Science.gov

Sample records for peptide alignment approach

  1. A graph kernel approach for alignment-free domain–peptide interaction prediction with an application to human SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Kousik; Costa, Fabrizio; Backofen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: State-of-the-art experimental data for determining binding specificities of peptide recognition modules (PRMs) is obtained by high-throughput approaches like peptide arrays. Most prediction tools applicable to this kind of data are based on an initial multiple alignment of the peptide ligands. Building an initial alignment can be error-prone, especially in the case of the proline-rich peptides bound by the SH3 domains. Results: Here, we present a machine-learning approach based on an efficient graph-kernel technique to predict the specificity of a large set of 70 human SH3 domains, which are an important class of PRMs. The graph-kernel strategy allows us to (i) integrate several types of physico-chemical information for each amino acid, (ii) consider high-order correlations between these features and (iii) eliminate the need for an initial peptide alignment. We build specialized models for each human SH3 domain and achieve competitive predictive performance of 0.73 area under precision-recall curve, compared with 0.27 area under precision-recall curve for state-of-the-art methods based on position weight matrices. We show that better models can be obtained when we use information on the noninteracting peptides (negative examples), which is currently not used by the state-of-the art approaches based on position weight matrices. To this end, we analyze two strategies to identify subsets of high confidence negative data. The techniques introduced here are more general and hence can also be used for any other protein domains, which interact with short peptides (i.e. other PRMs). Availability: The program with the predictive models can be found at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/SH3PepInt.tar.gz. We also provide a genome-wide prediction for all 70 human SH3 domains, which can be found under http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SH3PepInt/Genome-Wide-Predictions.tar.gz. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary

  2. Synthetic approach to designing optical alignment systems.

    PubMed

    Whang, A J; Gallagher, N C

    1988-08-15

    The objective of this study is twofold: to design reticle patterns with desirable alignment properties; to build an automatic alignment system using these patterns. We design such reticle patterns via a synthetic approach; the resultant patterns, so-called pseudonoise arrays, are binary and their autocorrelation functions are bilevel. Both properties are desirable in optical alignment. Besides, these arrays have attractive signal-to-noise ratio performance when employed in alignment. We implement the pseudonoise array as a 2-D cross-grating structure of which the grating period is much less than the wavelength of impinging light used for alignment. The short grating period feature, together with the use of polarized light, enables us to perform essentially 2-D optical alignment in one dimension. This alignment separability allows us to build a system that performs alignment automatically according to a simple 1-D algorithm. PMID:20539412

  3. Peptide nanotube aligning side chains onto one side.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuki; Mitani, Shota; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2016-06-01

    A novel pseudo cyclic penta-β-peptide composed of a β-naphthylalanine, two β-alanines, and a sequence of ethylenediamine-succinic acid (CP5ES) is synthesized and investigated on peptide nanotube (PNT) formation. When the PNT is formed with the maximum number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the cyclic peptides, the sequence enables the alignment of the side chains, naphthyl groups, on one side of the PNT. Microscopic and spectroscopic observations of CP5ES crystals reveal that CP5ES forms rod- or needle-shaped molecular assemblies showing exciton coupling of the Cotton effect and predominant monomer emission, which are different from a reference cyclic tri-β-peptide composed of a β-naphthylalanine and two β-alanines. Insertion of a sequence of ethylenediamine-succinic acid into β-amino acids in the cyclic skeleton is therefore suggested to be effective to make the side chains aligning on one side of the PNT. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282135

  4. Detecting small plant peptides using SPADA (Small Peptide Alignment Discovery Application)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small peptides encoded as one- or two-exon genes in plants have recently been shown to affect multiple aspects of plant development, reproduction and defense responses. However, popular similarity search tools and gene prediction techniques generally fail to identify most members belonging to this class of genes. This is largely due to the high sequence divergence among family members and the limited availability of experimentally verified small peptides to use as training sets for homology search and ab initio prediction. Consequently, there is an urgent need for both experimental and computational studies in order to further advance the accurate prediction of small peptides. Results We present here a homology-based gene prediction program to accurately predict small peptides at the genome level. Given a high-quality profile alignment, SPADA identifies and annotates nearly all family members in tested genomes with better performance than all general-purpose gene prediction programs surveyed. We find numerous mis-annotations in the current Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula genome databases using SPADA, most of which have RNA-Seq expression support. We also show that SPADA works well on other classes of small secreted peptides in plants (e.g., self-incompatibility protein homologues) as well as non-secreted peptides outside the plant kingdom (e.g., the alpha-amanitin toxin gene family in the mushroom, Amanita bisporigera). Conclusions SPADA is a free software tool that accurately identifies and predicts the gene structure for short peptides with one or two exons. SPADA is able to incorporate information from profile alignments into the model prediction process and makes use of it to score different candidate models. SPADA achieves high sensitivity and specificity in predicting small plant peptides such as the cysteine-rich peptide families. A systematic application of SPADA to other classes of small peptides by research communities will greatly

  5. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  6. Partial face recognition: alignment-free approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2013-05-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for holistic face recognition with impressive performance. However, few studies have tackled how to recognize an arbitrary patch of a face image. Partial faces frequently appear in unconstrained scenarios, with images captured by surveillance cameras or handheld devices (e.g., mobile phones) in particular. In this paper, we propose a general partial face recognition approach that does not require face alignment by eye coordinates or any other fiducial points. We develop an alignment-free face representation method based on Multi-Keypoint Descriptors (MKD), where the descriptor size of a face is determined by the actual content of the image. In this way, any probe face image, holistic or partial, can be sparsely represented by a large dictionary of gallery descriptors. A new keypoint descriptor called Gabor Ternary Pattern (GTP) is also developed for robust and discriminative face recognition. Experimental results are reported on four public domain face databases (FRGCv2.0, AR, LFW, and PubFig) under both the open-set identification and verification scenarios. Comparisons with two leading commercial face recognition SDKs (PittPatt and FaceVACS) and two baseline algorithms (PCA+LDA and LBP) show that the proposed method, overall, is superior in recognizing both holistic and partial faces without requiring alignment.

  7. Partial face recognition: alignment-free approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2013-05-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for holistic face recognition with impressive performance. However, few studies have tackled how to recognize an arbitrary patch of a face image. Partial faces frequently appear in unconstrained scenarios, with images captured by surveillance cameras or handheld devices (e.g., mobile phones) in particular. In this paper, we propose a general partial face recognition approach that does not require face alignment by eye coordinates or any other fiducial points. We develop an alignment-free face representation method based on Multi-Keypoint Descriptors (MKD), where the descriptor size of a face is determined by the actual content of the image. In this way, any probe face image, holistic or partial, can be sparsely represented by a large dictionary of gallery descriptors. A new keypoint descriptor called Gabor Ternary Pattern (GTP) is also developed for robust and discriminative face recognition. Experimental results are reported on four public domain face databases (FRGCv2.0, AR, LFW, and PubFig) under both the open-set identification and verification scenarios. Comparisons with two leading commercial face recognition SDKs (PittPatt and FaceVACS) and two baseline algorithms (PCA+LDA and LBP) show that the proposed method, overall, is superior in recognizing both holistic and partial faces without requiring alignment. PMID:23520259

  8. Triangular Alignment (TAME). A Tensor-based Approach for Higher-order Network Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Gleich, David F.; Kolda, Tamara G.; Grama, Ananth

    2015-11-01

    Network alignment is an important tool with extensive applications in comparative interactomics. Traditional approaches aim to simultaneously maximize the number of conserved edges and the underlying similarity of aligned entities. We propose a novel formulation of the network alignment problem that extends topological similarity to higher-order structures and provide a new objective function that maximizes the number of aligned substructures. This objective function corresponds to an integer programming problem, which is NP-hard. Consequently, we approximate this objective function as a surrogate function whose maximization results in a tensor eigenvalue problem. Based on this formulation, we present an algorithm called Triangular AlignMEnt (TAME), which attempts to maximize the number of aligned triangles across networks. We focus on alignment of triangles because of their enrichment in complex networks; however, our formulation and resulting algorithms can be applied to general motifs. Using a case study on the NAPABench dataset, we show that TAME is capable of producing alignments with up to 99% accuracy in terms of aligned nodes. We further evaluate our method by aligning yeast and human interactomes. Our results indicate that TAME outperforms the state-of-art alignment methods both in terms of biological and topological quality of the alignments.

  9. Classroom EFL Writing: The Alignment-Oriented Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haiyan, Miao; Rilong, Liu

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the alignment-oriented approach in classroom EFL writing. Based on a review of the characteristics of the written language and comparison between the product-focused approach and the process-focused approach, the paper proposes a practical classroom procedure as to how to teach EFL writing. A follow-up empirical study is…

  10. Immobilization of laminin peptide in molecularly aligned chitosan by covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Itoh, Soichiro; Kataoka, Kazunori; Tanaka, Junzo

    2005-05-01

    We developed a new biomaterial effective for nerve regeneration consisting of molecularly aligned chitosan with laminin peptides bonded covalently. Molecularly aligned chitosan was prepared from crab (Macrocheira kaempferi) tendons by ethanol treatment and 4 wt%-NaOH aqueous solutions to remove proteins and calcium phosphate, followed by deacetyl treatment using a 50 wt%-NaOH aqueous solution at 100 degrees C. Molecularly aligned tendon chitosan was chemically thiolated by reacting 4-thiobutyrolactone with the chitosan amino group. The introduction of thiol groups and their distribution to tendon chitosan and chitosan cast film were confirmed using ATR FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, and EDS. The 1.24 micromol/g of thiol groups introduced on the surface of tendon chitosan and the chitosan cast film was confirmed using ultraviolet (UV) spectra. Thiol groups of cysteine located at the end of synthetic laminin peptides were then reacted chemically with thiolated chitosan to form chitosan-S-S-laminin peptide. YIGSR estimated at 0.92 micromol/g and IKVAV estimated at 0.28 micromol/g on thiolated tendon chitosan were confirmed using UV spectra. YIGSR was estimated at 0.85 micromol/g and IKVAV was estimated at 0.34 micromol/g on the thiolated chitosan cast film.

  11. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  12. Connectivity independent protein-structure alignment: a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolbeck, Bjoern; May, Patrick; Schmidt-Goenner, Tobias; Steinke, Thomas; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein-structure alignment is a fundamental tool to study protein function, evolution and model building. In the last decade several methods for structure alignment were introduced, but most of them ignore that structurally similar proteins can share the same spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSE) but differ in the underlying polypeptide chain connectivity (non-sequential SSE connectivity). Results We perform protein-structure alignment using a two-level hierarchical approach implemented in the program GANGSTA. On the first level, pair contacts and relative orientations between SSEs (i.e. α-helices and β-strands) are maximized with a genetic algorithm (GA). On the second level residue pair contacts from the best SSE alignments are optimized. We have tested the method on visually optimized structure alignments of protein pairs (pairwise mode) and for database scans. For a given protein structure, our method is able to detect significant structural similarity of functionally important folds with non-sequential SSE connectivity. The performance for structure alignments with strictly sequential SSE connectivity is comparable to that of other structure alignment methods. Conclusion As demonstrated for several applications, GANGSTA finds meaningful protein-structure alignments independent of the SSE connectivity. GANGSTA is able to detect structural similarity of protein folds that are assigned to different superfamilies but nevertheless possess similar structures and perform related functions, even if these proteins differ in SSE connectivity. PMID:17118190

  13. Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the…

  14. Aligning collaborative and culturally responsive evaluation approaches.

    PubMed

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L

    2012-11-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the program, systematically engage stakeholders and integrate their program expertise throughout the evaluation, build evaluation capacity, and facilitate the co-creation of a more complex understanding of programs. However, the authors note that without explicit attention to considerations raised in culturally responsive evaluation approaches (for example, issues of race, power, and privilege), the voices and concerns of marginalized and underserved populations may be acknowledged, but not explicitly or adequately addressed. The intentional application of collaborative evaluation techniques coupled with a culturally responsive stance enhances the responsiveness, validity and utility of evaluations, as well as the cultural competence of evaluators.

  15. A divide and conquer approach to multiple alignment.

    PubMed

    Dress, A; Füllen, G; Perrey, S

    1995-01-01

    We present a report on work in progress on a divide and conquer approach to multiple alignment. The algorithm makes use of the costs calculated from applying the standard dynamic programming scheme to all pairs of sequences. The resulting cost matrices for pairwise alignment give rise to secondary matrices containing the additional costs imposed by fixing the path through the dynamic programming graph at a particular vertex. Such a constraint corresponds to a division of the problem obtained by slicing both sequences between two particular positions, and aligning the two sequences on the left and the two sequences on the right, charging for gaps introduced at the slicing point. To obtain an estimate for the additional cost imposed by forcing the multiple alignment through a particular vertex in the whole hypercube, we will take a (weighted) sum of secondary costs over all pairwise projections of the division of the problem, as defined by this vertex, that is, by slicing all sequences at the points suggested by the vertex. We then use that partition of every single sequence under consideration into two 'halfs' which imposes a minimal (weighted) sum of pairwise additional costs, making sure that one of the sequences is divided somewhere close to its midpoint. Hence, each iteration can cut the problem size in half. As the enumeration of all possible partitions may restrict this approach to small-size problems, we eliminate futile partitions, and organize their enumeration in a way that starts with the most promising ones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Protein and Peptide drug delivery: oral approaches.

    PubMed

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery.

  17. Pin-Align: A New Dynamic Programming Approach to Align Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, few tools for aligning protein-protein interaction networks have been suggested. These tools typically find conserved interaction patterns using various local or global alignment algorithms. However, the improvement of the speed, scalability, simplification, and accuracy of network alignment tools is still the target of new researches. In this paper, we introduce Pin-Align, a new tool for local alignment of protein-protein interaction networks. Pin-Align accuracy is tested on protein interaction networks from IntAct, DIP, and the Stanford Network Database and the results are compared with other well-known algorithms. It is shown that Pin-Align has higher sensitivity and specificity in terms of KEGG Ortholog groups. PMID:25435900

  18. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags.

  19. A statistical approach to determining responses to individual peptides from pooled-peptide ELISpot data.

    PubMed

    Ström, Peter; Støer, Nathalie; Borthwick, Nicola; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Tomáš; Reilly, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To investigate in detail the effect of infection or vaccination on the human immune system, ELISpot assays are used to simultaneously test the immune response to a large number of peptides of interest. Scientists commonly use "peptide pools", where, instead of an individual peptide, a test well contains a group of peptides. Since the response from a well may be due to any or many of the peptides in the pool, pooled assays usually need to be followed by confirmatory assays of a number of individual peptides. We present a statistical method that enables estimation of individual peptide responses from pool responses using the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for "incomplete data". We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of these estimates in simulation studies of ELISpot plates with 90 pools of 6 or 7 peptides arranged in three dimensions and three Mock wells for the estimation of background. In analysis of real pooled data from 6 subjects in a HIV-1 vaccine trial, where 199 peptides were arranged in 80 pools if size 9 or 10, our estimates were in very good agreement with the results from individual-peptide confirmatory assays. Compared to the classical approach, we could identify almost all the same peptides with high or moderate response, with less than half the number of confirmatory tests. Our method facilitates efficient use of the information available in pooled ELISpot data to avoid or reduce the need for confirmatory testing. We provide an easy-to-use free online application for implementing the method, where on uploading two spreadsheets with the pool design and pool responses, the user obtains the estimates of the individual peptide responses. PMID:27196788

  20. A novel approach for preparation of aligned electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Iman; Mosavi Mashhadi, Mahmoud; Faraji, Ghader

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, a new type of collector named ‘rotating grid collector’ was introduced and its capability in aligning the nanofibers was examined. The results showed that electrospinning using rotating grid collector could produce well aligned fibers with fiber alignment percent of 76%. It was found that in a constant solution flow rate increasing collector rotation speed and eccentric distance improved the fiber alignments. Having prepared the fiber textiles, we found that increasing the rotation speed improved the tensile strength of the fiber textile. This new collector is promising for future application in aligning nanofibers.

  1. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  2. The cortex-based alignment approach to TMS coil positioning.

    PubMed

    Duecker, Felix; Frost, Martin A; de Graaf, Tom A; Graewe, Britta; Jacobs, Christianne; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2014-10-01

    TMS allows noninvasive manipulation of brain activity in healthy participants and patients. The effectiveness of TMS experiments critically depends on precise TMS coil positioning, which is best for most brain areas when a frameless stereotactic system is used to target activation foci based on individual fMRI data. From a purely scientific perspective, individual fMRI-guided TMS is thus the method of choice to ensure optimal TMS efficiency. Yet, from a more practical perspective, such individual functional data are not always available, and therefore alternative TMS coil positioning approaches are often applied, for example, based on functional group data reported in Talairach coordinates. We here propose a novel method for TMS coil positioning that is based on functional group data, yet only requires individual anatomical data. We used cortex-based alignment (CBA) to transform individual anatomical data to an atlas brain that includes probabilistic group maps of two functional regions (FEF and hMT+/V5). Then, these functional group maps were back-transformed to the individual brain anatomy, preserving functional-anatomical correspondence. As a proof of principle, the resulting CBA-based functional targets in individual brain space were compared with individual FEF and hMT+/V5 hotspots as conventionally localized with individual fMRI data and with targets based on Talairach coordinates as commonly done in TMS research in case only individual anatomical data are available. The CBA-based approach significantly improved localization of functional brain areas compared with traditional Talairach-based targeting. Given the widespread availability of CBA schemes and preexisting functional group data, the proposed procedure is easy to implement and at no additional measurement costs. However, the accuracy of individual fMRI-guided TMS remains unparalleled, and the CBA-based approach should only be the method of choice when individual functional data cannot be obtained or

  3. Manufacturing and alignment tolerance analysis through Montecarlo approach for PLATO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bergomi, Maria; Biondi, Federico; Chinellato, Simonetta; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Greggio, Davide; Gullieuszik, Marco; Marafatto, Luca; Viotto, Valentina; Munari, Matteo; Pagano, Isabella; Sicilia, Daniela; Basso, Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Ghigo, Mauro; Spiga, Daniele; Bandy, Timothy; Brändli, Mathias; Benz, Willy; Bruno, Giordano; De Roche, Thierry; Piazza, Daniele; Rieder, Martin; Brandeker, Alexis; Klebor, Maximilian; Mogulsky, Valery; Schweitzer, Mario; Wieser, Matthias; Erikson, Anders; Rauer, Heike

    2016-07-01

    The project PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO) is one of the selected medium class (M class) missions in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The main scientific goal of PLATO is the discovery and study of extrasolar planetary systems by means of planetary transits detection. According to the current baseline, the scientific payload consists of 34 all refractive telescopes having small aperture (120mm) and wide field of view (diameter greater than 37 degrees) observing over 0.5-1 micron wavelength band. The telescopes are mounted on a common optical bench and are divided in four families of eight telescopes with an overlapping line-of-sight in order to maximize the science return. Remaining two telescopes will be dedicated to support on-board star-tracking system and will be specialized on two different photometric bands for science purposes. The performance requirement, adopted as merit function during the analysis, is specified as 90% enclosed energy contained in a square having size 2 pixels over the whole field of view with a depth of focus of +/-20 micron. Given the complexity of the system, we have followed a Montecarlo analysis approach for manufacturing and alignment tolerances. We will describe here the tolerance method and the preliminary results, speculating on the assumed risks and expected performances.

  4. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Tansel; Çökeliler, Dilek; Doğan, Mustafa; Koçum, Ismail Cengiz; Karatay, Okan; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m(3) (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was found

  5. A novel approach to structural alignment using realistic structural and environmental information.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Crippen, Gordon M

    2005-12-01

    In the era of structural genomics, it is necessary to generate accurate structural alignments in order to build good templates for homology modeling. Although a great number of structural alignment algorithms have been developed, most of them ignore intermolecular interactions during the alignment procedure. Therefore, structures in different oligomeric states are barely distinguishable, and it is very challenging to find correct alignment in coil regions. Here we present a novel approach to structural alignment using a clique finding algorithm and environmental information (SAUCE). In this approach, we build the alignment based on not only structural coordinate information but also realistic environmental information extracted from biological unit files provided by the Protein Data Bank (PDB). At first, we eliminate all environmentally unfavorable pairings of residues. Then we identify alignments in core regions via a maximal clique finding algorithm. Two extreme value distribution (EVD) form statistics have been developed to evaluate core region alignments. With an optional extension step, global alignment can be derived based on environment-based dynamic programming linking. We show that our method is able to differentiate three-dimensional structures in different oligomeric states, and is able to find flexible alignments between multidomain structures without predetermined hinge regions. The overall performance is also evaluated on a large scale by comparisons to current structural classification databases as well as to other alignment methods. PMID:16260755

  6. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Tansel; Çökeliler, Dilek; Doğan, Mustafa; Koçum, Ismail Cengiz; Karatay, Okan; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m(3) (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was found

  7. Selection of peptide ligands for piezoelectric peptide based gas sensors arrays using a virtual screening approach.

    PubMed

    Pizzoni, Daniel; Mascini, Marcello; Lanzone, Valentina; Del Carlo, Michele; Di Natale, Corrado; Compagnone, Dario

    2014-02-15

    Virtual and experimental affinity binding properties of 5 different peptides (cysteinylglycine, glutathione, Cys-Ile-His-Asn-Pro, Cys-Ile-Gln-Pro-Val, Cys-Arg-Gln-Val-Phe) vs. 14 volatile compounds belonging to relevant chemical classes were evaluated. The peptides were selected in order to have a large variability in physicochemical characteristics (including length). In virtual screening a rapid and cost-effective computational methodology for predicting binding scores of small peptide receptors vs. volatile compounds is proposed. Flexibility was considered for both ligands and peptides and each peptide conformer was treated as a possible receptor, generating a dedicated box and then running a docking process vs. all possible conformers of the 14 volatile compounds. The 5 peptides were covalently bound to gold nanoparticles and deposited onto 20 MHz quartz crystal microbalances to realize gas sensors. Gas sensing confirmed that each of the peptide conferred to the gold nanoparticles a particular selectivity pattern able to discriminate the 14 volatile compounds. The largest response was obtained for the pentapeptides Cys-Ile-His-Asn-Pro and Cys-Ile-Gln-Pro-Val while low response was achieved for the dipeptide. The comparative study, carried using a two-tailed T test, demonstrated that virtual screening was able to predict reliably the sensing ability of the pentapeptides. The dipeptide receptor exhibited 29% of virtual-experimental matching vs. 71% of glutathione and up to 93% for the pentapeptides. This virtual screening approach was proved to be a promising tool in predicting the behaviour of sensors array for gas detection. PMID:24060973

  8. Optimizing parameters on alignment of PCL/PGA nanofibrous scaffold: An artificial neural networks approach.

    PubMed

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Mirzaei, Esmaeil; Amani, Amir; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Saber, Reza; Faridi-Majidi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an artificial neural networks approach to finding the effects of electrospinning parameters on alignment of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/poly(glycolic acid) blend nanofibers. Four electrospinning parameters, namely total polymer concentration, working distance, drum speed and applied voltage were considered as input and the standard deviation of the angles of nanofibers, introducing fibers alignments, as the output of the model. The results demonstrated that drum speed and applied voltage are two critical factors influencing nanofibers alignment, however their effect are entirely interdependent. Their effects also are not independent of other electrospinning parameters. In obtaining aligned electrospun nanofibers, the concentration and working distance can also be effective. In vitro cell culture study on random and aligned nanofibers showed directional growth of cells on aligned fibers.

  9. CW dipolar broadening EPR spectroscopy and mechanically aligned bilayers used to measure distance and relative orientation between two TOAC spin labels on an antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Indra D.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Ghimire, Harishchandra; Inbaraj, Johnson J.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    An EPR membrane alignment technique was applied to measure distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a protein oriented along the surface of the membrane. Previously we demonstrated an EPR membrane alignment technique for measuring distances and relative orientations between two spin labels using a dual TOAC-labeled integral transmembrane peptide (M2δ segment of Acetylcholine receptor) as a test system. In this study we further utilized this technique and successfully measured the distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a membrane peripheral peptide (antimicrobial peptide magainin-2). The TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptides were mechanically aligned using DMPC lipids on a planar quartz support, and CW-EPR spectra were recorded at specific orientations. Global analysis in combination with rigorous spectral simulation was used to simultaneously analyze data from two different sample orientations for both single- and double-labeled peptides. We measured an internitroxide distance of 15.3 Å from a dual TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptide at positions 8 and 14 that closely matches with the 13.3 Å distance obtained from a model of the labeled magainin peptide. In addition, the angles determining the relative orientations of the two nitroxides have been determined, and the results compare favorably with molecular modeling. This study demonstrates the utility of the technique for proteins oriented along the surface of the membrane in addition to the previous results for proteins situated within the membrane bilayer.

  10. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism.

  11. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism. PMID:19772349

  12. Prediction of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Sequence Alignment and Support Vector Machine-Pairwise Algorithm Utilizing LZ-Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Shahrudin, Shahriza

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns an attempt to establish a new method for predicting antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are important to the immune system. Recently, researchers are interested in designing alternative drugs based on AMPs because they have found that a large number of bacterial strains have become resistant to available antibiotics. However, researchers have encountered obstacles in the AMPs designing process as experiments to extract AMPs from protein sequences are costly and require a long set-up time. Therefore, a computational tool for AMPs prediction is needed to resolve this problem. In this study, an integrated algorithm is newly introduced to predict AMPs by integrating sequence alignment and support vector machine- (SVM-) LZ complexity pairwise algorithm. It was observed that, when all sequences in the training set are used, the sensitivity of the proposed algorithm is 95.28% in jackknife test and 87.59% in independent test, while the sensitivity obtained for jackknife test and independent test is 88.74% and 78.70%, respectively, when only the sequences that has less than 70% similarity are used. Applying the proposed algorithm may allow researchers to effectively predict AMPs from unknown protein peptide sequences with higher sensitivity. PMID:25802839

  13. RV-Typer: A Web Server for Typing of Rhinoviruses Using Alignment-Free Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolekar, Pandurang S.; Waman, Vaishali P.; Kale, Mohan M.; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2016-01-01

    Rhinoviruses (RV) are increasingly being reported to cause mild to severe infections of respiratory tract in humans. RV are antigenically the most diverse species of the genus Enterovirus and family Picornaviridae. There are three species of RV (RV-A, -B and -C), with 80, 32 and 55 serotypes/types, respectively. Antigenic variation is the main limiting factor for development of a cross-protective vaccine against RV.Serotyping of Rhinoviruses is carried out using cross-neutralization assays in cell culture. However, these assays become laborious and time-consuming for the large number of strains. Alternatively, serotyping of RV is carried out by alignment-based phylogeny of both protein and nucleotide sequences of VP1. However, serotyping of RV based on alignment-based phylogeny is a multi-step process, which needs to be repeated every time a new isolate is sequenced. In view of the growing need for serotyping of RV, an alignment-free method based on “return time distribution” (RTD) of amino acid residues in VP1 protein has been developed and implemented in the form of a web server titled RV-Typer. RV-Typer accepts nucleotide or protein sequences as an input and computes return times of di-peptides (k = 2) to assign serotypes. The RV-Typer performs with 100% sensitivity and specificity. It is significantly faster than alignment-based methods. The web server is available at http://bioinfo.net.in/RV-Typer/home.html. PMID:26870949

  14. RV-Typer: A Web Server for Typing of Rhinoviruses Using Alignment-Free Approach.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Pandurang S; Waman, Vaishali P; Kale, Mohan M; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2016-01-01

    Rhinoviruses (RV) are increasingly being reported to cause mild to severe infections of respiratory tract in humans. RV are antigenically the most diverse species of the genus Enterovirus and family Picornaviridae. There are three species of RV (RV-A, -B and -C), with 80, 32 and 55 serotypes/types, respectively. Antigenic variation is the main limiting factor for development of a cross-protective vaccine against RV.Serotyping of Rhinoviruses is carried out using cross-neutralization assays in cell culture. However, these assays become laborious and time-consuming for the large number of strains. Alternatively, serotyping of RV is carried out by alignment-based phylogeny of both protein and nucleotide sequences of VP1. However, serotyping of RV based on alignment-based phylogeny is a multi-step process, which needs to be repeated every time a new isolate is sequenced. In view of the growing need for serotyping of RV, an alignment-free method based on "return time distribution" (RTD) of amino acid residues in VP1 protein has been developed and implemented in the form of a web server titled RV-Typer. RV-Typer accepts nucleotide or protein sequences as an input and computes return times of di-peptides (k = 2) to assign serotypes. The RV-Typer performs with 100% sensitivity and specificity. It is significantly faster than alignment-based methods. The web server is available at http://bioinfo.net.in/RV-Typer/home.html.

  15. General approach for characterizing in vitro selected peptides with protein binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Gillig, Annabelle; Shah, Pankti; Sau, Sujay P; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2014-08-01

    In vitro selection technologies are important tools for identifying high affinity peptides to proteins of broad medical and biological interest. However, the technological advances that have made it possible to generate long lists of candidate peptides have far outpaced our ability to characterize the binding properties of individual peptides. Here, we describe a low cost strategy to rapidly synthesize, purify, screen, and characterize peptides for high binding affinity. Peptides are assayed in a 96-well dot blot apparatus using membranes that enable partitioning of bound and unbound peptide-protein complexes. We have validated the binding affinity constants produced by this method using known peptide ligands and applied this process to discover five new peptides with nanomolar affinity to human α-thrombin. Given the need for new analytical tools that can accelerate peptide discovery and characterization, we feel that this approach would be useful to a wide range of technologies that utilize high affinity peptides.

  16. A parallel approach of COFFEE objective function to multiple sequence alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafalon, G. F. D.; Visotaky, J. M. V.; Amorim, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.; Neves, L. A.; de Souza, R. C. G.; Machado, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The computational tools to assist genomic analyzes show even more necessary due to fast increasing of data amount available. With high computational costs of deterministic algorithms for sequence alignments, many works concentrate their efforts in the development of heuristic approaches to multiple sequence alignments. However, the selection of an approach, which offers solutions with good biological significance and feasible execution time, is a great challenge. Thus, this work aims to show the parallelization of the processing steps of MSA-GA tool using multithread paradigm in the execution of COFFEE objective function. The standard objective function implemented in the tool is the Weighted Sum of Pairs (WSP), which produces some distortions in the final alignments when sequences sets with low similarity are aligned. Then, in studies previously performed we implemented the COFFEE objective function in the tool to smooth these distortions. Although the nature of COFFEE objective function implies in the increasing of execution time, this approach presents points, which can be executed in parallel. With the improvements implemented in this work, we can verify the execution time of new approach is 24% faster than the sequential approach with COFFEE. Moreover, the COFFEE multithreaded approach is more efficient than WSP, because besides it is slightly fast, its biological results are better.

  17. Regeneration of the Cavernous Nerve by Sonic Hedgehog Using Aligned Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Nicholas L.; Bond, Christopher W.; Tang, Yi; Harrington, Daniel A.; Zhang, Shuming; Stupp, Samuel I.; McKenna, Kevin E.; Podlasek, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to regenerate the cavernous nerve (CN), which provides innervation to the penis, have been minimally successful, with little translation into improved clinical outcomes. We propose that, Sonic hedgehog (SHH), is critical to maintain CN integrity, and that SHH delivered to the CN by novel peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers, will promote CN regeneration, restore physiological function, and prevent penile morphology changes that result in erectile dysfunction (ED). We performed localization studies, inhibition of SHH signaling in the CN, and treatment of crushed CNs with SHH protein via linear PA gels, which are an innovative extended release method of delivery. Morphological, functional and molecular analysis revealed that SHH protein is essential to maintain CN architecture, and that SHH treatment promoted CN regeneration, suppressed penile apoptosis and caused a 58% improvement in erectile function in less than half the time reported in the literature. These studies show that SHH has substantial clinical application to regenerate the CN in prostatectomy and diabetic patients, that this methodology has broad application to regenerate any peripheral nerve that SHH is necessary for maintenance of its structure, and that this nanotechnology method of protein delivery may have wide spread application as an in vivo delivery tool in many organs. PMID:20971506

  18. Approaches for Enhancing Oral Bioavailability of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Renukuntla, Jwala; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Boddu, Sai HS.; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-01-01

    Oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs faces immense challenge partially due to the gastrointestinal (GI) environment. In spite of considerable efforts by industrial and academic laboratories, no major breakthrough in the effective oral delivery of polypeptides and proteins has been accomplished. Upon oral administration, gastrointestinal epithelium acts as a physical and biochemical barrier for absorption of proteins resulting in low bioavailability (typically less than 1–2%). An ideal oral drug delivery system should be capable of a) maintaining the integrity of protein molecules until it reaches the site of absorption, b) releasing the drug at the target absorption site, where the delivery system appends to that site by virtue of specific interaction, and c) retaining inside the gastrointestinal tract irrespective of its transitory constraints. Various technologies have been explored to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of macromolecules such as insulin, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, calcitonin, human growth factor, vaccines, enkephalins, and interferons, all of which met with limited success. This review article intends to summarize the physiological barriers to oral delivery of peptides and proteins and novel pharmaceutical approaches to circumvent these barriers and enhance oral bioavailability of these macromolecules. PMID:23428883

  19. A fast approach to global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Global network alignment has been proposed as an effective tool for computing functional orthology. Commonly used global alignment techniques such as IsoRank rely on a two-step process: the first step is an iterative diffusion-based approach for assigning similarity scores to all possible node pairs (matchings); the second step applies a maximum-weight bipartite matching algorithm to this similarity score matrix to identify orthologous node pairs. While demonstrably successful in identifying orthologies beyond those based on sequences, this two-step process is computationally expensive. Recent work on computation of node-pair similarity matrices has demonstrated that the computational cost of the first step can be significantly reduced. The use of these accelerated methods renders the bipartite matching step as the dominant computational cost. This motivates a critical assessment of the tradeoffs of computational cost and solution quality (matching quality, topological matches, and biological significance) associated with the bipartite matching step. In this paper we utilize the state-of-the-art core diffusion-based step in IsoRank for similarity matrix computation, and couple it with two heuristic bipartite matching algorithms – a matrix-based greedy approach, and a tunable, adaptive, auction-based matching algorithm developed by us. We then compare our implementations against the performance and quality characteristics of the solution produced by the reference IsoRank binary, which also implements an optimal matching algorithm. Results Using heuristic matching algorithms in the IsoRank pipeline exhibits dramatic speedup improvements; typically ×30 times faster for the total alignment process in most cases of interest. More surprisingly, these improvements in compute times are typically accompanied by better or comparable topological and biological quality for the network alignments generated. These measures are quantified by the number of conserved

  20. Electrode alignment of transverse tripoles using a percutaneous triple-lead approach in spinal cord stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, V.; Buitenweg, J. R.; Holsheimer, J.; Veltink, P.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this modeling study is to determine the influence of electrode alignment of transverse tripoles on the paresthesia coverage of the pain area in spinal cord stimulation, using a percutaneous triple-lead approach. Transverse tripoles, comprising a central cathode and two lateral anodes, were modeled on the low-thoracic vertebral region (T10-T12) using percutaneous triple-lead configurations, with the center lead on the spinal cord midline. The triple leads were oriented both aligned and staggered. In the staggered configuration, the anodes were offset either caudally (caudally staggered) or rostrally (rostrally staggered) with respect to the midline cathode. The transverse tripolar field steering with the aligned and staggered configurations enabled the estimation of dorsal column fiber thresholds (IDC) and dorsal root fiber thresholds (IDR) at various anodal current ratios. IDC and IDR were considerably higher for the aligned transverse tripoles as compared to the staggered transverse tripoles. The aligned transverse tripoles facilitated deeper penetration into the medial dorsal columns (DCs). The staggered transverse tripoles always enabled broad and bilateral DC activation, at the expense of mediolateral steerability. The largest DC recruited area was obtained with the rostrally staggered transverse tripole. Transverse tripolar geometries, using percutaneous leads, allow for selective targeting of either medial or lateral DC fibers, if and only if the transverse tripole is aligned. Steering of anodal currents between the lateral leads of the staggered transverse tripoles cannot target medially confined populations of DC fibers in the spinal cord. An aligned transverse tripolar configuration is strongly recommended, because of its ability to provide more post-operative flexibility than other configurations.

  1. Energy level alignment at hybridized organic-metal interfaces from a GW projection approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifeng; Tamblyn, Isaac; Quek, Su Ying

    Energy level alignments at organic-metal interfaces are of profound importance in numerous (opto)electronic applications. Standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations generally give incorrect energy level alignments and missing long-range polarization effects. Previous efforts to address this problem using the many-electron GW method have focused on physisorbed systems where hybridization effects are insignificant. Here, we use state-of-the-art GW methods to predict the level alignment at the amine-Au interface, where molecular levels do hybridize with metallic states. This non-trivial hybridization implies that DFT result is a poor approximation to the quasiparticle states. However, we find that the self-energy operator is approximately diagonal in the molecular basis, allowing us to use a projection approach to predict the level alignments. Our results indicate that the metallic substrate reduces the HOMO-LUMO gap by 3.5 4.0 eV, depending on the molecular coverage/presence of Au adatoms. Our GW results are further compared with those of a simple image charge model that describes the level alignment in physisorbed systems. Syq and YC acknowledge Grant NRF-NRFF2013-07 and the medium-sized centre program from the National Research Foundation, Singapore.

  2. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  3. CVTree: a Whole-Genome and Alignment-Free Approach to Microbial Phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bailin

    The number of sequenced genomes of Archaea, Bacteria, and Fungi accumulates rapidly. Several thousands genomes of these unicellular organisms will be available in a few years. Due to the extremely large difference in genome size and gene content it is difficult to use the traditional alignment-based method to infer phylogeny from the genomes. An alignment-free and whole-genome-based approach called CVTree has been developed and successfully applied to these organisms. As CVTree has been successfully applied to genomes of viruses, chloroplasts, Bacteria, Archaea and fungi, in this brief review we will mainly touch on some mathematical problems related to the foundation of the new approach, including a few yet unsolved problems, such as the violation of the triangular inequalities of the dissimilarity measure used in the CVTree method.

  4. Sequence comparison alignment-free approach based on suffix tree and L-words frequency.

    PubMed

    Soares, Inês; Goios, Ana; Amorim, António

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of methods available for sequence comparison rely on a first sequence alignment step, which requires a number of assumptions on evolutionary history and is sometimes very difficult or impossible to perform due to the abundance of gaps (insertions/deletions). In such cases, an alternative alignment-free method would prove valuable. Our method starts by a computation of a generalized suffix tree of all sequences, which is completed in linear time. Using this tree, the frequency of all possible words with a preset length L-L-words--in each sequence is rapidly calculated. Based on the L-words frequency profile of each sequence, a pairwise standard Euclidean distance is then computed producing a symmetric genetic distance matrix, which can be used to generate a neighbor joining dendrogram or a multidimensional scaling graph. We present an improvement to word counting alignment-free approaches for sequence comparison, by determining a single optimal word length and combining suffix tree structures to the word counting tasks. Our approach is, thus, a fast and simple application that proved to be efficient and powerful when applied to mitochondrial genomes. The algorithm was implemented in Python language and is freely available on the web.

  5. First-Principles Approach to Energy Level Alignment at Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hybertsen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a first principles method to calculate the energy level alignment between semiconductor band edges and reference energy levels at aqueous interfaces. This alignment is fundamental to understand the electrochemical characteristics of any semiconductor electrode in general and the potential for photocatalytic activity in particular. For example, in the search for new photo-catalytic materials, viable candidates must demonstrate both efficient absorption of the solar spectrum and an appropriate alignment of the band edge levels in the semiconductor to the redox levels for the target reactions. In our approach, the interface-specific contribution to the electrostatic step across the interface is evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics to sample the physical interface structure and the corresponding change in the electrostatic potential at the interface. The reference electronic levels in the semiconductor and in the water are calculated using the GW approach, which naturally corrects for errors inherent in the use of Kohn-Sham energy eigenvalues to approximate the electronic excitation energies in each material. Taken together, our calculations provide the alignment of the semiconductor valence band edge to the centroid of the highest occupied 1b1 level in water. The known relationship of the 1b1 level to the normal hydrogen electrode completes the connection to electrochemical levels. We discuss specific results for GaN, ZnO, and TiO2. The effect of interface structural motifs, such as different degrees of water dissociation, and of dynamical characteristics, will be presented together with available experimental data. Work supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  6. Inhibition of the ferric uptake regulator by peptides derived from anti-FUR peptide aptamers: coupled theoretical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Cissé, Cheickna; Mathieu, Sophie V; Abeih, Mohamed B Ould; Flanagan, Lindsey; Vitale, Sylvia; Catty, Patrice; Boturyn, Didier; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-12-19

    The FUR protein (ferric uptake regulator) is an iron-dependent global transcriptional regulator. Specific to bacteria, FUR is an attractive antibacterial target since virulence is correlated to iron bioavailability. Recently, four anti-FUR peptide aptamers, composed of 13 amino acid variable loops inserted into a thioredoxinA scaffold, were identified, which were able to interact with Escherichia coli FUR (EcFUR), inhibit its binding to DNA and to decrease the virulence of pathogenic E. coli in a fly infection model. The first characterization of anti-FUR linear peptides (pF1 6 to 13 amino acids) derived from the variable part of the F1 anti-FUR peptide aptamer is described herein. Theoretical and experimental approaches, in original combination, were used to study interactions of these peptides with FUR in order to understand their mechanism of inhibition. After modeling EcFUR by homology, docking with Autodock was combined with molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent to take into account the flexibility of the partners. All calculations were cross-checked either with other programs or with experimental data. As a result, reliable structures of EcFUR and its complex with pF1 are given and an inhibition pocket formed by the groove between the two FUR subunits is proposed. The location of the pocket was validated through experimental mutation of key EcFUR residues at the site of proposed peptide interaction. Cyclisation of pF1, mimicking the peptide constraint in F1, improved inhibition. The details of the interactions between peptide and protein were analyzed and a mechanism of inhibition of these anti-FUR molecules is proposed.

  7. Prediction of Biofilm Inhibiting Peptides: An In silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Ashok K; Jaiswal, Shubham K; Sharma, Vineet K

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of microbial infections found in humans are caused by microbial biofilms. These biofilms are resistant to host immune system and most of the currently available antibiotics. Small peptides are extensively studied for their role as anti-microbial peptides, however, only a limited studies have shown their potential as inhibitors of biofilm. Therefore, to develop a unique computational method aimed at the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides, the experimentally validated biofilm inhibiting peptides sequences were used to extract sequence based features and to identify unique sequence motifs. Biofilm inhibiting peptides were observed to be abundant in positively charged and aromatic amino acids, and also showed selective abundance of some dipeptides and sequence motifs. These individual sequence based features were utilized to construct Support Vector Machine-based prediction models and additionally by including sequence motifs information, the hybrid models were constructed. Using 10-fold cross validation, the hybrid model displayed the accuracy and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 97.83% and 0.87, respectively. On the validation dataset, the hybrid model showed the accuracy and MCC value of 97.19% and 0.84, respectively. The validated model and other tools developed for the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides are available freely as web server at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/ and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/. PMID:27379078

  8. Prediction of Biofilm Inhibiting Peptides: An In silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Sharma, Ashok K.; Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of microbial infections found in humans are caused by microbial biofilms. These biofilms are resistant to host immune system and most of the currently available antibiotics. Small peptides are extensively studied for their role as anti-microbial peptides, however, only a limited studies have shown their potential as inhibitors of biofilm. Therefore, to develop a unique computational method aimed at the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides, the experimentally validated biofilm inhibiting peptides sequences were used to extract sequence based features and to identify unique sequence motifs. Biofilm inhibiting peptides were observed to be abundant in positively charged and aromatic amino acids, and also showed selective abundance of some dipeptides and sequence motifs. These individual sequence based features were utilized to construct Support Vector Machine-based prediction models and additionally by including sequence motifs information, the hybrid models were constructed. Using 10-fold cross validation, the hybrid model displayed the accuracy and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 97.83% and 0.87, respectively. On the validation dataset, the hybrid model showed the accuracy and MCC value of 97.19% and 0.84, respectively. The validated model and other tools developed for the prediction of biofilm inhibiting peptides are available freely as web server at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/ and http://metabiosys.iiserb.ac.in/biofin/. PMID:27379078

  9. An efficient multi-resolution GA approach to dental image alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Diaa Eldin; Ogirala, Mythili; Adjeroh, Donald; Ammar, Hany

    2006-02-01

    Automating the process of postmortem identification of individuals using dental records is receiving an increased attention in forensic science, especially with the large volume of victims encountered in mass disasters. Dental radiograph alignment is a key step required for automating the dental identification process. In this paper, we address the problem of dental radiograph alignment using a Multi-Resolution Genetic Algorithm (MR-GA) approach. We use location and orientation information of edge points as features; we assume that affine transformations suffice to restore geometric discrepancies between two images of a tooth, we efficiently search the 6D space of affine parameters using GA progressively across multi-resolution image versions, and we use a Hausdorff distance measure to compute the similarity between a reference tooth and a query tooth subject to a possible alignment transform. Testing results based on 52 teeth-pair images suggest that our algorithm converges to reasonable solutions in more than 85% of the test cases, with most of the error in the remaining cases due to excessive misalignments.

  10. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  11. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform.

  12. Combinatorial approaches: A new tool to search for highly structured β-hairpin peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Maria Teresa; López de la Paz, Manuela; Lacroix, Emmanuel; Serrano, Luis; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Here we present a combinatorial approach to evolve a stable β-hairpin fold in a linear peptide. Starting with a de novo-designed linear peptide that shows a β-hairpin structure population of around 30%, we selected four positions to build up a combinatorial library of 204 sequences. Deconvolution of the library using circular dichroism reduced such a sequence complexity to 36 defined sequences. Circular dichroism and NMR of these peptides resulted in the identification of two linear 14-aa-long peptides that in plain buffered solutions showed a percentage of β-hairpin structure higher than 70%. Our results show how combinatorial approaches can be used to obtain highly structured peptide sequences that could be used as templates in which functionality can be introduced. PMID:11782528

  13. Combinatorial approach for large-scale identification of linked peptides from tandem mass spectrometry spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R; Bourne, Philip E; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-04-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  14. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1b₁ energy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and themore » dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.« less

  15. First-principles approach to calculating energy level alignment at aqueous semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kharche, Neerav; Muckerman, James T.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2014-10-21

    A first-principles approach is demonstrated for calculating the relationship between an aqueous semiconductor interface structure and energy level alignment. The physical interface structure is sampled using density functional theory based molecular dynamics, yielding the interface electrostatic dipole. The GW approach from many-body perturbation theory is used to place the electronic band edge energies of the semiconductor relative to the occupied 1b₁ energy level in water. The application to the specific cases of nonpolar (101¯0 ) facets of GaN and ZnO reveals a significant role for the structural motifs at the interface, including the degree of interface water dissociation and the dynamical fluctuations in the interface Zn-O and O-H bond orientations. As a result, these effects contribute up to 0.5 eV.

  16. A Fast Alignment-Free Approach for De Novo Detection of Protein Conserved Regions

    PubMed Central

    Abnousi, Armen; Broschat, Shira L.; Kalyanaraman, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying conserved regions in protein sequences is a fundamental operation, occurring in numerous sequence-driven analysis pipelines. It is used as a way to decode domain-rich regions within proteins, to compute protein clusters, to annotate sequence function, and to compute evolutionary relationships among protein sequences. A number of approaches exist for identifying and characterizing protein families based on their domains, and because domains represent conserved portions of a protein sequence, the primary computation involved in protein family characterization is identification of such conserved regions. However, identifying conserved regions from large collections (millions) of protein sequences presents significant challenges. Methods In this paper we present a new, alignment-free method for detecting conserved regions in protein sequences called NADDA (No-Alignment Domain Detection Algorithm). Our method exploits the abundance of exact matching short subsequences (k-mers) to quickly detect conserved regions, and the power of machine learning is used to improve the prediction accuracy of detection. We present a parallel implementation of NADDA using the MapReduce framework and show that our method is highly scalable. Results We have compared NADDA with Pfam and InterPro databases. For known domains annotated by Pfam, accuracy is 83%, sensitivity 96%, and specificity 44%. For sequences with new domains not present in the training set an average accuracy of 63% is achieved when compared to Pfam. A boost in results in comparison with InterPro demonstrates the ability of NADDA to capture conserved regions beyond those present in Pfam. We have also compared NADDA with ADDA and MKDOM2, assuming Pfam as ground-truth. On average NADDA shows comparable accuracy, more balanced sensitivity and specificity, and being alignment-free, is significantly faster. Excluding the one-time cost of training, runtimes on a single processor were 49s, 10,566s, and 456s

  17. Denoising peptide tandem mass spectra for spectral libraries: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Lam, Henry

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid accumulation of data from shotgun proteomics experiments, it has become feasible to build comprehensive and high-quality spectral libraries of tandem mass spectra of peptides. A spectral library condenses experimental data into a retrievable format and can be used to aid peptide identification by spectral library searching. A key step in spectral library building is spectrum denoising, which is best accomplished by merging multiple replicates of the same peptide ion into a consensus spectrum. However, this approach cannot be applied to "singleton spectra," for which only one observed spectrum is available for the peptide ion. We developed a method, based on a Bayesian classifier, for denoising peptide tandem mass spectra. The classifier accounts for relationships between peaks, and can be trained on the fly from consensus spectra and immediately applied to denoise singleton spectra, without hard-coded knowledge about peptide fragmentation. A linear regression model was also trained to predict the number of useful "signal" peaks in a spectrum, thereby obviating the need for arbitrary thresholds for peak filtering. This Bayesian approach accumulates weak evidence systematically to boost the discrimination power between signal and noise peaks, and produces readily interpretable conditional probabilities that offer valuable insights into peptide fragmentation behaviors. By cross validation, spectra denoised by this method were shown to retain more signal peaks, and have higher spectral similarities to replicates, than those filtered by intensity only.

  18. A biomimetic approach for enhancing the in vivo half-life of peptides.

    PubMed

    Penchala, Sravan C; Miller, Mark R; Pal, Arindom; Dong, Jin; Madadi, Nikhil R; Xie, Jinghang; Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry; Batoon, Patrick; Samoshin, Vyacheslav; Franz, Andreas; Cox, Trever; Miles, Jesse; Chan, William K; Park, Miki S; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M

    2015-10-01

    The tremendous therapeutic potential of peptides has not yet been realized, mainly owing to their short in vivo half-life. Although conjugation to macromolecules has been a mainstay approach for enhancing protein half-life, the steric hindrance of macromolecules often harms the binding of peptides to target receptors, compromising the in vivo efficacy. Here we report a new strategy for enhancing the in vivo half-life of peptides without compromising their potency. Our approach involves endowing peptides with a small molecule that binds reversibly to the serum protein transthyretin. Although there are a few molecules that bind albumin reversibly, we are unaware of designed small molecules that reversibly bind other serum proteins and are used for half-life extension in vivo. We show here that our strategy was effective in enhancing the half-life of an agonist for GnRH receptor while maintaining its binding affinity, which was translated into superior in vivo efficacy.

  19. A New Approach to the Oral Administration of Insulin and Other Peptide Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffran, Murray; Sudesh Kumar, G.; Savariar, Celin; Burnham, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Frederick; Neckers, Douglas C.

    1986-09-01

    The oral administration of peptide drugs is well known to be precluded by their digestion in the stomach and small intestine. As a new approach to oral delivery, peptide drugs were coated with polymers cross-linked with azoaromatic groups to form an impervious film to protect orally administered drugs from digestion in the stomach and small intestine. When the azopolymer-coated drug reached the large intestine, the indigenous microflora reduced the azo bonds, broke the cross-links, and degraded the polymer film, thereby releasing the drug into the lumen of the colon for local action or for absorption. The ability of the azopolymer coating to protect and deliver orally administered peptide drugs was demonstrated in rats with the peptide hormones vasopressin and insulin.

  20. A Unified Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Approach to Protein-Peptide Docking

    PubMed Central

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are vital for the cell. They mediate, inhibit or serve as structural components in nearly 40% of all macromolecular interactions, and are often associated with diseases, making them interesting leads for protein drug design. In recent years, large-scale technologies have enabled exhaustive studies on the peptide recognition preferences for a number of peptide-binding domain families. Yet, the paucity of data regarding their molecular binding mechanisms together with their inherent flexibility makes the structural prediction of protein-peptide interactions very challenging. This leaves flexible docking as one of the few amenable computational techniques to model these complexes. We present here an ensemble, flexible protein-peptide docking protocol that combines conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Starting from an ensemble of three peptide conformations (extended, a-helix, polyproline-II), flexible docking with HADDOCK generates 79.4% of high quality models for bound/unbound and 69.4% for unbound/unbound docking when tested against the largest protein-peptide complexes benchmark dataset available to date. Conformational selection at the rigid-body docking stage successfully recovers the most relevant conformation for a given protein-peptide complex and the subsequent flexible refinement further improves the interface by up to 4.5 Å interface RMSD. Cluster-based scoring of the models results in a selection of near-native solutions in the top three for ∼75% of the successfully predicted cases. This unified conformational selection and induced fit approach to protein-peptide docking should open the route to the modeling of challenging systems such as disorder-order transitions taking place upon binding, significantly expanding the applicability limit of biomolecular interaction modeling by docking. PMID:23516555

  1. A new approach to implant alignment and ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty focussing on joint loads.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Frauke; Schwenninger, Christoph; Nolten, Ulrich; Firmbach, Franz Peter; Elfring, Robert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Preservation and recovery of the mechanical leg axis as well as good rotational alignment of the prosthesis components and well-balanced ligaments are essential for the longevity of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the framework of the OrthoMIT project, the genALIGN system, a new navigated implantation approach based on intra-operative force-torque measurements, has been developed. With this system, optical or magnetic position tracking as well as any fixation of invasive rigid bodies are no longer necessary. For the alignment of the femoral component along the mechanical axis, a sensor-integrated instrument measures the torques resulting from the deviation between the instrument's axis and the mechanical axis under manually applied axial compression load. When both axes are coaxial, the resulting torques equal zero, and the tool axis can be fixed with respect to the bone. For ligament balancing and rotational alignment of the femoral component, the genALIGN system comprises a sensor-integrated tibial trial inlay measuring the amplitude and application points of the forces transferred between femur and tibia. Hereby, the impact of ligament tensions on knee joint loads can be determined over the whole range of motion. First studies with the genALIGN system, including a comparison with an imageless navigation system, show the feasibility of the concept. PMID:22868781

  2. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  3. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions.

  4. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions. PMID:15187128

  5. Developing a New Teaching Approach for the Chemical Bonding Concept Aligned with Current Scientific and Pedagogical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Krajcik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The traditional pedagogical approach for teaching chemical bonding is often overly simplistic and not aligned with the most up-to-date scientific models. As a result, high-school students around the world lack fundamental understanding of chemical bonding. In order to improve students' understanding of this concept, it was essential to propose a…

  6. Designing and Scaling Level-Specific Writing Tasks in Alignment with the CEFR: A Test-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsch, Claudia; Rupp, Andre Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The "Common European Framework of Reference" (CEFR; Council of Europe, 2001) provides a competency model that is increasingly used as a point of reference to compare language examinations. Nevertheless, aligning examinations to the CEFR proficiency levels remains a challenge. In this article, we propose a new, level-centered approach to designing…

  7. Extending the coverage of spectral libraries: a neighbor-based approach to predicting intensities of peptide fragmentation spectra.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Arnold, Randy J; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Hardy, Richard W; Tang, Haixu; Radivojac, Predrag

    2013-03-01

    Searching spectral libraries in MS/MS is an important new approach to improving the quality of peptide and protein identification. The idea relies on the observation that ion intensities in an MS/MS spectrum of a given peptide are generally reproducible across experiments, and thus, matching between spectra from an experiment and the spectra of previously identified peptides stored in a spectral library can lead to better peptide identification compared to the traditional database search. However, the use of libraries is greatly limited by their coverage of peptide sequences: even for well-studied organisms a large fraction of peptides have not been previously identified. To address this issue, we propose to expand spectral libraries by predicting the MS/MS spectra of peptides based on the spectra of peptides with similar sequences. We first demonstrate that the intensity patterns of dominant fragment ions between similar peptides tend to be similar. In accordance with this observation, we develop a neighbor-based approach that first selects peptides that are likely to have spectra similar to the target peptide and then combines their spectra using a weighted K-nearest neighbor method to accurately predict fragment ion intensities corresponding to the target peptide. This approach has the potential to predict spectra for every peptide in the proteome. When rigorous quality criteria are applied, we estimate that the method increases the coverage of spectral libraries available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology by 20-60%, although the values vary with peptide length and charge state. We find that the overall best search performance is achieved when spectral libraries are supplemented by the high quality predicted spectra.

  8. A mostly traditional approach improves alignment of bisulfite-converted DNA

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Martin C.; Mori, Ryota; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Cytosines in genomic DNA are sometimes methylated. This affects many biological processes and diseases. The standard way of measuring methylation is to use bisulfite, which converts unmethylated cytosines to thymines, then sequence the DNA and compare it to a reference genome sequence. We describe a method for the critical step of aligning the DNA reads to the correct genomic locations. Our method builds on classic alignment techniques, including likelihood-ratio scores and spaced seeds. In a realistic benchmark, our method has a better combination of sensitivity, specificity and speed than nine other high-throughput bisulfite aligners. This study enables more accurate and rational analysis of DNA methylation. It also illustrates how to adapt general-purpose alignment methods to a special case with distorted base patterns: this should be informative for other special cases such as ancient DNA and AT-rich genomes. PMID:22457070

  9. Synthetic approaches to peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif.

    PubMed

    Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Arafat, Tawfiq; Threadgill, Michael D

    2007-05-15

    The pseudoprolines S-Dmo (5,5-dimethyl-4-oxaproline) and R-Dmt (5,5-dimethyl-4-thiaproline) have been used to study the effects of forcing a fully cis conformation in peptides. Synthesis of peptides containing these (which have the same configuration as L-Pro) is straightforward. However, synthesis of peptides containing S-Dmt is difficult, owing to the rapid cyclisation of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters to form the corresponding diketopiperazines (DKP); thus the intermediacy of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters must be avoided in the synthetic sequence. Peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif are particularly difficult, owing to the insolubility of coupling partners containing Gln. Introduction of Gln as N-Boc-pyroglutamate overcame the latter difficulty and the dipeptide active ester BocPygValOC(6)F(5) coupled in good yield with S-DmtOH. BocPygVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) was converted quantitatively to BocGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) with ammonia, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Two peptide derivatives (CbzSerLysLeuGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) and CbzSerSerLysLeuGlnVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2)) were assembled, using these new methods of coupling a dipeptide acid active ester with S-DmtOH and introduction of Gln as Pyg, followed by conventional peptide couplings. The presence of the Val caused these peptides to be cleaved very slowly by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at Leu Gln, rather than the expected Gln Val.

  10. Biofunctionalization of Surfaces with Peptides, Proteins, or Subcellular Organelles: Single-Molecule Studies and Nanomedical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranidis, A.; Choli-Papadopoulou, T.

    Immobilization of biologically active proteins and enzymes on surfaces is very important for the production of biofunctionalized surfaces for applications in medicine such as biosensors and in the diagnostics field. There are various approaches to immobilize and control the release of peptides/proteins from different surfaces. The identification of successful techniques to functionalize a particular material is a challenge. On the other hand, biomaterials are at the moment of great benefit for medicinal purposes and a lot of knowledge from different fields is required in order to design biomimetic scaffolds or biomimetic materials. The used methodologies are different for different materials and are mainly based on the special chemistry of the surfaces. Peptides with distinct properties are desired instead of entire proteins. However, in some cases, proteins cannot be replaced by peptide segments and therefore biochemical knowledge, such as in protein and/or genetic engineering is required.

  11. Exploring the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide conformational ensemble: A review of molecular dynamics approaches.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common dementia among elderly worldwide. There is no therapeutic drugs until now to treat effectively this disease. One main reason is due to the poorly understood mechanism of Aβ peptide aggregation, which plays a crucial role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It remains challenging to experimentally or theoretically characterize the secondary and tertiary structures of the Aβ monomer because of its high flexibility and aggregation propensity, and its conformations that lead to the aggregation are not fully identified. In this review, we highlight various structural ensembles of Aβ peptide revealed and characterized by computational approaches in order to find converging structures of Aβ monomer. Understanding how Aβ peptide forms transiently stable structures prior to aggregation will contribute to the design of new therapeutic molecules against the Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Innovative bioinformatic approaches for developing peptide-based vaccines against hypervariable viruses.

    PubMed

    Sirskyj, Danylo; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Golshani, Ashkan; Kumar, Ashok; Azizi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The application of the fields of pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics to vaccine design has been recently labeled 'vaccinomics'. This newly named area of vaccine research, heavily intertwined with bioinformatics, seems to be leading the charge in developing novel vaccines for currently unmet medical needs against hypervariable viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C and emerging avian and swine influenza. Some of the more recent bioinformatic approaches in the area of vaccine research include the use of epitope determination and prediction algorithms for exploring the use of peptide epitopes as vaccine immunogens. This paper briefly discusses and explores some current uses of bioinformatics in vaccine design toward the pursuit of peptide vaccines for hypervariable viruses. The various informatics and vaccine design strategies attempted by other groups toward hypervariable viruses will also be briefly examined, along with the strategy used by our group in the design and synthesis of peptide immunogens for candidate HIV and influenza vaccines.

  13. Exploring the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide conformational ensemble: A review of molecular dynamics approaches.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common dementia among elderly worldwide. There is no therapeutic drugs until now to treat effectively this disease. One main reason is due to the poorly understood mechanism of Aβ peptide aggregation, which plays a crucial role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It remains challenging to experimentally or theoretically characterize the secondary and tertiary structures of the Aβ monomer because of its high flexibility and aggregation propensity, and its conformations that lead to the aggregation are not fully identified. In this review, we highlight various structural ensembles of Aβ peptide revealed and characterized by computational approaches in order to find converging structures of Aβ monomer. Understanding how Aβ peptide forms transiently stable structures prior to aggregation will contribute to the design of new therapeutic molecules against the Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25908410

  14. Rate equation approach to understanding the ion-catalyzed formation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Sibirev, N. V.; Eliseev, I. E.; Vyazmin, S. Yu; Boitsov, V. M.; Natochin, Yu. V.; Dubina, M. V.

    2013-06-01

    The salt-induced peptide formation is important for assessing and approaching schemes of molecular evolution. Here, we present experimental data and an exactly solvable kinetic model describing the linear polymerization of L-glutamic amino acid in water solutions with different concentrations of KCl and NaCl. The length distributions of peptides are well fitted by the model. Strikingly, we find that KCl considerably enhances the peptide yield, while NaCl does not show any catalytic effect in most cases under our experimental conditions. The greater catalytic effect of potassium ions is entirely interpreted by one and single parameter, the polymerization rate constant that depends on the concentration of a given salt in the reaction mixture. We deduce numeric estimates for the rate constant at different concentrations of the ions and show that it is always larger for KCl. This leads to an exponential increase of the potassium- to sodium-catalyzed peptide concentration ratio with length. Our results show that the ion-catalyzed peptides have a higher probability to emerge in excess potassium rather than in sodium-rich water solutions.

  15. A biomimetic approach for enhancing the in vivo half-life of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Penchala, Sravan C; Miller, Mark R; Pal, Arindom; Dong, Jin; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Xie, Jinghang; Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry; Batoon, Patrick; Samoshin, Vyacheslav; Franz, Andreas; Cox, Trever; Miles, Jesse; Chan, William K; Park, Miki S; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous therapeutic potential of peptides has not yet been realized, mainly due to their short in vivo half-life. While conjugation to macromolecules has been a mainstay approach for enhancing the half-life of proteins, the steric hindrance of macromolecules often harms the binding of peptides to target receptors, compromising the in vivo efficacy. Here we report a new strategy for enhancing the in vivo half-life of peptides without compromising their potency. Our approach involves endowing peptides with a small-molecule that binds reversibly to the serum protein, transthyretin. Although there are few reversible albumin-binding molecules, we are unaware of designed small molecules that bind reversibly to other serum proteins and are used for half-life extension in vivo. We show here that our strategy was indeed effective in enhancing the half-life of an agonist for GnRH receptor while maintaining its binding affinity, which was translated into superior in vivo efficacy. PMID:26344696

  16. CMOS-analogous wafer-scale nanotube-on-insulator approach for submicrometer devices and integrated circuits using aligned nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Wang, Chuan; Lin, Albert; Patil, Nishant; Gomez, Lewis; Kumar, Akshay; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-01-01

    Massive aligned carbon nanotubes hold great potential but also face significant integration/assembly challenges for future beyond-silicon nanoelectronics. We report a wafer-scale processing of aligned nanotube devices and integrated circuits, including progress on essential technological components such as wafer-scale synthesis of aligned nanotubes, wafer-scale transfer of nanotubes to silicon wafers, metallic nanotube removal and chemical doping, and defect-tolerant integrated nanotube circuits. We have achieved synthesis of massive aligned nanotubes on complete 4 in. quartz and sapphire substrates, which were then transferred to 4 in. Si/SiO(2) wafers. CMOS analogous fabrication was performed to yield transistors and circuits with features down to 0.5 mum, with high current density approximately 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratios. In addition, chemical doping has been used to build fully integrated complementary inverter with a gain approximately 5, and a defect-tolerant design has been employed for NAND and NOR gates. This full-wafer approach could serve as a critical foundation for future integrated nanotube circuits.

  17. Aligning Game Activity with Educational Goals: Following a Constrained Design Approach to Instructional Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Brett E.; Scoresby, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design, creation and implementation of an instructional game for use in a high school poetry class following a commitment to an educational game design principle of "alignment". We studied groups of instructional designers and an interactive fiction computer game they built. The game was implemented in a 9th grade English classroom…

  18. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-08-24

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface.

  19. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface. PMID:27585118

  20. Aligning biological sequences on distributed bus networks: a divisible load scheduling approach.

    PubMed

    Min, Wong Han; Veeravalli, Bharadwaj

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we design a multiprocessor strategy that exploits the computational characteristics of the algorithms used for biological sequence comparison proposed in the literature. We employ divisible load theory (DLT) that is suitable for handling large scale processing on network based systems. For the first time in the domain of DLT, the problem of aligning biological sequences is attempted. The objective is to minimize the total processing time of the alignment process. In designing our strategy, DLT facilitates a clever partitioning of the entire computation process involved in such a way that the overall time consumed for aligning the sequences is a minimum. The partitioning takes into account the computation speeds of the nodes and the underlying communication network. Since this is a real-life application, the post-processing phase becomes important, and hence we consider propagating the results back in order to generate an exact alignment. We consider several cases in our analysis such as deriving closed-form solutions for the processing time for heterogeneous, homogeneous, and networks with slow links. Further, we attempt to employ a multiinstallment strategy to distribute the tasks such that a higher degree of parallelism can be achieved. For slow networks, our strategy recommends near-optimal solutions. We derive an important condition to identify such cases and propose two heuristic strategies. Also, our strategy can be extended for multisequence alignment by utilizing a clustering strategy such as the Berger-Munson algorithm proposed in the literature. Finally, we use real-life DNA samples of house mouse mitochondrion (Mus Musculus Mitochondrion, NC_001569) consisting of 16,295 residues and the DNA of human mitochondrion (Homo Sapiens Mitochondrion, NC_001807) consisting of 16,571 residues, obtainable from the GenBank, in our rigorous simulation experiments to illustrate all the theoretical findings.

  1. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  2. Towards large scale aligned carbon nanotube composites: an industrial safe-by-design and sustainable approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, P.; Belkadi, L.; Descarpentries, J.; Porterat, D.; Hibert, E.; Brouzes, A.; Mille, M.; Patel, S.; Pinault, M.; Reynaud, C.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.; Decamps, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    We present the main results demonstrating the feasibility of high surface (> A4 format size) semi-industrial fabrication of composites embedding VACNT in organic matrices. The process of growing VACNT exhibits several advantages regarding safety issues: integrating de facto a safe collecting procedure on the substrate, avoiding additional preparation steps and simplifying handling and protection by impregnation into a matrix. The following steps of the overall process: VACNT carpet functionalization, alignment control and impregnation, can be processed on-line in a closed and safe continuous process and lead to dramatically reduced direct nanotube exposure for workers and users. This project opens the route to a continuous, roll-to-roll, safer, cost-effective and green industrial process to manufacture composites with controlled and aligned greener "black" carbon nanotubes.

  3. Curve aligning approach for gait authentication based on a wearable accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hu; Yuao, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Gait authentication based on a wearable accelerometer is a novel biometric which can be used for identity identification, medical rehabilitation and early detection of neurological disorders. The method for matching gait patterns tells heavily on authentication performances. In this paper, curve aligning is introduced as a new method for matching gait patterns and it is compared with correlation and dynamic time warping (DTW). A support vector machine (SVM) is proposed to fuse pattern-matching methods in a decision level. Accelerations collected from ankles of 22 walking subjects are processed for authentications in our experiments. The fusion of curve aligning with backward-forward accelerations and DTW with vertical accelerations promotes authentication performances substantially and consistently. This fusion algorithm is tested repeatedly. Its mean and standard deviation of equal error rates are 0.794% and 0.696%, respectively, whereas among all presented non-fusion algorithms, the best one shows an EER of 3.03%. PMID:22621972

  4. Peptide Hydration Phenomena through a Combined Quantum Chemical and Bottom-Up Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Giuseppe; Chiacchio, Maria Assunta

    2016-09-01

    The M06-2X, TPSS, and B3PW91 density functionals and the classical ab initio MP2 method were used to study microsolvation around the protonated trialanine, Ala3H+. All adopted electronic structure approaches show the formation of wires or compact ring clusters of water molecules strongly bonded to peptidic polar groups through hydrogen bonds with hydration energy ranging from - 93 to -66 kcal mol-1. Independently from the adopted electronic structure methods, explicit water molecules favor peptidic chain with the polyproline II (PPII) conformation, thus the electronic energy stability order of the four unfolded conformers follows the sequence: PPII-PPII > β-PPII ˜ PPII-β > β-β, while entropy favors the reversed order. The delicate balance of electronic energy (or enthalpy) and entropy modulated by the temperature accounts for the change in abundance of the PPII and β conformations experimentally observed. The proposed bottom-up approach has been developed following the energetically dominant polar groups of peptide and water dipoles interactions. The intrapeptide dipole decoupling, caused by the β → PPII transformation, and the consequent greater dipole coupling with water molecules provide a rational base to explain the energy gain due to the explicit water coordination to PPII residues.

  5. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  6. Combined Systems Approaches Reveal Highly Plastic Responses to Antimicrobial Peptide Challenge in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowska, Justyna; Vermeer, Louic S.; Rogers, Geraint B.; Rehnnuma, Nabila; Amos, Sarah-Beth T. A.; Koller, Garrit; McArthur, Michael; Bruce, Kenneth D.; Mason, A. James

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining an in-depth understanding of the arms races between peptides comprising the innate immune response and bacterial pathogens is of fundamental interest and will inform the development of new antibacterial therapeutics. We investigated whether a whole organism view of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) challenge on Escherichia coli would provide a suitably sophisticated bacterial perspective on AMP mechanism of action. Selecting structurally and physically related AMPs but with expected differences in bactericidal strategy, we monitored changes in bacterial metabolomes, morphological features and gene expression following AMP challenge at sub-lethal concentrations. For each technique, the vast majority of changes were specific to each AMP, with such a plastic response indicating E. coli is highly capable of discriminating between specific antibiotic challenges. Analysis of the ontological profiles generated from the transcriptomic analyses suggests this approach can accurately predict the antibacterial mode of action, providing a fresh, novel perspective for previous functional and biophysical studies. PMID:24789011

  7. Identification and characterization of Aβ peptide interactors in Alzheimer's disease by structural approaches.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Keith D; Marr, Robert A; Norstrom, Eric M; Glucksman, Marc J

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are very limited pharmaceutical interventions for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to alleviate the amyloid burden implicated in the pathophysiology of the disease. Alzheimer's disease is characterized immunohistologically by the accumulation of senile plaques in the brain with afflicted patients progressively losing short-term memory and, ultimately, cognition. Although significant improvements in clinical diagnosis and care for AD patients have been made, effective treatments for this devastating disease remain elusive. A key component of the amyloid burden of AD comes from accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide which comes from processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by enzymes termed secretases, leading to production of these toxic Aβ peptides of 40-42 amino acids. New therapeutic approaches for reducing Aβ are warranted after the most logical avenues of inhibiting secretase activity appear less than optimal in ameliorating the progression of AD.Novel therapeutics may be gleaned from proteomics biomarker initiatives to yield detailed molecular interactions of enzymes and their potential substrates. Explicating the APPome by deciphering protein complexes forming in cells is a complementary approach to unveil novel molecular interactions with the amyloidogenic peptide precursor to both understand the biology and develop potential upstream drug targets. Utilizing these strategies we have identified EC 3.4.24.15 (EP24.15), a zinc metalloprotease related to neprilysin (NEP), with the ability to catabolize Aβ 1-42 by examining first potential in silico docking and then verification by mass spectrometry. In addition, a hormone carrier protein, transthyreitin (TTR), was identified and with its abundance in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), found to clear Aβ by inhibiting formation of oligomeric forms of Aβ peptide. The confluence of complementary strategies may allow new therapeutic avenues as well as biomarkers for AD that will aid in

  8. From Mollusks to Medicine: A Venomics Approach for the Discovery and Characterization of Therapeutics from Terebridae Peptide Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Verdes, Aida; Anand, Prachi; Gorson, Juliette; Jannetti, Stephen; Kelly, Patrick; Leffler, Abba; Simpson, Danny; Ramrattan, Girish; Holford, Mandë

    2016-01-01

    Animal venoms comprise a diversity of peptide toxins that manipulate molecular targets such as ion channels and receptors, making venom peptides attractive candidates for the development of therapeutics to benefit human health. However, identifying bioactive venom peptides remains a significant challenge. In this review we describe our particular venomics strategy for the discovery, characterization, and optimization of Terebridae venom peptides, teretoxins. Our strategy reflects the scientific path from mollusks to medicine in an integrative sequential approach with the following steps: (1) delimitation of venomous Terebridae lineages through taxonomic and phylogenetic analyses; (2) identification and classification of putative teretoxins through omics methodologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics; (3) chemical and recombinant synthesis of promising peptide toxins; (4) structural characterization through experimental and computational methods; (5) determination of teretoxin bioactivity and molecular function through biological assays and computational modeling; (6) optimization of peptide toxin affinity and selectivity to molecular target; and (7) development of strategies for effective delivery of venom peptide therapeutics. While our research focuses on terebrids, the venomics approach outlined here can be applied to the discovery and characterization of peptide toxins from any venomous taxa. PMID:27104567

  9. From Mollusks to Medicine: A Venomics Approach for the Discovery and Characterization of Therapeutics from Terebridae Peptide Toxins.

    PubMed

    Verdes, Aida; Anand, Prachi; Gorson, Juliette; Jannetti, Stephen; Kelly, Patrick; Leffler, Abba; Simpson, Danny; Ramrattan, Girish; Holford, Mandë

    2016-04-19

    Animal venoms comprise a diversity of peptide toxins that manipulate molecular targets such as ion channels and receptors, making venom peptides attractive candidates for the development of therapeutics to benefit human health. However, identifying bioactive venom peptides remains a significant challenge. In this review we describe our particular venomics strategy for the discovery, characterization, and optimization of Terebridae venom peptides, teretoxins. Our strategy reflects the scientific path from mollusks to medicine in an integrative sequential approach with the following steps: (1) delimitation of venomous Terebridae lineages through taxonomic and phylogenetic analyses; (2) identification and classification of putative teretoxins through omics methodologies, including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics; (3) chemical and recombinant synthesis of promising peptide toxins; (4) structural characterization through experimental and computational methods; (5) determination of teretoxin bioactivity and molecular function through biological assays and computational modeling; (6) optimization of peptide toxin affinity and selectivity to molecular target; and (7) development of strategies for effective delivery of venom peptide therapeutics. While our research focuses on terebrids, the venomics approach outlined here can be applied to the discovery and characterization of peptide toxins from any venomous taxa.

  10. Correction of anterior crossbite using modified transparent aligners: An esthetic approach.

    PubMed

    Abraham, K Korath; James, Arun Roy; Thenumkal, Elza; Emmatty, Tharian

    2016-01-01

    Anterior crossbite results from the abnormal axial inclination of one or more anterior teeth. It is a major esthetic and functional anomaly which has to be corrected in the primary and early mixed dentition period to allow the normal development of maxilla and mandible as well as the occlusion. Several treatment options are available to correct the problem. A unique appliance, "modified transparent tray aligners" was used to correct the anterior crossbite in an 8-year-old child. The clinical presentation, fabrication of the appliance, and the outcome are discussed.

  11. Correction of anterior crossbite using modified transparent aligners: An esthetic approach.

    PubMed

    Abraham, K Korath; James, Arun Roy; Thenumkal, Elza; Emmatty, Tharian

    2016-01-01

    Anterior crossbite results from the abnormal axial inclination of one or more anterior teeth. It is a major esthetic and functional anomaly which has to be corrected in the primary and early mixed dentition period to allow the normal development of maxilla and mandible as well as the occlusion. Several treatment options are available to correct the problem. A unique appliance, "modified transparent tray aligners" was used to correct the anterior crossbite in an 8-year-old child. The clinical presentation, fabrication of the appliance, and the outcome are discussed. PMID:27630508

  12. Transparent aligners: An invisible approach to correct mild skeletal class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Yezdani, A. Arif

    2015-01-01

    This case report highlights the treatment of a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with an invisible thermoplastic retainer. A 15-year-old female patient presented with a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with a retrognathic maxilla, orthognathic mandible, a low mandibular plane angle with Angle's class III malocclusion with maxillary lateral incisors in anterior cross-bite with crowding of maxillary anteriors, imbricated and rotated mandibular incisors and deep bite. Accurate upper and lower impressions and a bite registration were taken with polyvinyl siloxane rubber base impression material. This was then sent to the lab for the processing of a series of ClearPath aligners. The ClearPath virtual set-up sent from the lab provided the treatment plan and interproximal reduction estimation complete with posttreatment results. This enabled the clinician to actively participate in the treatment plan and provide the necessary suggestions. The ClearPath three-dimensional aligner was found to have effectively corrected the anterior cross-bite and crowding of the maxillary anteriors. PMID:26015738

  13. Novel Approach to Prepare {sup 99m}Tc-Based Multivalent RGD Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Shuang Liu

    2012-10-24

    This project presents a novel approach to prepare the {sup 99m}Tc-bridged multivalent RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartate) peptides. This project will focus on fundamentals of {sup 99m}Tc radiochemistry. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the proof-of-principle for the proposed radiotracers. Once a kit formulation is developed for preparation of the {sup 99m}Tc-bridged multivalent RGD peptides, various tumor-bearing animal models will be used to evaluate their potential for SPECT (single photon-emission computed tomography) imaging of cancer. We have demonstrated that (1) multimerization of cyclic RGD peptides enhances the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} bonding affinity and radiotracer tumor uptake; (2) addition of G{sub 3} or PEG{sub 4} linkers makes it possible for two RGD motifs in 3P-RGD{sub 2} and 3G-RGD{sub 2} to achieve simultaneous integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding; and (3) multimers are actually bivalent (not multivalent), the presence of extra RGD motifs can enhance the tumor retention time of the radiotracer.

  14. A Brief Review of Computer-Assisted Approaches to Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Ashesh; Basak, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The growing incidences of new viral diseases and increasingly frequent viral epidemics have strained therapeutic and preventive measures; the high mutability of viral genes puts additional strains on developmental efforts. Given the high cost and time requirements for new drugs development, vaccines remain as a viable alternative, but there too traditional techniques of live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines have the danger of allergenic reactions and others. Peptide vaccines have, over the last several years, begun to be looked on as more appropriate alternatives, which are economically affordable, require less time for development and hold the promise of multi-valent dosages. The developments in bioinformatics, proteomics, immunogenomics, structural biology and other sciences have spurred the growth of vaccinomics where computer assisted approaches serve to identify suitable peptide targets for eventual development of vaccines. In this mini-review we give a brief overview of some of the recent trends in computer assisted vaccine development with emphasis on the primary selection procedures of probable peptide candidates for vaccine development. PMID:27153063

  15. A Brief Review of Computer-Assisted Approaches to Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Ashesh; Basak, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The growing incidences of new viral diseases and increasingly frequent viral epidemics have strained therapeutic and preventive measures; the high mutability of viral genes puts additional strains on developmental efforts. Given the high cost and time requirements for new drugs development, vaccines remain as a viable alternative, but there too traditional techniques of live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines have the danger of allergenic reactions and others. Peptide vaccines have, over the last several years, begun to be looked on as more appropriate alternatives, which are economically affordable, require less time for development and hold the promise of multi-valent dosages. The developments in bioinformatics, proteomics, immunogenomics, structural biology and other sciences have spurred the growth of vaccinomics where computer assisted approaches serve to identify suitable peptide targets for eventual development of vaccines. In this mini-review we give a brief overview of some of the recent trends in computer assisted vaccine development with emphasis on the primary selection procedures of probable peptide candidates for vaccine development. PMID:27153063

  16. A Brief Review of Computer-Assisted Approaches to Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Ashesh; Basak, Subhash C

    2016-05-04

    The growing incidences of new viral diseases and increasingly frequent viral epidemics have strained therapeutic and preventive measures; the high mutability of viral genes puts additional strains on developmental efforts. Given the high cost and time requirements for new drugs development, vaccines remain as a viable alternative, but there too traditional techniques of live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines have the danger of allergenic reactions and others. Peptide vaccines have, over the last several years, begun to be looked on as more appropriate alternatives, which are economically affordable, require less time for development and hold the promise of multi-valent dosages. The developments in bioinformatics, proteomics, immunogenomics, structural biology and other sciences have spurred the growth of vaccinomics where computer assisted approaches serve to identify suitable peptide targets for eventual development of vaccines. In this mini-review we give a brief overview of some of the recent trends in computer assisted vaccine development with emphasis on the primary selection procedures of probable peptide candidates for vaccine development.

  17. Novel approach to the growth and characterization of aligned epitaxial gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Tania Alicia

    Nanowire devices are potential building blocks for complex electronic circuitry, however, challenges such as in-place alignment, precise positioning and nanowire device integration need to be addressed. In this work selective area grown (SAG), micron sized gallium nitride (GaN) mesas were used as growth substrates for lateral epitaxial GaN nanowire arrays. The thermodynamically stable mesa facets provide a crystallographic match for directed nanowire synthesis by minimizing the surface energy at the interface between the nanowire and substrate Nanowires grow from the sidewalls of GaN mesas forming parallel and hexagonal networks. Alignment occurs in the nonpolar m-axis <10l0> and semipolar <10ll> directions respectively. Gallium nitride nanowires are interconnected between thermodynamically stable and smooth pyramidal (10ll) , and (1l22) surfaces of adjacent GaN mesas, and they also grow from a single mesa to form free-standing nanowire cantilevers. The synthesis of lateral free-standing nanowires has led to exciting studies of their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Characterization of the electrical properties is carried out by in situ probing of single nanowires on the growth substrate inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The current transport is found to be largely dominated by thermionic field emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, and is significantly limited by a large contact resistance at the probe-nanowire interface. The carrier concentration and mobilities of the probed nanowires are extracted and are in agreement with standard field effects transistors (FETs) fabricated from nanowires grown using similar growth conditions. These results reveal that electrical probing of lateral GaN nanowires is a reliable means of characterizing their electrical properties once the interface resistance between the probe and nanowire is considered. The optical properties of the nanowires were investigated. Photon emission at 3.26 eV dominated the

  18. An Umpolung Approach for the Chemoselective Arylation of Selenocysteine in Unprotected Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein we report an umpolung strategy for the bioconjugation of selenocysteine in unprotected peptides. This mild and operationally simple approach takes advantage of the electrophilic character of an oxidized selenocysteine (Se–S bond) to react with a nucleophilic arylboronic acid to provide the arylated selenocysteine within hours. This reaction is amenable to a wide range of boronic acids with different biorelevant functional groups and is unique to selenocysteine. Experimental evidence indicates that under oxidative conditions the arylated derivatives are more stable than the corresponding alkylated selenocysteine. PMID:26225900

  19. IBBOMSA: An Improved Biogeography-based Approach for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rohit Kumar; Banka, Haider

    2016-01-01

    In bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an NP-hard problem. Hence, nature-inspired techniques can better approximate the solution. In the current study, a novel biogeography-based optimization (NBBO) is proposed to solve an MSA problem. The biogeography-based optimization (BBO) is a new paradigm for optimization. But, there exists some deficiencies in solving complicated problems such as low population diversity and slow convergence rate. NBBO is an enhanced version of BBO, in which, a new migration operation is proposed to overcome the limitations of BBO. The new migration adopts more information from other habitats, maintains population diversity, and preserves exploitation ability. In the performance analysis, the proposed and existing techniques such as VDGA, MOMSA, and GAPAM are tested on publicly available benchmark datasets (ie, Bali base). It has been observed that the proposed method shows the superiority/competitiveness with the existing techniques. PMID:27812276

  20. A Basis Set for Peptides for the Variational Approach to Conformational Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2015-09-01

    Although Markov state models have proven to be powerful tools in resolving the complex features of biomolecular kinetics, the discretization of the conformational space has been a bottleneck since the advent of the method. A recently introduced variational approach, which uses basis functions instead of crisp conformational states, opened up a route to construct kinetic models in which the discretization error can be controlled systematically. Here, we develop and test a basis set for peptides to be used in the variational approach. The basis set is constructed by combining local residue-centered kinetic modes that are obtained from kinetic models of terminally blocked amino acids. Using this basis set, we model the conformational kinetics of two hexapeptides with sequences VGLAPG and VGVAPG. Six basis functions are sufficient to represent the slow kinetic modes of these peptides. The basis set also allows for a direct interpretation of the slow kinetic modes without an additional clustering in the space of the dominant eigenvectors. Moreover, changes in the conformational kinetics due to the exchange of leucine in VGLAPG to valine in VGVAPG can be directly quantified by comparing histograms of the basis set expansion coefficients.

  1. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  2. Antilope--a Lagrangian relaxation approach to the de novo peptide sequencing problem.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Sandro; Klau, Gunnar W; Reinert, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Peptide sequencing from mass spectrometry data is a key step in proteome research. Especially de novo sequencing, the identification of a peptide from its spectrum alone, is still a challenge even for state-of-the-art algorithmic approaches. In this paper, we present ANTILOPE, a new fast and flexible approach based on mathematical programming. It builds on the spectrum graph model and works with a variety of scoring schemes. ANTILOPE combines Lagrangian relaxation for solving an integer linear programming formulation with an adaptation of Yen’s k shortest paths algorithm. It shows a significant improvement in running time compared to mixed integer optimization and performs at the same speed like other state-of-the-art tools. We also implemented a generic probabilistic scoring scheme that can be trained automatically for a data set of annotated spectra and is independent of the mass spectrometer type. Evaluations on benchmark data show that ANTILOPE is competitive to the popular state-of-the-art programs PepNovo and NovoHMM both in terms of runtime and accuracy. Furthermore, it offers increased flexibility in the number of considered ion types. ANTILOPE will be freely available as part of the open source proteomics library OpenMS.

  3. RNAMotifScanX: a graph alignment approach for RNA structural motif identification.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuncong; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-03-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent three-dimensional (3D) components found in the RNA architecture. These RNA structural motifs play important structural or functional roles and usually exhibit highly conserved 3D geometries and base-interaction patterns. Analysis of the RNA 3D structures and elucidation of their molecular functions heavily rely on efficient and accurate identification of these motifs. However, efficient RNA structural motif search tools are lacking due to the high complexity of these motifs. In this work, we present RNAMotifScanX, a motif search tool based on a base-interaction graph alignment algorithm. This novel algorithm enables automatic identification of both partially and fully matched motif instances. RNAMotifScanX considers noncanonical base-pairing interactions, base-stacking interactions, and sequence conservation of the motifs, which leads to significantly improved sensitivity and specificity as compared with other state-of-the-art search tools. RNAMotifScanX also adopts a carefully designed branch-and-bound technique, which enables ultra-fast search of large kink-turn motifs against a 23S rRNA. The software package RNAMotifScanX is implemented using GNU C++, and is freely available from http://genome.ucf.edu/RNAMotifScanX.

  4. Multi-Beam Approach for Accelerating Alignment and Calibration of HyspIRI-Like Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastwood, Michael L.; Green, Robert O.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hochberg, Eric B.; Hein, Randall C.; Kroll, Linley A.; Geier, Sven; Coles, James B.; Meehan, Riley

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes an optical stimulus that produces more consistent results, and can be automated for unattended, routine generation of data analysis products needed by the integration and testing team assembling a high-fidelity imaging spectrometer system. One key attribute of the system is an arrangement of pick-off mirrors that provides multiple input beams (five in this implementation) to simultaneously provide stimulus light to several field angles along the field of view of the sensor under test, allowing one data set to contain all the information that previously required five data sets to be separately collected. This stimulus can also be fed by quickly reconfigured sources that ultimately provide three data set types that would previously be collected separately using three different setups: Spectral Response Function (SRF), Cross-track Response Function (CRF), and Along-track Response Function (ARF), respectively. This method also lends itself to expansion of the number of field points if less interpolation across the field of view is desirable. An absolute minimum of three is required at the beginning stages of imaging spectrometer alignment.

  5. Single-Step Grafting of Aminooxy-Peptides to Hyaluronan: A Simple Approach to Multifunctional Therapeutics for Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Joshua.; Mullins, Meagan; Northrup, Laura; Thati, Shara; Siahaan, Teruna; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to antigens is directed in part by the presence or absence of costimulatory signals. The ability to coincidently present both antigen and, for example, a peptide that inhibits or activates the costimulatory pathway, would be a valuable tool for tolerization or immunization, respectively. A simple reaction scheme utilizing oxime chemistry was identified as a means to efficiently conjugate different peptide species to hyaluronan. Peptides synthesized with an aminooxy N-terminus reacted directly to hyaluronan under slightly acidic aqueous conditions without the need for a catalyst. The resulting oxime bond was found to rapidly hydrolyze at pH 2 releasing peptide, but was stable at higher pH values (5.5 and 7). Two different peptide species, a multiple sclerosis antigen (PLP) and an ICAM-1 ligand (LABL) known to block immune cell stimulation, were functionalized with the aminooxy end group. These peptides showed similar reactivity to hyaluronan and were conjugated in an equimolar ratio. The resulting hyaluronan with grafted PLP and LABL significantly inhibited disease in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis. Aminooxy-peptides facilitate simple synthesis of multifunctional hyaluronan graft polymers, thus enabling novel approaches to antigen-specific immune modulation. PMID:23541930

  6. Alignment of direct detection device micrographs using a robust Optical Flow approach.

    PubMed

    Abrishami, Vahid; Vargas, Javier; Li, Xueming; Cheng, Yifan; Marabini, Roberto; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar Sánchez; Carazo, José María

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of direct detection devices in cryo-EM has shown that specimens present beam-induced motion (BIM). Consequently, in this work, we develop a BIM correction method at the image level, resulting in an integrated image in which the in-plane BIM blurring is compensated prior to particle picking. The methodology is based on a robust Optical Flow (OF) approach that can efficiently correct for local movements in a rapid manner. The OF works particularly well if the BIM pattern presents a substantial degree of local movements, which occurs in our data sets for Falcon II data. However, for those cases in which the BIM pattern corresponds to global movements, we have found it advantageous to first run a global motion correction approach and to subsequently apply OF. Additionally, spatial analysis of the Optical Flow allows for quantitative analysis of the BIM pattern. The software that incorporates the new approach is available in XMIPP (http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es).

  7. Structural re-alignment in an immunologic surface region of ricin A chain

    SciTech Connect

    Zemla, A T; Zhou, C E

    2007-07-24

    We compared structure alignments generated by several protein structure comparison programs to determine whether existing methods would satisfactorily align residues at a highly conserved position within an immunogenic loop in ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs). Using default settings, structure alignments generated by several programs (CE, DaliLite, FATCAT, LGA, MAMMOTH, MATRAS, SHEBA, SSM) failed to align the respective conserved residues, although LGA reported correct residue-residue (R-R) correspondences when the beta-carbon (Cb) position was used as the point of reference in the alignment calculations. Further tests using variable points of reference indicated that points distal from the beta carbon along a vector connecting the alpha and beta carbons yielded rigid structural alignments in which residues known to be highly conserved in RIPs were reported as corresponding residues in structural comparisons between ricin A chain, abrin-A, and other RIPs. Results suggest that approaches to structure alignment employing alternate point representations corresponding to side chain position may yield structure alignments that are more consistent with observed conservation of functional surface residues than do standard alignment programs, which apply uniform criteria for alignment (i.e., alpha carbon (Ca) as point of reference) along the entirety of the peptide chain. We present the results of tests that suggest the utility of allowing user-specified points of reference in generating alternate structural alignments, and we present a web server for automatically generating such alignments.

  8. A computational design approach for virtual screening of peptide interactions across K+ channel families☆

    PubMed Central

    Doupnik, Craig A.; Parra, Katherine C.; Guida, Wayne C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels represent a large family of membrane proteins with many being well established targets in pharmacotherapy. The ‘druggability’ of heteromeric channels comprised of different subunits remains obscure, due largely to a lack of channel-specific probes necessary to delineate their therapeutic potential in vivo. Our initial studies reported here, investigated the family of inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels given the availability of high resolution crystal structures for the eukaryotic constitutively active Kir2.2 channel. We describe a ‘limited’ homology modeling approach that can yield chimeric Kir channels having an outer vestibule structure representing nearly any known vertebrate or invertebrate channel. These computationally-derived channel structures were tested ""in silico for ‘docking’ to NMR structures of tertiapin (TPN), a 21 amino acid peptide found in bee venom. TPN is a highly selective and potent blocker for the epithelial rat Kir1.1 channel, but does not block human or zebrafish Kir1.1 channel isoforms. Our Kir1.1 channel-TPN docking experiments recapitulated published in vitro ""findings for TPN-sensitive and TPN-insensitive channels. Additionally, in silico site-directed mutagenesis identified ‘hot spots’ within the channel outer vestibule that mediate energetically favorable docking scores and correlate with sites previously identified with in vitro thermodynamic mutant-cycle analysis. These ‘proof-of-principle’ results establish a framework for virtual screening of re-engineered peptide toxins for interactions with computationally derived Kir channels that currently lack channel-specific blockers. When coupled with electrophysiological validation, this virtual screening approach may accelerate the drug discovery process, and can be readily applied to other ion channels families where high resolution structures are available. PMID:25709757

  9. The alignment of a voltage-sensing peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and in oriented lipid bilayers by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, K; Kinder, R; Bechinger, B

    1999-01-01

    The S4 segments of voltage-gated sodium channels are important parts of the voltage-sensing elements of these proteins. Furthermore, the addition of the isolated S4 polypeptide to planar lipid bilayers results in stepwise increases of ion conductivity. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms of pore formation by amphipathic peptides, the structure and orientation of the S4 segment of the first internal repeat of the rat brain II sodium channel was investigated in the presence of DPC micelles by multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy on oriented phospholipid bilayers. Both the anisotropic chemical shift observed by proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy and the attenuating effects of DOXYL-stearates on TOCSY crosspeak intensities of micelle-associated S4 indicate that the central alpha-helical portion of this peptide is oriented approximately parallel to the membrane surface. Simulated annealing and molecular dynamics calculations of the peptide in a biphasic tetrachloromethane-water environment indicate that the peptide alpha-helix extends over approximately 12 residues. A less regular structure further toward the C-terminus allows for the hydrophobic residues of this part of the peptide to be positioned in the tetrachloromethane environment. The implications for possible pore-forming mechanisms are discussed. PMID:10512830

  10. Structure-based approach to improve a small-molecule inhibitor by the use of a competitive peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuki; Takeuchi, Koh; Ueda, Hiroshi; Morita, Yasuhiro; Tanimura, Ryuji; Shimada, Ichio; Takahashi, Hideo

    2014-03-01

    Structural information about the target-compound complex is invaluable in the early stage of drug discovery. In particular, it is important to know into which part of the initial compound additional interaction sites could be introduced to improve its affinity. Herein, we demonstrate that the affinity of a small-molecule inhibitor for its target protein could be successfully improved by the constructive introduction of the interaction mode of a competitive peptide. The strategy involved the discrimination of overlapping and non-overlapping peptide-compound pharmacophores by the use of a ligand-based NMR spectroscopic approach, INPHARMA. The obtained results enabled the design of a new compound with improved affinity for the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). The approach proposed herein efficiently combines the advantages of compounds and peptides for the development of higher-affinity druglike ligands.

  11. Peptide-based approaches to treat lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Macri, Christophe; Chaloin, Olivier; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2012-09-01

    After a long period where the potential of therapeutic peptides was let into oblivion and even dismissed, there is a revival of interest in peptides as potential drug candidates. Novel strategies for limiting metabolism and improve their bioavailability, and alternative routes of administration have emerged. This resulted in a large number of peptide-based drugs that are now being marketed in different indications. Regarding autoimmunity, successful data have been reported in numerous mouse models of autoimmune inflammation, yet relatively few clinical trials based on synthetic peptides are currently underway. This review reports on peptides that show much promises in appropriate mouse models of autoimmunity and describes in more detail clinical trials based on peptides for treating autoimmune patients. A particular emphasis is given to the 21-mer peptide P140/Lupuzor that has completed successfully phase I, phase IIa and phase IIb clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. A Self-Assembly Pathway to Aligned Monodomain Gels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuming; Greenfield, Megan A.; Mata, Alvaro; Palmer, Liam C.; Bitton, Ronit; Mantei, Jason R.; Aparicio, Conrado; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2011-01-01

    Aggregates of charged amphiphilic molecules have been found to access a structure at elevated temperature that templates alignment of supramolecular fibrils over macroscopic scales. The thermal pathway leads to a lamellar plaque structure with fibrous texture that breaks upon cooling into large arrays of aligned nanoscale fibres and forms a strongly birefringent liquid. By manually dragging this liquid crystal from a pipette onto salty media, it is possible to extend this alignment over centimetres in noodle-shaped viscoelastic strings. Using this approach, the solution of supramolecular filaments can be mixed with cells at physiological temperatures to form monodomain gels of aligned cells and filaments. The nature of the self-assembly process and its biocompatibility would allow formation of cellular wires in situ that have any length and customized peptide compositions for use in biological applications. PMID:20543836

  13. A self-assembly pathway to aligned monodomain gels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuming; Greenfield, Megan A.; Mata, Alvaro; Palmer, Liam C.; Bitton, Ronit; Mantei, Jason R.; Aparicio, Conrado; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2010-06-13

    Aggregates of charged amphiphilic molecules have been found to access a structure at elevated temperature that templates alignment of supramolecular fibrils over macroscopic scales. The thermal pathway leads to a lamellar plaque structure with fibrous texture that breaks on cooling into large arrays of aligned nanoscale fibres and forms a strongly birefringent liquid. By manually dragging this liquid crystal from a pipette onto salty media, it is possible to extend this alignment over centimetres in noodle-shaped viscoelastic strings. Using this approach, the solution of supramolecular filaments can be mixed with cells at physiological temperatures to form monodomain gels of aligned cells and filaments. The nature of the self-assembly process and its biocompatibility would allow formation of cellular wires in situ that have any length and customized peptide compositions for use in biological applications.

  14. A self-assembly pathway to aligned monodomain gels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuming; Greenfield, Megan A.; Mata, Alvaro; Palmer, Liam C.; Bitton, Ronit; Mantei, Jason R.; Aparicio, Conrado; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2010-09-27

    Aggregates of charged amphiphilic molecules have been found to access a structure at elevated temperature that templates alignment of supramolecular fibrils over macroscopic scales. The thermal pathway leads to a lamellar plaque structure with fibrous texture that breaks on cooling into large arrays of aligned nanoscale fibres and forms a strongly birefringent liquid. By manually dragging this liquid crystal from a pipette onto salty media, it is possible to extend this alignment over centimetres in noodle-shaped viscoelastic strings. Using this approach, the solution of supramolecular filaments can be mixed with cells at physiological temperatures to form monodomain gels of aligned cells and filaments. The nature of the self-assembly process and its biocompatibility would allow formation of cellular wires in situ that have any length and customized peptide compositions for use in biological applications.

  15. The Development and Application of a Quantitative Peptide Microarray Based Approach to Protein Interaction Domain Specificity Space*

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Brett W.; Kim, Yohan; Wang, Miaoyan; Peters, Bjoern; Rock, Ronald S.; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein interaction domain (PID) linear peptide motif interactions direct diverse cellular processes in a specific and coordinated fashion. PID specificity, or the interaction selectivity derived from affinity preferences between possible PID-peptide pairs is the basis of this ability. Here, we develop an integrated experimental and computational cellulose peptide conjugate microarray (CPCMA) based approach for the high throughput analysis of PID specificity that provides unprecedented quantitative resolution and reproducibility. As a test system, we quantify the specificity preferences of four Src Homology 2 domains and 124 physiological phosphopeptides to produce a novel quantitative interactome. The quantitative data set covers a broad affinity range, is highly precise, and agrees well with orthogonal biophysical validation, in vivo interactions, and peptide library trained algorithm predictions. In contrast to preceding approaches, the CPCMAs proved capable of confidently assigning interactions into affinity categories, resolving the subtle affinity contributions of residue correlations, and yielded predictive peptide motif affinity matrices. Unique CPCMA enabled modes of systems level analysis reveal a physiological interactome with expected node degree value decreasing as a function of affinity, resulting in minimal high affinity binding overlap between domains; uncover that Src Homology 2 domains bind ligands with a similar average affinity yet strikingly different levels of promiscuity and binding dynamic range; and parse with unprecedented quantitative resolution contextual factors directing specificity. The CPCMA platform promises broad application within the fields of PID specificity, synthetic biology, specificity focused drug design, and network biology. PMID:25135669

  16. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  17. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  18. On the co-alignment of solar telescopes. A new approach to solar pointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiger, J.

    2013-06-01

    Helioseismological measurements require long observing times and thus may be adversely affected by lateral image drifts as caused by pointing instabilities. At the Vacuum Tower Telescope VTT, Tenerife we have recorded drift values of up to 5" per hour under unstable thermal conditions (dome opening, strong day-to-day thermal gradients). Typically drifts of 0.5" - 1.0" per hour may be encountered under more favorable conditions. Past experience has shown that most high-resolution solar telescopes may be affected by this problem to some degree. This inherent shortcoming of solar pointing is caused by the fact that the guiding loop can be closed only within the guiding beam but not within the telescope's main beam. We have developed a new approach to this problem. We correlate continuum brightness patterns observed from within the telescope main beam with patterns originating from a full disk telescope. We show that brightness patterns of sufficient size are unique with respect to solar location at any instant of time and may serve as a location identifier. We make use of the fact that averaged location information of solar structures is invariant with respect to telescope resolution. We have carried out tests at the VTT together with SDO. We have used SDO as a full disk reference. We were able to reduce lateral image drifts by an order of magnitude.

  19. xComb: a cross-linked peptide database approach to protein-protein interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Singh, Pragya; Shaffer, Scott A.; Goodlett, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an informatic method to identify tandem mass spectra composed of chemically cross-linked peptides from those of linear peptides and to assign sequence to each of the two unique peptide sequences. For a given set of proteins the key software tool, xComb, combs through all theoretically feasible cross-linked peptides to create a database consisting of a subset of all combinations represented as peptide FASTA files. The xComb library of select theoretical cross-linked peptides may then be used as a database that is examined by a standard proteomic search engine to match tandem mass spectral datasets to identify cross-linked peptides. The database search may be conducted against as many as 50 proteins with a number of common proteomic search engines, e.g. Phenyx, Sequest, OMSSA, Mascot and X!Tandem. By searching against a peptide library of linearized, cross-linked peptides, rather than a linearized protein library, search times are decreased and the process is decoupled from any specific search engine. A further benefit of decoupling from the search engine is that protein cross-linking studies may be conducted with readily available informatics tools for which scoring routines already exist within the proteomic community. PMID:20302351

  20. Statistical learning of peptide retention behavior in chromatographic separations: a new kernel-based approach for computational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Nico; Leinenbach, Andreas; Huber, Christian G; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Background High-throughput peptide and protein identification technologies have benefited tremendously from strategies based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in combination with database searching algorithms. A major problem with existing methods lies within the significant number of false positive and false negative annotations. So far, standard algorithms for protein identification do not use the information gained from separation processes usually involved in peptide analysis, such as retention time information, which are readily available from chromatographic separation of the sample. Identification can thus be improved by comparing measured retention times to predicted retention times. Current prediction models are derived from a set of measured test analytes but they usually require large amounts of training data. Results We introduce a new kernel function which can be applied in combination with support vector machines to a wide range of computational proteomics problems. We show the performance of this new approach by applying it to the prediction of peptide adsorption/elution behavior in strong anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SAX-SPE) and ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP-RP-HPLC). Furthermore, the predicted retention times are used to improve spectrum identifications by a p-value-based filtering approach. The approach was tested on a number of different datasets and shows excellent performance while requiring only very small training sets (about 40 peptides instead of thousands). Using the retention time predictor in our retention time filter improves the fraction of correctly identified peptide mass spectra significantly. Conclusion The proposed kernel function is well-suited for the prediction of chromatographic separation in computational proteomics and requires only a limited amount of training data. The performance of this new method is demonstrated by applying it to peptide retention time prediction in IP

  1. New Milk Protein-Derived Peptides with Potential Antimicrobial Activity: An Approach Based on Bioinformatic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dziuba, Bartłomiej; Dziuba, Marta

    2014-01-01

    New peptides with potential antimicrobial activity, encrypted in milk protein sequences, were searched for with the use of bioinformatic tools. The major milk proteins were hydrolyzed in silico by 28 enzymes. The obtained peptides were characterized by the following parameters: molecular weight, isoelectric point, composition and number of amino acid residues, net charge at pH 7.0, aliphatic index, instability index, Boman index, and GRAVY index, and compared with those calculated for known 416 antimicrobial peptides including 59 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from milk proteins listed in the BIOPEP database. A simple analysis of physico-chemical properties and the values of biological activity indicators were insufficient to select potentially antimicrobial peptides released in silico from milk proteins by proteolytic enzymes. The final selection was made based on the results of multidimensional statistical analysis such as support vector machines (SVM), random forest (RF), artificial neural networks (ANN) and discriminant analysis (DA) available in the Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides (CAMP database). Eleven new peptides with potential antimicrobial activity were selected from all peptides released during in silico proteolysis of milk proteins. PMID:25141106

  2. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347–356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205–214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588–624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes.

  3. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347-356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205-214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588-624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes.

  4. Carcinogenesis of renal cell carcinoma reflected in HLA ligands: A novel approach for synergistic peptide vaccination design.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Martin G; Kowalewski, Daniel J; Schuster, Heiko; Di Marco, Moreno; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Stenzl, Arnulf; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances in immunotherapy of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), peptide vaccination strategies still lack an approach for personalized peptide vaccination that takes intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity and biological characteristics into account. In this study, we use an immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry-based approach supplemented by network analysis of HLA ligands to target this goal. By analyzing HLA-presented peptides for HLA class I and II of 11 malignant and 6 non-malignant kidney tissue samples, more than 2,700 peptides and 1,600 corresponding source proteins were identified. A high overlap with HLA ligands derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was detected most likely due to tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells and therefore excluded from network analysis. Subsequent biological function analysis of HLA ligands by the GeneMANIA online platform showed enrichment for well established, but also novel, pathways and biological processes involved in carcinogenesis of RCC almost exclusively in malignant tissue samples. By exploring source proteins involved in these overrepresented pathways, we verified various known tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) for RCC (e.g., CA9, EGLN3, IGFBP3, MMP7, PAX2, VEGFA, or EGFR) but could also detect novel TAAs for RCC (e.g., PLOD2, LOX, ENPEP, or TGFBI). Some of these new TAAs had already been shown to elicit a T cell response in cancer patients. Thus, network analysis of HLA ligands provided a new platform for implementing personalized, multipeptide vaccines with potentially synergistic antitumor effects. PMID:27622074

  5. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  6. Therapeutic Approaches Using Host Defence Peptides to Tackle Herpes Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2009-01-01

    One of the most common viral infections in humans is caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can easily be treated with nucleoside analogues (e.g., acyclovir), but resistant strains are on the rise. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity against HSV. New evidence has also indicated that these host defence peptides are able to selectively stimulate the innate immune system to fight of infections. This review will focus on the anti-HSV activity of such peptides (both natural and synthetic), describe their mode of action and their clinical potential. PMID:21994576

  7. A General Synthetic Approach for Designing Epitope Targeted Macrocyclic Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Liang, JingXin; Bunck, David N; Umeda, Aiko; Farrow, Blake; Coppock, Matthew B; Sarkes, Deborah A; Finch, Amethist S; Agnew, Heather D; Pitram, Suresh; Lai, Bert; Yu, Mary Beth; Museth, A Katrine; Deyle, Kaycie M; Lepe, Bianca; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances P; McCarthy, Amy; Alvarez-Villalonga, Belen; Chen, Ann; Heath, John; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N; Heath, James R

    2015-11-01

    We describe a general synthetic strategy for developing high-affinity peptide binders against specific epitopes of challenging protein biomarkers. The epitope of interest is synthesized as a polypeptide, with a detection biotin tag and a strategically placed azide (or alkyne) presenting amino acid. This synthetic epitope (SynEp) is incubated with a library of complementary alkyne or azide presenting peptides. Library elements that bind the SynEp in the correct orientation undergo the Huisgen cycloaddition, and are covalently linked to the SynEp. Hit peptides are tested against the full-length protein to identify the best binder. We describe development of epitope-targeted linear or macrocycle peptide ligands against 12 different diagnostic or therapeutic analytes. The general epitope targeting capability for these low molecular weight synthetic ligands enables a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, similar to those of monoclonal antibodies.

  8. dPABBs: A Novel in silico Approach for Predicting and Designing Anti-biofilm Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Rakesh; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, biofilms are being recognised for their causative role in persistent infections (like cystic fibrosis, otitis media, diabetic foot ulcers) and nosocomial diseases (biofilm-infected vascular catheters, implants and prosthetics). Given the clinical relevance of biofilms and their recalcitrance to conventional antibiotics, it is imperative that alternative therapeutics are proactively sought. We have developed dPABBs, a web server that facilitates the prediction and design of anti-biofilm peptides. The six SVM and Weka models implemented on dPABBs were observed to identify anti-biofilm peptides on the basis of their whole amino acid composition, selected residue features and the positional preference of the residues (maximum accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and MCC of 95.24%, 92.50%, 97.73% and 0.91, respectively, on the training datasets). On the N-terminus, it was seen that either of the cationic polar residues, R and K, is present at all five positions in case of the anti-biofilm peptides, whereas in the QS peptides, the uncharged polar residue S is preponderant at the first (also anionic polar residues D, E), third and fifth positions. Positive predictions were also obtained for 29 FDA-approved peptide drugs and ten antimicrobial peptides in clinical development, indicating at their possible repurposing for anti-biofilm therapy. dPABBs is freely accessible on: http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/abp/antibiofilm/. PMID:26912180

  9. Peptide sequencing using a patchwork approach and surface-induced dissociation in sector-TOF and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Facundo M; Smith, Lori L; Kuppannan, Krishnamoorthy; Yang, Xi; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2003-12-01

    Surface-induced ion activation in combination with a database search strategy based on the Patchwork concept is applied to the determination of peptide sequences. Surface-induced dissociation (SID) is performed in a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer and in a hybrid sector/time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to evaluate the importance of accurate mass analysis of the SID fragment ions for peptide identification. The modified Patchwork approach is based on piecing together the peptide blocks in a bidirectional way, simultaneously using low-mass fragments originating from the C-terminus and N-terminus of the molecule, and relying on the measurement of the peptide's molecular weight with moderate mass accuracy. The results from this analysis are used as search filters in MASCOT's (http://www.matrixscience.com) Sequence Query search engine, with the simultaneous addition of the full MS/MS peak list. SID is performed with collision targets coated with pure and mixed composition self-assembled monolayers produced by fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon alkanethiolate solutions of varying chemical composition. The resulting MS/MS spectra produced on pure and mixed hydrocarbon SAMs are submitted to the modified version of Patchwork sequencing. It is found that hydrocarbon surfaces improve the relative abundance of larger fragments. Under the moderate mass accuracy conditions (+/-0.3 u) offered by our linear-TOF-SID instrument, it is found that increasing the abundance of larger fragments dramatically improves the sequencing scores.

  10. Elimination and exchange of trifluoroacetate counter-ion from cationic peptides: a critical evaluation of different approaches.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stéphane; Zékri, Elisabeth; Rousseau, Bernard; Paternostre, Maïté; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Fay, Nicolas

    2008-03-01

    Most synthesized peptides are nowadays produced using solid-phase procedures. Due to cleavage and purification conditions, they are mainly obtained in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and, for cationic peptides, as trifluoroacetate (TF-acetate) salts. However, TF-acetate interferes with physicochemical characterizations using infrared spectroscopy and might significantly affect the in vivo studies. Thus, TF-acetate exchange by another counter-ion is often required. Up to now, the classical procedure has consisted of freeze-drying the peptide several times in the presence of an excess of a stronger acid than TFA (pKa approximately 0): generally HCl (pKa = - 7). This approach means that working at pH < 1 can induce peptide degradation. We therefore tested three different approaches to exchange the tightly bound TF-acetate counter-ion from the dicationic octapeptide lanreotide: (i) reverse-phase HPLC, (ii) ion-exchange resin, and (iii) deprotonation/reprotonation cycle of the amino groups. The first two approaches allow the partial to almost complete exchange of the TF-acetate counter-ion by another ion from an acid weaker than TFA, such as acetic acid (pKa = 4.5), and the third requires a basic solution that permits the complete removal of TF-acetate counter-ion. The efficiency of these three procedures was tested and compared by using different analytical techniques such as 19F-NMR, 1H-NMR and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). We also show that ATR-IR can be used to monitor the TFA removal. The counter-ion exchange procedures described in this study are easy to carry out, fast, harmless and reproducible. Moreover, two of them offer the very interesting possibility of exchanging the initial TF-acetate by any other counter-ion. PMID:18035848

  11. Design of an epitope-based peptide vaccine against spike protein of human coronavirus: an in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Emran, Abdullah-Al; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin

    2014-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV), a member of Coronaviridae family, is the causative agent of upper respiratory tract infections and “atypical pneumonia”. Despite severe epidemic outbreaks on several occasions and lack of antiviral drug, not much progress has been made with regard to an epitope-based vaccine designed for HCoV. In this study, a computational approach was adopted to identify a multiepitope vaccine candidate against this virus that could be suitable to trigger a significant immune response. Sequences of the spike proteins were collected from a protein database and analyzed with an in silico tool, to identify the most immunogenic protein. Both T cell immunity and B cell immunity were checked for the peptides to ensure that they had the capacity to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The peptide sequence from 88–94 amino acids and the sequence KSSTGFVYF were found as the most potential B cell and T cell epitopes, respectively. Furthermore, conservancy analysis was also done using in silico tools and showed a conservancy of 64.29% for all epitopes. The peptide sequence could interact with as many as 16 human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and showed high cumulative population coverage, ranging from 75.68% to 90.73%. The epitope was further tested for binding against the HLA molecules, using in silico docking techniques, to verify the binding cleft epitope interaction. The allergenicity of the epitopes was also evaluated. This computational study of design of an epitope-based peptide vaccine against HCoVs allows us to determine novel peptide antigen targets in spike proteins on intuitive grounds, albeit the preliminary results thereof require validation by in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:25187696

  12. Continuum approaches to understanding ion and peptide interactions with the membrane.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, Naomi R; Callenberg, Keith M; Boyle, Jon P; Grabe, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Experimental and computational studies have shown that cellular membranes deform to stabilize the inclusion of transmembrane (TM) proteins harboring charge. Recent analysis suggests that membrane bending helps to expose charged and polar residues to the aqueous environment and polar head groups. We previously used elasticity theory to identify membrane distortions that minimize the insertion of charged TM peptides into the membrane. Here, we extend our work by showing that it also provides a novel, computationally efficient method for exploring the energetics of ion and small peptide penetration into membranes. First, we show that the continuum method accurately reproduces energy profiles and membrane shapes generated from molecular simulations of bare ion permeation at a fraction of the computational cost. Next, we demonstrate that the dependence of the ion insertion energy on the membrane thickness arises primarily from the elastic properties of the membrane. Moreover, the continuum model readily provides a free energy decomposition into components not easily determined from molecular dynamics. Finally, we show that the energetics of membrane deformation strongly depend on membrane patch size both for ions and peptides. This dependence is particularly strong for peptides based on simulations of a known amphipathic, membrane binding peptide from the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. In total, we address shortcomings and advantages that arise from using a variety of computational methods in distinct biological contexts. PMID:24652510

  13. Combined Bioinformatic and Rational Design Approach To Develop Antimicrobial Peptides against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, C. Seth; Kloos, Zachary; Murray, Brian; Tabe, Ebot; Gupta, Monica; Kwak, Jun Ha; Karande, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens are a growing problem, and novel strategies are needed to combat this threat. Among the most significant of these resistant pathogens is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is an unusually difficult microbial target due to its complex membrane. Here, we design peptides for specific activity against M. tuberculosis using a combination of “database filtering” bioinformatics, protein engineering, and de novo design. Several variants of these peptides are structurally characterized to validate the design process. The designed peptides exhibit potent activity (MIC values as low as 4 μM) against M. tuberculosis and also exhibit broad activity against a host of other clinically relevant pathogenic bacteria such as Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). They also display excellent selectivity, with low cytotoxicity against cultured macrophages and lung epithelial cells. These first-generation antimicrobial peptides serve as a platform for the design of antibiotics and for investigating structure-activity relationships in the context of the M. tuberculosis membrane. The antimicrobial peptide design strategy is expected to be generalizable for any pathogen for which an activity database can be created. PMID:26902758

  14. Combined Bioinformatic and Rational Design Approach To Develop Antimicrobial Peptides against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearson, C Seth; Kloos, Zachary; Murray, Brian; Tabe, Ebot; Gupta, Monica; Kwak, Jun Ha; Karande, Pankaj; McDonough, Kathleen A; Belfort, Georges

    2016-05-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens are a growing problem, and novel strategies are needed to combat this threat. Among the most significant of these resistant pathogens is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is an unusually difficult microbial target due to its complex membrane. Here, we design peptides for specific activity against M. tuberculosis using a combination of "database filtering" bioinformatics, protein engineering, and de novo design. Several variants of these peptides are structurally characterized to validate the design process. The designed peptides exhibit potent activity (MIC values as low as 4 μM) against M. tuberculosis and also exhibit broad activity against a host of other clinically relevant pathogenic bacteria such as Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). They also display excellent selectivity, with low cytotoxicity against cultured macrophages and lung epithelial cells. These first-generation antimicrobial peptides serve as a platform for the design of antibiotics and for investigating structure-activity relationships in the context of the M. tuberculosis membrane. The antimicrobial peptide design strategy is expected to be generalizable for any pathogen for which an activity database can be created.

  15. Continuum Approaches to Understanding Ion and Peptide Interactions with the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Latorraca, Naomi R.; Callenberg, Keith M.; Boyle, Jon P.; Grabe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies have shown that cellular membranes deform to stabilize the inclusion of transmembrane (TM) proteins harboring charge. Recent analysis suggests that membrane bending helps to expose charged and polar residues to the aqueous environment and polar head groups. We previously used elasticity theory to identify membrane distortions that minimize the insertion of charged TM peptides into the membrane. Here, we extend our work by showing that it also provides a novel, computationally efficient method for exploring the energetics of ion and small peptide penetration into membranes. First, we show that the continuum method accurately reproduces energy profiles and membrane shapes generated from molecular simulations of bare ion permeation at a fraction of the computational cost. Next, we demonstrate that the dependence of the ion insertion energy on the membrane thickness arises primarily from the elastic properties of the membrane. Moreover, the continuum model readily provides a free energy decomposition into components not easily determined from molecular dynamics. Finally, we show that the energetics of membrane deformation strongly depend on membrane patch size both for ions and peptides. This dependence is particularly strong for peptides based on simulations of a known amphipathic, membrane binding peptide from the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. In total, we address shortcomings and advantages that arise from using a variety of computational methods in distinct biological contexts. PMID:24652510

  16. Engineering cell alignment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Du, Yanan; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Cell alignment plays a critical role in various cell behaviors including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane protein relocation, nucleus gene expression, and ECM remodeling. Cell alignment is also known to exert significant effects on tissue regeneration (e.g., neuron) and modulate mechanical properties of tissues including skeleton, cardiac muscle and tendon. Therefore, it is essential to engineer cell alignment in vitro for biomechanics, cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. With advances in nano- and micro-scale technologies, a variety of approaches have been developed to engineer cell alignment in vitro, including mechanical loading, topographical patterning, and surface chemical treatment. In this review, we first present alignments of various cell types and their functionality in different tissues in vivo including muscle and nerve tissues. Then, we provide an overview of recent approaches for engineering cell alignment in vitro. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are addressed for future improvement of engineering cell alignment.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for Peptide analysis: target-based approaches and proteomics/peptidomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Kašička, Václav

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the potential of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) for peptide analysis is demonstrated by the presentation of two different strategies typically followed in analysis of these biomolecules by CE-MS. The first one is a target-based approach and it is used to detect a toxic oligopeptide in a complex matrix. Namely, CE-MS using an ion trap MS analyzer is applied to detect and quantify γ-glutamyl-S-ethenyl-cysteine (GEC) bioactive dipeptide in a legume plant. The second one is a shotgun-like methodology used for proteomic analysis. Particularly, CE-MS using a time-of-flight MS analyzer is employed to investigate the substantial equivalence between a genetically modified (GM) variety of soybean and its conventional isogenic counterpart. These generic methods have broad applications for the analysis of peptides in a large variety of matrices, including applications in the area of proteomics and peptidomics. PMID:23386342

  18. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  19. A continuous peptide epitope reacting with pandemic influenza AH1N1 predicted by bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Vazquez, Jonathan P; Correa-Basurto, José; García-Machorro, Jazmin; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Moreau, Violaine; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Reyes-López, Cesar A; Rojas-López, Marlon; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2015-09-01

    Computational identification of potential epitopes with an immunogenic capacity challenges immunological research. Several methods show considerable success, and together with experimental studies, the efficiency of the algorithms to identify potential peptides with biological activity has improved. Herein, an epitope was designed by combining bioinformatics, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. The hemagglutinin protein of the H1N1 influenza pandemic strain served as a template, owing to the interest of obtaining a scheme of immunization. Afterward, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the epitope to analyze if any antibodies in human sera before and after the influenza outbreak in 2009 recognize this peptide. Also, a plaque reduction neutralization test induced by virus-neutralizing antibodies and the IgG determination showed the biological activity of this computationally designed peptide. The results of the ELISAs demonstrated that the serum of both prepandemic and pandemic recognized the epitope. Moreover, the plaque reduction neutralization test evidenced the capacity of the designed peptide to neutralize influenza virus in Madin-Darby canine cells.

  20. A Discovery-Oriented Approach to Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, Matthew R.; Miedema, Christopher J.; Brennan, Brian B.

    2012-01-01

    In this discovery-oriented laboratory experiment, students use solid-phase synthesis techniques to construct a dipeptide containing an unknown amino acid. Following synthesis and cleavage from the polymeric support, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry is employed to identify the unknown amino acid that was used in the peptide coupling. This…

  1. MSblender: A probabilistic approach for integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taejoon; Choi, Hyungwon; Vogel, Christine; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Marcotte, Edward M

    2011-07-01

    Shotgun proteomics using mass spectrometry is a powerful method for protein identification but suffers limited sensitivity in complex samples. Integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines is a promising strategy to increase the number of peptide identifications and reduce the volume of unassigned tandem mass spectra. Existing methods pool statistical significance scores such as p-values or posterior probabilities of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from multiple search engines after high scoring peptides have been assigned to spectra, but these methods lack reliable control of identification error rates as data are integrated from different search engines. We developed a statistically coherent method for integrative analysis, termed MSblender. MSblender converts raw search scores from search engines into a probability score for every possible PSM and properly accounts for the correlation between search scores. The method reliably estimates false discovery rates and identifies more PSMs than any single search engine at the same false discovery rate. Increased identifications increment spectral counts for most proteins and allow quantification of proteins that would not have been quantified by individual search engines. We also demonstrate that enhanced quantification contributes to improve sensitivity in differential expression analyses.

  2. A continuous peptide epitope reacting with pandemic influenza AH1N1 predicted by bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Vazquez, Jonathan P; Correa-Basurto, José; García-Machorro, Jazmin; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Moreau, Violaine; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Reyes-López, Cesar A; Rojas-López, Marlon; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2015-09-01

    Computational identification of potential epitopes with an immunogenic capacity challenges immunological research. Several methods show considerable success, and together with experimental studies, the efficiency of the algorithms to identify potential peptides with biological activity has improved. Herein, an epitope was designed by combining bioinformatics, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. The hemagglutinin protein of the H1N1 influenza pandemic strain served as a template, owing to the interest of obtaining a scheme of immunization. Afterward, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the epitope to analyze if any antibodies in human sera before and after the influenza outbreak in 2009 recognize this peptide. Also, a plaque reduction neutralization test induced by virus-neutralizing antibodies and the IgG determination showed the biological activity of this computationally designed peptide. The results of the ELISAs demonstrated that the serum of both prepandemic and pandemic recognized the epitope. Moreover, the plaque reduction neutralization test evidenced the capacity of the designed peptide to neutralize influenza virus in Madin-Darby canine cells. PMID:25788327

  3. Stereoselective synthesis of macrocyclic peptides via a dual olefin metathesis and ethenolysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Shane L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds occupy an important chemical space between small molecules and biologics and are prevalent in many natural products and pharmaceuticals. The growing interest in macrocycles has been fueled, in part, by the design of novel synthetic methods to these compounds. One appealing strategy is ring-closing metathesis (RCM) that seeks to construct macrocycles from acyclic diene precursors using defined transition-metal alkylidene catalysts. Despite its broad utility, RCM generally gives rise to a mixture of E- and Z-olefin isomers that can hinder efforts for the large-scale production and isolation of such complex molecules. To address this issue, we aimed to develop methods that can selectively enrich macrocycles in E- or Z-olefin isomers using an RCM/ethenolysis strategy. The utility of this methodology was demonstrated in the stereoselective formation of macrocyclic peptides, a class of compounds that have gained prominence as therapeutics in drug discovery. Herein, we report an assessment of various factors that promote catalyst-directed RCM and ethenolysis on a variety of peptide substrates by varying the olefin type, peptide sequence, and placement of the olefin in macrocycle formation. These methods allow for control over olefin geometry in peptides, facilitating their isolation and characterization. The studies outlined in this report seek to expand the scope of stereoselective olefin metathesis in general RCM. PMID:26509000

  4. Characterization of Peptide Polymer Interactions in Poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) Nanoparticles: A Mass Spectrometric Approach.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2010-07-01

    Drug/polymer interactions occur during in situ polymerization of poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) (PACA) formulations. We have used MALDI ionization coupled tandem time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry as an accurate method to characterize covalent peptide/polymer interactions of PACA nanoparticles with the bioactives D-Lys6-GnRH, insulin, [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II, and fragments of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 (1-3)) and human adrenocorticotropic hormone (h-ACTH, (18-39)) at the molecular level. Covalent interactions of peptide with alkylcyanoacrylate were identified for D-Lys6-GnRH, [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II and IGF-1 (1-3). D-Lys6-GnRH and [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II were modified at their histidine side chain within the peptide, whilst IGF-1 (1-3) was modified at the C-terminal glutamic acid residue. The more complex protein insulin was not modified despite the presence of 2 histidine residues. This might be explained by the engagement of histidine residues in the folding and sterical arrangement of insulin under polymerization conditions. As expected, h-ACTH (18-39) that does not contain histidine residues did not interfere in the polymerization process. Lowering the pH did not prevent the covalent association of PACA with D-Lys6-GnRH or IGF-1 (1-3). Conclusively, protein and peptide bioactives are potentially reactive towards alkylcyanoacrylate monomers via various mechanisms with limited interference of pH. Histidines and C-terminal glutamic acid residues have been identified as potential sites of interaction. The likelihood of their engagement in the polymerization process (initiators), however, seems dependent on their sterical availability. The reactivity of nucleophilic functional groups should always be considered and bioactives examined for their potential to covalently interfere with alkylcyanoacrylate monomers, especially when designing PACA delivery systems for protein and peptide biopharmaceuticals.

  5. Characterization of Peptide Polymer Interactions in Poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) Nanoparticles: A Mass Spectrometric Approach.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Alexandra P; Kleffmann, Torsten; Rades, Thomas; McDowell, Arlene

    2010-02-17

    Drug/polymer interactions occur during in situ polymerization of poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) (PACA) formulations. We have used MALDI ionization coupled tandem time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry as an accurate method to characterize covalent peptide/polymer interactions of PACA nanoparticles with the bioactives D-Lys6-GnRH, insulin, [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II, and fragments of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 (1-3)) and human adrenocorticotropic hormone (h-ACTH, (18-39)) at the molecular level. Covalent interactions of peptide with alkylcyanoacrylate were identified for D-Lys6-GnRH, [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II and IGF-1 (1-3). D-Lys6-GnRH and [Asn1-Val5]-angiotensin II were modified at their histidine side chain within the peptide, whilst IGF-1 (1-3) was modified at the C-terminal glutamic acid residue. The more complex protein insulin was not modified despite the presence of 2 histidine residues. This might be explained by the engagement of histidine residues in the folding and sterical arrangement of insulin under polymerization conditions. As expected, h-ACTH (18-39) that does not contain histidine residues did not interfere in the polymerisation process. Lowering the pH did not prevent the covalent association of PACA with D-Lys6-GnRH or IGF-1 (1-3). Conclusively, protein and peptide bioactives are potentially reactive towards alkylcyanoacrylate monomers via various mechanisms with limited interference of pH. Histidines and C-terminal glutamic acid residues have been identified as potential sites of interaction. The likelihood of their engagement in the polymerisation process (initiators), however, seems dependant on their sterical availability. The reactivity of nucleophilic functional groups should always be considered and bioactives examined for their potential to covalently interfere with alkylcyanoacrylate monomers, especially when designing PACA delivery systems for protein and peptide biopharmaceuticals.

  6. The rational search for selective anticancer derivatives of the peptide Trichogin GA IV: a multi-technique biophysical approach

    PubMed Central

    Dalzini, Annalisa; Bergamini, Christian; Biondi, Barbara; De Zotti, Marta; Panighel, Giacomo; Fato, Romana; Peggion, Cristina; Bortolus, Marco; Maniero, Anna Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Peptaibols are peculiar peptides produced by fungi as weapons against other microorganisms. Previous studies showed that peptaibols are promising peptide-based drugs because they act against cell membranes rather than a specific target, thus lowering the possibility of the onset of multi-drug resistance, and they possess non-coded α-amino acid residues that confer proteolytic resistance. Trichogin GA IV (TG) is a short peptaibol displaying antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity. In the present work, we studied thirteen TG analogues, adopting a multidisciplinary approach. We showed that the cytotoxicity is tuneable by single amino-acids substitutions. Many analogues maintain the same level of non-selective cytotoxicity of TG and three analogues are completely non-toxic. Two promising lead compounds, characterized by the introduction of a positively charged unnatural amino-acid in the hydrophobic face of the helix, selectively kill T67 cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. To explain the determinants of the cytotoxicity, we investigated the structural parameters of the peptides, their cell-binding properties, cell localization, and dynamics in the membrane, as well as the cell membrane composition. We show that, while cytotoxicity is governed by the fine balance between the amphipathicity and hydrophobicity, the selectivity depends also on the expression of negatively charged phospholipids on the cell surface. PMID:27039838

  7. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  8. Exploring the venom proteome of the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, via snake venomics and combinatorial peptide ligand library approaches.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Juan J; Fasoli, Elisa; Sanz, Libia; Boschetti, Egisto; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2009-06-01

    We report the proteomic characterization of the venom of the medically important North American western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, using two complementary approaches: snake venomics (to gain an insight of the overall venom proteome), and two solid-phase combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL), followed by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometric characterization of in-gel digested protein bands (to capture and "amplify" low-abundance proteins). The venomics approach revealed approximately 24 distinct proteins belonging to 2 major protein families (snake venom metalloproteinases, SVMP, and serine proteinases), which represent 69.5% of the total venom proteins, 4 medium abundance families (medium-size disintegrin, PLA(2), cysteine-rich secretory protein, and l-amino acid oxidase) amounting to 25.8% of the venom proteins, and 3 minor protein families (vasoactive peptides, endogenous inhibitor of SVMP, and C-type lectin-like). This toxin profile potentially explains the cytotoxic, myotoxic, hemotoxic, and hemorrhagic effects evoked by C. atrox envenomation. Further, our results showing that C. atrox exhibits a similar level of venom variation as Sistrurus miliarius points to a "diversity gain" scenario in the lineage leading to the Sistrurus catenatus taxa. On the other hand, the two combinatorial hexapeptide libraries captured distinct sets of proteins. Although the CPLL-treated samples did not retain a representative venom proteome, protein spots barely, or not at all, detectable in the whole venom were enriched in the two CPLL-treated samples. The amplified low copy number C. atrox venom proteins comprised a C-type lectin-like protein, several PLA(2) molecules, PIII-SVMP isoforms, glutaminyl cyclase isoforms, and a 2-cys peroxiredoxin highly conserved across the animal kingdom. Peroxiredoxin and glutaminyl cyclase may participate, respectively, in redox processes leading to the structural/functional diversification of toxins, and in the N

  9. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  10. Transferrin Fusion Technology: A Novel Approach to Prolonging Biological Half-Life of Insulinotropic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Joon; Zhou, Jie; Martin, Bronwen; Carlson, Olga D.; Maudsley, Stuart; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Wustner, Jay; Turner, Andrew; Sadeghi, Homayoun

    2010-01-01

    Fusion proteins made up of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and exendin-4 (EX-4) fused to a nonglycosylated form of human transferrin (GLP-1-Tf or EX-4-Tf) were produced and characterized. GLP-1-Tf activated the GLP-1 receptor, was resistant to inactivation by peptidases, and had a half-life of approximately 2 days, compared with 1 to 2 min for native GLP-1. GLP-1-Tf retained the acute, glucose-dependent insulin-secretory properties of native GLP-1 in diabetic animals and had a profound effect on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In addition, Tf and the fusion proteins did not cross the blood-brain-barrier but still reduced food intake after peripheral administration. EX-4-Tf proved to be as effective as EX-4 but had longer lived effects on blood glucose and food intake. This novel transferrin fusion technology could improve the pharmacology of various peptides. PMID:20498254

  11. Signal-BNF: a Bayesian network fusing approach to predict signal peptides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi; Chen, Youying; Chen, Liping; Guo, Gongde; Fan, Yongxian; Kong, Xiangzeng

    2012-01-01

    A signal peptide is a short peptide chain that directs the transport of a protein and has become the crucial vehicle in finding new drugs or reprogramming cells for gene therapy. As the avalanche of new protein sequences generated in the postgenomic era, the challenge of identifying new signal sequences has become even more urgent and critical in biomedical engineering. In this paper, we propose a novel predictor called Signal-BNF to predict the N-terminal signal peptide as well as its cleavage site based on Bayesian reasoning network. Signal-BNF is formed by fusing the results of different Bayesian classifiers which used different feature datasets as its input through weighted voting system. Experiment results show that Signal-BNF is superior to the popular online predictors such as Signal-3L and PrediSi. Signal-BNF is featured by high prediction accuracy that may serve as a useful tool for further investigating many unclear details regarding the molecular mechanism of the zip code protein-sorting system in cells.

  12. Signal-BNF: A Bayesian Network Fusing Approach to Predict Signal Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Chen, Youying; Chen, Liping; Guo, Gongde; Fan, Yongxian; Kong, Xiangzeng

    2012-01-01

    A signal peptide is a short peptide chain that directs the transport of a protein and has become the crucial vehicle in finding new drugs or reprogramming cells for gene therapy. As the avalanche of new protein sequences generated in the postgenomic era, the challenge of identifying new signal sequences has become even more urgent and critical in biomedical engineering. In this paper, we propose a novel predictor called Signal-BNF to predict the N-terminal signal peptide as well as its cleavage site based on Bayesian reasoning network. Signal-BNF is formed by fusing the results of different Bayesian classifiers which used different feature datasets as its input through weighted voting system. Experiment results show that Signal-BNF is superior to the popular online predictors such as Signal-3L and PrediSi. Signal-BNF is featured by high prediction accuracy that may serve as a useful tool for further investigating many unclear details regarding the molecular mechanism of the zip code protein-sorting system in cells. PMID:23118510

  13. Peptides and proteins used to enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to the brain: preclinical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Aguirre, Carolina; Morales, Francisco; Gallardo-Toledo, Eduardo; Guerrero, Simon; Giralt, Ernest; Araya, Eyleen; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2015-01-01

    An exciting and emerging field in nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the preclinical development of new strategies for the treatment and diagnosis of brain-related diseases such as neurodegeneration and cerebral tumors. The treatment of many brain-related disorders with AuNPs, which possess useful physical properties, is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The BBB highly regulates the substances that can permeate into the brain. Peptides and proteins may represent promising tools to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we summarize the potential applications of AuNPs to CNS disorders, discuss different strategies based on the use of peptides or proteins to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the brain, and examine the intranasal administration route, which bypasses the BBB. We also analyze the potential neurotoxicity of AuNPs and the perspectives and new challenges concerning the use of peptides and proteins to enhance the delivery of AuNPs to the brain. The majority of the work described in this review is in a preclinical stage of experimentation, or in select cases, in clinical trials in humans. We note that the use of AuNPs still requires substantial study before being translated into human applications. However, for further clinical research, the issues related to the potential use of AuNPs must be analyzed. PMID:26300639

  14. Peptide prefractionation is essential for proteomic approaches employing multiple-reaction monitoring of fruit proteomic research.

    PubMed

    Yang, XiaoTang; Li, Li; Song, Jun; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Li, XiHong; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2014-01-01

    Off-gel™ IEF has become a popular tool in proteomics research to fractionate peptides or proteins. We conducted a detailed investigation on the fruit proteomics of apple, banana, and strawberry fruit employing Off-gel™ electrophoresis (OGE) as a crucial step to improve the proteome coverage and quantitative proteomic workflows including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). We provide technical details concerning the application of Off-gel™IEF, nano-LC-MS detection, and MRM optimization and analysis. Our results demonstrated that the application of OGE is an effective method for peptide fractionation and increased significantly the number of proteins identified by at least ten times, with more total peptides detected and collected. Furthermore, we developed a protocol combining OGE and MRM studies to identify and quantitatively investigate monodehydroascorbate reductase, a key enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system of apple fruit during fruit ripening. Using this method, the quantitative changes in this protein during ripening and in response to ethylene treatment was investigated. Our results provide direct and comprehensive evidence demonstrating the benefits of OGE and its application for both shotgun and quantitative proteomics research. PMID:24227789

  15. New approaches to improve a peptide vaccine against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar; Rosas-Salgado, Gabriela; Hernández-Gonzalez, Marisela; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Cabrera-Ponce, José; López-Casillas, Fernando; González-Bonilla, César; Santiago-Machuca, Araceli; Ruíz-Pérez, Fernando; Sánchez, Joaquín; Goldbaum, Fernando; Aluja, Aline; Larralde, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium frequently affects human health and rustic porciculture. Cysticerci may localize in the central nervous system of humans causing neurocysticercosis, a major health problem in undeveloped countries. Prevalence and intensity of this disease in pigs and humans are related to social factors (poor personal hygiene, low sanitary conditions, rustic rearing of pigs, open fecalism) and possibly to biological factors such as immunity, genetic background, and gender. The indispensable role of pigs as an obligatory intermediate host in the life cycle offers the possibility of interfering with transmission through vaccination of pigs. An effective vaccine based on three synthetic peptides against pig cysticercosis has been successfully developed and proved effective in experimental and field conditions. The well-defined peptides that constitute the cysticercosis vaccine offer the possibility to explore alternative forms of antigen production and delivery systems that may improve the cost/benefit of this and other vaccines. Encouraging results were obtained in attempts to produce large amounts of these peptides and increased its immunogenicity by expression in recombinant filamentous phage (M13), in transgenic plants (carrots and papaya), and associated to bacterial immunogenic carrier proteins.

  16. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Properties of Mastoparan- and Sifuvirtide- Derivative Antimicrobial Peptides Using Chemical Structure-Function Relationship - in vivo and in silico Approaches.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Mernea, Maria; Borcan, Florin; Mihailescu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, also called body defense peptides, are chemical structures widely distributed across the animal and vegetal kingdoms that have a fundamental role as part of the immune system. These peptides are used against a wide range of pathogens, such as Gram-negative and - positive bacteria, fungi and viruses, etc. Their action spectrum makes them important for the pharmaceutical industry, as they could represent templates for the design of new and more potent structures by using drug design and drug delivery systems. Here we present the antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis (expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration values) for 33 mastoparan analogs and their new derivatives by quantitative structure-activity relationship method (2D, aligned and also non-aligned 3D-QSAR). We establish the contribution to antimicrobial activity of molecular descriptors like hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond donor and steric hindrance, correlated with contributions from the membrane environment (sodium, potassium, chloride ions). Also the studies of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide and its analogs are presented in context of interaction with lipid structures during fusion and delivery of these drugs.

  17. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  18. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  19. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  20. Curriculum Alignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Ronald; Tissot, Paula

    Curriculum alignment (CA) refers to the congruence of all the elements of a school's curriculum: curriculum goals; instructional program--what is taught and the materials used; and tests used to judge outcomes. CA can be a very powerful can be a very powerful factor in improving schools. Although further research is needed on CA, there is…

  1. An Approach to Identifying the Effect of Technique Asymmetries on Body Alignment in Swimming Exemplified by a Case Study of a Breaststroke Swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Ross H.; Fairweather, Malcolm M.; Alcock, Alison; McCabe, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining good alignment to minimize resistive drag in swimming there is a paucity of literature relating to the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations of the body about a vertical axis (yaw). The purpose of this paper was to present an approach to analyzing the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations in swimming, exemplifying the process with a case study of a breaststroke swimmer. The kinematics and angular kinetics of an elite female international breaststroke swimmer performing a ‘fatigue set’ of four 100m swims were derived from digitized three-dimensional video data using a 13 segment body model. Personalised anthropometric data required to quantify accurately segment and whole body centres of mass and segmental angular momentum were obtained by the elliptical zone method. Five episodes of torques producing yaw occurred in the stroke cycle sampled for each 100m swim of this swimmer. These torques were linked to bilateral differences in upper limb kinematics during 1) out-sweep; 2) in-sweep; 3) upper limb recovery; and lower limb kinematics during 4) Lower limb recovery and 5) the kick. It has been shown that by quantifying whole body torques, in conjunction with the kinematic movement patterns, the effect of technique asymmetries on body alignment can be assessed. Assessment of individual swimmers in this manner provides a solid foundation for planning interventions in strength, flexibility, and technique to improve alignment and performance. Key points A unique (not been attempted previously) study of yaw in breaststroke swimming that yields new knowledge of how technique and strength asymmetries affects body alignment. Establishes an approach to investigation of yaw in swimming using 3D videography and inverse dynamics. Exemplifies the approach with a case study. The case study illustrated the potential of the approach to enable detailed assessment of yaw and to explain how the yaw is produced in terms of the

  2. An approach to identifying the effect of technique asymmetries on body alignment in swimming exemplified by a case study of a breaststroke swimmer.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ross H; Fairweather, Malcolm M; Alcock, Alison; McCabe, Carla B

    2015-06-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining good alignment to minimize resistive drag in swimming there is a paucity of literature relating to the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations of the body about a vertical axis (yaw). The purpose of this paper was to present an approach to analyzing the effect of technique asymmetries on rotations in swimming, exemplifying the process with a case study of a breaststroke swimmer. The kinematics and angular kinetics of an elite female international breaststroke swimmer performing a 'fatigue set' of four 100m swims were derived from digitized three-dimensional video data using a 13 segment body model. Personalised anthropometric data required to quantify accurately segment and whole body centres of mass and segmental angular momentum were obtained by the elliptical zone method. Five episodes of torques producing yaw occurred in the stroke cycle sampled for each 100m swim of this swimmer. These torques were linked to bilateral differences in upper limb kinematics during 1) out-sweep; 2) in-sweep; 3) upper limb recovery; and lower limb kinematics during 4) Lower limb recovery and 5) the kick. It has been shown that by quantifying whole body torques, in conjunction with the kinematic movement patterns, the effect of technique asymmetries on body alignment can be assessed. Assessment of individual swimmers in this manner provides a solid foundation for planning interventions in strength, flexibility, and technique to improve alignment and performance. Key pointsA unique (not been attempted previously) study of yaw in breaststroke swimming that yields new knowledge of how technique and strength asymmetries affects body alignment.Establishes an approach to investigation of yaw in swimming using 3D videography and inverse dynamics.Exemplifies the approach with a case study. The case study illustrated the potential of the approach to enable detailed assessment of yaw and to explain how the yaw is produced in terms of the asymmetries

  3. PINALOG: a novel approach to align protein interaction networks—implications for complex detection and function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Hang T. T.; Sternberg, Michael J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of protein–protein interaction networks (PPINs) at the system level has become increasingly important in understanding biological processes. Comparison of the interactomes of different species not only provides a better understanding of species evolution but also helps with detecting conserved functional components and in function prediction. Method and Results: Here we report a PPIN alignment method, called PINALOG, which combines information from protein sequence, function and network topology. Alignment of human and yeast PPINs reveals several conserved subnetworks between them that participate in similar biological processes, notably the proteasome and transcription related processes. PINALOG has been tested for its power in protein complex prediction as well as function prediction. Comparison with PSI-BLAST in predicting protein function in the twilight zone also shows that PINALOG is valuable in predicting protein function. Availability and implementation: The PINALOG web-server is freely available from http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/~pinalog. The PINALOG program and associated data are available from the Download section of the web-server. Contact: m.sternberg@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22419782

  4. A Novel Peptide Thrombopoietin Mimetic Designing and Optimization Using Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) is a cytokine receptor protein present on the cell surface. The activation of TPOR by thrombopoietin (TPO) (a glycoprotein hormone) triggers an intracellular cascade of megakaryocytopoiesis for the formation of platelets. Recent studies on ex vivo megakaryocytopoiesis have evolved the possibilities of therapeutics uses. These findings have paved the way for the development of various TPO alternatives (recombinant TPO, peptide, and non-peptide TPO mimetics), which are useful in regenerative medicine. However, these alternatives possess various limitations such as induction of autoimmune effects, high production cost, low specificity, and hence activity. In the present study, a novel peptidic TPO mimetic was designed through computational studies by studying the binding sites of TPO and TMP to TPOR and analogs of known mimetics. Screening of combinatorial library was done through molecular docking using ClusPro. These studies indicated mimetic-9 as a significant molecule since it was found to have better binding score of −938.8 kcal/mol with seven hydrogen bonds and a high number of hydrophobic interactions, than known mimetic TMP with docking score of −798.4 kcal/mol and TMP dimer with docking score of −811.9 kcal/mol for TPOR. Mimetic9-TPOR complex was further assessed by the molecular dynamics simulation, and their complex was found to be stable with an RMSD value of 0.091 Å. While studying the parameters, mimetic-9 was found to have overall good physiochemical properties with positive grand average hydropathy (GRAVY) score and high instability index score and was found to be localized in the extracellular region. The designed mimetic-9 might prove to be a useful lead molecule for mimicking the role of TPO for in vitro platelet production with higher efficiency.

  5. A novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine against cancer: an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2014-05-21

    Cancer immunotherapy has an outstanding position in cancer prevention and treatment. In this kind of therapy, the immune system is activated to eliminate cancerous cells. Multi-epitope peptide cancer vaccines are manifesting as the next generation of cancer immunotherapy. In the present study, we have implemented various strategies to design an efficient multi-epitope vaccine. CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) epitopes, which have a pivotal role in cellular immune responses, helper epitopes and adjuvant, are three crucial components of peptide vaccine. CTL epitopes were determined from two high immunogenic protein Wilms tumor-1 (WT1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 by various servers, which apply different algorithms. CTL epitopes were linked together by AAY and HEYGAEALERAG motifs to enhance epitope presentation. Pan HLA DR-binding epitope (PADRE) peptide sequence and helper epitopes, which have defined from Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) by various servers, were used to induce CD4+ helper T lymphocytes (HTLs) responses. Additionally, helper epitopes were conjugated together via GPGPG motifs that stimulate HTL immunity. Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin (HBHA), a novel TLR4 agonist was employed as an adjuvant to polarize CD4+ T cells toward T-helper 1 to induce strong CTL responses. Moreover, the EAAAK linker was introduced to N and C terminals of HBHA for efficient separation. 3D model of protein was generated and predicted B cell epitopes were determined from the surface of built structure. Our protein contains several linear and conformational B cell epitopes, which suggests the antibody triggering property of this novel vaccine. Hence, our final protein can be used for prophylactic or therapeutic usages, because it can potentially stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses.

  6. A Novel Peptide Thrombopoietin Mimetic Designing and Optimization Using Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) is a cytokine receptor protein present on the cell surface. The activation of TPOR by thrombopoietin (TPO) (a glycoprotein hormone) triggers an intracellular cascade of megakaryocytopoiesis for the formation of platelets. Recent studies on ex vivo megakaryocytopoiesis have evolved the possibilities of therapeutics uses. These findings have paved the way for the development of various TPO alternatives (recombinant TPO, peptide, and non-peptide TPO mimetics), which are useful in regenerative medicine. However, these alternatives possess various limitations such as induction of autoimmune effects, high production cost, low specificity, and hence activity. In the present study, a novel peptidic TPO mimetic was designed through computational studies by studying the binding sites of TPO and TMP to TPOR and analogs of known mimetics. Screening of combinatorial library was done through molecular docking using ClusPro. These studies indicated mimetic-9 as a significant molecule since it was found to have better binding score of -938.8 kcal/mol with seven hydrogen bonds and a high number of hydrophobic interactions, than known mimetic TMP with docking score of -798.4 kcal/mol and TMP dimer with docking score of -811.9 kcal/mol for TPOR. Mimetic9-TPOR complex was further assessed by the molecular dynamics simulation, and their complex was found to be stable with an RMSD value of 0.091 Å. While studying the parameters, mimetic-9 was found to have overall good physiochemical properties with positive grand average hydropathy (GRAVY) score and high instability index score and was found to be localized in the extracellular region. The designed mimetic-9 might prove to be a useful lead molecule for mimicking the role of TPO for in vitro platelet production with higher efficiency. PMID:27630985

  7. A Novel Peptide Thrombopoietin Mimetic Designing and Optimization Using Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) is a cytokine receptor protein present on the cell surface. The activation of TPOR by thrombopoietin (TPO) (a glycoprotein hormone) triggers an intracellular cascade of megakaryocytopoiesis for the formation of platelets. Recent studies on ex vivo megakaryocytopoiesis have evolved the possibilities of therapeutics uses. These findings have paved the way for the development of various TPO alternatives (recombinant TPO, peptide, and non-peptide TPO mimetics), which are useful in regenerative medicine. However, these alternatives possess various limitations such as induction of autoimmune effects, high production cost, low specificity, and hence activity. In the present study, a novel peptidic TPO mimetic was designed through computational studies by studying the binding sites of TPO and TMP to TPOR and analogs of known mimetics. Screening of combinatorial library was done through molecular docking using ClusPro. These studies indicated mimetic-9 as a significant molecule since it was found to have better binding score of −938.8 kcal/mol with seven hydrogen bonds and a high number of hydrophobic interactions, than known mimetic TMP with docking score of −798.4 kcal/mol and TMP dimer with docking score of −811.9 kcal/mol for TPOR. Mimetic9-TPOR complex was further assessed by the molecular dynamics simulation, and their complex was found to be stable with an RMSD value of 0.091 Å. While studying the parameters, mimetic-9 was found to have overall good physiochemical properties with positive grand average hydropathy (GRAVY) score and high instability index score and was found to be localized in the extracellular region. The designed mimetic-9 might prove to be a useful lead molecule for mimicking the role of TPO for in vitro platelet production with higher efficiency. PMID:27630985

  8. Unifying expression scale for peptide hydrophobicity in proteomic reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography experiments.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Marine; Shamshurin, Dmitry; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2013-11-19

    As an initial step in our efforts to unify the expression of peptide retention times in proteomic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiments, we aligned the chromatographic properties of a number of peptide retention standards against a collection of peptides commonly observed in proteomic experiments. The standard peptide mixtures and tryptic digests of samples of different origins were separated under the identical chromatographic condition most commonly employed in proteomics: 100 Å C18 sorbent with 0.1% formic acid as an ion-pairing modifier. Following our original approach (Krokhin, O. V.; Spicer, V. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 9522-9530) the retention characteristics of these standards and collection of tryptic peptides were mapped into hydrophobicity index (HI) or acetonitrile percentage units. This scale allows for direct visualization of the chromatographic outcome of LC-MS acquisitions, monitors the performance of the gradient LC system, and simplifies method development and interlaboratory data alignment. Wide adoption of this approach would significantly aid understanding the basic principles of gradient peptide RP-HPLC and solidify our collective efforts in acquiring confident peptide retention libraries, a key component in the development of targeted proteomic approaches.

  9. Signal-CF: a subsite-coupled and window-fusing approach for predicting signal peptides.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an automated method for predicting signal peptide sequences and their cleavage sites in eukaryotic and bacterial protein sequences. It is a 2-layer predictor: the 1st-layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as secretory or non-secretory; if it is secretory, the process will be automatically continued with the 2nd-layer prediction engine to further identify the cleavage site of its signal peptide. The new predictor is called Signal-CF, where C stands for "coupling" and F for "fusion", meaning that Signal-CF is formed by incorporating the subsite coupling effects along a protein sequence and by fusing the results derived from many width-different scaled windows through a voting system. Signal-CF is featured by high success prediction rates with short computational time, and hence is particularly useful for the analysis of large-scale datasets. Signal-CF is freely available as a web-server at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/Signal-CF/ or http://202.120.37.186/bioinf/Signal-CF/.

  10. Inspiration from the mirror: D-amino acid containing peptides in biomedical approaches.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2016-06-01

    D-amino acids, the enantiomers of naturally abundant L-amino acids, bear unique stereochemistry properties that lead to the resistance towards most of the endogenous enzymes. Previous works have demonstrated applications of D-amino acids in therapeutic development with the aid of mirror-image phage display and retro-inverso peptide synthesis. In this review, we highlight the recent progress and challenges in the exploration of D-amino acids at the interface of chemistry and life science. First, we will introduce some progress made in traditional application of D-amino acids to enhance biostability of peptide therapeutics. Then, we discuss some works that explore the relatively underexplored interactions between the enzyme and D-amino acids and enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids. To highlight the enzymatic reactions of D-amino acids, we will describe several emerging works on the enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA) and their potential application in selective anti-inflammatory or anticancer therapies. At the end, we briefly mention the challenges and possible future directions. PMID:27159920

  11. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation.

  12. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  13. Proline Editing: A General and Practical Approach to the Synthesis of Functionally and Structurally Diverse Peptides. Analysis of Steric versus Stereoelectronic Effects of 4-Substituted Prolines on Conformation within Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil K.; Naduthambi, Devan; Thomas, Krista M.; Zondlo, Neal J.

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized proline residues have diverse applications. Herein we describe a practical approach, proline editing, for the synthesis of peptides with stereospecifically modified proline residues. Peptides are synthesized by standard solid-phase-peptide-synthesis to incorporate Fmoc-Hydroxyproline (4R-Hyp). In an automated manner, the Hyp hydroxyl is protected and the remainder of the peptide synthesized. After peptide synthesis, the Hyp protecting group is orthogonally removed and Hyp selectively modified to generate substituted proline amino acids, with the peptide main chain functioning to “protect” the proline amino and carboxyl groups. In a model tetrapeptide (Ac-TYPN-NH2), 4R-Hyp was stereospecifically converted to 122 different 4-substituted prolyl amino acids, with 4R or 4S stereochemistry, via Mitsunobu, oxidation, reduction, acylation, and substitution reactions. 4-Substituted prolines synthesized via proline editing include incorporated structured amino acid mimetics (Cys, Asp/Glu, Phe, Lys, Arg, pSer/pThr), recognition motifs (biotin, RGD), electron-withdrawing groups to induce stereoelectronic effects (fluoro, nitrobenzoate), handles for heteronuclear NMR (19F:fluoro; pentafluorophenyl or perfluoro-tert-butyl ether; 4,4-difluoro; 77SePh) and other spectroscopies (fluorescence, IR: cyanophenyl ether), leaving groups (sulfonate, halide, NHS, bromoacetate), and other reactive handles (amine, thiol, thioester, ketone, hydroxylamine, maleimide, acrylate, azide, alkene, alkyne, aryl halide, tetrazine, 1,2-aminothiol). Proline editing provides access to these proline derivatives with no solution phase synthesis. All peptides were analyzed by NMR to identify stereoelectronic and steric effects on conformation. Proline derivatives were synthesized to permit bioorthogonal conjugation reactions, including azide-alkyne, tetrazinetrans-cyclooctene, oxime, reductive amination, native chemical ligation, Suzuki, Sonogashira, cross-metathesis, and Diels

  14. Image alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  15. Pareto optimal pairwise sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    DeRonne, Kevin W; Karypis, George

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignment using evolutionary profiles is a commonly employed tool when investigating a protein. Many profile-profile scoring functions have been developed for use in such alignments, but there has not yet been a comprehensive study of Pareto optimal pairwise alignments for combining multiple such functions. We show that the problem of generating Pareto optimal pairwise alignments has an optimal substructure property, and develop an efficient algorithm for generating Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments. All possible sets of two, three, and four profile scoring functions are used from a pool of 11 functions and applied to 588 pairs of proteins in the ce_ref data set. The performance of the best objective combinations on ce_ref is also evaluated on an independent set of 913 protein pairs extracted from the BAliBASE RV11 data set. Our dynamic-programming-based heuristic approach produces approximated Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments that contain comparable alignments to those on the exact frontier, but on average in less than 1/58th the time in the case of four objectives. Our results show that the Pareto frontiers contain alignments whose quality is better than the alignments obtained by single objectives. However, the task of identifying a single high-quality alignment among those in the Pareto frontier remains challenging.

  16. Magnetically aligned supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2 , it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  17. Optimization of Search Engines and Postprocessing Approaches to Maximize Peptide and Protein Identification for High-Resolution Mass Data.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Sheng, Quanhu; Li, Jun; Ma, Danjun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Wang, Xue; Shyr, Yu; Yi, Zhengping; Qu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The two key steps for analyzing proteomic data generated by high-resolution MS are database searching and postprocessing. While the two steps are interrelated, studies on their combinatory effects and the optimization of these procedures have not been adequately conducted. Here, we investigated the performance of three popular search engines (SEQUEST, Mascot, and MS Amanda) in conjunction with five filtering approaches, including respective score-based filtering, a group-based approach, local false discovery rate (LFDR), PeptideProphet, and Percolator. A total of eight data sets from various proteomes (e.g., E. coli, yeast, and human) produced by various instruments with high-accuracy survey scan (MS1) and high- or low-accuracy fragment ion scan (MS2) (LTQ-Orbitrap, Orbitrap-Velos, Orbitrap-Elite, Q-Exactive, Orbitrap-Fusion, and Q-TOF) were analyzed. It was found combinations involving Percolator achieved markedly more peptide and protein identifications at the same FDR level than the other 12 combinations for all data sets. Among these, combinations of SEQUEST-Percolator and MS Amanda-Percolator provided slightly better performances for data sets with low-accuracy MS2 (ion trap or IT) and high accuracy MS2 (Orbitrap or TOF), respectively, than did other methods. For approaches without Percolator, SEQUEST-group performs the best for data sets with MS2 produced by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and IT analysis; Mascot-LFDR gives more identifications for data sets generated by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and analyzed in Orbitrap (HCD-OT) and in Orbitrap Fusion (HCD-IT); MS Amanda-Group excels for the Q-TOF data set and the Orbitrap Velos HCD-OT data set. Therefore, if Percolator was not used, a specific combination should be applied for each type of data set. Moreover, a higher percentage of multiple-peptide proteins and lower variation of protein spectral counts were observed when analyzing technical replicates using Percolator

  18. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  19. Predicting peptide vaccine candidates against H1N1 influenza virus through theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano; Campos-Rodriguez, Rafael; Rojas-Hernandez, Saul; Contis-Montes de Oca, Arturo; Correa-Basurto, José

    2015-05-01

    Identification of potential epitopes that might activate the immune system has been facilitated by the employment of algorithms that use experimental data as templates. However, in order to prove the affinity and the map of interactions between the receptor (major histocompatibility complex, MHC, or T-cell receptor) and the potential epitope, further computational studies are required. Docking and molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations have been an effective source of generating structural information at molecular level in immunology. Herein, in order to provide a detailed understanding of the origins of epitope recognition and to select the best peptide candidate to develop an epitope-based vaccine, docking and MDs simulations in combination with MMGBSA free energy calculations and per-residue free energy decomposition were performed, taking as starting complexes those formed between four designed epitopes (P1-P4) from hemagglutinin (HA) of the H1N1 influenza virus and MHC-II anchored in POPC membrane. Our results revealed that the energetic contributions of individual amino acids within the pMHC-II complexes are mainly dictated by van der Waals interactions and the nonpolar part of solvation energy, whereas the electrostatic interactions corresponding to hydrogen bonds and salt bridges determine the binding specificity, being the most favorable interactions formed between p4 and MHC-II. Then, P1-P4 epitopes were synthesized and tested experimentally to compare theoretical and experimental results. Experimental results show that P4 elicited the highest strong humoral immune response to HA of the H1N1 and may induce antibodies that are cross-reactive to other influenza subtypes, suggesting that it could be a good candidate for the development of a peptide-based vaccine.

  20. Mass balance approaches for estimating the intestinal absorption and metabolism of peptides and analogues: theoretical development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinko, P. J.; Leesman, G. D.; Amidon, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for estimating the extent of intestinal peptide and peptide analogue absorption was developed on the basis of a mass balance approach that incorporates convection, permeability, and reaction. The macroscopic mass balance analysis (MMBA) was extended to include chemical and enzymatic degradation. A microscopic mass balance analysis, a numerical approach, was also developed and the results compared to the MMBA. The mass balance equations for the fraction of a drug absorbed and reacted in the tube were derived from the general steady state mass balance in a tube: [formula: see text] where M is mass, z is the length of the tube, R is the tube radius, Pw is the intestinal wall permeability, kr is the reaction rate constant, C is the concentration of drug in the volume element over which the mass balance is taken, VL is the volume of the tube, and vz is the axial velocity of drug. The theory was first applied to the oral absorption of two tripeptide analogues, cefaclor (CCL) and cefatrizine (CZN), which degrade and dimerize in the intestine. Simulations using the mass balance equations, the experimental absorption parameters, and the literature stability rate constants yielded a mean estimated extent of CCL (250-mg dose) and CZN (1000-mg dose) absorption of 89 and 51%, respectively, which was similar to the mean extent of absorption reported in humans (90 and 50%). It was proposed previously that 15% of the CCL dose spontaneously degraded systematically; however, our simulations suggest that significant CCL degradation occurs (8 to 17%) presystemically in the intestinal lumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. Mimicking nature: a novel peptide-based bio-inspired approach for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Emanuela; Quatela, Alessia; Caruso, Mario; Tagliaferro, Roberto; De Zotti, Marta; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; Di Carlo, Aldo; Venanzi, Mariano

    2014-01-13

    A bioinspired approach is applied to photoelectric conversion devices. A 3(10)-helical hexapeptide bearing a pyrene unit is immobilized on a gold-covered TiO2 surface. The device is integrated for the first time in a dye-sensitized solar cell, exhibiting stability after several measurements. The approach could have promising applications in the field of optoelectronics.

  2. Ligand and Structure-Based Approaches for the Identification of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Zhu, Yasheng; Qiu, Shengzhi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a metalloprotease catalyzing the removal of a formyl group from newly synthesized proteins, which makes it an important antibacterial drug target. Given the importance of PDF inhibitors like actinonin in antibacterial drug discovery, several reported potent PDF inhibitors were used to develop pharmacophore models using the Galahad module of Sybyl 7.1 software. Generated pharmacophore models were composed of two donor atom centers, four acceptor atom centers and two hydrophobic groups. Model-1 was screened against the Zinc database and several compounds were retrieved as hits. Compounds with Qfit values of more than 60 were employed to perform a molecular docking study with the receptor Escherichia coli PDF, then compounds with docking score values of more than 6 were used to predict the in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity risk via OSIRIS property explorer. Two known PDF inhibitors were also used to perform a molecular docking study with E. coli PDF as reference molecules. The results of the molecular docking study were validated by reproducing the crystal structure of actinonin. Molecular docking and in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity prediction studies suggested that ZINC08740166 has a relatively high docking score of 7.44 and a drug score of 0.78. PMID:27428963

  3. Strategic approaches for improving entrapment of hydrophilic peptide drugs by lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Jiang, Sai-Ping; Du, Yong-Zhong; Miao, Jing; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2009-05-01

    In order to introduce hydrophilic peptide drugs into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), a technique of combining hydrophobic ion pairing (HIP) and non-aqueous oil-in-oil (O/O) emulsion-evaporation was developed. Leuprolide (LR) was selected as the model drug, while sodium stearate (SA-Na) was used as the negative charged ion pairing material. The formation of leuprolide-sodium stearate (LR-SA-Na) complex was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was observed that when the molar ratio of SA-Na/LR reached 2/1, ca 88.5% LR was incorporated into the hydrophobic ion complexes with SA-Na. Compared with the conventional method of solvent diffusion in an aqueous system, the efficiency of LR drug entrapment with SLN increased from 28.0% to 74.6% by the combined technique of HIP and O/O emulsion-evaporation. In vitro drug release tests revealed that employing technique of HIP obviously reduced the burst release and slowed down the rate of drug release. At meanwhile, applying the method of non-aqueous O/O emulsion-evaporation, the longer time of drug release but relatively higher drug burst release ratio was observed in comparison with those by the solvent diffusion method in an aqueous system. The drug entrapment and release behaviors of LR-SA-Na SLN prepared by the O/O emulsion-evaporation method suggested that it could potentially be exploited as an oral delivery system for leuprolide.

  4. A sequence-based computational approach to predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Nakariyakul, Songyot; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    The PDZ domain is one of the most ubiquitous protein domains that is involved in coordinating signaling complex formation and protein networking by reversibly interacting with multiple binding partners. It has been linked to many devastating diseases such as avian influenza, Fraser syndrome, Usher syndrome and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. Understanding the selectivity of PDZ domains can help elucidate how defects in PDZ proteins and their binding partners lead to human diseases. Since experimental methods to determine the interaction specificity of the PDZ domains are expensive and labor intensive, an accurate computational method is thus needed. Our developed support vector machine-based predictor using dipeptide composition is shown to qualitatively predict PDZ domain-peptide interaction with a high accuracy rate. Furthermore, since most of the dipeptide compositions are redundant and irrelevant, we propose a new hybrid feature selection technique to select only a subset of these compositions for interaction prediction. The experimental results show that only approximately 25% of dipeptide features are needed and that our method improves the prediction results significantly. The selected dipeptide features are also analyzed and shown to play important roles in specificity patterns of PDZ domains. Our method is based only on primary sequence information, and it can be used for the research of drug target and drug design in identifying PDZ domain-ligand interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics, Systems Biology & Clinical Implications. Guest Editor: Yudong Cai. PMID:23608946

  5. Ligand and Structure-Based Approaches for the Identification of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Zhu, Yasheng; Qiu, Shengzhi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a metalloprotease catalyzing the removal of a formyl group from newly synthesized proteins, which makes it an important antibacterial drug target. Given the importance of PDF inhibitors like actinonin in antibacterial drug discovery, several reported potent PDF inhibitors were used to develop pharmacophore models using the Galahad module of Sybyl 7.1 software. Generated pharmacophore models were composed of two donor atom centers, four acceptor atom centers and two hydrophobic groups. Model-1 was screened against the Zinc database and several compounds were retrieved as hits. Compounds with Qfit values of more than 60 were employed to perform a molecular docking study with the receptor Escherichia coli PDF, then compounds with docking score values of more than 6 were used to predict the in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity risk via OSIRIS property explorer. Two known PDF inhibitors were also used to perform a molecular docking study with E. coli PDF as reference molecules. The results of the molecular docking study were validated by reproducing the crystal structure of actinonin. Molecular docking and in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity prediction studies suggested that ZINC08740166 has a relatively high docking score of 7.44 and a drug score of 0.78. PMID:27428963

  6. Conformational preferences of a peptide corresponding to the major antigenic determinant of foot-and-mouth disease virus: implications for peptide-vaccine approaches.

    PubMed

    de Prat-Gay, G

    1997-05-15

    The conformational preferences in solution of a peptide corresponding to the GH loop of the VP1 capsid protein from the foot-and-mouth disease virus were examined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism. The GH loop is the major antigenic determinant of the virus and participates in cell attachment through an integrin-like Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues Gly132 to Ser162 of the VP1 capsid protein of the serotype O, is largely disordered in aqueous solution as shown by the absence of long- and medium-range NOE contacts and by random-like chemical shifts values. Helical contents in aqueous solution were estimated to be less than 10%, as determined by extrapolation of trifluoroethanol titration from CD measurements, in good agreement with estimations from NMR experiments. In the presence of 40% trifluoroethanol an alpha-helix, flanked by two proline residues between Asn12 (Asn143 in the intact protein) and Leu28 (159), is induced. This contrasts with the 3(10) helix observed between residues Leu148 and Val155 in the crystal structure of the dithiothreitol-reduced virus, indicating that the cosolvent does not stabilize a residual, low-populated structure, similar to that in the intact virus. Several algorithms also fail to predict the structure found in the intact virus because these are based mainly on local sequence information. The lack of structure of the peptide in aqueous solution strongly suggests that the conformational determinants sufficient for the structure stabilization of this highly immunogenic antigen are mostly dictated by interactions of the loop with other regions of the virus structure, and do not arise from local amino acid sequence information. The ability of designed GH-VP1 peptides to neutralize anti-virus antibodies is likely to arise from antibody-induced conformation of the peptide and its application as peptide vaccines is not straightforward. Similarly, insertion of these peptides

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Computational Approaches to Relative Protein Quantification Using Peptide Peak Intensities in Label-free LC-MS Proteomics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, Melissa M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Metz, Thomas O.; Pounds, Joel G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2013-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is widely used to identify and quantify peptides in complex biological samples. In particular, label-free shotgun proteomics is highly effective for the identification of peptides and subsequently obtaining a global protein profile of a sample. As a result, this approach is widely used for discovery studies. Typically, the objective of these discovery studies is to identify proteins that are affected by some condition of interest (e.g. disease, exposure). However, for complex biological samples, label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments measure peptides and do not directly yield protein quantities. Thus, protein quantification must be inferred from one or more measured peptides. In recent years, many computational approaches to relative protein quantification of label-free LC-MS data have been published. In this review, we examine the most commonly employed quantification approaches to relative protein abundance from peak intensity values, evaluate their individual merits, and discuss challenges in the use of the various computational approaches.

  8. Approaches towards the automated interpretation and prediction of electrospray tandem mass spectra of non-peptidic combinatorial compounds.

    PubMed

    Klagkou, Katerina; Pullen, Frank; Harrison, Mark; Organ, Andy; Firth, Alistair; Langley, G John

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is widely used within the pharmaceutical industry as a means of rapid identification of potential drugs. With the growth of combinatorial libraries, mass spectrometry (MS) became the key analytical technique because of its speed of analysis, sensitivity, accuracy and ability to be coupled with other analytical techniques. In the majority of cases, electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) has become the default ionisation technique. However, due to the absence of fragment ions in the resulting spectra, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is required to provide structural information for the identification of an unknown analyte. This work discusses the first steps of an investigation into the fragmentation pathways taking place in electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The ultimate goal for this project is to set general fragmentation rules for non-peptidic, pharmaceutical, combinatorial compounds. As an aid, an artificial intelligence (AI) software package is used to facilitate interpretation of the spectra. This initial study has focused on determining the fragmentation rules for some classes of compound types that fit the remit as outlined above. Based on studies carried out on several combinatorial libraries of these compounds, it was established that different classes of drug molecules follow unique fragmentation pathways. In addition to these general observations, the specific ionisation processes and the fragmentation pathways involved in the electrospray mass spectra of these systems were explored. The ultimate goal will be to incorporate our findings into the computer program and allow identification of an unknown, non-peptidic compound following insertion of its ES-MS/MS spectrum into the AI package. The work herein demonstrates the potential benefit of such an approach in addressing the issue of high-throughput, automated MS/MS data interpretation.

  9. A Stochastic Hill Climbing Approach for Simultaneous 2D Alignment and Clustering of Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Cyril F; Bonnet, Frederic; Elmlund, Dominika; Elmlund, Hans

    2016-06-01

    A critical step in the analysis of novel cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single-particle datasets is the identification of homogeneous subsets of images. Methods for solving this problem are important for data quality assessment, ab initio 3D reconstruction, and analysis of population diversity due to the heterogeneous nature of macromolecules. Here we formulate a stochastic algorithm for identification of homogeneous subsets of images. The purpose of the method is to generate improved 2D class averages that can be used to produce a reliable 3D starting model in a rapid and unbiased fashion. We show that our method overcomes inherent limitations of widely used clustering approaches and proceed to test the approach on six publicly available experimental cryo-EM datasets. We conclude that, in each instance, ab initio 3D reconstructions of quality suitable for initialization of high-resolution refinement are produced from the cluster centers. PMID:27184214

  10. Evaluation of Two Approaches for Aligning Data Obtained from a Motion Capture System and an In-Shoe Pressure Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A.

    2014-01-01

    An in-shoe pressure measurement (IPM) system can be used to measure center of pressure (COP) locations, and has fewer restrictions compared to the more conventional approach using a force platform. The insole of an IPM system, however, has its own coordinate system. To use an IPM system along with a motion capture system, there is thus a need to align the coordinate systems of the two measurement systems. To address this need, the current study examined two different approaches—rigid body transformation and nonlinear mapping (i.e., multilayer feed-forward neural network (MFNN))—to express COP measurements from an IPM system in the coordinate system of a motion capture system. Ten participants (five male and five female) completed several simulated manual material handling (MMH) activities, and during these activities the performance of the two approaches was assessed. Results indicated that: (1) performance varied between MMH activity types; and (2) a MFNN performed better than or comparable to the rigid body transformation, depending on the specific input variable sets used. Further, based on the results obtained, it was argued that a nonlinear mapping vs. rigid body transformation approach may be more effective to account for shoe deformation during MMH or potentially other types of physical activity. PMID:25222032

  11. State strategies of governance in biomedical innovation: aligning conceptual approaches for understanding 'Rising Powers' in the global context

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 'Innovation' has become a policy focus in its own right in many states as they compete to position themselves in the emerging knowledge economies. Innovation in biomedicine is a global enterprise in which 'Rising Power' states figure prominently, and which undoubtedly will re-shape health systems and health economies globally. Scientific and technological innovation processes and policies raise difficult issues in the domains of science/technology, civil society, and the economic and healthcare marketplace. The production of knowledge in these fields is complex, uncertain, inter-disciplinary and inter-institutional, and subject to a continuing political struggle for advantage. As part of this struggle, a wide variety of issues - regulation, intellectual property, ethics, scientific boundaries, healthcare market formation - are raised and policy agendas negotiated. Methods A range of social science disciplines and approaches have conceptualised such innovation processes. Against a background of concepts such as the competition state and the developmental state, and national innovation systems, we give an overview of a range of approaches that have potential for advancing understanding of governance of global life science and biomedical innovation, with special reference to the 'Rising Powers', in order to examine convergences and divergences between them. Conceptual approaches that we focus on include those drawn from political science/political economy, sociology of technology; Innovation Studies and Science & Technology Studies. The paper is part of a project supported by the UK ESRC's Rising Powers programme. Results We show convergences and complementarities between the approaches discussed, and argue that the role of the national state itself has become relatively neglected in much of the relevant theorising. Conclusions We conclude that an approach is required that enables innovation and governance to be seen as 'co-producing' each other in a multi

  12. Global alignment: Finding rearrangements during alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Malde, Sanket; Poliakov, Alexander; Do, Chuong B.; Couronne, Olivier; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2003-01-06

    Motivation: To compare entire genomes from different species, biologists increasingly need alignment methods that are efficient enough to handle long sequences, and accurate enough to correctly align the conserved biological features between distant species. The two main classes of pairwise alignments are global alignment, where one string is transformed into the other, and local alignment, where all locations of similarity between the two strings are returned. Global alignments are less prone to demonstrating false homology as each letter of one sequence is constrained to being aligned to only one letter of the other. Local alignments, on the other hand, can cope with rearrangements between non-syntenic, orthologous sequences by identifying similar regions in sequences; this, however, comes at the expense of a higher false positive rate due to the inability of local aligners to take into account overall conservation maps.

  13. Preparation of ⁶⁸Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides using a manual labelling approach for small-animal PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eduardo; Martínez, Alfonso; Oteo, Marta; García, Angel; Morcillo, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides are a promising PET radiotracers used in the detection of different tumours types due to their ability for binding specifically receptors overexpressed in these. Furthermore, (68)Ga can be produced by a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator on site which is a very good alternative to cyclotron-based PET isotopes. Here, we describe a manual labelling approach for the synthesis of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides based on concentration and purification of the commercial (68)Ga/(68)Ga generator eluate using an anion exchange-cartridge. (68)Ga-DOTA-TATE was used to image a pheochromocytoma xenograft mouse model by a microPET/CT scanner. The method described provides satisfactory results, allowing the subsequent (68)Ga use to label DOTA-peptides. The simplicity of the method along with its implementation reduced cost, makes it useful in preclinical PET studies. PMID:26492321

  14. Preparation of ⁶⁸Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides using a manual labelling approach for small-animal PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eduardo; Martínez, Alfonso; Oteo, Marta; García, Angel; Morcillo, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides are a promising PET radiotracers used in the detection of different tumours types due to their ability for binding specifically receptors overexpressed in these. Furthermore, (68)Ga can be produced by a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator on site which is a very good alternative to cyclotron-based PET isotopes. Here, we describe a manual labelling approach for the synthesis of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides based on concentration and purification of the commercial (68)Ga/(68)Ga generator eluate using an anion exchange-cartridge. (68)Ga-DOTA-TATE was used to image a pheochromocytoma xenograft mouse model by a microPET/CT scanner. The method described provides satisfactory results, allowing the subsequent (68)Ga use to label DOTA-peptides. The simplicity of the method along with its implementation reduced cost, makes it useful in preclinical PET studies.

  15. A peptidomic approach to study the contribution of added casein proteins to the peptide profile in Spanish dry-fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Mora, Leticia; Escudero, Elizabeth; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-01

    Peptidomics is a necessary alternative in the analysis of naturally generated peptides in dry-fermented processing. The intense proteolysis occurred during the processing of dry-fermented sausages is due to the action of endopeptidases and exopeptidases from both, endogenous muscle origin and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) added in the starter. Sodium caseinate is frequently used as an additive in this type of products because of its emulsifying properties, and consequently influences the protein profile available during the proteolysis. In this study, a mass spectrometry approach has been used to determine the impact of added sodium caseinate in the final peptide profile as well as to analyse its possible influence in the presence of certain previously described casein-derived bioactive peptides.

  16. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided.

  17. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided. PMID:26769116

  18. Novel isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu) reagents enable absolute quantification of peptides and proteins using a standard curve approach

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive due to the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using Mass Differential Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N,N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective due to their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared to previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error) while the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error). PMID:25377360

  19. Multiple sequence alignment with DIALIGN.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    DIALIGN is a software tool for multiple sequence alignment by combining global and local alignment features. It composes multiple alignments from local pairwise sequence similarities. This approach is particularly useful to discover conserved functional regions in sequences that share only local homologies but are otherwise unrelated. An anchoring option allows to use external information and expert knowledge in addition to primary-sequence similarity alone. The latest version of DIALIGN optionally uses matches to the PFAM database to detect weak homologies. Various versions of the program are available through Göttingen Bioinformatics Compute Server (GOBICS) at http://www.gobics.de/department/software.

  20. A rational approach to select immunogenic peptides that induce IFN-γ response against Toxoplasma gondii in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Néstor I; Moncada, Diego M; Gómez-Marin, Jorge E

    2015-12-01

    The ideal vaccine to prevent toxoplasmosis in humans would comprise antigens that elicit a protective T cell type 1 response with high IFN-γ production. Here, we report the use of a bioinformatics pipeline to discover peptides based on biochemical characteristics that predict strong IFN-γ response by human leukocytes. We selected peptide sequences that previously were reported to induce IFN-γ to identify the biophysical characteristics that will predict HLA-A*02 high-affinity epitopes. We found that the protein motif pattern FL...L..[VL] was common in previously reported highly immunogenic sequences. We have selected new peptides with a length of 9 residues with affinities from 2 to 21 nM with peptide signal and transmembrane domains and predicted to be cleaved at the proteasome to perform ELISPOT assays with human leukocytes. Within 9 peptides with the highest scores for IFN-γ production, four peptides elicited IFN-γ levels in a range from 252 to 1763 SFC/1e6. Our pipeline uncovered Toxoplasma proteins with peptides that are processed by MHC class 1 in humans. Our results suggest that our rational strategy for the selection of immunogenic epitopes could be used to select peptides as candidates for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines. PMID:26210043

  1. A Novel Peptide-Binding Motifs Inference Approach to Understand Deoxynivalenol Molecular Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Yousef I.; Watts, Christena; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a type B trichothecene mycotoxin that is commonly detected in cereals and grains world-wide. The low-tolerated levels of this mycotoxin, especially in mono-gastric animals, reflect its bio-potency. The toxicity of DON is conventionally attributed to its ability to inhibit ribosomal protein biosynthesis, but recent advances in molecular tools have elucidated novel mechanisms that further explain DON’s toxicological profile, complementing the diverse symptoms associated with its exposure. This article summarizes the recent findings related to novel mechanisms of DON toxicity as well as how structural modifications to DON alter its potency. In addition, it explores feasible ways of expanding our understating of DON-cellular targets and their roles in DON toxicity, clearance, and detoxification through the utilization of computational biology approaches. PMID:26043274

  2. A novel Peptide-binding motifs inference approach to understand deoxynivalenol molecular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Watts, Christena; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Ting

    2015-06-02

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a type B trichothecene mycotoxin that is commonly detected in cereals and grains world-wide. The low-tolerated levels of this mycotoxin, especially in mono-gastric animals, reflect its bio-potency. The toxicity of DON is conventionally attributed to its ability to inhibit ribosomal protein biosynthesis, but recent advances in molecular tools have elucidated novel mechanisms that further explain DON's toxicological profile, complementing the diverse symptoms associated with its exposure. This article summarizes the recent findings related to novel mechanisms of DON toxicity as well as how structural modifications to DON alter its potency. In addition, it explores feasible ways of expanding our understating of DON-cellular targets and their roles in DON toxicity, clearance, and detoxification through the utilization of computational biology approaches.

  3. A novel approach to enhance antibody sensitivity and specificity by peptide cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Takeshi; Valencia, Julio C.; Hall, Matthew D.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2008-01-01

    Most current techniques employed to improve antigen-antibody signals in western blotting and in immunohistochemistry rely on sample processing prior to staining (e.g. microwaving) or using a more robust reporter (e.g. a secondary antibody with biotin-streptavidin). We have developed and optimized a new approach intended to stabilize the complexes formed between antigens and their respective primary antibodies by cupric ions at high pH. This technique improves the affinity and lowers cross-reactivity with non-specific bands of ∼20% of antibodies tested (5/25). Here we report that this method can enhance antigen-antibody specificity and can improve the utility of some poorly reactive primary antibodies. PMID:18801330

  4. Are Two Better Than One? A New Approach for Multidentate Grafting of Peptides to a Gold Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Mario; Gatto, Emanuela; Palleschi, Antonio; Scarselli, Manuela; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Formaggio, Fernando; Longo, Edoardo; Toniolo, Claudio; Wright, Karen; Venanzi, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Multidentate binding of two helical hexapeptides to a gold surface was obtained by introducing in the peptide chain a non ribosomial amino acid, i.e. the 4-amino-1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid (Adt) residue, a Cα-tetrasubstituted α-amino acid bearing a heterocyclic side chain characterized by a disulfide group. The two peptides, mainly formed by strongly helicogenic Cα-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids, were both functionalized at the N-terminus by a ferrocenoyl (Fc) group, but differ in the number of Adt residues included in the peptide chain: the former (Fc6Adt2) contains two Adt residues at positions 1 and 4, while its analog (Fc6Adt1) contains a single Adt at position 4, since the Adt at position 1 is substituted by an α-amino isobutyric acid (Aib) residue. This peptide design allowed us to explore the different electrochemical properties and morphologies shown by the two peptide layers immobilized on a gold surface by two (Fc6Adt2) or a single (Fc6Adt1) bidentate linker, respectively. The electrochemical activity of the ferrocenoyl probe embedded in the peptide film was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and square wave voltammetry, while the binding and the morphology of the peptide layers were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM), respectively. Significant differences were observed in the electron transfer (ET) properties of the two peptides investigated, which emerge from the diverging morphology achieved by the peptide layers on the gold surface. It was found that while a standing-up configuration of the peptide layer, realized by a single bidentate linkage, maximizes the ET efficiency, a lying down configuration (two Adt linkages) allows for precise positioning of Fc in the proximity of a gold surface.

  5. The twilight zone of cis element alignments.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Sequence alignment of proteins and nucleic acids is a routine task in bioinformatics. Although the comparison of complete peptides, genes or genomes can be undertaken with a great variety of tools, the alignment of short DNA sequences and motifs entails pitfalls that have not been fully addressed yet. Here we confront the structural superposition of transcription factors with the sequence alignment of their recognized cis elements. Our goals are (i) to test TFcompare (http://floresta.eead.csic.es/tfcompare), a structural alignment method for protein-DNA complexes; (ii) to benchmark the pairwise alignment of regulatory elements; (iii) to define the confidence limits and the twilight zone of such alignments and (iv) to evaluate the relevance of these thresholds with elements obtained experimentally. We find that the structure of cis elements and protein-DNA interfaces is significantly more conserved than their sequence and measures how this correlates with alignment errors when only sequence information is considered. Our results confirm that DNA motifs in the form of matrices produce better alignments than individual sequences. Finally, we report that empirical and theoretically derived twilight thresholds are useful for estimating the natural plasticity of regulatory sequences, and hence for filtering out unreliable alignments.

  6. Alignment technology for backside integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J.; Kulse, P.; Haak, U.; Old, G.; Scheuring, G.; Döbereiner, St.; Hillmann, F.; Brück, H.-J.; Kaynak, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Marschmeyer, St.; Birkholz, M.; Schulz, K.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a backside-to-frontside alignment technique for the backside processing of Si wafers. Integrated MEMS components like BiCMOS-embedded RF-MEMS switches require accurate (1-2μm) alignment. We demonstrate an alignment technique providing overlay values of less than 500 nm by using a backside alignment layer. The approach is enabled by a new non-contact wafer pre-alignment system of the Nikon Scanner S207D allowing precise loading (<5μm) of the wafer onto the exposure stage. Before starting the back-side MEMS process, the misalignment between frontside devices and backside alignment layer has to be measured. The alignment errors are applied as lithography overlay corrections to the backside MEMS process. For the specific application of deep Si etching (Bosch process), moreover, one has to consider the etch profile angle deviation across the wafer (tilting), which turned out in our experiments to amount up to 8 μm. During initial experiments with a Nikon i-line stepper NSR-2205 i- 11D the overlay has been corrected by the stepper offset parameters. These parameters have been obtained by summing up both the wafer and intra-field scaling errors caused by deep Si etching and backside-to-frontside alignment errors. Misalignments and tilting errors were all measured with a MueTec MT 3000 IR optical metrology system using overlay marks. The developed alignment technique is applied to BiCMOS-embedded MEMS devices, i.e. mm-wave RF switches and a viscosity sensor chip based on the IHP's high-speed SiGe technology. It turned out to be very promising for backside processed MEMS components with critical alignment requirements.

  7. Variations in the Electrostatic Landscape of Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen Molecule Induced by Modifications in the Myelin Basic Protein Peptide: A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, William A.; Galindo, Johan F.; Ortiz, Marysol; Villaveces, José L.; Daza, Edgar E.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2009-01-01

    The receptor-ligand interactions involved in the formation of the complex between Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules and antigenic peptides, which are essential for establishing an adaptive immunological response, were analyzed in the Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) peptide complex (HLA-DRβ1*1501-MBP) using a multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach. The Human Leukocyte Antigen - peptide complex system was divided into four pockets together with their respective peptide fragment and the corresponding occupying amino acid was replaced by each of the remaining 19 amino acids. Partial atomic charges were calculated by a quantum chemistry approach at the Hatree Fock/3-21*G level, to study the behavior of monopole, dipole and quadrupole electrostatic multipolar moments. Two types of electrostatic behavior were distinguished in the pockets' amino acids: “anchoring” located in Pocket 1 and 4, and “recognition” located in Pocket 4 and 7. According to variations in the electrostatic landscape, pockets were ordered as: Pocket 1>Pocket 9≫Pocket 4≈Pocket 7 which is in agreement with the binding ability reported for Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex pockets. In the same way, amino acids occupying the polymorphic positions β13R, β26F, β28D, β9W, β74A, β47F and β57D were shown to be key for this Receptor-Ligand interaction. The results show that the multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach is appropriate for characterizing receptor-ligand interactions in the MHC–antigenic peptide complex, which could have potential implications for synthetic vaccine design. PMID:19132105

  8. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  9. Photo-cross-linking approach to engineering small tyrosine-containing peptide hydrogels with enhanced mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yin; Li, Ying; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-29

    Peptide-based supramolecular hydrogels have been extensively explored in biomaterials owing to their unique bioactive, stimulus-responsive, and biocompatible features. However, peptide-based hydrogels often have low mechanical stability with storage moduli of 10-1000 Pa. They are susceptible to mechanical destruction and solvent erosion, greatly hindering their practical application. Here, we present a photo-cross-linking strategy to enhance the mechanical stability of a peptide-based hydrogel by 10(4)-fold with a storage modulus of ~100 kPa, which is one of the highest reported so far for hydrogels made of small peptide molecules. This method is based on the ruthenium-complex-catalyzed conversion of tyrosine to dityrosine upon light irradiation. The reinforcement of the hydrogel through photo-cross-linking can be achieved within 2 min thanks to the fast reaction kinetics. The enhancement of the mechanical stability was due to the formation of a densely entangled fibrous network of peptide dimers through a dityrosine linkage. We showed that in order to implement this method successfully, the peptide sequence should be rationally designed to avoid the cross talk between self-assembly and cross-linking. This method is convenient and versatile for the enhancement of the mechanical stability of tyrosine-containing peptide-based hydrogels. We anticipate that the photo-cross-linked supramolecular hydrogels with much improved mechanical stability will find broad applications in tissue engineering and drug controlled release.

  10. Moving Away from the Reference Genome: Evaluating a Peptide Sequencing Tagging Approach for Single Amino Acid Polymorphism Identifications in the Genus Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Paul E; Adams, Rachel M; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity across natural populations of the model organism, Populus, is extensive, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism roughly every 200 base pairs. When deviations from the reference genome occur in coding regions, they can impact protein sequences. Rather than relying on a static reference database to profile protein expression, we employed a peptide sequence tagging (PST) approach capable of decoding the plasticity of the Populus proteome. Using shotgun proteomics data from two genotypes of P. trichocarpa, a tag-based approach enabled the detection of 6,653 unexpected sequence variants. Through manual validation, our study investigated how the most abundant chemical modification (methionine oxidation) could masquerade as a sequence variant (AlaSer) when few site-determining ions existed. In fact, precise localization of an oxidation site for peptides with more than one potential placement was indeterminate for 70% of the MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate that additional fragment ions made available by high energy collisional dissociation enhances the robustness of the peptide sequence tagging approach (81% of oxidation events could be exclusively localized to a methionine). We are confident that augmenting fragmentation processes for a PST approach will further improve the identification of single amino acid polymorphism in Populus and potentially other species as well.

  11. New approach for development of sensitive and environmentally friendly immunoassay for mycotoxin fumonisin B(1) based on using peptide-MBP fusion protein as substitute for coating antigen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chen, Bo; He, Qing-hua; Qiu, Yu-Lou; Liu, Xing; He, Zhen-yun; Xiong, Zheng-ping

    2014-08-19

    Here, on the basis of mimotope of small analytes, we demonstrated a new approach for development of sensitive and environmentally friendly immunoassay for toxic small analytes based on the peptide-MBP fusion protein. In this work, using mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) as a model hapten, phage displayed peptide (mimotope) that binds to the anti-FB1 antibody were selected by biopanning from a 12-mer peptide library. The DNA coding for the sequence of peptide was cloned into Escherichia coli ER2738 as a fusion protein with a maltose binding protein (MBP). The prepared peptide-MBP fusion protein are "clonable" homogeneous and FB1-free products and can be used as a coating antigen in the immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration of the quantitative immunoassay setup with fusion protein (F1-MBP and F15-MBP) was 2.15 ± 0.13 ng/mL and 1.26 ± 0.08 ng/mL, respectively. The fusion protein (F1-MBP) was also used to develop a qualitative Elispot assay with a cutoff level of 2.5 ng/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than that measured for chemically synthesized FB1-BSA conjugates based Elispot immunoassay. The peptide-MBP fusion protein not only can be prepared reproducibly as homogeneous and FB1-free products in a large-scale but also can contribute to the development of a highly sensitive immunoassay for analyzing FB1. Furthermore, the novel concept might provide potential applications to a general method for the immunoassay of various toxic small molecules.

  12. Aligning for Innovation - Alignment Strategy to Drive Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hurel; Teltschik, David; Bussey, Horace, Jr.; Moy, James

    2010-01-01

    With the sudden need for innovation that will help the country achieve its long-term space exploration objectives, the question of whether NASA is aligned effectively to drive the innovation that it so desperately needs to take space exploration to the next level should be entertained. Authors such as Robert Kaplan and David North have noted that companies that use a formal system for implementing strategy consistently outperform their peers. They have outlined a six-stage management systems model for implementing strategy, which includes the aligning of the organization towards its objectives. This involves the alignment of the organization from the top down. This presentation will explore the impacts of existing U.S. industrial policy on technological innovation; assess the current NASA organizational alignment and its impacts on driving technological innovation; and finally suggest an alternative approach that may drive the innovation needed to take the world to the next level of space exploration, with NASA truly leading the way.

  13. Accelerator and transport line survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are introduced and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations. Various approaches to smoothing used at major laboratories are discussed. 47 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Strategy-aligned fuzzy approach for market segment evaluation and selection: a modular decision support system by dynamic network process (DNP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi Nasrabadi, Ali; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimnejad, Sadoullah

    2013-05-01

    In competitive markets, market segmentation is a critical point of business, and it can be used as a generic strategy. In each segment, strategies lead companies to their targets; thus, segment selection and the application of the appropriate strategies over time are very important to achieve successful business. This paper aims to model a strategy-aligned fuzzy approach to market segment evaluation and selection. A modular decision support system (DSS) is developed to select an optimum segment with its appropriate strategies. The suggested DSS has two main modules. The first one is SPACE matrix which indicates the risk of each segment. Also, it determines the long-term strategies. The second module finds the most preferred segment-strategies over time. Dynamic network process is applied to prioritize segment-strategies according to five competitive force factors. There is vagueness in pairwise comparisons, and this vagueness has been modeled using fuzzy concepts. To clarify, an example is illustrated by a case study in Iran's coffee market. The results show that success possibility of segments could be different, and choosing the best ones could help companies to be sure in developing their business. Moreover, changing the priority of strategies over time indicates the importance of long-term planning. This fact has been supported by a case study on strategic priority difference in short- and long-term consideration.

  15. An enzyme-assisted nanoparticle crosslinking approach to enhance the mechanical strength of peptide-based supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Ding, Yin; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-01

    In this work we reported an enzyme-assisted nanoparticle crosslinking (EANC) strategy to enhance the mechanical stability of peptide-based supramolecular hydrogels by more than 3000 times. PMID:23948779

  16. Development of surface modified biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles to deliver GSE24.2 peptide to cells: a promising approach for the treatment of defective telomerase disorders.

    PubMed

    Egusquiaguirre, Susana P; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Iarriccio, Laura; Carbajo, Daniel; Albericio, Fernando; Royo, Miriam; Pedraz, José Luís; Hernández, Rosa M; Perona, Rosario; Igartua, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel strategy to deliver intracellularly the peptide GSE24.2 for the treatment of Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and other defective telomerase disorders. For this purpose, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA NPs) or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly ethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG NPs) attached to either polycations or cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) were prepared in order to increase their cellular uptake. The particles exhibited an adequate size and zeta potential, with good peptide loading and a biphasic pattern obtained in the in vitro release assay, showing an initial burst release and a later sustained release. GSE24.2 structural integrity after encapsulation was assessed using SDS-PAGE, revealing an unaltered peptide after the NPs elaboration. According to the cytotoxicity results, cell viability was not affected by uncoated polymeric NPs, but the incorporation of surface modifiers slightly decreased the viability of cells. The intracellular uptake exhibited a remarkable improvement of the internalization, when the NPs were conjugated to the CPPs. Finally, the bioactivity, addressed by measuring DNA damage rescue and telomerase reactivation, showed that some formulations had the lowest cytotoxicity and highest biological activity. These results proved that GSE24.2-loaded NPs could be delivered to cells, and therefore, become an effective approach for the treatment of DC and other defective telomerase syndromes. PMID:25660910

  17. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  18. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  19. Target alignment in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.; Bliss, E.S.; Murray, J.E.

    1994-06-06

    Accurate placement of hundreds of focused laser beams on target is necessary to achieve success in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The current system requirement is {le}7 {mu}rad error in output pointing and {le}1 mm error in focusing. To accommodate several system shots per day, a target alignment system must be able to align the target to chamber center, inject an alignment beam to represent each shot beam, and point and focus the alignment beams onto the target in about one hour. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have developed a target alignment concept and built a prototype to validate the approach. The concept comprises three systems: the chamber center reference, target alignment sensor, and target alignment beams.

  20. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  1. A hierarchical coarse-grained (all-atom to all residue) approach to peptides (P1, P2) binding with a graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry; Kim, Sang; Naik, Rajesh

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Kim et al. [1] have found that peptides P1: HSSYWYAFNNKT and P2: EPLQLKM bind selectively to graphene surfaces and edges respectively which are critical in modulating both the mechanical as well as electronic transport properties of graphene. Such distinctions in binding sites (edge versus surface) observed in electron micrographs were verified by computer simulation by an all-atomic model that captures the pi-pi bonding. We propose a hierarchical approach that involves input from the all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) study (with atomistic detail) into a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation to extend this study further to a larger scale. The binding energy of a free amino acid with the graphene sheet from all-atom simulation is used in the interaction parameter for the coarse-grained approach. Peptide chain executes its stochastic motion with the Metropolis algorithm. We investigate a number of local and global physical quantities and find that peptide P1 is likely to bind more strongly to graphene sheet than P2 and that it is anchored by three residues ^4Y^5W^6Y. [1] S.N. Kim et al J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 14480 (2011).

  2. Simultaneous Alignment and Folding of Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; O'Donnell, Charles W.; Will, Sebastian; Devadas, Srinivas; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Accurate comparative analysis tools for low-homology proteins remains a difficult challenge in computational biology, especially sequence alignment and consensus folding problems. We present partiFold-Align, the first algorithm for simultaneous alignment and consensus folding of unaligned protein sequences; the algorithm's complexity is polynomial in time and space. Algorithmically, partiFold-Align exploits sparsity in the set of super-secondary structure pairings and alignment candidates to achieve an effectively cubic running time for simultaneous pairwise alignment and folding. We demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques on transmembrane β-barrel proteins, an important yet difficult class of proteins with few known three-dimensional structures. Testing against structurally derived sequence alignments, partiFold-Align significantly outperforms state-of-the-art pairwise and multiple sequence alignment tools in the most difficult low-sequence homology case. It also improves secondary structure prediction where current approaches fail. Importantly, partiFold-Align requires no prior training. These general techniques are widely applicable to many more protein families (partiFold-Align is available at http://partifold.csail.mit.edu/). PMID:24766258

  3. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  4. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  5. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  6. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  7. Conservation Analysis of Dengue Virus T-cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Candidates Using Peptide Block Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets of broadly covering antigens. Since T-cell epitopes are recognized as peptides rather than individual residues, this method is based on calculating the information content of blocks of peptides from a multiple sequence alignment of homologous proteins rather than using the information content of individual residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage of variant antigens. We applied the block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which cover 99% of available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides. In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008) resulted in 165 conserved 9-mer peptides. Many of the conserved blocks are located consecutively in the proteins. Connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides 110 comprised predicted HLA binder sets. In total, 457 subunit peptides that encompass the diversity of all sequenced DENV strains of which 333 are T-cell epitope candidates. PMID:22566858

  8. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  9. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  10. Silicification of peptide-coated silver nanoparticles--A Biomimetic soft chemistry approach toward chiral hybrid core-shell materials.

    PubMed

    Graf, Philipp; Mantion, Alexandre; Haase, Andrea; Thünemann, Andreas F; Masić, Admir; Meier, Wolfgang; Luch, Andreas; Taubert, Andreas

    2011-02-22

    Silica and silver nanoparticles are relevant materials for new applications in optics, medicine, and analytical chemistry. We have previously reported the synthesis of pH responsive, peptide-templated, chiral silver nanoparticles. The current report shows that peptide-stabilized nanoparticles can easily be coated with a silica shell by exploiting the ability of the peptide coating to hydrolyze silica precursors such as TEOS or TMOS. The resulting silica layer protects the nanoparticles from chemical etching, allows their inclusion in other materials, and renders them biocompatible. Using electron and atomic force microscopy, we show that the silica shell thickness and the particle aggregation can be controlled simply by the reaction time. Small-angle X ray scattering confirms the Ag/peptide@silica core-shell structure. UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy prove the conservation of the silver nanoparticle chirality upon silicification. Biological tests show that the biocompatibility in simple bacterial systems is significantly improved once a silica layer is deposited on the silver particles.

  11. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance. PMID:23519660

  12. A bottom-up approach to build the hyperpolarizability of peptides and proteins from their amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duboisset, Julien; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Benichou, Emmanuel; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Lascoux, Noelle; Jonin, Christian; Hache, François; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-08-29

    We experimentally demonstrate that some peptides and proteins lend themselves to an elementary analysis where their first hyperpolarizability can be decomposed into the coherent superposition of the first hyperpolarizability of their elementary units. We then show that those elementary units can be associated with the amino acids themselves in the case of nonaromatic amino acids and nonresonant second harmonic generation. As a case study, this work investigates the experimentally determined first hyperpolarizability of rat tail Type I collagen and compares it to that of the shorter peptide [(PPG)10]3, where P and G are the one-letter code for Proline and Glycine, respectively, and that of the triamino acid peptides PPG and GGG. An absolute value of (0.16 ± 0.01) × 10(-30) esu for the first hyperpolarizability of nonaromatic amino acids is then obtained by using the newly defined 0.087 × 10(-30) esu reference value for water. By using a collagen like model, the microscopic hyperpolarizability along the peptide bond can be evaluated at (0.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-30) esu. PMID:23879840

  13. Strategies for active alignment of lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Wilde, Chrisitan; Hahne, Felix; Lüerß, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Today's optical systems require up-to-date assembly and joining technology. The trend of keeping dimensions as small as possible while maintaining or increasing optical imaging performance leaves little to no room for mechanical lens adjustment equipment that may remain in the final product. In this context active alignment of optical elements opens up possibilities for the fast and cost-economic manufacturing of lenses and lens assemblies with highest optical performance. Active alignment for lens manufacturing is the precise alignment of the optical axis of a lens with respect to an optical or mechanical reference axis (e.g. housing) including subsequent fixation by glue. In this contribution we will describe different approaches for active alignment and outline strengths and limitations of the different methods. Using the SmartAlign principle, highest quality cemented lenses can be manufactured without the need for high precision prealignment, while the reduction to a single alignment step greatly reduces the cycle time. The same strategies can also be applied to bonding processes. Lenses and lens groups can be aligned to both mechanical and optical axes to maximize the optical performance of a given assembly. In hybrid assemblies using both mechanical tolerances and active alignment, SmartAlign can be used to align critical lens elements anywhere inside the system for optimized total performance. Since all geometrical parameters are re-measured before each alignment, this process is especially suited for complex and time-consuming production processes where the stability of the reference axis would otherwise be critical. For highest performance, lenses can be actively aligned using up to five degrees of freedom. In this way, SmartAlign enables the production of ultra-precise mounted lenses with an alignment precision below 1 μm.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  15. Achieving Organisational Change through Values Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to, first, establish the interdependency between the successful achievement of organisational change and the attainment of values alignment within an organisation's culture and then, second, to describe an effective means for attaining such values alignment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature from the…

  16. MAVID multiple alignment server.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicolas; Pachter, Lior

    2003-07-01

    MAVID is a multiple alignment program suitable for many large genomic regions. The MAVID web server allows biomedical researchers to quickly obtain multiple alignments for genomic sequences and to subsequently analyse the alignments for conserved regions. MAVID has been successfully used for the alignment of closely related species such as primates and also for the alignment of more distant organisms such as human and fugu. The server is fast, capable of aligning hundreds of kilobases in less than a minute. The multiple alignment is used to build a phylogenetic tree for the sequences, which is subsequently used as a basis for identifying conserved regions in the alignment. The server can be accessed at http://baboon.math.berkeley.edu/mavid/.

  17. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  18. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2011-09-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  19. Liquid crystal alignment in cylindrical microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychłowski, M.; Yaroshchuk, O.; Kravchuk, R.; Woliński, T.

    2012-03-01

    A variety of alignment configurations of liquid crystals (LCs) inside the glassy cylindrical capillaries is realized by using alignment materials providing different anchoring. The radial configuration with central disclination line is obtained for homeotropic boundary conditions. In turn, the axial, transversal and tilted alignment structures are realized by using materials for planar anchoring. The uniformity and controlling of the latter structures were provided by photoalignment method. This approach can be further used to control LC alignment in the photonic crystal fibers recognized as advanced elements for different optical devices.

  20. Multiple alignment using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    A simulated annealing method is described for training hidden Markov models and producing multiple sequence alignments from initially unaligned protein or DNA sequences. Simulated annealing in turn uses a dynamic programming algorithm for correctly sampling suboptimal multiple alignments according to their probability and a Boltzmann temperature factor. The quality of simulated annealing alignments is evaluated on structural alignments of ten different protein families, and compared to the performance of other HMM training methods and the ClustalW program. Simulated annealing is better able to find near-global optima in the multiple alignment probability landscape than the other tested HMM training methods. Neither ClustalW nor simulated annealing produce consistently better alignments compared to each other. Examination of the specific cases in which ClustalW outperforms simulated annealing, and vice versa, provides insight into the strengths and weaknesses of current hidden Maxkov model approaches.

  1. Folding and membrane insertion of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin occur as a concerted process.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Matthew R; Damianoglou, Angeliki; Rodger, Alison; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2008-11-01

    Many antibiotic peptides function by binding and inserting into membranes. Understanding this process provides an insight into the fundamentals of both membrane protein folding and antibiotic peptide function. For the first time, in this work, flow-aligned linear dichroism (LD) is used to study the folding of the antibiotic peptide gramicidin. LD provides insight into the combined processes of peptide folding and insertion and has the advantage over other similar techniques of being insensitive to off-membrane aggregation events. By combining LD data with conventional measurements of protein fluorescence and circular dichroism, the mechanism of gramicidin insertion is elucidated. The mechanism consists of five separately assignable steps that include formation of a water-insoluble gramicidin aggregate, dissociation from the aggregate, partitioning of peptide to the membrane surface, oligomerisation on the surface and concerted insertion and folding of the peptide to the double-helical form of gramicidin. Measurement of the rates of each step shows that although changes in the fluorescence signal cease 10 s after the initiation of the process, the insertion of the peptide into the membrane is actually not complete for a further 60 min. This last membrane insertion phase is only apparent by measurement of LD and circular dichroism signal changes. In summary, this study demonstrates the importance of multi-technique approaches, including LD, in studies of membrane protein folding.

  2. A Novel Peptide Binding Prediction Approach for HLA-DR Molecule Based on Sequence and Structural Information.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Zhao, Yilei; Pan, Gaofeng; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    MHC molecule plays a key role in immunology, and the molecule binding reaction with peptide is an important prerequisite for T cell immunity induced. MHC II molecules do not have conserved residues, so they appear as open grooves. As a consequence, this will increase the difficulty in predicting MHC II molecules binding peptides. In this paper, we aim to propose a novel prediction method for MHC II molecules binding peptides. First, we calculate sequence similarity and structural similarity between different MHC II molecules. Then, we reorder pseudosequences according to descending similarity values and use a weight calculation formula to calculate new pocket profiles. Finally, we use three scoring functions to predict binding cores and evaluate the accuracy of prediction to judge performance of each scoring function. In the experiment, we set a parameter α in the weight formula. By changing α value, we can observe different performances of each scoring function. We compare our method with the best function to some popular prediction methods and ultimately find that our method outperforms them in identifying binding cores of HLA-DR molecules. PMID:27340658

  3. Mimicking of Arginine by Functionalized N(ω)-Carbamoylated Arginine As a New Broadly Applicable Approach to Labeled Bioactive Peptides: High Affinity Angiotensin, Neuropeptide Y, Neuropeptide FF, and Neurotensin Receptor Ligands As Examples.

    PubMed

    Keller, Max; Kuhn, Kilian K; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Biselli, Sabrina; Mollereau, Catherine; Wifling, David; Svobodová, Jaroslava; Bernhardt, Günther; Cabrele, Chiara; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; Gmeiner, Peter; Buschauer, Armin

    2016-03-10

    Derivatization of biologically active peptides by conjugation with fluorophores or radionuclide-bearing moieties is an effective and commonly used approach to prepare molecular tools and diagnostic agents. Whereas lysine, cysteine, and N-terminal amino acids have been mostly used for peptide conjugation, we describe a new, widely applicable approach to peptide conjugation based on the nonclassical bioisosteric replacement of the guanidine group in arginine by a functionalized carbamoylguanidine moiety. Four arginine-containing peptide receptor ligands (angiotensin II, neurotensin(8-13), an analogue of the C-terminal pentapeptide of neuropeptide Y, and a neuropeptide FF analogue) were subject of this proof-of-concept study. The N(ω)-carbamoylated arginines, bearing spacers with a terminal amino group, were incorporated into the peptides by standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. The synthesized chemically stable peptide derivatives showed high receptor affinities with Ki values in the low nanomolar range, even when bulky fluorophores had been attached. Two new tritiated tracers for angiotensin and neurotensin receptors are described.

  4. CARNA--alignment of RNA structure ensembles.

    PubMed

    Sorescu, Dragos Alexandru; Möhl, Mathias; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf; Will, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Due to recent algorithmic progress, tools for the gold standard of comparative RNA analysis, namely Sankoff-style simultaneous alignment and folding, are now readily applicable. Such approaches, however, compare RNAs with respect to a simultaneously predicted, single, nested consensus structure. To make multiple alignment of RNAs available in cases, where this limitation of the standard approach is critical, we introduce a web server that provides a complete and convenient interface to the RNA structure alignment tool 'CARNA'. This tool uniquely supports RNAs with multiple conserved structures per RNA and aligns pseudoknots intrinsically; these features are highly desirable for aligning riboswitches, RNAs with conserved folding pathways, or pseudoknots. We represent structural input and output information as base pair probability dot plots; this provides large flexibility in the input, ranging from fixed structures to structure ensembles, and enables immediate visual analysis of the results. In contrast to conventional Sankoff-style approaches, 'CARNA' optimizes all structural similarities in the input simultaneously, for example across an entire RNA structure ensemble. Even compared with already costly Sankoff-style alignment, 'CARNA' solves an intrinsically much harder problem by applying advanced, constraint-based, algorithmic techniques. Although 'CARNA' is specialized to the alignment of RNAs with several conserved structures, its performance on RNAs in general is on par with state-of-the-art general-purpose RNA alignment tools, as we show in a Bralibase 2.1 benchmark. The web server is freely available at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/CARNA. PMID:22689637

  5. Directed peptide amphiphile assembly using aqueous liquid crystal templates in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    van der Asdonk, Pim; Keshavarz, Masoumeh; Christianen, Peter C M; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-21

    An alignment technique based on the combination of magnetic fields and a liquid crystal (LC) template uses the advantages of both approaches: the magnetic fields offer non-contact methods that apply to all sample sizes and shapes, whilst the LC templates offer high susceptibilities. The combination introduces a route to control the spatial organization of materials with low intrinsic susceptibilities. We demonstrate that we can unidirectionally align one such material, peptide amphiphiles in water, on a centimeter scale at a tenfold lower magnetic field by using a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal as a template. We can transform the aligned supramolecular assemblies into optically active π-conjugated polymers after photopolymerization. Lastly, by reducing the magnetic field strength needed for addressing these assemblies, we are able to create more complex structures by initiating self-assembly of our supramolecular materials under competing alignment forces between the magnetically induced alignment of the assemblies (with a positive diamagnetic anisotropy) and the elastic force dominated alignment of the template (with a negative diamagnetic anisotropy), which is directed orthogonally. Although the approach is still in its infancy and many critical parameters need optimization, we believe that it is a very promising technique to create tailor-made complex structures of (aqueous) functional soft matter. PMID:27320385

  6. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  7. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  8. Facile solid-phase synthesis of sulfated tyrosine-containing peptides: Part II. Total synthesis of human big gastrin-II and its C-terminal glycine-extended peptide (G34-Gly sulfate) by the solid-phase segment condensation approach.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, K; Aida, C; Fujiwara, H; Yagami, T; Futaki, S

    2001-08-01

    Application of the fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-based solid-phase segment condensation approach to the preparation of sulfated peptides was investigated through the synthesis of human big gastrin-II, a 34-residue sulfated tyrosine [Tyr(SO3H)]-containing peptide. Highly acid-sensitive 2-chlorotrityl resin (Clt resin) was exclusively employed as an anchor-resin for the preparation of the three peptide segments having the C-terminal Pro residue as well as of the Tyr(SO3H)-containing resin-bound segment. By using the PyBOP-mediated coupling protocol [PyBOP=benzotriazolyloxytris(pyrrolidino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphatel, we successively condensed each segment and constructed the 34-residue peptide-resin without any difficulty. The final acid treatment of the fully protected peptide-resin at low temperature (90% aqueous TFA, 0 degree C for 8 h), which can detach a Tyr(SO3H)-containing peptide from the resin and remove the protecting groups concurrently with minimum deterioration of the sulfate, afforded a crude sulfated peptide. After one-step HPLC purification, a highly homogeneous human big gastrin-II was easily obtained in 14% yield from the protected peptide-resin. The sulfate form of the C-terminal glycine-extended gastrin (G34-Gly sulfate), a posttranslational processing intermediate of gastrin-II, was also successfully prepared with the segment condensation approach (11% yield). These results demonstrated the usefulness of the segment condensation protocol for preparing large Tyr(SO3H)-containing peptides.

  9. Targeted Peptide Measurements in Biology and Medicine: Best Practices for Mass Spectrometry-based Assay Development Using a Fit-for-Purpose Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Steven A.; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Domon, Bruno; Deutsch, Eric W.; Grant, Russel; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Huttenhain, Ruth; Koomen, John M.; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; MacLean, Brendan; Mani, DR; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Neubert, Hendrik; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Reiter, Lukas; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh N.; Bethem, Robert; Blonder, Josip; Boja, Emily; Botelho, Julianne; Boyne, Michael; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Chan, Daniel W.; Keshishian, Hasmik; Kuhn, Eric; Kingsinger, Christopher R.; Lee, Jerry S.; Lee, Sang-Won; Moritz, Robert L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Rifai, Nader; Ritchie, James E.; Rodriguez, Henry; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Townsend, Reid; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Whiteley, Gordon; Wiita, Arun; Weintraub, Susan

    2014-01-14

    Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this “fit-for-purpose” approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and

  10. Targeted Peptide Measurements in Biology and Medicine: Best Practices for Mass Spectrometry-based Assay Development Using a Fit-for-Purpose Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Steven A.; Abbatiello, Susan E.; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Borchers, Christoph; Domon, Bruno; Deutsch, Eric W.; Grant, Russell P.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Koomen, John M.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Liu, Tao; MacLean, Brendan; Mani, DR; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Neubert, Hendrik; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Reiter, Lukas; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh; Bethem, Robert; Blonder, Josip; Boja, Emily; Botelho, Julianne; Boyne, Michael; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Chan, Daniel; Keshishian, Hasmik; Kuhn, Eric; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Lee, Sang-Won; Moritz, Robert; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Rifai, Nader; Ritchie, James; Rodriguez, Henry; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Townsend, R. Reid; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Whiteley, Gordon; Wiita, Arun; Weintraub, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this “fit-for-purpose” approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and

  11. Hybrid in Silico/in Vitro Approach for the Identification of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides from Parma Dry-Cured Ham.

    PubMed

    Dellafiora, Luca; Paolella, Sara; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Dossena, Arnaldo; Cozzini, Pietro; Galaverna, Gianni

    2015-07-22

    The bioactivity assessment of foodborne peptides is currently a research area of great relevance, and, in particular, several studies are devoted to the antihypertensive effects through the inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE). In the present work, a straightforward workflow to identify inhibitory peptides from food matrices is proposed, which involves a hybrid in vitro/in silico tandem approach. Parma dry-cured ham was chosen as case study. In particular, the advantage of using the hybrid approach to identify active sequences (in comparison to the experimental trials alone) has been pointed out. Specifically, fractions obtained by in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of ham samples of 18 and 24 months of aging have been assessed for ACE inhibition. At the same time, the released peptidomic profiles, which cannot be entirely evaluated by using in vitro assays, have been screened for the inhibition by using an in silico model. Then, to identify novel inhibitory sequences, a series of strong candidates have been synthesized and assessed for their inhibitory activity through in vitro assay. On the one hand, the use of computational simulations appeared to be an effective strategy to find active sequences, as confirmed by in vitro analysis. On the other hand, strong inhibitory sequences were identified for the first time in Parma dry-cured ham (e.g., LGL and SFVTT with IC50 values of 145 and 395 μM, respectively), which is a product of international dietary and economic relevance. Therefore, these findings demonstrate the usefulness of in silico methodologies coupled to in vitro tests for the identification of potentially bioactive peptides, and they give an important contribution to the study of the overall nutritional value of Parma ham.

  12. Targeting RNA with cysteine-constrained peptides

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Virginia A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Basso, Anne; Cavanagh, John; Melander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    A combined approach for targeting RNA with novel, biologically active ligands has been developed using a cyclic peptide library and in silico modeling. This approach has successfully identified novel cyclic peptide constructs that can target bTAR RNA. Subsequently, RNA/peptide interactions were effectively modeled using the HADDOCK docking program. PMID:18065222

  13. A general approach to controlled alignment of filamentous supra-biomolecular assemblies into centimeter-scale highly-ordered patterns through nature-inspired magnetic guidance

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Binrui; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    We took the advantage of the capability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) being aligned along a magnetic field and reproducibly generated large scale bio-nanofiber assemblies with the orientation of the constituent bio-nanofibers defined by the applied magnetic field. When decorated by MNPs, bio-nanofibers could be guided by the external magnetic field to become oriented either horizontally or vertically, forming single- and multi-orientation layered assemblies. PMID:24115320

  14. Comparison of marmoset and human FSH using synthetic peptides of the β-subunit L2 loop region and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kutteyil, Susha S; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Mojidra, Rahul; Joseph, Shaini; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a glycoprotein hormone required for female and male gametogenesis in vertebrates. Common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate monkey, used as animal model in biomedical research. Observations like, requirement of extremely high dose of human FSH in marmosets for superovulation compared to other primates and generation of antibodies in marmoset against human FSH after repeated superovulation cycles, point towards the possibility that FSH-FSH receptor (FSHR) interaction in marmosets might be different than in the humans. In this study we attempted to understand some of these structural differences using FSH peptides and anti-peptide antibody approach. Based on sequence alignment, in silico modeling and docking studies, L2 loop of FSH β-subunit (L2β) was found to be different between marmoset and human. Hence, peptides corresponding to region 32-50 of marmoset and human L2β loop were synthesized, purified and characterized. The peptides displayed dissimilarity in terms of molecular mass, predicted isoelectric point, predicted charge and in the ability to inhibit hormone-receptor interaction. Polyclonal antibodies generated against both the peptides were found to exhibit specific binding for the corresponding peptide and parent FSH in ELISA and Western blotting respectively and exhibited negligible reactivity to cross-species peptide and FSH in ELISA. The anti-peptide antibody against marmoset FSH was also able to detect native FSH in marmoset plasma samples and pituitary sections. In summary, the L2β loop of marmoset and human FSH has distinct receptor interaction ability and immunoreactivity indicating possibility of subtle conformational and biochemical differences between the two regions which may affect the FSH-FSHR interaction in these two primates. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282136

  15. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  16. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo . E-mail: ysbae04@skku.edu

    2006-05-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused {beta}-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-{beta}-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material.

  17. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  18. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  19. An integrated, peptide-based approach to site-specific protein immobilization for detection of biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Ilmar C; Löwik, Dennis W P M; Boelens, Wilbert C; van Hest, Jan C M; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2016-09-21

    We have developed an integrated solution for the site-specific immobilization of proteins on a biosensor surface, which may be widely applicable for high throughput analytical purposes. The gold surface of a biosensor was coated with an anti-fouling layer of zwitterionic peptide molecules from which leucine zipper peptides protrude. Proteins of interest, the autoantigenic proteins La and U1A, were immobilized via a simple incubation procedure by using the complementary leucine zipper sequence as a genetically fused binding tag. This tag forms a strong coiled-coil interaction that is stable during multiple consecutive measurements and under common regeneration conditions. Visualization of the immobilized proteins of interest via antibody binding with multiplex surface plasmon resonance imaging demonstrated 2.5 times higher binding responses than when these proteins were randomly attached to the surface via the commonly applied activated ester-mediated coupling. The proteins could also be immobilized in a leucine zipper-dependent manner directly from complex mixtures like bacterial lysates, eliminating the need for laborious purification steps. This method allows the production of uniform functional protein arrays by control over immobilized protein orientation and geometry and is compatible with high-throughput procedures.

  20. Sensitive Technique For Detecting Alignment Of Seed Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency response near resonance measured. Improved technique for detection and quantification of alignment of injection-seeding laser with associated power-oscillator laser proposed. Particularly useful in indicating alignment at spectral purity greater than 98 percent because it becomes more sensitive as perfect alignment approached. In addition, implemented relatively easily, without turning on power-oscillator laser.

  1. Identification of crucial hydrogen-bonding residues for the interaction of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase subunits via peptide display, mutational, and calorimetric approaches.

    PubMed

    Bridges, K G; Chow, C S; Coen, D M

    2001-06-01

    The catalytic subunit, Pol, of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase interacts via its extreme C terminus with the processivity subunit, UL42. This interaction is critical for viral replication and thus a potential target for antiviral drug action. To investigate the Pol-binding region on UL42, we engineered UL42 mutations but also used random peptide display to identify artificial ligands of the Pol C terminus. The latter approach selected ligands with homology to residues 171 to 176 of UL42. Substitution of glutamine 171 with alanine greatly impaired binding to Pol and stimulation of long-chain DNA synthesis by Pol, identifying this residue as crucial for subunit interactions. To study these interactions quantitatively, we used isothermal titration calorimetry and wild-type and mutant forms of Pol-derived peptides and UL42. Each of three peptides corresponding to either the last 36, 27, or 18 residues of Pol bound specifically to UL42 in a 1:1 complex with a dissociation constant of 1 to 2 microM. Thus, the last 18 residues suffice for most of the binding energy, which was due mainly to a change in enthalpy. Substitutions at positions corresponding to Pol residue 1228 or 1229 or at UL42 residue 171 abolished or greatly reduced binding. These residues participate in hydrogen bonds observed in the crystal structure of the C terminus of Pol bound to UL42. Thus, interruption of these few bonds is sufficient to disrupt the interaction, suggesting that small molecules targeting the relevant side chains could interfere with Pol-UL42 binding.

  2. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  3. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  4. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  5. Face Alignment via Regressing Local Binary Features.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shaoqing; Cao, Xudong; Wei, Yichen; Sun, Jian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient and accurate regression approach for face alignment. Our approach has two novel components: 1) a set of local binary features and 2) a locality principle for learning those features. The locality principle guides us to learn a set of highly discriminative local binary features for each facial landmark independently. The obtained local binary features are used to jointly learn a linear regression for the final output. This approach achieves the state-of-the-art results when tested on the most challenging benchmarks to date. Furthermore, because extracting and regressing local binary features are computationally very cheap, our system is much faster than previous methods. It achieves over 3000 frames per second (FPS) on a desktop or 300 FPS on a mobile phone for locating a few dozens of landmarks. We also study a key issue that is important but has received little attention in the previous research, which is the face detector used to initialize alignment. We investigate several face detectors and perform quantitative evaluation on how they affect alignment accuracy. We find that an alignment friendly detector can further greatly boost the accuracy of our alignment method, reducing the error up to 16% relatively. To facilitate practical usage of face detection/alignment methods, we also propose a convenient metric to measure how good a detector is for alignment initialization.

  6. A physicochemical approach for predicting the effectiveness of peptide-based gene delivery systems for use in plasmid-based gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, J G; Li, C; Shi, M; Logan, M J; Alila, H; Rolland, A; Tomlinson, E; Sparrow, J T; Smith, L C

    1998-01-01

    Novel synthetic peptides, based on carrier peptide analogs (YKAKnWK) and an amphipathic peptide (GLFEALLELLESLWELLLEA), have been formulated with DNA plasmids to create peptide-based gene delivery systems. The carrier peptides are used to condense plasmids into nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter (DH) ranging from 40 to 200 nm, which are sterically stable for over 100 h. Size and morphology of the carrier peptide/plasmid complex have been determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The amphipathic peptide is used as a pH-sensitive lytic agent to facilitate release of the plasmid from endosomes after endocytosis of the peptide/plasmid complex. Hemolysis assays have shown that the amphipathic peptide destabilizes lipid bilayers at low pH, mimicking the properties of viral fusogenic peptides. However, circular dichroism studies show that unlike the viral fusion peptides, this amphipathic peptide loses some of its alpha-helical structure at low pH in the presence of liposomes. The peptide-based gene delivery systems were tested for transfection efficiency in a variety of cell lines, including 14-day C2C12 mouse myotubes, using gene expression systems containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. Transfection data demonstrate a correlation between in vitro transfection efficiency and the combination of several physical properties of the peptide/plasmid complexes, including 1) DNA dose, 2) the zeta potential of the particle, 3) the requirement of both lytic and carrier peptides, and 4) the number of lysine residues associated with the carrier peptide. Transfection data on 14-day C2C12 myotubes utilizing the therapeutic human growth hormone gene formulated in an optimal peptide gene delivery system show an increase in gene expression over time, with a maximum in protein levels at 96 h (approximately 18 ng/ml). PMID:9635734

  7. Alignment algorithm for homology modeling and threading.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, N. N.; Luethy, R.

    1998-01-01

    A DNA/protein sequence comparison is a popular computational tool for molecular biologists. Finding a good alignment implies an evolutionary and/or functional relationship between proteins or genomic loci. Sequential similarity between two proteins indicates their structural resemblance, providing a practical approach for structural modeling, when structure of one of these proteins is known. The first step in the homology modeling is a construction of an accurate sequence alignment. The commonly used alignment algorithms do not provide an adequate treatment of the structurally mismatched residues in locally dissimilar regions. We propose a simple modification of the existing alignment algorithm which treats these regions properly and demonstrate how this modification improves sequence alignments in real proteins. PMID:9521100

  8. Some Alignment Considerations for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R

    2004-06-08

    Next Linear Collider type accelerators require a new level of alignment quality. The relative alignment of these machines is to be maintained in an error envelope dimensioned in micrometers and for certain parts in nanometers. In the nanometer domain our terra firma cannot be considered monolithic but compares closer to jelly. Since conventional optical alignment methods cannot deal with the dynamics and cannot approach the level of accuracy, special alignment and monitoring techniques must be pursued.

  9. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides

    PubMed Central

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L.; Otero-González, Anselmo J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  10. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides.

    PubMed

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L; Otero-González, Anselmo J

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  11. Genome alignment with graph data structures: a comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in rapid, low-cost sequencing have opened up the opportunity to study complete genome sequences. The computational approach of multiple genome alignment allows investigation of evolutionarily related genomes in an integrated fashion, providing a basis for downstream analyses such as rearrangement studies and phylogenetic inference. Graphs have proven to be a powerful tool for coping with the complexity of genome-scale sequence alignments. The potential of graphs to intuitively represent all aspects of genome alignments led to the development of graph-based approaches for genome alignment. These approaches construct a graph from a set of local alignments, and derive a genome alignment through identification and removal of graph substructures that indicate errors in the alignment. Results We compare the structures of commonly used graphs in terms of their abilities to represent alignment information. We describe how the graphs can be transformed into each other, and identify and classify graph substructures common to one or more graphs. Based on previous approaches, we compile a list of modifications that remove these substructures. Conclusion We show that crucial pieces of alignment information, associated with inversions and duplications, are not visible in the structure of all graphs. If we neglect vertex or edge labels, the graphs differ in their information content. Still, many ideas are shared among all graph-based approaches. Based on these findings, we outline a conceptual framework for graph-based genome alignment that can assist in the development of future genome alignment tools. PMID:24712884

  12. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  13. A statistical algorithm for assessing cellular alignment.

    PubMed

    Nectow, Alexander R; Gil, Eun Seok; Kaplan, David L; Kilmer, Misha E

    2013-03-01

    Current statistical techniques for analyzing cellular alignment data in the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering are limited because of heuristic and less quantitative approaches. For example, generally a cutoff degree limit (commonly 20 degrees) is arbitrarily defined within which cells are considered "aligned." The effectiveness of a patterned biomaterial in guiding the alignment of cells, such as neurons, is often critical to predict relationships between the biomaterial design and biological outcomes, both in vitro and in vivo. This becomes particularly important in the case of peripheral neurons, which require precise axon guidance to obtain successful regenerative outcomes. To address this issue, we have developed a protocol for processing cellular alignment data sets, which implicitly determines an "angle of alignment." This was accomplished as follows: cells "aligning" with an underlying, anisotropic scaffold display uniformly distributed angles up to a cutoff point determined by how effective the biomaterial is in aligning cells. Therefore, this fact was then used to determine where an alignment angle data set diverges from a uniform distribution. This was accomplished by measuring the spacing between the collected, increasingly ordered angles and analyzing their underlying distributions using a normalized cumulative periodogram criterion. The proposed protocol offers a novel way to implicitly define cellular alignment, with respect to various anisotropic biomaterials. This method may also offer an alternative to assess cellular alignment, which could offer improved predictive measures related to biological outcomes. Furthermore, the approach described can be used for a broad range of cell types grown on 2D surfaces, but would not be applicable to 3D scaffold systems in the present format.

  14. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    SciTech Connect

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  15. Hole-Aligning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  16. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  17. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  18. Structure diversification of vancomycin through peptide-catalyzed, site-selective lipidation: A catalysis-based approach to combat glycopeptide-resistant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, Sabesan; Miller, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of antibiotic-resistant infections highlights the need for novel antibiotic leads, perhaps with a broader spectrum of activity. Herein, we disclose a semisynthetic, catalytic approach for structure diversification of vancomycin. We have identified three unique peptide catalysts that exhibit site-selectivity for the lipidation of the aliphatic hydroxyls on vancomycin, generating three new derivatives 9a, 9b and 9c. Incorporation of lipid chains into vancomycin scaffold provides promising improvement of its bioactivity against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (Van A and Van B phenotypes of VRE). The MICs for 9a, 9b, and 9c against MRSA and VRE (Van B phenotype) range from 0.12 to 0.25 μg/mL. We have also performed a structure activity relationship (SAR) study to investigate the effect of lipid chain length at the newly accessible G4-OH derivatization site. PMID:25671771

  19. A combined tryptic peptide and winged peptide internal standard approach for the determination of α-lactalbumin in dairy products by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shiyun; Zhang, Jingshun; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Qi; Huang, Baifen; Ren, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    A robust ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method at peptide level was established for measuring α-lactalbumin in various dairy products. An isotope-labeled winged peptide (VKKILDKVG*INYW*LAHKALCSEKL) with extra amino acids of the sequence of signature peptide concatenated at each end as the internal standard was spiked in samples to participate in the whole tryptic digestion process. The peptide VG*INYW*LAHK that resulted from the isotope-labeled winged peptide was used as the final isotopically labeled internal standard of the α-lactalbumin signature peptide (VGINYWLAHK) during the quantitative analysis. The contents of α-lactalbumin in samples were calculated based on the equimolar relationship between the α-lactalbumin protein and signature peptide. The optimized molar ratio of trypsin to protein (1:60) and enzymatic digestion time (5 h) could not only improve the digestion efficiency and reduce the cost, but also minimize the period of sample pretreatment. Considering the robustness of the current method using the isotopically labeled internal standard and acceptable measurement cost, its application may promote the development of nutrient investigation and quality control of α-lactalbumin in dairy products. This protein analysis method might provide a new reference strategy for food analysis and quantitative protein analysis.

  20. A Unique Approach to Generate Self-Aligned SiO2/Ge/SiO2/SiGe Gate-Stacking Heterostructures in a Single Fabrication Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Ting; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Hsu, Ting-Chia; Liao, Po-Hsiang; George, Thomas; Li, Pei-Wen

    2015-05-01

    We report a first-of-its-kind, unique approach for generating a self-aligned, gate-stacking heterostructure of Ge quantum dot (QD)/SiO2/SiGe shell on Si in a single fabrication step. The 4-nm-thick SiO2 layer between the Ge QD and SiGe shell fabricated during the single-step process is the result of an exquisitely controlled dynamic balance between the fluxes of oxygen and silicon interstitials. The high-quality interface properties of our "designer" heterostructure are evidenced by the low interface trap density of as low as 2-4 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1 and superior transfer characteristics measured for Ge-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Thanks to the very thin interfacial SiO2 layer, carrier storage within the Ge QDs with good memory endurance was established under relatively low-voltage programming/erasing conditions. We hope that our unique self-aligned, gate-stacking heterostructure provides an effective approach for the production of next-generation, high-performance Ge gate/SiO2/SiGe channel MOSFETs.

  1. A Unique Approach to Generate Self-Aligned SiO2/Ge/SiO2/SiGe Gate-Stacking Heterostructures in a Single Fabrication Step.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Ting; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Hsu, Ting-Chia; Liao, Po-Hsiang; George, Thomas; Li, Pei-Wen

    2015-01-01

    We report a first-of-its-kind, unique approach for generating a self-aligned, gate-stacking heterostructure of Ge quantum dot (QD)/SiO2/SiGe shell on Si in a single fabrication step. The 4-nm-thick SiO2 layer between the Ge QD and SiGe shell fabricated during the single-step process is the result of an exquisitely controlled dynamic balance between the fluxes of oxygen and silicon interstitials. The high-quality interface properties of our "designer" heterostructure are evidenced by the low interface trap density of as low as 2-4 × 10(11) cm(-2) eV(-1) and superior transfer characteristics measured for Ge-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Thanks to the very thin interfacial SiO2 layer, carrier storage within the Ge QDs with good memory endurance was established under relatively low-voltage programming/erasing conditions. We hope that our unique self-aligned, gate-stacking heterostructure provides an effective approach for the production of next-generation, high-performance Ge gate/SiO2/SiGe channel MOSFETs.

  2. Selective targeting of glucagon-like peptide-1 signalling as a novel therapeutic approach for cardiovascular disease in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Mitchel; Chong, Aaron; Robinson, Emma; Green, Brian D; Grieve, David J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone whose glucose-dependent insulinotropic actions have been harnessed as a novel therapy for glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. Although it has been known for some time that the GLP-1 receptor is expressed in the CVS where it mediates important physiological actions, it is only recently that specific cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 in the setting of diabetes have been described. GLP-1 confers indirect benefits in cardiovascular disease (CVD) under both normal and hyperglycaemic conditions via reducing established risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity, which are markedly increased in diabetes. Emerging evidence indicates that GLP-1 also exerts direct effects on specific aspects of diabetic CVD, such as endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, angiogenesis and adverse cardiac remodelling. However, the majority of studies have employed experimental models of diabetic CVD and information on the effects of GLP-1 in the clinical setting is limited, although several large-scale trials are ongoing. It is clearly important to gain a detailed knowledge of the cardiovascular actions of GLP-1 in diabetes given the large number of patients currently receiving GLP-1-based therapies. This review will therefore discuss current understanding of the effects of GLP-1 on both cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes and direct actions on the heart and vasculature in this setting and the evidence implicating specific targeting of GLP-1 as a novel therapy for CVD in diabetes. PMID:25231355

  3. PRO_LIGAND: an approach to de novo molecular design. 6. Flexible fitting in the design of peptides.

    PubMed

    Murray, C W; Clark, D E; Byrne, D G

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes the further development of the functionality of our in-house de novo design program, PRO_LIGAND. In particular, attention is focused on the implementation and validation of the 'direct tweak' method for the construction of conformationally flexible molecules, such as peptides, from molecular fragments. This flexible fitting method is compared to the original method based on libraries of prestored conformations for each fragment. It is shown that the directed tweak method produces results of comparable quality, with significant time savings. By removing the need to generate a set of representative conformers for any new library fragment, the flexible fitting method increases the speed and simplicity with which new fragments can be included in a fragment library and also reduces the disk space required for library storage. A further improvement to the molecular construction process within PRO_LIGAND is the inclusion of a constrained minimisation procedure which relaxes fragments onto the design model and can be used to reject highly strained structures during the structure generation phase. This relaxation is shown to be very useful in simple test cases, but restricts diversity for more realistic examples. The advantages and disadvantages of these additions to the PRO_LIGAND methodology are illustrated by three examples: similar design to an alpha helix region of dihydrofolate reductase, complementary design to the active site of HIV-1 protease and similar design to an epitope region of lysozyme. PMID:8594156

  4. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in cerebral vasospasm, and as a therapeutic approach to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kokkoris, Stelios; Andrews, Peter; Webb, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most potent microvascular vasodilators identified to date. Vascular relaxation and vasodilation is mediated via activation of the CGRP receptor. This atypical receptor is made up of a G protein-coupled receptor called calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a single transmembrane protein called receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP), and an additional protein that is required for Gas coupling, known as receptor component protein (RCP). Several mechanisms involved in CGRP-mediated relaxation have been identified. These include nitric oxide (NO)-dependent endothelium-dependent mechanisms or cAMP-mediated endothelium-independent pathways; the latter being more common. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with cerebral vasoconstriction that occurs several days after the hemorrhage and is often fatal. The vasospasm occurs in 30–40% of patients and is the major cause of death from this condition. The vasoconstriction is associated with a decrease in CGRP levels in nerves and an increase in CGRP levels in draining blood, suggesting that CGRP is released from nerves to oppose the vasoconstriction. This evidence has led to the concept that exogenous CGRP may be beneficial in a condition that has proven hard to treat. The present article reviews: (a) the pathophysiology of delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after SAH (b) the basics of the CGRP receptor structure, signal transduction, and vasodilatation mechanisms and (c) the studies that have been conducted so far using CGRP in both animals and humans with SAH. PMID:23162536

  5. Shuttle onboard IMU alignment methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The current approach to the shuttle IMU alignment is based solely on the Apollo Deterministic Method. This method is simple, fast, reliable and provides an accurate estimate for the present cluster to mean of 1,950 transformation matrix. If four or more star sightings are available, the application of least squares analysis can be utilized. The least squares method offers the next level of sophistication to the IMU alignment solution. The least squares method studied shows that a more accurate estimate for the misalignment angles is computed, and the IMU drift rates are a free by-product of the analysis. Core storage requirements are considerably more; estimated 20 to 30 times the core required for the Apollo Deterministic Method. The least squares method offers an intermediate solution utilizing as much data that is available without a complete statistical analysis as in Kalman filtering.

  6. Blasting and Zipping: Sequence Alignment and Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Orion; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-03-01

    Alignment of biological sequences such as DNA, RNA or proteins is one of the most widely used tools in computational bioscience. While the accomplishments of sequence alignment algorithms are undeniable the fact remains that these algorithms are based upon heuristic scoring schemes. Therefore, these algorithms do not provide model independent and objective measures for how similar two (or more) sequences actually are. Although information theory provides such a similarity measure - the mutual information (MI) - numerous previous attempts to connect sequence alignment and information have not produced realistic estimates for the MI from a given alignment. We report on a simple and flexible approach to get robust estimates of MI from global alignments. The presented results may help establish MI as a reliable tool for evaluating the quality of global alignments, judging the relative merits of different alignment algorithms, and estimating the significance of specific alignments.

  7. Experience in Aligning Anatomical Ontologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    An ontology is a formal representation of a domain modeling the entities in the domain and their relations. When a domain is represented by multiple ontologies, there is need for creating mappings among these ontologies in order to facilitate the integration of data annotated with these ontologies and reasoning across ontologies. The objective of this paper is to recapitulate our experience in aligning large anatomical ontologies and to reflect on some of the issues and challenges encountered along the way. The four anatomical ontologies under investigation are the Foundational Model of Anatomy, GALEN, the Adult Mouse Anatomical Dictionary and the NCI Thesaurus. Their underlying representation formalisms are all different. Our approach to aligning concepts (directly) is automatic, rule-based, and operates at the schema level, generating mostly point-to-point mappings. It uses a combination of domain-specific lexical techniques and structural and semantic techniques (to validate the mappings suggested lexically). It also takes advantage of domain-specific knowledge (lexical knowledge from external resources such as the Unified Medical Language System, as well as knowledge augmentation and inference techniques). In addition to point-to-point mapping of concepts, we present the alignment of relationships and the mapping of concepts group-to-group. We have also successfully tested an indirect alignment through a domain-specific reference ontology. We present an evaluation of our techniques, both against a gold standard established manually and against a generic schema matching system. The advantages and limitations of our approach are analyzed and discussed throughout the paper.

  8. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  9. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  10. Galaxy Alignments: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin; Cacciato, Marcello; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Kiessling, Alina; Kirk, Donnacha; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.

  11. Radiative Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains was discovered in the interstellar medium more than 60 years ago. A quantitative, observationally well tested theory of the phenomenon has finally emerged in the last decade, promising not only an improved understanding of interstellar magnetic fields, but new tools for studying the dust environments and grain characteristics. This Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory also has many potential applications in solar system physics, including for comet dust characteristics. I will review the main aspects of the theory and the observational tests performed to date, as well as some of the new possibilities for using polarization as a tool to study dust and its environment, with RAT alignment.

  12. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  13. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  14. Single-molecule studies on individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-13

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress in single-molecule studies of individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces. The structures and the mechanism of peptide assembly are discussed in detail. The contents include the following topics: structural analysis of single peptide molecules, adsorption and assembly of peptides on surfaces, folding structures of the amyloid peptides, interaction between amyloid peptides and dye or drug molecules, and modulation of peptide assemblies by small molecules. The explorations of peptide adsorption and assembly will benefit the understanding of the mechanisms for protein-protein interactions, protein-drug interactions and the pathogenesis of amyloidoses. The investigations on peptide assembly and its modulations could also provide a potential approach towards the treatment of the amyloidoses.

  15. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  16. Combination Approach of YSA Peptide Anchored Docetaxel Stealth Liposomes with Oral Antifibrotic Agent for the Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Doddapaneni, Ravi; Sekar, Vasanthakumar; Chowdhury, Nusrat; Singh, Mandip

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of nanocarriers can be amplified by active targeting and overcoming the extracellular matrix associated barriers of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of oral antifibrotic agent (telmisartan) on tumor uptake and anticancer efficacy of EphA2 receptor targeted liposomes. Docetaxel loaded PEGylated liposomes (DPL) functionalized with nickel chelated phospholipid were prepared using a modified hydration method. DPL were incubated with various concentrations of histidine tagged EphA2 receptor specific peptide (YSA) to optimize particle size, zeta potential, and percentage YSA binding. Cellular uptake studies using various endocytosis blockers revealed that a caveolae dependent pathway was the major route for internalization of YSA anchored liposomes of docetaxel (YDPL) in A549 lung cancer cell line. Hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of optimized YDPL were 157.3 ± 11.8 nm and -3.64 mV, respectively. Orthotopic lung tumor xenograft (A549) bearing athymic nude mice treated with oral telmisartan (5 mg/kg) for 2 days showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher uptake of YDPL in tumor tissues compared to healthy tissue. Average lung tumor weight of the YDPL + telmisartan treated group was 4.8- and 3.8-fold lower than that of the DPL and YDPL treated groups (p < 0.05). Substantially lower expression (p < 0.05) of EphA2 receptor protein, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), MMP-9, and collagen 1A level with increased E-cadherin and TIMP-1 levels in immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis of lung tumor samples of the combination group confirmed antifibrotic effect with enhanced anticancer activity. Active targeting and ECM remodeling synergistically contributed to anticancer efficacy of YDPL in orthotopic lung cancer.

  17. Peptide-mediated RNA delivery: a novel approach for enhanced transfection of primary and post-mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, T; Carlisle, R C; Read, M L; Ogris, M; Seymour, L W

    2001-09-15

    Synthetic vectors were evaluated for their ability to mediate efficient mRNA transfection. Initial results indicated that lipoplexes, but not polyplexes based on polyethylenimine (PEI, 25 and 22 kDa), poly(L-lysine) (PLL, 54 kDa) or dendrimers, mediated efficient translation of mRNA in B16-F10 cells. Significant mRNA transfection was achieved by lipoplex delivery in quiescent (passage 0) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and by passage 4, 10.7% of HUVEC were transfected compared to 0.84% with DNA. Lack of expression with PEI 25 kDa/mRNA or PLL 54 kDa/mRNA in a cell-free translation assay and following cytoplasmic injection into Rat1 cells indicated that these polyplexes were too stable to release mRNA. In contrast, polyplexes formed using smaller PEI 2 kDa and PLL 3.4 kDa gave 5-fold greater expression in B16-F10 cells compared to DOTAP, but were dependent on chloroquine for transfection activity. Endosomolytic activity was incorporated by conjugating PEI 2 kDa to melittin and resulting PEI 2 kDa-melittin/mRNA polyplexes mediated high transfection levels in HeLa cells (31.1 +/- 4.1%) and HUVEC (58.5 +/- 2.9%) in the absence of chloroquine, that was potentiated to 52.2 +/- 2.7 and 71.6 +/- 1.7%, respectively, in the presence of chloroquine. These results demonstrate that mRNA polyplexes based on peptide-modified low molecular weight polycations can possess versatile properties including endosomolysis that should enable efficient non-viral mRNA transfection of quiescent and post-mitotic cells. PMID:11557821

  18. Protein interactions between the C-terminus of Aβ-peptide and phospholipase A2--a structure biology based approach to identify novel Alzheimer's therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Pillai, Vikram G; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) polypeptide plays a key role in determining the state of protein aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The hydrophobic C-terminal part of the Aβ peptide is critical in triggering the transformation from α-helical to β- sheet structure. We hypothesized that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) may inhibit the aggregation of Aβ peptide by interacting with the peptide and keeping the two peptide chains apart. In order to examine the nature of interactions between PLA2 and Aβ peptide, we prepared and crystallized complex of Naja naja sagittifera PLA2 with the C-terminal hepta-peptide Val-Gly-Gly-Val-Val-Ile-Ala. The X-ray intensity data were collected to 2.04 A resolution and the structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to the crystallographic R factor of 0.186. The structural analysis revealed that the peptide binds to PLA2 at the hydrophobic substrate binding cavity forming at least eight hydrogen bonds and approximately a two dozen Van der Waals interactions. The number and nature of interactions indicate that the affinity between PLA2 and the hepta-peptide is greater than the affinity between two Aβ peptide chains. Therefore, PLA2 is proposed as a probable ligand to prevent the aggregation of Aβ peptides. PMID:25230229

  19. Protein interactions between the C-terminus of Aβ-peptide and phospholipase A2--a structure biology based approach to identify novel Alzheimer's therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Pillai, Vikram G; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) polypeptide plays a key role in determining the state of protein aggregation in Alzheimer's disease. The hydrophobic C-terminal part of the Aβ peptide is critical in triggering the transformation from α-helical to β- sheet structure. We hypothesized that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) may inhibit the aggregation of Aβ peptide by interacting with the peptide and keeping the two peptide chains apart. In order to examine the nature of interactions between PLA2 and Aβ peptide, we prepared and crystallized complex of Naja naja sagittifera PLA2 with the C-terminal hepta-peptide Val-Gly-Gly-Val-Val-Ile-Ala. The X-ray intensity data were collected to 2.04 A resolution and the structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to the crystallographic R factor of 0.186. The structural analysis revealed that the peptide binds to PLA2 at the hydrophobic substrate binding cavity forming at least eight hydrogen bonds and approximately a two dozen Van der Waals interactions. The number and nature of interactions indicate that the affinity between PLA2 and the hepta-peptide is greater than the affinity between two Aβ peptide chains. Therefore, PLA2 is proposed as a probable ligand to prevent the aggregation of Aβ peptides.

  20. Investigating Conversational Dynamics: Interactive Alignment, Interpersonal Synergy, and Collective Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates interpersonal processes underlying dialog by comparing two approaches, "interactive alignment" and "interpersonal synergy", and assesses how they predict collective performance in a joint task. While the interactive alignment approach highlights imitative patterns between interlocutors, the synergy…

  1. Alignment of University Information Technology Resources with the Malcolm Baldrige Results Criteria for Performance Excellence in Education: A Balanced Scorecard Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Deborah F.; Humphrey, Roberta L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors suggest using a balanced scorecard (BSC) approach to evaluate information technology (IT) resources in higher education institutions. The BSC approach illustrated is based on the performance criteria of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in Education. This article suggests areas of potential impact of IT on BSC measures in…

  2. CARNA—alignment of RNA structure ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Sorescu, Dragoş Alexandru; Möhl, Mathias; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf; Will, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Due to recent algorithmic progress, tools for the gold standard of comparative RNA analysis, namely Sankoff-style simultaneous alignment and folding, are now readily applicable. Such approaches, however, compare RNAs with respect to a simultaneously predicted, single, nested consensus structure. To make multiple alignment of RNAs available in cases, where this limitation of the standard approach is critical, we introduce a web server that provides a complete and convenient interface to the RNA structure alignment tool ‘CARNA’. This tool uniquely supports RNAs with multiple conserved structures per RNA and aligns pseudoknots intrinsically; these features are highly desirable for aligning riboswitches, RNAs with conserved folding pathways, or pseudoknots. We represent structural input and output information as base pair probability dot plots; this provides large flexibility in the input, ranging from fixed structures to structure ensembles, and enables immediate visual analysis of the results. In contrast to conventional Sankoff-style approaches, ‘CARNA’ optimizes all structural similarities in the input simultaneously, for example across an entire RNA structure ensemble. Even compared with already costly Sankoff-style alignment, ‘CARNA’ solves an intrinsically much harder problem by applying advanced, constraint-based, algorithmic techniques. Although ‘CARNA’ is specialized to the alignment of RNAs with several conserved structures, its performance on RNAs in general is on par with state-of-the-art general-purpose RNA alignment tools, as we show in a Bralibase 2.1 benchmark. The web server is freely available at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/CARNA. PMID:22689637

  3. Were the first springtails semi-aquatic? A phylogenetic approach by means of 28S rDNA and optimization alignment.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haese, Cyrille A

    2002-01-01

    Emergence from an aquatic environment to the land is one of the major evolutionary transitions within the arthropods. It is often considered that the first hexapods, and in particular the first springtails, were semi-aquatic and this assumption drives evolutionary models towards particular conclusions. To address the question of the ecological origin of the springtails, phylogenetic analyses by optimization alignment were performed on D1 and D2 regions of the 28S rDNA for 55 collembolan exemplars and eight outgroups. Relationships among the orders Symphypleona, Entomobryomorpha and Poduromorpha are inferred. More specifically, a robust hypothesis is provided for the subfamilial relationships within the order Poduromorpha. Contrary to previous statements, the semi-aquatic species Podura aquatica is not basal or 'primitive', but well nested in the Poduromorpha. The analyses performed for the 24 different weighting schemes yielded the same conclusion: semi-aquatic ecology is not ancestral for the springtails. It is a derived condition that evolved independently several times. The adaptation for semi-aquatic life is better interpreted as a step towards independence from land, rather than indication of an aquatic origin. PMID:12061958

  4. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  5. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    PubMed

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  6. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  7. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  8. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  9. Aligning parallel arrays to reduce communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Robert; Gilbert, John R.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    Axis and stride alignment is an important optimization in compiling data-parallel programs for distributed-memory machines. We previously developed an optimal algorithm for aligning array expressions. Here, we examine alignment for more general program graphs. We show that optimal alignment is NP-complete in this setting, so we study heuristic methods. This paper makes two contributions. First, we show how local graph transformations can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. Second, we give a heuristic that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. Our algorithms have been implemented; we present experimental results showing their effect on the performance of some example programs running on the CM-5.

  10. Technology of alignment mark in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Tang; Chen, Baoqin; Niu, Jiebin

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam direct wring lithography has been an indispensable approach by which all sorts of novel nano-scale devices include many kinds optical devices can be fabricated. Alignment accuracy is a key factor especially to those devices which need multi-level lithography. In addition to electron beam lithography system itself the quality of alignment mark directly influences alignment accuracy. This paper introduces fundamental of alignment mark detection and discusses some techniques of alignment mark fabrication along with considerations for obtaining highly accurate alignment taking JBX5000LS and JBX6300FS e-beam lithography systems for example. The fundamental of alignment mark detection is expounded first. Many kinds of factors which can impact on the quality of alignment mark are analyzed including mark materials, depth of mark groove and influence of multi-channel process. It has been proved from experiments that material used as metal mark with higher average atomic number is better beneficial for getting high alignment accuracy. Depth of mark groove is required to 1.5~5 μm on our experience. The more process steps alignment mark must pass through, the more probability of being damaged there will be. So the compatibility of alignment mark fabrication with the whole device process and the protection of alignment mark are both need to be considered in advance.

  11. Enhanced Schwann cell attachment and alignment using one-pot "dual click" GRGDS and YIGSR derivatized nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jukuan; Kontoveros, Dimitria; Lin, Fei; Hua, Geng; Reneker, Darrell H; Becker, Matthew L; Willits, Rebecca K

    2015-01-12

    Using metal-free click chemistry and oxime condensation methodologies, GRGDS and YIGSR peptides were coupled to random and aligned degradable nanofiber networks postelectrospinning in a one-pot reaction. The bound peptides are bioactive, as demonstrated by Schwann cell attachment and proliferation, and the inclusion of YIGSR with GRGDS alters the expression of the receptor for YIGSR. Additionally, aligned nanofibers act as a potential guidance cue by increasing the aspect ratio and aligning the actin filaments, which suggest that peptide-functionalized scaffolds would be useful to direct SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  12. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  13. A simple method to control over-alignment in the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Standley, Daron M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: We present a new feature of the MAFFT multiple alignment program for suppressing over-alignment (aligning unrelated segments). Conventional MAFFT is highly sensitive in aligning conserved regions in remote homologs, but the risk of over-alignment is recently becoming greater, as low-quality or noisy sequences are increasing in protein sequence databases, due, for example, to sequencing errors and difficulty in gene prediction. Results: The proposed method utilizes a variable scoring matrix for different pairs of sequences (or groups) in a single multiple sequence alignment, based on the global similarity of each pair. This method significantly increases the correctly gapped sites in real examples and in simulations under various conditions. Regarding sensitivity, the effect of the proposed method is slightly negative in real protein-based benchmarks, and mostly neutral in simulation-based benchmarks. This approach is based on natural biological reasoning and should be compatible with many methods based on dynamic programming for multiple sequence alignment. Availability and implementation: The new feature is available in MAFFT versions 7.263 and higher. http://mafft.cbrc.jp/alignment/software/ Contact: katoh@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153688

  14. High-speed multiple sequence alignment on a reconfigurable platform.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Tim; Schmidt, Bertil; Maskell, Douglas; Nathan, Darran; Clemens, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Progressive alignment is a widely used approach to compute multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). However, aligning several hundred sequences by popular progressive alignment tools requires hours on sequential computers. Due to the rapid growth of sequence databases biologists have to compute MSAs in a far shorter time. In this paper we present a new approach to MSA on reconfigurable hardware platforms to gain high performance at low cost. We have constructed a linear systolic array to perform pairwise sequence distance computations using dynamic programming. This results in an implementation with significant runtime savings on a standard FPGA.

  15. Membrane Interactions of Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 Peptides by Oriented Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Cesar, Amary; Bertani, Philippe; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 are three members of the family of linear cationic antimicrobial peptides found in tree frogs. The highly homologous peptides encompass 19 amino acids, and only differ in the amino acid composition and charge at the six most carboxy-terminal residues. Here, we investigated how such subtle changes are reflected in their membrane interactions and how these can be correlated to their biological activities. To this end, the three peptides were labeled with stable isotopes, reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers, and their detailed topology determined by a combined approach using 2H and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although phylloseptin-2 and -3 adopt perfect in-plane alignments, the tilt angle of phylloseptin-1 deviates by 8° probably to assure a more water exposed localization of the lysine-17 side chain. Furthermore, different azimuthal angles are observed, positioning the amphipathic helices of all three peptides with the charged residues well exposed to the water phase. Interestingly, our studies also reveal that two orientation-dependent 2H quadrupolar splittings from methyl-deuterated alanines and one 15N amide chemical shift are sufficient to unambiguously determine the topology of phylloseptin-1, where quadrupolar splittings close to the maximum impose the most stringent angular restraints. As a result of these studies, a strategy is proposed where the topology of a peptide structure can be determined accurately from the labeling with 15N and 2H isotopes of only a few amino acid residues. PMID:25140425

  16. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Daniel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. ATLAS is one of the two general purpose experiments. The inner tracking system of ATLAS, the Inner Detector, is built on two technologies: silicon detectors and drift tube based detectors. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the Silicon sensors is just a few microns. Therefore the alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is performed using complex algorithms requiring extensive CPU and memory usage. The proposed alignment algorithms were exercised on several applications. This proceedings present the outline of the alignment approach and results from Cosmic Ray runs and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data-taking. The full alignment chain was tested using these samples and alignment constants were produced and validated within 24 hours. Early alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is provided even before the LHC start up by analysing Cosmic Ray data.

  17. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  18. Barrel alignment fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, J. D.

    1981-04-01

    Fabrication of slapper type detonator cables requires bonding of a thin barrel over a bridge. Location of the barrel hole with respect to the bridge is critical: the barrel hole must be centered over the bridge uniform spacing on each side. An alignment fixture which permits rapid adjustment of the barrel position with respect to the bridge is described. The barrel is manipulated by pincer-type fingers which are mounted on a small x-y table equipped with micrometer adjustments. Barrel positioning, performed under a binocular microscopy, is rapid and accurate. After alignment, the microscope is moved out of position and an infrared (IR) heat source is aimed at the barrel. A 5-second pulse of infrared heat flows the adhesive under the barrel and bonds it to the cable. Sapphire and Fotoform glass barrels were bonded successfully with the alignment fixture.

  19. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  20. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  1. Uncertainty in homology inferences: Assessing and improving genomic sequence alignment

    PubMed Central

    Lunter, Gerton; Rocco, Andrea; Mimouni, Naila; Heger, Andreas; Caldeira, Alexandre; Hein, Jotun

    2008-01-01

    Sequence alignment underpins all of comparative genomics, yet it remains an incompletely solved problem. In particular, the statistical uncertainty within inferred alignments is often disregarded, while parametric or phylogenetic inferences are considered meaningless without confidence estimates. Here, we report on a theoretical and simulation study of pairwise alignments of genomic DNA at human–mouse divergence. We find that >15% of aligned bases are incorrect in existing whole-genome alignments, and we identify three types of alignment error, each leading to systematic biases in all algorithms considered. Careful modeling of the evolutionary process improves alignment quality; however, these improvements are modest compared with the remaining alignment errors, even with exact knowledge of the evolutionary model, emphasizing the need for statistical approaches to account for uncertainty. We develop a new algorithm, Marginalized Posterior Decoding (MPD), which explicitly accounts for uncertainties, is less biased and more accurate than other algorithms we consider, and reduces the proportion of misaligned bases by a third compared with the best existing algorithm. To our knowledge, this is the first nonheuristic algorithm for DNA sequence alignment to show robust improvements over the classic Needleman–Wunsch algorithm. Despite this, considerable uncertainty remains even in the improved alignments. We conclude that a probabilistic treatment is essential, both to improve alignment quality and to quantify the remaining uncertainty. This is becoming increasingly relevant with the growing appreciation of the importance of noncoding DNA, whose study relies heavily on alignments. Alignment errors are inevitable, and should be considered when drawing conclusions from alignments. Software and alignments to assist researchers in doing this are provided at http://genserv.anat.ox.ac.uk/grape/. PMID:18073381

  2. Aligning Biomolecular Networks Using Modular Graph Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towfic, Fadi; Greenlee, M. Heather West; Honavar, Vasant

    Comparative analysis of biomolecular networks constructed using measurements from different conditions, tissues, and organisms offer a powerful approach to understanding the structure, function, dynamics, and evolution of complex biological systems. We explore a class of algorithms for aligning large biomolecular networks by breaking down such networks into subgraphs and computing the alignment of the networks based on the alignment of their subgraphs. The resulting subnetworks are compared using graph kernels as scoring functions. We provide implementations of the resulting algorithms as part of BiNA, an open source biomolecular network alignment toolkit. Our experiments using Drosophila melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the DIP repository of protein-protein interaction data demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithms (as measured by % GO term enrichment of subnetworks identified by the alignment) is competitive with some of the state-of-the-art algorithms for pair-wise alignment of large protein-protein interaction networks. Our results also show that the inter-species similarity scores computed based on graph kernels can be used to cluster the species into a species tree that is consistent with the known phylogenetic relationships among the species.

  3. Radiative Torque Alignment: Essential Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2007-05-01

    Aligned grains provide a unique way to trace magnetic field topology in many astrophysical environments. In Lazarian & Hoang (2006), we derived analytical expressions for radiative torque (RAT) components, and studied the dynamics of grains assuming that the maximal inertia axis is always parallel to angular momentum. In this paper, to get insight into the dynamics of grains when thermal fluctuations are accounted for, we use AMO, and perform analytically averaging for RAT components. In addition, we study the RAT alignment for irregular grains (shape 1 and 3). We also evaluate the influence of suprathermal torques arising from H2 formation, as well as randomizing collisions with atomic gas on the alignment of grains driven by radiative torques (RATs). Our study is both based on the analytical model (AMO) and numerical calculations of RATs for irregular grains. To describe the H2 formation torques and random collisions we use the Langevin equation approach. We show that when thermal fluctuations are included, for both AMO and irregular grains, RATs tend to align grains at attractor points with low angular momentum (low-J attractor point). We found that random collisions by atomic gas act to substantially disalign the grain alignment in the case the phase trajectory map has only the low-J attractor point. In particular, if there exist attractor points at high angular momentum in the phase trajectory map, gas bombardment can move grains from the low- J attractor point to the high-J attractor point. Thus the degree of alignment increases.

  4. Global network alignment using multiscale spectral signatures

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Rob; Kingsford, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Protein interaction networks provide an important system-level view of biological processes. One of the fundamental problems in biological network analysis is the global alignment of a pair of networks, which puts the proteins of one network into correspondence with the proteins of another network in a manner that conserves their interactions while respecting other evidence of their homology. By providing a mapping between the networks of different species, alignments can be used to inform hypotheses about the functions of unannotated proteins, the existence of unobserved interactions, the evolutionary divergence between the two species and the evolution of complexes and pathways. Results: We introduce GHOST, a global pairwise network aligner that uses a novel spectral signature to measure topological similarity between subnetworks. It combines a seed-and-extend global alignment phase with a local search procedure and exceeds state-of-the-art performance on several network alignment tasks. We show that the spectral signature used by GHOST is highly discriminative, whereas the alignments it produces are also robust to experimental noise. When compared with other recent approaches, we find that GHOST is able to recover larger and more biologically significant, shared subnetworks between species. Availability: An efficient and parallelized implementation of GHOST, released under the Apache 2.0 license, is available at http://cbcb.umd.edu/kingsford_group/ghost Contact: rob@cs.umd.edu PMID:23047556

  5. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  6. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  7. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  8. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  9. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  10. Two Hybrid Algorithms for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naznin, Farhana; Sarker, Ruhul; Essam, Daryl

    2010-01-01

    In order to design life saving drugs, such as cancer drugs, the design of Protein or DNA structures has to be accurate. These structures depend on Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA). MSA is used to find the accurate structure of Protein and DNA sequences from existing approximately correct sequences. To overcome the overly greedy nature of the well known global progressive alignment method for multiple sequence alignment, we have proposed two different algorithms in this paper; one is using an iterative approach with a progressive alignment method (PAMIM) and the second one is using a genetic algorithm with a progressive alignment method (PAMGA). Both of our methods started with a "kmer" distance table to generate single guide-tree. In the iterative approach, we have introduced two new techniques: the first technique is to generate Guide-trees with randomly selected sequences and the second is of shuffling the sequences inside that tree. The output of the tree is a multiple sequence alignment which has been evaluated by the Sum of Pairs Method (SPM) considering the real value data from PAM250. In our second GA approach, these two techniques are used to generate an initial population and also two different approaches of genetic operators are implemented in crossovers and mutation. To test the performance of our two algorithms, we have compared these with the existing well known methods: T-Coffee, MUSCEL, MAFFT and Probcon, using BAliBase benchmarks. The experimental results show that the first algorithm works well for some situations, where other existing methods face difficulties in obtaining better solutions. The proposed second method works well compared to the existing methods for all situations and it shows better performance over the first one.

  11. A novel ICK peptide from the Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom gland: cloning, heterologous expression and immunological cross-reactivity approaches.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Constantino Lopes, Eduardo Soares; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-09-01

    The venom of a Loxosceles spider is composed of a complex mixture of biologically active components, consisting predominantly of low molecular mass molecules (3-45 kDa). Transcriptome analysis of the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland revealed ESTs with similarity to the previously described LiTx peptides. Sequences similar to the LiTx3 isoform were the most abundant, representing approximately 13.9% of all ESTs and 32% of the toxin-encoding messengers. These peptides are grouped in the ICK (Inhibitor Cystine Knot) family, which contains single chain molecules with low molecular mass (3-10 kDa). Due to their high number of cysteine residues, ICK peptides form intramolecular disulfide bridges. The aims of this study were to clone and express a novel ICK peptide isoform, as well as produce specific hyperimmune serum for immunoassays. The corresponding cDNA was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing restriction sites for the XhoI and BamHI enzymes; this PCR product was then ligated in the pET-14b vector and transformed into E. coli AD494 (DE3) cells. The peptide was expressed by IPTG induction for 4 h at 30 °C and purified by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA resin. Hyperimmune serum to the recombinant peptide was produced in rabbits and was able to specifically recognize both the purified recombinant peptide and the native form present in the venom. Furthermore, the recombinant peptide was recognized by antisera raised against L. intermedia, L. gaucho and L. laeta whole venoms. The recombinant peptide obtained will enable future studies to characterize its biological activity, as well as investigations regarding possible biotechnological applications.

  12. Simultaneous alignment of short reads against multiple genomes

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Korbinian; Hagmann, Jörg; Ossowski, Stephan; Warthmann, Norman; Gesing, Sandra; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Weigel, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Genome resequencing with short reads generally relies on alignments against a single reference. GenomeMapper supports simultaneous mapping of short reads against multiple genomes by integrating related genomes (e.g., individuals of the same species) into a single graph structure. It constitutes the first approach for handling multiple references and introduces representations for alignments against complex structures. Demonstrated benefits include access to polymorphisms that cannot be identified by alignments against the reference alone. Download GenomeMapper at . PMID:19761611

  13. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  14. Homonuclear decoupling for enhancing resolution and sensitivity in NOE and RDC measurements of peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinfa; Roche, Julien; Bax, Ad

    2014-04-01

    Application of band-selective homonuclear (BASH) 1H decoupling pulses during acquisition of the 1H free induction decay is shown to be an efficient procedure for removal of scalar and residual dipolar couplings between amide and aliphatic protons. BASH decoupling can be applied in both dimensions of a homonuclear 2D NMR experiment and is particularly useful for enhancing spectral resolution in the HN-Hα region of NOESY spectra of peptides and proteins, which contain important information on the backbone torsion angles. The method then also prevents generation of zero quantum and HzN-Hzα terms, thereby facilitating analysis of intraresidue interactions. Application to the NOESY spectrum of a hexapeptide fragment of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein highlights the considerable diffusion anisotropy present in linear peptides. Removal of residual dipolar couplings between HN and aliphatic protons in weakly aligned proteins increases resolution in the 1H-15N HSQC region of the spectrum and allows measurement of RDCs in samples that are relatively strongly aligned. The approach is demonstrated for measurement of RDCs in protonated 15N/13C-enriched ubiquitin, aligned in Pf1, yielding improved fitting to the ubiquitin structure.

  15. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  16. Alignment of multiple proteins with an ensemble of Hidden Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yinglei; Qu, Junfeng; Hura, Gurdeep S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a new method that progressively construct and update a set of alignments by adding sequences in certain order to each of the existing alignments. Each of the existing alignments is modelled with a profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and an added sequence is aligned to each of these profile HMMs. We introduced an integer parameter for the number of profile HMMs. The profile HMMs are then updated based on the alignments with leading scores. Our experiments on BaliBASE showed that our approach could efficiently explore the alignment space and significantly improve the alignment accuracy. PMID:20376922

  17. Graph-based molecular alignment (GMA).

    PubMed

    Marialke, J; Körner, R; Tietze, S; Apostolakis, Joannis

    2007-01-01

    We describe a combined 2D/3D approach for the superposition of flexible chemical structures, which is based on recent progress in the efficient identification of common subgraphs and a gradient-based torsion space optimization algorithm. The simplicity of the approach is reflected in its generality and computational efficiency: the suggested approach neither requires precalculated statistics on the conformations of the molecules nor does it make simplifying assumptions on the topology of the molecules being compared. Furthermore, graph-based molecular alignment produces alignments that are consistent with the chemistry of the molecules as well as their general structure, as it depends on both the local connectivities between atoms and the overall topology of the molecules. We validate this approach on benchmark sets taken from the literature and show that it leads to good results compared to computationally and algorithmically more involved methods. The results suggest that, for most practical purposes, graph-based molecular alignment is a viable alternative to molecular field alignment with respect to structural superposition and leads to structures of comparable quality in a fraction of the time. PMID:17381175

  18. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  20. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  1. Enhancement of initial equivalency for protein structure alignment based on encoded local structures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth; Wang, Jui-Chih; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Tsai, Kun-Nan; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Most alignment algorithms find an initial equivalent residue pair followed by an iterative optimization process to explore better near-optimal alignments in the surrounding solution space of the initial alignment. It plays a decisive role in determining the alignment quality since a poor initial alignment may make the final alignment trapped in an undesirable local optimum even with an iterative optimization. We proposed a vector-based alignment algorithm with a new initial alignment approach accounting for local structure features called MIRAGE-align. The new idea is to enhance the quality of the initial alignment based on encoded local structural alphabets to identify the protein structure pair whose sequence identity falls in or below twilight zone. The statistical analysis of alignment quality based on Match Index (MI) and computation time demonstrated that MIRAGE-align algorithm outperformed four previously published algorithms, i.e., the residue-based algorithm (CE), the vector-based algorithm (SSM), TM-align, and Fr-TM-align. MIRAGE-align yields a better estimate of initial solution to enhance the quality of initial alignment and enable the employment of a non-iterative optimization process to achieve a better alignment. PMID:22717522

  2. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  3. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  4. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  5. Alignment control study for the solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the alignment and focus errors than can be tolerated, methods of sensing such errors, and mechanisms to make the necessary corrections were addressed. Alternate approaches and their relative merits were considered. The results of this study indicate that adequate alignment control can be achieved.

  6. Research on polychaete annelid osmoregulatory peptide(s) by immunocytochemical and physiological approaches. Computer reconstruction of the brain and evidence for a role of angiotensin-like molecules in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller.

    PubMed

    Fewou, J; Dhainaut-Courtois, N

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and physiological studies were carried out on Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller in order to obtain evidence concerning the neuroendocrine control of polychaete osmoregulation. The occurrence in this animal of peptides immunologically related to mammalian angiotensin II and I (AII and AI) and oxytocin (OT) was demonstrated in the brain and the ventral nerve cord (VNC) perikarya and nerve fibres as well as in a few peripheral structures (peripheral nerves, epithelial cells, nuchal organ, intestine and nephridia). The exact localization of immunoreactive cells was achieved by serial sections of brain and ventral nerve cord followed by a three-dimensional reconstruction of brain ganglionic nuclei using the CATIA ('Conception Assistée Tridimensionnelle Inter Active') Dassault system program. Injections of polyclonal antisera against AII or OT provoked a partial inhibition of the increase in body weight in Nereis exposed to hypo-osmotic medium. The effect of a-AII seemed more pronounced than that of a-OT. In a subsequent test, injections of synthetic AII and AII-amide (peptide recently isolated from an achaete (Salzet et al (1995) J Biol Chem 270, 1575-1582) enhanced the increase in body weight and, therefore, strengthened the hypothesis of the neuroendocrine control of Nereis osmoregulation. The antidiuretic effect of both synthetic peptides in this study was indicative of the exact role of Nereis endogenous molecule(s). AII was less potent than its amidated form. If AI-like can easily be struck off the list of putative endogenous osmoregulatory factors, the role of OT-like substance in Nereis osmoregulation, which is partially demonstrated in this study, needs to be clarified by further physiological experiments using injection of synthetic peptide(s) or endogenous substance(s). All these results are discussed and compared to those recently obtained in an achaete annelid (Salzet et al (1993) Brain Res 631, 247-255; Salzet et al (1993) Brain

  7. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  8. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  9. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  10. Oriented Circular Dichroism: A Method to Characterize Membrane-Active Peptides in Oriented Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Fanghänel, Susanne; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-02-16

    The structures of membrane-bound polypeptides are intimately related to their functions and may change dramatically with the lipid environment. Circular dichroism (CD) is a rapid analytical method that requires relatively low amounts of material and no labeling. Conventional CD is routinely used to monitor the secondary structure of peptides and proteins in solution, for example, in the presence of ligands and other binding partners. In the case of membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins, these measurements can be applied to, and remain limited to, samples containing detergent micelles or small sonicated lipid vesicles. Such traditional CD analysis reveals only secondary structures. With the help of an oriented circular dichroism (OCD) setup, however, based on the preparation of macroscopically oriented lipid bilayers, it is possible to address the membrane alignment of a peptide in addition to its conformation. This approach has been mostly used for α-helical peptides so far, but other structural elements are conceivable as well. OCD analysis relies on Moffitt's theory, which predicts that the electronic transition dipole moments of the backbone amide bonds in helical polypeptides are polarized either parallel or perpendicular to the helix axis. The interaction of the electric field vector of the circularly polarized light with these transitions results in an OCD spectrum of a membrane-bound α-helical peptide, which exhibits a characteristic line shape and reflects the angle between the helix axis and the bilayer normal. For parallel alignment of a peptide helix with respect to the membrane surface (S-state), the corresponding "fingerprint" CD band around 208 nm will exhibit maximum negative amplitude. If the helix changes its alignment via an obliquely tilted (T-state) to a fully inserted transmembrane orientation (I-state), the ellipticity at 208 nm decreases and the value approaches zero due to the decreased interactions between the field and the

  11. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  12. Reducing beam shaper alignment complexity: diagnostic techniques for alignment and tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2011-10-01

    Safe and efficient optical alignment is a critical requirement for industrial laser systems used in a high volume manufacturing environment. Of specific interest is the development of techniques to align beam shaping optics within a beam line; having the ability to instantly verify by a qualitative means that each element is in its proper position as the beam shaper module is being aligned. There is a need to reduce these types of alignment techniques down to a level where even a newbie to optical alignment will be able to complete the task. Couple this alignment need with the fact that most laser system manufacturers ship their products worldwide and the introduction of a new set of variables including cultural and language barriers, makes this a top priority for manufacturers. Tools and methodologies for alignment of complex optical systems need to be able to cross these barriers to ensure the highest degree of up time and reduce the cost of maintenance on the production floor. Customers worldwide, who purchase production laser equipment, understand that the majority of costs to a manufacturing facility is spent on system maintenance and is typically the largest single controllable expenditure in a production plant. This desire to reduce costs is driving the trend these days towards predictive and proactive, not reactive maintenance of laser based optical beam delivery systems [10]. With proper diagnostic tools, laser system developers can develop proactive approaches to reduce system down time, safe guard operational performance and reduce premature or catastrophic optics failures. Obviously analytical data will provide quantifiable performance standards which are more precise than qualitative standards, but each have a role in determining overall optical system performance [10]. This paper will discuss the use of film and fluorescent mirror devices as diagnostic tools for beam shaper module alignment off line or in-situ. The paper will also provide an overview

  13. Dengue fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus synthetic peptides, with motifs to fit HLA class I haplotypes prevalent in human populations in endemic regions, can be used for application to skin Langerhans cells to prime antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs)--a novel approach to the protection of humans.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    1994-09-01

    Flaviviruses were reported to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in infected individuals, indicating that nonapeptides, proteolytic cleavage products of the viral precursor protein, enter the endoplasmic reticulum in infected cells and interact with HLA class I molecules. The assembled HLA class I molecules are transported to the plasma membrane and prime CD8+ T cells. Current knowledge of the interaction of viral peptides with HLA molecules is reviewed. Based on this review, an idea is presented to use synthetic flavivirus peptides with an amino acid motif to fit with the HLA class I peptide binding group of HLA haplotypes prevalent in a given population in an endemic area. These synthetic viral peptides may be introduced into the human skin using a lotion containing the peptides ("Peplotion") together with substances capable of enhancing the penetration of these peptides into the skin to reach Langerhans cells. The peptide-treated Langerhans cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, may bind the synthetic viral peptides by their HLA class I peptide-binding grooves. Antigens carrying Langerhans cells are able to migrate and induce the cellular immune response in the lymph nodes. This approach to the priming of antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may provide cellular immune protection from flavivirus infection without inducing the humoral immune response, which can lead to the shock syndrome in Dengue fever patients. To be able to develop anti-Dengue virus synthetic peptides for populations with different HLA class I haplotypes, it is necessary to develop computational studies to design HLA class I Dengue virus synthetic peptides with motifs to fit the HLA haplotypes of the population living in an endemic region for Dengue fever. Experiments to study Dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis peptides vaccines and their effectiveness in protection against Dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis are needed. The development of human antiviral vaccines for application of viral

  14. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration.

  15. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  16. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-03-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  17. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  18. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  19. Alignment and alignment transition of bent core nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the alignment of nematics consisting of bimesogen bent core molecules of chlorine substituent of benzene derivative and their binary mixture with rod like nematics. It was found that the alignment layer made from polyimide material, which is usually used for promoting vertical (homeotropic) alignment of rod like nematics, promotes instead a planar alignment of the bent core nematic and its nematic mixtures. At higher concentration of the rod like nematic component in these mixtures, a temperature driven transition from vertical to planar alignment was found near the transition to isotropic phase.

  20. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  1. The number of reduced alignments between two DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we consider DNA sequences as mathematical strings. Total and reduced alignments between two DNA sequences have been considered in the literature to measure their similarity. Results for explicit representations of some alignments have been already obtained. Results We present exact, explicit and computable formulas for the number of different possible alignments between two DNA sequences and a new formula for a class of reduced alignments. Conclusions A unified approach for a wide class of alignments between two DNA sequences has been provided. The formula is computable and, if complemented by software development, will provide a deeper insight into the theory of sequence alignment and give rise to new comparison methods. AMS Subject Classification Primary 92B05, 33C20, secondary 39A14, 65Q30 PMID:24684679

  2. Improving ASM stepper alignment accuracy by alignment signal intensity simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gerald; Pushpala, Sagar M.; Bradford, Bradley; Peng, Zezhong; Gottipati, Mohan

    1993-08-01

    As photolithography technology advances into submicron regime, the requirement for alignment accuracy also becomes much tighter. The alignment accuracy is a function of the strength of the alignment signal. Therefore, a detailed alignment signal intensity simulation for 0.8 micrometers EPROM poly-1 layer on ASM stepper was done based on the process of record in the fab to reduce misalignment and improve die yield. Oxide thickness variation did not have significant impact on the alignment signal intensity. However, poly-1 thickness was the most important parameter to affect optical alignments. The real alignment intensity data versus resist thickness on production wafers was collected and it showed good agreement with the simulated results. Similar results were obtained for ONO dielectric layer at a different fab.

  3. Implied alignment: a synapomorphy-based multiple-sequence alignment method and its use in cladogram search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    A method to align sequence data based on parsimonious synapomorphy schemes generated by direct optimization (DO; earlier termed optimization alignment) is proposed. DO directly diagnoses sequence data on cladograms without an intervening multiple-alignment step, thereby creating topology-specific, dynamic homology statements. Hence, no multiple-alignment is required to generate cladograms. Unlike general and globally optimal multiple-alignment procedures, the method described here, implied alignment (IA), takes these dynamic homologies and traces them back through a single cladogram, linking the unaligned sequence positions in the terminal taxa via DO transformation series. These "lines of correspondence" link ancestor-descendent states and, when displayed as linearly arrayed columns without hypothetical ancestors, are largely indistinguishable from standard multiple alignment. Since this method is based on synapomorphy, the treatment of certain classes of insertion-deletion (indel) events may be different from that of other alignment procedures. As with all alignment methods, results are dependent on parameter assumptions such as indel cost and transversion:transition ratios. Such an IA could be used as a basis for phylogenetic search, but this would be questionable since the homologies derived from the implied alignment depend on its natal cladogram and any variance, between DO and IA + Search, due to heuristic approach. The utility of this procedure in heuristic cladogram searches using DO and the improvement of heuristic cladogram cost calculations are discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  4. Structural and Functional Diversity of Peptide Toxins from Tarantula Haplopelma hainanum (Ornithoctonus hainana) Venom Revealed by Transcriptomic, Peptidomic, and Patch Clamp Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Ya; Huang, Yong; He, Quan-Ze; Luo, Ji; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shan-Shan; Liu, Jin-Yan; Huang, Peng-Fei; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping

    2015-05-29

    Spider venom is a complex mixture of bioactive peptides to subdue their prey. Early estimates suggested that over 400 venom peptides are produced per species. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for this impressive diversity, transcriptomics based on second generation high throughput sequencing was combined with peptidomic assays to characterize the venom of the tarantula Haplopelma hainanum. The genes expressed in the venom glands were identified, and the bioactivity of their protein products was analyzed using the patch clamp technique. A total of 1,136 potential toxin precursors were identified that clustered into 90 toxin groups, of which 72 were novel. The toxin peptides clustered into 20 cysteine scaffolds that included between 4 and 12 cysteines, and 14 of these groups were newly identified in this spider. Highly abundant toxin peptide transcripts were present and resulted from hypermutation and/or fragment insertion/deletion. In combination with variable post-translational modifications, this genetic variability explained how a limited set of genes can generate hundreds of toxin peptides in venom glands. Furthermore, the intraspecies venom variability illustrated the dynamic nature of spider venom and revealed how complex components work together to generate diverse bioactivities that facilitate adaptation to changing environments, types of prey, and milking regimes in captivity.

  5. Structural and Functional Diversity of Peptide Toxins from Tarantula Haplopelma hainanum (Ornithoctonus hainana) Venom Revealed by Transcriptomic, Peptidomic, and Patch Clamp Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Ya; Huang, Yong; He, Quan-Ze; Luo, Ji; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shan-Shan; Liu, Jin-Yan; Huang, Peng-Fei; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping

    2015-05-29

    Spider venom is a complex mixture of bioactive peptides to subdue their prey. Early estimates suggested that over 400 venom peptides are produced per species. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for this impressive diversity, transcriptomics based on second generation high throughput sequencing was combined with peptidomic assays to characterize the venom of the tarantula Haplopelma hainanum. The genes expressed in the venom glands were identified, and the bioactivity of their protein products was analyzed using the patch clamp technique. A total of 1,136 potential toxin precursors were identified that clustered into 90 toxin groups, of which 72 were novel. The toxin peptides clustered into 20 cysteine scaffolds that included between 4 and 12 cysteines, and 14 of these groups were newly identified in this spider. Highly abundant toxin peptide transcripts were present and resulted from hypermutation and/or fragment insertion/deletion. In combination with variable post-translational modifications, this genetic variability explained how a limited set of genes can generate hundreds of toxin peptides in venom glands. Furthermore, the intraspecies venom variability illustrated the dynamic nature of spider venom and revealed how complex components work together to generate diverse bioactivities that facilitate adaptation to changing environments, types of prey, and milking regimes in captivity. PMID:25770214

  6. Structural and Functional Diversity of Peptide Toxins from Tarantula Haplopelma hainanum (Ornithoctonus hainana) Venom Revealed by Transcriptomic, Peptidomic, and Patch Clamp Approaches*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Ya; Huang, Yong; He, Quan-Ze; Luo, Ji; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shan-Shan; Liu, Jin-Yan; Huang, Peng-Fei; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Spider venom is a complex mixture of bioactive peptides to subdue their prey. Early estimates suggested that over 400 venom peptides are produced per species. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for this impressive diversity, transcriptomics based on second generation high throughput sequencing was combined with peptidomic assays to characterize the venom of the tarantula Haplopelma hainanum. The genes expressed in the venom glands were identified, and the bioactivity of their protein products was analyzed using the patch clamp technique. A total of 1,136 potential toxin precursors were identified that clustered into 90 toxin groups, of which 72 were novel. The toxin peptides clustered into 20 cysteine scaffolds that included between 4 and 12 cysteines, and 14 of these groups were newly identified in this spider. Highly abundant toxin peptide transcripts were present and resulted from hypermutation and/or fragment insertion/deletion. In combination with variable post-translational modifications, this genetic variability explained how a limited set of genes can generate hundreds of toxin peptides in venom glands. Furthermore, the intraspecies venom variability illustrated the dynamic nature of spider venom and revealed how complex components work together to generate diverse bioactivities that facilitate adaptation to changing environments, types of prey, and milking regimes in captivity. PMID:25770214

  7. Heat-Treatment-Responsive Proteins in Different Developmental Stages of Tomato Pollen Detected by Targeted Mass Accuracy Precursor Alignment (tMAPA).

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Palak; Doerfler, Hannes; Jegadeesan, Sridharan; Ghatak, Arindam; Pressman, Etan; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker; Firon, Nurit; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we have developed a quantitative shotgun proteomics strategy called mass accuracy precursor alignment (MAPA). The MAPA algorithm uses high mass accuracy to bin mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of precursor ions from LC-MS analyses, determines their intensities, and extracts a quantitative sample versus m/z ratio data alignment matrix from a multitude of samples. Here, we introduce a novel feature of this algorithm that allows the extraction and alignment of proteotypic peptide precursor ions or any other target peptide from complex shotgun proteomics data for accurate quantification of unique proteins. This strategy circumvents the problem of confusing the quantification of proteins due to indistinguishable protein isoforms by a typical shotgun proteomics approach. We applied this strategy to a comparison of control and heat-treated tomato pollen grains at two developmental stages, post-meiotic and mature. Pollen is a temperature-sensitive tissue involved in the reproductive cycle of plants and plays a major role in fruit setting and yield. By LC-MS-based shotgun proteomics, we identified more than 2000 proteins in total for all different tissues. By applying the targeted MAPA data-processing strategy, 51 unique proteins were identified as heat-treatment-responsive protein candidates. The potential function of the identified candidates in a specific developmental stage is discussed.

  8. AVID: A global alignment program.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nick; Dubchak, Inna; Pachter, Lior

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new global alignment method called AVID. The method is designed to be fast, memory efficient, and practical for sequence alignments of large genomic regions up to megabases long. We present numerous applications of the method, ranging from the comparison of assemblies to alignment of large syntenic genomic regions and whole genome human/mouse alignments. We have also performed a quantitative comparison of AVID with other popular alignment tools. To this end, we have established a format for the representation of alignments and methods for their comparison. These formats and methods should be useful for future studies. The tools we have developed for the alignment comparisons, as well as the AVID program, are publicly available. See Web Site References section for AVID Web address and Web addresses for other programs discussed in this paper. PMID:12529311

  9. AVID: A global alignment program.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nick; Dubchak, Inna; Pachter, Lior

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new global alignment method called AVID. The method is designed to be fast, memory efficient, and practical for sequence alignments of large genomic regions up to megabases long. We present numerous applications of the method, ranging from the comparison of assemblies to alignment of large syntenic genomic regions and whole genome human/mouse alignments. We have also performed a quantitative comparison of AVID with other popular alignment tools. To this end, we have established a format for the representation of alignments and methods for their comparison. These formats and methods should be useful for future studies. The tools we have developed for the alignment comparisons, as well as the AVID program, are publicly available. See Web Site References section for AVID Web address and Web addresses for other programs discussed in this paper.

  10. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  11. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  12. CELT optics Alignment Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Terry S.; Nelson, Jerry E.; Chanan, Gary A.; Noethe, Lothar

    2003-01-01

    The California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) is a project to build a 30-meter diameter telescope for research in astronomy at visible and infrared wavelengths. The current optical design calls for a primary, secondary, and tertiary mirror with Ritchey-Chretién foci at two Nasmyth platforms. The primary mirror is a mosaic of 1080 actively-stabilized hexagonal segments. This paper summarizes a CELT report that describes a step-by-step procedure for aligning the many degrees of freedom of the CELT optics.

  13. Liquid Crystal Based Sensor to Detect Beta-Sheet Formation of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadati, Monirosadat; Izmitli Apik, Aslin; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-03-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the progression of Alzheimer's, typeII diabetes and Huntington's diseases. Although larger aggregates remain important for clinical determination, small oligomers are of great interest due to their potentially toxic nature. It is therefore crucial to develop methods that probe the aggregation process at early stages and in the vicinity of biological membranes. Here, we present a simple method that relies on liquid crystalline materials and a Langmuir monolayer at the aqueous-liquid crystal (LC) interface. The approach is based on the LC's specific response to β-sheet structures, which abound in amyloid fibrils. When the system is observed under polarized light, the fibrils formed by amyloidogenic peptides give rise to the formation of elongated and branched structures in the LCs. Moreover, the PolScope measurements prove that the LCs are predominantly aligned along the fibrils when exposed to a β-sheet forming peptide. In contrast, non-amyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of irregularly tilted LCs. This method is capable of reporting aggregation at lipid-aqueous interfaces at nanomolar concentrations of the peptide, and much earlier than commonly used fluorescence-based techniques. We thank Prof. Oleg D. Levrentovich and Young-Ki Kim from the Liquid Crystal Institute of Kent State University for the use of their PolScope instrument. This work was partially supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (P300P2_151342).

  14. Large current difference in Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array with functionalization of peptides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array (VSNEA) was fabricated using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches by chemical vapor deposition and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process for biomolecule sensing. To verify the feasibility for the detection of biomolecules, Au-coated VSNEA was functionalized using peptides having a fluorescent probe. Cyclic voltammograms of the peptide-functionalized Au-coated VSNEA show a steady-state electrochemical current behavior. Because of the critically small dimension and vertically aligned nature of VSNEA, the current density of Au-coated VSNEA was dramatically higher than that of Au film electrodes. Au-coated VSNEA further showed a large current difference with and without peptides that was nine times more than that of Au film electrodes. These results indicate that Au-coated VSENA is highly effective device to detect peptides compared to conventional thin-film electrodes. Au-coated VSNEA can also be used as a divergent biosensor platform in many applications. PMID:24279451

  15. Large current difference in Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array with functionalization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Han, Sanghun; Kim, Hyungsuk; Lee, Jaehyung; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lim, Yong-Beom; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2013-11-26

    Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array (VSNEA) was fabricated using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches by chemical vapor deposition and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process for biomolecule sensing. To verify the feasibility for the detection of biomolecules, Au-coated VSNEA was functionalized using peptides having a fluorescent probe. Cyclic voltammograms of the peptide-functionalized Au-coated VSNEA show a steady-state electrochemical current behavior. Because of the critically small dimension and vertically aligned nature of VSNEA, the current density of Au-coated VSNEA was dramatically higher than that of Au film electrodes. Au-coated VSNEA further showed a large current difference with and without peptides that was nine times more than that of Au film electrodes. These results indicate that Au-coated VSENA is highly effective device to detect peptides compared to conventional thin-film electrodes. Au-coated VSNEA can also be used as a divergent biosensor platform in many applications.

  16. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  17. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    PubMed

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics.

  18. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  19. Overcoming low-alignment signal contrast induced alignment failure by alignment signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong Soo; Kim, Young Ha; Hwang, Hyunwoo; Lee, Jeongjin; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Paarhuis, Bart; Kok, Haico; de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; Mason, Christopher; Aarts, Igor; de Boeij, Wim P.

    2016-03-01

    Overlay is one of the key factors which enables optical lithography extension to 1X node DRAM manufacturing. It is natural that accurate wafer alignment is a prerequisite for good device overlay. However, alignment failures or misalignments are commonly observed in a fab. There are many factors which could induce alignment problems. Low alignment signal contrast is one of the main issues. Alignment signal contrast can be degraded by opaque stack materials or by alignment mark degradation due to processes like CMP. This issue can be compounded by mark sub-segmentation from design rules in combination with double or quadruple spacer process. Alignment signal contrast can be improved by applying new material or process optimization, which sometimes lead to the addition of another process-step with higher costs. If we can amplify the signal components containing the position information and reduce other unwanted signal and background contributions then we can improve alignment performance without process change. In this paper we use ASML's new alignment sensor (as was introduced and released on the NXT:1980Di) and sample wafers with special stacks which can induce poor alignment signal to demonstrate alignment and overlay improvement.

  20. Alignment of the Fibrin Network Within an Autologous Plasma Clot.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Jan; Seybold, Dominik; Peter, Elvira; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Köller, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Autologous plasma clots with longitudinally aligned fibrin fibers could serve as a scaffold for longitudinal axonal regrowth in cases of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. Three different techniques for assembling longitudinally oriented fibrin fibers during the fibrin polymerization process were investigated as follows: fiber alignment was induced by the application of either a magnetic field or-as a novel approach-electric field or by the induction of orientated flow. Fiber alignment was characterized by scanning electron microscopy analysis followed by image processing using fast Fourier transformation (FFT). Besides FFT output images, area xmin to xmax, as well as full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the FFT graph plot peaks, was calculated to determine the relative degree of fiber alignment. In addition, fluorescently labeled human fibrinogen and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used to visualize fibrin and cell orientation in aligned and nonaligned plasma clots. Varying degrees of fiber alignment were achieved by the three different methods, with the electric field application producing the highest degree of fiber alignment. The embedded MSCs showed a longitudinal orientation in the electric field-aligned plasma clots. The key feature of this study is the ability to produce autologous plasma clots with aligned fibrin fibers using physical techniques. This orientated internal structure of an autologous biomaterial is promising for distinct therapeutic applications, such as a guiding structure for cell migration and growth dynamics.

  1. Modulation of autoimmunity with artificial peptides

    PubMed Central

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The loss of immune tolerance to self antigens leads to the development of autoimmune responses. Since self antigens are often multiple and/or their sequences may not be known, one approach to restore immune tolerance uses synthetic artificial peptides that interfere or compete with self peptides in the networks of cellular interactions that drive the autoimmune process. This review describes the rationale behind the use of artificial peptides in autoimmunity and their mechanisms of action. Examples of use of artificial peptides in preclinical studies and in the management of human autoimmune diseases are provided. PMID:20807590

  2. Simulation-based Discovery of Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Pestana, Luis A.

    Today, there is a growing need for environmentally friendly synthetic membranes with selective transport capabilities to address some of society's most pressing issues, such as carbon dioxide pollution, or access to clean water. While conventional membranes cannot stand up to the challenge, thin nanocomposite membranes, where vertically aligned subnanometer pores (e.g. nanotubes) are embedded in a thin polymeric film, promise to overcome some of the current limitations, namely, achieving a monodisperse distribution of subnanometer size pores, vertical pore alignment across the membrane thickness, and tunability of the pore surface chemistry. Self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNs), are particularly promising as selective nanopores because the pore size can be controlled at the subnanometer level, exhibit high chemical design flexibility, and display remarkable mechanical stability. In addition, when conjugated with polymer chains, the cyclic peptides can co-assemble in block copolymer domains to form nanoporous thin films. CPNs are thus well positioned to tackle persistent challenges in molecular separation applications. However, our poor understanding of the physics underlying their remarkable properties prevents the rational design and implementation of CPNs in technologically relevant membranes. In this dissertation, we use a simulation-based approach, in particular molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to investigate the critical knowledge gaps hindering the implementation of CPNs. Computational mechanical tests show that, despite the weak nature of the stabilizing hydrogen bonds and the small cross section, CPNs display a Young's modulus of approximately 20 GPa and a maximum strength of around 1 GPa, placing them among the strongest proteinaceous materials known. Simulations of the self-assembly process reveal that CPNs grow by self-similar coarsening, contrary to other low-dimensional peptide systems, such as amyloids, that are believed to grow through

  3. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity-A Structural and Biochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity-I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  4. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity—A Structural and Biochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity—I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  5. Approximate protein structural alignment in polynomial time.

    PubMed

    Kolodny, Rachel; Linial, Nathan

    2004-08-17

    Alignment of protein structures is a fundamental task in computational molecular biology. Good structural alignments can help detect distant evolutionary relationships that are hard or impossible to discern from protein sequences alone. Here, we study the structural alignment problem as a family of optimization problems and develop an approximate polynomial-time algorithm to solve them. For a commonly used scoring function, the algorithm runs in O(n(10)/epsilon(6)) time, for globular protein of length n, and it detects alignments that score within an additive error of epsilon from all optima. Thus, we prove that this task is computationally feasible, although the method that we introduce is too slow to be a useful everyday tool. We argue that such approximate solutions are, in fact, of greater interest than exact ones because of the noisy nature of experimentally determined protein coordinates. The measurement of similarity between a pair of protein structures used by our algorithm involves the Euclidean distance between the structures (appropriately rigidly transformed). We show that an alternative approach, which relies on internal distance matrices, must incorporate sophisticated geometric ingredients if it is to guarantee optimality and run in polynomial time. We use these observations to visualize the scoring function for several real instances of the problem. Our investigations yield insights on the computational complexity of protein alignment under various scoring functions. These insights can be used in the design of scoring functions for which the optimum can be approximated efficiently and perhaps in the development of efficient algorithms for the multiple structural alignment problem. PMID:15304646

  6. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  7. Nova laser alignment control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J.; Holloway, F.W.; McGuigan, D.L.; Shelton, R.T.

    1984-03-29

    Alignment of the Nova laser requires control of hundreds of optical components in the ten beam paths. Extensive application of computer technology makes daily alignment practical. The control system is designed in a manner which provides both centralized and local manual operator controls integrated with automatic closed loop alignment. Menudriven operator consoles using high resolution color graphics displays overlaid with transport touch panels allow laser personnel to interact efficiently with the computer system. Automatic alignment is accomplished by using image analysis techniques to determine beam references points from video images acquired along the laser chain. A major goal of the design is to contribute substantially to rapid experimental turnaround and consistent alignment results. This paper describes the computer-based control structure and the software methods developed for aligning this large laser system.

  8. Dust alignment in astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex; Thiem Hoang, Chi

    Dust is known to be aligned in interstellar medium and the arising polarization is extensively used to trace magnetic fields. What process aligns dust grains was one of the most long-standing problems of astrophysics in spite of the persistent efforts to solve it. For years the Davis-Greenstein paramagnetic alignment was the primary candidate for explaining grain alignment. However, the situation is different now and the most promising mechanism is associated with radiative torques (RATs) acting on irregular grains. I shall present the analytical theory of RAT alignment, discuss the observational tests that support this theory. I shall also discuss in what situations we expect to see the dominance of paramagnetic alignment.

  9. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  10. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  11. [Alignment of malpositioned canines].

    PubMed

    Wagner, L

    1991-03-01

    This article presents a system for aligning impacted canines. The base of this system is the lingual arch, a rigid reaction unit of four teeth, molars and premolars. From this base unit an impacted canine can be extruded, moved distally, jumped over the occlusion and derotated by segment arches, coil springs and elastic ligatures. The efficiency of this appliance is due to the elimination of undesired reactive forces, the safe moving of teeth, the possibility of an exact force application and the simple manipulation; also the esthetic inconvenience is minimal. All this results in a better prognosis and an essentially shorter treatment time. This appliance can be used in the upper and the lower jaw. Schematic drawings and clinical examples demonstrate this method.

  12. Alignment of Mathematics State-Level Standards and Assessments: The Role of Reviewer Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Herman, Joan L.; Webb, Norman L.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the role of reviewer agreement in judgments about alignment between tests and standards. We used case data from three state alignment studies to explore how different approaches to incorporating reviewer agreement changes alignment conclusions. The three case studies showed varying degrees of reviewer agreement about…

  13. Using reconfigurable hardware to accelerate multiple sequence alignment with ClustalW.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Tim; Schmidt, Bertil; Nathan, Darran; Clemens, Ralf; Maskell, Douglas

    2005-08-15

    Aligning hundreds of sequences using progressive alignment tools such as ClustalW requires several hours on state-of-the-art workstations. We present a new approach to compute multiple sequence alignments in far shorter time using reconfigurable hardware. This results in an implementation of ClustalW with significant runtime savings on a standard off-the-shelf FPGA.

  14. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  15. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  16. A Combinatorial Peptide Ligand Libraries Treatment Followed by a Dual-Enzyme, Dual-Activation Approach on a nano-flow LC/Orbitrap/ETD for Comprehensive Analysis of Swine Plasma Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Young, Rebeccah; Page, Brian J.; Engler, Frank; Halfon, Marc S.; Canty, John M.; Qu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The plasma proteome holds enormous clinical potentials, yet an in-depth analysis of the plasma proteome remains a daunting challenge due to its high complexity and the extremely-wide dynamic range in protein concentrations. Furthermore, existing antibody-based approaches for depleting high-abundance proteins are not adaptable to the analysis of animal plasma proteome, which are often essential for experimental pathology/pharmacology. Here we describe a highly-comprehensive method for the investigation of animal plasma proteomes, which employs an optimized combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) treatment to reduce the protein concentration dynamic range and a dual-enzyme, dual-activation strategy to achieve high proteomic coverage. The CPLL-treatment enriched the lower-abundance proteins by >100-fold when loading the samples in moderately-denaturing condition with multiple loading-washing cycles. The native and the CPLL-treated plasma were digested in-parallel respectively by two enzymes (trypsin and GluC) carrying orthogonal specificities. By performing this differential proteolysis, the proteome coverage is improved where peptides produced by only one enzyme are poorly detectable. Digests were fractionated with high-resolution SCX chromatography and then resolved on a long, heated nano-LC column. MS analysis was performed on an LTQ/Orbitrap respectively with two complementary activation methods (CID and ETD). We applied this optimized strategy to investigate the plasma proteome from swine, a prominent animal model for cardiovascular diseases(CVD). This large-scale analysis results in an identification of a total 3421 unique proteins, spanning a concentration range of 9–10 orders of magnitude. The proteins were identified under a set of commonly-accepted criteria including precursor mass error<15 ppm, Xcorr cutoffs, ≥two unique peptides at the peptide probability≥95% and protein probability≥99%, and the peptide FDR of the dataset was 1.8% as

  17. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  18. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  19. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  20. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications.

  1. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications. PMID:25395305

  2. Quasiparticle Level Alignment for Photocatalytic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-13

    Electronic level alignment at the interface between an adsorbed molecular layer and a semiconducting substrate determines the activity and efficiency of many photocatalytic materials. Standard density functional theory (DFT)-based methods have proven unable to provide a quantitative description of this level alignment. This requires a proper treatment of the anisotropic screening, necessitating the use of quasiparticle (QP) techniques. However, the computational complexity of QP algorithms has meant a quantitative description of interfacial levels has remained elusive. We provide a systematic study of a prototypical interface, bare and methanol-covered rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, to determine the type of many-body theory required to obtain an accurate description of the level alignment. This is accomplished via a direct comparison with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. We consider GGA DFT, hybrid DFT, and G0W0, scQPGW1, scQPGW0, and scQPGW QP calculations. Our results demonstrate that G0W0, or our recently introduced scQPGW1 approach, are required to obtain the correct alignment of both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied interfacial molecular levels (HOMO/LUMO). These calculations set a new standard in the interpretation of electronic structure probe experiments of complex organic molecule/semiconductor interfaces.

  3. The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, Martin; Koch, Dietmar; Paluszek, Heiko

    2012-09-01

    The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the largest radio telescope recently built in Europe - a 64m Radio Telescope designed to operate in a wavelength regime down to 1mm. The SRT is designed in a classical Gregorian configuration, allowing access to the primary mirror focus (F1), the Gregorian focus (F2) as well as a further translation to different F3 using a beam waveguide system and an automated change between different F3 receiver positions. The primary mirror M1, 64m in diameter, is composed by 1008 individual panels. The surface can be actively controlled. It’s surface, as well as the one of the 8 m Gregorian subreflector, needed to be adjusted after panel mounting at the Sardinia site. The measurement technique used is photogrammetry. In case of the large scale M1 a dedicated combination of a large scale and a small scale approach was developed to achieve extremely high accuracy on the large scale dimension. The measurement/ alignment efforts were carried out in 2010 and 2011, with a final completion in spring 2012. The results obtained are presented and discussed. The overall alignment approach also included the absolute adjustments of M2 to M1 and the alignments of M3, M4 and M5. M3 is a rotating mirror guiding the RF beam to M4 or M5, depending on the operational scenario. These adjustments are based on Lasertracker measurements and have been carried out in an integrated approach.

  4. Field-free alignment in repetitively kicked nitrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James P.; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Coffee, Ryan N.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate a high level of laser-induced transient alignment in room temperature and density N{sub 2} with a technique that avoids laser field ionization. Our measured alignment shows an improvement over previous one-pulse or two-pulse experimental alignment results and approaches the theoretical maximum value. We employ eight equally spaced ultrafast laser pulses with a separation that takes advantage of the periodic revivals for the ensemble of quantum rotors. Each successive pulse increases the transient alignment [(t)] and also moves the rotational population away from thermal equilibrium. These measurements are combined with simulations to determine the value of , the J-state distributions, and the functional dependencies of the alignment features.

  5. Alignment of Iron Nanoparticles in a Magnetic Field Due to Shape Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Rios, Orlando; Parish, Chad M

    2015-07-09

    During high magnetic field processing there is evidence for alignment of non-spherical metallic particles above the Curie temperature in alloys with negligible magneto-crystalline anisotropy. The main driving force for alignment is the magnetic shape anisotropy. Current understanding of the phenomenon is not adequate to quantify the effect of particle size, aspect ratio, temperature and the magnetic field on particle alignment. We demonstrate a Monte Carlo approach coupled with size scaling to show the conditions under which alignment is possible.

  6. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  7. A solid-phase combinatorial approach for indoloquinolizidine-peptides with high affinity at D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Molero, Anabel; Vendrell, Marc; Bonaventura, Jordi; Zachmann, Julian; López, Laura; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluis, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Albericio, Fernando; Casadó, Vicent; Royo, Miriam

    2015-06-01

    Ligands acting at multiple dopamine receptors hold potential as therapeutic agents for a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, compounds able to bind at D1R and D2R with high affinity could restore the effects of dopamine depletion and enhance motor activation on degenerated nigrostriatal dopaminergic systems. We have directed our research towards the synthesis and characterisation of heterocycle-peptide hybrids based on the indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine core. This privileged structure is a water-soluble and synthetically accessible scaffold with affinity for diverse GPCRs. Herein we have prepared a solid-phase combinatorial library of 80 indoloquinolizidine-peptides to identify compounds with enhanced binding affinity at D2R, a receptor that is crucial to re-establish activity on dopamine-depleted degenerated GABAergic neurons. We applied computational tools and high-throughput screening assays to identify 9a{1,3,3} as a ligand for dopamine receptors with nanomolar affinity and agonist activity at D2R. Our results validate the application of indoloquinolizidine-peptide combinatorial libraries to fine-tune the pharmacological profiles of multiple ligands at D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

  8. Primary structure of water buffalo beta-casein tryptic and CNBr peptides.

    PubMed

    Petrilli, P; Addeo, F; Chianese, L

    1983-01-01

    The partial amino acid sequence (70%) of water buffalo beta-casein has been determined by aligning the sequences of tryptic and CNBr peptides along the polypeptide chain of bovine beta-casein. Only five amino acid substitutions are observed. Moreover, as in all the beta-caseins so far investigated, a morphine-like peptide is present.

  9. A novel approach for predicting acyl glucuronide reactivity via Schiff base formation: development of rapidly formed peptide adducts for LC/MS/MS measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyao; Davis, Margaret; Li, Fangbiao; Azam, Farooq; Scatina, JoAnn; Talaat, Rasmy

    2004-09-01

    A novel technique to study the reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites to protein has been developed and is described herein. Considered here are acyl glucuronide metabolites, which have undergone the rearrangement of the glucuronic acid moiety at physiological temperature and pH. The investigation of the reactivity of these electrophilic metabolites was carried out by measuring the rate of reaction of rearranged AG metabolites in forming the corresponding acyl glucuronide-peptide adduct in the presence of Lys-Phe. This differs from the parallel technique used in forming AG adducts of proteins that have been previously reported. In the study described here, the Schiff base adduct, diclofenac acyl glucuronide-Lys-Phe product, was generated and structurally elucidated by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis. The product structure was proved to be a Schiff base adduct by chemical derivatization by nucleophilic addition of HCN and chemical reduction with NaCNBH(3), followed by LC/MS/MS analysis. It is proposed here that the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronides as measured by covalent binding to protein is proportional to the amount of its peptide adduct generated with the peptide technique described. The application of this technique to the assessment of the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites was validated by developing a reactivity rank of seven carboxylic acid-containing drugs. Consistency was achieved between the ranking of reactivity in the peptide technique for these seven compounds and the rankings found in the literature. In addition, a correlation (R(2) = 0.95) was revealed between the formation of a peptide adduct and the rearrangement rate of the primary acyl glucuronide of seven tested compounds. A structure effect on the degree of reactivity has demonstrated the rate order: acetic acid > propionic acid > benzoic acid derivatives. A rational explanation of this order was proposed, based on the inherent

  10. Lexical alignment in triadic communication.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one's interlocutor's lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants' lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment.

  11. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  12. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  13. Transformation and Alignment in Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Carl J.; Hahn, Ulrike; Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper contrasts two structural accounts of psychological similarity: structural alignment (SA) and Representational Distortion (RD). SA proposes that similarity is determined by how readily the structures of two objects can be brought into alignment; RD measures similarity by the complexity of the transformation that "distorts" one…

  14. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  15. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  16. Lexical alignment in triadic communication

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one’s interlocutor’s lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants’ lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment. PMID:25762955

  17. Curriculum Alignment: Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitzel, Thomas C.; Vogler, Daniel E.

    Curriculum alignment is the conscious congruence of three educational elements: curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Alignment is rooted in the belief that instructional plans are established through outcomes-based content goals and the goal of assuring that delivery and assessment are congruent. Platform unity, based on the Principles of…

  18. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  19. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mäde, Veronika; Els-Heindl, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Summary The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies. PMID:24991269

  20. Heterogeneous Data Fusion via Space Alignment Using Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Jaegul; Bohn, Shawn J.; Nakamura, Grant C.; White, Amanda M.; Park, Haesun

    2012-04-26

    Heterogeneous data sets are typically represented in different feature spaces, making it difficult to analyze relationships spanning different data sets even when they are semantically related. Data fusion via space alignment can remedy this task by integrating multiple data sets lying in different spaces into one common space. Given a set of reference correspondence data that share the same semantic meaning across different spaces, space alignment attempts to place the corresponding reference data as close together as possible, and accordingly, the entire data are aligned in a common space. Space alignment involves optimizing two potentially conflicting criteria: minimum deformation of the original relationships and maximum alignment between the different spaces. To solve this problem, we provide a novel graph embedding framework for space alignment, which converts each data set into a graph and assigns zero distance between reference correspondence pairs resulting in a single graph. We propose a graph embedding method for fusion based on nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS). Its criteria using the rank order rather than the distance allows nonmetric MDS to effectively handle both deformation and alignment. Experiments using parallel data sets demonstrate that our approach works well in comparison to existing methods such as constrained Laplacian eigenmaps, Procrustes analysis, and tensor decomposition. We also present standard cross-domain information retrieval tests as well as interesting visualization examples using space alignment.

  1. Botulinum alignment for congenital esotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Ing, M R

    1992-01-01

    This is the first report of a group of patients with congenital esotropia examined for motor and sensory evidence of binocularity a minimum of 3 years after alignment by botulinum. Evidence for binocularity was clearly present in approximately one half of the patients. Lag time to satisfactory alignment was at least 1 month (average, 5 months) following the initial botulinum injection. The results must be considered preliminary. However, when these results are compared with those of patients with congenital esotropia aligned by incisional surgery by age 2 years and examined with the same testing devices by this same investigator, botulinum alignment appears to be less effective than surgical alignment in establishing evidence for binocularity (P < 0.005). PMID:1494828

  2. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit .

  3. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit . PMID:27397138

  4. Space Mirror Alignment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  5. Magnetic alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, L. V.; Schenz, R. F.; Sommargren, G. E.

    1990-08-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This article begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100-μm accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The 100-μm accuracy is an error circle about an ideal axis for 300 m or more. The article describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axes of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development of a straight-line reference based on the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. The Poisson alignment reference system should be accurate to 25 μm over 300 m, which is believed to be a factor-of-4 improvement over earlier techniques. An error budget shows that only 25% of the total budgeted tolerance is used for the alignment reference system, so the remaining tolerances should fall within the allowable range for FEL alignment.

  6. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  7. Improving scanner wafer alignment performance by target optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Philippe; Jehoul, Christiane; Socha, Robert; Menchtchikov, Boris; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Kent, Eric; Schoonewelle, Hielke; Tinnemans, Patrick; Tuffy, Paul; Belen, Jun; Wise, Rich

    2016-03-01

    In the process nodes of 10nm and below, the patterning complexity along with the processing and materials required has resulted in a need to optimize alignment targets in order to achieve the required precision, accuracy and throughput performance. Recent industry publications on the metrology target optimization process have shown a move from the expensive and time consuming empirical methodologies, towards a faster computational approach. ASML's Design for Control (D4C) application, which is currently used to optimize YieldStar diffraction based overlay (DBO) metrology targets, has been extended to support the optimization of scanner wafer alignment targets. This allows the necessary process information and design methodology, used for DBO target designs, to be leveraged for the optimization of alignment targets. In this paper, we show how we applied this computational approach to wafer alignment target design. We verify the correlation between predictions and measurements for the key alignment performance metrics and finally show the potential alignment and overlay performance improvements that an optimized alignment target could achieve.

  8. A novel randomized iterative strategy for aligning multiple protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Berger, M P; Munson, P J

    1991-10-01

    The rigorous alignment of multiple protein sequences becomes impractical even with a modest number of sequences, since computer memory and time requirements increase as the product of the lengths of the sequences. We have devised a strategy to approach such an optimal alignment, which modifies the intensive computer storage and time requirements of dynamic programming. Our algorithm randomly divides a group of unaligned sequences into two subgroups, between which an optimal alignment is then obtained by a Needleman-Wunsch style of algorithm. Our algorithm uses a matrix with dimensions corresponding to the lengths of the two aligned sequence subgroups. The pairwise alignment process is repeated using different random divisions of the whole group into two subgroups. Compared with the rigorous approach of solving the n-dimensional lattice by dynamic programming, our iterative algorithm results in alignments that match or are close to the optimal solution, on a limited set of test problems. We have implemented this algorithm in a computer program that runs on the IBM PC class of machines, together with a user-friendly environment for interactively selecting sequences or groups of sequences to be aligned either simultaneously or progressively.

  9. Testing the tidal alignment model of galaxy intrinsic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; McQuinn, Matthew E-mail: mmcquinn@berkeley.edu

    2011-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has become a powerful probe of large-scale structure and cosmological parameters. Precision weak lensing measurements require an understanding of the intrinsic alignment of galaxy ellipticities, which can in turn inform models of galaxy formation. It is hypothesized that elliptical galaxies align with the background tidal field and that this alignment mechanism dominates the correlation between ellipticities on cosmological scales (in the absence of lensing). We use recent large-scale structure measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test this picture with several statistics: (1) the correlation between ellipticity and galaxy overdensity, w{sub g+}; (2) the intrinsic alignment auto-correlation functions; (3) the correlation functions of curl-free, E, and divergence-free, B, modes, the latter of which is zero in the linear tidal alignment theory; (4) the alignment correlation function, w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ), a recently developed statistic that generalizes the galaxy correlation function to account for the angle between the galaxy separation vector and the principle axis of ellipticity. We show that recent measurements are largely consistent with the tidal alignment model and discuss dependence on galaxy luminosity. In addition, we show that at linear order the tidal alignment model predicts that the angular dependence of w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ) is simply w{sub g+}(r{sub p})cos (2θ) and that this dependence is consistent with recent measurements. We also study how stochastic nonlinear contributions to galaxy ellipticity impact these statistics. We find that a significant fraction of the observed LRG ellipticity can be explained by alignment with the tidal field on scales ∼> 10 \\hMpc. These considerations are relevant to galaxy formation and evolution.

  10. A hybrid retention time alignment algorithm for SWATH-MS data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Amon, Sabine; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Recently, data-independent acquisition (DIA) MS has gained popularity as a qualitative-quantitative workflow for proteomics. One outstanding problem in the analysis of DIA-MS data is alignment of chromatographic retention times across multiple samples, which facilitates peptide identification and accurate quantification. Here, we present a novel hybrid (profile-based and feature-based) algorithm for LC-MS alignment and test it on sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH) (a type of DIA) data. Our algorithm uses a profile-based dynamic time warping algorithm to obtain a coarse alignment and corrects large retention time shifts, and then uses a feature-based bipartite matching algorithm to match feature to feature at a fine scale. We evaluated our method by comparing our aligned feature pairs to peptide identification results of pseudo-MS2 spectra exported by DIA-Umpire, a recently reported tool for deconvoluting DIA-MS data. We proposed that our method can be used to align DIA-MS data prior to identification, and the alignment can be used to delete noise peaks or screen for differentially changed features. We found that a simple alignment-enabled denoising scheme can reduce the number of pseudo-MS2 spectra exported by DIA-Umpire by up to around 40%, while retaining a comparable number of identifications. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of our tool for accurate label-free relative quantification across multiple SWATH runs.

  11. A hybrid retention time alignment algorithm for SWATH-MS data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Amon, Sabine; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Recently, data-independent acquisition (DIA) MS has gained popularity as a qualitative-quantitative workflow for proteomics. One outstanding problem in the analysis of DIA-MS data is alignment of chromatographic retention times across multiple samples, which facilitates peptide identification and accurate quantification. Here, we present a novel hybrid (profile-based and feature-based) algorithm for LC-MS alignment and test it on sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH) (a type of DIA) data. Our algorithm uses a profile-based dynamic time warping algorithm to obtain a coarse alignment and corrects large retention time shifts, and then uses a feature-based bipartite matching algorithm to match feature to feature at a fine scale. We evaluated our method by comparing our aligned feature pairs to peptide identification results of pseudo-MS2 spectra exported by DIA-Umpire, a recently reported tool for deconvoluting DIA-MS data. We proposed that our method can be used to align DIA-MS data prior to identification, and the alignment can be used to delete noise peaks or screen for differentially changed features. We found that a simple alignment-enabled denoising scheme can reduce the number of pseudo-MS2 spectra exported by DIA-Umpire by up to around 40%, while retaining a comparable number of identifications. Finally, we demonstrated the utility of our tool for accurate label-free relative quantification across multiple SWATH runs. PMID:27302277

  12. Structural Alignment Sensor Feasibility Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. H.; Huang, C. C.; Hodor, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A structural alignment sensor (SAS) was developed for use with large deployable antenna systems for contour measurement and/or active control. The SAS is a laser ranging system using frequency modulation and accurate phase measurement to determine distance. Work was done with a CO2 and HeNe laser. The capability of the SAS to measure antenna rib contours was studied over ranges of 50 meters to a resolution of 100 microns. Initial resolution data was taken with the CO2 system. This data shows that it will indeed meet the SAS requirements. The development of the HeNe system was initiated because it offers substantial improvement in size, weight, and power over the CO2 system. The final demonstration was made with the HeNe system and it too showed that the SAS requirements could be met with this alternate approach. The projection of these results to a conceptual design for a flight system and its application are described.

  13. Effects of diatomic reagent alignment on the A + BC reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattengill, M. D.; Zare, R. N.; Jaffe, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A computational study is reported on the A + BC - AB + C bimolecular exchange reaction in which BC is aligned with respect to the approach direction of atom A so that the initial rotational angular momentum vector of BC is either parallel (or equivalently antiparallel) or perpendicular to the initial velocity vector of A. The calculations employ a modification of the extended LEPS potential, which permits straightforward generation of noncollinear minimum energy reaction paths. The calculations clearly demonstrate that diatomic reagent alignment can markedly affect the nature of reaction product early partitioning; they also demonstrate that diatomic reagent alignment affects reactive cross sections.

  14. Aligning transcript of historical documents using dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaev, Irina; Cohen, Rafi; El-Sana, Jihad; Kedem, Klara

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate approach for aligning historical documents with their corresponding transcription. First, a representative of each letter in the historical document is cropped. Then, the transcription is transformed to synthetic word images by representing the letters in the transcription by the cropped letters. These synthetic word images are aligned to groups of connected components in the original text, along each line, using dynamic programming. For measuring image similarities we experimented with a variety of feature extraction and matching methods. The presented alignment algorithm was tested on two historical datasets and provided excellent results.

  15. Incorporating Linguistic Information to Statistical Word-Level Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendejas, Eduardo; Barceló, Grettel; Gelbukh, Alexander; Sidorov, Grigori

    Parallel texts are enriched by alignment algorithms, thus establishing a relationship between the structures of the implied languages. Depending on the alignment level, the enrichment can be performed on paragraphs, sentences or words, of the expressed content in the source language and its translation. There are two main approaches to perform word-level alignment: statistical or linguistic. Due to the dissimilar grammar rules the languages have, the statistical algorithms usually give lower precision. That is why the development of this type of algorithms is generally aimed at a specific language pair using linguistic techniques. A hybrid alignment system based on the combination of the two traditional approaches is presented in this paper. It provides user-friendly configuration and is adaptable to the computational environment. The system uses linguistic resources and procedures such as identification of cognates, morphological information, syntactic trees, dictionaries, and semantic domains. We show that the system outperforms existing algorithms.

  16. Efficient visual grasping alignment for cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicewarner, Keith E.; Kelley, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Monocular information from a gripper-mounted camera is used to servo the robot gripper to grasp a cylinder. The fundamental concept for rapid pose estimation is to reduce the amount of information that needs to be processed during each vision update interval. The grasping procedure is divided into four phases: learn, recognition, alignment, and approach. In the learn phase, a cylinder is placed in the gripper and the pose estimate is stored and later used as the servo target. This is performed once as a calibration step. The recognition phase verifies the presence of a cylinder in the camera field of view. An initial pose estimate is computed and uncluttered scan regions are selected. The radius of the cylinder is estimated by moving the robot a fixed distance toward the cylinder and observing the change in the image. The alignment phase processes only the scan regions obtained previously. Rapid pose estimates are used to align the robot with the cylinder at a fixed distance from it. The relative motion of the cylinder is used to generate an extrapolated pose-based trajectory for the robot controller. The approach phase guides the robot gripper to a grasping position. The cylinder can be grasped with a minimal reaction force and torque when only rough global pose information is initially available.

  17. Two Influential Primate Classifications Logically Aligned

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Nico M.; Pier, Naomi M.; Reeder, Deeann M.; Chen, Mingmin; Yu, Shizhuo; Kianmajd, Parisa; Bowers, Shawn; Ludäscher, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Classifications and phylogenies of perceived natural entities change in the light of new evidence. Taxonomic changes, translated into Code-compliant names, frequently lead to name:meaning dissociations across succeeding treatments. Classification standards such as the Mammal Species of the World (MSW) may experience significant levels of taxonomic change from one edition to the next, with potential costs to long-term, large-scale information integration. This circumstance challenges the biodiversity and phylogenetic data communities to express taxonomic congruence and incongruence in ways that both humans and machines can process, that is, to logically represent taxonomic alignments across multiple classifications. We demonstrate that such alignments are feasible for two classifications of primates corresponding to the second and third MSW editions. Our approach has three main components: (i) use of taxonomic concept labels, that is name sec. author (where sec. means according to), to assemble each concept hierarchy separately via parent/child relationships; (ii) articulation of select concepts across the two hierarchies with user-provided Region Connection Calculus (RCC-5) relationships; and (iii) the use of an Answer Set Programming toolkit to infer and visualize logically consistent alignments of these input constraints. Our use case entails the Primates sec. Groves (1993; MSW2–317 taxonomic concepts; 233 at the species level) and Primates sec. Groves (2005; MSW3–483 taxonomic concepts; 376 at the species level). Using 402 RCC-5 input articulations, the reasoning process yields a single, consistent alignment and 153,111 Maximally Informative Relations that constitute a comprehensive meaning resolution map for every concept pair in the Primates sec. MSW2/MSW3. The complete alignment, and various partitions thereof, facilitate quantitative analyses of name:meaning dissociation, revealing that nearly one in three taxonomic names are not reliable across

  18. Two Influential Primate Classifications Logically Aligned.

    PubMed

    Franz, Nico M; Pier, Naomi M; Reeder, Deeann M; Chen, Mingmin; Yu, Shizhuo; Kianmajd, Parisa; Bowers, Shawn; Ludäscher, Bertram

    2016-07-01

    Classifications and phylogenies of perceived natural entities change in the light of new evidence. Taxonomic changes, translated into Code-compliant names, frequently lead to name:meaning dissociations across succeeding treatments. Classification standards such as the Mammal Species of the World (MSW) may experience significant levels of taxonomic change from one edition to the next, with potential costs to long-term, large-scale information integration. This circumstance challenges the biodiversity and phylogenetic data communities to express taxonomic congruence and incongruence in ways that both humans and machines can process, that is, to logically represent taxonomic alignments across multiple classifications. We demonstrate that such alignments are feasible for two classifications of primates corresponding to the second and third MSW editions. Our approach has three main components: (i) use of taxonomic concept labels, that is name sec. author (where sec. means according to), to assemble each concept hierarchy separately via parent/child relationships; (ii) articulation of select concepts across the two hierarchies with user-provided Region Connection Calculus (RCC-5) relationships; and (iii) the use of an Answer Set Programming toolkit to infer and visualize logically consistent alignments of these input constraints. Our use case entails the Primates sec. Groves (1993; MSW2-317 taxonomic concepts; 233 at the species level) and Primates sec. Groves (2005; MSW3-483 taxonomic concepts; 376 at the species level). Using 402 RCC-5 input articulations, the reasoning process yields a single, consistent alignment and 153,111 Maximally Informative Relations that constitute a comprehensive meaning resolution map for every concept pair in the Primates sec. MSW2/MSW3. The complete alignment, and various partitions thereof, facilitate quantitative analyses of name:meaning dissociation, revealing that nearly one in three taxonomic names are not reliable across treatments

  19. CMP-compatible alignment strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouchouze, Eric; Darracq, Jean-Michel; Gemen, Jack

    1997-07-01

    As semiconductor technology continues its way towards smaller geometries, CMP has gained acceptance as the planarization technique for interconnect layers. Its benefits are well known, especially in terms of imaging. However, one of its major drawbacks is to make difficult the alignment of interconnect layers, since a planarized alignment mark is less visible for the stepper's alignment system. Usual workarounds include the clearing of process layers from the alignment mark before exposing the product layer. Although these workarounds provide a temporary solution, they are too costly to be viable in a mass production environment. In this experiment, a non-zero alignment strategy using new mark designs has been tested on the backend layers of a 0.35 micrometers CMOS process. New mark designs have been evaluated, where the space part of the gratings has been filled with 'segments' of various width, the purpose being to minimize the planarization effect of the metallization process. For the selection of the best mark design, several criteria have been taken into account: the stepper's built-in alignment diagnostic software provides information on the quality of the alignment signal. The most important criterion is the product overlay measurement and its repeatability. Marks cross sections using a FIB/SEM tool give indications on the mark profile after metal deposition.

  20. Galaxy Alignments: Theory, Modelling & Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Cacciato, Marcello; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kirk, Donnacha; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Brown, Michael L.; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The shapes of galaxies are not randomly oriented on the sky. During the galaxy formation and evolution process, environment has a strong influence, as tidal gravitational fields in the large-scale structure tend to align nearby galaxies. Additionally, events such as galaxy mergers affect the relative alignments of both the shapes and angular momenta of galaxies throughout their history. These "intrinsic galaxy alignments" are known to exist, but are still poorly understood. This review will offer a pedagogical introduction to the current theories that describe intrinsic galaxy alignments, including the apparent difference in intrinsic alignment between early- and late-type galaxies and the latest efforts to model them analytically. It will then describe the ongoing efforts to simulate intrinsic alignments using both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations. Due to the relative youth of this field, there is still much to be done to understand intrinsic galaxy alignments and this review summarises the current state of the field, providing a solid basis for future work.

  1. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  2. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  3. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  4. Incorporating peak grouping information for alignment of multiple liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wandy, Joe; Daly, Rónán; Breitling, Rainer; Rogers, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been widely used for large-scale comparative studies in systems biology, including proteomics, glycomics and metabolomics. In almost all experimental design, it is necessary to compare chromatograms across biological or technical replicates and across sample groups. Central to this is the peak alignment step, which is one of the most important but challenging preprocessing steps. Existing alignment tools do not take into account the structural dependencies between related peaks that coelute and are derived from the same metabolite or peptide. We propose a direct matching peak alignment method for LC/MS data that incorporates related peaks information (within each LC/MS run) and investigate its effect on alignment performance (across runs). The groupings of related peaks necessary for our method can be obtained from any peak clustering method and are built into a pair-wise peak similarity score function. The similarity score matrix produced is used by an approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem to produce the actual alignment result. Results: We demonstrate that related peak information can improve alignment performance. The performance is evaluated on a set of benchmark datasets, where our method performs competitively compared to other popular alignment tools. Availability: The proposed alignment method has been implemented as a stand-alone application in Python, available for download at http://github.com/joewandy/peak-grouping-alignment. Contact: Simon.Rogers@glasgow.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25649621

  5. SAS-Pro: simultaneous residue assignment and structure superposition for protein structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shweta B; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html.

  6. SAS-Pro: Simultaneous Residue Assignment and Structure Superposition for Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shweta B.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html. PMID:22662161

  7. Hierarchical modeling for rare event detection and cell subset alignment across flow cytometry samples.

    PubMed

    Cron, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Frelinger, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Singh, Satwinder K; Britten, Cedrik M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; West, Mike; Chan, Cliburn

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less). Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM) approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM) naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a consistent labeling

  8. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  9. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  10. The H-index of 'an approach to correlate tandem mass spectral data of peptides with amino acid sequences in a protein database'.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Magnetic axis alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Lee V.; Schenz, Richard F.; Sommargren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This paper begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100 micrometer accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The paper describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axis of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development and use of the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. An error budget shows that the Poisson alignment reference system will make it possible to meet the alignment tolerances for an FEL.

  12. Synthetic Peptide libraries for T-cell epitope identification.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, H S; Drijfhout, J W; Koning, F

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes a methodology for elucidating immunogenic epitopes stimulatory for CD4(+) T-cell clones (Fig. 1). The methodology makes use of synthetic peptide libraries and must be regarded as an alternative to other approaches, such as peptide elution or the application of genetic libraries. The methodology only requires knowledge about the restriction element of the T-cell clone. The restriction element determines which major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding anchor motif must be built into the library peptides. A synthetic peptide library is prepared comprising approx 8 million peptides. The synthesis proceeds via a mix-and-split protocol using a solidphase approach on a hybrid resin (1,2). On a hybrid resin, most of the peptide material (84%) is attached via an acid-labile linker whereas the remaining part of the peptide material is acid-stable attached (3). During synthesis, resinbound peptides comprising 14 amino acid residues are produced, with each resin bead containing one unique peptide (4,5). The beads are split into 384 pools, with each pool containing 20,000 beads. From each pool, about 28% of the peptide material is cleaved from every bead. Subsequently, in the first screening round, the 384 pools, each containing 20,000 solubilized peptides, are tested in a proliferation assay with the T-cell clone. Fig. 1. Flow diagram of the complete procedure for the identification of T-cell epitopes using synthetic peptide libraries (1).

  13. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  14. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  15. Controlling the alignment of liquid crystals by nanoparticle-doped and UV-treated polyimide alignment films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Shie-Chang; Hwang, Su-June; Chen, Tai-An; Liu, Han-Shiang; Chen, Mu-Zhe

    2012-03-01

    We have developed two approaches for controlling the pretilt angles of liquid crystal molecules by using conventional polyimide (PI) alignment materials either doping homogeneous PIs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsequioxanes (POSS) nanoparticles or treating homeotropic PIs with ultraviolet light. These techniques are very simple and are compatible with current methods familiar in the LCD industry. The characteristics of modified PI alignment films and their applications for photonic devices are demonstrated in this paper.

  16. Visual attitude orientation and alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. A.; Morris, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Active vehicle optical alignment aid and a passive vehicle three-dimensional alignment target ensure proper orientation and alignment plus control of the closure range and rate between two bodies, one in controlled motion and one at rest.

  17. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  18. Theory of grain alignment in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne G.

    1993-01-01

    Research accomplishments are presented and include the following: (1) mathematical theory of grain alignment; (2) super-paramagnetic alignment of molecular cloud grains; and (3) theory of grain alignment by ambipolar diffusion.

  19. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  20. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures.

  1. Recent advances in peptide-based subunit nanovaccines.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is the most efficient way to protect humans against pathogens. Peptide-based vaccines offer several advantages over classical vaccines, which utilized whole organisms or proteins. However, peptides alone are not immunogenic and need a delivery system that can boost their recognition by the immune system. In recent years, nanotechnology-based approaches have become one of the most promising strategies in peptide vaccine delivery. This review summarizes knowledge on peptide vaccines and nanotechnology-based approaches for their delivery. The recently reported nano-sized delivery platforms for peptide antigens are reviewed, including nanoparticles composed of polymers, peptides, lipids, inorganic materials and nanotubes. The future prospects for peptide-based nanovaccines are discussed.

  2. Neural nets for aligning optical components in harsh environments: Beam smoothing spatial filter as an example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The goal is to develop an approach to automating the alignment and adjustment of optical measurement, visualization, inspection, and control systems. Classical controls, expert systems, and neural networks are three approaches to automating the alignment of an optical system. Neural networks were chosen for this project and the judgements that led to this decision are presented. Neural networks were used to automate the alignment of the ubiquitous laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The results and future plans of the project are presented.

  3. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  5. Fixture for aligning motor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shervington, Roger M.; Vaghani, Vallabh V.; Vanek, Laurence D.; Christensen, Scott A.

    2009-12-08

    An alignment fixture includes a rotor fixture, a stator fixture and a sensor system which measures a rotational displacement therebetween. The fixture precisely measures rotation of a generator stator assembly away from a NULL position referenced by a unique reference spline on the rotor shaft. By providing an adjustable location of the stator assembly within the housing, the magnetic axes within each generator shall be aligned to a predetermined and controlled tolerance between the generator interface mounting pin and the reference spline on the rotor shaft. Once magnetically aligned, each generator is essentially a line replaceable unit which may be readily mounted to any input of a multi-generator gearbox assembly with the assurance that the magnetic alignment will be within a predetermined tolerance.

  6. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  7. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  8. Recursive dynamic programming for adaptive sequence and structure alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, R.; Zimmer, R.; Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a new alignment procedure that is capable of aligning protein sequences and structures in a unified manner. Recursive dynamic programming (RDP) is a hierarchical method which, on each level of the hierarchy, identifies locally optimal solutions and assembles them into partial alignments of sequences and/or structures. In contrast to classical dynamic programming, RDP can also handle alignment problems that use objective functions not obeying the principle of prefix optimality, e.g. scoring schemes derived from energy potentials of mean force. For such alignment problems, RDP aims at computing solutions that are near-optimal with respect to the involved cost function and biologically meaningful at the same time. Towards this goal, RDP maintains a dynamic balance between different factors governing alignment fitness such as evolutionary relationships and structural preferences. As in the RDP method gaps are not scored explicitly, the problematic assignment of gap cost parameters is circumvented. In order to evaluate the RDP approach we analyse whether known and accepted multiple alignments based on structural information can be reproduced with the RDP method.

  9. Accurate multiple network alignment through context-sensitive random walk

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Comparative network analysis can provide an effective means of analyzing large-scale biological networks and gaining novel insights into their structure and organization. Global network alignment aims to predict the best overall mapping between a given set of biological networks, thereby identifying important similarities as well as differences among the networks. It has been shown that network alignment methods can be used to detect pathways or network modules that are conserved across different networks. Until now, a number of network alignment algorithms have been proposed based on different formulations and approaches, many of them focusing on pairwise alignment. Results In this work, we propose a novel multiple network alignment algorithm based on a context-sensitive random walk model. The random walker employed in the proposed algorithm switches between two different modes, namely, an individual walk on a single network and a simultaneous walk on two networks. The switching decision is made in a context-sensitive manner by examining the current neighborhood, which is effective for quantitatively estimating the degree of correspondence between nodes that belong to different networks, in a manner that sensibly integrates node similarity and topological similarity. The resulting node correspondence scores are then used to predict the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) alignment of the given networks. Conclusions Performance evaluation based on synthetic networks as well as real protein-protein interaction networks shows that the proposed algorithm can construct more accurate multiple network alignments compared to other leading methods. PMID:25707987

  10. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions.

  11. A hypothetical model for the peptide binding domain of hsp70 based on the peptide binding domain of HLA.

    PubMed Central

    Rippmann, F; Taylor, W R; Rothbard, J B; Green, N M

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of the peptide binding domains of 33 70 kd heat shock proteins (hsp70) have been aligned and a consensus secondary structure has been deduced. Individual members showed no significant deviation from the consensus, which showed a beta 4 alpha motif repeated twice, followed by two further helices and a terminus rich in Pro and Gly. The repeated motif could be aligned with the secondary structure of the functionally equivalent peptide binding domain of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I maintaining equivalent residues in structurally important positions in the two families and a model was built based on this alignment. The interaction of this domain with the ATP domain is considered. The overall model is shown to be consistent with the properties of products of chymotryptic cleavage. PMID:2022182

  12. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  16. Elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education aligned with STEM designed projects created by Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students in a Reggio Emilio project approach setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Nicole

    This paper examines how elements of the Next Generation Science Standards' (NGSS) New Framework for K-12 Science Education standards (National Research Council 2011)---specifically the cross-cutting concept "cause and effect" are aligned with early childhood students' creation of projects of their choice. The study took place in a Reggio Emilio-inspired, K-12 school, in a multi-aged kindergarten, first and second grade classroom with 14 students. Students worked on their projects independently with the assistance of their peers and teachers. The students' projects and the alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards' New Framework were analyzed by using pre and post assessments, student interviews, and discourse analysis. Results indicate that elements of the New Framework for K-12 Science Education emerged through students' project presentation, particularly regarding the notion of "cause and effect". More specifically, results show that initially students perceived the relationship between "cause and effect" to be negative.

  17. Highly Angiogenic Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Kang, Marci K.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of current tissue regeneration approaches using artificial scaffolds are fibrous encapsulation, lack of host cellular infiltration, unwanted immune responses, surface degradation preceding biointegration, and artificial degradation byproducts. Specifically, for scaffolds larger than 200 500 μm, implants must be accompanied by host angiogenesis in order to provide adequate nutrient/waste exchange in the newly forming tissue. In the current work, we design a peptide-based self-assembling nanofibrous hydrogel containing cell-mediated degradation and proangiogenic moieties that specifically address these challenges. This hydrogel can be easily delivered by syringe, is rapidly infiltrated by cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, and rapidly forms an extremely robust mature vascular network. scaffolds show no signs of fibrous encapsulation and after 3 weeks are resorbed into the native tissue. These supramolecular assemblies may prove a vital paradigm for tissue regeneration and specifically for ischemic tissue disease. PMID:25584521

  18. Alignment control of carbon nanotube forest from random to nearly perfectly aligned by utilizing the crowding effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Futaba, Don N; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-07-24

    Alignment represents an important structural parameter of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) owing to their exceptionally high aspect ratio, one-dimensional property. In this paper, we demonstrate a general approach to control the alignment of few-walled CNT forests from nearly random to nearly ideally aligned by tailoring the density of active catalysts at the catalyst formation stage, which can be experimentally achieved by controlling the CNT forest mass density. Experimentally, we found that the catalyst density and the degree of alignment were inseparably linked because of a crowding effect from neighboring CNTs, that is, the increasing confinement of CNTs with increased density. Therefore, the CNT density governed the degree of alignment, which increased monotonically with the density. This relationship, in turn, allowed the precise control of the alignment through control of the mass density. To understand this behavior further, we developed a simple, first-order model based on the flexural modulus of the CNTs that could quantitatively describe the relationship between the degree of alignment (HOF) and carbon nanotube spacing (crowding effect) of any type of CNTs.

  19. An Improved Method for Completely Uncertain Biological Network Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Zhao, Muwei; Zhong, Wei; He, Jieyue

    2015-01-01

    With the continuous development of biological experiment technology, more and more data related to uncertain biological networks needs to be analyzed. However, most of current alignment methods are designed for the deterministic biological network. Only a few can solve the probabilistic network alignment problem. However, these approaches only use the part of probabilistic data in the original networks allowing only one of the two networks to be probabilistic. To overcome the weakness of current approaches, an improved method called completely probabilistic biological network comparison alignment (C_PBNA) is proposed in this paper. This new method is designed for complete probabilistic biological network alignment based on probabilistic biological network alignment (PBNA) in order to take full advantage of the uncertain information of biological network. The degree of consistency (agreement) indicates that C_PBNA can find the results neglected by PBNA algorithm. Furthermore, the GO consistency (GOC) and global network alignment score (GNAS) have been selected as evaluation criteria, and all of them proved that C_PBNA can obtain more biologically significant results than those of PBNA algorithm. PMID:26000284

  20. Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, Rami; Zhang, Chen; van der Weegen, Rob; Ruiz, Luis; Li, Changyi; Keten, Sinan; Helms, Brett A.; Xu, Ting

    2011-09-06

    A facile route to generate cyclic peptide nanotubes with tunable interiors is presented. By incorporating 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid in the d,l-alternating primary sequence of a cyclic peptide, a functional group can be presented in the interior of the nanotubes without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes. The new design of such a cyclic peptide also enables one to modulate the nanotube growth process to be compatible with the polymer processing window without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes, thus opening a viable approach toward molecularly defined porous membranes.

  1. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  2. SWAMP+: multiple subsequence alignment using associative massive parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfadt, Shannon Irene; Baker, Johnnie W

    2010-10-18

    A new parallel algorithm SWAMP+ incorporates the Smith-Waterman sequence alignment on an associative parallel model known as ASC. It is a highly sensitive parallel approach that expands traditional pairwise sequence alignment. This is the first parallel algorithm to provide multiple non-overlapping, non-intersecting subsequence alignments with the accuracy of Smith-Waterman. The efficient algorithm provides multiple alignments similar to BLAST while creating a better workflow for the end users. The parallel portions of the code run in O(m+n) time using m processors. When m = n, the algorithmic analysis becomes O(n) with a coefficient of two, yielding a linear speedup. Implementation of the algorithm on the SIMD ClearSpeed CSX620 confirms this theoretical linear speedup with real timings.

  3. Reconfigurable Photonic Capsules Containing Cholesteric Liquid Crystals with Planar Alignment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Seok; Kim, Su Kyung; Won, Jong Chan; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) reflect selected wavelengths of light owing to their periodic helical structures. The encapsulation of CLCs leads to photonic devices that can be easily processed and might be used as stand-alone microsensors. However, when CLCs are enclosed by polymeric membranes, they usually lose their planar alignment, leading to a deterioration of the optical performance. A microfluidics approach was employed to integrate an ultrathin alignment layer into microcapsules to separate the CLC core and the elastomeric solid membrane using triple-emulsion drops as the templates. The thinness of the alignment layer provides high lubrication resistance, preserving the layer integrity during elastic deformation of the membrane. The CLCs in the microcapsules can thus maintain their planar alignment, rendering the shape and optical properties highly reconfigurable.

  4. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  5. Combined Statistical Analyses of Peptide Intensities and Peptide Occurrences Improves Identification of Significant Peptides from MS-based Proteomics Data

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; McCue, Lee Ann; Waters, Katrina M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Varnum, Susan M.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based (LC-MS) proteomics uses peak intensities of proteolytic peptides to infer the differential abundance of peptides/proteins. However, substantial run-to-run variability in peptide intensities and observations (presence/absence) of peptides makes data analysis quite challenging. The missing abundance values in LC-MS proteomics data are difficult to address with traditional imputation-based approaches because the mechanisms by which data are missing are unknown a priori. Data can be missing due to random mechanisms such as experimental error, or non-random mechanisms such as a true biological effect. We present a statistical approach that uses a test of independence known as a G-test to test the null hypothesis of independence between the number of missing values and the experimental groups. We pair the G-test results evaluating independence of missing data (IMD) with a standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) that uses only means and variances computed from the observed data. Each peptide is therefore represented by two statistical confidence metrics, one for qualitative differential observation and one for quantitative differential intensity. We use two simulated and two real LC-MS datasets to demonstrate the robustness and sensitivity of the ANOVA-IMD approach for assigning confidence to peptides with significant differential abundance among experimental groups.

  6. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moles-Valls, Regina

    2010-05-01

    The CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world largest particle accelerator. ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the two general purpose experiments equipped with a charged particle tracking system built on two technologies: silicon and drift tube based detectors, composing the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID). The alignment of the tracking system poses a challenge as one should solve a linear equation with almost 36 000 degrees of freedom. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the silicon sensors is just few microns. This limit comes from the requirement that the misalignment should not worsen the resolution of the track parameter measurements by more than 20%. Therefore the alignment of the ATLAS ID requires complex algorithms with extensive CPU and memory usage. So far the proposed alignment algorithms are exercised on several applications. We will present the outline of the alignment approach and results from Cosmic Ray runs and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data taking. For the later application the trigger of the experiment is simulated and the event filter is applied in order to produce an alignment input data stream. The full alignment chain is tested using that stream and alignment constants are produced and validated within 24 h. Cosmic ray data serves to produce an early alignment of the real ATLAS Inner Detector even before the LHC start up. Beyond all tracking information, the assembly survey database contains essential information in order to determine the relative position of one module with respect to its neighbors. Finally a hardware system measuring an array of grid lines in the modules support structure with a Frequency Scan Interferometer monitors short time system deformations.

  7. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  8. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  9. Structure alignment of membrane proteins: Accuracy of available tools and a consensus strategy.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Marcus; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-09-01

    Protein structure alignment methods are used for the detection of evolutionary and functionally related positions in proteins. A wide array of different methods are available, but the choice of the best method is often not apparent to the user. Several studies have assessed the alignment accuracy and consistency of structure alignment methods, but none of these explicitly considered membrane proteins, which are important targets for drug development and have distinct structural features. Here, we compared 13 widely used pairwise structural alignment methods on a test set of homologous membrane protein structures (called HOMEP3). Each pair of structures was aligned and the corresponding sequence alignment was used to construct homology models. The model accuracy compared to the known structures was assessed using scoring functions not incorporated in the tested structural alignment methods. The analysis shows that fragment-based approaches such as FR-TM-align are the most useful for aligning structures of membrane proteins. Moreover, fragment-based approaches are more suitable for comparison of protein structures that have undergone large conformational changes. Nevertheless, no method was clearly superior to all other methods. Additionally, all methods lack a measure to rate the reliability of a position within a structure alignment. To solve both of these problems, we propose a consensus-type approach, combining alignments from four different methods, namely FR-TM-align, DaliLite, MATT, and FATCAT. Agreement between the methods is used to assign confidence values to each position of the alignment. Overall, we conclude that there remains scope for the improvement of structural alignment methods for membrane proteins.

  10. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Alice P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Laverty, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes) and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection. PMID:25436505

  11. AVPpred: collection and prediction of highly effective antiviral peptides.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Nishant; Qureshi, Abid; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-07-01

    In the battle against viruses, antiviral peptides (AVPs) had demonstrated the immense potential. Presently, more than 15 peptide-based drugs are in various stages of clinical trials. Emerging and re-emerging viruses further emphasize the efforts to accelerate antiviral drug discovery efforts. Despite, huge importance of the field, no dedicated AVP resource is available. In the present study, we have collected 1245 peptides which were experimentally checked for antiviral activity targeting important human viruses like influenza, HIV, HCV and SARS, etc. After removing redundant peptides, 1056 peptides were divided into 951 training and 105 validation data sets. We have exploited various peptides sequence features, i.e. motifs and alignment followed by amino acid composition and physicochemical properties during 5-fold cross validation using Support Vector Machine. Physiochemical properties-based model achieved maximum 85% accuracy and 0.70 Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC). Performance of this model on the experimental validation data set showed 86% accuracy and 0.71 MCC which is far better than the general antimicrobial peptides prediction methods. Therefore, AVPpred-the first web server for predicting the highly effective AVPs would certainly be helpful to researchers working on peptide-based antiviral development. The web server is freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/avppred. PMID:22638580

  12. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I.; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J.; Calixto-Romo, M. Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  13. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J; Calixto-Romo, M Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  14. On the hydrophobicity of peptides: Comparing empirical predictions of peptide log P values.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sarah J; Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Holliday, John D; Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    Peptides are of great therapeutic potential as vaccines and drugs. Knowledge of physicochemical descriptors, including the partition coefficient logP, is useful for the development of predictive Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs). We have investigated the accuracy of available programs for the prediction of logP values for peptides with known experimental values obtained from the literature. Eight prediction programs were tested, of which seven programs were fragment-based methods: XLogP, LogKow, PLogP, ACDLogP, AlogP, Interactive Analysis's LogP and MlogP; and one program used a whole molecule approach: QikProp. The predictive accuracy of the programs was assessed using r(2) values, with ALogP being the most effective (r( 2) = 0.822) and MLogP the least (r(2) = 0.090). We also examined three distinct types of peptide structure: blocked, unblocked, and cyclic. For each study (all peptides, blocked, unblocked and cyclic peptides) the performance of programs rated from best to worse is as follows: all peptides - ALogP, QikProp, PLogP, XLogP, IALogP, LogKow, ACDLogP, and MlogP; blocked peptides - PLogP, XLogP, ACDLogP, IALogP, LogKow, QikProp, ALogP, and MLogP; unblocked peptides - QikProp, IALogP, ALogP, ACDLogP, MLogP, XLogP, LogKow and PLogP; cyclic peptides - LogKow, ALogP, XLogP, MLogP, QikProp, ACDLogP, IALogP. In summary, all programs gave better predictions for blocked peptides, while, in general, logP values for cyclic peptides were under-predicted and those of unblocked peptides were over-predicted. PMID:17597897

  15. Observation of reduced cytotoxicity of aggregated amyloidogenic peptides with chaperone-like molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Xu, Meng; Mao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-07-26

    The pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases is associated with different types of aggregates of amyloidogenic peptides, including senile plaques, fibrils, protofibrils, and oligomers. It is therefore valuable to explore diversity of approaches toward reducing the cytotoxicity of amyloidogenic peptides by modulating aggregation behaviors. Herein we report an approach toward reducing the neuronal cytotoxicity of amyloidogenic peptides by accelerating the aggregation process, which is different from prevalent methods via inhibiting the aggregation of peptides. The pyridyl derivatives behave like chaperones to dramatically change the assembling characteristics of the peptides via strong hydrogen bond formation with C-termini of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which is revealed by using scanning probe microscopy. The light scattering experiments demonstrated the effect of the chaperone-like molecules on accelerating the aggregation process of Aβ peptides, accompanied by the reduced neuronal cytotoxicity of amyloidogenic peptides. These results would give rise to a complementary approach for modulating biological effects of the aggregates of amyloidogenic peptides.

  16. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  17. DIDA: Distributed Indexing Dispatched Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Hamid; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Raymond, Anthony; Jackman, Shaun D; Chu, Justin; Breshears, Clay P; Birol, Inanc

    2015-01-01

    One essential application in bioinformatics that is affected by the high-throughput sequencing data deluge is the sequence alignment problem, where nucleotide or amino acid sequences are queried against targets to find regions of close similarity. When queries are too many and/or targets are too large, the alignment process becomes computationally challenging. This is usually addressed by preprocessing techniques, where the queries and/or targets are indexed for easy access while searching for matches. When the target is static, such as in an established reference genome, the cost of indexing is amortized by reusing the generated index. However, when the targets are non-static, such as contigs in the intermediate steps of a de novo assembly process, a new index must be computed for each run. To address such scalability problems, we present DIDA, a novel framework that distributes the indexing and alignment tasks into smaller subtasks over a cluster of compute nodes. It provides a workflow beyond the common practice of embarrassingly parallel implementations. DIDA is a cost-effective, scalable and modular framework for the sequence alignment problem in terms of memory usage and runtime. It can be employed in large-scale alignments to draft genomes and intermediate stages of de novo assembly runs. The DIDA source code, sample files and user manual are available through http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/dida. The software is released under the British Columbia Cancer Agency License (BCCA), and is free for academic use. PMID:25923767

  18. Measuring peptide translocation into large unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Sara A; Nelson, Rachel B; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-01-27

    There is an active interest in peptides that readily cross cell membranes without the assistance of cell membrane receptors(1). Many of these are referred to as cell-penetrating peptides, which are frequently noted for their potential as drug delivery vectors(1-3). Moreover, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial peptides that operate via non-membrane lytic mechanisms(4,5), particularly those that cross bacterial membranes without causing cell lysis and kill cells by interfering with intracellular processes(6,7). In fact, authors have increasingly pointed out the relationship between cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides(1,8). A firm understanding of the process of membrane translocation and the relationship between peptide structure and its ability to translocate requires effective, reproducible assays for translocation. Several groups have proposed methods to measure translocation into large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUVs)(9-13). LUVs serve as useful models for bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes and are frequently used in peptide fluorescent studies(14,15). Here, we describe our application of the method first developed by Matsuzaki and co-workers to consider antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin and buforin II(16,17). In addition to providing our protocol for this method, we also present a straightforward approach to data analysis that quantifies translocation ability using this assay. The advantages of this translocation assay compared to others are that it has the potential to provide information about the rate of membrane translocation and does not require the addition of a fluorescent label, which can alter peptide properties(18), to tryptophan-containing peptides. Briefly, translocation ability into lipid vesicles is measured as a function of the Foster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between native tryptophan residues and dansyl phosphatidylethanolamine when proteins are associated with the external LUV membrane (Figure 1). Cell

  19. Global Alignment System for Large Genomic Sequencing

    2002-03-01

    AVID is a global alignment system tailored for the alignment of large genomic sequences up to megabases in length. Features include the possibility of one sequence being in draft form, fast alignment, robustness and accuracy. The method is an anchor based alignment using maximal matches derived from suffix trees.

  20. Photosensitive Polymers for Liquid Crystal Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahilny, U. V.; Stankevich, A. I.; Trofimova, A. V.; Muravsky, A. A.; Murauski, A. A.

    The peculiarities of alignment of liquid crystal (LC) materials by the layers of photocrosslinkable polymers with side benzaldehyde groups are considered. The investigation of mechanism of photostimulated alignment by rubbed benzaldehyde layer is performed. The methods of creation of multidomain aligning layers on the basis of photostimulated rubbing alignment are described.