions of two GC or AT pairs by IC pairs in the ATF/CRE target sequence. In two other oligonucleotides there was a substitution of A by I in two AT pairs (mismatch IT pairs were presumably formed in the duplex) and one oligonucleotide contained I instead of C in two base pairs (IG mismatch in the duplex). Conformation changes of BP1 that occur on complex formation were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding of peptide BP1 to oligonucleotides is accompanied by an increase of the α-helix content, which depends strongly on the oligonucleotide sequence. The substitution of two GC pairs within the specific binding site has either none or only a small effect. However, the substitution of two AT pairs within the binding site by IC strongly decreases the specificity of binding to a level observed with an oligonucleotide containing the C/EBP binding site, differing from the ATF/CRE site at four positions (Votavová et al., J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 3 (1997) 587). Similar results were obtained also with an oligonucleotide containing I instead of C in two base pairs (IG mismatch in the duplex). Two oligonucleotides with two substitutions of A by I but with unchanged T in the AT pairs (IT mismatch) showed smaller decrease in the α-helix formation on peptide binding than oligonucleotides, in which the whole AT pair was replaced by IC. The effect of such a substitution depends on the position of the original AT pairs in the target sequence, but the presence of T appears to be essential for specific peptide binding.

  3. The Arabidopsis bZIP Gene AtbZIP63 Is a Sensitive Integrator of Transient Abscisic Acid and Glucose Signals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Matiolli, Cleverson Carlos; Tomaz, Juarez Pires; Duarte, Gustavo Turqueto; Prado, Fernanda Manso; Del Bem, Luiz Eduardo Vieira; Silveira, Amanda Bortolini; Gauer, Luciane; Corrêa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Drumond, Rodrigo Duarte; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Di Mascio, Paolo; Meyer, Christian; Vincentz, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Glucose modulates plant metabolism, growth, and development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Hexokinase1 (HXK1) is a glucose sensor that may trigger abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis and sensitivity to mediate glucose-induced inhibition of seedling development. Here, we show that the intensity of short-term responses to glucose can vary with ABA activity. We report that the transient (2 h/4 h) repression by 2% glucose of AtbZIP63, a gene encoding a basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor partially involved in the Snf1-related kinase KIN10-induced responses to energy limitation, is independent of HXK1 and is not mediated by changes in ABA levels. However, high-concentration (6%) glucose-mediated repression appears to be modulated by ABA, since full repression of AtbZIP63 requires a functional ABA biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, the combination of glucose and ABA was able to trigger a synergistic repression of AtbZIP63 and its homologue AtbZIP3, revealing a shared regulatory feature consisting of the modulation of glucose sensitivity by ABA. The synergistic regulation of AtbZIP63 was not reproduced by an AtbZIP63 promoter-5′-untranslated region::β-glucuronidase fusion, thus suggesting possible posttranscriptional control. A transcriptional inhibition assay with cordycepin provided further evidence for the regulation of mRNA decay in response to glucose plus ABA. Overall, these results indicate that AtbZIP63 is an important node of the glucose-ABA interaction network. The mechanisms by which AtbZIP63 may participate in the fine-tuning of ABA-mediated abiotic stress responses according to sugar availability (i.e., energy status) are discussed. PMID:21844310

  4. In silico identification of Bell pepper endornavirus from pepper transcriptomes and their phylogenetic and recombination analyses.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Cho, Won Kyong

    2016-01-10

    Here, we identified eight Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolates from nine different pepper transcriptomes. BPEV was present with low copy numbers ranging from 0.01% to 0.18% in the host transcriptome. Phylogenetic identified two different groups of BPEV isolates. Sequence alignment of the five BPEV genomes revealed conservation of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Recombination analysis identified two possible recombinant events in the isolate Yolo Wonder. Single nucleotide variation profiles revealed the presence of BPEV variants within a single pepper cultivar. Taken together, this study provides phylogenetic and recombination analyses of the genus Endornavirus using pepper transcriptome data.

  5. Effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on the microbial community during nukadoko fermentation

    PubMed Central

    ONO, Hiroshi; NISHIO, Shoko; TSURII, Jun; KAWAMOTO, Tetsuhiro; SONOMOTO, Kenji; NAKAYAMA, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Nukadoko is a fermented rice bran bed traditionally used for pickling vegetables in Japan. To date, the production of both homemade and commercial nukadoko has depended on natural fermentation without using starter cultures. Spices, Japanese pepper, and red pepper, are added to nukadoko empirically, but the functions of spices in nukadoko have not been fully elucidated. To investigate the effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on nukadoko fermentation, we compared the chemical and microbiological changes during 2 months of fermentation of a laboratory model nukadoko with or without spices. The successive pH values and colony counts in the first 10 days showed that the spices promoted lactic acid bacteria (LAB) growth and fermentation in the nukadoko niche. The successive bacterial communities during natural fermentation of nukadoko were carefully monitored by pyrotag 16S rRNA analysis, and the effect of spices on the development and maintenance of the nukadoko microbiota was investigated. It was shown that addition of Japanese peppers and red peppers shortened the pre-lactic acid fermentation phase, during which Staphylococcus saprophyticus grew dominantly, and promoted the development of a microbiota that LAB dominated. Notably, the growth of the dominant LAB, Pediococcus pentosaceus, was improved by adding either Japanese pepper or red pepper. The differences in the LAB species, which were associated with the differences in chemical composition of the nukadoko, were dependent on the type of pepper used. We conclude that the spices used can affect the bacterial community and modulate its metabolic profile in nukadoko. PMID:25625032

  6. Effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on the microbial community during nukadoko fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroshi; Nishio, Shoko; Tsurii, Jun; Kawamoto, Tetsuhiro; Sonomoto, Kenji; Nakayama, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Nukadoko is a fermented rice bran bed traditionally used for pickling vegetables in Japan. To date, the production of both homemade and commercial nukadoko has depended on natural fermentation without using starter cultures. Spices, Japanese pepper, and red pepper, are added to nukadoko empirically, but the functions of spices in nukadoko have not been fully elucidated. To investigate the effects of Japanese pepper and red pepper on nukadoko fermentation, we compared the chemical and microbiological changes during 2 months of fermentation of a laboratory model nukadoko with or without spices. The successive pH values and colony counts in the first 10 days showed that the spices promoted lactic acid bacteria (LAB) growth and fermentation in the nukadoko niche. The successive bacterial communities during natural fermentation of nukadoko were carefully monitored by pyrotag 16S rRNA analysis, and the effect of spices on the development and maintenance of the nukadoko microbiota was investigated. It was shown that addition of Japanese peppers and red peppers shortened the pre-lactic acid fermentation phase, during which Staphylococcus saprophyticus grew dominantly, and promoted the development of a microbiota that LAB dominated. Notably, the growth of the dominant LAB, Pediococcus pentosaceus, was improved by adding either Japanese pepper or red pepper. The differences in the LAB species, which were associated with the differences in chemical composition of the nukadoko, were dependent on the type of pepper used. We conclude that the spices used can affect the bacterial community and modulate its metabolic profile in nukadoko. PMID:25625032

  7. In silico identification of Bell pepper endornavirus from pepper transcriptomes and their phylogenetic and recombination analyses.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Cho, Won Kyong

    2016-01-10

    Here, we identified eight Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolates from nine different pepper transcriptomes. BPEV was present with low copy numbers ranging from 0.01% to 0.18% in the host transcriptome. Phylogenetic identified two different groups of BPEV isolates. Sequence alignment of the five BPEV genomes revealed conservation of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Recombination analysis identified two possible recombinant events in the isolate Yolo Wonder. Single nucleotide variation profiles revealed the presence of BPEV variants within a single pepper cultivar. Taken together, this study provides phylogenetic and recombination analyses of the genus Endornavirus using pepper transcriptome data. PMID:26410036

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the SBP-Box Family Genes under Phytophthora capsici Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huai-Xia; Jin, Jing-Hao; He, Yu-Mei; Lu, Bo-Ya; Li, Da-Wei; Chai, Wei-Guo; Khan, Abid; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that are extensively involved in many physiological and biochemical processes, including growth, development, and signal transduction. However, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SBP-box family genes have not been well characterized. We investigated SBP-box family genes in the pepper genome and characterized these genes across both compatible and incompatible strain of Phytophthora capsici, and also under different hormone treatments. The results indicated that total 15 members were identified and distributed on seven chromosomes of pepper. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SBP-box genes of pepper can be classified into six groups. In addition, duplication analysis within pepper genome, as well as between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes demonstrated that there are four pairs of homology of SBP-box genes in the pepper genome and 10 pairs between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the CaSBP genes demonstrated their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. The expression profiles were similarly analyzed following exposure to P. capsici inoculation and hormone treatments. It was shown that nine of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) exhibited a dramatic up-regulation after compatible HX-9 strain (P. capsici) inoculation, while CaSBP09 and CaSBP15 were down-regulated. In case of PC strain (P. capsici) infection six of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP02, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) were arose while CaSBP14 was down regulated. Furthermore, Salicylic acid, Methyl jasmonate and their biosynthesis inhibitors treatment indicated that some of the CaSBP genes are potentially involved in these hormone regulation pathways. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles of the pepper CaSBP genes, will help to improve pepper stress tolerance in the future. PMID:27148327

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the SBP-Box Family Genes under Phytophthora capsici Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huai-Xia; Jin, Jing-Hao; He, Yu-Mei; Lu, Bo-Ya; Li, Da-Wei; Chai, Wei-Guo; Khan, Abid; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that are extensively involved in many physiological and biochemical processes, including growth, development, and signal transduction. However, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SBP-box family genes have not been well characterized. We investigated SBP-box family genes in the pepper genome and characterized these genes across both compatible and incompatible strain of Phytophthora capsici, and also under different hormone treatments. The results indicated that total 15 members were identified and distributed on seven chromosomes of pepper. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SBP-box genes of pepper can be classified into six groups. In addition, duplication analysis within pepper genome, as well as between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes demonstrated that there are four pairs of homology of SBP-box genes in the pepper genome and 10 pairs between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the CaSBP genes demonstrated their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. The expression profiles were similarly analyzed following exposure to P. capsici inoculation and hormone treatments. It was shown that nine of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) exhibited a dramatic up-regulation after compatible HX-9 strain (P. capsici) inoculation, while CaSBP09 and CaSBP15 were down-regulated. In case of PC strain (P. capsici) infection six of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP02, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) were arose while CaSBP14 was down regulated. Furthermore, Salicylic acid, Methyl jasmonate and their biosynthesis inhibitors treatment indicated that some of the CaSBP genes are potentially involved in these hormone regulation pathways. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles of the pepper CaSBP genes, will help to improve pepper stress tolerance in the future.

  10. Molecular characterization of Pvr9 that confers a hypersensitive response to Pepper mottle virus (a potyvirus) in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-07-01

    There are some R genes against potyviruses which were mapped in pepper. However, none of them has been characterized at the molecular level. In this study, we characterized Pvr9 which is an Rpi-blb2 ortholog from pepper and confers a hypersensitive response to Pepper mottle virus (PepMoV) in a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana. This gene putatively encoded for 1298 amino acids and is located on pepper chromosome 6. PepMoV NIb was the elicitor of the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response. NIb from several other potyviruses also elicited the hypersensitive response. Inoculation of pepper with PepMoV resulted in a minor increase in Pvr9 transcription in the resistant cultivar CM334 and a slight down-regulation in the susceptible cultivar Floral Gem. The 5' upstream region of Pvr9 from cultivar CM334 had higher transcription activity than the region from cultivar Floral Gem. The cultivars CM334 and Floral Gem had non-functional Pvr9 homologs with loss-of-function mutations.

  11. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  12. Quality Characteristics of Stirred Yoghurt Added with Fermented Red Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Mee; Lee, Chi-Ho; Son, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Pungency of hot pepper has limited its usage even though it shows various health beneficial effects. This study was conducted to develop the novel yoghurt containing hot pepper with diminishing pungency and aimed to examine the quality characteristics of yoghurt prepared with fermented red pepper. Hot pepper was first fermented with Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 to reduce the pungency of capsaicin. We then examined the quality, sensory characteristics, and antioxidant activity of yoghurt containing the fermented red pepper. The titratable acidity of this yoghurt increased whereas the viscosity decreased with increasing amounts of added red pepper. The total polyphenol content increased in proportion to the amount of added red pepper. The antioxidant activity significantly increased with the addition of red pepper (p<0.05). Color evaluation showed that the L value decreased whereas the a and b values increased significantly with the amount of red pepper added (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, yoghurt prepared with higher amounts of fermented red pepper received lower scores. However, yoghurt containing fermented red pepper at a concentration of 0.05% received higher scores for taste, flavor, and overall acceptability than yoghurt prepared with non-fermented pepper. Therefore, it can be concluded that the application of red pepper fermented by Bacillus licheniformis SK1230 gives beneficial feature to the preparation of yoghurt. PMID:26761278

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-32 Peppers from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the...

  14. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31... from Spain. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) may be imported into the United States from Spain only... subpart: (a) The peppers must be grown in the Alicante or Almeria Province of Spain in...

  15. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-32 Peppers from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the...

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  18. De novo transcriptome assembly in chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens) to identify genes involved in the biosynthesis of capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoqun; Li, Wanshun; Wu, Yimin; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    The capsaicinoids are a group of compounds produced by chili pepper fruits and are used widely in many fields, especially in medical purposes. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has not yet been established clearly. To understand more knowledge in biosynthesis of capsaicinoids, we applied RNA-seq for the mixture of placenta and pericarp of pungent pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.). We have assessed the effect of various assembly parameters using different assembly software, and obtained one of the best strategies for de novo assembly of transcriptome data. We obtained a total 54,045 high-quality unigenes (transcripts) using Trinity software. About 92.65% of unigenes showed similarity to the public protein sequences, genome of potato and tomato and pepper (C. annuum) ESTs databases. Our results predicted 3 new structural genes (DHAD, TD, PAT), which filled gaps of the capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway predicted by Mazourek, and revealed new candidate genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis based on KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis. A significant number of SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) and SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) markers were predicted in C. frutescens and C. annuum sequences, which will be helpful in the identification of polymorphisms within chili pepper populations. These data will provide new insights to the pathway of capsaicinoid biosynthesis and subsequent research of chili peppers. In addition, our strategy of de novo transcriptome assembly is applicable to a wide range of similar studies.

  19. De novo transcriptome assembly in chili pepper (Capsicum frutescens) to identify genes involved in the biosynthesis of capsaicinoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoqun; Li, Wanshun; Wu, Yimin; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    The capsaicinoids are a group of compounds produced by chili pepper fruits and are used widely in many fields, especially in medical purposes. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has not yet been established clearly. To understand more knowledge in biosynthesis of capsaicinoids, we applied RNA-seq for the mixture of placenta and pericarp of pungent pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.). We have assessed the effect of various assembly parameters using different assembly software, and obtained one of the best strategies for de novo assembly of transcriptome data. We obtained a total 54,045 high-quality unigenes (transcripts) using Trinity software. About 92.65% of unigenes showed similarity to the public protein sequences, genome of potato and tomato and pepper (C. annuum) ESTs databases. Our results predicted 3 new structural genes (DHAD, TD, PAT), which filled gaps of the capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway predicted by Mazourek, and revealed new candidate genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis based on KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis. A significant number of SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) and SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) markers were predicted in C. frutescens and C. annuum sequences, which will be helpful in the identification of polymorphisms within chili pepper populations. These data will provide new insights to the pathway of capsaicinoid biosynthesis and subsequent research of chili peppers. In addition, our strategy of de novo transcriptome assembly is applicable to a wide range of similar studies. PMID:23349661

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly in Chili Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) to Identify Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Capsaicinoids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoqun; Li, Wanshun; Wu, Yimin; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    The capsaicinoids are a group of compounds produced by chili pepper fruits and are used widely in many fields, especially in medical purposes. The capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway has not yet been established clearly. To understand more knowledge in biosynthesis of capsaicinoids, we applied RNA-seq for the mixture of placenta and pericarp of pungent pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.). We have assessed the effect of various assembly parameters using different assembly software, and obtained one of the best strategies for de novo assembly of transcriptome data. We obtained a total 54,045 high-quality unigenes (transcripts) using Trinity software. About 92.65% of unigenes showed similarity to the public protein sequences, genome of potato and tomato and pepper (C. annuum) ESTs databases. Our results predicted 3 new structural genes (DHAD, TD, PAT), which filled gaps of the capsaicinoid biosynthetic pathway predicted by Mazourek, and revealed new candidate genes involved in capsaicinoid biosynthesis based on KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis. A significant number of SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) and SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) markers were predicted in C. frutescens and C. annuum sequences, which will be helpful in the identification of polymorphisms within chili pepper populations. These data will provide new insights to the pathway of capsaicinoid biosynthesis and subsequent research of chili peppers. In addition, our strategy of de novo transcriptome assembly is applicable to a wide range of similar studies. PMID:23349661

  1. [Beliefs about chili pepper consumption and health in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, L; Fernández-Ortega M, C; Costa-Dias, R; Franco-Marina, J; Alejandre-Badillo, T

    1995-01-01

    Eating chili peppers is a cultural tradition in Mexico. Controversial characteristics have been empirically associated to chili pepper consumption and human health. In this paper, the beliefs about the health impacts of chili pepper consumption in two independent groups of Mexico City residents are described. The results confirm, on the one hand, that there is a wide variety of health benefits and damages associated with chili pepper consumption, but on the other hand, that the levels of chili pepper consumption are not related to beliefs about its human health impact.

  2. Anther Culture in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Anther culture is the most popular of the techniques used to induce microspore embryogenesis. This technique is well set up in a wide range of crops, including pepper. In this chapter, a protocol for anther culture in pepper is described. The protocol presented hereby includes the steps from the selection of buds from donor plants to the regeneration and acclimatization of doubled haploid plants derived from the embryos, as well as a description of how to analyze the ploidy level of the regenerated plants.

  3. Anther culture of chili pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum spp.) is a very important horticultural crop around the world and is especially important for Mexicans because of its impact in the culture and the cuisine. Biotechnological tools such as tissue culture techniques and specifically anther culture may be applied successfully for plant breeding and genetic improvement in order to generate isogenic lines (100% homozygous) in a shorter time in comparison with the classic breeding methods. In this chapter, a protocol for efficient recovery of chili pepper haploid plants from in vitro cultured anthers is described. PMID:22610631

  4. Anther Culture in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Anther culture is the most popular of the techniques used to induce microspore embryogenesis. This technique is well set up in a wide range of crops, including pepper. In this chapter, a protocol for anther culture in pepper is described. The protocol presented hereby includes the steps from the selection of buds from donor plants to the regeneration and acclimatization of doubled haploid plants derived from the embryos, as well as a description of how to analyze the ploidy level of the regenerated plants. PMID:26619881

  5. Occurrence and distribution of pepper veinal mottle virus and cucumber mosaic virus in pepper in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arogundade, Olawale; Balogun, Olusegun Samuel; Kareem, Kehinde Titilope

    2012-04-11

    Viral diseases constitute obstacles to pepper production in the world. In Nigeria, pepper plants are primarily affected by pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Pepper leaf curl Virus (TLCV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Pepper mottle virus (PMV) and a host of other viruses. The experiment was carried out with a diagnostic survey on the experimental field of the National Horticultural Research Institute, Ibadan, Nigeria and on pepper farms in six local government areas within Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria, forty samples were collected from each of the farms. Diseased samples were obtained from the field and taken to the laboratory for indexing. In ELISA test some of the samples from the pepper farms showed positive reaction to single infection with PVMV (36.79%), CMV (22.14%) while some others showed positive reaction to mixed infection of the two viruses (10%) but some also negative reaction to PVMV and CMV antisera (31.07).

  6. Irrigation timing and fertilizer rate in peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive rain fall might leach nutrients from the soil or cause producers to not supply irrigation to pepper (Capsicum sp.). Fertilizer at 150 or 300 lb/acre of triple 17 NPK, the lower rate is the recommended rate, was supplied to either bell, cv. Jupiter, or non-pungent jalapeno, cv. Pace 105, pe...

  7. Antimutagenic properties of bell and black peppers.

    PubMed

    El Hamss, R; Idaomar, M; Alonso-Moraga, A; Muñoz Serrano, A

    2003-01-01

    The wing Somatic Mutation And Recombination Test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster was used to study the modulating action of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) and black pepper (Piper nigrum) in combination with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the promutagen agent ethyl carbamate (EC). Larvae trans-heterozygous for the third chromosome recessive markers multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare-3 [flr(3)] were fed genotoxins alone or in combination with each of the two spices. Genetic changes induced in somatic cells of the wing's imaginal discs lead to the formation of mutant clones on the wing blade. Our results showed that bell pepper was effective in reducing the mutational events induced by EC and MMS and black pepper was only effective against EC. Pretreatment of 2-day-old larvae with the spices for 24 h followed by a treatment with EC and MMS was only effective in reducing mutations induced by EC. Suppression of metabolic activation or interaction with the active groups of mutagens could be mechanisms by which the spices exert their antimutagenic action.

  8. Conservation Biological Control in Pepper and Eggplant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several important factors contribute to low productivity in pepper and eggplant due to western flower thrips. Research has been conducted to develop an understanding of flower thrips population dynamics and insecticide efficacy studies have allowed us to direct recommendations for biological contro...

  9. Antioxidants in Hot Pepper: Variation Among Accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA/ARS pepper (Capsicum spp.) germplasm collection contains several thousand accessions. Many of these have not been previously analyzed for their concentrations of ascorbic acid, capsaicin, and total phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidants and have a number of nutritional or hea...

  10. The AT-Hook motif as a versatile minor groove anchor for promoting DNA binding of transcription factor fragments

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; Couceiro, Jose R.; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of chimeric DNA binding peptides comprising a DNA binding fragment of natural transcription factors (the basic region of a bZIP protein or a monomeric zinc finger module) and an AT-Hook peptide motif. The resulting peptide conjugates display high DNA affinity and excellent sequence selectivity. Furthermore, the AT-Hook motif also favors the cell internalization of the conjugates. PMID:26290687

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Pepper (Capsicum annuum) Revealed a Role of 24-Epibrassinolide in Response to Chilling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jungen; Gan, Yantai; Yu, Jihua; Calderón-Urrea, Alejandro; Lyu, Jian; Zhang, Guobin; Feng, Zhi; Xie, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have positive effects on many processes during plant growth, development, and various abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available regarding the global gene expression of BRs in response to chilling stress in pepper. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to determine the molecular roles of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) during a chilling stress response. There were 39,829 transcripts, and, among them, 656 were differently-expressed genes (DEGs) following EBR treatment (Chill+EBR) compared with the control (Chill only), including 335 up-regulated and 321 down-regulated DEGs. We selected 20 genes out of the 656 DEGs for RT-qPCR analysis to confirm the RNA-Seq. Based on GO enrich and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that photosynthesis was significantly up-enriched in biological processes, accompanied by significant increases in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), Fv/Fm, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the results indicate that EBR enhanced endogenous levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) while suppressing the ethylene (ETH) biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that BRs function via a synergistic cross-talk with SA, JA, and ETH signaling pathways in response to chilling stress. In addition, EBR induced cellulose synthase-like protein and UDP-glycosyltransferase, suggesting a contribution to the formation of cell wall and hormone metabolism. EBR also triggered the calcium signaling transduction in cytoplasm, and activated the expression of cellular redox homeostasis related genes, such as GSTX1, PER72, and CAT2. This work, therefor, identified the specific genes showed different expression patterns in EBR-treated pepper and associated with the processes of hormone metabolism, redox, signaling, transcription, and defense. Our study provides the first evidence of the potent roles of BRs, at the transcription level, to induce the tolerance to chilling stress in pepper as a function of the combination of the

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Pepper (Capsicum annuum) Revealed a Role of 24-Epibrassinolide in Response to Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jungen; Gan, Yantai; Yu, Jihua; Calderón-Urrea, Alejandro; Lyu, Jian; Zhang, Guobin; Feng, Zhi; Xie, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have positive effects on many processes during plant growth, development, and various abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available regarding the global gene expression of BRs in response to chilling stress in pepper. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to determine the molecular roles of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) during a chilling stress response. There were 39,829 transcripts, and, among them, 656 were differently-expressed genes (DEGs) following EBR treatment (Chill+EBR) compared with the control (Chill only), including 335 up-regulated and 321 down-regulated DEGs. We selected 20 genes out of the 656 DEGs for RT-qPCR analysis to confirm the RNA-Seq. Based on GO enrich and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that photosynthesis was significantly up-enriched in biological processes, accompanied by significant increases in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), Fv/Fm, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the results indicate that EBR enhanced endogenous levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) while suppressing the ethylene (ETH) biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that BRs function via a synergistic cross-talk with SA, JA, and ETH signaling pathways in response to chilling stress. In addition, EBR induced cellulose synthase-like protein and UDP-glycosyltransferase, suggesting a contribution to the formation of cell wall and hormone metabolism. EBR also triggered the calcium signaling transduction in cytoplasm, and activated the expression of cellular redox homeostasis related genes, such as GSTX1, PER72, and CAT2. This work, therefor, identified the specific genes showed different expression patterns in EBR-treated pepper and associated with the processes of hormone metabolism, redox, signaling, transcription, and defense. Our study provides the first evidence of the potent roles of BRs, at the transcription level, to induce the tolerance to chilling stress in pepper as a function of the combination of the

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Pepper (Capsicum annuum) Revealed a Role of 24-Epibrassinolide in Response to Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jungen; Gan, Yantai; Yu, Jihua; Calderón-Urrea, Alejandro; Lyu, Jian; Zhang, Guobin; Feng, Zhi; Xie, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) have positive effects on many processes during plant growth, development, and various abiotic stress responses. However, little information is available regarding the global gene expression of BRs in response to chilling stress in pepper. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to determine the molecular roles of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) during a chilling stress response. There were 39,829 transcripts, and, among them, 656 were differently-expressed genes (DEGs) following EBR treatment (Chill+EBR) compared with the control (Chill only), including 335 up-regulated and 321 down-regulated DEGs. We selected 20 genes out of the 656 DEGs for RT-qPCR analysis to confirm the RNA-Seq. Based on GO enrich and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that photosynthesis was significantly up-enriched in biological processes, accompanied by significant increases in the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), Fv/Fm, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the results indicate that EBR enhanced endogenous levels of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) while suppressing the ethylene (ETH) biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that BRs function via a synergistic cross-talk with SA, JA, and ETH signaling pathways in response to chilling stress. In addition, EBR induced cellulose synthase-like protein and UDP-glycosyltransferase, suggesting a contribution to the formation of cell wall and hormone metabolism. EBR also triggered the calcium signaling transduction in cytoplasm, and activated the expression of cellular redox homeostasis related genes, such as GSTX1, PER72, and CAT2. This work, therefor, identified the specific genes showed different expression patterns in EBR-treated pepper and associated with the processes of hormone metabolism, redox, signaling, transcription, and defense. Our study provides the first evidence of the potent roles of BRs, at the transcription level, to induce the tolerance to chilling stress in pepper as a function of the combination of the

  14. New Insights on Eggplant/Tomato/Pepper Synteny and Identification of Eggplant and Pepper Orthologous QTL

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Riccardo; Van Deynze, Allen; Portis, Ezio; Rotino, Giuseppe L.; Toppino, Laura; Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant, pepper, and tomato are the most exploited berry-producing vegetables within the Solanaceae family. Their genomes differ in size, but each has 12 chromosomes which have undergone rearrangements causing a redistribution of loci. The genome sequences of all three species are available but differ in coverage, assembly quality and percentage of anchorage. Determining their syntenic relationship and QTL orthology will contribute to exploit genomic resources and genetic data for key agronomic traits. The syntenic analysis between tomato and pepper based on the alignment of 34,727 tomato CDS to the pepper genome sequence, identified 19,734 unique hits. The resulting synteny map confirmed the 14 inversions and 10 translocations previously documented, but also highlighted 3 new translocations and 4 major new inversions. Furthermore, each of the 12 chromosomes exhibited a number of rearrangements involving small regions of 0.5–0.7 Mbp. Due to high fragmentation of the publicly available eggplant genome sequence, physical localization of most eggplant QTL was not possible, thus, we compared the organization of the eggplant genetic map with the genome sequence of both tomato and pepper. The eggplant/tomato syntenic map confirmed all the 10 translocations but only 9 of the 14 known inversions; on the other hand, a newly detected inversion was recognized while another one was not confirmed. The eggplant/pepper syntenic map confirmed 10 translocations and 8 inversions already detected and suggested a putative new translocation. In order to perform the assessment of eggplant and pepper QTL orthology, the eggplant and pepper sequence-based markers located in their respective genetic map were aligned onto the pepper genome. GBrowse in pepper was used as reference platform for QTL positioning. A set of 151 pepper QTL were located as well as 212 eggplant QTL, including 76 major QTL (PVE ≥ 10%) affecting key agronomic traits. Most were confirmed to cluster in orthologous

  15. New Insights on Eggplant/Tomato/Pepper Synteny and Identification of Eggplant and Pepper Orthologous QTL.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Riccardo; Van Deynze, Allen; Portis, Ezio; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Toppino, Laura; Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lanteri, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant, pepper, and tomato are the most exploited berry-producing vegetables within the Solanaceae family. Their genomes differ in size, but each has 12 chromosomes which have undergone rearrangements causing a redistribution of loci. The genome sequences of all three species are available but differ in coverage, assembly quality and percentage of anchorage. Determining their syntenic relationship and QTL orthology will contribute to exploit genomic resources and genetic data for key agronomic traits. The syntenic analysis between tomato and pepper based on the alignment of 34,727 tomato CDS to the pepper genome sequence, identified 19,734 unique hits. The resulting synteny map confirmed the 14 inversions and 10 translocations previously documented, but also highlighted 3 new translocations and 4 major new inversions. Furthermore, each of the 12 chromosomes exhibited a number of rearrangements involving small regions of 0.5-0.7 Mbp. Due to high fragmentation of the publicly available eggplant genome sequence, physical localization of most eggplant QTL was not possible, thus, we compared the organization of the eggplant genetic map with the genome sequence of both tomato and pepper. The eggplant/tomato syntenic map confirmed all the 10 translocations but only 9 of the 14 known inversions; on the other hand, a newly detected inversion was recognized while another one was not confirmed. The eggplant/pepper syntenic map confirmed 10 translocations and 8 inversions already detected and suggested a putative new translocation. In order to perform the assessment of eggplant and pepper QTL orthology, the eggplant and pepper sequence-based markers located in their respective genetic map were aligned onto the pepper genome. GBrowse in pepper was used as reference platform for QTL positioning. A set of 151 pepper QTL were located as well as 212 eggplant QTL, including 76 major QTL (PVE ≥ 10%) affecting key agronomic traits. Most were confirmed to cluster in orthologous

  16. Characterization and expression profile of CaNAC2 pepper gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei-Li; Wang, Shu-Bin; Chen, Ru-Gang; Chen, Bi-Hua; Du, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Yan-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factors have diverse role in development and stress regulation. A new transcript encoding NAC protein, homologous to nam-like protein 4 from Petunia was identified from an ABA-regulated subtractive cDNA library of Capsicum annuum seedling. Here, this homolog (named CaNAC2) from C. annuum was characterized and investigated its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Our results indicated that a plant-specific and conserved NAC domain was located in the N-terminus domain of CaNAC2 which was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 410 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CaNAC2 belonged to the NAC2 subgroup of the orthologous group 4d. The protein CaNAC2 was subcellularly localized in the nucleus and it had transcriptional activity in yeast cell. CaNAC2 was expressed mainly in seed and root. The transcription expression of CaNAC2 was strongly induced by cold, salt and ABA treatment and inhibited by osmotic stress and SA treatment. Silence of CaNAC2 in virus-induced gene silenced pepper seedlings resulted in the increased susceptibility to cold stress and delayed the salt-induced leaf chlorophyll degradation. These results indicated that this novel CaNAC2 gene might be involved in pepper response to abiotic stress tolerance.

  17. Characterization and expression profile of CaNAC2 pepper gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei-Li; Wang, Shu-Bin; Chen, Ru-Gang; Chen, Bi-Hua; Du, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Yan-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factors have diverse role in development and stress regulation. A new transcript encoding NAC protein, homologous to nam-like protein 4 from Petunia was identified from an ABA-regulated subtractive cDNA library of Capsicum annuum seedling. Here, this homolog (named CaNAC2) from C. annuum was characterized and investigated its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Our results indicated that a plant-specific and conserved NAC domain was located in the N-terminus domain of CaNAC2 which was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 410 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CaNAC2 belonged to the NAC2 subgroup of the orthologous group 4d. The protein CaNAC2 was subcellularly localized in the nucleus and it had transcriptional activity in yeast cell. CaNAC2 was expressed mainly in seed and root. The transcription expression of CaNAC2 was strongly induced by cold, salt and ABA treatment and inhibited by osmotic stress and SA treatment. Silence of CaNAC2 in virus-induced gene silenced pepper seedlings resulted in the increased susceptibility to cold stress and delayed the salt-induced leaf chlorophyll degradation. These results indicated that this novel CaNAC2 gene might be involved in pepper response to abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26442068

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in black pepper and red pepper by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Won-Jae; Sung, Hye-Jung; Kim, Sung-Youn; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-17

    This study evaluated the efficacy of gamma irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in black pepper (Piper nigrum) and red pepper (dried Capsicum annuum). Black pepper and red pepper inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation in the range of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy, and color change was evaluated after treatment. Pathogen populations decreased with increasing treatment doses. A gamma irradiation dose of 5 kGy decreased E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium populations >4.4 to >5.2 log CFU/g in black pepper without causing color change. Similarly, 5 kGy of gamma irradiation yielded reduction of 3.8 to >5.2 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in red pepper. During gamma irradiation treatment, L*, a* and b* values of red pepper were not significantly changed except for 297 μm to 420 μm size red pepper treated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation. Based on the D-value of pathogens in black pepper and red pepper, S. Typhimurium showed more resistant to gamma irradiation than did E. coli O157:H7. These results show that gamma irradiation has potential as a non-thermal process for inactivating foodborne pathogens in spices with minimal color changes.

  19. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation. PMID:26404494

  20. The AP-1 transcription factor homolog Pf-AP-1 activates transcription of multiple biomineral proteins and potentially participates in Pinctada fucata biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Liang, Jian; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-09-25

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates a series of physiological processes by specifically activating transcription of several genes, and one of its well-chartered functions in mammals is participating in bone mineralization. We isolated and cloned the complete cDNA of a Jun/AP-1 homolog from Pinctada fucata and called it Pf-AP-1. Pf-AP-1 had a highly conserved bZIP region and phosphorylation sites compared with those from mammals. A tissue distribution analysis showed that Pf-AP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in P. fucata and the mRNA level of Pf-AP-1 is extremely high in mantle. Pf-AP-1 expression was positively associated with multiple biomineral proteins in the mantle. The luciferase reporter assay in a mammalian cell line showed that Pf-AP-1 significantly up-regulates the transcriptional activity of the promoters of KRMP, Pearlin, and Prisilkin39. Inhibiting the activity of Pf-AP-1 depressed the expression of multiple matrix proteins. Pf-AP-1 showed a unique expression pattern during shell regeneration and pearl sac development, which was similar to the pattern observed for biomineral proteins. These results suggest that the Pf-AP-1 AP-1 homolog is an important transcription factor that regulates transcription of several biomineral proteins simultaneously and plays a role in P. fucata biomineralization, particularly during pearl and shell formation.

  1. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea.

  2. A method of high frequency virus-induced gene silencing in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bukang).

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunsook; Seong, Eunsoo; Kim, Yeoung-Cheol; Chung, Eun Joo; Oh, Sang-Keun; Lee, Sanghyeob; Park, Jeong Mee; Joung, Young Hee; Choi, Doil

    2004-04-30

    Using a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system, expression of phytogene desaturase (PDS) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small-subuit (rbcS) genes was suppressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bukang). The silenced phenotypes of pale yellow (rbcS), and photobleached leaves (PDS), were invariably obvious 2 weeks after inoculation with the TRV-based vector. In a parallel experiment, the same set of genes was silenced in N. benthamiana and yielded identical phenotypes to pepper 1 week after inoculation. Northern blot analyses showed that the endogenous levels of CarbcS and CaPDS transcripts were dramatically reduced in the silenced leaf tissues. These observations confirm that the silenced phenotype is closely correlated with the pattern of tissue expression. To our knowledge, this is the first high frequency VIGS method in pepper plants. It should provide a tool for large-scale gene silencing studies in pepper functional genomics.

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of cucumber mosaic virus populations infecting pepper suggests unique patterns of evolution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeong-Jin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Studying genetic structure and diversity of viruses is important to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that generate and maintain variations in viral populations. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is endemic in most pepper fields in Korea. Currently, no effective methods for control of CMV are available due to many environmental and biological factors such as the extensive evolutionary capacity of CMV. Thus, analyzing the genetic structure of CMV populations may facilitate the development of strategies for the control of CMV. In this study, 252 pepper (Capsicum annuum) samples showing virus symptoms were collected by field surveys performed throughout Korea in 2007. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that, in total, 165 collected samples were infected with CMV. Forty-five CMV isolates were randomly selected within each regional subpopulation and analyzed by full-genome sequencing. Analyses of genetic diversity showed that the 2b gene of CMV is under weaker purifying selection than the other genes. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of RNA1, the CMV isolates from pepper were divided into three clusters in subgroup I. Our full-genome sequence-based molecular analyses of the CMV Korean population suggest that the subpopulations of CMV have been geographically localized in pepper fields in Korea. PMID:25116642

  4. Detection of pepper mild mottle virus in pepper sauce in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiejun; Shi, Bingbin; Zheng, Hongying; Lu, Yuwen; Lin, Lin; Jiang, Tong; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-08-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) was detected by RT-PCR in all 42 pepper sauce samples from the 10 main manufacturing provinces in China at concentrations ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 (Log10 copies/mL). Their coat protein nucleotide sequences had 97.4 to 100 % identity to each other and 92.4 to 100 % to other published isolates. The samples remained infectious to N. benthamiana, indicating that commercial trade in sauce could contribute to the natural spread of PMMoV.

  5. Detection of pepper mild mottle virus in pepper sauce in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiejun; Shi, Bingbin; Zheng, Hongying; Lu, Yuwen; Lin, Lin; Jiang, Tong; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-08-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) was detected by RT-PCR in all 42 pepper sauce samples from the 10 main manufacturing provinces in China at concentrations ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 (Log10 copies/mL). Their coat protein nucleotide sequences had 97.4 to 100 % identity to each other and 92.4 to 100 % to other published isolates. The samples remained infectious to N. benthamiana, indicating that commercial trade in sauce could contribute to the natural spread of PMMoV. PMID:26021835

  6. Analysis of sequences from field samples reveals the presence of the recently described pepper vein yellows virus (genus Polerovirus) in six additional countries.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Dennis; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Kenyon, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    Polerovirus infection was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 29 pepper plants (Capsicum spp.) and one black nightshade plant (Solanum nigrum) sample collected from fields in India, Indonesia, Mali, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. At least two representative samples for each country were selected to generate a general polerovirus RT-PCR product of 1.4 kb length for sequencing. Sequence analysis of the partial genome sequences revealed the presence of pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) in all 13 samples. A 1990 Australian herbarium sample of pepper described by serological means as infected with capsicum yellows virus (CYV) was identified by sequence analysis of a partial CP sequence as probably infected with a potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) isolate.

  7. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  8. First report of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" on pepper in Honduras

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2012, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibiting symptoms that resembled those of the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” infection were observed in commercial pepper fields in several departments in Honduras, including Francisco Morazán, Ocotepeque, El Paraíso, and Olancho. Man...

  9. Toward Valid Measurement of Stephen Pepper's World Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    Two measures of the "world hypotheses" of Stephen Pepper were mailed to 100 sociobiologists, 87 behaviorists, 79 personality psychologists, and 45 human developmentalists. The World Hypothesis Scale (WHS) was designed to measure Pepper's four world views: (1) formism; (2) mechanism; (3) organicism; and (4) contextualism. The Organicism-Mechanism…

  10. Emittance formula for slits and pepper-pot measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this note, a rigid formula for slits and pepper-pot emittance measurement is derived. The derivation is based on the one- dimensional slit measurement setup. A mathematical generalization of the slit emittance formula to the pepper-pot measurement is discussed.

  11. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry...

  12. Non-pungent jalapeno peppers: Weed control and yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown to most consumers, non-pungent jalapeno peppers are used for making commercial picante sauces (salsas). The non-pungent jalapeno peppers produce the required jalapeno flavor along with the appropriate texture necessary for picante sauce. Capsaicin is added during processing to produce the va...

  13. 75 FR 30303 - Importation of Peppers From Panama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... be inspected: The banana moth (Opogona sacchari) and ] tomato yellow mosaic virus. In the 2004 PRA, peppers were determined to be a minor host for the banana moth. Since that time, there have been no interceptions of banana moth associated with shipments of peppers from Central America. Further, banana...

  14. Properties and detection of two cryptoviruses from pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A

    2011-10-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) contains a range of endogenous dsRNA molecules resembling the genomes of cryptoviruses. In this work, we have completed the molecular characterization of Pepper cryptic virus 1 (PCV-1) from cv "Jalapeño M" and generated complete genomic sequences of another cryptovirus from cv "Hungarian Wax" designated Pepper cryptic virus 2 (PCV-2). The two viruses share limited identical amino acid content in both genomic segments and appear phylogenetically closer to cryptoviruses reported from other crops (i.e. Raphanus sativus cryptic virus 3, Black raspberry cryptic virus) than to each other. Two sets of virus-specific primers were successfully used in RT-PCR tests for the simultaneous and discriminative detection of these two viruses in pepper leaves and seeds. Both viruses were detected in several pepper cultivars tested, either as single or mixed infections.

  15. Detection of gamma irradiated pepper and papain by chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, Abdus; Delincée, H.; Diehl, J. F.

    Chemiluminescence (CL) measurements of black pepper and of papain using luminol and lucigenin reactions were studied. Effects of grinding, irradiation (5-20 kGy) and particle size (750-140 μm) on CL of pepper, and of irradiation (10-30 kGy) on CL of papain, were investigated. All the tested treatments affected the luminescence response in both the luminol and lucigenin reactions; however, the pattern of changes in each case, was inconsistent. Optimum pepper size for maximum luminescence was 560 μm, and optimum irradiation doses were >15 kGy for pepper and >20 kGy for papain. Chemiluminescence may possibly be used as an indicator or irradiation treatment for pepper and papain at a dose of 10 kGy or higher, but further research is needed to establish the reliability of this method.

  16. Ectopic expression of pepper CaPF1 in potato enhances multiple stresses tolerance and delays initiation of in vitro tuberization.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jung Won; Jeon, Jae Heung; Choi, Doil; Yi, So Young; Joung, Hyouk; Kim, Hyun Soon

    2008-09-01

    Ethylene-responsive factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors, many of which have been linked to plant defense responses. However, little is known about the functional significance of ERF genes in potato plants compared to the model plant species Arabidopsis. We show here that overexpression of CaPF1, an ERF/AP2-type pepper transcription factor gene, effectively increased tolerance to freezing, heat, heavy metal, and oxidative stress in potatoes. Interestingly, CaPF1 was involved in tuber formation in potato plants. The time course of microtuber formation was significantly retarded in potato plants that overexpressed CaPF1 compared with wild-type potato plants. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that the pepper transcription factor gene, CaPF1, is involved in promotion of multiple stress tolerance and retardation of in vitro tuberization in potato plants. PMID:18642026

  17. Antihyperglucolipidaemic and anticarbonyl stress properties in green, yellow and red sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Shukla, Srishti; Kumar, Dommati Anand; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Effect of aqueous methanol extract of different colour sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) on parameters of diabesity and carbonyl stress was analysed in vitro. Yellow pepper displayed significantly (p < 0.001) higher intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than green and red pepper. Porcine pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity was significantly (p < 0.01) high in yellow and red pepper than in green pepper. Green and red pepper inhibited vesperlysine-type advanced glycation end products (AGEs) more potently than yellow pepper; however, pentosidine-type AGEs were similarly inhibited by all three peppers. Yellow and red pepper inhibited lipid peroxidation more potently (p < 0.01) than green pepper. Total polyphenol content and free radicals scavenging activities in yellow and red bell peppers were higher than in green pepper. Total flavonoid content was high in green pepper than that present in yellow and red peppers. Green pepper displayed presence of proanthocyanins; however, oligomeric anthocyanins were detected in yellow and red peppers.

  18. 7 CFR 457.148 - Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... six feet, the land area on which at least 7,260 linear feet of rows are planted. Bell pepper—An annual... air temperatures. Harvest—The picking of peppers on the unit. Mature bell pepper—A pepper that has.... Potential production—The number of boxes of mature bell peppers that the pepper plants will or would...

  19. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capscicum species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hot pepper is an important spice crop the world-over and is closely related to sweet peppers that represent an important vegetable crop in many cultures. Both hot and mild peppers are important sources of dietary nutrients and hot pepper is a source of the medicinal compound capsaicin, which is wide...

  20. Antihyperglucolipidaemic and anticarbonyl stress properties in green, yellow and red sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Shukla, Srishti; Kumar, Dommati Anand; Anusha, Sanga Venkata; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Effect of aqueous methanol extract of different colour sweet bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) on parameters of diabesity and carbonyl stress was analysed in vitro. Yellow pepper displayed significantly (p < 0.001) higher intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity than green and red pepper. Porcine pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity was significantly (p < 0.01) high in yellow and red pepper than in green pepper. Green and red pepper inhibited vesperlysine-type advanced glycation end products (AGEs) more potently than yellow pepper; however, pentosidine-type AGEs were similarly inhibited by all three peppers. Yellow and red pepper inhibited lipid peroxidation more potently (p < 0.01) than green pepper. Total polyphenol content and free radicals scavenging activities in yellow and red bell peppers were higher than in green pepper. Total flavonoid content was high in green pepper than that present in yellow and red peppers. Green pepper displayed presence of proanthocyanins; however, oligomeric anthocyanins were detected in yellow and red peppers. PMID:25868614

  1. Close encounters of many kinds: Fos-Jun interactions that mediate transcription regulatory specificity.

    PubMed

    Chinenov, Y; Kerppola, T K

    2001-04-30

    Fos and Jun family proteins regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in a variety of tissues and cell types. This functional versatility emerges from their interactions with related bZIP proteins and with structurally unrelated transcription factors. These interactions at composite regulatory elements produce nucleoprotein complexes with high sequence-specificity and regulatory selectivity. Several general principles including binding cooperativity and conformational adaptability have emerged from studies of regulatory complexes containing Fos-Jun family proteins. The structural properties of Fos-Jun family proteins including opposite orientations of heterodimer binding and the ability to bend DNA can contribute to the assembly and functions of such complexes. The cooperative recruitment of transcription factors, coactivators and chromatin remodeling factors to promoter and enhancer regions generates multiprotein transcription regulatory complexes with cell- and stimulus-specific transcriptional activities. The gene-specific architecture of these complexes can mediate the selective control of transcriptional activity.

  2. ABF transcription factors of Thellungiella salsuginea

    PubMed Central

    Vysotskii, Denis A.; de Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; Souer, Erik; Babakov, Alexei V.; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    ABF transcription factors are the key regulators of ABA signaling. Using RACE-PCR, we identified and sequenced the coding regions of four genes that encode ABF transcription factors in the extremophile plant Thellungiella salsuginea, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana that possesses high tolerance to abiotic stresses. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the similarity between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis ABFs ranged from 71% to 88%. Similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts, Thellungiella ABFs share a bZIP domain and four conservative domains, including a highly conservative motif at the C-terminal tail, which was reported to be a canonical site for binding by 14-3-3 regulatory proteins. Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed a rapid transcript induction of three of the ABF genes in response to salt stress. To check whether Thellungiella ABF transcription factors can interact with abundant 14-3-3 proteins, multiple constructs were designed, and yeast two-hybrid experiments were conducted. Six of the eight tested Ts14-3-3 proteins were able to bind the TsABFs in an isoform-specific manner. A serine-to-alanine substitution in the putative 14-3-3 binding motif resulted in the complete loss of interaction between the 14-3-3 proteins and the ABFs. The role of 14-3-3 interaction with ABFs in the salt and ABA signaling pathways is discussed in the context of Thellungiella survivability. PMID:23221757

  3. Prosystemin from potato, black nightshade, and bell pepper: primary structure and biological activity of predicted systemin polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Constabel, C P; Yip, L; Ryan, C A

    1998-01-01

    Prosystemin is the precursor protein of the 18 amino acid wound signal systemin which activates systemic defense in tomato leaves against insect herbivores (McGurl B, Pearce G, Orozco-Cardenas M, Ryan CA, Science 255 (1992) 1570-1573). Here, we report the isolation of cDNA sequences encoding prosystemin from potato (Solanum tuberosum), black nightshade (S. nigrum), and bell pepper (Capsicum annuum), all members of the Solanaceae family, using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Pairwise comparisons of the predicted prosystemin proteins from the three species with tomato prosystemin and among each other indicated sequence identities ranging from 73% to 88%. The deduced systemin polypeptides were synthesized and tested for their capacities to induce the synthesis of the defensive proteinase inhibitors in tomato leaves. Potato and pepper systemins were approximately as active as tomato systemin, whereas nightshade systemin was ten-fold less active. The accumulation of proteinase inhibitor mRNA transcripts could be induced in each of these plants by treatment with the homologous systemin. As in the tomato, in potato, black nightshade, and bell pepper plants, prosystemin homologs appear to function as precursors of systemic wound signals.

  4. Development of T cell lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP factor and Tax double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL cells possess a CD4+ CD25+ phenotype, similar to that of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genomic RNA, is expressed in all ATL cases and induces neoplastic and inflammatory disease in vivo. To test whether HBZ and Tax are both required for T cell malignancy, we generated HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice in which HBZ and Tax are expressed exclusively in CD4+ T cells. Survival was much reduced in HBZ/Tax double-transgenic mice compared with wild type littermates. Transgenic expression of HBZ and Tax induced skin lesions and T-cell lymphoma in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, Tax single transgenic mice did not develop major health problems. In addition, memory CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Treg cells counts were increased in HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice, and their proliferation was enhanced. There was very little difference between HBZ single and HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice. Taken together, these results show that HBZ, in addition to Tax, plays a critical role in T-cell lymphoma arising from HTLV-1 infection.

  5. Antioxidants in hot pepper: variation among accessions.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Kochhar, Tejinder S; Jarret, Robert L; Snyder, John C

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) pepper (Capsicum spp.) germplasm collection contains several thousand members or accessions. Many of these species and cultivars have not been analyzed for their concentrations of ascorbic acid, capsaicin, and total phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidants having a number of benefits for human health. The objective of this investigation was to select candidate accessions of hot pepper having high concentrations of ascorbic acid, capsaicin, free sugars, and total phenols for use as parents in breeding for these compounds. Seventeen accessions of pepper from the core Capsicum germplasm collection (four accessions of Capsicum chinense; five accessions of C. baccatum; six accessions of C. annuum; and two of C. frutescens) were field grown and their mature fruits were analyzed for their antioxidant composition. Concentrations of these compounds tended to be higher in C. chinense and C. baccatum, than in C. annuum and C. frutescens. Across all accessions the concentration of total phenols was correlated with ascorbic acid (r = 0.97) and free sugars (r = 0.80). Concentrations of total phenols (1.4, 1.3, and 1.3 mg g-1 fruit) and ascorbic acid (1.6, 1.2, and 1.3 mg g-1 fruit) were significantly greater in PI-633757, PI-387833, and PI-633754, respectively, compared to other accessions analyzed. Total capsaicinoids concentrations were greatest (1.3 mg g-1 fruit) in PI-438622 and lowest (0.002 mg g-1 fruit) in Grif-9320. The great variability within and among Capsicum species for these phytochemicals suggests that these selected accessions may be useful as parents in hybridization programs to produce fruits with value-added traits.

  6. Growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants amended with two sanitized sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Immaculada; Azcona, Iñaki; Aguirreolea, Jone; Morales, Fermín; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Palma, José Manuel; Rellán-Alvarez, Rubén; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    Organic wastes such as sewage sludge have been successfully used to increase crop productivity of horticultural soils. Nevertheless, considerations of the impact of sludges on vegetable and fruit quality have received little attention. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to investigate the impact of two sanitized sewage sludges, autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) and compost sludge, on the growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants ( Capsicum annuum L. cv. Piquillo) grown in the greenhouse. Two doses of ATAD (15 and 30% v/v) and three of composted sludge (15, 30, and 45%) were applied to a peat-based potting mix. Unamended substrate was included as control. ATAD and composted sludge increased leaf, shoot, and root dry matter, as well as fruit yield, mainly due to a higher number of fruits per plant. There was no effect of sludge on fruit size (dry matter per fruit and diameter). The concentrations of Zn and Cu in fruit increased with the addition of sewage sludges. Nevertheless, the levels of these elements remained below toxic thresholds. Pepper fruits from sludge-amended plants maintained low concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, thus indicating low pungency level, in accordance with the regulations prescribed by the Control Board of "Lodosa Piquillo peppers" Origin Denomination. The application of sludges did not modify the concentration of vitamin C (ASC) in fruit, whereas the highest doses of composted sludge tended to increase the content of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, without change in the GSH/GSSG ratio. There were no effects of sludge on the transcript levels of enzymes involved in the synthesis of vitamin C, l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) or in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR). Results suggest that the synthesis and degradation of ASC and GSH were compensated for in most of the

  7. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  8. [Severe type 1-allergy to raw bell pepper].

    PubMed

    Rüger, R D; Wagner, S; Simon, J C; Treudler, R

    2010-04-01

    We report on a patient with rare anaphylaxis after ingestion of raw bell pepper. A complex cluster of sensitization including grass and birch pointed out a possible pollen-associated food allergy. We suggest that the severe reaction is due to cross-reactivity towards Bet v 1. Western blot showed binding of the patient's serum to an 11 kDa protein, which has not been described yet and might be a new allergenic structure of the bell pepper plant or a fragment of the Bet v 1-homologous bell pepper protein.

  9. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed. PMID:23392382

  10. Electroporetic transfection of pepper protoplasts with plant potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Nubia; Murphy, John F; Suh, Sang-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Potyviruses are a persistent threat to bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) production worldwide. Much effort has been expended to study the resistance response of pepper cultivars at whole plant levels but with only limited effort at the cellular level using protoplasts. A pepper protoplast isolation procedure is available but an inoculation procedure is needed that provides consistent and highly efficient infection. An electroporation-based procedure for inoculation of potyviruses was developed using a base procedure developed for Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The final parameters identified for efficient potyvirus infection of pepper protoplasts involves two 25ms pulses, 200V each pulse with a 10s interval between pulses. Depending on the method of detection, e.g., ELISA versus RT-PCR, potyvirus RNA inoculum ranged from 10 to 40μg with infection detection occurring with samples of 50,000-100,000 protoplasts.

  11. Hot Chili Peppers: Extraction, Cleanup, and Measurement of Capsaicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping; Mabury, Scott A.; Sagebiel, John C.

    2000-12-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the red pepper or Capsicum annuum, is widely used in food preparation. The purpose of this experiment was to acquaint students with the active ingredients of hot chili pepper (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin), the extraction, cleanup, and analysis of these chemicals, as a fun and informative analytical exercise. Fresh peppers were prepared and extracted with acetonitrile, removing plant co-extractives by addition to a C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridge. Elution of the capsaicinoids was accomplished with a methanol-acetic acid solution. Analysis was completed by reverse-phase HPLC with diode-array or variable wavelength detection and calibration with external standards. Levels of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin were typically found to correlate with literature values for a specific hot pepper variety. Students particularly enjoyed relating concentrations of capsaicinoids to their perceived valuation of "hotness".

  12. Wheat Transcription Factor TaAREB3 Participates in Drought and Freezing Tolerances in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Li, Qian; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AREB (ABA response element binding) proteins in plants play direct regulatory roles in response to multiple stresses, but their functions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are not clear. In the present study, TaAREB3, a new member of the AREB transcription factor family, was isolated from wheat. Sequence analysis showed that the TaAREB3 protein is composed of three parts, a conserved N-terminal, a variable M region, and a conserved C-terminal with a bZIP domain. It belongs to the group A subfamily of bZIP transcription factors. TaAREB3 was constitutively expressed in stems, leaves, florets, anthers, pistils, seeds, and most highly, in roots. TaAREB3 gene expression was induced with abscisic acid (ABA) and low temperature stress, and its protein was localized in the nucleus when transiently expressed in tobacco epidermal cells and stably expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. TaAREB3 protein has transcriptional activation activity, and can bind to the ABRE cis-element in vitro. Overexpression of TaAREB3 in Arabidopsis not only enhanced ABA sensitivity, but also strengthened drought and freezing tolerances. TaAREB3 also activated RD29A, RD29B, COR15A, and COR47 by binding to their promoter regions in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results demonstrated that TaAREB3 plays an important role in drought and freezing tolerances in Arabidopsis. PMID:26884722

  13. A simple method for screening of plant NBS-LRR genes that confer a hypersensitive response to plant viruses and its application for screening candidate pepper genes against Pepper mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-06-01

    Plant NBS-LRR genes are abundant and have been increasingly cloned from plant genomes. In this study, a method based on agroinfiltration and virus inoculation was developed for the simple and inexpensive screening of candidate R genes that confer a hypersensitive response to plant viruses. The well-characterized resistance genes Rx and N, which confer resistance to Potato virus X (PVX) and tobamovirus, respectively, were used to optimize a transient expression assay for detection of hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Infectious sap of PVX and Tobacco mosaic virus were used to induce hypersensitive response in Rx- and N-infiltrated leaves, respectively. The transient expression of the N gene induced local hypersensitive response upon infection of another tobamovirus, Pepper mild mottle virus, through both sap and transcript inoculation. When this method was used to screen 99 candidate R genes from pepper, an R gene that confers hypersensitive response to the potyvirus Pepper mottle virus was identified. The method will be useful for the identification of plant R genes that confer resistance to viruses.

  14. Benzothiadiazole (BTH) induces resistance to Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Trejo-Saavedra, D L; García-Neria, M A; Rivera-Bustamante, R F

    2013-01-01

    Pepper is an economically important crop in many countries around the world but it is susceptible to many diseases. In Mexico, diseases caused by bipartite begomoviruses have emerged as important problems in pepper. Several control strategies have been explored wiht little success; most of them are based on the avoidance of virus transmission and the breeding for resistance. Abiotic inducers can act at various points in the signaling pathways involved in disease resistance, providing long-lasting, wide-spectrum resistance. Benzothiadiazole (BTH) shares the property of activating the systemic acquired resistance pathway downstream from the SA signaling. In this work, resistance to PepGMV infection was induced in pepper plants by activating the SA pathway using BTH treatment. The resistance was characterized by evaluating symptom appearance, virus accumulation and viral movement. Our results showed that BTH could be an attractive alternative to induce geminivirus resistance in pepper plants without a significant damage of the fruit quality and productivity.

  15. Lithium enhances CRTC oligomer formation and the interaction between the CREB coactivators CRTC and CBP--implications for CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Annette; von der Heyde, Anne Sophie; Böer, Ulrike; Phu, Do Thanh; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Oetjen, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are important drugs to treat bipolar disorder. Previous work showed that lithium by enforcing the interaction between the transcription factor CREB and its coactivator CRTC1 enhanced cAMP-stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription. Both CREB and CRTC have been implicated in neuronal adaptation, which might underlie lithium's therapeutic action. In the present study the mechanisms of lithium action on cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription were further elucidated. Transient transfection assays revealed that all three CRTC isoforms conferred lithium responsiveness to CREB whereas their intrinsic transcriptional activities remained unchanged by lithium, suggesting a conformational change of CREB or CRTC by lithium. In in vitro protein-protein interaction assays lithium enhanced the interaction between CREB and both coactivators CRTC and CBP. Furthermore, lithium enforced the oligomerization of CRTC, a prerequisite for CREB interaction. For further evaluation it was investigated whether lithium competes with magnesium, which coordinates the conformation of the CREB basic region leucine zipper (bZip). Mutational analysis of the magnesium coordinating lysine-290 within the bZip, in vitro and intracellular interaction assays and luciferase reporter-gene assays revealed that the effect of lithium on the CREB-CRTC interaction or on the transcriptional activity, respectively, was not affected by the mutation, thus excluding a magnesium-lithium competition. However, the CREB-CRTC interaction was strongly increased in lysine-290-mutants thereby extending the CRTC-CREB interaction domain. Taken together the results exclude a competition between lithium and magnesium at the bZip, but suggest that lithium by enforcing the CRTC-oligomer formation and the interaction of CREB-CBP-CRTC enhances cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

  16. Cloning and expression analysis of CaPIP1-1 gene in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan-Xu; Wang, Shu-Bin; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Xiao, Huai-Juan; Jin, Jing-Hao; Ji, Jiao-Jiao; Jing, Hua; Chen, Ru-Gang; Arisha, Mohamed Hamed; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-05-25

    Plant aquaporins are responsible for water transmembrane transport, which play an important role on abiotic and biotic stresses. A novel plasma membrane intrinsic protein of CaPIP1-1 was isolated from the pepper P70 according to transcriptome databases of Phytophthora capsici inoculation and chilling stress library. CaPIP1-1, which is 1155 bp in length with an open reading frame of 861 bp, encoded 286 amino acids. Three introns, exhibited CT/AC splice junctions, were observed in CaPIP1-1. The numbers and location of introns in CaPIP1-1 were the same as observed in tomato and potato. CaPIP1-1 was abundantly expressed in pepper fruit. Increased transcription levels of CaPIP1-1 were found in the different stresses, including chilling stress, salt stress, mannitol stress, salicylic acid, ABA treatment and Phytophthora capsici infection. The expression of CaPIP1-1 was downregulated by 50 μM HgCl2 and 100 μM fluridone. The pepper plants silenced CaPIP1-1 in cv. Qiemen showed growth inhibition and decreased tolerance to salt and mannitol stresses using detached leaf method.

  17. A systematic survey in Arabidopsis thaliana of transcription factors that modulate circadian parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hanano, Shigeru; Stracke, Ralf; Jakoby, Marc; Merkle, Thomas; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Weisshaar, Bernd; Davis, Seth J

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant circadian systems regulate various biological processes in harmony with daily environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the underlying clock mechanism is comprised of multiple integrated transcriptional feedbacks, which collectively lead to global patterns of rhythmic gene expression. The transcriptional networks are essential within the clock itself and in its output pathway. Results Here, to expand understanding of transcriptional networks within and associated to the clock, we performed both an in silico analysis of transcript rhythmicity of transcription factor genes, and a pilot assessment of functional phenomics on the MYB, bHLH, and bZIP families. In our in silico analysis, we defined which members of these families express a circadian waveform of transcript abundance. Up to 20% of these families were over-represented as clock-controlled genes. To detect members that contribute to proper oscillator function, we systematically measured rhythmic growth via an imaging system in hundreds of misexpression lines targeting members of the transcription-factor families. Three transcription factors were found that conferred aberrant circadian rhythms when misexpressed: MYB3R2, bHLH69, and bHLH92. Conclusion Transcript abundance of many transcription factors in Arabidopsis oscillates in a circadian manner. Further, a developed pipeline assessed phenotypic contribution of a panel of transcriptional regulators in the circadian system. PMID:18426557

  18. A ubiquitous plant housekeeping gene, PAP, encodes a major protein component of bell pepper chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pozueta-Romero, J; Rafia, F; Houlné, G; Cheniclet, C; Carde, J P; Schantz, M L; Schantz, R

    1997-11-01

    We have isolated a cDNA (PAP) corresponding to a single nuclear gene that encodes an approximately 30-kD major protein of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit chromoplasts. RNA and protein analyses revealed that, although at a low level, this gene is also expressed in every organ of the plant, the amount of the corresponding transcript and protein dramatically increasing in the latter stages of fruit development. Western-blot and immunocytochemical analyses of purified chloroplasts from leaves and fruits and of chromoplasts from red fruits showed that the encoded protein is the major component of plastoglobules and fibrils and is localized on the outer surface of these lipid structures. Analyses of PAP in plants belonging to different taxa revealed that it is expressed and highly conserved in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. The presence of the protein in plastids not differentiating into chromoplasts indicates that PAP is expressed irrespective of the ontogeny of various plastid lines. In light of our results and since the encoded protein, identical to that previously named ChrB or fibrillin, is present in plastoglobules from several species and accumulates in the fibrils of bell pepper chromoplast, we propose to designate it as a plastid-lipid-associated protein.

  19. Cloning and expression of squalene synthase cDNA from hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Yoon, Yong-Hwi; Kim, Hak-Yoon; Shin, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dal-Ung; Lee, In-Jung; Kim, Kil-Ung

    2002-06-30

    We isolated and artificially expressed a cDNA clone of the Capsicum annuum squalene synthase (CASS) gene to elucidate the pattern of alternatively regulated two-branch point enzymes. The 1,674-bp CASS cDNA contained an open reading frame of 411 amino acids, yielding a predicted molecular mass of about 45 kDa. A deduced amino acid sequence comparison to other squalene syntheses showed identities with Nicotiana tabacum (91%), Nicotiana benthamiana (90%), Arabidopsis thaliana (79%), and rats (40%). The artificially expressed soluble form of the CASS enzyme was identified by the enzyme activity that converted FPP to squalene and by SDS-PAGE. A Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two copies of the squalene synthase gene exist in the hot pepper genome. In hot pepper, the regulation of the branch point enzymes, squalene synthase and sesquiterpene cyclase was investigated in the UV-challenged leaves of Capsicum annuum. The transcript level and enzyme activity of the CASS were slightly reduced by UV. However, those of the CASC were rapidly induced within 24 h and slowly decreased thereafter. PMID:12132584

  20. Analysis of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in peppers and pepper sauces by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; Ramírez-Maya, Erika; Alvarado-Suárez, Luís Angel

    2009-04-01

    A simple method for the analysis of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in peppers and pepper sauces by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed. A novel device was designed for direct extraction solid phase microextraction in order to avoid damage to the fiber. The analysis was performed without derivatization for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Selection fiber, extraction temperature, extraction time and pH, were optimized. The method was linear in the range 0.109-1.323 microg/mL for capsaicin and 0.107-1.713 microg/mL for dihydrocapsaicin with correlation coefficient up to r=0.9970 for both capsaicinoids. The precision of the method was less than 10%. The method was applied to the analysis of 11 varieties of peppers and four pepper sauces. A broad range of capsaicin (55.0-25 459 microg/g) and dihydrocapsaicin (93-1 130 microg/g) was found in the pepper and pepper sauces samples (4.3-717.3 and 1.0-134.8 microg/g), respectively.

  1. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections. PMID:25027570

  2. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections.

  3. Susceptibility of ornamental pepper banker plant candidates to common greenhouse pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of four potential ornamental pepper banker plant candidates [Black Pearl (BP), Explosive Ember (EE), Masquerade (MA), Red Missile (RM), and a commercial pepper cultivar Blitz (BL)] were evaluated against three common greenhouse pests - Bemisia tabaci, Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Fra...

  4. Black pepper and health claims: a comprehensive treatise.

    PubMed

    Butt, Masood Sadiq; Pasha, Imran; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Saeed, Farhan; Ahmed, Waqas

    2013-01-01

    For millennia, spices have been an integral part of human diets and commerce. Recently, the widespread recognition of diet-health linkages bolsters their dietary importance. The bioactive components present in them are of considerable significance owing to their therapeutic potential against various ailments. They provide physiological benefits or prevent chronic ailment in addition to the fundamental nutrition and often included in the category of functional foods. Black pepper (Piper Nigrum L.) is an important healthy food owing to its antioxidant, antimicrobial potential and gastro-protective modules. Black pepper, with piperine as an active ingredient, holds rich phytochemistry that also includes volatile oil, oleoresins, and alkaloids. More recently, cell-culture studies and animal modeling predicted the role of black pepper against number of maladies. The free-radical scavenging activity of black pepper and its active ingredients might be helpful in chemoprevention and controlling progression of tumor growth. Additionally, the key alkaloid components of Piper Nigrum, that is, piperine assist in cognitive brain functioning, boost nutrient's absorption and improve gastrointestinal functionality. In this comprehensive treatise, efforts are made to elucidate the antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, gastro-protective, and antidepressant activities of black pepper. Moreover, the synergistic interaction of black pepper with different drugs and nutrients is the limelight of the manuscript. However, the aforementioned health-promoting benefits associated with black pepper are proven in animal modeling. Thus, there is a need to conduct controlled randomized trials in human subjects, cohort studies, and meta-analyses. Such future studies would be helpful in recommending its application in diet-based regimens to prevent various ailments.

  5. Authentication of bell peppers using boron and strontium isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang; Vogl, Jochen; Voerkelius, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    The wrong declaration of food in terms of geographical origin and production method is a major problem for the individual consumer and public regulatory authorities. The authentication of food matrices using H-C-N-O-S isotopic compositions is already well established. However, specific questions require additional isotopic systems, which are more diagonstic for the source reservoires involved or production methods used. Here we present B and Sr isotopic compositions of bell peppers from Europe (Germany, Austria, Netherlands, Spain) and Israel to verfiy their origin. The bell peppers' B isotopic compositions between different locations are highly variable (d11BNISTSRM951 -8 to +35 ‰), whereas the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are all close to modern seawater Sr isotopic composition of about 0.7092 (0.7078 to 0.7107), but still can reliably be distinguished. Distinct isotopically heavy and light B isotopic fingerprints are obtained for bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands. Samples from Germany, Austria, and Spain display overlapping d11B values between 0 and +12 ‰. Bell peppers from Israel show high d11B values (+28 to +35 ‰) combined with 87Sr/86Sr ratios slightly more unradiogenic than modern seawater (ca 0.7079). Bell peppers from the Netherlands, however, show low d11B values (-8 ‰) combinded with 87Sr/86Sr ratios of modern seawater (approx. 0.7085). Mainly based on diagnostic B isotopic compositions bell peppers from Israel and the Netherlands can be related to a specific geographical growing environment (Israel) or production method (Netherlands). The isotope fingerprints of bell peppers from the Netherlands are consistent with growing conditions in greenhouses typical for the Netherlands vegetable farming. Using optimized production methods crops in greenhouses were supplied with nutritients by liquid fertilizers on artificial substrates. As most fertilizers derive from non-marine salt deposits, fertilization typically imprints invariant d11B values close

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accordance with the conditions in 7 CFR 319.56-42 and were inspected and found free from Agrotis segetum... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from the Republic of Korea. 319.56-42 Section... Peppers from the Republic of Korea. Peppers (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) from the Republic of...

  7. 7 CFR 319.56-24 - Lettuce and peppers from Israel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lettuce and peppers from Israel. 319.56-24 Section 319... Lettuce and peppers from Israel. (a) Lettuce may be imported into the United States from Israel without... section have been met. (b) Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from Israel may be imported into the...

  8. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiyan; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bell Pepper Endornavirus Isolate from Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2015-08-20

    Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) is a double-stranded RNA virus infecting economically important crops, such as peppers. Next-generation sequencing of small RNAs extracted from the leaves of a pepper plant showing mild viral symptoms, along with subsequent analysis, identified BPEV. The complete genome of this isolate was cloned and sequenced.

  10. Electronic Nose Based Alternative Method for the Determination of Capsaicin in Hot Chili Pepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, E. I.; Andreoli, A.; Martinelli, E.; Candeloro, N.; Mantini, A.; di Natale, C.; de Lorenzo, A.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the EN aptitude to evaluate different pepper brands' freshness by repeated measurements of chosen pepper samples. This, in addition to study the possibility of differentiation and classification of Bell, Thai and Scotch Bonnet pepper brands, available in the Italian market.

  11. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiyan; Cheng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  12. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiyan; Cheng, Zhihui; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-05-15

    A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bell Pepper Endornavirus Isolate from Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) is a double-stranded RNA virus infecting economically important crops, such as peppers. Next-generation sequencing of small RNAs extracted from the leaves of a pepper plant showing mild viral symptoms, along with subsequent analysis, identified BPEV. The complete genome of this isolate was cloned and sequenced. PMID:26294624

  14. Pungency Quantitation of Hot Pepper Sauces Using HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Thomas A.

    1999-02-01

    A class of compounds known as capsaicinoids are responsible for the "heat" of hot peppers. To determine the pungency of a particular pepper or pepper product, one may quantify the capsaicinoids and relate those concentrations to the perceived heat. The format of the laboratory described here allows students to collectively develop an HPLC method for the quantitation of the two predominant capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) in hot-pepper products. Each small group of students investigated one of the following aspects of the method: detector wavelength, mobile-phase composition, extraction of capsaicinoids, calibration, and quantitation. The format of the lab forced students to communicate and cooperate to develop this method. The resulting HPLC method involves extraction with acetonitrile followed by solid-phase extraction clean-up, an isocratic 80:20 methanol-water mobile phase, a 4.6 mm by 25 cm C-18 column, and UV absorbance detection at 284 nm. The method developed by the students was then applied to the quantitation of capsaicinoids in a variety of hot pepper sauces. Editor's Note on Hazards in our April 2000 issue addresses the above.

  15. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  16. Genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqin; Shi, Lanping; Liu, Yanyan; Tang, Qian; Shen, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Cai, Jinsen; Yu, Huanxin; Wang, Rongzhang; Wen, Jiayu; Lin, Youquan; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Mou, Shaoliang; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been implicated in plant growth, development, and environment adaptation, but a comprehensive understanding of MAPK signaling at genome-wide level is limited in Capsicum annuum. Herein, genome-wide identification and transcriptional expression analysis of MAPK and MAPK kinase (MAPKK) were performed in pepper. A total of 19 pepper MAPK (CaMAPKs) genes and five MAPKK (CaMAPKKs) genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CaMAPKs and CaMAPKKs could be classified into four groups and each group contains similar exon-intron structures. However, significant divergences were also found. Notably, five members of the pepper MAPKK family were much less conserved than those found in Arabidopsis, and 9 Arabidopsis MAPKs did not have orthologs in pepper. Additionally, 7 MAPKs in Arabidopsis had either two or three orthologs in the pepper genome, and six pepper MAPKs and one MAPKK differing in sequence were found in three pepper varieties. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the majority of MAPK and MAPKK genes were ubiquitously expressed and transcriptionally modified in pepper leaves after treatments with heat, salt, and Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation as well as exogenously applied salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, ethephon, and abscisic acid. The MAPKK-MAPK interactome was tested by yeast two-hybrid assay, the results showed that one MAPKK might interact with multiple MAPKs, one MAPK might also interact with more than one MAPKKs, constituting MAPK signaling networks which may collaborate in transmitting upstream signals into appropriate downstream cellular responses and processes. These results will facilitate future functional characterization of MAPK cascades in pepper. PMID:26442088

  17. Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Sabine; Gardeström, Per; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (bZIP63, At5g22920, BT2, MGD2, and TPS9) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardly impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/ transporting proteins (adg1, sex1, sus1-4, sus5/6, and tpt2), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—gin2.1 and oe3.2, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying pbZIP63::GUS showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced pbZIP63::GUS repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown gin2.1 and oe3.2 seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in oe3.2 plants for bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Overall, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression. PMID:26236323

  18. The Aspergillus nidulans metZ gene encodes a transcription factor involved in regulation of sulfur metabolism in this fungus and other Eurotiales.

    PubMed

    Piłsyk, Sebastian; Natorff, Renata; Sieńko, Marzena; Skoneczny, Marek; Paszewski, Andrzej; Brzywczy, Jerzy

    2015-05-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, expression of sulfur metabolism genes is activated by the MetR transcription factor containing a basic region and leucine zipper domain (bZIP). Here we identified and characterized MetZ, a new transcriptional regulator in A. nidulans and other Eurotiales. It contains a bZIP domain similar to the corresponding region in MetR and this similarity suggests that MetZ could potentially complement the MetR deficiency. The metR and metZ genes are interrupted by unusually long introns. Transcription of metZ, unlike that of metR, is controlled by the sulfur metabolite repression system (SMR) dependent on the MetR protein. Overexpression of metZ from a MetR-independent promoter in a ΔmetR background activates transcription of genes encoding sulfate permease, homocysteine synthase and methionine permease, partially complementing the phenotype of the ΔmetR mutation. Thus, MetZ appears to be a second transcription factor involved in regulation of sulfur metabolism genes.

  19. Pepper beta-galactosidase 1 (PBG1) plays a significant role in fruit ripening in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Nakajima, Tasuku

    2007-02-01

    During bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit ripening, beta-galactosidase activity increased markedly as compared with other glycosidases. We purified 77.5 kDa exo-1,4-beta-D-galactanase from red bell pepper fruit classified as beta-galactosidase II. A marked decrease in galactose content appeared during fruit ripening, especially in the pectic fraction. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed a considerable amount of galactose residues in this fraction. We isolated bell pepper beta-galactosidase (PBG1) cDNA. This PBG1 protein contained the putative active site, G-G-P-[LIVM]-x-Q-x-E-N-E-[FY], belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 35. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression of PBG1 in red fruit was significantly stronger than that from any other tissues. Moreover, expression of PBG1 occurred prior to that of pepper endo-polygalacturonase 1 (PPG1), the major fruit-ripening enzyme. Based on these results, it appears that the hydrolysis of galactose residues in pectic substances is the first event in the ripening process in bell pepper fruit.

  20. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-07-15

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity.

  1. Metabolomics Provides Quality Characterization of Commercial Gochujang (Fermented Pepper Paste).

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu Min; Suh, Dong Ho; Jung, Eun Sung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To identify the major factors contributing to the quality of commercial gochujang (fermented red pepper paste), metabolites were profiled by mass spectrometry. In principal component analysis, cereal type (wheat, brown rice, and white rice) and species of hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, C. annuum cv. Chung-yang, and C. frutescens) affected clustering patterns. Relative amino acid and citric acid levels were significantly higher in wheat gochujang than in rice gochujang. Sucrose, linoleic acid, oleic acid, and lysophospholipid levels were high in brown-rice gochujang, whereas glucose, maltose, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels were high in white-rice gochujang. The relative capsaicinoid and luteolin derivative contents in gochujang were affected by the hot pepper species used. Gochujang containing C. annuum cv. Chung-yang and C. frutescens showed high capsaicinoid levels. The luteolin derivative level was high in gochujang containing C. frutescens. These metabolite variations in commercial gochujang may be related to different physicochemical phenotypes and antioxidant activity. PMID:27428946

  2. Safety assessment for genetically modified sweet pepper and tomato.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang-Liang; Gu, Hongya; Li, Yi; Su, Yilan; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Zhicheng; Ming, Xiaotian; Tian, Jinhua; Pan, Naisui; Qu, Li-Jia

    2003-06-30

    The coat protein (CP) gene of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was cloned from a Chinese CMV isolate, the CaMV promoter and NOS terminator added and the gene construct was transformed into both sweet pepper and tomato plants to confer resistance to CMV. Safety assessments of these genetically modified (GM) plants were conducted. It was found that these two GM products showed no genotoxicity either in vitro or in vivo by the micronucleus test, sperm aberration test and Ames test. Animal feeding studies showed no significant differences in growth, body weight gain, food consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights and histopathology between rats or mice of either sex fed with either GM sweet pepper or tomato diets compared with those with non-GM diets. These results demonstrate that the CMV-resistant sweet pepper and tomato are comparable to the non-GM counterparts in terms of food safety.

  3. Deregulation of Sucrose-Controlled Translation of a bZIP-Type Transcription Factor Results in Sucrose Accumulation in Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Shin; Yang, Seung Hwan; Zhu, XuJun; Imai, Ryozo; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2012-01-01

    Sucrose is known to repress the translation of Arabidopsis thaliana AtbZIP11 transcript which encodes a protein belonging to the group of S (S - stands for small) basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP)-type transcription factor. This repression is called sucrose-induced repression of translation (SIRT). It is mediated through the sucrose-controlled upstream open reading frame (SC-uORF) found in the AtbZIP11 transcript. The SIRT is reported for 4 other genes belonging to the group of S bZIP in Arabidopsis. Tobacco tbz17 is phylogenetically closely related to AtbZIP11 and carries a putative SC-uORF in its 5′-leader region. Here we demonstrate that tbz17 exhibits SIRT mediated by its SC-uORF in a manner similar to genes belonging to the S bZIP group of the Arabidopsis genus. Furthermore, constitutive transgenic expression of tbz17 lacking its 5′-leader region containing the SC-uORF leads to production of tobacco plants with thicker leaves composed of enlarged cells with 3–4 times higher sucrose content compared to wild type plants. Our finding provides a novel strategy to generate plants with high sucrose content. PMID:22457737

  4. ABI-like transcription factor gene TaABL1 from wheat improves multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Bei; Gao, Shi-Qing; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Tang, Yi-Miao; Li, Xue-Yin; Li, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Yao-Feng; Chen, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in adaptive responses of plants to abiotic stresses. ABA-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic leucine zipper transcription factors that regulate the expression of downstream genes containing ABA-responsive elements (ABREs) in promoter regions. A novel ABI-like (ABA-insensitive) transcription factor gene, named TaABL1, containing a conserved basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain was cloned from wheat. Southern blotting showed that three copies were present in the wheat genome. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that TaABL1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP transcription factor family and was most closely related to ZmABI5 in maize and OsAREB2 in rice. Expression of TaABL1 was highly induced in wheat roots, stems, and leaves by ABA, drought, high salt, and low temperature stresses. TaABL1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed wheat mesophyll protoplast. Overexpression of TaABL1 enhanced responses of transgenic plants to ABA and hastened stomatal closure under stress, thereby improving tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses. Furthermore, overexpression of TaABL1 upregulated or downregulated the expression of some stress-related genes controlling stomatal closure in transgenic plants under ABA and drought stress conditions, suggesting that TaABL1 might be a valuable genetic resource for transgenic molecular breeding.

  5. Virus diseases of peppers (Capsicum spp.) and their control.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Kumar, Sanjeet; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Hughes, Jacqueline d'A

    2014-01-01

    The number of virus species infecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) crops and their incidences has increased considerably over the past 30 years, particularly in tropical and subtropical pepper production systems. This is probably due to a combination of factors, including the expansion and intensification of pepper cultivation in these regions, the increased volume and speed of global trade of fresh produce (including peppers) carrying viruses and vectors to new locations, and perhaps climate change expanding the geographic range suitable for the viruses and vectors. With the increased incidences of diverse virus species comes increased incidences of coinfection with two or more virus species in the same plant. There is then greater chance of synergistic interactions between virus species, increasing symptom severity and weakening host resistance, as well as the opportunity for genetic recombination and component exchange and a possible increase in aggressiveness, virulence, and transmissibility. The main virus groups infecting peppers are transmitted by aphids, whiteflies, or thrips, and a feature of many populations of these vector groups is that they can develop resistance to some of the commonly used insecticides relatively quickly. This, coupled with the increasing concern over the impact of over- or misuse of insecticides on the environment, growers, and consumers, means that there should be less reliance on insecticides to control the vectors of viruses infecting pepper crops. To improve the durability of pepper crop protection measures, there should be a shift away from the broadscale use of insecticides and the use of single, major gene resistance to viruses. Instead, integrated and pragmatic virus control measures should be sought that combine (1) cultural practices that reduce sources of virus inoculum and decrease the rate of spread of viruliferous vectors into the pepper crop, (2) synthetic insecticides, which should be used judiciously and only when the

  6. Cytomorphology of induced octoploid Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Panda, R C; Kumar, O A; Rao, K G

    1984-10-01

    Octoploidy was induced in Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum cultivar 'cerasiformis') through the application of colchicine and the cytomorphological features of two octoploid plants were described. In general, the octoploids did not exhibit gigas characters when compared to the tetraploids; on the contrary they were less vigorous, suggesting that the optimum and desirable ploidy level for Capsicum is probably tetraploid. Chromosome associations such as octovalents and hexavalents, in addition to IVs, IIIs, IIs and Is, were recorded at diakinesis and metaphase I. Meiosis was highly irregular and the pollen and seed fertility was very low. Cytological features of octoploid Chili peppers are compared with octoploids of Physalis and Petunia.

  7. Transgenic peppers that are highly tolerant to a new CMV pathotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Hee; Jung, Min; Shin, Sun Hee; Lee, Ji Hee; Choi, Soon Ho; Her, Nam Han; Lee, Jang Ha; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Paek, Kee Yoeup; Harn, Chee Hark

    2009-02-01

    The CMV (cucumber mosaic virus) is the most frequently occurring virus in chili pepper farms. A variety of peppers that are resistant to CMVP0 were developed in the middle of 1990s through a breeding program, and commercial cultivars have since been able to control the spread of CMVP0. However, a new pathotype (CMVP1) that breaks the resistance of CMVP0-resistant peppers has recently appeared and caused a heavy loss in productivity. Since no genetic source of this new pathotype was available, a traditional breeding method cannot be used to generate a CMVP1-resistant pepper variety. Therefore, we set up a transformation system of pepper using Agrobacterium that had been transfected with the coat protein gene, CMVP0-CP, with the aim of developing a new CMVP1-resistant pepper line. A large number of transgenic peppers (T(1), T(2) and T(3)) were screened for CMVP1 tolerance using CMVP1 inoculation. Transgenic peppers tolerant to CMVP1 were selected in a plastic house as well as in the field. Three independent T(3) pepper lines highly tolerant to the CMVP1 pathogen were found to also be tolerant to the CMVP0 pathogen. These selected T(3) pepper lines were phenotypically identical or close to the non-transformed lines. However, after CMVP1 infection, the height and fruit size of the non-transformed lines became shorter and smaller, respectively, while the T(3) pepper lines maintained a normal phenotype.

  8. Microarray analyses for identifying genes conferring resistance to pepper leaf curl virus in chilli pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Rai, Ved Prakash; Rai, Ashutosh; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Sanjeet; Singh, Major; Singh, Sheo Pratap

    2016-09-01

    Pepper leaf curl virus (PepLCV) is a serious threat to pepper (Capsicum spp.) production worldwide. Molecular mechanism underlying pepper plants response to PepLCV infection is key to develop PepLCV resistant varieties. In this study, we generated transcriptome profiles of PepLCV resistant genotype (BS-35) and susceptible genotype (IVPBC-535) after artificial viral inoculation using microarray technology and detail experimental procedures and analyses are described. A total of 319 genes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible genotypes were identified, out of that 234 unique genes were found to be up-regulated > 2-fold in resistant line BS-35 when compared to susceptible, IVPBC-535. The data set we generated has been analyzed to identify genes that are involved in the regulation of resistance against PepLCV. The raw data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE41131.

  9. Microarray analyses for identifying genes conferring resistance to pepper leaf curl virus in chilli pepper (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Rai, Ved Prakash; Rai, Ashutosh; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Kumar, Sanjeet; Singh, Major; Singh, Sheo Pratap

    2016-09-01

    Pepper leaf curl virus (PepLCV) is a serious threat to pepper (Capsicum spp.) production worldwide. Molecular mechanism underlying pepper plants response to PepLCV infection is key to develop PepLCV resistant varieties. In this study, we generated transcriptome profiles of PepLCV resistant genotype (BS-35) and susceptible genotype (IVPBC-535) after artificial viral inoculation using microarray technology and detail experimental procedures and analyses are described. A total of 319 genes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible genotypes were identified, out of that 234 unique genes were found to be up-regulated > 2-fold in resistant line BS-35 when compared to susceptible, IVPBC-535. The data set we generated has been analyzed to identify genes that are involved in the regulation of resistance against PepLCV. The raw data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE41131. PMID:27556012

  10. Evolution of total and individual capsaicinoids in peppers during ripening of the Cayenne pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Barbero, Gerardo F; Ruiz, Aurora G; Liazid, Ali; Palma, Miguel; Vera, Jesús C; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2014-06-15

    The evolution of total capsaicinoids and the individual contents of the five major capsaicinoids: nordihydrocapsaicin, capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, homocapsaicin and homodihydrocapsaicin present in the Cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), during fruit ripening, has been established. Capsaicinoids begin to accumulate gradually in the peppers from the beginning of its development up to a maximum concentration (1,789 μmol/Kg FW). From this time there is initially a sharp decrease in the total capsaicinoid content (32%), followed by a gradual decrease until day 80 of ripening. The two major capsaicinoids present in the Cayenne pepper are capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, which represent between 79% and 90%, respectively, of total capsaicinoids depending on fruit ripening. The relative content of capsaicin differs from the evolution of the other four capsaicinoids studied.

  11. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing.

    PubMed

    Seal, Dakshina R; Martin, Cliff G

    2016-03-04

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin "Habanero" was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars "SY" and "SR" were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (<1.5 cm). However based on proportions of fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation.

  12. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Dakshina R.; Martin, Cliff G.

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin “Habanero” was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars “SY” and “SR” were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (<1.5 cm). However based on proportions of fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation. PMID:26959066

  13. Photooxidation Tolerance Characters of a New Purple Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Li-jun; Zhang, Zhu-qing; Dai, Xiong-ze; Zou, Xue-xiao

    2013-01-01

    Huai Zi (HZ) is a new purple mutant of green pepper (PI 631133) that is obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture. The net photosynthetic rate (PN), chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, antioxidant substances, antioxidant enzymes, photosystem 1 (PS1) and PS2 activities were studied through methyl viologen (MV) treatment. The results showed that the PN, actual photochemical efficiency of PS2 (ΦPS2), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), PS1 and PS2 activities in HZ were lower than those in green pepper. HZ had a stronger ability to eliminate reactive oxygen species(O2•−) and accumulated less malondialdehyde (MDA) (a membrane lipid peroxidation product) than did green pepper, and had a higher content of antioxidants and antioxidant enzyme activity. This suggests that the lower light energy absorption and higher thermal dissipation and antioxidant activity of HZ contributed to a more stable PS2 photosynthetic capacity, which resulted in photooxidation tolerance. Hence, our study strongly suggests that pepper hybrids can achieve a modest ratio of chlorophyll and anthocyanin content, high PN and resistance to photooxidation, improving yield and resistance to adverse environments. PMID:23704924

  14. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... October 1, and continuing through April 30, MAFF must set and maintain Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis... transit other fruit fly-supporting areas unless shipping containers are sealed by MAFF with an official... from Spain. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) may be imported into the United States from Spain...

  15. High-throughput sequencing of black pepper root transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) is one of the most popular spices in the world. It is used in cooking and the preservation of food and even has medicinal properties. Losses in production from disease are a major limitation in the culture of this crop. The major diseases are root rot and foot rot, which are results of root infection by Fusarium solani and Phytophtora capsici, respectively. Understanding the molecular interaction between the pathogens and the host’s root region is important for obtaining resistant cultivars by biotechnological breeding. Genetic and molecular data for this species, though, are limited. In this paper, RNA-Seq technology has been employed, for the first time, to describe the root transcriptome of black pepper. Results The root transcriptome of black pepper was sequenced by the NGS SOLiD platform and assembled using the multiple-k method. Blast2Go and orthoMCL methods were used to annotate 10338 unigenes. The 4472 predicted proteins showed about 52% homology with the Arabidopsis proteome. Two root proteomes identified 615 proteins, which seem to define the plant’s root pattern. Simple-sequence repeats were identified that may be useful in studies of genetic diversity and may have applications in biotechnology and ecology. Conclusions This dataset of 10338 unigenes is crucially important for the biotechnological breeding of black pepper and the ecogenomics of the Magnoliids, a major group of basal angiosperms. PMID:22984782

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  18. 7 CFR 319.56-31 - Peppers from Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Peppers from Spain. 319.56-31 Section 319.56-31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-31...

  19. I'm Not a Chili Pepper: Are You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franciosi, Rob

    2006-01-01

    RateMyProfessors.com helps students rank their professors using a five-point rating scale in three areas, namely, helpfulness, clarity, and easiness. A college professor finds himself addicted to the site, which is rather low on substance and rates professors with a smiley face to indicate "good quality" and a red hot chili pepper to indicate the…

  20. Analysis of the January 2006 Pepper-Pot Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G; Chambers, F; Bieniosek, F; Henestroza, E

    2006-03-22

    Between January 9-12, 2006 a series of experiments were performed on the DARHT-II injector to measure the beam's emittance. Part of these experiments were pepper-pot measurements. This note describes the analysis of the data, and our conclusions from the experiments.

  1. Genome assembly of bell pepper endornavirus from small RNA.

    PubMed

    Sela, Noa; Luria, Neta; Dombrovsky, Aviv

    2012-07-01

    The family Endornaviridae infects diverse hosts, including plants, fungi, and oomycetes. Here we report for the first time the assembly of bell pepper endornavirus by next-generation sequencing of viral small RNA. Such a population of small RNA indicates the activation of the viral immunity silencing machinery by this cryptic virus, which probably encodes a novel silencing suppressor.

  2. Analysis of transcriptional activities of the Meq proteins present in highly virulent Marek's disease virus strains, RB1B and Md5.

    PubMed

    Murata, Shiro; Okada, Tsukasa; Kano, Rika; Hayashi, Yuko; Hashiguchi, Tomoyuki; Onuma, Misao; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus that causes malignant lymphomas in chickens. Recent field isolates of MDV have tended to exhibit increasing virulence, and MDV strains are currently classified into four categories based on their relative virulence. Meq, a putative MDV oncoprotein, resembles the Jun/Fos family of basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors and can regulate the expression of viral and cellular genes as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with a variety of bZIP family proteins. MDV isolates display distinct diversity and point mutations in Meq, which may contribute to changes in the transcriptional activities of Meq and subsequently, to observed increases in MDV oncogenicity. In this study, we introduced mutations into the meq gene and used dual luciferase reporter assays to analyze the transcriptional activities of the resulting Meq proteins to determine whether distinct mutations in Meq could be responsible for differences in transcriptional activity among MDV strains. A proline-to-alanine substitution at position 217, the second position of one of the proline direct repeats in the transactivation domain, enhanced the transactivation activity of Meq. In addition, we found that two substitutions at positions 283 and 320 affected transactivation activity. These results suggest that the distinct diversity of and point mutations in the Meq proteins are responsible for differences in transactivation activity among MDV strains.

  3. Toxic carriers in pepper sprays may cause corneal erosion.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Juha M; Moilanen, Jukka A O; Hack, Tapani; Tervo, Timo M T

    2003-02-01

    We describe four patients who developed corneal erosion after an exposure to a pepper spray containing toxic carriers. Two of these patients were exposed to a pepper gas containing 5% oleoresin capsicum (OC) as an irritant and 92% trichlorethylene or unknown amount of dichloromethane as a carrier. One patient was exposed to a mock (containing 92% trichlorethylene as a carrier) training pepper gas without OC. The fourth patient was exposed to an unidentified Russian pepper gas spray. Two of the patients were examined by in vivo confocal microscopy to demonstrate the depth and quality of the stromal damage. To test the toxicity of the commercial tear spray, it was analyzed and test sprayed on a soft contact lens and into a plastic cup. Visual acuity was measured and the eyes were examined with a slit-lamp up to 5 months. Physical damage to a soft contact lens was visually acquired. All patients showed a long-lasting, deep corneal and conjuctival erosion, which resolved partly with medical therapy during the following weeks/months. Confocal microscopy revealed corneal nerve damage, and keratocyte activation reaching two-thirds of stroma for one patient. The spray caused serious damage to both the soft contact lens and the plastic cup. The safety of the commercially available pepper sprays should be assessed before marketing, and a list of acceptable ingredients created. The sprays should also have instructions on the use of the compound as well as on the first aid measures after the exposure. Solvents known to be toxic should not be used.

  4. Characterisation of Phytophthora capsici isolates from black pepper in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Truong, Nguyen V; Liew, Edward C Y; Burgess, Lester W

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora foot rot of black pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici is a major disease of black pepper (Piper nigrum) throughout Vietnam. To understand the population structure of P. capsici, a large collection of P. capsici isolates from black pepper was studied on the basis of mating type, random amplified microsatellites (RAMS) and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) fingerprinting. Two mating types A1 and A2 were detected in four provinces in two climatic regions, with A1:A2 ratios ranging from 1:3 to 1:5. In several instances A1 and A2 mating types were found to co-exist in the same farm or black pepper pole, suggesting the potential for sexual reproduction of P. capsici in the field in Vietnam although its contribution to disease epidemics is uncertain. RAMS and REP DNA fingerprinting analysis of 118 isolates of P. capsici from black pepper showed that the population was genetically more diverse where two mating types were found, although the overall genetic diversity was low with most of the isolates belonging to one clonal group. The implication of these findings is discussed. The low diversity among isolates suggests that the P. capsici population may have originated from a single source. There was no genetic differentiation of isolates from different climatic regions. In addition to the large clonal group, several isolates with unique RAMS/REP phenotypes were also detected. Most of these unique phenotypes belonged to the minority A1 mating type. This may have significant implications for a gradual increase in overall genetic diversity. PMID:20960972

  5. Managing the pepper maggot (Diptera: Tephritidae) using perimeter trap cropping.

    PubMed

    Boucher, T Jude; Ashley, Richard; Durgy, Robert; Sciabarrasi, Michael; Calderwood, William

    2003-04-01

    A perimeter trap crop barrier of hot cherry peppers, border-row insecticide applications, and a combination of the two management strategies were evaluated to see if they could protect a centrally located main crop of bell peppers from oviposition and infestation by the pepper maggot, Zonosemata electa (Say). In large plots, the main cash crop of bell peppers was protected from the majority of the oviposition and infestation by all three barriers. The combination sprayed/trap crop barrier provided the best protection against both oviposition and infestation and resulted in over 98% pest-free fruit at harvest. Maggots infested only 1.7% of the main crop fruit when protected by a sprayed or unsprayed trap crop barrier, compared with 15.4% in control plots. The perimeter sprayed/trap crop strategy was employed in three commercial fields in 2000 and 2001. The combination barrier resulted in superior insect control and reduced insecticide use at all commercial locations, compared with the same farms' past history or to farms using conventional and integrated pest management (IPM) methods. Economic analysis showed that the technique is more cost effective and profitable than relying on whole-field insecticide applications to control the pepper maggot. Farmer users were surveyed and found the perimeter trap crop technique simple to use, with many hard-to-measure benefits associated with worker protection issues, marketing, personnel/management relations, pest control and the environment. Use of the perimeter trap crop technique as part of an IPM or organic program can help improve crop quality and overall farm profitability, while reducing pesticide use and the possibility of secondary pest outbreaks.

  6. CaWRKY58, encoding a group I WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, negatively regulates resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuna; Dang, Fengfeng; Liu, Zhiqin; Wang, Xu; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Yu, Lu; She, Jianju; Shi, Youliang; Lin, Jinhui; Chen, Chengcong; Guan, Deyi; Qiu, Ailian; He, Shuilin

    2013-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by large gene families across the plant kingdom. So far, their biological and molecular functions in nonmodel plants, including pepper (Capsicum annuum) and other Solanaceae, remain poorly understood. Here, we report on the functional characterization of a new group I WRKY protein from pepper, termed CaWRKY58. Our data indicate that CaWRKY58 can be localized to the nucleus and can activate the transcription of the reporter β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the 35S core promoter with two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. In pepper plants infected with the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, CaWRKY58 transcript levels showed a biphasic response, manifested in an early/transient down-regulation and late up-regulation. CaWRKY58 transcripts were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid. Tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY58 did not show any obvious morphological phenotypes, but exhibited disease symptoms of greater severity than did wild-type plants. The enhanced susceptibility of CaWRKY58-overexpressing tobacco plants correlated with the decreased expression of hypersensitive response marker genes, as well as various defence-associated genes. Consistently, CaWRKY58 pepper plants silenced by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) displayed enhanced resistance to the highly virulent R. solanacearum strain FJC100301, and this was correlated with enhanced transcripts of defence-related pepper genes. Our results suggest that CaWRKY58 acts as a transcriptional activator of negative regulators in the resistance of pepper to R. solanacearum infection.

  7. Overexpression of CaWRKY27, a subgroup IIe WRKY transcription factor of Capsicum annuum, positively regulates tobacco resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum infection.

    PubMed

    Dang, Fengfeng; Wang, Yuna; She, Jianju; Lei, Yufen; Liu, Zhiqin; Eulgem, Thomas; Lai, Yan; Lin, Jing; Yu, Lu; Lei, Dan; Guan, Deyi; Li, Xia; Yuan, Qian; He, Shuilin

    2014-03-01

    WRKY proteins are encoded by a large gene family and are linked to many biological processes across a range of plant species. The functions and underlying mechanisms of WRKY proteins have been investigated primarily in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice. The roles of these transcription factors in non-model plants, including pepper and other Solanaceae, are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the expression and function of a subgroup IIe WRKY protein from pepper (Capsicum annuum), denoted as CaWRKY27. The protein localized to nuclei and activated the transcription of a reporter GUS gene construct driven by the 35S promoter that contained two copies of the W-box in its proximal upstream region. Inoculation of pepper cultivars with Ralstonia solanacearum induced the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in 76a, a bacterial wilt-resistant pepper cultivar, whereas it downregulated the expression of CaWRKY27 transcript in Gui-1-3, a bacterial wilt-susceptible pepper cultivar. CaWRKY27 transcript levels were also increased by treatments with salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and ethephon (ETH). Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CaWRKY27 exhibited resistance to R. solanacearum infection compared to that of wild-type plants. This resistance was coupled with increased transcript levels in a number of marker genes, including hypersensitive response genes, and SA-, JA- and ET-associated genes. By contrast, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaWRKY27 increased the susceptibility of pepper plants to R. solanacearum infection. These results suggest that CaWRKY27 acts as a positive regulator in tobacco resistance responses to R. solanacearum infection through modulation of SA-, JA- and ET-mediated signaling pathways.

  8. Expression analysis of transcription factors from the interaction between cacao and Moniliophthora perniciosa (Tricholomataceae).

    PubMed

    Lopes, M A; Hora, B T; Dias, C V; Santos, G C; Gramacho, K P; Cascardo, J C M; Gesteira, A S; Micheli, F

    2010-07-06

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is one of the most important tropical crops; however, production is threatened by numerous pathogens, including the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, which causes witches' broom disease. To understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of this disease in cacao, we focused our attention on cacao transcription factors (TFs), which act as master regulators of cellular processes and are important for the fine-tuning of plant defense responses. We developed a macroarray with 88 TF cDNA from previously obtained cacao-M. perniciosa interaction libraries. Seventy-two TFs were found differentially expressed between the susceptible (Catongo) and resistant (TSH1188) genotypes and/or during the disease time course--from 24 h to 30 days after infection. Most of the differentially expressed TFs belonged to the bZIP, MYB and WRKY families and presented opposite expression patterns in susceptible and resistant cacao-M. perniciosa interactions (i.e., up-regulated in Catongo and down-regulated in TSH1188). The results of the macroarray were confirmed for bZIP and WRKY TFs by real-time PCR. These differentially expressed TFs are good candidates for subsequent functional analysis as well as for plant engineering. Some of these TFs could also be localized on the cacao reference map related to witches' broom resistance, facilitating the breeding and selection of resistant cacao trees.

  9. Postharvest responses of red and yellow sweet peppers grown under photo-selective nets.

    PubMed

    Selahle, Kamogelo M; Sivakumar, Dharini; Jifon, John; Soundy, Puffy

    2015-04-15

    Postharvest responses of red ('HTSP-3') and yellow ('Celaya') sweet pepper fruit yield, quality parameters and bioactive compounds (to three types of photo-selective nets and a standard black net) were investigated in this study. Red and yellow peppers produced under the black net retained higher β-carotene, lower total phenolic contents and showed deep red and orange colour after storage. Both peppers produced under the pearl net retained a higher ascorbic content, antioxidant scavenging activity, fruit firmness and also reduced weight loss after storage. Red and yellow peppers grown under pearl and yellow nets resulted in a higher percentage of marketable fruit, after storage. Red pepper grown under the yellow net showed a higher number of odour active aroma compounds in the fruit, while black nets significantly affected the synthesis of odour active aroma compounds during storage. Sensory analysis indicated a preference for red pepper fruits after storage from plants grown under pearl nets.

  10. Key Microbiota Identification Using Functional Gene Analysis during Pepper (Piper nigrum L.) Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-01-01

    Pepper pericarp microbiota plays an important role in the pepper peeling process for the production of white pepper. We collected pepper samples at different peeling time points from Hainan Province, China, and used a metagenomic approach to identify changes in the pericarp microbiota based on functional gene analysis. UniFrac distance-based principal coordinates analysis revealed significant changes in the pericarp microbiota structure during peeling, which were attributed to increases in bacteria from the genera Selenomonas and Prevotella. We identified 28 core operational taxonomic units at each time point, mainly belonging to Selenomonas, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Anaerovibrio, and Clostridium genera. The results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the functional level, we observed significant increases in microbial features related to acetyl xylan esterase and pectinesterase for pericarp degradation during peeling. These findings offer a new insight into biodegradation for pepper peeling and will promote the development of the white pepper industry. PMID:27768750

  11. Antioxidant, Antinociceptive, and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Carotenoids Extracted from Dried Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Marcela; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Hernández-Navarro, María Dolores; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Dorantes-Alvarez, Lidia; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids extracted from dried peppers were evaluated for their antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Peppers had a substantial carotenoid content: guajillo 3406 ± 4 μg/g, pasilla 2933 ± 1 μg/g, and ancho 1437 ± 6 μg/g of sample in dry weight basis. A complex mixture of carotenoids was discovered in each pepper extract. The TLC analysis revealed the presence of chlorophylls in the pigment extract from pasilla and ancho peppers. Guajillo pepper carotenoid extracts exhibited good antioxidant activity and had the best scavenging capacity for the DPPH+ cation (24.2%). They also exhibited significant peripheral analgesic activity at 5, 20, and 80 mg/kg and induced central analgesia at 80 mg/kg. The results suggest that the carotenoids in dried guajillo peppers have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory benefits and could be useful for pain and inflammation relief. PMID:23091348

  12. Tumor cell growth inhibition is correlated with levels of capsaicin present in hot peppers.

    PubMed

    Dou, Dan; Ahmad, Aamir; Yang, Huanjie; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2011-01-01

    There are conflicting reports with regard to the value of hot peppers and their primary active component compound, capsaicin, as an anticancer agent. We tested extracts from a number of peppers and found them to induce significant growth arrest and apoptosis in human breast and leukemia cancer cell lines in vitro with no significant effect on normal breast epithelial cells. Further, cell growth inhibition and cell death induction were positively correlated with the capsaicin content (based on the Scoville scale) of the peppers, and the hydroxyl radical scavenger thiourea significantly inhibited the activity of pepper extracts, suggesting the involvement of free radicals in mediating the biological activity of the pepper extracts. These results suggest a potential use of pepper extracts as anticancer agents.

  13. A case of acute myocardial infarction due to the use of cayenne pepper pills.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Muhammet Rasit; Karabag, Turgut; Dogan, Sait Mesut; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Aydin, Mustafa

    2012-04-01

    The use of weight loss pills containing cayenne pepper has ever been increasing. The main component of cayenne pepper pills is capsaicin. There are conflicting data about the effects of capsaicin on the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we present the case of a 41 year old male patient with no cardiovascular risk factors who took cayenne pepper pills to lose weight and developed acute myocardial infarction.

  14. A novel F-box protein CaF-box is involved in responses to plant hormones and abiotic stress in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rugang; Guo, Weili; Yin, Yanxu; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2014-02-10

    The F-box protein family is characterized by an F-box motif that has been shown to play an important role in regulating various developmental processes and stress responses. In this study, a novel F-box-containing gene was isolated from leaves of pepper cultivar P70 (Capsicum annuum L.) and designated CaF-box. The full-length cDNA is 2088 bp and contains an open reading frame of 1914 bp encoding a putative polypeptide of 638 amino acids with a mass of 67.8 kDa. CaF-box was expressed predominantly in stems and seeds, and the transcript was markedly upregulated in response to cold stress, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) treatment, and downregulated under osmotic and heavy metal stress. CaF-box expression was dramatically affected by salt stress, and was rapidly increased for the first hour, then sharply decreased thereafter. In order to further assess the role of CaF-box in the defense response to abiotic stress, a loss-of-function experiment in pepper plants was performed using a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique. Measurement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage revealed stronger lipid peroxidation and cell death in the CaF-box-silenced plants than in control plants, suggesting CaF-box plays an important role in regulating the defense response to abiotic stress resistance in pepper plants.

  15. Pepper pectin methylesterase inhibitor protein CaPMEI1 is required for antifungal activity, basal disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    An, Soo Hyun; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, In Sun; Lee, Sung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Pectin is one of the main components of the plant cell wall that functions as the primary barrier against pathogens. Among the extracellular pectinolytic enzymes, pectin methylesterase (PME) demethylesterifies pectin, which is secreted into the cell wall in a highly methylesterified form. Here, we isolated and functionally characterized the pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) gene CaPMEI1, which encodes a pectin methylesterase inhibitor protein (PMEI), in pepper leaves infected by Xanthomonascampestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPMEI1 transcripts are localized in the xylem of vascular bundles in leaf tissues, and pathogens and abiotic stresses can induce differential expression of this gene. Purified recombinant CaPMEI1 protein not only inhibits PME, but also exhibits antifungal activity against some plant pathogenic fungi. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaPMEI1 in pepper confers enhanced susceptibility to Xcv, accompanied by suppressed expression of some defense-related genes. Transgenic ArabidopsisCaPMEI1-overexpression lines exhibit enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, mannitol and methyl viologen, but not to the biotrophic pathogen Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Together, these results suggest that CaPMEI1, an antifungal protein, may be involved in basal disease resistance, as well as in drought and oxidative stress tolerance in plants. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00425-008-0719-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18327607

  16. Contributions of transcription and mRNA decay to gene expression dynamics of fission yeast in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Marguerat, Samuel; Lawler, Katherine; Brazma, Alvis; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels of control to shape gene regulation is only partially understood. Here we show that a combination of two simple and non-invasive genomic techniques, coupled with kinetic mathematical modeling, affords insight into the intricate dynamics of RNA regulation in response to oxidative stress in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study reveals a dominant role of transcriptional regulation in response to stress, but also points to the first minutes after stress induction as a critical time when the coordinated control of mRNA turnover can support the control of transcription for rapid gene regulation. In addition, we uncover specialized gene expression strategies associated with distinct functional gene groups, such as simultaneous transcriptional repression and mRNA destabilization for genes encoding ribosomal proteins, delayed mRNA destabilization with varying contribution of transcription for ribosome biogenesis genes, dominant roles of mRNA stabilization for genes functioning in protein degradation, and adjustment of both transcription and mRNA turnover during the adaptation to stress. We also show that genes regulated independently of the bZIP transcription factor Atf1p are predominantly controlled by mRNA turnover, and identify putative cis-regulatory sequences that are associated with different gene expression strategies during the stress response. This study highlights the intricate and multi-faceted interplay between transcription and RNA turnover during the dynamic regulatory response to stress. PMID:25007214

  17. High prevalence of poleroviruses in field-grown pepper in Turkey and Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Buzkan, Nihal; Arpaci, Bülent B; Simon, Vincent; Fakhfakh, Hatem; Moury, Benoît

    2013-04-01

    Open-field pepper crops were sampled in 2011 in Turkey and Tunisia and surveyed for the major pepper-infecting viruses. As expected, potato virus Y and cucumber mosaic virus (in both countries), and tobacco etch virus (in Turkey only) were quite frequent. However, poleroviruses were the most common viruses, with prevalences above 70 %. Partial sequence analyses revealed the occurrence of poleroviruses resembling either beet western yellows virus (BWYV) or pepper vein yellows virus in the sampled areas, with BWYV being predominant in Turkey but in the minority in Tunisia. Poleroviruses should therefore be taken into account in disease control of pepper crops in the Mediterranean area.

  18. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  19. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in chili pepper leaves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Da-Wei; Jin, Jing-Hao; Yin, Yan-Xu; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Chai, Wei-Guo; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, the expression of multiple genes was altered in the silenced leaves. The expression of MYC was significantly lower in CaMYB-silenced leaves, whereas WD40 showed the opposite pattern. Most structural genes including CHS, CHI, F3H, F3′5′H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, ANP, and GST were repressed in CaMYB-silenced foliage with the exception of PAL, C4H, and 4CL. These results indicated that MYB plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic related genes. Besides CaMYB silenced leaves rendered more sporulation of Phytophthora capsici Leonian indicating that CaMYB might be involved in the defense response to pathogens. PMID:26217354

  20. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in chili pepper leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Da-Wei; Jin, Jing-Hao; Yin, Yan-Xu; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Chai, Wei-Guo; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, the expression of multiple genes was altered in the silenced leaves. The expression of MYC was significantly lower in CaMYB-silenced leaves, whereas WD40 showed the opposite pattern. Most structural genes including CHS, CHI, F3H, F3'5'H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, ANP, and GST were repressed in CaMYB-silenced foliage with the exception of PAL, C4H, and 4CL. These results indicated that MYB plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic related genes. Besides CaMYB silenced leaves rendered more sporulation of Phytophthora capsici Leonian indicating that CaMYB might be involved in the defense response to pathogens. PMID:26217354

  1. Heterology expression of the sweet pepper CBF3 gene confers elevated tolerance to chilling stress in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha; Tang, Xian-Feng; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Li-Yan; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-10-15

    Various studies have confirmed that the CBF (C-repeat binding factor) family of transcription factors has a key role in regulating many plants' responses to cold stress. Here we isolated CBF3 from sweet pepper (Capsicum frutescens). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein of CfCBF3 was targeted to the nucleus of the onion epidermis cell. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that CfCBF3 was expressed in leaves of sweet pepper and the expression was induced by low temperature, drought and salinity stresses but not by ABA. Overexpression of CfCBF3 under the control of the CaMV35S promoter in tobacco induced expression of orthologs of CBF3-targeted genes and increased chilling tolerance without a dwarf phenotype. Indeed it also led to multiple biochemical and physiological changes associated with chilling stress. Higher levels of proline (Pro) and soluble sugars and lower content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed in transgenic plants. Our results demonstrated that the increase in total unsaturated fatty acids, especially in phosphatidylglycerol (PG) was detected by overexpression of CfCBF3. During exposure to chilling stress, the transgenic lines were less susceptible to chilling-induced photoinhibition than wild-type (WT) plants. These results suggest that overexpression of CfCBF3 led to modification of the fatty acid unsaturation and alleviated the injuries under chilling stress.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10°C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach. Results Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10°C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters. Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2 spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters. Conclusion Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. PMID:20100339

  3. The soybean GmbZIP1 transcription factor enhances multiple abiotic stress tolerances in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi-Qing; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Zhao, Chang-Ping; Li, Liancheng; Xu, Hui-jun; Tang, Yi-miao; Zhao, Xin; Ma, You-Zhi

    2011-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element binding proteins (AREBs) are basic domain/leucine zipper transcription factors that bind to the ABA-responsive element (ABRE) in the promoter regions of ABA-inducible genes in plants. A novel bZIP transcription factor gene, GmbZIP1, encoding 438 amino acids with a conserved bZIP domain composed of 60 amino acids was isolated from salt-tolerant soybean cv. Tiefeng 8. Southern blotting showed that only one copy was present in the soybean genome. Phylogenetic analyses showed that GmbZIP1 belonged to the AREB subfamily of the bZIP family and was most closely related to AtABF2 and OsTRAB1. The expression of GmbZIP1 was highly induced by ABA, drought, high salt and low temperature; and GmbZIP1 was expressed in soybean roots, stems and leaves under different stress conditions. GmbZIP1 was localized inside the nuclei of transformed onion epidermal cells. Overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the responses of transgenic plants to ABA and triggered stomatal closure under stresses, potentially leading to improved tolerances to several abiotic stresses such as high salt, low temperature and drought in transgenic plants. Furthermore, overexpression of GmbZIP1 affected the expression of some ABA or stress-related genes involved in regulating stomatal closure in Arabidopsis under ABA, drought and high salt stress conditions. A few AREB elements were detected in the promoter region of those ABA or stress-related genes, suggesting that GmbZIP1 regulates the ABA response or stomatal closure mediated by those downstream genes in transgenic Arabidopsis. Moreover, GmbZIP1 was used to improve the drought tolerance trait of Chinese wheat varieties BS93. Functional analysis showed that overexpression of GmbZIP1 enhanced the drought tolerance of transgenic wheat, and transcripts of GmbZIP1 were detected in transgenic wheat using RT-PCR. In addition, GmbZIP1 overexpression did not result in growth retardation in all transgenic plants, suggesting that Gmb

  4. Antibacterial mechanism and activities of black pepper chloroform extract.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lan; Hu, Yue-Ying; Chen, Wen-Xue

    2015-12-01

    Black pepper extracts reportedly inhibit food spoilage and food pathogenic bacteria. This study explored the antimicrobial activity of black pepper chloroform extract (BPCE) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial mechanism of BPCE was elucidated by analyzing the cell morphology, respiratory metabolism, pyruvic acid content, and ATP levels of the target bacteria. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the bacterial cells were destroyed and that plasmolysis was induced. BPCE inhibited the tricarboxylic acid pathway of the bacteria. The extract significantly increased pyruvic acid concentration in bacterial solutions and reduced ATP level in bacterial cells. BPCE destroyed the permeability of the cell membrane, which consequently caused metabolic dysfunction, inhibited energy synthesis, and triggered cell death. PMID:26604394

  5. Mixed noble gas effect on cut green peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, L. V.; Zhang, M.; Karangwa, E.; Chesereka, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attempts at using gas which leads to hydrate formation as a preservative tool in fresh-cut fruits and vegetables have been reported. In this study, changes in some physical and biochemical properties of fresh-cut green peppers under compressed noble gas treatments were examined. Mixed argonkrypton and argon treatments were performed before cold storage at 5°C for 15 days. Mass loss and cell membrane permeability were found to be the lowest in mixed argon-krypton samples. Besides, a lower CO2 concentration and vitamin C loss were detected in gastreated samples compared to untreated samples (control). While the total phenol degradation was moderately reduced, the effect of the treatment on polyphenoloxidase activity was better at the beginning of the storage period. The minimum changes in quality observed in cut peppers resulted from both mixed and gas treatment alone.

  6. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV) and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, Aviv; Glanz, Eyal; Lachman, Oded; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Antignus, Yehezkel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV). PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV) and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV) (both poleroviruses). The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs), which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93%) and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%). Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV) contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP), may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2) were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5) and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3) with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s) between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s), resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper: comprehensive sequence and expression profile analysis under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Lu, Jin-Ping; Zhai, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Shu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are present in all plant species and play important roles in alleviating heat stress and enhancing plant thermotolerance by preventing the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. However, very little is known about the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), an important vegetable crop with character of temperate but thermosensitive. In this study, a total of 35 putative pepper Hsp20 genes (CaHsp20s) were identified and renamed on the basis of their molecular weight, and then their gene structure, genome location, gene duplication, phylogenetic relationship, and interaction network were also analyzed. The expression patterns of CaHsp20 genes in four different tissues (root, stem, leaf, and flower) from the thermotolerant line R9 under heat stress condition were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The transcripts of most CaHsp20 genes maintained a low level in all of the four tissues under normal temperature condition, but were highly induced by heat stress, while the expression of CaHsp16.6b, 16.7, and 23.8 were only detected in specific tissues and were not so sensitive to heat stress like other CaHsp20 genes. In addition, compared to those in thermotolerant line R9, the expression peak of most CaHsp20 genes in thermosensitive line B6 under heat stress was hysteretic, and several CaHsp20 genes (CaHsp16.4, 18.2a, 18.7, 21.2, 22.0, 25.8, and 25.9) showed higher expression levels in both line B6 and R9. These data suggest that the CaHsp20 genes may be involved in heat stress and defense responses in pepper, which provides the basis for further functional analyses of CaHsp20s in the formation of pepper acquired thermotoleance. PMID:26483820

  8. The Complete Genomic Sequence of Pepper Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (PYLCV) and Its Implications for Our Understanding of Evolution Dynamics in the Genus Polerovirus

    PubMed Central

    Dombrovsky, Aviv; Glanz, Eyal; Lachman, Oded; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Antignus, Yehezkel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV). PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV) and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV) (both poleroviruses). The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs), which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93%) and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%). Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV) contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP), may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2) were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5) and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3) with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s) between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s), resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range. PMID:23936244

  9. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV) and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, Aviv; Glanz, Eyal; Lachman, Oded; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Antignus, Yehezkel

    2013-01-01

    We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV). PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV) and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV) (both poleroviruses). The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs), which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93%) and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%). Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV) contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP), may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2) were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5) and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3) with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s) between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s), resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range. PMID:23936244

  10. Effects of pepper grenade explosions on non-combatant bystanders.

    PubMed

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Shah, Tajamul H; Bagdadi, Farhana; Khan, Umar Hafiz

    2014-11-01

    Pepper gas is used for riot control in many parts of the world. Yet, its effects on bystanders are largely unreported. We fielded a questionnaire-based survey of 500 bystanders exposed to gas when police used pepper grenades against belligerent 'stone-pelters' in the northern Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir. Of 294 non-combatants who consented to participate in our survey, 97 per cent developed cough and irritation of the throat within few seconds of breathing the pungent smelling gas. They reported respiratory problems, dermatologic symptoms, sleep disturbances, and mood changes with varying frequency. Sixteen reported exacerbations of underlying respiratory disorders, with one temporally related to death. Symptoms led 51 to get medical attention. Nearly all respondents reported that symptoms recurred on re-exposure. We conclude that use of pepper grenades can cause serious acute symptoms in non-combatants accidentally exposed. We recommend alternate methods of riot control - water cannons, baton charges, tasers, plastic or rubber bullets, and so on - that have no collateral side effects on non-combatants be considered for routine use.

  11. Influence of agricultural practices on fruit quality of bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zahra, T R

    2011-09-15

    An experiment was carried out under plastic house conditions to compare the effect of four fermented organic matter sources (cattle, poultry and sheep manure in addition to 1:1:1 mixture of the three organic matter sources) in which 4 kg organic matter m(-2) were used, with that of the conventional agriculture (chemical fertilizers) treatments on Marvello red pepper fruit quality, by using a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replicates. Pepper fruits characteristics cultivated in soil supplemented with manure were generally better than those from plants grown in soil only. Addition of animal manure increased bell pepper fruit content of soluble solids, ascorbic acid, total phenols, crude fibre and intensity of red color as compare with conventional agriculture that produced fruits with higher titratable acidity, water content, lycopene and bigger fruit size. In most cases of animal manure treatments, best results were obtained by the sheep manure treatment that produced the highest TSS, while the worst results were obtained by the poultry manure treatment that produced the smallest fruit and lowest fruit lycopene content.

  12. The Thyroid Hormone Receptor Is a Suppressor of ras-Mediated Transcription, Proliferation, and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    García-Silva, Susana; Aranda, Ana

    2004-01-01

    The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) has a profound effect on growth, differentiation, and metabolism in higher organisms. Here we demonstrate that T3 inhibits ras-induced proliferation in neuroblastoma cells and blocks induction of cyclin D1 expression by the oncogene. The hormone, at physiological concentrations, strongly antagonizes the transcriptional response mediated by the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ribosomal-S6 subunit kinase (Rsk) signaling pathway in cells expressing thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). T3 blocks the response to the oncogenic forms of the three ras isoforms (H-, K-, and N-ras) and both TRα and TRβ can mediate this action. The main target for induction of cyclin D1 transcription by oncogenic ras in neuroblastoma cells is a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) located in proximal promoter sequences, and T3 represses the transcriptional activity of b-Zip transcription factors such as CREB (CRE-binding protein) or ATF-2 (activation transcription factor 2) that are direct targets of Rsk2 and bind to this sequence. The hormone also blocks fibroblast transformation by oncogenic ras when TR is expressed. Furthermore, TRs act as suppressors of tumor formation by the oncogene in vivo in nude mice. The TRβ isoform has stronger antitransforming properties than the α isoform and can inhibit tumorigenesis even in hypothyroid mice. These results show the existence of a previously unrecognized transcriptional cross talk between the TRs and the ras oncogene which influences relevant processes such as cell proliferation, transformation, or tumorigenesis. PMID:15314161

  13. Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V.; Linz, John E.

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive and unequivocal evidence that secondary metabolism in filamentous fungi and plants is associated with oxidative stress. In support of this idea, transcription factors related to oxidative stress response in yeast, plants, and fungi have been shown to participate in controlling secondary metabolism. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one model of secondary metabolism, has been demonstrated to be triggered and intensified by reactive oxygen species buildup. An oxidative stress-related bZIP transcription factor AtfB is a key player in coordinate expression of antioxidant genes and genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Recent findings from our laboratory provide strong support for a regulatory network comprised of at least four transcription factors that bind in a highly coordinated and timely manner to promoters of the target genes and regulate their expression. In this review, we will focus on transcription factors involved in co-regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis with oxidative stress response in aspergilli, and we will discuss the relationship of known oxidative stress-associated transcription factors and secondary metabolism in other organisms. We will also talk about transcription factors that are involved in oxidative stress response, but have not yet been demonstrated to be affiliated with secondary metabolism. The data support the notion that secondary metabolism provides a secondary line of defense in cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:23598564

  14. 76 FR 78231 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Peppers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Vegetables'' (7 CFR 319.56-1 through 319.56-54). Under these regulations, peppers from Costa Rica, El.... Respondents: National plant protection organization officials and growers and shippers of peppers in...

  15. NFATc2 recruits cJun homodimers to an NFAT site to synergistically activate interleukin-2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Walters, Ryan D; Drullinger, Linda F; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2013-11-01

    Transcription of interleukin-2 (IL-2), a pivotal cytokine in the mammalian immune response, is induced by NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional activators in stimulated T cells. NFATc2 and cJun drive high levels of synergistic human IL-2 transcription, which requires a unique interaction between the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 and cJun homodimers. Here we studied the mechanism by which this interaction contributes to synergistic activation of IL-2 transcription. We found that NFATc2 can recruit cJun homodimers to the -45 NFAT element, which lacks a neighboring AP-1 site. The bZip domain of cJun is sufficient to interact with the C-terminal activation domain of NFATc2 in the absence of DNA and this interaction is inhibited by AP-1 DNA. When the -45 NFAT site was replaced by either an NFAT/AP-1 composite site or a single AP-1 site the specificity for cJun homodimers in synergistically activating IL-2 transcription was lost, and cJun/cFos heterodimers strongly activated transcription. These studies support a model in which IL-2 transcriptional synergy is mediated by the unique recruitment of a cJun homodimer to the -45 NFAT site by NFATc2, where it acts as a co-activator for IL-2 transcription.

  16. First Complete Genome Sequence of Pepper vein yellows virus from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the first complete genomic RNA sequence of the polerovirus Pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) obtained from a pepper plant in Australia. We compare it with complete PeVYV genomes from Japan and China. The Australian genome was more closely related to the Japanese than the Chinese genome. PMID:27231375

  17. 509-45-1: A C. annuum Pepper germplasm containing high concentrations of capsinoids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication reports the public release of pepper (Capsicum annuum) germplasm ‘509-45-1’. Pepper germplasm 509-45-1 is a small-fruited, non-pungent single plant selection from PI 645509. Fruit of ‘509-45-1’ contain high concentrations of capsinoids [capsiate ((4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl (E)-8...

  18. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approved production sites. The peppers must be safeguarded by an insect-proof mesh screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit from the production site to the packinghouse and while awaiting packing. The peppers must be packed in insect-proof cartons or containers, or covered with insect-proof mesh or...

  19. 7 CFR 319.56-42 - Peppers from the Republic of Korea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... approved production sites. The peppers must be safeguarded by an insect-proof mesh screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit from the production site to the packinghouse and while awaiting packing. The peppers must be packed in insect-proof cartons or containers, or covered with insect-proof mesh or...

  20. Tospoviruses and Thrips and Integrated Resistance Management Strategies in Pepper in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida ranks second in the production and value of bell pepper in the U.S. In 2015, Florida produced over one-half billion pounds of bell pepper on over 12,000 acres, valued at over 220 million dollars. In recent years, several invasive species of thrips and thrips-vectored tospoviruses have beco...

  1. Effects of vermicomposts produced from food waste on the growth and yields of greenhouse peppers.

    PubMed

    Arancon, Norman Q; Edwards, Clive A; Atiyeh, Rola; Metzger, James D

    2004-06-01

    Vermicomposts, produced commercially from food wastes, were substituted at a range of different concentrations into a soil-less commercial bedding plant container medium, Metro-Mix 360 (MM360), to evaluate their effects on the growth and yields of peppers in the greenhouse. Six-week-old peppers (Capsicum annum L. var. California) were transplanted into 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, 20% or 10% MM360 substituted with 0%, 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% vermicompost. All plants were watered three times weekly with 200 ppm Peter's Nutrient Solution from the time of transplanting up to 107 days. Peppers grown in potting mixtures containing 40% food waste vermicomposts and 60% MM360 yielded 45% more fruit weights and had 17% greater mean number of fruits than those grown in MM360 only. The mean heights, numbers of buds and numbers of flowers of peppers grown in potting mixtures containing 10-80% vermicompost although greater did not differ significantly from those of peppers grown in MM360. There were no positive correlations between the increases in pepper yields, and the amounts of mineral-N and microbial biomass-N in the potting mixtures, or the concentrations of nitrogen in the shoot tissues of peppers. Factors such as: an improvement of the physical structure of the potting medium, increases in populations of beneficial microorganisms and the potential availability of plant growth-influencing-substances produced by microorganisms in vermicomposts, could have contributed to the increased pepper yields obtained. PMID:15051075

  2. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense.

  3. Influence of combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder on production traits of the broilers

    PubMed Central

    Kirubakaran, A.; Moorthy, M.; Chitra, R.; Prabakar, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of combinations of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.), garlic (Allium sativum), and black pepper (Piper nigrum) powder supplementation on production traits of broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: A total of 288 commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1-9 groups with 4 replicates each. An experiment was conducted in broilers with different feed formulations; control feed, with no added fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder; and 8 treatment groups receiving feed supplemented with different combinations of fenugreek, garlic, and black pepper powder. The individual broilers’ body weight and feed consumption were recorded and calculate the body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Results: Broiler’s weight gain and FCR were significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). Cumulative feed consumption was significantly higher in groups receiving feed supplemented with garlic and black pepper powder combinations (p<0.01). Conclusion: The combination of garlic and black pepper powder supplemented broiler feed fed groups showed higher production performance. The 5 g/kg garlic powder+1 g/kg black pepper powder and 10 g/kg garlic powder+2 g/kg black pepper powder significantly improved the weight gain and FCR. PMID:27284222

  4. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and water loss in a diverse collection of pepper (capsicum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruits are covered by a relatively thick coating of cuticle that limits fruit water loss, a trait previously associated with maintenance of post-harvest fruit quality during commercial marketing. We’ve examined the fruit cuticles from 50 diverse pepper genotypes from a world c...

  5. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense. PMID:22791917

  6. Runaway transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A newly demonstrated defect in RNA polymerase II termination caused by 7SK snRNA knockdown may have revealed a novel mechanism uncoupling RNA processing from transcription. Please see related Research article, http://genomebiology.com/2013/14/9/R98 PMID:24079702

  7. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M.; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder. PMID:25582173

  8. Production of methanol from heat-stressed pepper and corn leaf disks

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.A. . Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture)

    1994-05-01

    Early Calwonder'' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and Jubilee'' corn (Zea mays L.) leaf disks exposed to high temperature stress produced ethylene, ethane, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol based on comparison of retention times during gas chromatography to authentic standards. Methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde were also identified by mass spectroscopy. Corn leaf disks produced lower levels of ethylene, ethane, and methanol, but more acetaldehyde and ethanol than pepper. Production of ethane, a by-product of lipid peroxidation, coincided with an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) in pepper but not in corn. Compared with controls, pepper leaf disks infiltrated with linolenic acid evolved significantly greater amounts of ethane, acetaldehyde, and methanol and similar levels of ethanol. EL and volatile hydrocarbon production were not affected by fatty acid infiltration in corn. Infiltration of pepper leaves with buffers increasing in pH from 5.5 to 9.5 increased methanol production.

  9. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-05-01

    Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

  10. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Park, Minkyu; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Yong-Min; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eunyoung; Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Kyongyong; Lee, Gir-Won; Oh, Sang-Keun; Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Shin-Young; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Yang, Hee-Bum; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Won-Hee; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Shin, Chanseok; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, June Hyun; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Byung-Dong; Cohen, Oded; Paran, Ilan; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Saet Buyl; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Shin, Younhee; Noh, Seung-Jae; Park, Junhyung; Seo, Young Sam; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyun A; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Sang-Bong; Bosland, Paul W; Reeves, Gregory; Jo, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Bong-Woo; Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Choi, Hee-Seung; Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Yeisoo; Do Choi, Yang; Park, Beom-Seok; van Deynze, Allen; Ashrafi, Hamid; Hill, Theresa; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Yeam, Inhwa; Giovannoni, James J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Sørensen, Iben; Lee, Sang-Jik; Kim, Ryan W; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Beom-Soon; Lim, Jong-Sung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-03-01

    Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the Americas, is the most widely grown spice crop in the world. We report whole-genome sequencing and assembly of the hot pepper (Mexican landrace of Capsicum annuum cv. CM334) at 186.6× coverage. We also report resequencing of two cultivated peppers and de novo sequencing of the wild species Capsicum chinense. The genome size of the hot pepper was approximately fourfold larger than that of its close relative tomato, and the genome showed an accumulation of Gypsy and Caulimoviridae family elements. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses suggested that change in gene expression and neofunctionalization of capsaicin synthase have shaped capsaicinoid biosynthesis. We found differential molecular patterns of ripening regulators and ethylene synthesis in hot pepper and tomato. The reference genome will serve as a platform for improving the nutritional and medicinal values of Capsicum species.

  11. Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Zerlin, Alona; Li, Zhaoping; Heber, David

    2015-05-01

    Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder. PMID:25582173

  12. Genome sequence of the hot pepper provides insights into the evolution of pungency in Capsicum species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Park, Minkyu; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Yong-Min; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Seo, Eunyoung; Choi, Jaeyoung; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jung, Kyongyong; Lee, Gir-Won; Oh, Sang-Keun; Bae, Chungyun; Kim, Saet-Byul; Lee, Hye-Young; Kim, Shin-Young; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Yang, Hee-Bum; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kang, Won-Hee; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Shin, Chanseok; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, June Hyun; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Byung-Dong; Cohen, Oded; Paran, Ilan; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Saet Buyl; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Shin, Younhee; Noh, Seung-Jae; Park, Junhyung; Seo, Young Sam; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kim, Hyun A; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Sang-Bong; Bosland, Paul W; Reeves, Gregory; Jo, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Bong-Woo; Cho, Hyung-Taeg; Choi, Hee-Seung; Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Yeisoo; Do Choi, Yang; Park, Beom-Seok; van Deynze, Allen; Ashrafi, Hamid; Hill, Theresa; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Yeam, Inhwa; Giovannoni, James J; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Sørensen, Iben; Lee, Sang-Jik; Kim, Ryan W; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Beom-Soon; Lim, Jong-Sung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2014-03-01

    Hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the oldest domesticated crops in the Americas, is the most widely grown spice crop in the world. We report whole-genome sequencing and assembly of the hot pepper (Mexican landrace of Capsicum annuum cv. CM334) at 186.6× coverage. We also report resequencing of two cultivated peppers and de novo sequencing of the wild species Capsicum chinense. The genome size of the hot pepper was approximately fourfold larger than that of its close relative tomato, and the genome showed an accumulation of Gypsy and Caulimoviridae family elements. Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses suggested that change in gene expression and neofunctionalization of capsaicin synthase have shaped capsaicinoid biosynthesis. We found differential molecular patterns of ripening regulators and ethylene synthesis in hot pepper and tomato. The reference genome will serve as a platform for improving the nutritional and medicinal values of Capsicum species. PMID:24441736

  13. Black pepper and piperine reduce cholesterol uptake and enhance translocation of cholesterol transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Duangjai, Acharaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Praputbut, Sakonwun; Limpeanchob, Nanteetip

    2013-04-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) lowers blood lipids in vivo and inhibits cholesterol uptake in vitro, and piperine may mediate these effects. To test this, the present study aimed to compare actions of black pepper extract and piperine on (1) cholesterol uptake and efflux in Caco-2 cells, (2) the membrane/cytosol distribution of cholesterol transport proteins in these cells, and (3) the physicochemical properties of cholesterol micelles. Piperine or black pepper extract (containing the same amount of piperine) dose-dependently reduced cholesterol uptake into Caco-2 cells in a similar manner. Both preparations reduced the membrane levels of NPC1L1 and SR-BI proteins but not their overall cellular expression. Micellar cholesterol solubility of lipid micelles was unaffected except by 1 mg/mL concentration of black pepper extract. These data suggest that piperine is the active compound in black pepper and reduces cholesterol uptake by internalizing the cholesterol transporter proteins.

  14. Characterization of Cell-Death-Inducing Members of the Pectate Lyase Gene Family in Phytophthora capsici and Their Contributions to Infection of Pepper.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Zhu, Chunyuan; Ding, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xiaoyan; Morris, Paul F; Tyler, Brett M; Zhang, Xiuguo

    2015-07-01

    Pectate lyases (PL) play a critical role in pectin degradation. PL have been extensively studied in major bacterial and fungal pathogens of a wide range of plant species. However, the contribution of PL to infection by oomycete pathogens remains largely unknown. Here, we cloned 22 full-length pectate lyase (PcPL) genes from a highly aggressive strain of Phytophthora capsici SD33. Of these, PVX agroinfiltration revealed that 12 PcPL genes were found to be highly induced during infection of pepper by SD33 but the induction level was twofold less in a mildly aggressive strain, YN07. The four genes with the highest transcript levels as measured by by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PcPL1, PcPL15, PcPL16, and PcPL20) also produced a severe cell death response following transient expression in pepper leaves but the other eight PcPL genes did not. Overexpression of these four genes increased the virulence of SD33 on pepper slightly, and increased it more substantially during infection of tobacco. Overexpression of the genes in YN07 restored its aggressiveness to near that of SD33. Gene silencing experiments with the 12 PcPL genes produced diverse patterns of silencing of PcPL genes, from which it could be inferred from regression analysis that PcPL1, PcPL16, and PcPL20 could account for nearly all of the contributions of the PcPL genes to virulence.

  15. De novo transcriptome sequencing reveals a considerable bias in the incidence of simple sequence repeats towards the downstream of 'Pre-miRNAs' of black pepper.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Asha, Srinivasan; Mallika, Vijayan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs). We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of '43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs'. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted 'pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs'. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted 'pre-miRNA candidates'. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of 'tandem repeats' in miRNAs.

  16. The industrial melanism mutation in British peppered moths is a transposable element.

    PubMed

    Van't Hof, Arjen E; Campagne, Pascal; Rigden, Daniel J; Yung, Carl J; Lingley, Jessica; Quail, Michael A; Hall, Neil; Darby, Alistair C; Saccheri, Ilik J

    2016-06-01

    Discovering the mutational events that fuel adaptation to environmental change remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. The classroom example of a visible evolutionary response is industrial melanism in the peppered moth (Biston betularia): the replacement, during the Industrial Revolution, of the common pale typica form by a previously unknown black (carbonaria) form, driven by the interaction between bird predation and coal pollution. The carbonaria locus has been coarsely localized to a 200-kilobase region, but the specific identity and nature of the sequence difference controlling the carbonaria-typica polymorphism, and the gene it influences, are unknown. Here we show that the mutation event giving rise to industrial melanism in Britain was the insertion of a large, tandemly repeated, transposable element into the first intron of the gene cortex. Statistical inference based on the distribution of recombined carbonaria haplotypes indicates that this transposition event occurred around 1819, consistent with the historical record. We have begun to dissect the mode of action of the carbonaria transposable element by showing that it increases the abundance of a cortex transcript, the protein product of which plays an important role in cell-cycle regulation, during early wing disc development. Our findings fill a substantial knowledge gap in the iconic example of microevolutionary change, adding a further layer of insight into the mechanism of adaptation in response to natural selection. The discovery that the mutation itself is a transposable element will stimulate further debate about the importance of 'jumping genes' as a source of major phenotypic novelty.

  17. The industrial melanism mutation in British peppered moths is a transposable element.

    PubMed

    Van't Hof, Arjen E; Campagne, Pascal; Rigden, Daniel J; Yung, Carl J; Lingley, Jessica; Quail, Michael A; Hall, Neil; Darby, Alistair C; Saccheri, Ilik J

    2016-06-01

    Discovering the mutational events that fuel adaptation to environmental change remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. The classroom example of a visible evolutionary response is industrial melanism in the peppered moth (Biston betularia): the replacement, during the Industrial Revolution, of the common pale typica form by a previously unknown black (carbonaria) form, driven by the interaction between bird predation and coal pollution. The carbonaria locus has been coarsely localized to a 200-kilobase region, but the specific identity and nature of the sequence difference controlling the carbonaria-typica polymorphism, and the gene it influences, are unknown. Here we show that the mutation event giving rise to industrial melanism in Britain was the insertion of a large, tandemly repeated, transposable element into the first intron of the gene cortex. Statistical inference based on the distribution of recombined carbonaria haplotypes indicates that this transposition event occurred around 1819, consistent with the historical record. We have begun to dissect the mode of action of the carbonaria transposable element by showing that it increases the abundance of a cortex transcript, the protein product of which plays an important role in cell-cycle regulation, during early wing disc development. Our findings fill a substantial knowledge gap in the iconic example of microevolutionary change, adding a further layer of insight into the mechanism of adaptation in response to natural selection. The discovery that the mutation itself is a transposable element will stimulate further debate about the importance of 'jumping genes' as a source of major phenotypic novelty. PMID:27251284

  18. Life history and life tables of Bactericera cockerelli (Homoptera: Psyllidae) on eggplant and bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Bing; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2009-12-01

    The development, survivorship, and fecundity of the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), fed on eggplant (Solanum melongena L., variety Special Hibush) and bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L., variety Capsitrano) were studied in the laboratory at 26.7 +/- 2 degrees C, 70 +/- 5% RH, and at a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. Immature B. cockerelli developed faster (24.1 d) when fed on eggplant than on bell pepper (26.2 d). Survival rates of immature stages from egg to adult emergence were higher on eggplant (50.2%) than on bell pepper (34.6%). The longevity of B. cockerelli female adults fed on bell pepper was similar to that of females fed on eggplant (62.2 versus 55.0 d), but the male adults fed on eggplant lived shorter lives (39.4 d) than those fed on bell pepper (53.9 d). However, the preoviposition and oviposition periods, fecundity, and sex ratio of B. cockerelli fed on eggplant were not different from those fed on bell pepper. The r(m ) value and the finite rate of increase (lambda) of B. cockerelli were higher on eggplant (0.1099 and 1.116, respectively) than on bell pepper (0.0884 and 1.0924, respectively). Mean generation time and doubling time of B. cockerelli were shorter on eggplant (40.4 and 6.3 d, respectively) than on bell pepper (46.1 and 7.8 d, respectively). In contrast, lifetime fecundity of B. cockerelli was greater on bell pepper (227.3 offspring) than on eggplant (186.5 offspring). Based on these life history parameters, we concluded that B. cockerelli performed better on eggplant than on bell pepper.

  19. Effects of grilling on luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) content in sweet green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Durucasu, Inci; Tokuşoğlu, Ozlem

    2007-10-01

    The content of luteloin in green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) produced in Turkey were determined by RP-HPLC with DAD detection. The luteloin (3',4',5,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone) content of green pepper samples were 46.00 +/- 0.76 mg kg(-1) f.w. (average). The alterations of luteloin concentrations with heating process (grilling, közleme) and the loss of luteloin amount were also determined. Luteolin contents of grilled peppers were found as 29.96 +/- 0.96 mg kg(-1) f.w. The method was objective and reproducible for accurate detection of luteloin in green pepper and other pepper varieties.

  20. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  1. The grapevine VvibZIPC22 transcription factor is involved in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Malacarne, Giulia; Coller, Emanuela; Czemmel, Stefan; Vrhovsek, Urska; Engelen, Kristof; Goremykin, Vadim; Bogs, Jochen; Moser, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In grapevine, flavonoids constitute one of the most abundant subgroups of secondary metabolites, influencing the quality, health value, and typicity of wines. Their synthesis in many plant species is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level by modulation of flavonoid pathway genes either by single regulators or by complexes of different regulators. In particular, bZIP and MYB factors interact synergistically in the recognition of light response units present in the promoter of some genes of the pathway, thus mediating light-dependent flavonoid biosynthesis. We recently identified VvibZIPC22, a member of clade C of the grapevine bZIP family, in a quantitative trait locus (QTL) specifically associated with kaemperol content in mature berries. Here, to validate the involvement of this candidate gene in the fine regulation of flavonol biosynthesis, we characterized its function by in vitro and in vivo experiments. A role for this gene in the control of flavonol biosynthesis was indeed confirmed by its highest expression at flowering and during UV light-mediated induction, paralleled by accumulation of the flavonol synthase 1 transcript and flavonol compounds. The overexpression of VvibZIPC22 in tobacco caused a significant increase in several flavonoids in the flower, via induction of general and specific genes of the pathway. In agreement with this evidence, VvibZIPC22 was able to activate the promoters of specific genes of the flavonoid pathway, alone or together with other factors, as revealed by transient reporter assays. These findings, supported by in silico indications, allowed us to propose VvibZIPC22 as a new regulator of flavonoid biosynthesis in grapevine. PMID:27194742

  2. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J.; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  3. Molecular characterization of pepper germin-like protein as the novel PR-16 family of pathogenesis-related proteins isolated during the resistance response to viral and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Shin, Yun-Chul; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Boo-Ja; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-09-01

    To understand the molecular defense mechanism controlling the hypersensitive response (HR) better, we examined the hot pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bugang), which exhibits an HR in response to infection by Tobacco mosaic virus pathotype P0 (TMV-P0). A full-length cDNA clone was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library that was constructed with mRNA extracted from hot pepper leaves during the resistance response to TMV-P0. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone exhibited a high sequence similarity to germin-like protein (GLP). The CaGLP1 (Capsicum annuum GLP1) cDNA contains a single open reading frame of 660 bp encoding 220 amino acid residues. Upon inoculation with TMV or Xanthomonas, CaGLP1 transcripts were specifically accumulated in the incompatible interaction but not in the compatible interaction. In plants treated with salicylic acid (SA) or ethephon, which are signal molecules in the defense-related signal transduction pathway, CaGLP1 transcripts were accumulated rapidly. As far as we know, this is the first report that plant GLPs can be specifically induced during a defense response against viral infection. These data suggest that in the hot pepper plant CaGLP1 may be involved in the defense response to viral pathogens, and thus be classified as a new family of PR proteins, 'PR-16'.

  4. Prehispanic use of chili peppers in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Powis, Terry G; Gallaga Murrieta, Emiliano; Lesure, Richard; Lopez Bravo, Roberto; Grivetti, Louis; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2013-01-01

    The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin). No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE-300 CE). Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids. PMID:24236083

  5. Prehispanic Use of Chili Peppers in Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Terry G.; Gallaga Murrieta, Emiliano; Lesure, Richard; Lopez Bravo, Roberto; Grivetti, Louis; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin). No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE–300 CE). Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids. PMID:24236083

  6. Compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsicion pepper in potting trials.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Marenco, M; Gullino, M L; Garibaldi, A

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of soil-borne plant diseases with composts has been widely studied. Composts suppressive to soil-borne pathogens have been detected in various cropping systems. Vegetable plants are generally propagated in pots, allowing the use of suppressive substrates to control zoospore-producing pathogens, like Phytophthora sp. The objective of the present work was to assess compost suppressiveness against Phytophthora capsici on pepper (cv. Corno di Toro). A municipal compost showing a good suppressive activity in previous trials on vegetable crops was used. Compost was mixed at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) with a commercial peat substrate, used as control. Substrates have been inoculated at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/l with wheat and hemp kernels infested with P. capsici and after one week 10 plants were transplanted for each treatment in 4 trays of 10 liters volume capacity and placed in greenhouse at 20 degrees C. Diseased plants were assessed weekly after transplanting and above-ground biomass of plants was assessed at the end of the trials. Compost applied at 80% significantly controlled the disease at high inoculum density (1 g/l), while at lower inoculums density, 0.25 and 0.5 g/l, reduced compost applications, 40% and 60% respectively, were sufficient to significantly control the disease. The application of compost at 20%, in absence of the pathogen, increased the biomass of pepper plants compared to control. The use of compost based substrates can be a suitable strategy for controlling soil-borne diseases on pepper, but results depends on application rates.

  7. Prehispanic use of chili peppers in Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Powis, Terry G; Gallaga Murrieta, Emiliano; Lesure, Richard; Lopez Bravo, Roberto; Grivetti, Louis; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W

    2013-01-01

    The genus Capsicum is New World in origin and represents a complex of a wide variety of both wild and domesticated taxa. Peppers or fruits of Capsicum species rarely have been identified in the paleoethnobotanical record in either Meso- or South America. We report here confirmation of Capsicum sp. residues from pottery samples excavated at Chiapa de Corzo in southern Mexico dated from Middle to Late Preclassic periods (400 BCE to 300 CE). Residues from 13 different pottery types were collected and extracted using standard techniques. Presence of Capsicum was confirmed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS-MS Analysis. Five pottery types exhibited chemical peaks for Capsicum when compared to the standard (dihydrocapsaicin). No peaks were observed in the remaining eight samples. Results of the chemical extractions provide conclusive evidence for Capsicum use at Chiapas de Corzo during a 700 year period (400 BCE-300 CE). Presence of Capsicum in different types of culinary-associated pottery raises questions how chili pepper could have been used during this early time period. As Pre-Columbian cacao products sometimes were flavored using Capsicum, the same pottery sample set was tested for evidence of cacao using a theobromine marker: these results were negative. As each vessel that tested positive for Capsicum had a culinary use we suggest here the possibility that chili residues from the Chiapas de Corzo pottery samples reflect either paste or beverage preparations for religious, festival, or every day culinary use. Alternatively, some vessels that tested positive merely could have been used to store peppers. Most interesting from an archaeological context was the presence of Capsicum residue obtained from a spouted jar, a pottery type previously thought only to be used for pouring liquids.

  8. Interferon-γ Promotes Inflammation and Development of T-Cell Lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitagami, Yu; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Kinosada, Haruka; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an etiological agent of several inflammatory diseases and a T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene that is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, and it has multiple functions on T-cell signaling pathways. HBZ has important roles in HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, since HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice develop systemic inflammation and T-cell lymphomas, which are similar phenotypes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. We showed previously that in HBZ-Tg mice, HBZ causes unstable Foxp3 expression, leading to an increase in regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the consequent induction of IFN-γ-producing cells, which in turn leads to the development of inflammation in the mice. In this study, we show that the severity of inflammation is correlated with the development of lymphomas in HBZ-Tg mice, suggesting that HBZ-mediated inflammation is closely linked to oncogenesis in CD4+ T cells. In addition, we found that IFN-γ-producing cells enhance HBZ-mediated inflammation, since knocking out IFN-γ significantly reduced the incidence of dermatitis as well as lymphoma. Recent studies show the critical roles of the intestinal microbiota in the development of Tregs in vivo. We found that even germ-free HBZ-Tg mice still had an increased number of Tregs and IFN-γ-producing cells, and developed dermatitis, indicating that an intrinsic activity of HBZ evokes aberrant T-cell differentiation and consequently causes inflammation. These results show that immunomodulation by HBZ is implicated in both inflammation and oncogenesis, and suggest a causal connection between HTLV-1-associated inflammation and ATL. PMID:26296091

  9. Effect of Red Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) Powder or Red Pepper Pigment on the Performance and Egg Yolk Color of Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huaqiang; Jin, Liji; Wu, Feifei; Thacker, Philip; Li, Xiaoyu; You, Jiansong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Sizhao; Li, Shuying; Xu, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of red pepper (Capsicum frutescens) powder or red pepper pigment on the performance and egg yolk color of laying hens. In Exp. 1, 210, thirty-wk old, Hy-line Brown laying hens were fed one of seven diets containing 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.0, 4.8 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment or 0.3 ppm carophyll red. Each diet was fed to three replicate batteries of hens with each battery consisting of a row of five cages of hens with two hens per cage (n = 3). In Exp. 2, 180, thirty-wk old, Hyline Brown laying hens, housed similarly to those in Exp. 1, were fed an unsupplemented basal diet as well as treatments in which the basal diet was supplemented with 0.8% red pepper powder processed in a laboratory blender to an average particle size of 300 μm, 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill (44 μm) and finally 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill but mixed with 5% Na2CO3 either before or after grinding. A diet supplemented with 0.3 ppm carophyll red pigment was also included (n = 3). In both experiments, hens were fed the red pepper powder or pigment for 14 days. After feeding of the powder or pigment was terminated, all hens were fed the basal diet for eight more days to determine if the dietary treatments had any residual effects. In Exp. 1, there were no differences in egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio due to inclusion of red pepper pigment in the diet. Average egg weight was higher (p<0.05) for birds fed 1.2, 2.4 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment than for birds fed the diet containing 0.3 ppm red pepper pigment. On d 14, egg color scores increased linearly as the level of red pepper pigment in the diet increased. In Exp. 2, feeding red pepper powder did not affect egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio (p>0.05). However, compared with the control group, supplementation with all of the red pepper

  10. Effect of Red Pepper (Capsicum frutescens) Powder or Red Pepper Pigment on the Performance and Egg Yolk Color of Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaqiang; Jin, Liji; Wu, Feifei; Thacker, Philip; Li, Xiaoyu; You, Jiansong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Sizhao; Li, Shuying; Xu, Yongping

    2012-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of red pepper (Capsicum frutescens) powder or red pepper pigment on the performance and egg yolk color of laying hens. In Exp. 1, 210, thirty-wk old, Hy-line Brown laying hens were fed one of seven diets containing 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.0, 4.8 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment or 0.3 ppm carophyll red. Each diet was fed to three replicate batteries of hens with each battery consisting of a row of five cages of hens with two hens per cage (n = 3). In Exp. 2, 180, thirty-wk old, Hyline Brown laying hens, housed similarly to those in Exp. 1, were fed an unsupplemented basal diet as well as treatments in which the basal diet was supplemented with 0.8% red pepper powder processed in a laboratory blender to an average particle size of 300 μm, 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill (44 μm) and finally 0.8% red pepper powder processed as a super fine powder with a vibrational mill but mixed with 5% Na2CO3 either before or after grinding. A diet supplemented with 0.3 ppm carophyll red pigment was also included (n = 3). In both experiments, hens were fed the red pepper powder or pigment for 14 days. After feeding of the powder or pigment was terminated, all hens were fed the basal diet for eight more days to determine if the dietary treatments had any residual effects. In Exp. 1, there were no differences in egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio due to inclusion of red pepper pigment in the diet. Average egg weight was higher (p<0.05) for birds fed 1.2, 2.4 or 9.6 ppm red pepper pigment than for birds fed the diet containing 0.3 ppm red pepper pigment. On d 14, egg color scores increased linearly as the level of red pepper pigment in the diet increased. In Exp. 2, feeding red pepper powder did not affect egg-laying performance, feed consumption or feed conversion ratio (p>0.05). However, compared with the control group, supplementation with all of the red pepper

  11. A male sterile pepper (C. annuum L.) mutant.

    PubMed

    Daskaloff, S

    1968-08-01

    1. After treatment of dry seeds of red pepperCapsicum annuum L. with X-rays a male-sterile mutant was discovered in the M2. 2. The male-sterile mutant segregates in a ratio of 3.28:1 (χ(2)=3.148, probability 0.07). 3. After an alternative cultivation of male-sterile plants and of a variety with good combining ability relatively good fruit-setting and seed production was obtained. 4. Grafting of male-sterile scions to normal stocks does not affect the male-sterile phenotype.

  12. Dynamics of the chili pepper transcriptome during fruit development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The set of all mRNA molecules present in a cell constitute the transcriptome. The transcriptome varies depending on cell type as well as in response to internal and external stimuli during development. Here we present a study of the changes that occur in the transcriptome of chili pepper fruit during development and ripening. Results RNA-Seq was used to obtain transcriptomes of whole Serrano-type chili pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L.; ‘Tampiqueño 74’) collected at 10, 20, 40 and 60 days after anthesis (DAA). 15,550,468 Illumina MiSeq reads were assembled de novo into 34,066 chili genes. We classified the expression patterns of individual genes as well as genes grouped into Biological Process ontologies and Metabolic Pathway categories using statistical criteria. For the analyses of gene groups we added the weighted expression of individual genes. This method was effective in interpreting general patterns of expression changes and increased the statistical power of the analyses. We also estimated the variation in diversity and specialization of the transcriptome during chili pepper development. Approximately 17% of genes exhibited a significant change of expression in at least one of the intervals sampled. In contrast, significant differences in approximately 63% of the Biological Processes and 80% of the Metabolic Pathways studied were detected in at least one interval. Confirming previous reports, genes related to capsaicinoid and ascorbic acid biosynthesis were significantly upregulated at 20 DAA while those related to carotenoid biosynthesis were highly expressed in the last period of fruit maturation (40–60 DAA). Our RNA-Seq data was validated by examining the expression of nine genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis by qRT-PCR. Conclusions In general, more profound changes in the chili fruit transcriptome were observed in the intervals between 10 to 20 and 40 to 60 DAA. The last interval, between 40 to 60 DAA, included 49% of all

  13. Characterization of a new curtovirus, pepper yellow dwarf virus, from chile pepper and distribution in weed hosts in New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nhan; Creamer, Rebecca; Rascon, Jaime; Belfon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over 4,950 asymptomatic weed samples from more than 20 weed species that are host plants for curtoviruses were collected from ten chile pepper fields in southern New Mexico (NM) during 2003, 2004 and 2005 to identify whether they were infected with curtoviruses and to determine which curtoviruses were distributed in the weed population. Polymerase chain reaction using primers designed to detect a portion of the coat protein (cp) gene were used to detect curtoviruses, and infected plants were further tested for specific curtoviruses using primers designed to detect to a portion of the replication-associated protein (rep) gene. Amplification of the cp gene was successful from 3.7, 1.17, and 1.9% of the weed samples in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively. Seventy-three amplicons from those samples were sequenced and compared to well-characterized curtoviruses. Analysis of the rep nucleotide sequences showed that ~32.9% of the weed isolates tested were closely related to beet mild curly top virus (BMCTV). Approximately 12.4% were closely related to beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV). The rest of the weed isolates (54.7%), which shared a very high level of nucleotide sequence identity to each other, represent a new curtovirus species. Using eight primers designed for PCR, complete genomes of three curtoviruses isolated from chile pepper samples representing the three groups of curtoviruses in southern New Mexico were sequenced. Comparisons of whole sequences of the genomes revealed that the DG2SW171601 isolate (2,929 nucleotides) was nearly identical to BMCTV-W4 (~98% nucleotide sequence identity). The LRME27601 isolate (2,927 nucleotides) was most closely related to BSCTV (~92% nucleotide sequence identity). The LJN17601 isolate (2,959 nucleotides) shared only from 49.9 to 88.8% nucleotide sequence identity with other well-characterized curtoviruses. Based on the accepted cut-off of 89%, we propose that the LJN17601 isolate is a member of a new curtovirus species

  14. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-08-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15:1, 9:7 or 3:1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of cultivated and wild peppers provides insights into Capsicum domestication and specialization.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng; Yu, Changshui; Shen, Yaou; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lang; Min, Jiumeng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Shancen; Xu, Meng; Luo, Yong; Yang, Yulan; Wu, Zhiming; Mao, Likai; Wu, Haiyang; Ling-Hu, Changying; Zhou, Huangkai; Lin, Haijian; González-Morales, Sandra; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L; Tian, Hao; Tang, Xin; Zhao, Maojun; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Anwei; Yao, Xiaoming; Cui, Junjie; Li, Wenqi; Chen, Zhe; Feng, Yongqiang; Niu, Yongchao; Bi, Shimin; Yang, Xiuwei; Li, Weipeng; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Xirong; Montes-Hernández, Salvador; Leyva-González, Marco A; Xiong, Zhiqiang; He, Xiujing; Bai, Lijun; Tan, Shu; Tang, Xiangqun; Liu, Dan; Liu, Jinwen; Zhang, Shangxing; Chen, Maoshan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Liao, Weiqin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Min; Lv, Xiaodan; Wen, Bo; Liu, Hongjun; Luan, Hemi; Zhang, Yonggang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaodian; Xu, Jiaohui; Li, Xueqin; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Junyi; Palloix, Alain; Bosland, Paul W; Li, Yingrui; Krogh, Anders; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Yin, Ye; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-04-01

    As an economic crop, pepper satisfies people's spicy taste and has medicinal uses worldwide. To gain a better understanding of Capsicum evolution, domestication, and specialization, we present here the genome sequence of the cultivated pepper Zunla-1 (C. annuum L.) and its wild progenitor Chiltepin (C. annuum var. glabriusculum). We estimate that the pepper genome expanded ∼0.3 Mya (with respect to the genome of other Solanaceae) by a rapid amplification of retrotransposons elements, resulting in a genome comprised of ∼81% repetitive sequences. Approximately 79% of 3.48-Gb scaffolds containing 34,476 protein-coding genes were anchored to chromosomes by a high-density genetic map. Comparison of cultivated and wild pepper genomes with 20 resequencing accessions revealed molecular footprints of artificial selection, providing us with a list of candidate domestication genes. We also found that dosage compensation effect of tandem duplication genes probably contributed to the pungent diversification in pepper. The Capsicum reference genome provides crucial information for the study of not only the evolution of the pepper genome but also, the Solanaceae family, and it will facilitate the establishment of more effective pepper breeding programs.

  16. Regulation of Black Pepper Inflorescence Quantity by Shading at Different Growth Stages.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chao; Wu, Guiping; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Jianfeng; Wang, Can; Yu, Huan; Wu, Huasong

    2016-07-01

    Black pepper is a perennial plant that can bloom throughout the year. It is generally expected that pepper inflorescence quantity could be minimized at the nonfull-bloom stage. The objective of this study was to find an appropriate shading measure that could inhibit blooming at other growing stages except the full-bloom stage and did not cause any reduction in pepper yield and quality. In this study, pepper trees were shaded up to 15%, 30%, 60% and 75%, respectively, and the inflorescence quantity, photosynthetic characteristics, pepper yield and quality traits were investigated at every growing stage. The results showed that the effect of shading on pepper yield decreased as time progressed. Shading treatment did not alter the composition of piperine and volatile oil, but reduced the moisture content. Based on the correlation between photosynthetic parameter and inflorescence number, the appropriate shading intensities for regulating inflorescence quantity at different phenological stages were determined. Moreover, it was found that the regulation of inflorescence quantity could be achieved by controlling leaf temperature during recovery to filling period. This research outcome also will give us some guidelines to develop other management strategies that control leaf temperature and regulate inflorescence quantity to consequently improve pepper yield. PMID:27144907

  17. Induction of Drought Stress Resistance by Multi-Functional PGPR Bacillus licheniformis K11 in Pepper.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Hui; Kim, Sang-Dal

    2013-06-01

    Drought stress is one of the major yield affecting factor for pepper plant. The effects of PGPRs were analyzed in relation with drought resistance. The PGPRs inoculated pepper plants tolerate the drought stress and survived as compared to non-inoculated pepper plants that died after 15 days of drought stress. Variations in protein and RNA accumulation patterns of inoculated and non-inoculated pepper plants subjected to drought conditions for 10 days were confirmed by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and differential display PCR (DD-PCR), respectively. A total of six differentially expressed stress proteins were identified in the treated pepper plants by 2D-PAGE. Among the stress proteins, specific genes of Cadhn, VA, sHSP and CaPR-10 showed more than a 1.5-fold expressed in amount in B. licheniformis K11-treated drought pepper compared to untreated drought pepper. The changes in proteins and gene expression patterns were attributed to the B. licheniformis K11. Accordingly, auxin and ACC deaminase producing PGPR B. licheniformis K11 could reduce drought stress in drought affected regions without the need for overusing agrochemicals and chemical fertilizer. These results will contribute to the development of a microbial agent for organic farming by PGPR. PMID:25288947

  18. Whole-genome sequencing of cultivated and wild peppers provides insights into Capsicum domestication and specialization

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Yu, Changshui; Shen, Yaou; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lang; Min, Jiumeng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Shancen; Xu, Meng; Luo, Yong; Yang, Yulan; Wu, Zhiming; Mao, Likai; Wu, Haiyang; Ling-Hu, Changying; Zhou, Huangkai; Lin, Haijian; González-Morales, Sandra; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L.; Tian, Hao; Tang, Xin; Zhao, Maojun; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Anwei; Yao, Xiaoming; Cui, Junjie; Li, Wenqi; Chen, Zhe; Feng, Yongqiang; Niu, Yongchao; Bi, Shimin; Yang, Xiuwei; Li, Weipeng; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Xirong; Montes-Hernández, Salvador; Leyva-González, Marco A.; Xiong, Zhiqiang; He, Xiujing; Bai, Lijun; Tan, Shu; Tang, Xiangqun; Liu, Dan; Liu, Jinwen; Zhang, Shangxing; Chen, Maoshan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Liao, Weiqin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Min; Lv, Xiaodan; Wen, Bo; Liu, Hongjun; Luan, Hemi; Zhang, Yonggang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaodian; Xu, Jiaohui; Li, Xueqin; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Junyi; Palloix, Alain; Bosland, Paul W.; Li, Yingrui; Krogh, Anders; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Yin, Ye; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    As an economic crop, pepper satisfies people’s spicy taste and has medicinal uses worldwide. To gain a better understanding of Capsicum evolution, domestication, and specialization, we present here the genome sequence of the cultivated pepper Zunla-1 (C. annuum L.) and its wild progenitor Chiltepin (C. annuum var. glabriusculum). We estimate that the pepper genome expanded ∼0.3 Mya (with respect to the genome of other Solanaceae) by a rapid amplification of retrotransposons elements, resulting in a genome comprised of ∼81% repetitive sequences. Approximately 79% of 3.48-Gb scaffolds containing 34,476 protein-coding genes were anchored to chromosomes by a high-density genetic map. Comparison of cultivated and wild pepper genomes with 20 resequencing accessions revealed molecular footprints of artificial selection, providing us with a list of candidate domestication genes. We also found that dosage compensation effect of tandem duplication genes probably contributed to the pungent diversification in pepper. The Capsicum reference genome provides crucial information for the study of not only the evolution of the pepper genome but also, the Solanaceae family, and it will facilitate the establishment of more effective pepper breeding programs. PMID:24591624

  19. Artificial substrates for oviposition and larval development of the pepper weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Addesso, K M; McAuslane, H J; Stansly, P A; Slansky, F; Schuster, D J

    2009-02-01

    The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a major pest of cultivated peppers (Capsicum spp.) and other cultivated and wild species within the family Solanaceae. Laboratory study of this insect, as well as its biological control agents, will be greatly facilitated by an artificial rearing system that does not rely on pepper fruit. An egg collection method and amendments to a standard larval diet were investigated for use in the rearing of this weevil. Spherical sachets made of Parafilm or netting enclosing leaves of pepper, American black nightshade, eggplant, tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco induced oviposition. Tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco leaves were accepted despite the fact that these are not oviposition hosts for pepper weevils in the wild. A standard larval diet formula was modified in an attempt to improve egg hatch, larval survival, developmental time, and adult mass. The diet formula was modified with the addition of freeze-dried jalapeño pepper powder, an additional lipid source, alternate protein sources, and the removal of methyl paraben. None of the aforementioned treatments resulted in a significant improvement over the standard diet. Egg hatch was greater when eggs were incubated on moist paper towels rather than in diet; thus, placement of neonates rather than eggs into diet improved production of adults. Suggestions for more efficient rearing of weevils on the currently available diet and future directions for the development of an artificial rearing system for pepper weevil are discussed. PMID:19253644

  20. Regulation of Black Pepper Inflorescence Quantity by Shading at Different Growth Stages.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chao; Wu, Guiping; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Jianfeng; Wang, Can; Yu, Huan; Wu, Huasong

    2016-07-01

    Black pepper is a perennial plant that can bloom throughout the year. It is generally expected that pepper inflorescence quantity could be minimized at the nonfull-bloom stage. The objective of this study was to find an appropriate shading measure that could inhibit blooming at other growing stages except the full-bloom stage and did not cause any reduction in pepper yield and quality. In this study, pepper trees were shaded up to 15%, 30%, 60% and 75%, respectively, and the inflorescence quantity, photosynthetic characteristics, pepper yield and quality traits were investigated at every growing stage. The results showed that the effect of shading on pepper yield decreased as time progressed. Shading treatment did not alter the composition of piperine and volatile oil, but reduced the moisture content. Based on the correlation between photosynthetic parameter and inflorescence number, the appropriate shading intensities for regulating inflorescence quantity at different phenological stages were determined. Moreover, it was found that the regulation of inflorescence quantity could be achieved by controlling leaf temperature during recovery to filling period. This research outcome also will give us some guidelines to develop other management strategies that control leaf temperature and regulate inflorescence quantity to consequently improve pepper yield.

  1. Genetic diversity in the germplasm of black pepper determined by EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, B D; Fan, R; Hu, L S; Wu, H S; Hao, C Y

    2016-03-18

    This study aimed to assess genetic diversity in the germplasm of black pepper from around the world using SSR markers from EST. In total, 13 markers were selected and successfully amplified the target loci across the black pepper germplasm. All the EST-SSR markers showed high levels of polymorphisms with an average polymorphism information content of 0.93. The genetic similarity coefficients among all accessions ranged from 0.724 to 1.000, with an average of 0.867. These results indicated that black pepper germplasms possess a complex genetic background and high genetic diversity. Based on a cluster analysis, 148 black pepper germplasms were grouped in two major clades: the Neotropics and the Asian tropics. Peperomia pellucida was grouped separately and distantly from all other accessions. These results generally agreed with the genetic and geographic distances. However, the Asian tropics clade did not cluster according to their geographic origins. In addition, compared with the American accessions, the Asian wild accessions and cultivated accessions grouped together, indicating a close genetic relationship. This verified the origin of black pepper. The newly developed EST-SSRs are highly valuable resources for the conservation of black pepper germplasm diversity and for black pepper breeding.

  2. Artificial substrates for oviposition and larval development of the pepper weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Addesso, K M; McAuslane, H J; Stansly, P A; Slansky, F; Schuster, D J

    2009-02-01

    The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a major pest of cultivated peppers (Capsicum spp.) and other cultivated and wild species within the family Solanaceae. Laboratory study of this insect, as well as its biological control agents, will be greatly facilitated by an artificial rearing system that does not rely on pepper fruit. An egg collection method and amendments to a standard larval diet were investigated for use in the rearing of this weevil. Spherical sachets made of Parafilm or netting enclosing leaves of pepper, American black nightshade, eggplant, tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco induced oviposition. Tomato, potato, and jasmine tobacco leaves were accepted despite the fact that these are not oviposition hosts for pepper weevils in the wild. A standard larval diet formula was modified in an attempt to improve egg hatch, larval survival, developmental time, and adult mass. The diet formula was modified with the addition of freeze-dried jalapeño pepper powder, an additional lipid source, alternate protein sources, and the removal of methyl paraben. None of the aforementioned treatments resulted in a significant improvement over the standard diet. Egg hatch was greater when eggs were incubated on moist paper towels rather than in diet; thus, placement of neonates rather than eggs into diet improved production of adults. Suggestions for more efficient rearing of weevils on the currently available diet and future directions for the development of an artificial rearing system for pepper weevil are discussed.

  3. Genetic diversity in the germplasm of black pepper determined by EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, B D; Fan, R; Hu, L S; Wu, H S; Hao, C Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess genetic diversity in the germplasm of black pepper from around the world using SSR markers from EST. In total, 13 markers were selected and successfully amplified the target loci across the black pepper germplasm. All the EST-SSR markers showed high levels of polymorphisms with an average polymorphism information content of 0.93. The genetic similarity coefficients among all accessions ranged from 0.724 to 1.000, with an average of 0.867. These results indicated that black pepper germplasms possess a complex genetic background and high genetic diversity. Based on a cluster analysis, 148 black pepper germplasms were grouped in two major clades: the Neotropics and the Asian tropics. Peperomia pellucida was grouped separately and distantly from all other accessions. These results generally agreed with the genetic and geographic distances. However, the Asian tropics clade did not cluster according to their geographic origins. In addition, compared with the American accessions, the Asian wild accessions and cultivated accessions grouped together, indicating a close genetic relationship. This verified the origin of black pepper. The newly developed EST-SSRs are highly valuable resources for the conservation of black pepper germplasm diversity and for black pepper breeding. PMID:27050963

  4. QTL analysis of fertility restoration in cytoplasmic male sterile pepper.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Zhang, B X; Lefebvre, V; Huang, S W; Daubèze, A M; Palloix, A

    2004-09-01

    Fertility restoration of Peterson's cytoplasmic male-sterility in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is quantitative and environment-dependent. QTL analysis of fertility restoration was performed based on the test-cross progeny of 77013A (a strict cytoplasmic-genetic male sterile line) and a doubled haploid population of 114 lines obtained from an F1 hybrid between Yolo wonder (a sterility maintainer line) and Perennial (a fertility-restorer line). The fertility of the test-crossed lines was assessed under greenhouse and open field conditions using three criteria related to pollen or seed production. One major QTL for fertility restoration was mapped to chromosome P6. It was significant in all the environments and for all the traits, accounting for 20-69% of the phenotypic variation, depending on the trait. Four additional minor QTLs were also detected on chromosomes P5, P2, and linkage groups PY3 and PY1, accounting for 7-17% of the phenotypic variation. Most of the alleles increasing fertility originated from the restorer parent, except for two alleles at minor QTLs. Phenotypic analysis and genetic dissection indicated that breeding pepper for complete sterility of female lines and high hybrid fertility requires complex combinations of alleles from both parents and a strict control of the environment. PMID:15173931

  5. Four Arabidopsis AREB/ABF transcription factors function predominantly in gene expression downstream of SnRK2 kinases in abscisic acid signalling in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Fujita, Yasunari; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mogami, Junro; Todaka, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Under osmotic stress conditions such as drought and high salinity, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1/ABF2, AREB2/ABF4 and ABF3, which are activated by SNF1-related kinase 2s (SnRK2s) such as SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3 (SRK2D/E/I). However, since the three AREB/ABFs are crucial, but not exclusive, for the SnRK2-mediated gene expression, transcriptional pathways governed by SRK2D/E/I are not fully understood. Here, we show that a bZIP transcription factor, ABF1, is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression in Arabidopsis. Despite lower expression levels of ABF1 than those of the three AREB/ABFs, the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 mutant plants displayed increased sensitivity to drought and decreased sensitivity to ABA in primary root growth compared with the areb1 areb2 abf3 mutant. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that expression of downstream genes of SRK2D/E/I, which include many genes functioning in osmotic stress responses and tolerance such as transcription factors and LEA proteins, was mostly impaired in the quadruple mutant. Thus, these results indicate that the four AREB/ABFs are the predominant transcription factors downstream of SRK2D/E/I in ABA signalling in response to osmotic stress during vegetative growth.

  6. Pepper leaf matrix as a promising analyte protectant prior to the analysis of thermolabile terbufos and its metabolites in pepper using GC-FPD.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Abd El-Aty, A M; Abid, Morad D N; Park, Jong-Hyouk; Na, Tae Woong; Kim, Yong-Doo; Shim, Jae-Han

    2012-07-15

    During gas chromatography (GC), the matrix can deactivate the active site during the transport of the compound from the injector to the detector. This deactivation capacity varies among matrices, as it is dependant on the concentrations of the different constituent compounds of each matrix. During the analysis of terbufos and its metabolites, two of its metabolites were highly thermolabile, and were readily decomposed inside the GC system. As the matrix can mask the active site, we carried out a matrix-matched calibration in an effort to protect the analyte against decomposition. As a component of our analysis, the pepper matrix was the first to be matched; however, it failed to completely protect the metabolites. Subsequently, a variety of different compounds, including 3-ethoxy-1,2-propanediol, gulonolactone, and sorbitol at 10, 1, and 1mg/mL were tested; however, none of these generated the desired effect. We surmised that some of the compounds may have decomposed inside the injection port, so we introduced a carbofrit inlet liner, which is highly inert. But, this step did not improve the protective qualities of the matrices. Finally, pepper leaf matrix was added to the pepper matrix, and we observed a profound protective effect for almost all of the analytes tested. A selective detector (flame photometric detector with phosphorus filter) was used to facilitate a high matrix concentration without interaction with the analyte. After resolving the problem of these two metabolites, terbufos and its five toxic metabolites were analyzed in pepper and pepper leaf samples. The recovery rates for terbufos and its metabolites were 73-114.5% with a relative standard deviation of <12%. This method was successfully applied to field samples, and terbufos sulfone, terbufos sulfoxide, and terbufoxon sulfoxide were found as residues in the suspected pepper and pepper leaf samples.

  7. Pick and Eat Crop Testing: Dwarf Tomato and Pepper as Candidate Space Crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Massa, G. D.; Stutte, G. W.; Spencer, L. E.; Hummerick, M. E.; Sirmons, T.; Douglas, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf tomato and pepper plants were grown in controlled environment chambers to assess their potential as space crops for supplementing the crew's diet. Six cultivars of each species were compared in initial tests and then down-selected to three cultivars of each. Initial selection criteria included fruit yield, growth height, and nutritional value. Following completion of a second production test with the three best performing cultivars, sample fruits of both tomato and peppers were then assessed for acceptance using tasting panels. Based on the criteria considered in these studies, Red Robin tomato and Pompeii pepper were recommended for consideration for use in space.

  8. Characterization of VIP1 activity as a transcriptional regulator in vitro and in planta

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Benoît; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    VIP1 (VirE2 interacting protein 1), initially discovered as a host protein involved in Agrobacterium-plant cell DNA transfer, is a transcription factor of the basic leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain family that regulates several defence-related genes in Arabidopsis. We have developed assays to assess VIP1 binding to its DNA target in vitro and transcriptional activation efficiency in planta. Several point mutations in the VIP1 response element VRE affected the VIP1 activity, and a strong correlation between VIP1-VRE binding and transcriptional activation levels was observed. Promoter activation by VIP1 was influenced by bacterial and plant proteins known to interact with VIP1 during Agrobacterium infection, i.e., VirE2, VirF and VIP2. VirF, an F-box protein, strongly decreased VIP1 transcriptional activation ability, but not its binding to VRE in vitro, most likely by triggering proteasomal degradation of VIP1. Finally, activation of a VRE-containing promoter was observed in dividing cells, probably resulting from activation of endogenous VIP1. PMID:23942522

  9. UV-B signaling pathways and fluence rate dependent transcriptional regulation of ARIADNE12.

    PubMed

    Lang-Mladek, Christina; Xie, Lisi; Nigam, Neha; Chumak, Nina; Binkert, Melanie; Neubert, Susanne; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-08-01

    ARI12 belongs to a family of 'RING between RING fingers' (RBR) domain proteins with E3 ligase activity (Eisenhaber et al. 2007). The Arabidopsis genome codes for 14 ARI genes and two pseudogenes (Mladek et al. 2003). Under standard growth conditions ARI12 is predominantly expressed in roots. In addition, ARI12 is strongly induced in leaves following exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation at dosages similar to those in areas under a reduced ozone layer. With quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses and promoter:reporter constructs we show that the expression of ARI12 peaks 2-4 h after UV-B radiation exposure. To test if ARI12's transcriptional activation depends on key players of the UV-B signaling pathway, ARI12 expression was quantified in mutants of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH) and the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) genes. ARI12 transcription was reduced by 50-70% in hy5, hyh and hy5/hyh double mutants, but not in uvr8 mutants. However, under low fluence rate UV-B conditions ARI12 is not induced in these mutants. Our results show that ARI12 represents a downstream target of the low fluence rate UVR8/HY5/HYH UV-B signaling pathway while under high fluence rates its expression is regulated by the two bZIP transcription factors HY5 and HYH in an UVR8-independent manner.

  10. The Hot Pepper (Capsicum annuum) MicroRNA Transcriptome Reveals Novel and Conserved Targets: A Foundation for Understanding MicroRNA Functional Roles in Hot Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghyun; Choi, Yourim; Kim, Soyoung; Reeves, Gregory; Yeom, Seon-In; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Park, Minkyu; Kim, Seungill; Choi, Ik-Young; Choi, Doil; Shin, Chanseok

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs approximately 21 nt in length which play important roles in regulating gene expression in plants. Although many miRNA studies have focused on a few model plants, miRNAs and their target genes remain largely unknown in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide. Here, we employed high-throughput sequencing technology to identify miRNAs in pepper extensively from 10 different libraries, including leaf, stem, root, flower, and six developmental stage fruits. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we successfully identified 29 and 35 families of conserved and novel miRNAs, respectively. Northern blot analysis was used to validate further the expression of representative miRNAs and to analyze their tissue-specific or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, we computationally predicted miRNA targets, many of which were experimentally confirmed using 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis. One of the validated novel targets of miR-396 was a domain rearranged methyltransferase, the major de novo methylation enzyme, involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation in plants. This work provides the first reliable draft of the pepper miRNA transcriptome. It offers an expanded picture of pepper miRNAs in relation to other plants, providing a basis for understanding the functional roles of miRNAs in pepper. PMID:23737975

  11. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy.

  12. Response of Resistant and Susceptible Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum) to a Southern California Meloidogyne incognita Population from a Commercial Bell Pepper Field.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Jose Luis; Bachie, Oli; Ploeg, Antoon

    2014-12-01

    To determine the presence and level of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) infestation in Southern California bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) fields, soil and root samples were collected in April and May 2012 and analyzed for the presence of root-knot nematodes. The earlier samples were virtually free of root-knot nematodes, but the later samples all contained, sometimes very high numbers, of root-knot nematodes. Nematodes were all identified as M. incognita. A nematode population from one of these fields was multiplied in a greenhouse and used as inoculum for two repeated pot experiments with three susceptible and two resistant bell pepper varieties. Fruit yields of the resistant peppers were not affected by the nematodes, whereas yields of two of the three susceptible pepper cultivars decreased as a result of nematode inoculation. Nematode-induced root galling and nematode multiplication was low but different between the two resistant cultivars. Root galling and nematode reproduction was much higher on the three susceptible cultivars. One of these susceptible cultivars exhibited tolerance, as yields were not affected by the nematodes, but nematode multiplication was high. It is concluded that M. incognita is common in Southern California bell pepper production, and that resistant cultivars may provide a useful tool in a nonchemical management strategy. PMID:25580027

  13. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT).

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  14. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT)

    PubMed Central

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT’s ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  15. The Bach Family of Transcription Factors: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factors Bach1 and Bach2, which belong to a basic region-leucine zipper (bZip) family, repress target gene expression by forming heterodimers with small Maf proteins. With the ability to bind to heme, Bach1 and Bach2 are important in maintaining heme homeostasis in response to oxidative stress, which is characterized by high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells and thereby induces cellular damage and senescence. The inactivation of Bach1 exerts an antioxidant effect. Thus, Bach1 may be a potential therapeutic target of oxidative stress-related diseases. Bach2 participates in oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis and is involved in macrophage-mediated innate immunity as well as the adaptive immune response. Bach1 and Bach2 promote the differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors to B cells by repressing myeloid-related genes. Bach2 is able to regulate class-switch recombination and plasma cell differentiation by altering the concentration of mitochondrial ROS during B cell differentiation. Furthermore, Bach2 maintains T cell homeostasis, influences the function of macrophages, and plays a role in autoimmunity. Bach2-controlling genes with super enhancers in T cells play a key role in immune regulation. However, in spite of new research, the role of Bach1 and Bach2 in immune cells and immune response is not completely clear, nor are their respective roles of in oxidative stress and the immune response, in particular with regard to the clinical phenotypes of autoimmune diseases. The anti-immunosenescence action of Bach and the role of epigenetic modifications of these transcription factors may be important in the mechanism of Bach transcription factors in mediating oxidative stress and cellular immunity. PMID:27052415

  16. Comparative genomics reveals diversity among xanthomonads infecting tomato and pepper

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial spot of tomato and pepper is caused by four Xanthomonas species and is a major plant disease in warm humid climates. The four species are distinct from each other based on physiological and molecular characteristics. The genome sequence of strain 85-10, a member of one of the species, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) has been previously reported. To determine the relationship of the four species at the genome level and to investigate the molecular basis of their virulence and differing host ranges, draft genomic sequences of members of the other three species were determined and compared to strain 85-10. Results We sequenced the genomes of X. vesicatoria (Xv) strain 1111 (ATCC 35937), X. perforans (Xp) strain 91-118 and X. gardneri (Xg) strain 101 (ATCC 19865). The genomes were compared with each other and with the previously sequenced Xcv strain 85-10. In addition, the molecular features were predicted that may be required for pathogenicity including the type III secretion apparatus, type III effectors, other secretion systems, quorum sensing systems, adhesins, extracellular polysaccharide, and lipopolysaccharide determinants. Several novel type III effectors from Xg strain 101 and Xv strain 1111 genomes were computationally identified and their translocation was validated using a reporter gene assay. A homolog to Ax21, the elicitor of XA21-mediated resistance in rice, and a functional Ax21 sulfation system were identified in Xcv. Genes encoding proteins with functions mediated by type II and type IV secretion systems have also been compared, including enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction, as contributors to pathogenicity. Conclusions Comparative genomic analyses revealed considerable diversity among bacterial spot pathogens, providing new insights into differences and similarities that may explain the diverse nature of these strains. Genes specific to pepper pathogens, such as the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide cluster, and genes

  17. Blue-light-regulated transcription factor, Aureochrome, in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    During the course of evolution through various endosymbiotic processes, diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes acquired blue light (BL) responses that do not use photosynthetic pathways. Photosynthetic stramenopiles, which have red algae-derived chloroplasts through secondary symbiosis, are principal primary producers in aquatic environments, and play important roles in ecosystems and aquaculture. Through secondary symbiosis, these taxa acquired BL responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast photo-relocation movement, and photomorphogenesis similar to those which green plants acquired through primary symbiosis. Photosynthetic stramenopile BL receptors were undefined until the discovery in 2007, of a new type of BL receptor, the aureochrome (AUREO), from the photosynthetic stramenopile alga, Vaucheria. AUREO has a bZIP domain and a LOV domain, and thus BL-responsive transcription factor. AUREO orthologs are only conserved in photosynthetic stramenopiles, such as brown algae, diatoms, and red tide algae. Here, a brief review is presented of the role of AUREOs as photoreceptors for these diverse BL responses and their biochemical properties in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

  18. Melatonin content of pepper and tomato fruits: effects of cultivar and solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Riga, Patrick; Medina, Sonia; García-Flores, Libia Alejandra; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of cultivar and solar radiation on the melatonin content of Capsicum annuum (pepper) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruits. The melatonin content of red pepper fruits ranged from 31 to 93ngg(-1) (dry weight). The melatonin content of tomato ranged from 7.5 to 250ngg(-1) (dry weight). We also studied the effect of ripeness on melatonin content and identified one group of pepper cultivars in which the melatonin content increased as the fruit ripened and another in which it decreased as the fruit ripened. Under shade conditions, the melatonin content in most of tomato cultivars tended to increase (up to 135%), whereas that of most pepper cultivars decreased (to 64%). Overall, the results also demonstrated that the melatonin content of the fruits was not related to carbon fluxes from leaves.

  19. Identification of irradiated pepper with the level of hydrogen gas as a probe

    SciTech Connect

    Dohmaru, T.; Furuta, M.; Katayama, T.; Toratani, H.; Takeda, A. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel method to detect whether or not a particular pepper has been irradiated has been developed which is based on the fact that H2 is formed in organic substances irradiated with ionizing radiation. Following gamma irradiation, black and white peppers were ground to powder in a gastight ceramic mill. By gas-chromatographic analysis of the gas in the mill, we observed that H2 had been released from the irradiated pepper grains. Curves plotting the H2 content vs storage time at storage temperatures of 7, 22, and 30 degrees C showed that the higher the temperatures, the smaller the H2 content, and that identification of irradiated pepper was possible for 2-4 months after 10 kGy irradiation.

  20. Physicochemical and microbiological qualities of steamed and irradiated ground black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Waje, Catherine K; Kim, Hyun-Ku; Kim, Kyong-Su; Todoriki, Setsuko; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2008-06-25

    The effects of steam and irradiation treatments on the physicochemical properties (moisture content, pH, extractable yield, reducing sugar, soluble pigment, antioxidant activity, piperine, Hunter's color, and sensory attributes) and microbiological quality (total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and yeasts and molds) of ground black pepper stored at refrigerated and room temperatures for 6 months were compared and evaluated. Irradiation resulted in a higher microbial reduction in pepper, with minimal effects on the proximate composition, functional components, color, and sensory attributes of the spice. Steamed peppers appeared darker, and a considerable decrease in the piperine content was observed after treatment and storage. This study illustrates that irradiation is a better decontamination method than steam treatment in eliminating microorganisms without apparently affecting the quality of the powdered spice. Storage at 4 degrees C enhanced the microbial quality and minimized the loss of piperine content in ground black peppers.

  1. A Sprinkle of Pepper: The State of Black Influence in White Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Frank W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of Blacks in white institutions of higher education is no more than a sprinkling of pepper. The article discusses some problems facing the Black students, Black faculty and Black administrators at these schools. (Author/HMV)

  2. Screening of antagonistic bacteria for biological control of nursery wilt of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Anith, K N; Radhakrishnan, N V; Manomohandas, T P

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists of Phytophthora capsici were isolated from underground shoot portions of rooted cuttings of black pepper. Initially isolates were screened by dual culture on potato dextrose agar and carrot agar. Further, a screening was done on black pepper shoots for supression of lesion caused by the pathogen. Most of the antagonists showed varying levels of antagonism in the dual culture and the shoot assay. Isolate PN-026, showing the highest suppression of lesion development in the shoot assay was found to be the most efficient antagonist in reducing Phytophthora capsici induced nursery wilt of black pepper. This screening involving the host, pathogen, and the antagonist, performed on black pepper shoot (the planting material for this vegetatively propagated crop), could be used as a rapid and reliable method for the isolation of efficient bacterial antagonists of P. capsici.

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from C.M. Pepper, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from C.M. Pepper, Everyday Life in Washington (1900, p. 371) - Robert P. Dodge House, 1534 Twenty-eighth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria Causes Bacterial Spot Disease on Pepper Plant in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kyeon, Min-Seong; Son, Soo-Hyeong; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2016-01-01

    In 2004, bacterial spot-causing xanthomonads (BSX) were reclassified into 4 species—Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, X. vesicatoria, X. perforans, and X. gardneri. Bacterial spot disease on pepper plant in Korea is known to be caused by both X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and X. vesicatoria. Here, we reidentified the pathogen causing bacterial spots on pepper plant based on the new classification. Accordingly, 72 pathogenic isolates were obtained from the lesions on pepper plants at 42 different locations. All isolates were negative for pectolytic activity. Five isolates were positive for amylolytic activity. All of the Korean pepper isolates had a 32 kDa-protein unique to X. euvesicatoria and had the same band pattern of the rpoB gene as that of X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans as indicated by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. A phylogenetic tree of 16S rDNA sequences showed that all of the Korean pepper plant isolates fit into the same group as did all the reference strains of X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans. A phylogenetic tree of the nucleotide sequences of 3 housekeeping genes—gapA, gyrB, and lepA showed that all of the Korean pepper plant isolates fit into the same group as did all of the references strains of X. euvesicatoria. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, we identified the pathogen as X. euvesicatoria. Neither X. vesicatoria, the known pathogen of pepper bacterial spot, nor X. perforans, the known pathogen of tomato plant, was isolated. Thus, we suggest that the pathogen causing bacterial spot disease of pepper plants in Korea is X. euvesicatoria. PMID:27721693

  5. Resolution of "salt and pepper" appearance of the skull with vitamin D therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gursimran; Singh, Parminder; Mittal, Naveen; Singla, Mani Kant

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hypovitaminosis D leads to state of decreased mineralization and generalized osteomalacia. It also results in secondary hyperparathyroidism causing increased bone turn over and decreased bone mass, manifested radiologically as a "salt and pepper" appearance in skull, subperiosteal resorption, bone cysts and lytic lesions. In this case, a young male patient with hypovitaminosis D and secondary hyperparathyroidism, radiological features show resolution of "salt and pepper" appearance of the skull with vitamin D in 11 months and regression of other lytic lesions.

  6. Assessment of hot peppers for aflatoxin and mold proliferation during storage.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Qumer; Amjad, Muhammad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Ariño, Agustin

    2011-05-01

    Aflatoxin contamination and mold proliferation in three hot pepper hybrids (Sky Red, Maha, and Wonder King) were studied during 5 months of storage at three temperatures (20, 25, and 30°C) and under different packaging conditions (low-density polyethylene bags and jute bags). The presence of aflatoxins in hot pepper samples was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with a UV-Vis detector. Sampling for analysis of aflatoxins, total mold counts, and Aspergillus counts was carried out at 0, 50, 100, and 150 days of storage. Hot peppers packed in jute bags were more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination than those packed in polyethylene bags; aflatoxin concentrations were 75% higher in peppers stored in jute bags. The effect of storage temperature resulted in aflatoxin concentrations that were 61% higher in hot peppers stored at 25 and 30°C than in those stored at 20°C. Of the three pepper hybrids, Wonder King was more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, with a maximum of 1.50 μg/kg when packed in jute bags and stored at 25°C for 150 days. However, no sample exceeded the maximum permitted level for total aflatoxins in spices established by European Union regulations (10 μg/kg). Total mold counts and Aspergillus counts increased with storage duration, but all counts were significantly lower in peppers stored in polyethylene bags. A gradual increase in temperature during prolonged storage of hot peppers in combination with aeration may be the main reasons for increases in fungal biomass and Aspergillus proliferation with the subsequent aflatoxin production. PMID:21549057

  7. Tinea nigra presenting speckled or "salt and pepper" pattern.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, André Luiz; Cruz, Rosana Cé Bella; Haddad, Vidal Junior

    2014-06-01

    A 7-year-old Caucasian female resident of the southern coast of Brazil presented dark spots on the left palm that converged to a unique macule with speckled pattern at about 1 month. The mycological exam and the fungi culture were typical of Hortaea werneckii, the agent of the superficial mycosis Tinea nigra. The patient received butenafine hydrochloride 1% for 30 days, resulting in a complete remission of the lesion. At a follow-up visit 12 months after treatment, there was no lesion recurrence. We describe a form of rare geographical Tinea nigra with a speckled pattern. The "salt and pepper" aspect should be taken into consideration when the mycosis was suspected.

  8. Pathotypes of Bacterial Spot Pathogen Infecting Capsicum Peppers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Khin Pa Pa; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Mo, Hwang-Sung; Yoo, Hee Ju; Byeon, Si-Eun; Jegal, Yoonhyuk; Mekuriaw, Alebel A.; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-seven isolates of bacterial spot pathogen (Xanthomonas spp.) collected from six provinces of Korea were tested for the identification of their pathotypes and determination of their distribution throughout Korea in an effort to genetically manage the disease. Near isogenic lines of Early Calwonder (Capsicum annuum) pepper plants carrying Bs1, Bs2 and Bs3, and PI235047 (C. pubescens) were used as differential hosts. Race P1 was found to be predominant, followed by race P7, and races P3 and P8 were also observed. This is the first report of races P7 and P8 in Korea. The races P7 and P8 were differentiated from the former races P1 and P3, respectively, on the basis of their ability to elicit hypersensitive reactions to PI235047. PMID:26674555

  9. Rehydration characteristics of dehydrated West African pepper (Piper guineense) leaves.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Laura C; Ekechi, Constance A

    2014-11-01

    The rehydration characteristics of dehydrated West African pepper leaves were investigated at hydration temperatures of 28, 60, 70, and 80°C. Four treatments were given to the leaves: blanched and sun dried, unblanched and sun dried, blanched and shade dried, and unblanched and shade dried. The hydration process of the dehydrated leaves was adequately described by the Peleg's equation. As the hydration temperature increased from 28 to 70°C, there was a significant decrease in the Peleg's constant K 1, while for most of the leaves the Peleg's constant K 2 varied with temperature. Rehydration ratio values ranged from 3.75 in blanched shade dried leaves to 4.26 in unblanched sun dried leaves with the unblanched leaves generally exhibiting higher ratios than the blanched leaves.

  10. Molecular and biological characterization of pepper yellow vein Mali virus (PepYVMV) isolates associated with pepper yellow vein disease in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Tiendrébéogo, Fidèle; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Hoareau, Murielle; Traoré, Valentin S Edgar; Barro, Nicolas; Péréfarres, Frédéric; Reynaud, Bernard; Traoré, Alfred S; Konaté, Gnissa; Lett, Jean-Michel; Traoré, Oumar

    2011-03-01

    Yellow vein disease (YVD) is a major problem in pepper in West Africa. Despite the recent implication of a begomovirus in YVD in Mali and in Burkina Faso, the aetiology of the disease remains unclear. Using symptomatic samples from the main vegetable cultivation regions in Burkina Faso, 10 full-length DNA-A-like begomovirus sequences were obtained, each showing 98% nucleotide identity to pepper yellow vein Mali virus (PepYVMV). The host range was determined after construction of a viral clone for agroinfection. Severe symptoms developed in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. By contrast, no symptoms developed in either commercial or local pepper cultivars, demonstrating that the aetiology of YVD is not only associated with the presence of PepYVMV.

  11. The effect of domestic processing on the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from chili peppers (Capsicum species).

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Alessandro; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; O'Callaghan, Yvonne; Galvin, Karen; Menichini, Francesco; O'Brien, Nora

    2013-12-01

    The content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from different chili peppers were analysed and the effects of typical domestic processing were investigated. Peppers were analysed before and after cooking by conventional boiling (10 min in 100 °C water) and also following a freezing period of four months in a domestic freezer (-20 °C). The content and bioaccessibility of the eight carotenoids quantified varied, depending on cultivar, species, colour and processing. Provitamin A carotenoids (β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) and capsanthin were present at highest concentrations in the samples before and after processing. In general, yellow and orange peppers were the best sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and neoxanthin. Xanthophyll carotenoids were more efficiently transferred to the micelles and, therefore, were also more bioavailable. Processing decreased the carotenoid content in certain samples; however, the micellar content was generally not lower for processed peppers; therefore the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from processed peppers is enhanced relative to unprocessed peppers.

  12. The effect of domestic processing on the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from chili peppers (Capsicum species).

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Alessandro; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; O'Callaghan, Yvonne; Galvin, Karen; Menichini, Francesco; O'Brien, Nora

    2013-12-01

    The content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids from different chili peppers were analysed and the effects of typical domestic processing were investigated. Peppers were analysed before and after cooking by conventional boiling (10 min in 100 °C water) and also following a freezing period of four months in a domestic freezer (-20 °C). The content and bioaccessibility of the eight carotenoids quantified varied, depending on cultivar, species, colour and processing. Provitamin A carotenoids (β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin) and capsanthin were present at highest concentrations in the samples before and after processing. In general, yellow and orange peppers were the best sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and neoxanthin. Xanthophyll carotenoids were more efficiently transferred to the micelles and, therefore, were also more bioavailable. Processing decreased the carotenoid content in certain samples; however, the micellar content was generally not lower for processed peppers; therefore the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from processed peppers is enhanced relative to unprocessed peppers. PMID:23871001

  13. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  14. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    del Rocío Gómez-García, María; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  15. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  16. The effect of irradiation in the preservation of pink pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Adriana Régia Marques; Arthur, Valter; Nogueira, Danielle Pires

    2012-08-01

    Pink peppers, also known as "pimenta-rosa" and "poivre rose", are the fruit of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, a species of pepper cultivated in Brazil, and have great potential for the exploration of uses. In efforts to lengthen the shelf life of this pepper, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different doses of radiation on its physical composition and color. The pink pepper samples were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy, and the moisture, ash and lipid contents, pH and color were analyzed. The moisture content, lipid content and pH analysis indicated effects due to the irradiation (p>0.05) in which the higher doses resulted in decreases in the attribute. In contrast, there were no significant differences for the ash analysis (p<0.05) among the studied doses. The color of the pink peppers were affected by the irradiation: the parameters a* and b* were the most affected by the intermediate doses (0.2 and 0.8 kGy), which induced their elevation, enhancing the reddish and yellowish colors. Based on the presented data, irradiation is as an alternative preservation process for pink peppers.

  17. White pepper and piperine have different effects on pharmacokinetics of puerarin in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong-Zhuo; Chen, Hai-Ming; Su, Zu-Qing; Hou, Shao-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zheng, Yi-Feng; Li, Yu-Cui; Lin, Ji; Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Su, Zi-Ren; Fu, Lu-Di

    2014-01-01

    This study attempted to explore the effects of white pepper and its major component piperine on puerarin administered to rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters of puerarin in rats were determined by oral administration (400 mg/kg) or intravenous injection (40 mg/kg) of puerarin, pretreated with or without white pepper and piperine given orally. Compared to the control group given oral puerarin only, the combined use of piperine (10 or 20 mg/kg) increased the C max of puerarin by 1.30-fold or 1.64-fold and the AUC0-∞ by 133% or 157%, respectively. In contrast, coadministration of white pepper (125 or 250 mg/kg) decreased oral absorption of puerarin to 83% or 74%, respectively. On the other hand, pretreatment with piperine orally did not alter the intravenous pharmacokinetics of puerarin, while the AUC of puerarin after intravenous administration was increased by pretreatment with white pepper. The results indicate that pretreatment with piperine or pepper exerts different effects on pharmacokinetics of puerarin administrated via intragastric and intravenous routes. Therefore, it is suggested that the combined application of piperine or white pepper with puerarin should be carefully monitored for potential diet-drug interactions.

  18. Sunflower as a Potential Trap Crop of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Pepper Fields.

    PubMed

    Soergel, D C; Ostiguy, N; Fleischer, S J; Troyer, R R; Rajotte, E G; Krawczyk, G

    2015-12-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), feeds on a variety of fruits and vegetables, and is an economically important invasive hemipteran pest. Trap cropping of H. halys was examined at the Pennsylvania State University Southeast Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SEAREC) in Lancaster Co., PA, from 2012 to 2013, with sunflowers used as a trap crop to protect bell pepper. H. halys were observed frequently on sunflowers planted surrounding the pepper field, and in both years of this experiment significantly more H. halys were observed in sunflowers than peppers. Both adults and nymphs were observed with equal frequency, with higher numbers of both observed in September. A 2:1 ratio of females to males was observed throughout both years. While sunflowers were attractive to H. halys, no difference in fruit damage was observed in peppers surrounded by the sunflower trap crop versus those peppers surrounded by peppers. While sunflowers present an interesting potential trap crop for H. halys, future research is needed to clarify the feasibility of this crop protection technique.

  19. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after “lights on”) and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h). Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils. PMID:26462948

  20. Sunflower as a Potential Trap Crop of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Pepper Fields.

    PubMed

    Soergel, D C; Ostiguy, N; Fleischer, S J; Troyer, R R; Rajotte, E G; Krawczyk, G

    2015-12-01

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), feeds on a variety of fruits and vegetables, and is an economically important invasive hemipteran pest. Trap cropping of H. halys was examined at the Pennsylvania State University Southeast Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SEAREC) in Lancaster Co., PA, from 2012 to 2013, with sunflowers used as a trap crop to protect bell pepper. H. halys were observed frequently on sunflowers planted surrounding the pepper field, and in both years of this experiment significantly more H. halys were observed in sunflowers than peppers. Both adults and nymphs were observed with equal frequency, with higher numbers of both observed in September. A 2:1 ratio of females to males was observed throughout both years. While sunflowers were attractive to H. halys, no difference in fruit damage was observed in peppers surrounded by the sunflower trap crop versus those peppers surrounded by peppers. While sunflowers present an interesting potential trap crop for H. halys, future research is needed to clarify the feasibility of this crop protection technique. PMID:26331305

  1. Napropamide residues in runoff and infiltration water from pepper production.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Patterson, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    A field study was conducted on a Lowell silty loam soil of 2.7% organic matter at the Kentucky State University Research Farm, Franklin County, Kentucky. Eighteen universal soil loss equation (USLE) standard plots (22 x 3.7 m each) were established on a 10% slope. Three soil management practices were used: (i) class-A biosolids (sewage sludge), (ii) yard waste compost, each mixed with native soil at a rate of 50 ton acre(-1) on a dry-weight basis, and (iii) a no-mulch (NM) treatment (rototilled bare soil), used for comparison purposes. Devrinol 50-DF "napropamide" [N,N-diethyl-2-(1-naphthyloxy) propionamide] was applied as a preemergent herbicide, incorporated into the soil surface, and the plots were planted with 60-day-old sweet bell pepper seedlings. Napropamide residues one hour following spraying averaged 0.8, 0.4, and 0.3 microg g(-1) dry soil in sewage sludge, yard waste compost, and no-mulch treatments, respectively. Surface runoff water, runoff sediment, and napropamide residues in runoff were significantly reduced by the compost and biosolid treatments. Yard waste compost treatments increased water infiltration and napropamide residues in the vadose zone compared to sewage sludge and NM treatments. Total pepper yields from yard waste compost amended soils (9187 lbs acre(-1)) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than yield from either the soil amended with class-A biosolids (6984 lbs acre(-1)) or the no-mulch soil (7162 lbs acre(-1)). PMID:15913012

  2. Napropamide residues in runoff and infiltration water from pepper production.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F; Patterson, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    A field study was conducted on a Lowell silty loam soil of 2.7% organic matter at the Kentucky State University Research Farm, Franklin County, Kentucky. Eighteen universal soil loss equation (USLE) standard plots (22 x 3.7 m each) were established on a 10% slope. Three soil management practices were used: (i) class-A biosolids (sewage sludge), (ii) yard waste compost, each mixed with native soil at a rate of 50 ton acre(-1) on a dry-weight basis, and (iii) a no-mulch (NM) treatment (rototilled bare soil), used for comparison purposes. Devrinol 50-DF "napropamide" [N,N-diethyl-2-(1-naphthyloxy) propionamide] was applied as a preemergent herbicide, incorporated into the soil surface, and the plots were planted with 60-day-old sweet bell pepper seedlings. Napropamide residues one hour following spraying averaged 0.8, 0.4, and 0.3 microg g(-1) dry soil in sewage sludge, yard waste compost, and no-mulch treatments, respectively. Surface runoff water, runoff sediment, and napropamide residues in runoff were significantly reduced by the compost and biosolid treatments. Yard waste compost treatments increased water infiltration and napropamide residues in the vadose zone compared to sewage sludge and NM treatments. Total pepper yields from yard waste compost amended soils (9187 lbs acre(-1)) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than yield from either the soil amended with class-A biosolids (6984 lbs acre(-1)) or the no-mulch soil (7162 lbs acre(-1)).

  3. Salt and Pepper Pigmentation - Skin Manifestation of Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraju, D; Prakash, G; Yoganandh, T; Subramanian, S R; Ramkumar, S

    2015-09-01

    A 50 year old male presented with progressive difficulty in swallowing both liquid and solid food with no history of Raynaud's phenomenon. A general examination revealed skin changes in the form of thickening, hyperpigmentation and tightening of skin of fingers, hand, forearm and legs. The patient had painless skin induration over the legs, forearm and hand. Salt and pepper pigmentation was seen on the upper back (Figure 1a), over mastoid process (Figure 1b) and the concha of pinna (Figure 1c). Anti-Scl 70 was positive. Anti-centromere antibodies were negative. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) revealed very severe restrictive lung disease. Barium swallow study was normal. Despite being advised to undergo oesophageal manometry test in view of dysphagia, patient was not willing for the same. Diagnosis of systemic sclerosis was made. Systemic sclerosis is a disease in which extensive fibrosis, vascular alterations and autoantibodies against various cellular antigens being the principal features with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Skin pigmentation changes among other features of skin involvement include a salt-and-pepper appearance due to diffuse hyperpigmentation with sparing of the perifollicular areas. This may be due to the richer capillary network that may warm the perifollicular skin and preserve melanogenesis producing the perifollicular pigment retention in systemic sclerosis.1,2 Both cellular and humoral immune factors in combination with external factors such as trauma or inflammation may trigger the destruction of melanocytes.3 Moreover, various physical factors like temperature changes as well as genetic, hormonal factors may influence pigment formation. Such changes in pigmentation is also seen during repigmentation around hair follicles in vitiligo. Clinically, both vitiligo and depigmented lesions of systemic sclerosis present as chalk-white macules with well-defined borders. However, mucosal involvement is commonly seen in vitiligo while depigmented

  4. A systems biology perspective on the role of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Drought is one of the major challenges affecting crop productivity and yield. However, water stress responses are notoriously multigenic and quantitative with strong environmental effects on phenotypes. It is also clear that water stress often does not occur alone under field conditions but rather in conjunction with other abiotic stresses such as high temperature and high light intensities. A multidisciplinary approach with successful integration of a whole range of -omics technologies will not only define the system, but also provide new gene targets for both transgenic approaches and marker-assisted selection. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling and some constitute major hubs in the signaling webs. The main transcription factors in this network include MYB, bHLH, bZIP, ERF, NAC, and WRKY transcription factors. The role of WRKY transcription factors in abiotic stress signaling networks is just becoming apparent and systems biology approaches are starting to define their places in the signaling network. Using systems biology approaches, there are now many transcriptomic analyses and promoter analyses that concern WRKY transcription factors. In addition, reports on nuclear proteomics have identified WRKY proteins that are up-regulated at the protein level by water stress. Interactomics has started to identify different classes of WRKY-interacting proteins. What are often lacking are connections between metabolomics, WRKY transcription factors, promoters, biosynthetic pathways, fluxes and downstream responses. As more levels of the system are characterized, a more detailed understanding of the roles of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in crops will be obtained.

  5. Transcription Factor ADS-4 Regulates Adaptive Responses and Resistance to Antifungal Azole Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. PMID:26100701

  6. Tissue-specific expression of the PNZIP promoter is mediated by combinatorial interaction of different cis-elements and a novel transcriptional factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Tao; Yu, Yan-Li; Yang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Jie-Dao; Zheng, Cheng-Chao

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that PNZIP and its homologs encode a special cyclase and play an important role in chlorophyll biosynthesis in higher plants. To investigate the molecular mechanism governing the PNZIP gene, the PNZIP promoter was isolated and analyzed. Deletion analysis indicated that G-box is an important element in the regulation of the reporter gene expression. Further mutation assay demonstrated that G-box and GATACT elements are necessary and sufficient for the high and tissue-specific expression of the GUS gene. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, we have isolated a novel tobacco bZIP protein, NtbZIP, which can specifically recognize the G-box of the PNZIP promoter. The NtbZIP protein shares a limited amino acid homology to Arabidopsis ABI5 and AtAREB1 and very low homology to other bZIP proteins. Northern blot analysis showed that the NtbZIP gene is not induced by exogenous ABA and is expressed in different tobacco organs. Cotransformation assays showed that the NtbZIP protein could activate the transcription of the GUS gene driven by the PNZIP promoter. Transgenic tobaccos analysis demonstrated that constitutively expressing antisense NtbZIP gene resulted in a lower NTZIP synthesis and reduced chlorophyll levels. We suggest that NTZIP is a target gene of NtbZIP, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of the PNZIP promoter is mediated by combinatorial interaction of different cis-elements and a novel transcriptional factor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tao; Yu, Yan-Li; Yang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Jie-Dao; Zheng, Cheng-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that PNZIP and its homologs encode a special cyclase and play an important role in chlorophyll biosynthesis in higher plants. To investigate the molecular mechanism governing the PNZIP gene, the PNZIP promoter was isolated and analyzed. Deletion analysis indicated that G-box is an important element in the regulation of the reporter gene expression. Further mutation assay demonstrated that G-box and GATACT elements are necessary and sufficient for the high and tissue-specific expression of the GUS gene. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, we have isolated a novel tobacco bZIP protein, NtbZIP, which can specifically recognize the G-box of the PNZIP promoter. The NtbZIP protein shares a limited amino acid homology to Arabidopsis ABI5 and AtAREB1 and very low homology to other bZIP proteins. Northern blot analysis showed that the NtbZIP gene is not induced by exogenous ABA and is expressed in different tobacco organs. Cotransformation assays showed that the NtbZIP protein could activate the transcription of the GUS gene driven by the PNZIP promoter. Transgenic tobaccos analysis demonstrated that constitutively expressing antisense NtbZIP gene resulted in a lower NTZIP synthesis and reduced chlorophyll levels. We suggest that NTZIP is a target gene of NtbZIP, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis. PMID:19270069

  8. Occurrence of pepper mild mottle virus in drinking water sources in Japan.

    PubMed

    Haramoto, Eiji; Kitajima, Masaaki; Kishida, Naohiro; Konno, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Asami, Mari; Akiba, Michihiro

    2013-12-01

    Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) is a plant virus that has been recently proposed as a potential indicator of human fecal contamination of environmental waters; however, information on its geographical occurrence in surface water is still limited. We aimed to determine the seasonal and geographic occurrence of PMMoV in drinking water sources all over Japan. Between July 2008 and February 2011, 184 source water samples were collected from 30 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs); viruses from 1 to 2 liters of each sample were concentrated by using an electronegative membrane, followed by RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Using quantitative PCR, PMMoV was detected in 140 (76%) samples, with a concentration ranging from 2.03×10(3) to 2.90×10(6) copies/liter. At least one of the samples from 27 DWTPs (n=4 or 8) was positive for PMMoV; samples from 10 of these DWTPs were always contaminated. There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PMMoV among geographical regions but not a seasonal difference. PMMoV was frequently detected in samples that were negative for human enteric virus or Escherichia coli. A phylogenetic analysis based on the partial nucleotide sequences of the PMMoV coat protein gene in 12 water samples from 9 DWTPs indicated that there are genetically diverse PMMoV strains present in drinking water sources in Japan. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the occurrence of PMMoV in environmental waters across wide geographical regions.

  9. Reduced activity of ATP synthase in mitochondria causes cytoplasmic male sterility in chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjie; Pandeya, Devendra; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Liu, Wing Yee; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2013-04-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a maternally inherited trait characterized by the inability to produce functional pollen. The CMS-associated protein Orf507 (reported as Orf456 in previous researches) was previously identified as a candidate gene for mediating male sterility in pepper. Here, we performed yeast two-hybrid analysis to screen for interacting proteins, and found that the ATP synthase 6 kDa subunit containing a mitochondrial signal peptide (MtATP6) specifically interacted with Orf507. In addition, the two proteins were found to be interacted in vivo using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays. Further functional characterization of Orf507 revealed that the encoded protein is toxic to bacterial cells. Analysis of tissue-specific expression of ATP synthase 6 kDa showed that the transcription level was much lower in anthers of the CMS line than in their wild type counterparts. In CMS plants, ATP synthase activity and content were reduced by more than half compared to that of the normal plants. Taken together, it can be concluded that reduced ATP synthase activity and ATP content might have affected pollen development in CMS plants. Here, we hypothesize that Orf507 might cause MtATP6 to be nonfunctional by changing the latter's conformation or producing an inhibitor that prevents the normal functioning of MtATP6. Thus, further functional analysis of mitochondrial Orf507 will provide insights into the mechanisms underlying CMS in plants. PMID:23274393

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nano-encapsulated black pepper oleoresin using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin for antioxidant and antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bruna N; Ozdemir, Necla; Hill, Laura E; Gomes, Carmen L

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have reported antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of black pepper oleoresin which is associated to its phenolic compounds and piperine. The ability of cyclodextrins to form an inclusion complex with a guest molecule could improve black pepper oleoresin application, bioavailability, and stability in foods. Hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) inclusion complex with black pepper olereosin were synthesized using the kneading method and characterized for its physico-chemical properties and its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Inclusion complex size was 103.9 ± 7.6 nm and indicated to be a polydisperse system. The entrapment efficiency was 78.3 ± 3.6%, which suggests that other constituents in black pepper oleoresin have higher affinities for HPBCD than piperine (major compound in black pepper oleoresin). Thermograms showed the disappearance of oxidation peaks of black pepper oleoresin, proving complex formation with HPBCD. Phase solubility results indicated 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex formation and an increase of black pepper oleoresin aqueous solubility with HPBCD concentration. Nano-encapsulation with HPBCD did not affect (P > 0.05) total phenolic content; however, it enhanced (P < 0.05) black pepper oleoresin antioxidant activity. Black pepper oleoresin and its inclusion complex were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Both free and encapsulated black pepper oleoresin effectively inhibited bacterial growth within the concentration range tested. Black pepper oleoresin encapsulated in HPBCD was able to inhibit Salmonella at lower (P < 0.05) concentrations than its corresponding free extract. Therefore, black pepper oleoresin-HPBCD nanocapsules could have important applications in the food industry as antimicrobial and antioxidant system. PMID:24329956

  11. Synthesis and characterization of nano-encapsulated black pepper oleoresin using hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin for antioxidant and antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bruna N; Ozdemir, Necla; Hill, Laura E; Gomes, Carmen L

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have reported antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of black pepper oleoresin which is associated to its phenolic compounds and piperine. The ability of cyclodextrins to form an inclusion complex with a guest molecule could improve black pepper oleoresin application, bioavailability, and stability in foods. Hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPBCD) inclusion complex with black pepper olereosin were synthesized using the kneading method and characterized for its physico-chemical properties and its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Inclusion complex size was 103.9 ± 7.6 nm and indicated to be a polydisperse system. The entrapment efficiency was 78.3 ± 3.6%, which suggests that other constituents in black pepper oleoresin have higher affinities for HPBCD than piperine (major compound in black pepper oleoresin). Thermograms showed the disappearance of oxidation peaks of black pepper oleoresin, proving complex formation with HPBCD. Phase solubility results indicated 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex formation and an increase of black pepper oleoresin aqueous solubility with HPBCD concentration. Nano-encapsulation with HPBCD did not affect (P > 0.05) total phenolic content; however, it enhanced (P < 0.05) black pepper oleoresin antioxidant activity. Black pepper oleoresin and its inclusion complex were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli K12 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Both free and encapsulated black pepper oleoresin effectively inhibited bacterial growth within the concentration range tested. Black pepper oleoresin encapsulated in HPBCD was able to inhibit Salmonella at lower (P < 0.05) concentrations than its corresponding free extract. Therefore, black pepper oleoresin-HPBCD nanocapsules could have important applications in the food industry as antimicrobial and antioxidant system.

  12. A single residue in the 126-kDa protein of pepper mild mottle virus controls the severity of symptoms on infected green bell pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, T U; Nagaoka, E N; Hagiwara, K; Sasaya, T; Omura, T

    2009-01-01

    Infectious cDNA clones originally derived from a mild strain of Pepper mild mottle virus were constructed by replacing residue 649, a critical point for attenuation of this virus, with all possible amino acids. All clones were infectious to pepper plants and induced a variety of symptoms, including no visible symptoms. The results of this study showed that a single amino acid mutation at residue 649 could control the function of the 126- and 183-kDa proteins, replicases with multiple roles in the life cycle of this virus.

  13. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    PubMed

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  14. Isolation and amplification of genomic DNA from recalcitrant dried berries of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.)--a medicinal spice.

    PubMed

    Dhanya, K; Kizhakkayil, Jaleel; Syamkumar, S; Sasikumar, B

    2007-10-01

    Black pepper is an important medicinal spice traded internationally. The extraction of high quality genomic DNA for PCR amplification from dried black pepper is challenging because of the presence of the exceptionally large amount of oxidized polyphenolic compounds, polysaccharides and other secondary metabolites. Here we report a modified hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol by incorporating potassium acetate and a final PEG precipitation step to isolate PCR amplifiable genomic DNA from dried and powdered berries of black pepper. The protocol has trade implication as it will help in the PCR characterization of traded black peppers from different countries.

  15. Imaging Erg and Jun transcription factor interaction in living cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Camuzeaux, Barbara; Heliot, Laurent; Coll, Jean . E-mail: martine.duterque@ibl.fr

    2005-07-15

    Physical interactions between transcription factors play important roles in modulating gene expression. Previous in vitro studies have shown a transcriptional synergy between Erg protein, an Ets family member, and Jun/Fos heterodimer, members of the bZip family, which requires direct Erg-Jun protein interactions. Visualization of protein interactions in living cells is a new challenge in biology. For this purpose, we generated fusion proteins of Erg, Fos, and Jun with yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins, YFP and CFP, respectively. After transient expression in HeLa cells, interactions of the resulting fusion proteins were explored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy (FRET) in fixed and living cells. FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun was monitored by using photobleaching FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Both techniques revealed the occurrence of intermolecular FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun. This is stressed by loss of FRET with an YFP-Erg version carrying a point mutation in its ETS domain. These results provide evidence for the interaction of Erg and Jun proteins in living cells as a critical prerequisite of their transcriptional synergy, but also for the essential role of the Y371 residue, conserved in most Ets proteins, in this interaction.

  16. Activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator through MEKK1-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siu, Yeung-Tung; Ching, Yick-Pang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2008-11-01

    CREB is a prototypic bZIP transcription factor and a master regulator of glucose metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Transducers of regulated CREB activity (TORCs) are essential transcriptional coactivators of CREB and an important point of regulation on which various signals converge. In this study, we report on the activation of TORC1 through MEKK1-mediated phosphorylation. MEKK1 potently activated TORC1, and this activation was independent of downstream effectors MEK1/MEK2, ERK2, JNK, p38, protein kinase A, and calcineurin. MEKK1 induced phosphorylation of TORC1 both in vivo and in vitro. Expression of the catalytic domain of MEKK1 alone in cultured mammalian cells sufficiently caused phosphorylation and subsequent activation of TORC1. MEKK1 physically interacted with TORC1 and stimulated its nuclear translocation. An activation domain responsive to MEKK1 stimulation was mapped to amino acids 431-650 of TORC1. As a physiological activator of CREB, interleukin 1alpha triggered MEKK1-dependent phosphorylation of TORC1 and its consequent recruitment to the cAMP response elements in the interleukin 8 promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest a new mechanism for regulated activation of TORC1 transcriptional coactivator and CREB signaling.

  17. Effects of biochar amendment on relieving cadmium stress and reducing cadmium accumulation in pepper.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyu; Zhao, Ye; Zhou, Huaidong; Gao, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Biochar is widely used in agricultural soils or heavy metal-polluted soils to improve the quality of the soils, which would affect the growth of the plant. However, the information of biochars' effect on the plant growth was still lacking, especially for the physiological response of the plant. Pot experiments were used to examine the effect of willow-derived biochars at two temperatures (450 and 600 °C) on cadmium (Cd) accumulation in pepper and to reveal the response of physiological parameters to exogenous Cd stress (1 and 5 mg/kg). The results showed that the accumulation of Cd in pepper roots was higher than that in pepper shoots. For low level of Cd treatments, high additional rates of the biochars could obviously reduce the accumulation of Cd in the pepper roots. Moreover, there was a negative correlation between the C content of the biochar-amended soils and the Cd content of the pepper root, suggesting that the application of biochar to the soil decreased the Cd accumulation in the root. A positive relationship between the H/C ratios of biochar-amended soils and their corresponding Cd concentrations in pepper root indicated that low thermal temperature-derived biochar could play an important role in immobilizing Cd in the soil. Furthermore, on the condition of low Cd level of treatments, the malondialdehyde content decreased in biochar-amended soils, especially at high biochar application rate. The chlorophyll content increased with increasing the rates of the biochar application. The physiological parameters indirectly proved that the application of biochar did not always alleviate the toxic effects of Cd on pepper leaves at high Cd concentration. PMID:26976015

  18. Identification of seven hydrophobic clusters in GCN4 making redundant contributions to transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B M; Drysdale, C M; Natarajan, K; Hinnebusch, A G

    1996-01-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator in the bZIP family that regulates amino acid biosynthetic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The N-terminal 100 amino acids of GCN4 contains a potent activation function that confers high-level transcription in the absence of the centrally located acidic activation domain (CAAD) delineated in previous studies. To identify specific amino acids important for activation by the N-terminal domain, we mutagenized a GCN4 allele lacking the CAAD and screened alleles in vivo for reduced expression of the HIS3 gene. We found four pairs of closely spaced phenylalanines and a leucine residue distributed throughout the N-terminal 100 residues of GCN4 that are required for high-level activation in the absence of the CAAD. Trp, Leu, and Tyr were highly functional substitutions for the Phe residue at position 45. Combined with our previous findings, these results indicate that GCN4 contains seven clusters of aromatic or bulky hydrophobic residues which make important contributions to transcriptional activation at HIS3. None of the seven hydrophobic clusters is essential for activation by full-length GCN4, and the critical residues in two or three clusters must be mutated simultaneously to observe a substantial reduction in GCN4 function. Numerous combinations of four or five intact clusters conferred high-level transcription of HIS3. We propose that many of the hydrophobic clusters in GCN4 act independently of one another to provide redundant means of stimulating transcription and that the functional contributions of these different segments are cumulative at the HIS3 promoter. On the basis of the primacy of bulky hydrophobic residues throughout the activation domain, we suggest that GCN4 contains multiple sites that mediate hydrophobic contacts with one or more components of the transcription initiation machinery. PMID:8816468

  19. NUCLEAR FACTOR Y, Subunit C (NF-YC) Transcription Factors Are Positive Regulators of Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardana, Chamindika L.; Holt III, Ben F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that NF-Y transcription factors are positive regulators of skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Three NF-YC genes (NF-YC3, NF-YC4, and NF-YC9) are known to have overlapping functions in photoperiod dependent flowering and previous studies demonstrated that they interact with basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. This included ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), which has well-demonstrated roles in photomorphogenesis. Similar to hy5 mutants, we report that nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants failed to inhibit hypocotyl elongation in all tested light wavelengths. Surprisingly, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 hy5 mutants had synergistic defects in light perception, suggesting that NF-Ys represent a parallel light signaling pathway. As with other photomorphogenic transcription factors, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants also partially suppressed the short hypocotyl and dwarf rosette phenotypes of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (cop1) mutants. Thus, our data strongly suggest that NF-Y transcription factors have important roles as positive regulators of photomorphogenesis, and in conjunction with other recent reports, implies that the NF-Y are multifaceted regulators of early seedling development. PMID:27685091

  20. Optimization of virus-induced gene silencing in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, J-E; Li, D-W; Gong, Z-H; Zhang, Y-L

    2013-07-24

    Virus-induced gene silencing is currently a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants. Here, we optimized the protocol for virus-induced gene silencing, and investigated factors that affect the efficiency of tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing in pepper plants. Consequently, an optimal protocol was obtained by the syringe-infiltration method in the leaves of pepper plants. The protocol involves 2-leaf stage plants, preparing the Agrobacterium inoculum at a final OD600 of 1.0 and then growing the inoculated plants at 22°C. Using this protocol, we achieved high efficiency in silencing CaPDS in different cultivars of pepper plants. We further used the CaPOD gene to illustrate the general reliability of this optimized protocol. Viral symptoms were observed on the leaves of inoculated plants of the Early Calwonder cultivar 25 days post-inoculation, indicating that this protocol can also be used to silence other genes in pepper plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression levels of CaPDS and CaPOD were dramatically reduced in inoculated leaves compared to control plants. These results demonstrate that the optimized protocol can be applied to functional genomic studies in pepper to investigate genes involved in a wide range of biological processes.

  1. Exposure to ozone reduces postharvest quality loss in red and green chilli peppers.

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Marcin; Rees, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    The effect of continuous exposure to ozone at 0.45, 0.9 and 2μmolmol(-1) on quality changes during the storage of red and green chilli peppers at 10°C was investigated. Ozone at 0.45 and 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced disease incidence in red peppers, with no further benefits at 2μmolmol(-1). Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) reduced weight loss during storage and improved firmness maintenance. Skin colour was bleached in red peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), and in green ones at all tested doses. Total phenolic content was not affected by ozone but antioxidant activity was reduced in green chilli peppers exposed to ozone at 2μmolmol(-1), due to lower ascorbic acid content in those samples. Ozone at 0.9μmolmol(-1) extended the shelf-life of chilli peppers. PMID:27211651

  2. Natural occurrence of mycotoxins and toxigenic capacity of Alternaria strains from mouldy peppers.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Cabral, Lucía; Terminiello, Laura; Fernández Pinto, Virginia; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Patriarca, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an important crop cultivated worldwide, with Argentina being one of the major producers in South America. The fruit is susceptible to several fungal diseases, leading to severe economic losses for producers. In this study, Alternaria was found as the prevalent genus in mouldy peppers (50% fruits infected). Morphological identification revealed that all 64 Alternaria isolates belonged to small-spored species, most of them corresponding to A. tenuissima, A. arborescens and A. alternata species-groups. Their secondary metabolite profile was evaluated in vitro; alternariols were synthesized by most of the isolates (91% for alternariol and 92% for alternariol monomethyl ether). A high number of Alternaria spp. also produced tenuazonic acid (64%), altenuene (84%) and tentoxin (72%). In addition, damaged pepper fruits were analysed for the presence of tenuazonic acid and alternariols. A total 32 out of 48 spoiled pepper fruits were contaminated with at least one of these metabolites. Half of the samples were positive for tenuazonic acid (range 8-11,422μg/kg), while alternariol and its monomethyl ether were less frequently detected (21 and 29%, respectively) and at lower concentrations. This is the first report on the natural occurrence of Alternaria mycotoxins in Argentinean sweet pepper, and highlights a consumer risk when mouldy fruits are used in industrialized products because these compounds are not destroyed by conventional heat treatments.

  3. Physiological quality and gene expression during the development of habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) seeds.

    PubMed

    Santos, H O; Von Pinho, E V R; Von Pinho, I V; Dutra, S M F; Andrade, T; Guimarães, R M

    2015-05-12

    Phytohormones have different characteristics and functions, and they may be subject to changes in their gene expression and synthesis during seed development. In this study, we evaluated the physiological qualities of habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacquin) during seed development and the expression of genes involved in germination. Seeds were obtained from fruits harvested at different stages of development [i.e., 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days after anthesis (DAA)]. Immediately after harvesting, the seeds were subjected to various tests to determine moisture content, germination, first count germination, and seedling emergence. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the expression of various genes, including MAN2, NCED, B73, ICL6, and GA3ox. Electrophoresis was used to assess the expression of various enzymes, including α-amylase, isocitrate-lyase, and endo-β-mannanase. Habanero peppers harvested at 70 DAA and subjected to 7 days of rest exhibited higher germination rates and vigor compared to those harvested at all other developmental stages. Peppers harvested at 63 DAA without drying exhibited higher α amylase and AmyB73 gene expression levels. Peppers harvested at 70 DAA with 7 days of rest exhibited higher endo-β-mannanase expression levels. MAN2 gene expression increased during the development of non-dried seeds until 70 DAA. Peppers harvested at 42 DAA exhibited the highest isocitrate-lyase and ICL6 gene activity levels in comparison to those at all other developmental stages.

  4. Complete genome sequence of a novel endornavirus isolated from hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Kil Hyun; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-12-01

    The complete genome of a putative new endornavirus infecting hot peppers (Capsicum annuum) was determined to be 14,729 nt in size, including 12 cytosines at the 3' end. The hot pepper-infecting virus has the highest nucleotide sequence similarity (94% query cover and 72% identity) to bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolated from the cultivar Yolo Wonder in the USA (GenBank accession no. JN019858). The putative single, large open reading frame encodes a 4,884-amino-acid-long polyprotein that contains four putative functional domains: a viral methyltransferase, a viral RNA helicase, a glycosyltransferase, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. A phylogenetic tree based on whole polyprotein sequences confirmed the close evolutionary relationship of the studied endornavirus to BPEV. The hot pepper-infecting virus also has a nick at nt position 975. Taken together, these results suggest that this virus belongs to a new species in the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), for which the name hot pepper endornavirus (HPEV) is proposed.

  5. Chili pepper consumption and gastric cancer in Mexico: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, L; Hernández Avila, M; Dubrow, R

    1994-02-01

    Laboratory studies indicate that capsaicin, the hot-tasting component of chili peppers, may be carcinogenic. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Mexico City during 1989-1990 to evaluate the relation between chili pepper consumption and gastric cancer risk. The study included 220 incident cases and 752 controls randomly selected from the general population. Information was collected by interview. Chili pepper consumers were at high risk for gastric cancer compared with nonconsumers (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio = 5.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.72-11.06). Among consumers, there was a highly significant trend of increasing risk with increasing self-rated level of consumption (low, medium, and high) (p = 2 x 10(-7). The odds ratio for high-level consumers compared with nonconsumers was 17.11 (95% CI 7.78-37.59). However, when consumption was measured as frequency per day, a significant trend among consumers was not observed. Multivariable adjustment increased the magnitude of the chili pepper-gastric cancer association, but a significant trend among consumers (measured as frequency per day) was still not observed. Chili pepper consumption may be a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, but further studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  6. Natural occurrence of mycotoxins and toxigenic capacity of Alternaria strains from mouldy peppers.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Cabral, Lucía; Terminiello, Laura; Fernández Pinto, Virginia; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Patriarca, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an important crop cultivated worldwide, with Argentina being one of the major producers in South America. The fruit is susceptible to several fungal diseases, leading to severe economic losses for producers. In this study, Alternaria was found as the prevalent genus in mouldy peppers (50% fruits infected). Morphological identification revealed that all 64 Alternaria isolates belonged to small-spored species, most of them corresponding to A. tenuissima, A. arborescens and A. alternata species-groups. Their secondary metabolite profile was evaluated in vitro; alternariols were synthesized by most of the isolates (91% for alternariol and 92% for alternariol monomethyl ether). A high number of Alternaria spp. also produced tenuazonic acid (64%), altenuene (84%) and tentoxin (72%). In addition, damaged pepper fruits were analysed for the presence of tenuazonic acid and alternariols. A total 32 out of 48 spoiled pepper fruits were contaminated with at least one of these metabolites. Half of the samples were positive for tenuazonic acid (range 8-11,422μg/kg), while alternariol and its monomethyl ether were less frequently detected (21 and 29%, respectively) and at lower concentrations. This is the first report on the natural occurrence of Alternaria mycotoxins in Argentinean sweet pepper, and highlights a consumer risk when mouldy fruits are used in industrialized products because these compounds are not destroyed by conventional heat treatments. PMID:27517345

  7. Complete genome sequence of a novel endornavirus isolated from hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Kil Hyun; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-12-01

    The complete genome of a putative new endornavirus infecting hot peppers (Capsicum annuum) was determined to be 14,729 nt in size, including 12 cytosines at the 3' end. The hot pepper-infecting virus has the highest nucleotide sequence similarity (94% query cover and 72% identity) to bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) isolated from the cultivar Yolo Wonder in the USA (GenBank accession no. JN019858). The putative single, large open reading frame encodes a 4,884-amino-acid-long polyprotein that contains four putative functional domains: a viral methyltransferase, a viral RNA helicase, a glycosyltransferase, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. A phylogenetic tree based on whole polyprotein sequences confirmed the close evolutionary relationship of the studied endornavirus to BPEV. The hot pepper-infecting virus also has a nick at nt position 975. Taken together, these results suggest that this virus belongs to a new species in the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), for which the name hot pepper endornavirus (HPEV) is proposed. PMID:26424198

  8. [Identification and localization of virus RNA in pepper (Capsicum anuum L.) chloroplasts by means of the PCR method].

    PubMed

    Mel'nichuk, M D; Dubin, A V; Sytnik, S K; Kozhukalo, B E; Alekseenko, I P; D'iachkova, O A

    2003-01-01

    Localization of virus RNA in stroma of Capsicum anuum L. chloroplasts was determined by the PCR method. Accumulation of virus protein in the membranes and stroma of infected pepper chloroplasts has been studied. It is concluded that the virus protein synthesis takes place in the pepper chloroplasts.

  9. Capsicum and capsaicin--a review: case report of the use of hot peppers in child abuse.

    PubMed

    Tominack, R L; Spyker, D A

    1987-01-01

    Capsaicin, the active principle of hot peppers of the genus Capsicum, exhibits broad bioactivity. It targets neuronal structures which contain substance P, clinically seen as gastrointestinal and dermatologic irritation, bronchospasm and fibrinolysis. As a research tool, capsaicin profoundly alters neurologic anatomy and function. We review the toxicity of capsaicin and comment briefly on the use of hot peppers in child abuse. PMID:3328791

  10. Nitrogen metabolism in pepper plants applied with different bioregulators.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Castilla, N; Romero, L

    2000-07-01

    Certain bioregulators were studied in relation to nitrogen metabolism of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Lamuyo). Plants were grown under controlled conditions and submitted to regular fertilization with macro- and micronutrients. Treatments were as follows: nontreated control (T0); fosfonutren [essential amino acids and micronutrients (46.9 mg L(-)(1))] (T1); biozyme [GA(3) (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus IAA (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus zeatin (83.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus chelated micronutrients] (T2); and GA(3) [16 mg L(-)(1)] (T3). The concentrations of NO(3)(-), organic N, amino acids, and proteins, the activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), and finally the foliar dry weight and yield were analyzed. The results indicated that the application of certain bioregulators, such as fosfonutren (T1), which contain amino acids can cause a negative effect on the efficiency and utilization of NO(3)(-), resulting in a drastic loss in growth and yield, even under the control treatment, in which no bioregulator was applied. On the contrary, the application of certain bioregulators based principally on the combination of different hormones, as in the case of biozyme (T2), increased NO(3)(-) assimilation under our experimental conditions, due possibly to a greater availability of these bioregulators in the leaves and increased NR and NiR activities. This appears to explain why the T2 treatment gave the greatest foliar dry weight and fruit yield per plant in the experiment.

  11. Proteome analysis of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Muhammad Asim; Grossmann, Jonas; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baginsky, Sacha

    2006-12-01

    We report a comprehensive proteome analysis of chromoplasts from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The combination of a novel strategy for database-independent detection of proteins from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data with standard database searches allowed us to identify 151 proteins with a high level of confidence. These include several well-known plastid proteins but also novel proteins that were not previously reported from other plastid proteome studies. The majority of the identified proteins are active in plastid carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among the most abundant individual proteins are capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillin, which are involved in the synthesis and storage of carotenoids that accumulate to high levels in chromoplasts. The relative abundances of the identified chromoplast proteins differ remarkably compared with their abundances in other plastid types, suggesting a chromoplast-specific metabolic network. Our results provide an overview of the major metabolic pathways active in chromoplasts and extend existing knowledge about prevalent metabolic activities of different plastid types.

  12. Phytotoxicity of sarmentine isolated from long pepper (Piper longum) fruit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huazhang; Morgan, Christy M; Asolkar, Ratnakar N; Koivunen, Marja E; Marrone, Pamela G

    2010-09-22

    Discovery of novel natural herbicides has become crucial to overcome increasing weed resistance and environmental issues. In this article, we describe the finding that a methanol extract of dry long pepper (Piper longum L.) fruits is phytotoxic to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. The bioassay-guided fractionation and purification of the crude extract led to isolation of sarmentine (1), a known compound, as the active principle. Phytotoxicity of 1 was examined with a variety of seedlings of field crops and weeds. Results indicated that 1 was a contact herbicide and possessed broad-spectrum herbicidal activity. Moreover, a series of sarmentine analogues were then synthesized to study the structure-activity relationship (SAR). SAR studies suggested that phytotoxicity of sarmentine and its analogues was specific due to chemical structures, i.e., the analogues of the acid moiety of 1 were active, but the amine and its analogues were inactive; the ester analogues and amide analogues with a primary amine of 1 were also inactive. In addition, quantification of 1 from different resources of the dry P. longum fruits using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry showed a wide variation, ranging from almost zero to 0.57%. This study suggests that 1 has potential as an active lead molecule for synthesized herbicides as well as for bioherbicides derived from natural resources. PMID:20839888

  13. Complete genome sequence and biological characterization of Moroccan pepper virus (MPV) and reclassification of Lettuce necrotic stunt virus as MPV.

    PubMed

    Wintermantel, William M; Hladky, Laura L

    2013-05-01

    Moroccan pepper virus (MPV) and Lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV) have been steadily increasing in prevalence in central Asia and western North America, respectively, over the past decade. Recent sequence analysis of LNSV demonstrated a close relationship between the coat proteins of LNSV and MPV. To determine the full extent of the relationship between LNSV and MPV, the genomes of three MPV isolates were sequenced and compared with that of LNSV. Sequence analysis demonstrated that genomic nucleotide sequences as well as virus-encoded proteins of the three MPV isolates and LNSV shared 97% or greater identity. A full-length clone of a California LNSV isolate was developed and virus derived from infectious transcripts was used to evaluate host plant reactions under controlled conditions. Symptoms of LNSV matched those described previously for MPV on most of a select series of host plants, although some differences were observed. Collectively, these molecular and biological results demonstrate that LNSV should be classified as MPV within the family Tombusviridae, genus Tombusvirus, and confirm the presence of MPV in North America. PMID:23360531

  14. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Amber J.; Broman, Aimee T.; Zarnowski, Robert; Dwyer, Teigan G.; Bond, Laura M.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Fontaine, Joël; Ntambi, James M.; Keleş, Sündüz; Kendziorski, Christina; Gauthier, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s) underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ) fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0–48 hours), gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C) and during the phase transition to mold (22°C). This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition. PMID:26114571

  15. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators of Zat12 using comprehensive yeast one-hybrid screens.

    PubMed

    Ben Daniel, Bat-Hen; Cattan, Esther; Wachtel, Chaim; Avrahami, Dorit; Glick, Yair; Malichy, Asaf; Gerber, Doron; Miller, Gad

    2016-08-01

    To appropriately acclimate to environmental stresses, plants have to rapidly activate a specific transcriptional program. Yet, the identity and function of many of the transcriptional regulators that mediate early responses to abiotic stress stimuli is still unknown. In this work we employed the promoter of the multi-stress-responsive zinc-finger protein Zat12 in yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) screens to identify early abiotic stress-responsive transcriptional regulators. Analysis of Zat12 promoter fragments fused to luciferase underlined an approximately 200 bp fragment responsive to NaCl and to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using these segments and others as baits against Y1H control or stress Arabidopsis prey libraries, we identified 15 potential Zat12 transcriptional regulators. Among the prominent proteins identified were known transcription factors including bZIP29 and ANAC91 as well as unknown function proteins such as a homolog of the human USB1, a U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) processing protein, and dormancy/auxin-associated family protein 2 (DRM2). Altered expression of Zat12 during high light stress in the knockout mutants further indicated the involvement of these proteins in the regulation of Zat12. Using a state of the art microfluidic approach we showed that AtUSB1 and DRM2 can specifically bind dsDNA and were able to identify the preferred DNA-binding motif of all four proteins. Overall, the proteins identified in this work provide an important start point for charting the earliest signaling network of Zat12 and of other genes required for acclimation to abiotic stresses. PMID:26923089

  16. Mobility of heavy metals from soil into hot pepper fruits: a field study.

    PubMed

    Antonious, G F; Kochhar, T S

    2009-01-01

    Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin contribute to pungency as well as having health-promoting properties, in peppers. Twenty-three genotypes (four spp.) of hot pepper from the USDA germplasm collection were grown in the field to identify accessions having increased concentrations of these two compounds and determine the concentrations of heavy metals, in mature fruits. Concentrations and relative proportions of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and seven heavy metals varied between and within pepper species. Plant Introduction 547069 (C. annuum) contained the greatest concentrations of the two pungent compounds. Fruits of PI-439381 and PI-267729 (C. baccatum) accumulated the greatest concentrations of Pb, while PI-246331 (C. annuum) accumulated the greatest concentration of Cd among accessions tested.

  17. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  18. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Stamler, Rio A; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay.

  19. Bioflavour production from tomato and pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Güneşer, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Karagül Yüceer, Yonca; Özmen Toğay, Sine; İşleten Hoşoğlu, Müge; Elibol, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Bioflavours are called natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds which are produced using metabolic pathway of the microorganism and/or plant cells or their enzyme systems with bioengineering approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate bioflavour production from tomato and red pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii. Obtained specific growth rates of K. marxianus and D. hansenii in tomato pomace were 0.081/h and 0.177/h, respectively. The bioflavour profile differed between the yeasts. Both yeasts can produce esters and alcohols such as phenyl ethyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isoamyl acetate, phenyl ethyl acetate and isovaleric acid. "Tarhana" and "rose" were descriptive flavour terms for tomato and pepper pomaces fermented by K. marxianus, respectively. Tomato pomace fermented by D. hansenii had the most intense "green bean" flavour while "fermented vegetable" and "storage/yeast" were defined as characteristic flavour terms for pepper pomaces fermented by D. hansenii. PMID:25614449

  20. Analysis of the blackening of green pepper (Piper nigrum Linnaeus) berries.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fenglin; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong; Fang, Yiming; Wang, Qinghuang

    2013-06-01

    This paper investigates polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, reduced weight percentage after sun drying, and the changes in colour and appearance of green pepper (Piper nigrum Linnaeus) berries after blanching and sun drying. The results show that the degree of reduced weight percentage and browning in green pepper berries after blanching for 10 min is greater at 100°C than at 90 and 80°C. Moreover, the samples blanched at 100°C for 10 min had the fastest water loss, but the lowest PPO activity. Thus, the PPO enzymatic oxidation of polyphenols might not be the only reason for the browning of green pepper berries. This result is significantly different from that of Variyar, Pendharkar, Banerjeea, and Bandyopadhyay (1988) and therefore deserves further study.

  1. William Pepper Jr, MD (1843-1898): portrait of a nineteenth-century medical educator.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, Vincent; Bellini, Lisa M

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Pepper Jr was a prominent Philadelphia physician whose contributions to medicine in the late 19th century are not widely known. As a young physician he rose in stature rapidly due to his abilities as a diagnostician, teacher, writer and researcher. His primary interest, however, was to improve the education of physicians. He orchestrated the creation of America's first university-controlled teaching hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, enabling substantial improvements in clinical training. Pepper later became Provost of the University of Pennsylvania and ambitiously transformed the curriculum of the medical school, providing greater basic science and clinical training. He also worked to establish several institutes and museums in Philadelphia in order to promote academic pursuits, particularly in medicine. William Pepper Jr was one of the 19th century's foremost medical educators and his accomplishments helped reshape the way medicine was taught throughout the United States.

  2. Phytyl Fatty Acid Esters in the Pulp of Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Krauß, Stephanie; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2016-08-17

    Phytyl fatty acid esters (PFAE) are esters of fatty acids with the isoprenoid alcohol phytol (3,7R,11R,15-tetramethylhexadec-2E-enol). In this study, PFAE were identified and quantified in bell pepper using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All red (n = 14) and yellow (n = 6) samples contained six or seven PFAE at 0.9-11.2 mg/100 g fresh weight. By contrast, PFAE were not detected in green bell pepper samples (n = 3). PFAE might eventually be a source for bioavailable phytol, which can be transformed into phytanic acid by humans. Phytanic acid cannot be properly degraded by patients who suffer from Refsum's disease (tolerable daily intake (TDI) ≤ 10 mg of phytanic acid). The phytol moiety of the PFAE (0.4-5.4 mg/100 g fresh weight) would contribute up to ∼50% to the TDI with the consumption of only one portion of bell pepper fruit pulp.

  3. Changes of lipoxygenase and fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase activities in bell pepper fruits during maturation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, K; Shibata, Y; Tateba, H; Hatanaka, A; Kajiwara, T

    1997-01-01

    Developmental changes in fatty acid hydroperoxide lyase (HPO lyase) and lipoxygenase (LOX) during the maturation of bell pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Kyonami) were examined by means of activity measurements, immunological detection of both the enzymes, and analysis of the volatile compounds formed upon homogenization of the fruits. Both the enzyme activities decreased with maturation, and immunological studies showed that the amounts of the enzymes concomitantly decreased. The amounts of six-carbon aldehydes and alcohols formed from bell pepper fruits upon homogenization also decreased during maturation, and with the fully ripened red fruits, these volatile compounds were hardly detectable. These results suggest that the major factor contributing to the changes in the composition of volatile compounds during the maturation of bell pepper fruits was changes in the amounts of HPO lyase and LOX.

  4. Antioxidant activities of two sweet pepper Capsicum annuum L. varieties phenolic extracts and the effects of thermal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yazdizadeh Shotorbani, Narmin; Jamei, Rashid; Heidari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Sweet peppers Capsicum annuum L. (C. annuum) are an excellent source of vitamins A and C as well as phenolic compounds, which are important antioxidant components that may reduce the risk of diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate their antioxidant activity under various temperatures. Materials and Methods: To compare the antioxidant activity in various temperatures (20, 35, 50, and 65 °C), two different types of colored (red and green) sweet bell peppers C annuum were selected. The red peppers were selected from those cultivated in Shahreza, Esfahan and the green peppers with the local name of Gijlar were selected from those cultivated in Urmia, West Azarbayjan. The experiments were carried out to measure the total phenolic and flavonoid content, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), chain-breaking activity, scavenging activities of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and hydrogen peroxide radicals. Results: Total phenol and flavonoid contents of pepper extracts were enhanced with increasing temperature to 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of DPPH radical of red pepper extract was enhanced because of putting at 50 °C for 30 min and for Gijlar pepper extract scavenging capacity was increased at 65 °C. Scavenging capacity of hydrogen peroxide radical of extracts was the highest at 35 °C. Chain-breaking activity of red pepper extract was increased for 60 min at 35 °C. FRAP (C) of red pepper extract was significantly different (p<0.05) in compare with Gijlar pepper. Conclusion: An appropriate temperature maintained a high antioxidant activity of phenolic compound, which could be due to the combined effect of non enzymatic reaction and phenolic compound stability. PMID:25050256

  5. Could essential oils of green and black pepper be used as food preservatives?

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Miloš; Stojković, Dejan; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Marković, Tatjana; Smiljković, Marija; Soković, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Black and green pepper essential oils were used in this study in order to determine the chemical composition, in vitro antimicrobial activity against food spoilage microorganisms and in situ oils effect on food microorganism, after incorporation in chicken soup, by suggested methodology for calculation of Growth inhibition concentrations (GIC50). Chemical analysis revealed a total of 34 components. The major constituent of black pepper oil was trans-caryophyllene (30.33 %), followed by limonene (12.12 %), while β-pinene (24.42 %), δ(3)-carene (19.72 %), limonene (18.73 %) and α-pinene (10.39 %) were dominant compounds in green pepper oil. Antimicrobial activity was determined by microdilution technique and minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal/fungicidal concentrations (MBC/MFC) were determined. Green pepper oil showed stronger antibacterial and antifungal activity (MIC 0.50-1.87; MBC 0.63-2.5 mg/ml; MIC 0.07-0.16; MFC 0.13-1.25 mg/ml) against black pepper oil (MIC 0.07-3.75; MBC 0.60-10.00 mg/ml; MIC 0.63-5.00; MFC 1.25-10.00 mg/ml. Oils successfully inhibited the growth of S. aureus in chicken soup in a dose dependent manner. GIC50 values were calculated after 24, 48 and 72 h and were in range of 0.156-0.689 mg/ml. The 50 % inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of EOs were 36.84 and 38.77 mg/ml with in 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay respectively. The obtained results revealed that black and green pepper volatiles are efficient in controlling the growth of known food-spoilage microorganisms. PMID:26396402

  6. Physiology of pepper fruit and the metabolism of antioxidants: chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, José M.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana; del Río, Luis A.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Álvarez de Morales, Paz; Camejo, Daymi M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Pepper (Capsicum annuum) contains high levels of antioxidants, such as vitamins A and C and flavonoids. However, information on the role of these beneficial compounds in the physiology of pepper fruit remains scarce. Recent studies have shown that antioxidants in ripe pepper fruit play a key role in responses to temperature changes, and the redox state at the time of harvest affects the nutritional value for human consumption. In this paper, the role of antioxidant metabolism of pepper fruit during ripening and in the response to low temperature is addressed, paying particular attention to ascorbate, NADPH and the superoxide dismutase enzymatic system. The participation of chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes in the ripening process is also investigated. Scope and Results Important changes occur at a subcellular level during ripening of pepper fruit. Chloroplasts turn into chromoplasts, with drastic conversion of their metabolism, and the role of the ascorbate–glutathione cycle is essential. In mitochondria from red fruits, higher ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and Mn-SOD activities are involved in avoiding the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in these organelles during ripening. Peroxisomes, whose antioxidant capacity at fruit ripening is substantially affected, display an atypical metabolic pattern during this physiological stage. In spite of these differences observed in the antioxidative metabolism of mitochondria and peroxisomes, proteomic analysis of these organelles, carried out by 2-D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF and provided here for the first time, reveals no changes between the antioxidant metabolism from immature (green) and ripe (red) fruits. Conclusions Taken together, the results show that investigation of molecular and enzymatic antioxidants from cell compartments, especially chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes, is a useful tool to study the physiology of pepper fruit, particularly in the context of

  7. Levels of Nitrates and Nitrites in Chili Pepper and Ventricina Salami

    PubMed Central

    Piccirilli, Michele; Iafigliola, Luigi; Amadoro, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ventricina is a traditional sausage made from pork meat produced in the Abruzzi and Molise regions. The aim of this study was to detect the content of nitrates and nitrites in local cultivars of chilli pepper, and their concentration in ventricina samples spiced with the same chilli pepper. Furthermore, it was examined whether, in the samples of ventricina with nitrate addition, the spicing with chilli pepper could exceed the maximum added dose. The concentration of nitrates and nitrites in the organic chilli pepper was 531.0±94.6 mg/kg and less than 5.0 mg, respectively, in the traditional chilli pepper it was 394.0±39.6 and less than 5.0 mg, while in the commercial it was 325.0±115.0 and less than 5.0 mg. The determination of nitrites and nitrates was carried out by high performance ion chromatography. In ventricina samples produced without added sodium nitrate, nitrates and nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at the case-filling time (t0) and after 50 days of aging (t50). In the samples of ventricina with added sodium nitrate, nitrate concentration values were 134.0±20.9 mg/kg at t0 and 129.0±15.4 mg/kg at t50, while the nitrites were below 5.0 mg/kg at t0 and 28.8±15.8 mg/kg at t50. Although in ventricina the amount of chilli pepper is quite relevant, it did not lead to a detectable concentration of nitrates. The maximum allowed amount was never exceeded. PMID:27800331

  8. Could essential oils of green and black pepper be used as food preservatives?

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Miloš; Stojković, Dejan; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Marković, Tatjana; Smiljković, Marija; Soković, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Black and green pepper essential oils were used in this study in order to determine the chemical composition, in vitro antimicrobial activity against food spoilage microorganisms and in situ oils effect on food microorganism, after incorporation in chicken soup, by suggested methodology for calculation of Growth inhibition concentrations (GIC50). Chemical analysis revealed a total of 34 components. The major constituent of black pepper oil was trans-caryophyllene (30.33 %), followed by limonene (12.12 %), while β-pinene (24.42 %), δ(3)-carene (19.72 %), limonene (18.73 %) and α-pinene (10.39 %) were dominant compounds in green pepper oil. Antimicrobial activity was determined by microdilution technique and minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal/fungicidal concentrations (MBC/MFC) were determined. Green pepper oil showed stronger antibacterial and antifungal activity (MIC 0.50-1.87; MBC 0.63-2.5 mg/ml; MIC 0.07-0.16; MFC 0.13-1.25 mg/ml) against black pepper oil (MIC 0.07-3.75; MBC 0.60-10.00 mg/ml; MIC 0.63-5.00; MFC 1.25-10.00 mg/ml. Oils successfully inhibited the growth of S. aureus in chicken soup in a dose dependent manner. GIC50 values were calculated after 24, 48 and 72 h and were in range of 0.156-0.689 mg/ml. The 50 % inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of EOs were 36.84 and 38.77 mg/ml with in 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay respectively. The obtained results revealed that black and green pepper volatiles are efficient in controlling the growth of known food-spoilage microorganisms.

  9. OsbZIP58, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, regulates starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiu-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Starch composition and the amount in endosperm, both of which contribute dramatically to seed yield, cooking quality, and taste in cereals, are determined by a series of complex biochemical reactions. However, the mechanism regulating starch biosynthesis in cereal seeds is not well understood. This study showed that OsbZIP58, a bZIP transcription factor, is a key transcriptional regulator controlling starch synthesis in rice endosperm. OsbZIP58 was expressed mainly in endosperm during active starch synthesis. osbzip58 null mutants displayed abnormal seed morphology with altered starch accumulation in the white belly region and decreased amounts of total starch and amylose. Moreover, osbzip58 had a higher proportion of short chains and a lower proportion of intermediate chains of amylopectin. Furthermore, OsbZIP58 was shown to bind directly to the promoters of six starch-synthesizing genes, OsAGPL3, Wx, OsSSIIa, SBE1, OsBEIIb, and ISA2, and to regulate their expression. These findings indicate that OsbZIP58 functions as a key regulator of starch synthesis in rice seeds and provide new insights into seed quality control. PMID:23846875

  10. Shared developmental roles and transcriptional control of autophagy and apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Péter; Borsos, Eva; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Kovács, Tibor; Kovács, Attila L; Sigmond, Tímea; Hargitai, Balázs; Pásztor, Líz; Sengupta, Tanima; Dengg, Marlene; Pécsi, Ildikó; Tóth, Judit; Nilsen, Hilde; Vértessy, Beáta G; Vellai, Tibor

    2011-05-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated self-degradation process of eukaryotic cells that, depending on the cellular milieu, can either promote survival or act as an alternative mechanism of programmed cell death (PCD) in terminally differentiated cells. Despite the important developmental and medical implications of autophagy and the main form of PCD, apoptosis, orchestration of their regulation remains poorly understood. Here, we show in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, that various genetic and pharmacological interventions causing embryonic lethality trigger a massive cell death response that has both autophagic and apoptotic features. The two degradation processes are also redundantly required for normal development and viability in this organism. Furthermore, the CES-2-like basic region leucine-zipper (bZip) transcription factor ATF-2, an upstream modulator of the core apoptotic cell death pathway, is able to directly regulate the expression of at least two key autophagy-related genes, bec-1/ATG6 and lgg-1/ATG8. Thus, the two cell death mechanisms share a common method of transcriptional regulation. Together, these results imply that under certain physiological and pathological conditions, autophagy and apoptosis are co-regulated to ensure the proper morphogenesis and survival of the developing organism. The identification of apoptosis and autophagy as compensatory cellular pathways in C. elegans might help us to understand how dysregulated PCD in humans can lead to diverse pathologies, including cancer, neurodegeneration and diabetes. PMID:21502138

  11. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Lin, Jianzhong; Lin, Chentao

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1. Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  12. A Drought-Inducible Transcription Factor Delays Reproductive Timing in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Tao; Gomez, Adam; Li, Cong; Yu, Chunsheng; Li, Hongyu; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Yuanzhu; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chentao

    2016-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying photoperiod or temperature control of flowering time have been recently elucidated, but how plants regulate flowering time in response to other external factors, such as water availability, remains poorly understood. Using a large-scale Hybrid Transcription Factor approach, we identified a bZIP transcriptional factor, O. sativa ABA responsive element binding factor 1 (OsABF1), which acts as a suppressor of floral transition in a photoperiod-independent manner. Simultaneous knockdown of both OsABF1 and its closest homologous gene, OsbZIP40, in rice (Oryza sativa) by RNA interference results in a significantly earlier flowering phenotype. Molecular and genetic analyses demonstrate that a drought regime enhances expression of the OsABF1 gene, which indirectly suppresses expression of the Early heading date 1 (Ehd1) gene that encodes a key activator of rice flowering. Furthermore, we identified a drought-inducible gene named OsWRKY104 that is under the direct regulation of OsABF1 Overexpression of OsWRKY104 can suppress Ehd1 expression and confers a later flowering phenotype in rice. Together, these findings reveal a novel pathway by which rice modulates heading date in response to the change of ambient water availability. PMID:26945049

  13. First record of tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) on pepper in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fanigliulo, A; Pacella, R; Comes, S; Crescenzi, A

    2008-01-01

    During a survey in summer 2007, a disease of pepper (Capsicum annuum) under plastic tunnels was observed in Policoro (Matera), on the Ionic coast of Basilicata Region, with a disease incidence in some cases of more than 50%. Affected cultivars were Eppo and Almund (S Et G). The diseased plants exhibited light mosaic or mottling, leaf distortion, interveinal and marginal leaf chlorosis, upward curling of leaf margins of older leaves. The causal pathogen was suspected to be a begomovirus due to the large population of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci observed on the crop. Detection assays for Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) were used. In DAS-ELISA, positive results (178 plants resulted positive over 200 symptomatic plants assayed) were obtained using a "broad-spectrum" reagent combination (distributed by Bioreba AG) detecting TYLCV, TYLCSV, and other begamoviruses. A couple of synthetic oligonucleotides allowing the amplification of the whole coat protein (CP) gene of TYLCSV and TYLCV was used for PCR of ELISA positive samples in order to perform the molecular characterisation of the viral isolate responsible of the disease. RFLP analysis performed on the PCR product, 1008 bp long, showed the presence of only TYLCSV in the infected pepper plants. The same couple of primers allowed the detection of the virus also in symptomless pepper plants. To test whitefly transmission, adults of B. tabaci allowed to feed on naturally infected pepper plants were transferred on 10 healthy Eppo pepper seedlings (15 whiteflies/plant). Insects were killed 2 days later using an insecticide. Twenty days post exposition 10 plants/10 resulted positive in ELISA, and showed the same symptoms observed in natural infection. TYLCSV was not reported before on pepper in the surveyed area, but it was recorded with severe outbreaks on tomato, both in protected and in open field crops. This species was probably the primary source of infection from

  14. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  15. Pepper yellow mosaic virus, a new potyvirus in sweetpepper, Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Nagata, A K; Fonseca, M E N; Resende, R O; Boiteux, L S; Monte, D C; Dusi, A N; de Avila, A C; van der Vlugt, R A A

    2002-04-01

    A potyvirus was found causing yellow mosaic and veinal banding in sweetpepper in Central and Southeast Brazil. The sequence analysis of the 3' terminal region of the viral RNA revealed a coat protein of 278 amino acids, followed by 275 nucleotides in the 3'-untranslated region preceding a polyadenylated tail. The virus shared 77.4% coat protein amino acid identity with Pepper severe mosaic virus, the closest Potyvirus species. The 3'-untranslated region was highly divergent from other potyviruses. Based on these results, the virus found in sweetpepper plants could be considered as a new potyvirus. The name Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) is suggested.

  16. Starch fossils and the domestication and dispersal of chili peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Linda; Dickau, Ruth; Zarrillo, Sonia; Holst, Irene; Pearsall, Deborah M; Piperno, Dolores R; Berman, Mary Jane; Cooke, Richard G; Rademaker, Kurt; Ranere, Anthony J; Raymond, J Scott; Sandweiss, Daniel H; Scaramelli, Franz; Tarble, Kay; Zeidler, James A

    2007-02-16

    Chili peppers (Capsicum spp.) are widely cultivated food plants that arose in the Americas and are now incorporated into cuisines worldwide. Here, we report a genus-specific starch morphotype that provides a means to identify chili peppers from archaeological contexts and trace both their domestication and dispersal. These starch microfossils have been found at seven sites dating from 6000 years before present to European contact and ranging from the Bahamas to southern Peru. The starch grain assemblages demonstrate that maize and chilies occurred together as an ancient and widespread Neotropical plant food complex that predates pottery in some regions.

  17. Black pepper powder microbiological quality improvement using DBD systems in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Maciej; Hołub, Marcin; Balcerak, Michał; Kalisiak, Stanisław; Dąbrowski, Waldemar

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary results are given regarding black pepper powder decontamination using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in atmospheric pressure. Three different DBD reactor constructions were investigated, both packaged and unpackaged material was treated. Due to potential, industrial applications, in addition to microbiological results, water activity, loss of mass and the properties of packaging material, regarding barrier properties were investigated. Argon based treatment of packed pepper with DBD reactor configuration is proposed and satisfactory results are presented for treatment time of 5 min or less. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  18. Bactericidal activity of black pepper, bay leaf, aniseed and coriander against oral isolates.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nazia Masood Ahmed; Tariq, Perween

    2006-07-01

    Present investigation focused on antibacterial potential of aqueous decoction of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L.), aniseed (Pimpinella anisum L.), and coriander (Coriandum sativum L.) against 176 bacterial isolates belonging to 12 different genera of bacterial population isolated from oral cavity of 200 individuals. The disc diffusion technique was employed. Overall aqueous decoction of black pepper was the most bacterial-toxic exhibited 75% antibacterial activity as compared to aqueous decoction of bay leaf (53.4%) and aqueous decoction of aniseed (18.1%), at the concentration of 10 ml/disc. The aqueous decoction of coriander did not show any antibacterial effect against tested bacterial isolates.

  19. Genetic and molecular regulation of fruit and plant domestication traits in tomato and pepper.

    PubMed

    Paran, Ilan; van der Knaap, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Tomato and pepper are two Solanaceous fruit crops that display an enormous diversity in fruit morphology. In this review, we will present an overview of the history of tomato and pepper and discuss key plant traits that were specifically selected during domestication of the two species. The traits discussed are fruit weight, shape, colour, ripening, pungency and plant architecture. We will review these characteristics as well as the genetic loci or genes that control these features, questioning whether mutations at orthologous loci occurred independently in these two species or whether unique plant and fruit features resulted in selection at different genes. PMID:18037678

  20. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-02-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (approximately 80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3-10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5-10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(-2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(-2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element.

  1. Analysis of the spacing between the two palindromes of activation sequence-1 with respect to binding to different TGA factors and transcriptional activation potential

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Stefanie; Thurow, Corinna; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Gatz, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    In higher plants, activation sequence-1 (as-1) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter mediates both salicylic acid- and auxin-inducible transcriptional activation. Originally found in viral and T-DNA promoters, as-1-like elements are also functional elements of plant promoters activated in the course of a defence response upon pathogen attack. as-1-like elements are characterised by two imperfect palindromes with the palindromic centres being spaced by 12 bp. They are recognised by plant nuclear as-1-binding factor ASF-1, the major component of which is basic/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein TGA2.2 (∼80%) in Nicotiana tabacum. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, ASF-1 as well as bZIP proteins TGA2.2, TGA2.1 and TGA1a showed a 3–10-fold reduced binding affinity to mutant as-1 elements encoding insertions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 bp between the palindromes, respectively. This correlated with a 5–10-fold reduction in transcriptional activation from these elements in transient expression assays. Although ASF-1 and TGA factors bound efficiently to a mutant element carrying a 2 bp deletion between the palindromes [as-1/(–2)], the latter was strongly compromised with respect to mediating gene expression in vivo. A fusion protein consisting of TGA2.2 and a constitutive activation domain mediated transactivation from as-1/(–2) demonstrating binding of TGA factors in vivo. We therefore conclude that both DNA binding and transactivation require optimal positioning of TGA factors on the as-1 element. PMID:11809891

  2. Identification of an miRNA candidate reflects the possible significance of transcribed microsatellites in the hairpin precursors of black pepper.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2012-06-01

    Plant miRNAs (18-24nt) are generated by the RNase III-type Dicer endonuclease from the endogenous hairpin precursors ('pre-miRNAs') with significant regulatory functions. The transcribed regions display a higher frequency of microsatellites, when compared to other regions of the genomic DNA. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) resulting from replication slippage occurring in transcripts affect the expression of genes. The available experimental evidence for the incidence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors is limited. Considering the potential significance of SSRs in the miRNA genes, we carried out a preliminary analysis to verify the presence of SSRs in the pri-miRNAs of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). We isolated a (CT) dinucleotide SSR bearing transcript using SMART strategy. The transcript was predicted to be a 'pri-miRNA candidate' with Dicer sites based on miRNA prediction tools and MFOLD structural predictions. The presence of this 'miRNA candidate' was confirmed by real-time TaqMan assays. The upstream sequence of the 'miRNA candidate' by genome walking when subjected to PlantCARE showed the presence of certain promoter elements, and the deduced amino acid showed significant similarity with NAP1 gene, which affects the transcription of many genes. Moreover the hairpin-like precursor overlapped the neighbouring NAP1 gene. In silico analysis revealed distinct putative functions for the 'miRNA candidate', of which majority were related to growth. Hence, we assume that this 'miRNA candidate' may get activated during transcription of NAP gene, thereby regulating the expression of many genes involved in developmental processes. PMID:22367484

  3. Comparison of Fungal Community in Black Pepper-Vanilla and Vanilla Monoculture Systems Associated with Vanilla Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Xue, Chao; Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Huasong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Long-term vanilla monocropping often results in the occurrence of vanilla Fusarium wilt disease, seriously affecting its production all over the world. In the present study, vanilla exhibited significantly less Fusarium wilt disease in the soil of a long-term continuously cropped black pepper orchard. The entire fungal communities of bulk and rhizosphere soils between the black pepper-vanilla system (i.e., vanilla cropped in the soil of a continuously cropped black pepper orchard) and vanilla monoculture system were compared through the deep pyrosequencing. The results showed that the black pepper-vanilla system revealed a significantly higher fungal diversity than the vanilla monoculture system in both bulk and rhizosphere soils. The UniFrac-weighted PCoA analysis revealed significant differences in bulk soil fungal community structures between the two cropping systems, and fungal community structures were seriously affected by the vanilla root system. In summary, the black pepper-vanilla system harbored a lower abundance of Fusarium oxysporum in the vanilla rhizosphere soil and increased the putatively plant-beneficial fungal groups such as Trichoderma and Penicillium genus, which could explain the healthy growth of vanilla in the soil of the long-term continuously cropped black pepper field. Thus, cropping vanilla in the soil of continuously cropped black pepper fields for maintaining the vanilla industry is executable and meaningful as an agro-ecological system. PMID:26903995

  4. Analysis of black pepper volatiles by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography: A comparison of terpenes profiles with hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Gracka, Anna

    2015-10-30

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is widely used in food flavor compounds analysis in majority for profiling volatile compounds. Based on such profiles conclusions are often drawn concerning the percentage composition of volatile compounds in particular food, spices or raw materials. This paper focuses on the usefulness of SPME for the profiling of volatile compounds from spices using black pepper as an example. SPME profiles obtained in different analytical conditions were compared to the profile of pepper volatiles obtained using hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus. The profiles of both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes of black pepper were highly dependent on sample weight (0.1 and 1g samples were tested), and extraction time (durations from 2 to 120min were tested), regardless of the SPME fiber used (PDMS and CAR/PDMS coatings were used). The characteristic phenomenon for extraction from dry ground pepper was the decrease of monoterpenes % share in volatiles with increasing extraction times, whereas at the same time the % contents of sesquiterpenes increased. Addition of water to ground pepper substantially changed extraction kinetics and mutual proportions of mono to sesquiterpenes compared to dry samples by minimizing changes in mono- to sesquiterpenes ratio in different extraction times. Obtained results indicate that SPME can be a fast extraction method for volatiles of black pepper. Short extraction times (2-10min) in conjunction with the fast GC analysis (2.1min) proposed here may offer fast alternative to hydrodistillation allowing black pepper terpenes characterization. PMID:26427328

  5. Comparison of Fungal Community in Black Pepper-Vanilla and Vanilla Monoculture Systems Associated with Vanilla Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Xue, Chao; Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Huasong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Long-term vanilla monocropping often results in the occurrence of vanilla Fusarium wilt disease, seriously affecting its production all over the world. In the present study, vanilla exhibited significantly less Fusarium wilt disease in the soil of a long-term continuously cropped black pepper orchard. The entire fungal communities of bulk and rhizosphere soils between the black pepper-vanilla system (i.e., vanilla cropped in the soil of a continuously cropped black pepper orchard) and vanilla monoculture system were compared through the deep pyrosequencing. The results showed that the black pepper-vanilla system revealed a significantly higher fungal diversity than the vanilla monoculture system in both bulk and rhizosphere soils. The UniFrac-weighted PCoA analysis revealed significant differences in bulk soil fungal community structures between the two cropping systems, and fungal community structures were seriously affected by the vanilla root system. In summary, the black pepper-vanilla system harbored a lower abundance of Fusarium oxysporum in the vanilla rhizosphere soil and increased the putatively plant-beneficial fungal groups such as Trichoderma and Penicillium genus, which could explain the healthy growth of vanilla in the soil of the long-term continuously cropped black pepper field. Thus, cropping vanilla in the soil of continuously cropped black pepper fields for maintaining the vanilla industry is executable and meaningful as an agro-ecological system.

  6. Comparison of Fungal Community in Black Pepper-Vanilla and Vanilla Monoculture Systems Associated with Vanilla Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Xue, Chao; Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Huasong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Long-term vanilla monocropping often results in the occurrence of vanilla Fusarium wilt disease, seriously affecting its production all over the world. In the present study, vanilla exhibited significantly less Fusarium wilt disease in the soil of a long-term continuously cropped black pepper orchard. The entire fungal communities of bulk and rhizosphere soils between the black pepper-vanilla system (i.e., vanilla cropped in the soil of a continuously cropped black pepper orchard) and vanilla monoculture system were compared through the deep pyrosequencing. The results showed that the black pepper-vanilla system revealed a significantly higher fungal diversity than the vanilla monoculture system in both bulk and rhizosphere soils. The UniFrac-weighted PCoA analysis revealed significant differences in bulk soil fungal community structures between the two cropping systems, and fungal community structures were seriously affected by the vanilla root system. In summary, the black pepper-vanilla system harbored a lower abundance of Fusarium oxysporum in the vanilla rhizosphere soil and increased the putatively plant-beneficial fungal groups such as Trichoderma and Penicillium genus, which could explain the healthy growth of vanilla in the soil of the long-term continuously cropped black pepper field. Thus, cropping vanilla in the soil of continuously cropped black pepper fields for maintaining the vanilla industry is executable and meaningful as an agro-ecological system. PMID:26903995

  7. Evaluation of a push-pull strategy for the management of Frankliniella bispinosa (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in bell peppers.

    PubMed

    Tyler-Julian, Kara; Funderburk, Joe; Frantz, Galen; Mellinger, Charles

    2014-10-01

    A push-pull strategy for managing the anthophilous Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan) in pepper and increasing conservation biological control was evaluated. Push components of ultraviolet (UV)-reflective mulch and foliar applications of kaolin and the pull component of sunflower companion plants were evaluated in replicated field experiments in 2011 and 2012. Adult F. bispinosa rapidly colonized and reproduced in the peppers and sunflowers during early flowering, but populations declined later, as numbers of the predatory Orius insidiosus (Say) and Orius pumilio (Champion) increased in both hosts. Numbers of F. bispinosa were reduced by kaolin during early pepper flowering. Thrips numbers were increased on some of the later sample dates, apparently due to reduced predation that resulted from negative effects of kaolin and UV-reflective mulch on Orius populations. Numbers of thrips increased in peppers with companion plants during the first week of flowering each year, followed by declines in thrips numbers during the next 2 wk in 2011. There was little effect each year of the companion plants on the numbers of Orius in the pepper flowers. There was one date in 2011 and no dates in 2012 in which UV-reflective mulch or kaolin acted in concert with the presence of the companion plants to reduce thrips numbers in the main crop of pepper. Yield effects were not attributed to thrips damage. We conclude that sunflower companion plants did not act additively or synergistically with kaolin or UV-reflective mulch to reduce thrips and increase Orius populations in pepper.

  8. Analysis of black pepper volatiles by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography: A comparison of terpenes profiles with hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Gracka, Anna

    2015-10-30

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is widely used in food flavor compounds analysis in majority for profiling volatile compounds. Based on such profiles conclusions are often drawn concerning the percentage composition of volatile compounds in particular food, spices or raw materials. This paper focuses on the usefulness of SPME for the profiling of volatile compounds from spices using black pepper as an example. SPME profiles obtained in different analytical conditions were compared to the profile of pepper volatiles obtained using hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus. The profiles of both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes of black pepper were highly dependent on sample weight (0.1 and 1g samples were tested), and extraction time (durations from 2 to 120min were tested), regardless of the SPME fiber used (PDMS and CAR/PDMS coatings were used). The characteristic phenomenon for extraction from dry ground pepper was the decrease of monoterpenes % share in volatiles with increasing extraction times, whereas at the same time the % contents of sesquiterpenes increased. Addition of water to ground pepper substantially changed extraction kinetics and mutual proportions of mono to sesquiterpenes compared to dry samples by minimizing changes in mono- to sesquiterpenes ratio in different extraction times. Obtained results indicate that SPME can be a fast extraction method for volatiles of black pepper. Short extraction times (2-10min) in conjunction with the fast GC analysis (2.1min) proposed here may offer fast alternative to hydrodistillation allowing black pepper terpenes characterization.

  9. Pepper chat fruit viroid: biological and molecular properties of a proposed new species of the genus Pospiviroid.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, J Th J; Jansen, C C C; Roenhorst, J W; Flores, R; de la Peña, M

    2009-09-01

    In autumn 2006, a new disease was observed in a glasshouse-grown crop of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in the Netherlands. Fruit size of the infected plants was reduced up to 50%, and plant growth was also slightly reduced. Here we show that the disease is caused by a previously non-described viroid. The pepper viroid is transmitted by both mechanical inoculation and pepper seeds and, when inoculated experimentally, it infects several solanaceous plant species inducing vein necrosis and reduced fruit and tuber size in tomato and potato, respectively. The viroid RNA genome consists of 348 nucleotides and, with minor modifications, it has the central conserved and the terminal conserved regions characteristic of members of the genus Pospiviroid. Classification of the pepper viroid within the genus Pospiviroid is further supported by the presence and structure of hairpins I and II, the presence of internal and external RY motifs, and phylogenetic analyses. The primary structure of the pepper viroid only showed a maximum of 66% nucleotide sequence identity with other viroids, which is far below the main species demarcation limit of 90%. According to its biological and molecular properties, we propose to assign the pepper viroid to a new species within the genus Pospiviroid, and to name this new species Pepper chat fruit viroid.

  10. Evaluation of a push-pull strategy for the management of Frankliniella bispinosa (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in bell peppers.

    PubMed

    Tyler-Julian, Kara; Funderburk, Joe; Frantz, Galen; Mellinger, Charles

    2014-10-01

    A push-pull strategy for managing the anthophilous Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan) in pepper and increasing conservation biological control was evaluated. Push components of ultraviolet (UV)-reflective mulch and foliar applications of kaolin and the pull component of sunflower companion plants were evaluated in replicated field experiments in 2011 and 2012. Adult F. bispinosa rapidly colonized and reproduced in the peppers and sunflowers during early flowering, but populations declined later, as numbers of the predatory Orius insidiosus (Say) and Orius pumilio (Champion) increased in both hosts. Numbers of F. bispinosa were reduced by kaolin during early pepper flowering. Thrips numbers were increased on some of the later sample dates, apparently due to reduced predation that resulted from negative effects of kaolin and UV-reflective mulch on Orius populations. Numbers of thrips increased in peppers with companion plants during the first week of flowering each year, followed by declines in thrips numbers during the next 2 wk in 2011. There was little effect each year of the companion plants on the numbers of Orius in the pepper flowers. There was one date in 2011 and no dates in 2012 in which UV-reflective mulch or kaolin acted in concert with the presence of the companion plants to reduce thrips numbers in the main crop of pepper. Yield effects were not attributed to thrips damage. We conclude that sunflower companion plants did not act additively or synergistically with kaolin or UV-reflective mulch to reduce thrips and increase Orius populations in pepper. PMID:25199151

  11. An SSR-based genetic map of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) serves as an anchor for the alignment of major pepper maps.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Yutaka; Inoue, Takahiro; Minamiyama, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Nakao

    2012-03-01

    Of the Capsicum peppers (Capsicum spp.), cultivated C. annuum is the most commercially important, but has lacked an intraspecific linkage map based on sequence-specific PCR markers in accord with haploid chromosome numbers. We constructed a linkage map of pepper using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between two C. annuum genotypes, a bell-type cultivar 'California Wonder' and a Malaysian small-fruited cultivar 'LS2341 (JP187992)', which is used as a source of resistance to bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum). A set of 253 markers (151 SSRs, 90 AFLPs, 10 CAPSs and 2 sequence-tagged sites) was on the map which we constructed, spanning 1,336 cM. This is the first SSR-based map to consist of 12 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number in an intraspecific cross of C. annuum. As this map has a lot of PCR-based anchor markers, it is easy to compare it to other pepper genetic maps. Therefore, this map and the newly developed markers will be useful for cultivated C. annuum breeding.

  12. An SSR-based genetic map of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) serves as an anchor for the alignment of major pepper maps.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Yutaka; Inoue, Takahiro; Minamiyama, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Nakao

    2012-03-01

    Of the Capsicum peppers (Capsicum spp.), cultivated C. annuum is the most commercially important, but has lacked an intraspecific linkage map based on sequence-specific PCR markers in accord with haploid chromosome numbers. We constructed a linkage map of pepper using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between two C. annuum genotypes, a bell-type cultivar 'California Wonder' and a Malaysian small-fruited cultivar 'LS2341 (JP187992)', which is used as a source of resistance to bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum). A set of 253 markers (151 SSRs, 90 AFLPs, 10 CAPSs and 2 sequence-tagged sites) was on the map which we constructed, spanning 1,336 cM. This is the first SSR-based map to consist of 12 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number in an intraspecific cross of C. annuum. As this map has a lot of PCR-based anchor markers, it is easy to compare it to other pepper genetic maps. Therefore, this map and the newly developed markers will be useful for cultivated C. annuum breeding. PMID:23136519

  13. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  14. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network. PMID:27602231

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis and Evolution of the Pto-Like Protein Kinase (PLPK) Gene Family in Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Jahn, Molly; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Pto gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) domain-containing protein, confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). In this study, in vivo recognition assays using PVX constructs showed that AvrPto was specifically recognized in the pepper genotypes. This AvrPto recognition caused a nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) and localization of the PVX::AvrPto fusion protein to inoculated pepper leaf tissues, which indicates the presence of a similar Pto recognition mechanism in pepper as in tomato. However, genome-wide analysis in pepper revealed no Pto clade corresponding to that in tomato, suggesting an alternative system for Pto recognition in pepper. Nevertheless, 25 Pto-like protein kinases (PLPKs) with a highly conserved STK domain have been identified in the pepper genome. For the majority of the amino acid sites in the STK domain of Ptos and PLPKs, nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) nucleotide substitution ratios (ω) were less than one, suggesting that purifying selection played a predominant role in the evolutionary process. However, some amino acid sites were found to be subjected to episodic positive selection in the course of evolution of Pto homologs, and, thus, different evolutionary processes might have shaped the Pto gene family in plants. Based on RNA-seq data, PLPK genes and other Pto pathway genes, such as Prf, Pti1, Pti5, and Pti6 were expressed in all tested pepper genotypes. Therefore, the nonhost HR against Pst in pepper may be due to the recognition of the AvrPto effector by a PLPK homolog, and subsequent action of downstream components of the Pto signaling pathway. However, the possibility remains that the recognition of AvrPto in pepper plants may involve activities of other receptor like kinases (RLKs). The identification of the PLPKs in this study will serve as a foundation for further efforts to understand the roles of PLPKs in nonhost resistance. PMID:27536870

  16. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network.

  17. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network.

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis and Evolution of the Pto-Like Protein Kinase (PLPK) Gene Family in Pepper.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Jahn, Molly; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Pto gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) domain-containing protein, confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). In this study, in vivo recognition assays using PVX constructs showed that AvrPto was specifically recognized in the pepper genotypes. This AvrPto recognition caused a nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) and localization of the PVX::AvrPto fusion protein to inoculated pepper leaf tissues, which indicates the presence of a similar Pto recognition mechanism in pepper as in tomato. However, genome-wide analysis in pepper revealed no Pto clade corresponding to that in tomato, suggesting an alternative system for Pto recognition in pepper. Nevertheless, 25 Pto-like protein kinases (PLPKs) with a highly conserved STK domain have been identified in the pepper genome. For the majority of the amino acid sites in the STK domain of Ptos and PLPKs, nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) nucleotide substitution ratios (ω) were less than one, suggesting that purifying selection played a predominant role in the evolutionary process. However, some amino acid sites were found to be subjected to episodic positive selection in the course of evolution of Pto homologs, and, thus, different evolutionary processes might have shaped the Pto gene family in plants. Based on RNA-seq data, PLPK genes and other Pto pathway genes, such as Prf, Pti1, Pti5, and Pti6 were expressed in all tested pepper genotypes. Therefore, the nonhost HR against Pst in pepper may be due to the recognition of the AvrPto effector by a PLPK homolog, and subsequent action of downstream components of the Pto signaling pathway. However, the possibility remains that the recognition of AvrPto in pepper plants may involve activities of other receptor like kinases (RLKs). The identification of the PLPKs in this study will serve as a foundation for further efforts to understand the roles of PLPKs in nonhost resistance. PMID:27536870

  19. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network. PMID:27602231

  20. Viruses of pepper crops in the Mediterranean basin: a remarkable stasis.

    PubMed

    Moury, Benoît; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Compared to other vegetable crops, the major viral constraints affecting pepper crops in the Mediterranean basin have been remarkably stable for the past 20 years. Among these viruses, the most prevalent ones are the seed-transmitted tobamoviruses; the aphid-transmitted Potato virus Y and Tobacco etch virus of the genus Potyvirus, and Cucumber mosaic virus member of the genus Cucumovirus; and thrips-transmitted tospoviruses. The last major viral emergence concerns the tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which has undergone major outbreaks since the end of the 1980s and the worldwide dispersal of the thrips vector Frankliniella occidentalis from the western part of the USA. TSWV outbreaks in the Mediterranean area might have been the result of both viral introductions from Northern America and local reemergence of indigenous TSWV isolates. In addition to introductions of new viruses, resistance breakdowns constitute the second case of viral emergences. Notably, the pepper resistance gene Tsw toward TSWV has broken down a few years after its deployment in several Mediterranean countries while there has been an expansion of L³-resistance breaking pepper mild mottle tobamovirus isolates. Beyond the agronomical and economical concerns induced by the breakdowns of virus resistance genes in pepper, they also constitute original models to understand plant-virus interactions and (co)evolution.

  1. Identification of Leonurus sibiricus as a Weed Reservoir for Three Pepper-Infecting Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    In plant virus ecology, weeds are regarded as wild reservoirs of viruses and as potential sources for insect-mediated transmission of viruses. During field surveys in 2013–2014, three Leonurus sibiricus plants showing virus-like symptoms were collected from pepper fields in Daegu, Seosan, and Danyang in Korea. Molecular diagnosis assays showed that the collected L. sibiricus samples were infected with either Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), or Beet western yellow virus (BWYV), respectively. Since this is the first identification of TSWV, PMMoV, and BWYV from L. sibiricus, complete genome sequences of three virus isolates were determined to examine their phylogenetic relationships with the previously reported strains and isolates. Phylogenetic analyses performed using full genome sequences of the viruses showed the isolates of TSWV and PMMoV obtained from L. sibiricus are closely related to the pepper isolates of the corresponding viruses. Our results suggest that L. sibiricus could act an alternative host and reservoir of viruses that cause damages in pepper fields. PMID:26889117

  2. 7 CFR 457.148 - Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fresh market pepper crop insurance provisions. 457.148 Section 457.148 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.148 Fresh...

  3. Pepper seed extract suppresses invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Kim, Min-Sook; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the antimetastatic activities of chili pepper seed on human breast cancer cells. The water extract of chili pepper seeds was prepared and it contained a substantial amount of phenols (131.12 mg%) and no capsaicinoids. Pepper seed extract (PSE) suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 10, 25, and 50 μg/ml (MDA-MB-231: IC50 = 20.1 μg/ml, MCF-7: IC50 = 14.7 μg/ml). PSE increased the expression level of E-cadherin up to 1.2-fold of the control in MCF-7 cells. PSE also decreased the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 25 and 50 μg/ml. PSE treatment significantly suppressed the invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The motility of cancer cells was apparently retarded in the wound healing assay by the PSE treatment. Although our data collectively demonstrate that PSE inhibits invasion and migration of breast cancer cells, further study is needed to identify specific mechanisms and bioactive components contributing to antimetastatic effects of chili pepper seed. PMID:24341783

  4. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-09-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production. PMID:26361475

  5. An ESR protocol based on relaxation phenomena of irradiated Japanese pepper.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Nakamura, Hideo; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2006-03-13

    We found various free radicals in a commercially available pepper in Japan before and after irradiation using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The typical ESR spectrum of the pepper consists of a sextet centered at g = 2.0, a singlet at the same g-value and a singlet at g = 4.0. Upon gamma ray irradiation, a new pair of signals appeared in the pepper. The progressive saturation behavior (PSB) at various microwave power levels indicated quite different relaxation behaviors of those radicals. Namely, the peak intensity of the organic free radical component decreases in a monotonic fashion, whereas the Mn2+ and Fe3+ ESR signals substantially keep constant. This reflects the evidence of three independent radicals in the pepper before irradiation. The PSB of the pair peaks as induced by irradiation possessed quite different PSB from that of the free radical located at g = 2.0. We proposed a new protocol for the ESR detection of irradiated foods by the PSB method at different microwave power levels. This would call for a major modification of the CEN protocol in European Union.

  6. Improvement of red pepper yield and soil environment by summer catch aquatic crops in greenhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. F.; Wang, L. Z.; Peng, J.; Wang, G. L.; Guo, X. S.; Wen, T. G.; Gu, D. L.; Wang, W. Z.; Wu, C. W.

    2016-08-01

    To investigate effects of the rotation of summer catch crops on remediation retrogressed soils in continuous cropping, a field experiment was conducted. Rice, water spinach, or cress were selected as summer catch crops; bare fallow during summer fallow was used as the control group. Results showed that aquatic crops grown in summer fallow period could effectively reduce soil bulk density and pH, facilitate soil nutrient release, and improve soil physical and chemical properties compared with those grown in fallow period. Paddy-upland rotation could improve soil microbial members and increase bacterial and actinomycete populations; by contrast, paddy-upland rotation could reduce fungal populations and enhance bacterium-to-fungus ratio. Paddy-upland rotation could also actively promote activities of soil enzymes, such as urease, phosphatase, invertase, and catalase. The proposed paddy-upland rotation significantly affected the growth of red pepper; the yield and quality of the grown red pepper were enhanced. Summer catch crops, such as rice, water spinach, and cress significantly increased pepper yield in the following growing season by 15.4%, 10.2% and 14.0%, respectively, compared with those grown in fallow treatment. Therefore, the proposed paddy-upland crop rotation could be a useful method to alleviate continuous cropping problems involved in cultivating red pepper in greenhouses.

  7. Use of pepper crop residues for the control of root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Piedra Buena, A; García-Alvarez, A; Díez-Rojo, M A; Ros, C; Fernández, P; Lacasa, A; Bello, A

    2007-11-01

    The biofumigant effect of pepper crop residues (PCR) for controlling Meloidogyne incognita populations was evaluated. Under laboratory conditions, 0, 5, 10 and 20 g PCR were applied to 500 g nematode infested soil, with four replicates per treatment. After 20 days at 25 degrees C, PCR reduced significantly M. incognita populations and root galling indices in susceptible tomato cv. Marmande, and increased K, N and organic C in soil. In the field, biofumigation with PCR combined with fresh animal manures (with and without plastic cover), methyl bromide, and a control were evaluated through root galling indices on a pepper crop. Each treatment, except for the control, had a grafted and non-grafted susceptible pepper sub-treatment, with three replicates. Root galling indices were lower, and yields higher, on grafted plants, biofumigation with PCR and plastic cover, with similar values as MB treatment, suggesting that biofumigation with PCR is an efficient non-chemical alternative to control M. incognita populations, especially when applied with plastic cover, nitrogen-rich organic matter and followed by grafting on resistant pepper. PMID:17098424

  8. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora capsici isolates from pepper and pumpkin in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gobena, Daniel; Roig, Julián; Galmarini, Claudio; Hulvey, Jon; Lamour, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a soilborne oomycete plant pathogen that limits pepper production worldwide. The population structure varies significantly depending on the location (e.g. Peru vs. USA) and little is known about the diversity of P. capsici in Argentina. Our objective was to assess the diversity of P. capsici in Argentina at key pepper production areas. Forty isolates were recovered 2006-2009 from pepper and one isolate from pumpkin at 11 locations. Isolates were assessed for mating type, mefenoxam sensitivity and multilocus single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype profiles. Ten isolates with identical SNP profiles also were genotyped with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. All 41 isolates had the A1 mating type and were sensitive to mefenoxam. Genotypic analysis using eight polymorphic SNP markers indicated 87% of the isolates had the same multilocus genotype, which is fixed for heterozygosity at seven of the eight SNP sites. AFLP analyses confirmed these findings, and overall it appears that clonal reproduction drives the population structure of P. capsici in Argentina. The implications for breeding resistant peppers and overall disease management are discussed. PMID:21933926

  9. Selecting an ornamental pepper banker plant for Amblyseius swirskii in floriculture crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preference of phytoseiid mite Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) was assessed on four cultivars of ornamental pepper banker plant candidates; Red Missile (RM), Masquerade (MA), Explosive Ember (EE), and Black Pearl (BP) for potential control of pestiferous insects in floriculture. Cultivar prefere...

  10. Involvement of a universal amino acid synthesis impediment in cytoplasmic male sterility in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Fu, Hong-Fei; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Chai, Wei-Guo

    2016-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), we studied the different maturation processes of sterile and fertile pepper anthers. A paraffin section analysis of the sterile anthers indicated an abnormality of the tapetal layer and an over-vacuolization of the cells. The quantitative proteomics results showed that the expression of histidinol dehydrogenase (HDH), dihydroxy-acid dehydratase (DAD), aspartate aminotransferase (ATAAT), cysteine synthase (CS), delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), and glutamate synthetase (GS) in the amino acid synthesis pathway decreased by more than 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of DAD, ATAAT, CS and P5CS showed a 2- to 16-fold increase in the maintainer line anthers. We also found that most of the amino acid content levels decreased to varying degrees during the anther tapetum period of the sterile line, whereas these levels increased in the maintainer line. The results of our study indicate that during pepper anther development, changes in amino acid synthesis are significant and accompany abnormal tapetum maturity, which is most likely an important cause of male sterility in pepper. PMID:26987793

  11. Evaluation of biorational products for management of Phytophthora blight of bell pepper transplants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several commercially available biopesticides and phosphonate-containing products were selected and tested for their efficacy in controlling Phytopthora capsici on bell pepper at various inoculum and fertility levels. The effects of concentration, application method and frequency of application on t...

  12. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production. PMID:26361475

  13. Application of Volatile Antifungal Plant Essential Oils for Controlling Pepper Fruit Anthracnose by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Yang, Hye Ji; Jung, Heesoo; Yoon, Dong June; Sang, Mee Kyung; Jeun, Yong-Chull

    2015-09-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides has been destructive during pepper fruit production in outdoor fields in Korea. In vitro antifungal activities of 15 different plant essential oils or its components were evaluated during conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. In vitro conidial germination was most drastically inhibited by vapour treatments with carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral, p-cymene and linalool. Inhibition of the mycelial growth by indirect vapour treatment with essential oils was also demonstrated compared with untreated control. Carvacrol, cinnamon oil, trans-cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol were among the most inhibitory plant essential oils by the indirect antifungal efficacies. Plant protection efficacies of the plant essential oils were demonstrated by reduced lesion diameter on the C. gloeosporioides-inoculated immature green pepper fruits compared to the inoculated control fruits without any plant essential oil treatment. In planta test showed that all plant essential oils tested in this study demonstrated plant protection efficacies against pepper fruit anthracnose with similar levels. Thus, application of different plant essential oils can be used for eco-friendly disease management of anthracnose during pepper fruit production.

  14. The evolution of chili peppers (Capsicum-Solanaceae): a cytogenetic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capsicum (chili peppers) is a New World genus with five crop species of great economic importance for food and spices. An up-to-date summary of the karyotypic knowledge is presented, including data on classical staining (chromosome number, size and morphology), silver impregnation (number and positi...

  15. Mapping Brazilian Pepper Infestations in South Texas with Spatial Information Technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius), an evergreen shrub or tree indigenous to Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina, was introduced into the United States as an ornamental. This plant has an aggressive growth habit that allows it to establish, spread, and displace native vegetation, resulting in ...

  16. Effects of Different Cooking Methods on the Antioxidant Properties of Red Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Guk; Shin, Young Jee; Lee, Seongeung; Lee, Junsoo; Yoo, Seon Mi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of various cooking methods (boiling, steaming, stir-frying, and roasting) and three cooking times (5, 10, and 15 min) on the antioxidant properties of red pepper. Raw and cooked peppers were measured for proximate composition, ascorbic acid (AsA) content, total carotenoid content (TCC), total polyphenol content (TP), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activities. Results showed that the proximate composition, AsA content, TCC, TP, and antioxidant activities were significantly (p<0.05) affected by the cooking procedure; the loss rate varied among individual compounds. Boiling and steaming significantly reduced AsA content (24.3~66.5%), TP (13.9~ 54.9%), and antioxidant activity (21.7~60.5%) in red pepper, while stir-frying and roasting slightly reduced AsA content (2.7~25.9%), TP (1.8~4.9%), and antioxidant activity (4.9~17.9%). The highest loss was observed after boiling, followed by steaming, roasting, and stir-frying. Stir-frying and roasting better preserved AsA content, TCC, TP, and antioxidant activity. In conclusion, dry-heat cooking methods such as stir-frying and roasting may be preferred to retain the nutrient compositions and antioxidant properties of red pepper. PMID:24471098

  17. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Fruit Transcriptome in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Hu, Lisong; Hao, Chaoyun; Fan, Rui; Wu, Baoduo; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong

    2015-01-01

    Black pepper is one of the most popular and oldest spices in the world and valued for its pungent constituent alkaloids. Pinerine is the main bioactive compound in pepper alkaloids, which perform unique physiological functions. However, the mechanisms of piperine synthesis are poorly understood. This study is the first to describe the fruit transcriptome of black pepper by sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 56,281,710 raw reads were obtained and assembled. From these raw reads, 44,061 unigenes with an average length of 1,345 nt were generated. During functional annotation, 40,537 unigenes were annotated in Gene Ontology categories, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, Swiss-Prot database, and Nucleotide Collection (NR/NT) database. In addition, 8,196 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected. In a detailed analysis of the transcriptome, housekeeping genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction internal control, polymorphic SSRs, and lysine/ornithine metabolism-related genes were identified. These results validated the availability of our database. Our study could provide useful data for further research on piperine synthesis in black pepper.

  18. Reading "Salt and Pepper": Social Practices, Unfinished Narratives, and Critical Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Diane Downer

    2008-01-01

    In "Reading "Salt and Pepper"" Anderson examines a story written by three third grade girls and their insights about that story as they re-read it during its production and retrospectively, eight years later. Using a frame for understanding children's writing as social practice, the children's interviews, showing their multiple and sometimes…

  19. The Validity and Clinical Uses of the Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Pepper Visual Skills for Reading Test was assessed as a measure of reading ability with meaningful text in 38 adults with macular degeneration; scores were compared with assessment made using the Gray Oral Reading Test, a previously standardized assessment. The test's validity was confirmed. (Author/JDD)

  20. Genetic Compositions of Broad bean wilt virus 2 Infecting Red Pepper in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Nam, Moon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2) on red pepper was investigated using the samples obtained from 24 areas of 8 provinces in Korea. Two hundred and five samples (79%) out of 260 collected samples were found to be infected with BBWV2. While the single infection rate of BBWV2 was 21.5%, the co-infection rate of BBWV2 with Cucumber mosaic virus, Pepper mottle virus, Pepper mild mottle virus and/or Potato virus Y was 78.5%. To characterize the genetic diversity of BBWV2 Korean isolates, 7 isolates were fully sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BBWV2 isolates could be divided largely into two groups as Group I and Group II. Based on the partial sequence analyses, 153 selected BBWV2 isolates were subgrouped into GS-I (21.6%), GS-II (3.9%) and GS-III (56.9%). BBWV2 GS-III, which was predominant in Korea, appears to be a new combination between Group I RNA-1 and Group II RNA-2. Viral disease incidence of BBWV2 on red pepper was under 2% before 2004. However, the incidence was increased abruptly to 41.3% in 2005, 58.2% in 2006 and 79% in 2007. These rapid increases might be related with the emergence of new combinations between BBWV2 groups.

  1. First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in tomato, pepper and jimsonweed in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) in Puerto Rico. TCSV was detected in tomato, pepper and jimsonweed. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  2. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Fruit Transcriptome in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum).

    PubMed

    Hu, Lisong; Hao, Chaoyun; Fan, Rui; Wu, Baoduo; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong

    2015-01-01

    Black pepper is one of the most popular and oldest spices in the world and valued for its pungent constituent alkaloids. Pinerine is the main bioactive compound in pepper alkaloids, which perform unique physiological functions. However, the mechanisms of piperine synthesis are poorly understood. This study is the first to describe the fruit transcriptome of black pepper by sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 56,281,710 raw reads were obtained and assembled. From these raw reads, 44,061 unigenes with an average length of 1,345 nt were generated. During functional annotation, 40,537 unigenes were annotated in Gene Ontology categories, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, Swiss-Prot database, and Nucleotide Collection (NR/NT) database. In addition, 8,196 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected. In a detailed analysis of the transcriptome, housekeeping genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction internal control, polymorphic SSRs, and lysine/ornithine metabolism-related genes were identified. These results validated the availability of our database. Our study could provide useful data for further research on piperine synthesis in black pepper. PMID:26121657

  3. QTL analysis of plant development and fruit traits in pepper and performance of selective phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Barchi, Lorenzo; Lefebvre, Véronique; Sage-Palloix, Anne-Marie; Lanteri, Sergio; Palloix, Alain

    2009-04-01

    A QTL analysis was performed to determine the genetic basis of 13 horticultural traits conditioning yield in pepper (Capsicum annuum). The mapping population was a large population of 297 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) originating from a cross between the large-fruited bell pepper cultivar 'Yolo Wonder' and the small-fruited chilli pepper 'Criollo de Morelos 334'. A total of 76 QTLs were detected for 13 fruit and plant traits, grouped in 28 chromosome regions. These QTLs explained together between 7% (internode growth time) and 91% (fruit diameter) of the phenotypic variation. The QTL analysis was also performed on two subsets of 141 and 93 RILs sampled using the MapPop software. The smaller populations allowed for the detection of a reduced set of QTLs and reduced the overall percentage of trait variation explained by QTLs. The frequency of false positives as well as the individual effect of QTLs increased in reduced population sets as a result of reduced sampling. The results from the QTL analysis permitted an overall glance over the genetic architecture of traits considered by breeders for selection. Colinearities between clusters of QTLs controlling fruit traits and/or plant development in distinct pepper species and in related solanaceous crop species (tomato and eggplant) suggests that shared mechanisms control the shape and growth of different organs throughout these species.

  4. Bell pepper endornavirus: molecular and biological properties, and occurrence in the genus Capsicum.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryo; Kiyota, Eri; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Saha, Prasenjit; Roossinck, Marilyn J; Severin, Ake; Valverde, Rodrigo A

    2011-11-01

    Bell peppers (Capsicum annuum) harbour a large dsRNA virus. The linear genome (14.7 kbp) of two isolates from Japanese and USA bell pepper cultivars were completely sequenced and compared. They shared extensive sequence identity and contained a single, long ORF encoding a 4815 aa protein. This polyprotein contained conserved motifs of putative viral methyltransferase (MTR), helicase 1 (Hel-1), UDP-glycosyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This unique arrangement of conserved domains has not been reported in any of the known endornaviruses. Hence this virus, for which the name Bell pepper endornavirus (BPEV) is proposed, is a distinct species in the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae). The BPEV-encoded polyprotein contains a cysteine-rich region between the MTR and Hel-1 domains, with conserved CXCC motifs shared among several endornaviruses, suggesting an additional functional domain. In agreement with general endornavirus features, BPEV contains a nick in the positive-strand RNA molecule. The virus was detected in all bell pepper cultivars tested and transmitted through seed but not by graft inoculations. Analysis of dsRNA patterns and RT-PCR using degenerate primers revealed putative variants of BPEV, or closely related species, infecting other C. annuum genotypes and three other Capsicum species (C. baccatum, C. chinense and C. frutescens).

  5. Interactions of Phytophthora capsici with Resistant and Susceptible Pepper Roots and Stems.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Amara R; Smart, Christine D

    2015-10-01

    Using host resistance is an important strategy for managing pepper root and crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. An isolate of P. capsici constitutively expressing a gene for green fluorescent protein was used to investigate pathogen interactions with roots, crowns, and stems of Phytophthora-susceptible bell pepper 'Red Knight', Phytophthora-resistant bell pepper 'Paladin', and Phytophthora-resistant landrace Criollos de Morelos 334 (CM-334). In this study, the same number of zoospores attached to and germinated on roots of all cultivars 30 and 120 min postinoculation (pi), respectively. At 3 days pi, significantly more secondary roots had necrotic lesions on Red Knight than on Paladin and CM-334 plants. By 4 days pi, necrotic lesions had formed on the taproot of Red Knight but not Paladin or CM-334 plants. Although hyphae were visible in the crowns and stems of all Red Knight plants observed at 4 days pi, hyphae were observed in crowns of only a few Paladin and in no CM-334 plants, and never in stems of either resistant cultivar at 4 days pi. These results improve our understanding of how P. capsici infects plants and may contribute to the use of resistant pepper cultivars for disease management and the development of new cultivars.

  6. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper.

  7. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-03-19

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data.

  8. Pepper fruit as a model to study the metabolism of antioxidants, ROS and RNS.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose M; Corpas, Francisco J; Del Río, Luis A; López-Huertas, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is the second worldwide most consumed vegetable nowadays, with southern European countries being among the major producer areas. Pepper fruits contain high levels of vitamins A and C (ascorbate) and low calories what makes this produce greatly appropriate for human diet. In fact, fruits have enormous interest from the culinary and gastronomic points of view and can be used as raw, canned, condiment and food colorant, among others. Ripening of pepper fruits, an ethylene-independent process in this plant species, is somehow modulated by nitric oxide (NO), and the profile of several reactive nitrogen species (RNS) could be used as an index of this physiological stage. Regarding to the antioxidants' metabolism in fruits [1,2], it has been hypothesized that ascorbate plays an important role as a redox buffer during the ripening process. Furthermore, the interplay among enzymatic antioxidants protects pepper fruits against damage promoted by chilling conditions. The oxidative metabolism of peroxisomes seems to also participate in the regulation of the ripening process of fruits. PMID:26461360

  9. Identification of Leonurus sibiricus as a Weed Reservoir for Three Pepper-Infecting Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    In plant virus ecology, weeds are regarded as wild reservoirs of viruses and as potential sources for insect-mediated transmission of viruses. During field surveys in 2013-2014, three Leonurus sibiricus plants showing virus-like symptoms were collected from pepper fields in Daegu, Seosan, and Danyang in Korea. Molecular diagnosis assays showed that the collected L. sibiricus samples were infected with either Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), or Beet western yellow virus (BWYV), respectively. Since this is the first identification of TSWV, PMMoV, and BWYV from L. sibiricus, complete genome sequences of three virus isolates were determined to examine their phylogenetic relationships with the previously reported strains and isolates. Phylogenetic analyses performed using full genome sequences of the viruses showed the isolates of TSWV and PMMoV obtained from L. sibiricus are closely related to the pepper isolates of the corresponding viruses. Our results suggest that L. sibiricus could act an alternative host and reservoir of viruses that cause damages in pepper fields. PMID:26889117

  10. Weed control in sweet bell pepper using sequential postdirected applications of pelargonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum) producers would benefit from additional herbicide options that are safe to the crop and provide effective weed control. Research was conducted in southeastern Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) during 2010 and 2011 to determine the impact of pelargonic acid on weed control ef...

  11. Hyperspectral imaging for mapping of total nitrogen spatial distribution in pepper plant.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke-Qiang; Zhao, Yan-Ru; Li, Xiao-Li; Shao, Yong-Ni; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) hyperspectral imaging was employed to determine the spatial distribution of total nitrogen in pepper plant. Hyperspectral images of samples (leaves, stems, and roots of pepper plants) were acquired and their total nitrogen contents (TNCs) were measured using Dumas combustion method. Mean spectra of all samples were extracted from regions of interest (ROIs) in hyperspectral images. Random frog (RF) algorithm was implemented to select important wavelengths which carried effective information for predicting the TNCs in leaf, stem, root, and whole-plant (leaf-stem-root), respectively. Based on full spectra and the selected important wavelengths, the quantitative relationships between spectral data and the corresponding TNCs in organs (leaf, stem, and root) and whole-plant (leaf-stem-root) were separately developed using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). As a result, the PLSR model built by the important wavelengths for predicting TNCs in whole-plant (leaf-stem-root) offered a promising result of correlation coefficient (R) for prediction (RP = 0.876) and root mean square error (RMSE) for prediction (RMSEP = 0.426%). Finally, the TNC of each pixel within ROI of the sample was estimated to generate the spatial distribution map of TNC in pepper plant. The achievements of the research indicated that hyperspectral imaging is promising and presents a powerful potential to determine nitrogen contents spatial distribution in pepper plant.

  12. Development of a pungency measuring system for red-pepper powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capsaicinoids are the main components that determine the spiciness level of red-pepper powders. Current pungency measurement is mostly dependent on HPLC measurement technique, which is a sample-destructive, labor-intensive, time-consuming, and expensive method. In this research, a nondestructive on-...

  13. QTL analysis of plant development and fruit traits in pepper and performance of selective phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Barchi, Lorenzo; Lefebvre, Véronique; Sage-Palloix, Anne-Marie; Lanteri, Sergio; Palloix, Alain

    2009-04-01

    A QTL analysis was performed to determine the genetic basis of 13 horticultural traits conditioning yield in pepper (Capsicum annuum). The mapping population was a large population of 297 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) originating from a cross between the large-fruited bell pepper cultivar 'Yolo Wonder' and the small-fruited chilli pepper 'Criollo de Morelos 334'. A total of 76 QTLs were detected for 13 fruit and plant traits, grouped in 28 chromosome regions. These QTLs explained together between 7% (internode growth time) and 91% (fruit diameter) of the phenotypic variation. The QTL analysis was also performed on two subsets of 141 and 93 RILs sampled using the MapPop software. The smaller populations allowed for the detection of a reduced set of QTLs and reduced the overall percentage of trait variation explained by QTLs. The frequency of false positives as well as the individual effect of QTLs increased in reduced population sets as a result of reduced sampling. The results from the QTL analysis permitted an overall glance over the genetic architecture of traits considered by breeders for selection. Colinearities between clusters of QTLs controlling fruit traits and/or plant development in distinct pepper species and in related solanaceous crop species (tomato and eggplant) suggests that shared mechanisms control the shape and growth of different organs throughout these species. PMID:19219599

  14. Greenhouse evaluation of capsicum rootstocks for management of meloidogyne incognita on grafted bell pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth, development, and nematode susceptibility of various rootstock genotypes grafted to a commercial bell pepper variety scion were evaluated in a series of greenhouse experiments. Nine rootstocks including ‘Caribbean Red Habanero’, ‘ PA-136’ , ‘Keystone Resistant Giant’, ‘Yolo Wonder’, ‘Car...

  15. Evaluation of phytotoxicity of acibenzolar on fresh market bell peppers, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted inTifton, Georgia to evaluate the phytotoxicity of acibenzolar on fresh market bell peppers in 2011 for the control of bacterial spot. Five broadcast foliar applications were applied on a 6-8 day schedule beginning on 18 Apr and ending on 13 Jun 2011. On 18 Apr and 2 ...

  16. Evaluation of phytotoxicity of acibenzolar on fresh market bell peppers, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted inTifton, Georgia to evaluate the phytotoxicity of acibenzolar on fresh market bell peppers in 2012 for the control of bacterial spot. Five broadcast foliar applications were applied on a 6-8 day schedule beginning on 2 Apr and ending on 29 May 2012. On 2 and 17 Apr a...

  17. Genetic Compositions of Broad bean wilt virus 2 Infecting Red Pepper in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Nam, Moon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2) on red pepper was investigated using the samples obtained from 24 areas of 8 provinces in Korea. Two hundred and five samples (79%) out of 260 collected samples were found to be infected with BBWV2. While the single infection rate of BBWV2 was 21.5%, the co-infection rate of BBWV2 with Cucumber mosaic virus, Pepper mottle virus, Pepper mild mottle virus and/or Potato virus Y was 78.5%. To characterize the genetic diversity of BBWV2 Korean isolates, 7 isolates were fully sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BBWV2 isolates could be divided largely into two groups as Group I and Group II. Based on the partial sequence analyses, 153 selected BBWV2 isolates were subgrouped into GS-I (21.6%), GS-II (3.9%) and GS-III (56.9%). BBWV2 GS-III, which was predominant in Korea, appears to be a new combination between Group I RNA-1 and Group II RNA-2. Viral disease incidence of BBWV2 on red pepper was under 2% before 2004. However, the incidence was increased abruptly to 41.3% in 2005, 58.2% in 2006 and 79% in 2007. These rapid increases might be related with the emergence of new combinations between BBWV2 groups. PMID:25288954

  18. Structure and genetic diversity of natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    PubMed

    Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Duarte, J F; Santos, T C; Santos, R M; Silva-Mann, R; Carvalho, D

    2016-01-01

    In the face of a possible loss of genetic diversity in plants due the environmental changes, actions to ensure the genetic variability are an urgent necessity. The extraction of Brazilian pepper fruits is a cause of concern because it results in the lack of seeds in soil, hindering its distribution in space and time. It is important to address this concern and explore the species, used by riparian communities and agro-factories without considering the need for keeping the seeds for natural seed banks and for species sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure and the genetic diversity in natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Twenty-two alleles in 223 individuals were identified from eight forest remnants located in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and Sergipe. All populations presented loci in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviation. Four populations presented six combinations of loci in linkage disequilibrium. Six exclusive alleles were detected in four populations. Analysis of molecular variance showed the absence of diversity between regions and that between the populations (GST) was 41%. Genetic diversity was structured in seven clusters (ΔK7). Brazilian pepper populations were not structured in a pattern of isolation by distance and present genetic bottleneck. The populations São Mateus, Canastra, Barbacena, and Ilha das Flores were identified as management units and may support conservation projects, ecological restoration and in implementation of management plans for Brazilian pepper in the State of Sergipe. PMID:27323193

  19. First report of Oidiopsis taurica causing powdery mildew outbreak on pepper in Maryland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepper plants grown in large experimental plots at Beltsville Maryland showed widespread powdery mildew infection in the late summer of 2008. Extensive coverage of the abaxial surface by white patches of conidia was noted, along with chlorotic regions on the adaxial surface. Samples were taken for ...

  20. Factors affecting pheromone production by the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and collection efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several factors which might affect pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were investigated. Included were a comparison of porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), the effect of male age, the effect of time of day, the effect of mal...

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-40 - Peppers from certain Central American countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... country for the weevil Faustinus ovatipennis, pea leafminer, tomato fruit borer, banana moth, lantana... site, the NPPO may not allow export from that production site until the NPPO has determined that risk... which Medfly is considered to exist: (1) The peppers must be grown in approved production...

  2. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper. PMID:25477684

  3. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data. PMID:25792042

  4. Interactions of Phytophthora capsici with Resistant and Susceptible Pepper Roots and Stems.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Amara R; Smart, Christine D

    2015-10-01

    Using host resistance is an important strategy for managing pepper root and crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. An isolate of P. capsici constitutively expressing a gene for green fluorescent protein was used to investigate pathogen interactions with roots, crowns, and stems of Phytophthora-susceptible bell pepper 'Red Knight', Phytophthora-resistant bell pepper 'Paladin', and Phytophthora-resistant landrace Criollos de Morelos 334 (CM-334). In this study, the same number of zoospores attached to and germinated on roots of all cultivars 30 and 120 min postinoculation (pi), respectively. At 3 days pi, significantly more secondary roots had necrotic lesions on Red Knight than on Paladin and CM-334 plants. By 4 days pi, necrotic lesions had formed on the taproot of Red Knight but not Paladin or CM-334 plants. Although hyphae were visible in the crowns and stems of all Red Knight plants observed at 4 days pi, hyphae were observed in crowns of only a few Paladin and in no CM-334 plants, and never in stems of either resistant cultivar at 4 days pi. These results improve our understanding of how P. capsici infects plants and may contribute to the use of resistant pepper cultivars for disease management and the development of new cultivars. PMID:26010399

  5. First Report of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum in Pepper Plants in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibiting symptoms that resemble those of potato psyllid damage and/or ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ infection were observed in La Cruz de Elota, Sinaloa, México in March 2009. The plants had chlorotic or pale green leaves and exhibited leaf cupping, sh...

  6. Complete Nucleotide Sequences and Genome Organization of Two Pepper Mild Mottle Virus Isolates from Capsicum annuum in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Yoon, Ju-Yeon

    2016-05-19

    The complete genome sequences of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)-P2 and -P3 were determined by the Sanger sequencing method. Although PMMoV-P2 and PMMoV-P3 have different pathogenicity in some pepper cultivars, the complete genome sequences of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 are composed of 6,356 nucleotides (nt). In this study, we report the complete genome sequences and genome organization of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 isolates from pepper species in South Korea.

  7. Complete Nucleotide Sequences and Genome Organization of Two Pepper Mild Mottle Virus Isolates from Capsicum annuum in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Kwon, Sun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)-P2 and -P3 were determined by the Sanger sequencing method. Although PMMoV-P2 and PMMoV-P3 have different pathogenicity in some pepper cultivars, the complete genome sequences of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 are composed of 6,356 nucleotides (nt). In this study, we report the complete genome sequences and genome organization of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 isolates from pepper species in South Korea. PMID:27198033

  8. Amelioratory effect of dietary ingestion with red bell pepper on learning impairment in senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, H; Hirano, T; Inakuma, T

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dietary red bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) on learning performance was studied in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM). An experimental diet, which contained 20% (w/w) lyophilized powder of red bell pepper, was fed to SAMP8 mice. The mice that received the experimental diet showed much better acquisition in passive avoidance tasks as compared with a control group given a common diet. This indicated that the dietary ingestion of red bell pepper ameliorated the learning impairment in SAMP8.

  9. Four Arabidopsis AREB/ABF transcription factors function predominantly in gene expression downstream of SnRK2 kinases in abscisic acid signalling in response to osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, TAKUYA; FUJITA, YASUNARI; MARUYAMA, KYONOSHIN; MOGAMI, JUNRO; TODAKA, DAISUKE; SHINOZAKI, KAZUO; YAMAGUCHI-SHINOZAKI, KAZUKO

    2015-01-01

    Under osmotic stress conditions such as drought and high salinity, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1/ABF2, AREB2/ABF4 and ABF3, which are activated by SNF1-related kinase 2s (SnRK2s) such as SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3 (SRK2D/E/I). However, since the three AREB/ABFs are crucial, but not exclusive, for the SnRK2-mediated gene expression, transcriptional pathways governed by SRK2D/E/I are not fully understood. Here, we show that a bZIP transcription factor, ABF1, is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression in Arabidopsis. Despite lower expression levels of ABF1 than those of the three AREB/ABFs, the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 mutant plants displayed increased sensitivity to drought and decreased sensitivity to ABA in primary root growth compared with the areb1 areb2 abf3 mutant. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that expression of downstream genes of SRK2D/E/I, which include many genes functioning in osmotic stress responses and tolerance such as transcription factors and LEA proteins, was mostly impaired in the quadruple mutant. Thus, these results indicate that the four AREB/ABFs are the predominant transcription factors downstream of SRK2D/E/I in ABA signalling in response to osmotic stress during vegetative growth. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in osmotic stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1, AREB2, and ABF3, which are activated by SnRK2s such as SRK2D, SRK2E, and SRK2I (SRK2D/E/I). However, transcription factors other than the three AREB/ABFs that function downstream of SRK2D/E/I remain obscure. Here, we report that ABF1 is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2, and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression from a comparative analysis between the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 and areb1 areb2 abf3 mutants. Moreover, genome

  10. Microsatellite based analysis of genetic diversity of popular black pepper genotypes in South India.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Prasanth, V P; Soniya, E V

    2011-08-01

    The genotypes of black pepper are morphologically and genotypically highly diverse and carry all the cumulative variations inherited and maintained through generations. The present study describes the Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) or microsatellite based assessment of genetic diversity among forty popular genotypes and four different species of black pepper in Southern region of India. For isolation of SSR primers, our earlier attempts with enrichment strategies like 'Triplex affinity capture' did not extract a single SSR primer due to close proximity of restriction sites to the SSR motif. Hence we developed a 'Sequential Reverse Genome Walking (SRGW)' strategy with better enrichment efficiency of 72% that generated seven new SSR primers. Genotyping precisely discriminated majority of genotypes which indicated that the SSR primers are very informative. A total of 62 alleles with an average of 15.5 alleles over 4 loci were identified. All the SSR primers showed an average Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) value of 0.85. The estimated average Shared Allele Frequency ranged between 1.57 and 20.12%. The PCA plot revealed four closely related individual groups and identified Karimunda, Wild pepper and a local landrace 'local b' as the most divergent genotypes. Cluster analysis exposed the genetic relatedness between hybrids and selections with other known cultivars. The introduction of black pepper from South India to Malaysia was emphasized from the observation of genetic similarity of Malaysian cultivar 'Kuching' with other indigenous popular cultivars. The study was first to portray the precise genetic relatedness among the major indigenous genotypes of black pepper. PMID:21874534

  11. Effect of osmotic pretreatment on air drying characteristics and colour of pepper (Capsicum spp) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Falade, Kolawole Olumuyiwa; Oyedele, Olaniyi O

    2010-10-01

    Air-drying characteristics of fresh and osmotically pretreated (40°B, 50°B and 60°B sucrose solutions for 9 h) four pepper cultivars namely, Rodo (Capsicum annuum), Shombo (Capsicum frutescens), Bawa (Capsicum frutenscens) and Tatashe (Capsicum annuum), and CIE L*a*b* parameters of air-dried (50, 60, 70 and 80 °C) peppers were investigated. Moisture diffusivity and activation energy (Ea) were calculated from Fick's law and analogous Arrhenius equation, respectively. Colour difference, chroma and hue angle of fresh- and osmo-oven dried peppers were evaluated. Drying rates occurred predominantly in the falling rate. Moisture diffusivity varied from 8.071 × 10(-10)-1.048 × 10(-8), 7.710 × 10(-11)-1.018 × 10(-9), 9.807 × 10(-9)-1.746 × 10(-8) and 8.748 × 10(-10)-1.464 × 10(-9) m(2)/s for Bawa, Rodo, Shombo, and Tatashe, respectively. Ea for moisture diffusion during drying of peppers varied from 53.86 to 84.86 kJ/mol and was affected by cultivars and osmotic pretreatment concentration. Osmotic pretreatment and drying temperature had significant effect (p < 0.05) on a*, b*, chroma and hue angle values of dried peppers. PMID:23572676

  12. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and water loss in a diverse collection of pepper (Capsicum).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Eugene P; Popopvsky, Sigal; Lohrey, Gregory T; Alkalai-Tuvia, Sharon; Perzelan, Yaacov; Bosland, Paul; Bebeli, Penelope J; Paran, Ilan; Fallik, Elazar; Jenks, Matthew A

    2013-10-01

    Pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruits are covered by a relatively thick coating of cuticle that limits fruit water loss, a trait previously associated with maintenance of postharvest fruit quality during commercial marketing. To shed light on the chemical-compositional diversity of cuticles in pepper, the fruit cuticles from 50 diverse pepper genotypes from a world collection were screened for both wax and cutin monomer amount and composition. These same genotypes were also screened for fruit water loss rate and this was tested for associations with cuticle composition. Our results revealed an unexpectedly large amount of variation for the fruit cuticle lipids, with a more than 14-fold range for total wax amounts and a more than 16-fold range for cutin monomer amounts between the most extreme accessions. Within the major wax constituents fatty acids varied from 1 to 46%, primary alcohols from 2 to 19%, n-alkanes from 13 to 74% and triterpenoids and sterols from 10 to 77%. Within the cutin monomers, total hexadecanoic acids ranged from 54 to 87%, total octadecanoic acids ranged from 10 to 38% and coumaric acids ranged from 0.2 to 8% of the total. We also observed considerable differences in water loss among the accessions, and unique correlations between water loss and cuticle constituents. The resources described here will be valuable for future studies of the physiological function of fruit cuticle, for the identification of genes and QTLs associated with fruit cuticle synthesis in pepper fruit, and as a starting point for breeding improved fruit quality in pepper.

  13. Analysis of native carotenoid composition of sweet bell peppers by serially coupled C30 columns.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Daniele; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giacomo; Torre, Germana; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    Serial coupled columns reversed-phase separations in high-performance liquid chromatography can be a useful tool for the analysis of complex real samples. The great difficulties found when analyzing complex carotenoid samples, due to the high natural variability of these compounds, as well as to the presence of carotenoid esters, are well documented. In the present contribution, the applicability of connecting two C30 columns to increase significantly the separation power, resolution and peak capacity for the analysis of carotenoids in a complex carotenoid sample, like sweet bell peppers, has been shown for the first time. By using LC coupled to PDA/APCI-MS detectors, 56 different carotenoids have been detected in red sweet bell peppers. By using two serial coupled C30 columns a peak capacity of 95.4 was obtained, compared with 73 achieved using a single column. Moreover, resolution greatly improved between different critical peaks when using two serial coupled C30 columns, compared with a single column. Interestingly, free carotenoids, mono-esters and diesters were quantitatively equally represented (around 33% for each different class) in red sweet bell pepper, showing, therefore, a value for the ratio of mono-esters/diesters of around 1, which could be considered a parameter of typicality. Free beta-carotene (12.6%), capsanthin-C14:0 (8.4%), and capsanthin-C12:0-C14:0 (8.9%) were the most abundant carotenoids in the three different classes of red sweet bell pepper. No carotenoid esters were detected in either yellow or green sweet bell peppers. The application of such methodology in the analysis of other complex carotenoid matrices could be a future objective of research.

  14. Effect of osmotic pretreatment on air drying characteristics and colour of pepper (Capsicum spp) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Falade, Kolawole Olumuyiwa; Oyedele, Olaniyi O

    2010-10-01

    Air-drying characteristics of fresh and osmotically pretreated (40°B, 50°B and 60°B sucrose solutions for 9 h) four pepper cultivars namely, Rodo (Capsicum annuum), Shombo (Capsicum frutescens), Bawa (Capsicum frutenscens) and Tatashe (Capsicum annuum), and CIE L*a*b* parameters of air-dried (50, 60, 70 and 80 °C) peppers were investigated. Moisture diffusivity and activation energy (Ea) were calculated from Fick's law and analogous Arrhenius equation, respectively. Colour difference, chroma and hue angle of fresh- and osmo-oven dried peppers were evaluated. Drying rates occurred predominantly in the falling rate. Moisture diffusivity varied from 8.071 × 10(-10)-1.048 × 10(-8), 7.710 × 10(-11)-1.018 × 10(-9), 9.807 × 10(-9)-1.746 × 10(-8) and 8.748 × 10(-10)-1.464 × 10(-9) m(2)/s for Bawa, Rodo, Shombo, and Tatashe, respectively. Ea for moisture diffusion during drying of peppers varied from 53.86 to 84.86 kJ/mol and was affected by cultivars and osmotic pretreatment concentration. Osmotic pretreatment and drying temperature had significant effect (p < 0.05) on a*, b*, chroma and hue angle values of dried peppers.

  15. Response to trisodium phosphate treatment of Salmonella Chester attached to fresh-cut green pepper slices.

    PubMed

    Liao, C H; Cooke, P H

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory model using green pepper disks was developed to investigate the attachment of Salmonella Chester on plant tissue and to evaluate the effectiveness of sanitizer agents in inactivating attached bacteria on fruits. Pepper disks (14 mm in diam, and 3-4 mm in thickness) were immersed in a bacterial suspension containing 1.5 x 107 cfu x mL(-1) of S. Chester for 30 s and subsequently air-dried at room temperature for 10 min. Approximately 30% of the bacteria retained on the disk after immersion were firmly attached and could not be removed by two washes and agitation. A positive correlation was observed between the number of bacteria attached and the concentration of bacteria in the suspension. Population studies and scanning electron microscopic examinations revealed that attachment of S. Chester on pepper disks occurred mainly on the surfaces of injured (cut) tissue but rarely on the unbroken skin. When inoculated disks were treated with 3% to 12% (w/v) of trisodium phosphate (TSP) at pH 12.3 for 5 min, the population of bacteria on the disk was reduced by 10- to 100-fold. A small portion (0.7% to 7.1%) of bacteria attached to the disk were either resistant to or protected from the TSP treatment. When the pH of TSP solution was reduced from 12.3 to 4.5, the effectiveness of TSP in inactivating S. Chester on pepper disks was reduced by 26%. This study shows that surfaces of injured fruit tissue are the principal sites for bacterial attachment, and a small portion of the bacteria attached to the tissue are resistant to the sanitizer treatment. Avoiding mechanical injuries to fresh fruits during and after harvest would reduce the chance of pathogen attachment and contamination on green pepper and fruits of similar nature.

  16. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  17. Characterization of Capsicum annuum Genetic Diversity and Population Structure Based on Parallel Polymorphism Discovery with a 30K Unigene Pepper GeneChip

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Theresa A.; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  18. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  19. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy.

  20. Coactivator TIF1β Interacts with Transcription Factor C/EBPβ and Glucocorticoid Receptor To Induce α1-Acid Glycoprotein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Jin; Chen, Ya-Ling; Lee, Sheng-Chung

    1998-01-01

    The transcription of the α1-acid glycoprotein gene is induced by inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids. C/EBPβ is a major transcription factor involved in the induction of the agp gene by some cytokines. In this report, we have identified a novel transcriptional intermediary factor, TIF1β, which could enhance the transcription of the agp gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and C/EBPβ. TIF1β belongs to a subgroup of RING (really interesting new gene) finger proteins that contain a RING finger preceding two B box-type fingers and a putative coiled-coil domain (RBCC domain). Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the interaction between GR and TIF1β is ligand independent. The overexpression of the TIF1β gene enhances GR-regulated expression in a ligand- and glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE)-dependent manner. TIF1β can also augment C/EBPβ-mediated activity on wild-type and GRE-mutated agp genes, but this augmentation is diminished when all three C/EBPβ-binding elements are mutated. Functional and biochemical characterizations indicated that the bZIP domain of C/EBPβ and the RBCC domain, plant homeodomain finger, and bromodomain of TIF1β are crucial for the interactions of these proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TIF1β serves as a converging mediator of signal transduction pathways of glucocorticoids and some inflammatory cytokines. PMID:9742105