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Sample records for peptide binding specificity

  1. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  2. Specific binding of a basic peptide from HIV-1 Rev.

    PubMed Central

    Kjems, J; Calnan, B J; Frankel, A D; Sharp, P A

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) encodes a regulatory protein, Rev, which is required for cytoplasmic expression of incompletely spliced viral mRNA. Rev activity is mediated through specific binding to a cis-acting Rev responsive element (RRE) located within the env region of HIV-1. A monomer Rev binding site corresponding to 37 nucleotides of the RRE (IIB RNA) was studied by RNA footprinting, modification interference experiments and mutational analysis. Surprisingly, a 17 amino acid peptide, corresponding to the basic domain of Rev, binds specifically to this site at essentially identical nucleotides and probably induces additional base pairing. The Rev protein and related peptide interact primarily with two sets of nucleotides located at the junction of single and double stranded regions, and at an additional site located within a helix. This suggests that the domains of proteins responsible for specific RNA binding can be remarkably small and that the interaction between RNA and protein can probably induce structure in both constituents. Images PMID:1547776

  3. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  4. Specific binding of GM1-binding peptides to high-density GM1 in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Miwa; Taki, Takao; Okahata, Yoshio; Sato, Toshinori

    2007-01-16

    The ganglioside Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Neu5Acalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GM1) is an important receptor. We have previously identified GM1-binding peptides based on affinity selection from a random peptide library. In the present study, we determined the amino acids essential for binding GM1 and investigated the specific interaction with GM1 in the lipid membrane. Arginines and aromatic amino acids in the consensus sequence (W/F)RxL(xP/Px)xFxx(Rx/xR)xP contributed to the ability of the peptides to bind GM1. The peptide p3, VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP, having the consensus sequence, showed high affinity for GM1 with a dissociation constant of 1.2 microM. Furthermore, the density-dependent binding of p3 was investigated using mixed monolayers of GM1 and Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GlcCer). p3 binds preferentially to high-density GM1, and its interaction with GM1 was found to be cooperative based on a Hill plot. These results indicated that a lateral assembly of GM1 molecules was required for the recognition of carbohydrates by p3. The GM1-binding peptide played a role as a unique anti-GM1 probe differing from the cholera toxin B subunit or antibodies.

  5. Identification of Mimotope Peptides Which Bind to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoping; Pestka, James J.; Hespenheide, Brandon M.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Linz, John E.; Hart, L. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 6F5 (mAb 6F5), which recognizes the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) (vomitoxin), was used to select for peptides that mimic the mycotoxin by employing a library of filamentous phages that have random 7-mer peptides on their surfaces. Two phage clones selected from the random peptide phage-displayed library coded for the amino acid sequences SWGPFPF and SWGPLPF. These clones were designated DONPEP.2 and DONPEP.12, respectively. The results of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggested that the two phage displayed peptides bound to mAb 6F5 specifically at the DON binding site. The amino acid sequence of DONPEP.2 plus a structurally flexible linker at the C terminus (SWGPFPFGGGSC) was synthesized and tested to determine its ability to bind to mAb 6F5. This synthetic peptide (designated peptide C430) and DON competed with each other for mAb 6F5 binding. When translationally fused with bacterial alkaline phosphatase, DONPEP.2 bound specifically to mAb 6F5, while the fusion protein retained alkaline phosphatase activity. The potential of using DONPEP.2 as an immunochemical reagent in a DON immunoassay was evaluated with a DON-spiked wheat extract. When peptide C430 was conjugated to bovine serum albumin, it elicited antibody specific to peptide C430 but not to DON in both mice and rabbits. In an in vitro translation system containing rabbit reticulocyte lysate, synthetic peptide C430 did not inhibit protein synthesis but did show antagonism toward DON-induced protein synthesis inhibition. These data suggest that the peptides selected in this study bind to mAb 6F5 and that peptide C430 binds to ribosomes at the same sites as DON. PMID:10427007

  6. Phosphorylation-dependent mineral type specificity for apatite-binding peptide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Addison, William N.; Miller, Sharon J.; Ramaswamy, Janani; Mansouri, Ahmad; Kohn, David H.; McKee, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    Apatite-binding peptides discovered by phage display provide an alternative design method for creating functional biomaterials for bone and tooth tissue repair. A limitation of this approach is the absence of display peptide phosphorylation – a post-translational modification important to mineral-binding proteins. To refine the material specificity of a recently identified apatite-binding peptide, and to determine critical design parameters (net charge, charge distribution, amino acid sequence and composition) controlling peptide affinity for mineral, we investigated the effects of phosphorylation and sequence scrambling on peptide adsorption to four different apatites (bone-like mineral, and three types of apatite containing initially 0, 5.6 and 10.5% carbonate). Phosphorylation of peptide VTKHLNQISQSY (pVTK) led to a 10-fold increase in peptide adsorption (compared to nonphosphorylated peptide) to bone-like mineral, and a 2-fold increase in adsorption to the carbonated apatite, but there was no effect of phosphorylation on peptide affinity to pure hydroxyapatite (without carbonate). Sequence scrambling of the nonphosphorylated VTK peptide enhanced its specificity for the bone-like mineral, but scrambled pVTK peptide did not significantly alter mineral-binding suggesting that despite the importance of sequence order and/or charge distribution to mineral binding, the enhanced binding after phosphorylation exceeds any further enhancement by altered sequence order. Osteoblast culture mineralization was dose-dependently inhibited by pVTK and to a significantly lesser extent by scrambled pVTK, while the nonphosphorylated and scrambled forms had no effect, indicating that inhibition of osteoblast mineralization is dependent on both peptide sequence and charge. Computational modeling of peptide-mineral interactions indicated a favorable change in binding energy upon phosphorylation that was unaffected by scrambling. In conclusion, phosphorylation of serine residues

  7. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on X-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with R osetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several R osetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

  8. Serine repeat antigen peptides which bind specifically to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Puentes, A; Garcia, J; Vera, R; Lopez, Q R; Urquiza, M; Vanegas, M; Salazar, L M; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-08-01

    It has been reported that serine repeat antigen (SERA) binds directly to human erythrocyte membranes, inside-out vesicles and intact mouse erythrocytes. Similarly, mAbs specific against SERA are effective in blocking red blood cell (RBC) invasion by P. falciparum merozoites. Furthermore, the N-terminal recombinant SERA fragment inhibits the merozoite invasion of erythrocyte. In this study of 49 non-overlapping 20-residue-long peptides encompassing the whole SERA protein FCR3 strain, seven peptides having high RBC binding activity were found. Six of these peptides (three from the SERA N-terminal domain) are located in conserved regions and show affinity constants between 150 and 1100 nM, Hill coefficients between 1.5 and 3.0 and 30000-120000 binding sites per cell. Some of these peptides inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion of erythrocyte and intra-erythrocytic development. Residues which are critical in the binding to erythrocytes (in bold face), i.e. 6725 (YLKETNNAISFESNSGSLEKK), 6733 (YALGSDIPEKCDTLASNCFLS), 6737 (YDNILVKMFKTNENNDKSELI), 6746 (DQGNCDTSWIFASKYHLETI), 6754 (YKKVQNLCGDDTADHAVNIVG) and 6762 (NEVSERVHVYHILKHIKDGK), were determined by means of competition assays with high-binding peptide glycine analogues. The identification of peptides which bind to erythrocyte membrane is important in understanding the process of RBC invasion by P. falciparum merozoites.

  9. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  10. Specific erythrocyte binding capacity and biological activity of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1)-derived peptides

    PubMed Central

    Curtidor, Hernando; Rodríguez, Luis E.; Ocampo, Marisol; López, Ramses; García, Javier E.; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; Puentes, Álvaro; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1) is a member of the ebl multigene family involved in Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes. We found that five EBL-1 high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to erythrocytes: 29895 (41HKKKSGELNNNKSGILRSTY60), 29903 (201LYECGK-KIKEMKWICTDNQF220), 29923 (601CNAILGSYADIGDIVRGLDV620), 29924(621WRDINTNKLSEK-FQKIFMGGY640), and 30018 (2481LEDIINLSKKKKKSINDTSFY2500). We also show that binding was saturable, not sialic acid-dependent, and that all peptides specifically bound to a 36-kDa protein on the erythrocyte membrane. The five HABPs inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion depending on the peptide concentration used, suggesting their possible role in the invasion process. PMID:15659376

  11. Specific erythrocyte binding capacity and biological activity of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1)-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Curtidor, Hernando; Rodríguez, Luis E; Ocampo, Marisol; López, Ramses; García, Javier E; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; Puentes, Alvaro; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-02-01

    Erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1) is a member of the ebl multigene family involved in Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes. We found that five EBL-1 high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to erythrocytes: 29895 ((41)HKKKSGELNNNKSGILRSTY(60)), 29903 ((201)LYECGK-KIKEMKWICTDNQF(220)), 29923 ((601)CNAILGSYADIGDIVRGLDV(620)), 29924((621)WRDINTNKLSEK-FQKIFMGGY(640)), and 30018 ((2481)LEDIINLSKKKKKSINDTSFY(2500)). We also show that binding was saturable, not sialic acid-dependent, and that all peptides specifically bound to a 36-kDa protein on the erythrocyte membrane. The five HABPs inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion depending on the peptide concentration used, suggesting their possible role in the invasion process.

  12. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  13. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  14. The impact of DR3 microvariation on peptide binding: the combinations of specific DR beta residues critical to binding differ for different peptides.

    PubMed

    Posch, P E; Hurley, C K; Geluk, A; Ottenhoff, T H

    1996-09-01

    HLA-DR molecules are a group of highly polymorphic glycoprotein heterodimers that present peptide antigens to T lymphocytes for immune surveillance. To assess the significance of limited polymorphism on the functional differentiation of DR molecules, the binding of several immunogenic peptides to the DR3 microvariants [DR(alpha, beta 1*0302) and DR(alpha, beta 1*0301)] and to mutants of these DR3 molecules was examined. This analysis has shown that each residue (DR beta 26, DR beta 28, DR beta 47, and DR beta 86), which differentiates these two DR3 molecules, contributes to their functional distinction and that the relative contribution of each residue varies for different peptide/DR3 complexes. For example, DR beta 28 and DR beta 86 controlled the mycobacterium tuberculosis 65-kD heat shock protein peptides 3-13 and 4-15 (HSP) binding specificity to DR (alpha, beta 1*0301). [HSP does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)], whereas DR beta 26, DR beta 28, and DR beta 86 controlled the influenza hemagglutinin peptide 306-318 (HA) binding specificity to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302). [HA does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301).] In comparison, DR beta 86 alone controlled the binding level difference of sperm whale myoglobin peptide 132-151 (SWM) and of myelin basic protein peptide 152-170 (MBP) [both bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301) at levels five times greater than to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)] to the DR3 molecules. Although not critical, additional DR beta residues influenced the binding level of individual peptides of each of the DR3 molecules and, again, the combinations of these residues differed for different peptide/DR3 complexes. These data showed that individual DR residues vary in their relative contribution to the interaction between a specific DR molecule and different peptides and that limited polymorphism can create substantial differences in the peptide binding profiles among DR molecules.

  15. High-energy water sites determine peptide binding affinity and specificity of PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Beuming, Thijs; Farid, Ramy; Sherman, Woody

    2009-08-01

    PDZ domains have well known binding preferences for distinct C-terminal peptide motifs. For most PDZ domains, these motifs are of the form [S/T]-W-[I/L/V]. Although the preference for S/T has been explained by a specific hydrogen bond interaction with a histidine in the PDZ domain and the (I/L/V) is buried in a hydrophobic pocket, the mechanism for Trp specificity at the second to last position has thus far remained unknown. Here, we apply a method to compute the free energies of explicit water molecules and predict that potency gained by Trp binding is due to a favorable release of high-energy water molecules into bulk. The affinities of a series of peptides for both wild-type and mutant forms of the PDZ domain of Erbin correlate very well with the computed free energy of binding of displaced waters, suggesting a direct relationship between water displacement and peptide affinity. Finally, we show a correlation between the magnitude of the displaced water free energy and the degree of Trp-sensitivity among subtypes of the HTRA PDZ family, indicating a water-mediated mechanism for specificity of peptide binding.

  16. Achieving Peptide Binding Specificity and Promiscuity by Loops: Case of the Forkhead-Associated Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ming M.; Chang, Chia-en A.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of a series of cellular events requires specific protein–protein interactions, which are usually mediated by modular domains to precisely select a particular sequence from diverse partners. However, most signaling domains can bind to more than one peptide sequence. How do proteins create promiscuity from precision? Moreover, these complex interactions typically occur at the interface of a well-defined secondary structure, α helix and β sheet. However, the molecular recognition primarily controlled by loop architecture is not fully understood. To gain a deep understanding of binding selectivity and promiscuity by the conformation of loops, we chose the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as our model system. The domain can bind to diverse peptides via various loops but only interact with sequences containing phosphothreonine (pThr). We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for multiple free and bound FHA domains to study the changes in conformations and dynamics. Generally, FHA domains share a similar folding structure whereby the backbone holds the overall geometry and the variety of sidechain atoms of multiple loops creates a binding surface to target a specific partner. FHA domains determine the specificity of pThr by well-organized binding loops, which are rigid to define a phospho recognition site. The broad range of peptide recognition can be attributed to different arrangements of the loop interaction network. The moderate flexibility of the loop conformation can help access or exclude binding partners. Our work provides insights into molecular recognition in terms of binding specificity and promiscuity and helpful clues for further peptide design. PMID:24870410

  17. Materials specificity and directed assembly of a gold-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Duman, Memed; Oren, Ersin Emre; Gungormus, Mustafa; Xiong, Xiaorong; Kacar, Turgay; Parviz, Babak A; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2006-11-01

    Adsorption studies of a genetically engineered gold-binding peptide, GBP1, were carried out using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to quantify its molecular affinity to noble metals. The peptide showed higher adsorption onto and lower desorption from a gold surface compared to a platinum substrate. The material specificity, that is, the preferential adsorption, of GBP1 was also demonstrated using gold and platinum micropatterned on a silicon wafer containing native oxide. The biotinylated three-repeat units of GBP1 were preferentially adsorbed onto gold regions delineated using streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots (SAQDs). These experiments not only demonstrate that an inorganic-binding peptide could preferentially adsorb onto a metal (Au) rather than an oxide (SiO2) but also onto one noble metal (Au) over another (Pt). This result shows the utility of an engineered peptide as a molecular erector in the directed immobilization of a nanoscale hybrid entity (SAQDs) over selected regions (Au) on a fairly complex substrate (Au and Pt micropatterned regions on silica). The selective and controlled adsorption of inorganic-binding peptides may have significant implications in nano- and nanobiotechnology, where they could be genetically tailored for specific use in the development of self-assembled molecular systems.

  18. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  19. Improved DNA binding specificity from polyzinc finger peptides by using strings of two-finger units

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Klug, Aaron; Choo, Yen

    2001-01-01

    Multizinc finger peptides are likely to reach increased prominence in the search for the “ideal” designer transcription factor for in vivo applications such as gene therapy. However, for these treatments to be effective and safe, the peptides must bind with high affinity and, more importantly, with great specificity. Our previous research has shown that zinc finger arrays can be made to bind 18 bp of DNA with picomolar affinity, but also has suggested that arrays of fingers also may bind tightly to related sequences. This work addresses the question of zinc finger DNA binding specificity. We show that by changing the way in which zinc finger arrays are constructed—by linking three two-finger domains rather than two three-finger units—far greater target specificity can be achieved through increased discrimination against mutated or closely related sequences. These new peptides have the added capability of being able to span two short gaps of unbound DNA, although still binding with picomolar affinity to their target sites. We believe that this new method of constructing zinc finger arrays will offer greater efficacy in the fields of gene therapy and in the production of transgenic organisms than previously reported zinc finger arrays. PMID:11171969

  20. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10.

  1. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators.

  3. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 Å resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a ∼52 Å channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries. PMID:21217145

  4. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2012-02-07

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 {angstrom} resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a {approx}52 {angstrom} channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries.

  5. Investigating the specificity of adsorption of onto gold by gold-binding peptides using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Maranas, Janna

    2007-03-01

    It is possible to engineer artificial peptide sequences showing high specificity of adsorption for surfaces like gold, platinum or other solid materials. However, the reasons behind that high specificity are not clear. We investigate the adsorption of a genetically engineered peptide with high gold specificity using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Accurate Lennard-Jones parameters describing the interactions of gold with both water and amino acids are not currently available, so thus we discuss assignment of appropriate values. Two sets of simulations are presented: one using peptides made of a gold-binding motif (MHGKTQATSGTIQS) and another using peptides made of a non gold-binding motif (AIRRDVNCIGASMH). Adsorption onto the (111) and the (100) crystalline faces of gold is investigated. We discuss our results in light of the features of the peptide (sequence, charge, structure, nature of the amino acids) that may be responsible for the specificity of the gold-binding motif for gold.

  6. CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide specific binding sites in PC12 cells have characteristics of CART peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdeno; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2014-02-14

    CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is a neuropeptide with a powerful central anorexigenic effect. Specific CART peptide binding sites, most likely CART peptide receptors, have been found in PC12 cells. This study further characterizes the CART peptide binding sites in PC12 cells. After differentiation to a neuronal phenotype with nerve growth factor, the number of CART peptide binding sites in PC12 cells tripled. Following dexamethasone treatment, which transforms PC12 cells into chromaffin-like cells, the number of CART peptide binding sites substantially decreased. CART peptide did not affect the differentiation or acetylcholinesterase activity of PC12 cells, indicating that CART peptide does not participate in differentiation or neuronal activity. CART peptide increased the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun-amino-terminal kinase) and subsequent c-Jun protein expression. These effects were reversed by SP600125, a specific JNK-kinase inhibitor. CART peptide did not significantly affect ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), CREB (cAMP responsive element binding protein), or p38 phosphorylation and c-Fos protein expression. Central administration of CART peptide into mice also resulted in increased c-Jun positive cells in dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract, areas involved in food intake regulation. Activation of c-Jun by CART peptide might indicate a possible role of CART peptide in managing stress conditions rather than a role in cell proliferation or differentiation as well as the more complex and/or specific regulation ways by transcription factors in some nuclei involved in food intake regulation. The characteristics of stress that CART peptide potentially mediates should be further studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Selection of peptides with semiconductor binding specificity for directed nanocrystal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Sandra R.; English, D. S.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Barbara, Paul F.; Belcher, Angela M.

    2000-06-01

    In biological systems, organic molecules exert a remarkable level of control over the nucleation and mineral phase of inorganic materials such as calcium carbonate and silica, and over the assembly of crystallites and other nanoscale building blocks into complex structures required for biological function. This ability to direct the assembly of nanoscale components into controlled and sophisticated structures has motivated intense efforts to develop assembly methods that mimic or exploit the recognition capabilities and interactions found in biological systems. Of particular value would be methods that could be applied to materials with interesting electronic or optical properties, but natural evolution has not selected for interactions between biomolecules and such materials. However, peptides with limited selectivity for binding to metal surfaces and metal oxide surfaces have been successfully selected. Here we extend this approach and show that combinatorial phage-display libraries can be used to evolve peptides that bind to a range of semiconductor surfaces with high specificity, depending on the crystallographic orientation and composition of the structurally similar materials we have used. As electronic devices contain structurally related materials in close proximity, such peptides may find use for the controlled placement and assembly of a variety of practically important materials, thus broadening the scope for `bottom-up' fabrication approaches.

  8. A synthetic peptide mimic of λ-Cro shows sequence-specific binding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Abhishek; Maiti, Atanu; Roy, Koushik; Roy, Siddhartha

    2012-06-15

    Development of small synthetic transcription factors is important for future cellular engineering and therapeutics. This article describes the chemical synthesis of α-amino-isobutyric acid (Aib) substituted, conformationally constrained, helical peptide mimics of Cro protein from bacteriophage λ that encompasses the DNA recognition elements. The Aib substituted constrained helical peptide monomer shows a moderately reduced dissociation constant compared to the corresponding unsubstituted wild type peptide. A suitably cross-linked dimeric version of the peptide, mimicking the dimeric protein, recapitulates some of the important features of Cro. It binds to the operator site O(R)3, a high affinity Cro binding site in the λ genome, with good affinity and single base-pair discrimination specificity. A dimeric version of an even shorter peptide mimic spanning only the recognition helix of the helix-turn-helix motif of the Cro protein was created following the same design principles. This dimeric peptide binds to O(R)3 with affinity greater than that of the longer version. Chemical shift perturbation experiments show that the binding mode of this peptide dimer to the cognate operator site sequence is similar to the wild type Cro protein. A Green Fluorescent Protein based reporter assay in vivo reveals that the peptide dimer binds the operator site sequences with considerable selectivity and inhibits gene expression. Peptide mimics designed in this way may provide a future framework for creating effective synthetic transcription factors.

  9. Design of protein-interaction specificity affords selective bZIP-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Reinke, Aaron W.; Keating, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    Interaction specificity is a required feature of biological networks and a necessary characteristic of protein or small-molecule reagents and therapeutics. The ability to alter or inhibit protein interactions selectively would advance basic and applied molecular science. Assessing or modelling interaction specificity requires treating multiple competing complexes, which presents computational and experimental challenges. Here we present a computational framework for designing protein interaction specificity and use it to identify specific peptide partners for human bZIP transcription factors. Protein microarrays were used to characterize designed, synthetic ligands for all but one of 20 bZIP families. The bZIP proteins share strong sequence and structural similarities and thus are challenging targets to bind specifically. Yet many of the designs, including examples that bind the oncoproteins cJun, cFos and cMaf, were selective for their targets over all 19 other families. Collectively, the designs exhibit a wide range of novel interaction profiles, demonstrating that human bZIPs have only sparsely sampled the possible interaction space accessible to them. Our computational method provides a way to systematically analyze tradeoffs between stability and specificity and is suitable for use with many types of structure-scoring functions; thus it may prove broadly useful as a tool for protein design. PMID:19370028

  10. Specificity in substrate binding by protein folding catalysts: tyrosine and tryptophan residues are the recognition motifs for the binding of peptides to the pancreas-specific protein disulfide isomerase PDIp.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, L. W.; Freedman, R. B.; Klappa, P.

    2000-01-01

    Using a cross-linking approach, we recently demonstrated that radiolabeled peptides or misfolded proteins specifically interact in vitro with two luminal proteins in crude extracts from pancreas microsomes. The proteins were the folding catalysts protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDIp, a glycosylated, PDI-related protein, expressed exclusively in the pancreas. In this study, we explore the specificity of these proteins in binding peptides and related ligands and show that tyrosine and tryptophan residues in peptides are the recognition motifs for their binding by PDIp. This peptide-binding specificity may reflect the selectivity of PDIp in binding regions of unfolded polypeptide during catalysis of protein folding. PMID:10794419

  11. Targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer using specific binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianfeng; Tan, Gewen; Sheng, Nengquan; You, Weiqiang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the first in China among all gastrointestinal cancers in terms of incidence, and liver metastasis is the leading cause of death for patients with advanced gastric cancer. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a cytokine commonly chosen as the target for gene therapy against cancers. The specific binding peptide pd20 of gastric cancer cells with a high potential for liver metastasis was fused with human TNF to obtain the pd20-TNF gene using DNA recombinant technique. The expression of the fusion protein was induced and the protein was purified. In vitro activity test showed that the fusion protein greatly improved the membrane permeability of liver cells in nude mice with liver metastasis from gastric cancer. The tumor implantation experiment in nude mice showed that the fusion protein effectively mitigated the cancer lesions. The results provide important clues for developing the drugs for targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer. PMID:27347305

  12. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ina; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Tamas, Raluca; Kungulovski, Goran; Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Jeltsch, Albert

    2011-08-31

    Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides.

  13. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides. PMID:21884582

  14. A comprehensive analysis of predicted HLA binding peptides of JE viral proteins specific to north Indian isolates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Saxena, Komal; Mishra, Sanjay; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), a viral disease has significantly increased worldwide especially, in the developing region due to challenges in immunization, vector control and lack of appropriate treatment methods. An effective, yet an expensive heat-killed vaccine is available for the disease. Therefore, the design and development of short peptide vaccine candidate is promising. We used immune-informatics methods to perform a comprehensive analysis of the entire JEV proteome of north Indian isolate to identify the conserved peptides binding known specific HLA alleles among the documented JEV genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. The prediction analysis identified 102 class I (using propred I) and 118 class II (using propred) binding peptides at 4% threshold value. These predicted HLA allele binding peptides were further analyzed for potential conserved region using IEDB (an immune epitope database and analysis resource). This analysis shows that 78.81% of class II (in genotype 2) and 76.47% of HLA I (in genotype 3) bound peptides are conserved. The peptides IPIVSVASL, KGAQRLAAL, LAVFLICVL and FRTLFGGMS, VFLICVLTV, are top ranking with potential super antigenic property by binding to all HLA allele members of B7 and DR4 super-types, respectively. This data finds application in the design and development of short peptide vaccine candidates and diagnostic agents for JE following adequate validation and verification.

  15. Specific receptor binding of atrial natriuretic peptide to rat renal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Ogawa, N.; Ota, Z.

    1985-09-01

    Radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was studied in rat kidney membranes. Binding of ( SVI)-ANP to membrane preparations of rat whole kidney was saturated and show a high affinity. Furthermore, renal cortex membrane had a higher affinity for ANP binding site than renal medulla membrane. This high affinity ANP receptor site in renal cortex membrane indicated that ANP controlled the balance of water and sodium excretion due to this receptor site in the kidney.

  16. HLA DR4w4-binding motifs illustrate the biochemical basis of degeneracy and specificity in peptide-DR interactions.

    PubMed

    Sette, A; Sidney, J; Oseroff, C; del Guercio, M F; Southwood, S; Arrhenius, T; Powell, M F; Colón, S M; Gaeta, F C; Grey, H M

    1993-09-15

    In the present study, we describe the definition of a DRB1*0401 (DR4w4)-specific motif. The strategy used entailed a three-step process: 1) screening a large set of unrelated peptide ligands to identify good MHC binders; 2) truncation analysis of several DR4w4 binding peptides of high affinity to identify the crucial core-binding regions; 3) the use of single amino acid substitutions of the DR4w4-binding peptide hemagglutinin (HA) 307-319 to elucidate the specific residues crucial for binding. The DR4w4 motif is characterized by the presence of a hydrophobic or aromatic (F, W, Y, L, I, V, M) anchor residue in position 1, and a second hydroxyl (S, T) or aliphatic (L, I, V, or M) anchor residue in position 6. Furthermore, positive charges (R, K) are not allowed in positions 4, 7, and 9, and negative charges (D, E) are not allowed in position 9. This motif was present in 92% of good (IC50 < or = 100 nM) DR4w4-binding peptides, but less than 25% of the negative (IC50 > 45 microM) binders, indicating that the presence of the motif is necessary, but not sufficient for good DR4w4 binding capacity. The results of the present study are discussed in relation to previous work defining binding motifs and rules for other DR alleles, illustrating how different DR alleles bind variations on a similar structural theme. Finally, using two different peptide ligands [tetanus toxoid 830-843 and HA 307-319] as model systems, it is demonstrated how the fine allelic specificity of the DR binders can be predictably modulated by introducing subtle changes in the primary amino acid sequence.

  17. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  18. Uncovering the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-C: a general strategy to determine the specificity of any MHC class I molecule.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette; Boucherma, Rachid; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Lemonnier, François A; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren

    2014-11-15

    MHC class I molecules (HLA-I in humans) present peptides derived from endogenous proteins to CTLs. Whereas the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-A and -B molecules have been studied extensively, little is known about HLA-C specificities. Combining a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach with a peptide-HLA-I dissociation assay, in this study we present a general strategy to determine the peptide-binding specificity of any MHC class I molecule. We applied this novel strategy to 17 of the most common HLA-C molecules, and for 16 of these we successfully generated matrices representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide-binding data and update our pan-specific NetMHCpan predictor, whose predictive performance was considerably improved with respect to peptide binding to HLA-C. The updated predictor was used to assess the specificities of HLA-C molecules, which were found to cover a more limited sequence space than HLA-A and -B molecules. Assessing the functional significance of these new tools, HLA-C*07:01 transgenic mice were immunized with stable HLA-C*07:01 binders; six of six tested stable peptide binders were immunogenic. Finally, we generated HLA-C tetramers and labeled human CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. These new resources should support future research on the biology of HLA-C molecules. The data are deposited at the Immune Epitope Database, and the updated NetMHCpan predictor is available at the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis and the Immune Epitope Database. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Prediction of Surface and pH-Specific Binding of Peptides to Metal and Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Emami, Fateme Sadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Naik, Rajesh; Knecht, Marc; Perry, Carole C.; Huang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of specific peptide adsorption onto metallic and oxidic nanostructures has been elucidated in atomic resolution using novel force fields and surface models in comparison to measurements. As an example, variations in peptide adsorption on Pd and Pt nanoparticles depending on shape, size, and location of peptides on specific bounding facets are explained. Accurate computational predictions of reaction rates in C-C coupling reactions using particle models derived from HE-XRD and PDF data illustrate the utility of computational methods for the rational design of new catalysts. On oxidic nanoparticles such as silica and apatites, it is revealed how changes in pH lead to similarity scores of attracted peptides lower than 20%, supported by appropriate model surfaces and data from adsorption isotherms. The results demonstrate how new computational methods can support the design of nanoparticle carriers for drug release and the understanding of calcification mechanisms in the human body.

  20. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info .

  1. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen 3 (MSP3) protein peptides that bind specifically to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis E.; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramses; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Receptor–ligand interactions between synthetic peptides and normal human erythrocytes were studied to determine Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) FC27 strain regions that specifically bind to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Three MSP-3 protein high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified; their binding to erythrocytes became saturable, had nanomolar affinity constants, and became sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and trypsin but were resistant to chymotrypsin treatment. All of them specifically recognized 45-, 55-, and 72-kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. They all presented α-helix structural elements. All HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by ~55%–85%, suggesting that MSP-3 protein’s role in the invasion process probably functions by using mechanisms similar to those described for other MSP family antigens. PMID:15987906

  2. Specific Capture of Peptide-Receptive Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules by Antibody Micropatterns Allows for a Novel Peptide-Binding Assay in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Dirscherl, Cindy; Palankar, Raghavendra; Delcea, Mihaela; Kolesnikova, Tatiana A; Springer, Sebastian

    2017-02-02

    Binding assays with fluorescently labeled ligands and recombinant receptor proteins are commonly performed in 2D arrays. But many cell surface receptors only function in their native membrane environment and/or in a specific conformation, such as they appear on the surface of live cells. Thus, receptors on live cells should be used for ligand binding assays. Here, it is shown that antibodies preprinted on a glass surface can be used to specifically array a peptide receptor of the immune system, i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule H-2K(b) , into a defined pattern on the surface of live cells. Monoclonal antibodies make it feasible to capture a distinct subpopulation of H-2K(b) and hold it at the cell surface. This patterned receptor enables a novel peptide-binding assay, in which the specific binding of a fluorescently labeled index peptide is visualized by microscopy. Measurements of ligand binding to captured cell surface receptors in defined confirmations apply to many problems in cell biology and thus represent a promising tool in the field of biosensors.

  3. Specificity of RSG-1.2 Peptide Binding to RRE-IIB RNA Element of HIV-1 over Rev Peptide Is Mainly Enthalpic in Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔTm = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a Ka = 16.2±0.6×107 M−1 where enthalpic change ΔH = −13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = −2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (Ka = 3.1±0.4×107 M−1) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding. PMID:21853108

  4. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH = -13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = -2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (K(a) = 3.1±0.4×10(7) M(-1)) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding.

  5. MHC2SKpan: a novel kernel based approach for pan-specific MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computational methods for the prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II binding peptides play an important role in facilitating the understanding of immune recognition and the process of epitope discovery. To develop an effective computational method, we need to consider two important characteristics of the problem: (1) the length of binding peptides is highly flexible; and (2) MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and for the vast majority of them there are no sufficient training data. Methods We develop a novel string kernel MHC2SK (MHC-II String Kernel) method to measure the similarities among peptides with variable lengths. By considering the distinct features of MHC-II peptide binding prediction problem, MHC2SK differs significantly from the recently developed kernel based method, GS (Generic String) kernel, in the way of computing similarities. Furthermore, we extend MHC2SK to MHC2SKpan for pan-specific MHC-II peptide binding prediction by leveraging the binding data of various MHC molecules. Results MHC2SK outperformed GS in allele specific prediction using a benchmark dataset, which demonstrates the effectiveness of MHC2SK. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of MHC2SKpan using various benckmark data sets from several different perspectives: Leave-one-allele-out (LOO), 5-fold cross validation as well as independent data testing. MHC2SKpan has achieved comparable performance with NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and outperformed NetMHCIIpan-1.0, TEPITOPEpan and MultiRTA, being statistically significant. MHC2SKpan can be freely accessed at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC2SKpan/index.html. PMID:24564280

  6. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain.

    PubMed

    Panel, Nicolas; Sun, Young Joo; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Simonson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or "PB/LIE" free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  7. Probing the specificity of binding to the major nuclear localization sequence-binding site of importin-alpha using oriented peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sundy N Y; Takeda, Agnes A S; Fontes, Marcos R M; Harris, Jonathan M; Jans, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2010-06-25

    Importin-alpha is the nuclear import receptor that recognizes the classic monopartite and bipartite nuclear localization sequences (cNLSs), which contain one or two clusters of basic amino acids, respectively. Different importin-alpha paralogs in a single organism are specific for distinct repertoires of cargos. Structural studies revealed that monopartite cNLSs and the C-terminal basic clusters of the bipartite cNLSs bind to the same site on importin-alpha, termed the major cNLS-binding site. We used an oriented peptide library approach with five degenerate positions to probe the specificity of the major cNLS-binding site in importin-alpha. We identified the sequences KKKRR, KKKRK, and KKRKK as the optimal sequences for binding to this site for mouse importin-alpha2, human importin-alpha1, and human importin-alpha5, respectively. The crystal structure of mouse importin-alpha2 with its optimal peptide confirmed the expected binding mode resembling the binding of simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen cNLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptides containing these sequences bound to the corresponding proteins with low nanomolar affinities. Nuclear import assays showed that the sequences acted as functional cNLSs, with specificity for particular importin-alphas. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-alpha; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of cNLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified cNLSs in novel proteins.

  8. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, S; Zimic, M; Nielsen, M

    2014-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. One of the current state-of-the-art methods for MHC class I is NetMHCpan, which has a core ingredient for the representation of the MHC class I molecule using a pseudo-sequence representation of the binding cleft amino acid environment. New and large MHC-peptide-binding data sets are constantly being made available, and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses of different MHC data sets including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), non-human primates (chimpanzee, macaque and gorilla) and other animal alleles (cattle, mouse and swine). From these constructs, we showed that by focusing on MHC sequence positions found to be polymorphic across the MHC molecules used to train the method, the NetMHCpan method achieved a significant increase in the predictive performance, in particular, of non-human MHCs. This study hence showed that an improved performance of MHC-binding methods can be achieved not only by the accumulation of more MHC-peptide-binding data but also by a refined definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species.

  9. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  10. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-10-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite-erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having alpha-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 microM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion.

  11. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  12. Relative implication of peptide residues in binding to major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Db: application to the design of high-affinity, allele-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, D; Mazarguil, H; Oldstone, M B; Gairin, J E

    1995-08-01

    The H-2Db peptide sequence SMIENLEYM was manipulated (N- and C-terminus truncation and alanine substitution) to determine the role of structural elements (peptide ends and residue side chains) in binding to H-2Db. We found that good binding affinity could be obtained by compensating the minimal binding condition for one element by the optimal condition of the other element. In particular, we showed, that although the minimal binding sequence could be as short as a heptamer (deletion of positions 1 and 2), it needed the presence of optimal amino acids at other positions (IENLEYM). Conversely, the structurally minimal peptide would accept multiple alanine residues, but required the optimal nonameric length (AAAENAEAA). Positions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9, but not 6 and 8, were involved in the H-2Db-peptide interaction. Most residues interacted directly with the MHC molecule via their main chain (amino and carboxyl) atoms (positions 1 and 2), their side chains (positions 3 and 5), or both (position 9). Positions 4 and 7 were found to play an indirect role, probably by influencing the secondary structure. At the C-terminus, the presence of a residue at position 9, but not the hydrophobic nature of its side chain, was mandatory for binding. At the N-terminus, the role of the residue at position 1 was of either minor or critical importance depending on the presence or not of a strong auxiliary anchor at position 3. The indirect contribution of residue side chains at positions 4 and 7 reflected the importance of dynamic components in the binding process. Based on these results, we designed a series of high-affinity, H-2Db selective peptides derived from the sequence X1 AIX4NAEAL, where X1 = Y or K and X4 = E or K. After radioiodination or fluorescent (FITC) labelling, these peptides bound strongly and specifically to the surface of viable H-2Db-expressing cells. Rationally designed synthetic peptides, either alone or in a stable complex with MHC, might be of value for

  13. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; ...

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  14. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  15. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Neubauer, George H; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. PMID:25445329

  17. Detailed specificity analysis of antibodies binding to modified histone tails with peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ina; Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Brandt, Ole; Rathert, Philipp; Jeltsch, Albert

    2011-02-01

    Chromatin structure is greatly influenced by histone tail post-translational modifications (PTM), which also play a central role in epigenetic processes. Antibodies against modified histone tails are central research reagents in chromatin biology and molecular epigenetics. We applied Celluspots peptide arrays for the specificity analysis of 36 commercial antibodies from different suppliers which are directed towards modified histone tails. The arrays contained 384 peptides from 8 different regions of the N-terminal tails of histones, viz. H3 1-19, 7-26, 16-35 and 26-45, H4 1-19 and 11-30, H2A 1-19 and H2B 1-19, featuring 59 post-translational modifications in many different combinations. Using various controls we document the reliability of the method. Our analysis revealed previously undocumented details in the specificity profile. Most of the antibodies bound well to the PTM they have been raised for, but some failed. In addition some antibodies showed high cross-reactivity and most antibodies were inhibited by specific additional PTMs close to the primary one. Furthermore, specificity profiles for antibodies directed towards the same modification sometimes were very different. The specificity of antibodies used in epigenetic research is an important issue. We provide a catalog of antibody specificity profiles for 36 widely used commercial histone tail PTM antibodies. Better knowledge about the specificity profiles of antibodies will enable researchers to implement necessary control experiments in biological studies and allow more reliable interpretation of biological experiments using these antibodies.

  18. Small molecule functional analogs of peptides that inhibit lambda site-specific recombination and bind Holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Ranjit, Dev K; Rideout, Marc C; Nefzi, Adel; Ostresh, John M; Pinilla, Clemencia; Segall, Anca M

    2010-08-01

    Our lab has isolated hexameric peptides that are structure-selective ligands of Holliday junctions (HJ), central intermediates of several DNA recombination reactions. One of the most potent of these inhibitors, WRWYCR, has shown antibacterial activity in part due to its inhibition of DNA repair proteins. To increase the therapeutic potential of these inhibitors, we searched for small molecule inhibitors with similar activities. We screened 11 small molecule libraries comprising over nine million individual compounds and identified a potent N-methyl aminocyclic thiourea inhibitor that also traps HJs formed during site-specific recombination reactions in vitro. This inhibitor binds specifically to protein-free HJs and can inhibit HJ resolution by RecG helicase, but only showed modest growth inhibition of bacterial with a hyperpermeable outer membrane; nonetheless, this is an important step in developing a functional analog of the peptide inhibitors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Connecting Effective Immune Response, Fluorescent Granzyme B-like Peptide, Specific Peptide Binding Patterns, Patients with Cancer and Viral Infection, in Remission, Clinical Significance, and Liquid Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai Chun Jennifer; Luther, Donald Gene

    2016-11-01

    Functional cytotoxic-T-lymphocytes (CTL) with granzyme B play an important role in an effective immune response to tumor growth and infection progression. Tumor cells and platelets in peripheral whole blood smears of cancer patients have shown the presence of innate binding targets for GP1R, a fluorescent synthetic Granzyme B-like peptide. It is not known if similar GP1R-binding targets and specific binding patterns are detectable in peripheral blood of patients with viral infection. It is also not known if a specific binding pattern may be associated with an effective immune response to indicate a favorable prognosis. We reviewed the GP1R-binding patterns in the peripheral blood smears of 5 patients in remission at the time of sampling (3 with cancer and 2 with flu-like symptoms) and a negative control. We show with fluoroscopic images that there are: 1) fluorescent GP1R-binding targets mostly in the cytoplasmic areas of nucleated cells in patients with breast and lung cancer who have longer survival, 2) intense fluorescent deposits mostly in the nuclear areas of segmented neutrophils in patients recovered from severe to mild flu-like symptoms, 3) discernible fluorescent deposits in the cytoplasmic areas of small lymphocyte-like elements and overall intense fluorescent stain in large cells in the patient with advanced pancreatic cancer who had shorter survival, 4) GP1R-binding targets in numerous platelet-like elements in all 5 patients. The control sample did not show similar binding patterns. The potential association between specific GP1R-binding patterns in peripheral blood samples and prognostic significance, and its use as liquid biopsy are discussed.

  20. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate-peptide complex structures.

    PubMed

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Skerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-10-16

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the 'water retention site', suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG.

  1. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  2. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xixi; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives. PMID:28036002

  3. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xixi; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun

    2016-12-27

    Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl₂, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn(2+). Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives.

  4. Optimization of d-Peptides for Aβ Monomer Binding Specificity Enhances Their Potential to Eliminate Toxic Aβ Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Klein, Antonia Nicole; Ziehm, Tamar; van Groen, Thomas; Kadish, Inga; Elfgen, Anne; Tusche, Markus; Thomaier, Maren; Reiss, Kerstin; Brener, Oleksandr; Gremer, Lothar; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2017-09-20

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers are thought to be causative for the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Starting from the Aβ oligomer eliminating d-enantiomeric peptide D3, we developed and applied a two-step procedure based on peptide microarrays to identify D3 derivatives with increased binding affinity and specificity for monomeric Aβ(1-42) to further enhance the Aβ oligomer elimination efficacy. Out of more than 1000 D3 derivatives, we selected seven novel d-peptides, named ANK1 to ANK7, and characterized them in more detail in vitro. All ANK peptides bound to monomeric Aβ(1-42), eliminated Aβ(1-42) oligomers, inhibited Aβ(1-42) fibril formation, and reduced Aβ(1-42)-induced cytotoxicity more efficiently than D3. Additionally, ANK6 completely inhibited the prion-like propagation of preformed Aβ(1-42) seeds and showed a nonsignificant tendency for improving memory performance of tg-APPSwDI mice after i.p. application for 4 weeks. This supports the hypothesis that stabilization of Aβ monomers and thereby induced elimination of Aβ oligomers is a suitable therapeutic strategy.

  5. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xixi; Yang, Qian; Lin, Jiaping; Fu, Nanyan; Wang, Shaoyun

    2017-03-29

    Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  6. Studies of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) protein peptides specifically binding to human RBC.

    PubMed

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Bermúdez, Adriana; Forero, Martha; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rodríguez, Jorge; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2008-02-06

    Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated membrane antigen (RAMA) peptides used in normal red blood cell (RBC) binding assays revealed that peptides 33426 (79NINILSSVHRKGRILYDSF97) and 33460 (777HKKREKSISPHSYQKVSTKVQ797) bound with high activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. Such high binding activity peptides (HABPs) displayed helicoid and random coil structures as determined by circular dichroism. HABPs inhibited P. falciparumin vitro invasion of normal RBC by up to 61% (depending on concentration), suggesting that some RAMA protein regions could be involved in P. falciparum invasion of RBC. The nature and localisation of receptors on RBC surface responsible for HABP binding were studied using enzyme-treated erythrocytes and structural analysis.

  7. Site-Specific Polymer Attachment to HR2 Peptide Fusion Inhibitors against HIV-1 Decreases Binding Association Rates and Dissociation Rates Rather Than Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Stauffer, Angela N; Wurm, Frederik R; Root, Michael J; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-03-15

    A popular strategy for overcoming the limited plasma half-life of peptide heptad repeat 2 (HR2) fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 is conjugation with biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). However, despite improved resistance to proteolysis and reduced renal elimination, covalent attachment of polymers often causes a loss in therapeutic potency. In this study, we investigated the molecular origins of the loss in potency upon conjugation of linear, midfunctional, and hyperbranched PEG-like polymers to peptides that inhibit HIV-1-host cell membrane fusion. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that polymer conjugation imparted mass transport limitations that manifested as coexistent slower association and dissociation rates from the gp41 target on HIV-1. Furthermore, reduced association kinetics rather than affinity disruption was responsible for the loss in antiviral potency. Finally, the binding assays indicated that the unmodified HR2-derived peptide demonstrated diffusion-limited binding. The observed high potency of the unmodified peptide in HIV-1 inhibition assays was therefore attributed to rapid peptide conformational changes upon binding to the gp41 prehairpin structure. This study emphasizes that the view in which polymer ligation to therapeutic peptides inadvertently leads to loss in potency due to a loss in binding affinity requires scientific verification on a case-by-case basis and that high peptide potency may be due to rapid target-binding events.

  8. Specific Amyloid Binding of Polybasic Peptides In Vivo Is Retained by β-Sheet Conformers but Lost in the Disrupted Coil and All D-Amino Acid Variants.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jonathan S; Williams, Angela; Richey, Tina; Stuckey, Alan; Wooliver, Craig; Christopher Scott, J; Donnell, Robert; Martin, Emily B; Kennel, Stephen J

    2017-02-22

    The heparin-reactive, helical peptide p5 is an effective amyloid imaging agent in mice with systemic amyloidosis. Analogs of p5 with modified secondary structure characteristics exhibited altered binding to heparin, synthetic amyloid fibrils, and amyloid extracts in vitro. Herein, we further study the effects of peptide helicity and chirality on specific amyloid binding using a mouse model of systemic inflammation-associated (AA) amyloidosis. Peptides with disrupted helical structure [p5(coil) and p5(Pro3)], with an extended sheet conformation [p5(sheet)] or an all-D enantiomer [p5(D)], were chemically synthesized, radioiodinated, and their biodistribution studied in WT mice as well as transgenic animals with severe systemic AA amyloidosis. Peptide binding was assessed qualitatively by using small animal single-photon emission computed tomography/x-ray computed tomography imaging and microautoradiography and quantitatively using tissue counting. Peptides with reduced helical propensity, p5(coil) and p5(Pro3), exhibited significantly reduced binding to AA amyloid-laden organs. In contrast, peptide p5(D) was retained by non-amyloid-related ligands in the liver and kidneys of both WT and AA mice, but it also bound AA amyloid in the spleen. The p5(sheet) peptide specifically bound AA amyloid in vivo and was not retained by healthy tissues in WT animals. Modification of amyloid-targeting peptides using D-amino acids should be performed cautiously due to the introduction of unexpected secondary pharmacologic effects. Peptides that adopt a helical structure, to align charged amino acid side chains along one face, exhibit specific reactivity with amyloid; however, polybasic peptides with a propensity for β-sheet conformation are also amyloid-reactive and may yield a novel class of amyloid-targeting agents for imaging and therapy.

  9. MHC allele-specific binding of a malaria peptide makes it become promiscuous on fitting a glycine residue into pocket 6.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Parra, Carlos Alberto; Salazar, Luz Mary; Guzmán, Fanny; Pinto, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-18

    Peptide 1585 (EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKKQLE) has a highly conserved amino-acid sequence located in the Plasmodium falciparum main merozoite surface protein (MSP-1) C-terminal region, required for merozoite entry into human erythrocytes and therefore represents a vaccine candidate for P. falciparum malaria. Original sequence-specific binding to five HLA DRB1* alleles (0101, 0102, 0401, 0701, and 1101) revealed this peptide's specific HLA DRB1*0102 allele binding. This peptide's allele-specific binding to HLA DRB1*0102 took on broader specificity for the DRB1*0101, -0401, and -1101 alleles when lysine was replaced by glycine in position 17 (peptide 5198: EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKG(17)QLE). Binding of the identified G(10)VYRSLKGQLE(20) C-terminal register to these alleles suggests that peptide promiscuous binding relied on fitting Y(12), L(15), and G(17) into P-1, P-4, and P-6, respectively. The implications of the findings and the future of this synthetic vaccine candidate are discussed.

  10. [Screening of specific IgE-binding epitopes of dust mite allergens using short peptide array].

    PubMed

    Teng, Feixiang; Sun, Jinxia; Wang, Nan; Yu, Lili; Cui, Yubao

    2017-08-01

    Objective To screen the possible linear epitopes of major and mid-potency allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f1, Der f2, Der f4, Der f5 and Der f7). Methods Short peptides were synthesized on the basis of the amino acid sequences in active fraction of Der f1, Der f2, Der f4, Der f5 and Der f7. Each peptide had eight amino acids in length and seven of them were overlapped with each other. Put these peptides to the chip to build microarrays that would have immunoreaction with human serum IgE. Then the chips were scanned to analyze the data. Results A total of 1128 short peptides from the above five groups of allergens were synthesized, and the microarray chips were constructed. Six serum samples from children who were allergic to Dermatophagoides farinae were mixed and added to the microarray chips. The chips were scanned and analyzed, and the results showed that Der f1 had four epitopes (46-53aa, 71-78aa, 99-110aa and 179-186aa), that Der f2 had three epitopes (15-22aa, 80-89aa and 106-113aa), that Der f 4 had six epitopes (69-82aa, 107-116aa, 225-232aa, 261-268aa, 355-365aa and 483-496aa), that Der f5 had one epitope (102-109aa), and Der f7 had three epitopes (32-39aa, 52-64aa and 100-107aa). Conclusion We identified the linear epitopes of Der f1, Der f2, Der f4, Der f5 and Der f7.

  11. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    for an additional 35-45 min. After induction, 5 µL cells were added to 25µL 250 nM YPet-Mona for 45 min. on ice. Cells were then pelleted and...binding mechanism of phage particles displaying a constrained heptapeptide with specific affinity to SiO2 and TiO2 ," Anal. Chem. 78(14), 4872-4879 (2006...hydroxyapatite crystals," Langmuir 27(12), 7620-7628 (2011). [15] Dickerson, M. B. A., et al., Peptide-induced room temperature formation of nanostructured TiO2

  12. Identification of CRISP2 from human sperm as PSP94-binding protein and generation of CRISP2-specific anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are mainly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and reported to be involved at different stages of fertilization. CRISPs have been shown to interact with prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) from diverse sources, and the binding of these evolutionarily conserved proteins across species is proposed to be of functional significance. Of the three mammalian CRISPs, PSP94-CRISP3 interaction is well characterized, and specific binding sites have been identified; whereas, CRISP2 has been shown to interact with PSP94 in vitro. Interestingly, human CRISP3 and CRISP2 proteins are closely related showing 71.4% identity. In this study, we identified CRISP2 as a potential binding protein of PSP94 from human sperm. Further, we generated antisera capable of specifically detecting CRISP2 and not CRISP3. In this direction, specific peptides corresponding to the least conserved ion channel regulatory region were synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were generated against the peptide in rabbits. The binding characteristics of the anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody were evaluated using competitive ELISA. Immunoblotting experiments also confirmed that the peptide was able to generate antibodies capable of detecting the mature CRISP2 protein present in human sperm lysate. Furthermore, this anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody also detected the presence of native CRISP2 on sperm.Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Modulation of cluster incorporation specificity in a de novo iron-sulfur cluster binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Roy, Anindya; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins perform an astounding variety of functions, and represent one of the most abundant classes of metalloproteins. Most often, they constitute pairs or chains and act as electron transfer modules either within complex redox enzymes or within small diffusible proteins. We have previously described the design of a three-helix bundle that can bind two clusters within its hydrophobic core. Here, we use single-point mutations to exchange one of the Cys ligands coordinating the cluster to either Leu or Ser. We show that the mutants modulate the redox potential of the clusters and stabilize the [3Fe-4S] form over the [4Fe-4S] form, supporting the use of model iron-sulfur cluster proteins as modules in the design of complex redox enzymes.

  14. Targeted Peptide Specificity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    the conformation of small natural peptide ligands. In the last year two peptides were investigaýed by 2D-NMR,(j2.- conotoxin SI, which targets to the...targets. Although these venoms are very complex, we have focused on three groups of peptide toxins, the a, j and w- conotoxins which target to nicotinic...grant period are summarized below.) In addition, the 2D-NMR work is continuing and in addition to examining one of the conotoxins specific for the

  15. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  16. The use of specific binding of peptide-nucleic acid to DNA in the {open_quotes}Achilles heel{close_quotes} method

    SciTech Connect

    Krasil`nikova, M.M.; Izvol`skii, K.I.; Krupnik, O.V.; Lazurkin, Yu.S.

    1995-09-01

    The `Achilles heel` method (AHM) is used in the design of random-cleavage restriction endonucleases. These promising compounds can be widely used in practice, particularly for genomic DNA mapping. DNA is complexed with a site-specific DNA-binding reagent (protein or oligonucleotide) and then treated with methylase. The methylation sites overlapping with or adjacent to the DNA-binding sites of the reagent are protected from methylation. Thereafter, methylase is inactivated, the DNA-binding reagent is removed, and DNA is cleaved by the restriction endonuclease corresponding to the methylase used. As a result, DNA is cleaved only at those restriction sites that were protected by the DNA-binding reagent from methylation. Until now, proteins or oligonucleotides were used as site-specific DNA-binding reagents. Here, we report on the use of a peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) in AHM. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  17. The pattern recognition reagents RAGE VC1 and peptide p5 share common binding sites and exhibit specific reactivity with AA amyloid in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Stephen J.; Williams, Angela; Stuckey, Alan; Richey, Tina; Wooliver, Craig; Chazin, Walter; Stern, David A.; Martin, Emily B.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    In the US, there remains a need to develop a clinical method for imaging amyloid load in patients with systemic, visceral amyloidosis. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), which exists as a transmembrane receptor and soluble variant, is found associated with a number of amyloid deposits in man. It is unclear whether amyloid-associated RAGE is the membrane or soluble form; however, given the affinity of RAGE for amyloid, we have examined the ability of soluble RAGE VC1 to specifically localize with systemic AA amyloid in mice. We further compared the reactivity of RAGE VC1 with that of the synthetic, amyloid-reactive peptide p5. Methods Binding of radiolabeled RAGE VC1 and p5 to synthetic amyloid fibrils was evaluated using in vitro “pulldown” assays in the presence or absence of RAGE ligands. Radioiodinated RAGE VC1 and technetium-99 m-labeled p5 were studied in mice with systemic AA amyloidosis using dual-energy SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and microautoradiography. Results Soluble RAGE VC1 competed with radioiodinated peptide p5 for binding to rVλ6Wil, Aβ (1–40) and IAPP fibrils but not with the higher affinity peptide, p5R. Pre-incubation with AGE-BSA abrogated binding of VC1 and p5 to rVλ6Wil fibrils. Dual-energy SPECT/CT images and quantitative tissue biodistribution data showed that soluble RAGE VC1 specifically bound AA amyloid-laden organs in mice as effectively as peptide p5. Furthermore, microautoradiography confirmed that RAGE VC1 bound specifically to areas of Congo red-positive amyloid in mouse tissues but not in comparable tissues from control WT mice. Conclusion Soluble RAGE VC1 and peptide p5 have similar ligand binding properties and specifically localize with visceral AA amyloid deposits in mice. PMID:26701064

  18. Subtype-specific binding peptides enhance the therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicine in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao-An; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Chang, Yen-Hou; Chen, Po-Hung; He, Chun-Lin; Wu, Han-Chung; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2015-04-28

    Currently, epithelial ovarian cancer is viewed as a heterogeneous disease with five major histological subtypes. Clear cell carcinoma represents a specific histological subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer that demonstrates more aggressive clinical behavior and drug resistance compared with other subtypes. Nevertheless, clear cell carcinoma is treated in the same manner as the other subtypes without any particular consideration to its unique clinical characteristics. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of the current liposomal doxorubicin approach for the treatment of clear cell carcinoma, we aimed to develop a novel peptide-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin to actively target this subtype. Two phage clones (OC-6 and OC-26) that specifically bound to clear cell carcinoma were isolated from a phage peptide display library after biopanning procedures. The peptide sequences were translated and aligned (OCSP-6 for OC-6, and OCSP-26 for OC-26, respectively). Peptide-conjugated nanoparticles demonstrated better tumor endocytosis and time-dependent gradual increase of intracellular drug uptake than non-targeting liposomal nanoparticles. Furthermore, peptide-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin better controlled tumors than did non-targeting liposomal doxorubicin. The current work may pave a new way for the development of drugs that target each subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer in the future.

  19. Sequence-specific bacterial growth inhibition by peptide nucleic acid targeted to the mRNA binding site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Nakai, Kazufumi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted to the functional domains of 23S rRNA can inhibit translation and cell growth. However, effective inhibition of translation and cell growth using 16S rRNA-targeted PNA has still not been achieved. Here, we report that PNA targeted to the functional site of 16S rRNA could inhibit both gene expression in vitro and bacterial growth in pure culture with sequence specificity. We used 10-mer PNAs conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, which targeted the mRNA binding site at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. Using 0.6 microM of the peptide-PNAs, cell-free ss-galactosidase production decreased by 50%, whereas peptide-PNAs with one or two mismatches to the target sequence showed much weaker inhibition effects. To determine the growth inhibition and bactericidal effects of the peptide-PNA conjugate, we performed OD measurement and viable cell counting. We observed dose- and sequence-dependent inhibition of cell growth and bactericidal effects. These growth inhibitory effects are observed both in the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium efficiens, although inhibitory concentrations were different for each bacterial species. These results present possibilities for 16S rRNA sequence-based specific bacterial growth inhibition using a peptide-PNA conjugate.

  20. The role of a basic amino acid cluster in target site selection and non-specific binding of bZIP peptides to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, S J; Paolella, D N; Schepartz, A

    1997-01-01

    The ability of a transcription factor to locate and bind its cognate DNA site in the presence of closely related sites and a vast array of non-specific DNA is crucial for cell survival. The CREB/ATF family of transcription factors is an important group of basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins that display high affinity for the CRE site and low affinity for the closely related AP-1 site. Members of the CREB/ATF family share in common a cluster of basic amino acids at the N-terminus of their bZIP element. This basic cluster is necessary and sufficient to cause the CRE site to bend upon binding of a CREB/ATF protein. The possibility that DNA bending and CRE/AP-1 specificity were linked in CREB/ATF proteins was investigated using chimeric peptides derived from human CRE-BP1 (a member of the CREB/ATF family) and yeast GCN4, which lacks both a basic cluster and CRE/AP-1 specificity. Gain of function and loss of function experiments demonstrated that the basic cluster was not responsible for the CRE/AP-1 specificity displayed by all characterized CREB/ATF proteins. The basic cluster was, however, responsible for inducing very high affinity for non- specific DNA. It was further shown that basic cluster-containing peptides bind non-specific DNA in a random coil conformation. We postulate that the high non- specific DNA affinities of basic cluster-containing peptides result from cooperative electrostatic interactions with the phosphate backbone that do not require peptide organization. PMID:9224594

  1. Insights into the C-terminal Peptide Binding Specificity of the PDZ Domain of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Gracia, Javier; Costas-Insua, Carlos; Canales, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, displays a PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain located at its N terminus involved in subcellular targeting. The C termini of various cellular proteins insert within the binding groove of this PDZ domain and determine the subcellular distribution of neuronal NOS (nNOS). The molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are poorly understood because the PDZ domain of nNOS can apparently exhibit class I, class II, and class III binding specificity. In addition, it has been recently suggested that the PDZ domain of nNOS binds with very low affinity to the C termini of target proteins, and a necessary simultaneous lateral interaction must take place for binding to occur. We describe herein that the PDZ domain of nNOS can behave as a bona fide class III PDZ domain and bind to C-terminal sequences with acidic residues at the P−2 position with low micromolar binding constants. Binding to C-terminal sequences with a hydrophobic residue at the P−2 position plus an acidic residue at the P−3 position (class II) can also occur, although interactions involving residues extending up to the P−7 position mediate this type of binding. This promiscuous behavior also extends to its association to class I sequences, which must display a Glu residue at P−3 and a Thr residue at P−2. By means of site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy, we have been able to identify the residues involved in each specific type of binding and rationalize the mechanisms used to recognize binding partners. Finally, we have analyzed the high affinity association of the PDZ domain of nNOS to claudin-3 and claudin-14, two tight junction tetraspan membrane proteins that are essential components of the paracellular barrier. PMID:27030110

  2. Different Thermodynamic Binding Mechanisms and Peptide Fine Specificities Associated with a Panel of Structurally Similar High-Affinity T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.; Colf, L; Bankovich, A; Stone, J; Gao, Y; Chan, C; Huang, R; Garcia, K; Kranz, D

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms that govern T cell receptor (TCR)-peptide MHC (pMHC) binding and the role that different regions of the TCR play in affinity and antigen specificity, we have studied the TCR from T cell clone 2C. High-affinity mutants of the 2C TCR that bind QL9-L{sup d} as a strong agonist were generated previously by site-directed mutagenesis of complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1{Beta}, 2{alpha}, 3{alpha}, or 3{Beta}. We performed isothermal titration calorimetry to assess whether they use similar thermodynamic mechanisms to achieve high affinity for QL9-L{sup d}. Four of the five TCRs examined bound to QL9-L{sup d} in an enthalpically driven, entropically unfavorable manner. In contrast, the high-affinity CDR1{Beta} mutant resembled the wild-type 2C TCR interaction, with favorable entropy. To assess fine specificity, we measured the binding and kinetics of these mutants for both QL9-L{sup d} and a single amino acid peptide variant of QL9, called QL9-Y5-Ld. While 2C and most of the mutants had equal or higher affinity for the Y5 variant than for QL9, mutant CDR1{Beta} exhibited 8-fold lower affinity for Y5 compared to QL9. To examine possible structural correlates of the thermodynamic and fine specificity signatures of the TCRs, the structure of unliganded QL9-L{sup d} was solved and compared to structures of the 2C TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complex and three high-affinity TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complexes. Our findings show that the QL9-L{sup d} complex does not undergo major conformational changes upon binding. Thus, subtle changes in individual CDRs account for the diverse thermodynamic and kinetic binding mechanisms and for the different peptide fine specificities.

  3. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Molecular mechanism of selective binding of peptides to silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Firlej, Lucyna; Gergely, Csilla

    2014-07-28

    Despite extensive recent research efforts on material-specific peptides, the fundamental problem to be explored yet is the molecular interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces. Here we used computer simulations (density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics) to investigate the adsorption mechanism of silicon-binding peptides and the role of individual amino acids in the affinity of peptides for an n-type silicon (n(+)-Si) semiconductor. Three silicon binding 12-mer peptides previously elaborated using phage display technology have been studied. The peptides' conformations close to the surface have been determined and the best-binding amino acids have been identified. Adsorption energy calculations explain the experimentally observed different degrees of affinity of the peptides for n(+)-Si. Our residual scanning analysis demonstrates that the binding affinity relies on both the identity of the amino acid and its location in the peptide sequence.

  5. A Structural Study of Norovirus 3C Protease Specificity: Binding of a Designed Active Site-Directed Peptide Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are the major cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.7 Å resolution. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, which is based on the most rapidly cleaved recognition sequence in the 200 kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenyl ethyl ester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups in a noroviral 3C protease and thus provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics. PMID:21128685

  6. Binding Specificity of Radiolabeled Cyclic Peptide 153Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) to MHCC97-H Human Liver Cancer Cells and its Antitumor Effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghua; He, Yujie; Gu, Chen; Jiang, Jianwei; Zhou, Huan; Zhou, Shi

    2016-12-01

    This objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the radiolabeled cyclic peptide (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) on MHCC97-H human liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The protein expression levels were examined by Western blot analysis. Biological activity of (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) was assessed with the radioligand binding assay and competitive inhibition experiment. Subcellular localization of the cyclic peptide was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Animals were implanted with MHCC97-H cells and administered with (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC). Hematoxylin and eosin staining, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry were performed to evaluate the effects of (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) on implanted tumors. The expression levels of interleukin 11 receptor were significantly elevated, by 2-to 5-fold, in tumor cell lines, especially for MHCC97-H cells. Characterization of (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) showed that the biological activity of the cyclic peptide was not altered after labeling, and the radiolabeled cyclic peptide exhibited sufficient binding affinity to interleukin 11 receptor . The cyclic peptide of c(CGRRAGGSC) was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane of MHCC97-H cells. The in vivo experiments showed that the tumor growth was significantly inhibited by the treatment of (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC). The inhibitory effect of (153)Sm-DTPA-c(CGRRAGGSC) on tumor growth was further confirmed by Hematoxylin and eosin staining, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of interleukin 11 receptor in implanted tumors were significantly decreased in the treatment groups. (153)Sm-DTPA-c (CGRRAGGSC) could specifically bind to interleukin 11 receptor on MHCC97-H liver tumor cells, inhibiting the cell proliferation and inducing cellular apoptosis. These findings provide experimental evidence for the development of individual treatment of liver cancers, as well as recurrence and metastasis. © The

  7. Method for generation of peptide-specific IgY antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen binding protein epitope.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Maciej; Grzywa, Renata; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Skoreński, Marcin; Bobrek, Kamila; Nowak, Daria; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The IgY antibodies offer an attractive alternative to mammalian IgGs in research, diagnosis and medicine. The isolation of immunoglobulin Y from the egg yolks is efficient and economical, causing minimal suffering to animals. Here we present the methodology for the production of IgY antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and its peptidyl epitope (spanning residues 127-140). The Efb is an extracellular, adhesion protein which binds both human fibrinogen and complement C3 protein thus contributing to the high infectious potential of this pathogen. The selected epitope of Efb protein is responsible for the interaction with C3. The immunochemical characterization of both anti-Efb and epitope-specific IgY antibodies revealed their similar avidity, titer, and reactivity profile, although some differences in the hen's immune response to administered antigens is discussed.

  8. Floating gate memory with charge storage dots array formed by Dps protein modified with site-specific binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitake, Hiroki; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Yamashita, Ichro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2015-05-01

    We report a nanodot (ND) floating gate memory (NFGM) with a high-density ND array formed by a biological nano process. We utilized two kinds of cage-shaped proteins displaying SiO2 binding peptide (minTBP-1) on their outer surfaces: ferritin and Dps, which accommodate cobalt oxide NDs in their cavities. The diameters of the cobalt NDs were regulated by the cavity sizes of the proteins. Because minTBP-1 is strongly adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, high-density cobalt oxide ND arrays were obtained by a simple spin coating process. The densities of cobalt oxide ND arrays based on ferritin and Dps were 6.8 × 1011 dots cm-2 and 1.2 × 1012 dots cm-2, respectively. After selective protein elimination and embedding in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the charge capacities of both ND arrays were evaluated by measuring their C-V characteristics. The MOS capacitor embedded with the Dps ND array showed a wider memory window than the device embedded with the ferritin ND array. Finally, we fabricated an NFGM with a high-density ND array based on Dps, and confirmed its competent writing/erasing characteristics and long retention time.

  9. Design and structure of stapled peptides binding to estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Chris; Roberts, Lee R; Schade, Markus; Bazin, Richard; Bent, Andrew; Davies, Nichola L; Moore, Rob; Pannifer, Andrew D; Pickford, Andrew R; Prior, Stephen H; Read, Christopher M; Scott, Andrew; Brown, David G; Xu, Bin; Irving, Stephen L

    2011-06-29

    Synthetic peptides that specifically bind nuclear hormone receptors offer an alternative approach to small molecules for the modulation of receptor signaling and subsequent gene expression. Here we describe the design of a series of novel stapled peptides that bind the coactivator peptide site of estrogen receptors. Using a number of biophysical techniques, including crystal structure analysis of receptor-stapled peptide complexes, we describe in detail the molecular interactions and demonstrate that all-hydrocarbon staples modulate molecular recognition events. The findings have implications for the design of stapled peptides in general.

  10. Synthetic peptides from conserved regions of the Plasmodium falciparum early transcribed membrane and ring exported proteins bind specifically to red blood cell proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jeison; Curtidor, Hernando; Obando-Martinez, Ana Z; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Pinto, Martha; Martinez, Nora L; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2009-11-16

    Severe malaria pathology is directly associated with cytoadherence of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) to healthy RBCs and/or endothelial cells occurring during the intraerythrocytic development of Plasmodium falciparum. We synthesized, as 20-mer long peptides, the members of the ring exported (REX) protein family encoded in chromosome 9, as well as the early transcribed membrane proteins (E-TRAMP) 10.2 and 4, to identify specific RBC binding regions in these proteins. Twelve binding peptides were identified (designated as HABPs): three were identified in REX1, two in REX2, one in REX3, two in REX4 and four in E-TRAMP 10.2. The majority of these HABPs was conserved among different P. falciparum strains, according to sequence analysis. No HABPs were found in E-TRAMP 4. Bindings of HABPs were saturable and sensitive to the enzymatic treatment of RBCs and HABPs had different structural features, according to circular dichroism studies. Our results suggest that the REX and E-TRAMP families participate in relevant interactions with RBC membrane proteins, which highlight these proteins as potential targets for the development of fully effective immunoprophylactic methods.

  11. Roles of the species-specific subdomain and the N-terminal peptide of Toxoplasma gondii ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in ferredoxin binding.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Vittorio; Caprini, Gianluca; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Seeber, Frank; Zanetti, Giuliana; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2006-03-21

    The plant-type ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (Fd/FNR) redox system found in parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa has been proposed as a target for novel drugs used against life-threatening diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. Like many proteins from these protists, apicomplexan FNRs are characterized by the presence of unique peptide insertions of variable length and yet unknown function. Since three-dimensional data are not available for any of the parasite FNRs, we used limited proteolysis to carry out an extensive study of the conformation of Toxoplasma gondii FNR. This led to identification of 11 peptide bonds susceptible to the action of four different proteases. Cleavage sites are clustered in four regions of the enzyme, which include two of its three species-specific insertions. Such regions are thus predicted to form flexible surface loops. The protein substrate Fd protected FNR against cleavage both at its N-terminal peptide and at its largest sequence insertion (28 residues). Deletion by protein engineering of the species-specific subdomain containing the latter insertion resulted in an enzyme form that, although catalytically active, displayed a 10-fold decreased affinity for Fd. In contrast, removal of the first 15 residues of the enzyme unexpectedly enhanced its interaction with Fd. Thus, two flexible polypeptide regions of T. gondii FNR are involved in Fd interaction but have opposite roles in modulating the binding affinity for the protein ligand. In this respect, T. gondii FNR differs from plant FNRs, where the N-terminal peptide contributes to the stabilization of their complex with Fd.

  12. Site-specific immobilization of recombinant antibody fragments through material-binding peptides for the sensitive detection of antigens in enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    The immobilization of an antibody is one of the key technologies that are used to enhance the sensitivity and efficiency of the detection of target molecules in immunodiagnosis and immunoseparation. Recombinant antibody fragments such as VHH, scFv and Fabs produced by microorganisms are the next generation of ligand antibodies as an alternative to conventional whole Abs due to a smaller size and the possibility of site-directed immobilization with uniform orientation and higher antigen-binding activity in the adsorptive state. For the achievement of site-directed immobilization, affinity peptides for a certain ligand molecule or solid support must be introduced to the recombinant antibody fragments. In this mini-review, immobilization technologies for the whole antibodies (whole Abs) and recombinant antibody fragments onto the surfaces of plastics are introduced. In particular, the focus here is on immobilization technologies of recombinant antibody fragments utilizing affinity peptide tags, which possesses strong binding affinity towards the ligand molecules. Furthermore, I introduced the material-binding peptides that are capable of direct recognition of the target materials. Preparation and immobilization strategies for recombinant antibody fragments linked to material-binding peptides (polystyrene-binding peptides (PS-tags) and poly (methyl methacrylate)-binding peptide (PMMA-tag)) are the focus here, and are based on the enhancement of sensitivity and a reduction in the production costs of ligand antibodies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody.

  13. Alternative peptide binding motifs of Qa-2 class Ib molecules define rules for binding of self and nonself peptides.

    PubMed

    Tabaczewski, P; Chiang, E; Henson, M; Stroynowski, I

    1997-09-15

    Studies of naturally processed peptides eluted from membrane-bound and soluble isoforms of murine class Ib Qa-2 molecules determined several features of these ligands, such as the conserved nonameric length and the preferred usage of specific residues at four to six of nine peptide positions. The structural information derived from these studies proved insufficient to distinguish between two interpretations: 1) that Qa-2 are peptide receptors of higher stringency than ordinary class I molecules, and 2) that Qa-2 molecules, like classical class I Ags, bind diverse arrays of peptides. We have addressed this issue by a systematic analysis of peptide residues involved in the binding of membrane-bound Qa-2 molecule, MQ9b. The optimal binding of synthetic peptides in vitro occurs at neutral pH. Two dominant anchors are required for peptide binding to MQ9b: His at position 7 and a hydrophobic residue, Leu, Ile, or Phe, at position 9. In addition, one or two auxiliary anchors participate in binding. The identity and the position of the auxiliary anchors differ from peptide to peptide, suggesting that the binding motifs defined from pool sequencing are composed of many superimposed alternative motifs present in individual peptides. The number of anchors used by Qa-2 peptides is similar to that found in ligands of classical class I Ags. Consequently, the Qa-2 are predicted to bind large repertoires of self and nonself peptides. In support of this interpretation we demonstrate that MQ9b binds strongly 5 of 17 motif-positive, pathogen-derived synthetic peptides.

  14. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  15. Characterization of the peptide binding specificity of the HLA class I alleles B*38:01 and B*39:06

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Moore, Carrie; Lindvall, Mikaela; Wriston, Amanda; Hunt, Donald F.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; DiLorenzo, Teresa P.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    B*38:01 and B*39:06 are present with phenotypic frequencies <2% in the general population, but are of interest as B*39:06 is the B allele most associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility and 38:01 is most protective. A previous study derived putative main anchor motifs for both alleles based on peptide elution data. The present study has utilized panels of single amino acid substitution peptide libraries to derive detailed quantitative motifs accounting for both primary and secondary influences on peptide binding. From these analyses, both alleles were confirmed to utilize the canonical position 2/C-terminus main anchor spacing. B*38:01 preferentially bound peptides with the positively charged or polar residues H, R and Q in position 2, and the large hydrophobic residues I, F, L, W and M at the C-terminus. B*39:06 had a similar preference for R in position two, but also well tolerated M, Q and K. A more dramatic contrast between the two alleles was noted at the C-terminus, where the specificity of B*39:06 was clearly for small residues, with A as most preferred, followed by G, V, S, T, and I. Detailed position-by-position and residue-by-residue coefficient values were generated from the panels to provide detailed quantitative B*38:01 and B*39:06 motifs. It is hoped that these detailed motifs will facilitate the identification of T cell epitopes recognized in the context of two class I alleles associated with dramatically different dispositions towards type 1 diabetes, offering potential avenues for investigation of the role of CD8 T cells in this disease. PMID:26754738

  16. The Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) binds a specific DNA Aβ-interacting domain (AβID) in the APP, BACE1, and APOE promoters in a sequence-specific manner: characterizing a new regulatory motif.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Bryan; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-11-15

    Deposition of extracellular plaques, primarily consisting of amyloid β peptide (Aβ), in the brain is the confirmatory diagnostic of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the physiological and pathological role of Aβ is not fully understood. Herein, we demonstrate novel Aβ activity as a putative transcription factor upon AD-associated genes. We used oligomers from 5'-flanking regions of the apolipoprotein E (APOE), Aβ-precursor protein (APP) and β-amyloid site cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) genes for electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) with different fragments of the Aβ peptide. Our results suggest that Aβ bound to an Aβ-interacting domain (AβID) with a consensus of "KGGRKTGGGG". This peptide-DNA interaction was sequence specific, and mutation of the first "G" of the decamer's terminal "GGGG" eliminated peptide-DNA interaction. Furthermore, the cytotoxic Aβ25-35 fragment had greatest DNA affinity. Such specificity of binding suggests that the AβID is worth of further investigation as a site wherein the Aβ peptide may act as a transcription factor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Peptide binding properties of the three PDZ domains of Bazooka (Drosophila Par-3).

    PubMed

    Yu, Cao Guo; Tonikian, Raffi; Felsensteiner, Corinna; Jhingree, Jacquelyn R; Desveaux, Darrell; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Harris, Tony J C

    2014-01-01

    The Par complex is a conserved cell polarity regulator. Bazooka/Par-3 is scaffold for the complex and contains three PDZ domains in tandem. PDZ domains can act singly or synergistically to bind the C-termini of interacting proteins. Sequence comparisons among Drosophila Baz and its human and C. elegans Par-3 counterparts indicate a divergence of the peptide binding pocket of PDZ1 and greater conservation for the pockets of PDZ2 and PDZ3. However, it is unclear whether the domains from different species share peptide binding preferences, or if their tandem organization affects their peptide binding properties. To investigate these questions, we first used phage display screens to identify unique peptide binding profiles for each single PDZ domain of Baz. Comparisons with published phage display screens indicate that Baz and C. elegans PDZ2 bind to similar peptides, and that the peptide binding preferences of Baz PDZ3 are more similar to C. elegans versus human PDZ3. Next we quantified the peptide binding preferences of each Baz PDZ domain using single identified peptides in surface plasmon resonance assays. In these direct binding studies, each peptide had a binding preference for a single PDZ domain (although the peptide binding of PDZ2 was weakest and the least specific). PDZ1 and PDZ3 bound their peptides with dissociation constants in the nM range, whereas PDZ2-peptide binding was in the µM range. To test whether tandem PDZ domain organization affects peptide binding, we examined a fusion protein containing all three PDZ domains and their normal linker regions. The binding strengths of the PDZ-specific peptides to single PDZ domains and to the PDZ domain tandem were indistinguishable. Thus, the peptide binding pockets of each PDZ domain in Baz are not obviously affected by the presence of neighbouring PDZ domains, but act as isolated modules with specific in vitro peptide binding preferences.

  18. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  19. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  20. An extended CCR5-ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 serves as a co-receptor for the Human Immunodefficiency Virus type-1, HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing the ECL1 and ECL3 were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study we determined that in aqueous buffer the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168 to K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two dimensional Saturation Transfer Difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed the involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment, in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule and therefore, could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25703038

  1. Asymmetry of calmodulin revealed by peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, E; Leclerc, L; Marden, M C

    1993-03-01

    The binding of amphiphilic peptides to calmodulin has been studied using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. Calmodulin has no tryptophan residues but possesses two tyrosines (at positions 99 and 138) in the C-terminal half of the protein. The peptides have a single tryptophan which serves as energy acceptor for the protein tyrosine fluorescence. For the binding of mastoparan or peptide Baa17, with a tryptophan at position 3, the observed quenching of the tyrosine fluorescence of over a factor of 2 corresponds to an average tyrosine-trytophan distance of less than 14 Å. These results indicate that the peptides binds preferentially with the tryptophan in the C-terminal half of the protein.

  2. Membrane catalysis of peptide-receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Langelaan, David N.; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    The membrane catalysis hypothesis states that a peptide ligand activates its target receptor after an initial interaction with the surrounding membrane. Upon membrane binding and interaction, the ligand is structured such that receptor binding and activation is encouraged. As evidence for this hypothesis, there are numerous studies concerning the conformation that peptides adopt in membrane mimetic environments. This mini-review analyzes the features of ligand peptides with available high-resolution membrane-induced structure and a characterized membrane-binding region. At the peptide-membrane interface, both amphipathic helices and turn structures are commonly formed in peptide ligands and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions can be responsible for membrane binding. Apelin is the ligand to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) named APJ, with various important physiological effects, which we have recently characterized both in solution and bound to anionic micelles. The structural changes that apelin undergoes when binding to micelles provide strong evidence for membrane catalysis of apelin-APJ interactions. PMID:20453923

  3. Engineering short peptide sequences for uranyl binding.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Colette; Starck, Matthieu; Gathu, Vicky; Chenavier, Yves; Delangle, Pascale

    2014-12-08

    Peptides are interesting tools to rationalize uranyl-protein interactions, which are relevant to uranium toxicity in vivo. Structured cyclic peptide scaffolds were chosen as promising candidates to coordinate uranyl thanks to four amino acid side chains pre-oriented towards the dioxo cation equatorial plane. The binding of uranyl by a series of decapeptides has been investigated with complementary analytical and spectroscopic methods to determine the key parameters for the formation of stable uranyl-peptide complexes. The molar ellipticity of the uranyl complex at 195 nm is directly correlated to its stability, which demonstrates that the β-sheet structure is optimal for high stability in the peptide series. Cyclodecapeptides with four glutamate residues exhibit the highest affinities for uranyl with log KC =8.0-8.4 and, therefore, appear as good starting points for the design of high-affinity uranyl-chelating peptides.

  4. An extended CCR5 ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Abayev, Meital; Moseri, Adi; Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as a co-receptor for HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing extracellular loops 1 and 3 (ECL1 and ECL3) were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study, we found that, in aqueous buffer, the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168-K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two-dimensional saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule, and therefore could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions that are not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides, as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The structures and NMR data of ECL2S (Q186-T195) were deposited under Protein Data Bank ID 2mzx and BioMagResBank ID 25505. © 2015 FEBS.

  5. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  6. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  7. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  8. Targeting cancer-specific glycans by cyclic peptide lectinomimics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria C; Yongye, Austin B; Cudic, Mihael; Martinez Mayorga, Karina; Liu, Enbo; Mueller, Barbara M; Ainsley, Jon; Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana; Christov, Christo Z; Cudic, Mare; Cudic, Predrag

    2017-09-11

    The transformation from normal to malignant phenotype in human cancers is associated with aberrant cell-surface glycosylation. Thus, targeting glycosylation changes in cancer is likely to provide not only better insight into the roles of carbohydrates in biological systems, but also facilitate the development of new molecular probes for bioanalytical and biomedical applications. In the reported study, we have synthesized lectinomimics based on odorranalectin 1; the smallest lectin-like cyclic peptide isolated from the frog Odorrana grahami skin, and assessed the ability of these peptides to bind specific carbohydrates on molecular and cellular levels. In addition, we have shown that the disulfide bond found in 1 can be replaced with a lactam bridge. However, the orientation of the lactam bridge, peptides 2 and 3, influenced cyclic peptide's conformation and thus these peptides' ability to bind carbohydrates. Naturally occurring 1 and its analog 3 that adopt similar conformation in water bind preferentially L-fucose, and to a lesser degree D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, typically found within the mucin O-glycan core structures. In cell-based assays, peptides 1 and 3 showed a similar binding profile to Aleuria aurantia lectin and these two peptides inhibited the migration of metastatic breast cancer cell lines in a Transwell assay. Altogether, the reported data demonstrate the feasibility of designing lectinomimics based on cyclic peptides.

  9. Secondary structure propensity and chirality of the amyloidophilic peptide p5 and its analogues impacts ligand binding - In vitro characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Williams, Angela; Wooliver, Craig; ...

    2016-08-11

    Here, polybasic helical peptides, such as peptide p5, bind human amyloid extracts and synthetic amyloid fibrils. When radio labeled, peptide p5 has been shown to specifically bind amyloid in vivo thereby allowing imaging of the disease. Structural requirements for heparin and amyloid binding have been studied using analogues of p5 that modify helicity and chirality.

  10. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  11. Role of high-affinity HLA-DP specific CLIP-derived peptides in beryllium binding to the HLA-DPGlu69 berylliosis-associated molecules and presentation to beryllium-sensitized T cells

    PubMed Central

    Amicosante, Massimo; Berretta, Floriana; Dweik, Raed; Saltini, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Berylliosis is driven by the accumulation in the lung of beryllium-specific T helper type 1 (Th1) cells recognizing beryllium as antigen when presented principally by human leucocyte antigen DP molecules carrying a glutamate at position β69 (HLA-DPGlu69). This study was designed to clarify the precise role of peptides in beryllium binding to the HLA-DP groove’s pocket 4 and to identify peptides with higher affinity for pocket 4 that might prevent beryllium presentation and T-cell stimulation. Beryllium/HLA-DP interactions were analysed by the ability of beryllium to compete with CLIP and CLIP-derived peptides to HLA-DPGlu69 soluble molecule. The CLIP-derived low-affinity peptide CLIP-AA, could not outcompete beryllium; while the CLIP-derived high-affinity peptides CLIP-YY, CLIP-QY and CLIP-RF were only marginally influenced by the presence of beryllium in the competition assay. The effect of these CLIP-derived high-affinity peptides on beryllium presentation was determined by measuring interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release upon beryllium stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from beryllium-hypersensitive subjects. CLIP-YY did inhibit beryllium presentation and T-cell activation, while CLIP-QY and CLIP-RF markedly enhanced the IFN-γ response to beryllium. Anti-HLA-DP monoclonal antibody blocked the beryllium-induced IFN-γ release in the presence of CLIP-QY (88%) and CLIP-RF (76%). A similar effect was observed for CLIP-YY capability to block IFN-γ release by beryllium stimulation in the presence of CLIP-QY (79%) and CLIP-RF (76%). Overall, these data support the proposal that HLA-DP high-affinity peptides might be used as a model for specific berylliosis therapy. PMID:19191908

  12. Flexible Backbone Methods for Predicting and Designing Peptide Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Noah

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play critical roles in essentially every cellular process. These interactions are often mediated by protein interaction domains that enable proteins to recognize their interaction partners, often by binding to short peptide motifs. For example, PDZ domains, which are among the most common protein interaction domains in the human proteome, recognize specific linear peptide sequences that are often at the C-terminus of other proteins. Determining the set of peptide sequences that a protein interaction domain binds, or it's "peptide specificity," is crucial for understanding its cellular function, and predicting how mutations impact peptide specificity is important for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human diseases. Moreover, engineering novel cellular functions for synthetic biology applications, such as the biosynthesis of biofuels or drugs, requires the design of protein interaction specificity to avoid crosstalk with native metabolic and signaling pathways. The ability to accurately predict and design protein-peptide interaction specificity is therefore critical for understanding and engineering biological function. One approach that has recently been employed toward accomplishing this goal is computational protein design. This chapter provides an overview of recent methodological advances in computational protein design and highlights examples of how these advances can enable increased accuracy in predicting and designing peptide specificity.

  13. Characterization of histamine H/sub 1/-receptor binding peptides in guinea pig brain using (/sup 125/I)iodoazidophenpyramine, an irreversible specific photoaffinity probe

    SciTech Connect

    Ruat, M.; Koerner, M.; Garbarg, M.; Gros, C.; Schwartz, J.C.; Tertiuk, W.; Ganellin, C.R.

    1988-04-01

    Aminophenpyramine, a derivative of mepyramine (pyrilamine), a typical antagonists of histamine at its H/sub 1/ receptor was synthesized and converted into (/sup 125/I)iodoazidophenpyramine, a potential photoaffinity probe for the H/sub 1/ receptor. In the dark, reversible binding of this probe to cerebellar membranes occurred with a K/sub d/ of 1.2 x 10/sup -11/ M and a B/sub max/ of 240 fmol/mg of protein and was inhibited by various H/sub 1/-receptor antagonists with the expected potencies. These features establish the compound as one of the most potent H/sub 1/-receptor antagonists known so far. Upon IV irradiation, 5% of the bound radioactivity was covalently incorporated into cerebellar membrane polypeptides as shown by standard NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. Two bands of 47 and 56 kDa were consistently labeled, labeling being prevented by various H/sub 1/-receptor antagonists with the expected potencies and stereoselectivity. In the presence of protease inhibitors, labeling of the 56-kDa peptide increased at the expense of the 47-kDa peptide, suggesting that the latter was produced by hydrolysis of the former under the action of membrane proteases. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a band of 350-400 kDa appeared, apparently at the expense of the lighter bands, suggesting that the latter might be linked by one or more disulfide bridges to a higher molecular mass complex. The authors propose that at least part of the ligand binding domain of the histamine H/sub 1/ receptor resides within a subunit of apparent molecular mass 56,000.

  14. Oligomerization enhances the binding affinity of a silver biomineralization peptide and catalyzes nanostructure formation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Janairo, Jose Isagani B; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Wada, Junya; Omichinski, James G; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-05-03

    Binding affinity and specificity are crucial factors that influence nanostructure control by biomineralization peptides. In this paper, we analysed the role that the oligomeric state of a silver biomineralization peptide plays in regulating the morphology of silver nanostructure formation. Oligomerization was achieved by conjugating the silver specific TBP biomineralization peptide to the p53 tetramerization domain peptide (p53Tet). Interestingly, the TBP-p53Tet tetrameric peptide acted as a growth catalyst, controlling silver crystal growth, which resulted in the formation of hexagonal silver nanoplates without consuming the peptide. The TBP-p53Tet peptide caps the surface of the silver crystals, which enhances crystal growth on specific faces and thereby regulates silver nanostructure formation in a catalytic fashion. The present findings not only provide an efficient strategy for controlling silver nanostructure formation by biomineralization peptides, but they also demonstrate that in this case the oligomeric peptides play a unique catalytic role.

  15. A geometric and algebraic view of MHC-peptide complexes and their binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Pedro; Fan, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules present peptides to T lymphocytes. It is of critical biological and medical importance to elucidate how different MHC alleles bind to a specific set of peptides. Method In this study we approach the problem from the algebraic and geometric point of view to analyse MHC-peptide-binding data accumulated over the years. The space of sequence properties (having a particular amino acid at a particular position) of MHC-peptide complexes conveys a geometric structure to these sequence properties in the form of a distance measure, which reveals the peptide binding requirements imposed by the polymorphic sequence characteristics of the MHC molecules. Results Comparison of the results of this study with our current knowledge of MHC-peptide binding constraints leads to robust agreement. This study provides the tools to quantitate these binding constraints giving a more detailed account of them and opening the way to make peptide binding predictions for MHC alleles for which there is no peptide elution data. In addition, the geometric representation of MHC-peptide complex sequence data gives a distance measure between amino acids in reference to their ability to meet MHC binding requirements. Conclusions The algebraic and geometric view of amino acid sequences provides a theoretical framework to study the function of proteins when there is enough variation in this sequence to account for the variation in their function, as it is the case with MHC molecules in regard to their ability to present peptides. PMID:11472639

  16. High-throughput analysis of peptide binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bernard A.; Engelmann, Brett; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Modular protein interaction domains that recognize linear peptide motifs are found in hundreds of proteins within the human genome. Some protein interaction domains such as SH2, 14-3-3, Chromo and Bromo domains serve to recognize post-translational modification of amino acids (such as phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation etc.) and translate these into discrete cellular responses. Other modules such as SH3 and PDZ domains recognize linear peptide epitopes and serve to organize protein complexes based on localization and regions of elevated concentration. In both cases, the ability to nucleate specific signaling complexes is in large part dependent on the selectivity of a given protein module for its cognate peptide ligand. High throughput analysis of peptide-binding domains by peptide or protein arrays, phage display, mass spectrometry or other HTP techniques provides new insight into the potential protein-protein interactions prescribed by individual or even whole families of modules. Systems level analyses have also promoted a deeper understanding of the underlying principles that govern selective protein-protein interactions and how selectivity evolves. Lastly, there is a growing appreciation for the limitations and potential pitfalls of high-throughput analysis of protein-peptide interactomes. This review will examine some of the common approaches utilized for large-scale studies of protein interaction domains and suggest a set of standards for the analysis and validation of datasets from large-scale studies of peptide-binding modules. We will also highlight how data from large-scale studies of modular interaction domain families can provide insight into systems level properties such as the linguistics of selective interactions. PMID:22610655

  17. Predicting sequences and structures of MHC-binding peptides: a computational combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jun; Treutlein, Herbert R.; Rudy, George B.

    2001-06-01

    Peptides bound to MHC molecules on the surface of cells convey critical information about the cellular milieu to immune system T cells. Predicting which peptides can bind an MHC molecule, and understanding their modes of binding, are important in order to design better diagnostic and therapeutic agents for infectious and autoimmune diseases. Due to the difficulty of obtaining sufficient experimental binding data for each human MHC molecule, computational modeling of MHC peptide-binding properties is necessary. This paper describes a computational combinatorial design approach to the prediction of peptides that bind an MHC molecule of known X-ray crystallographic or NMR-determined structure. The procedure uses chemical fragments as models for amino acid residues and produces a set of sequences for peptides predicted to bind in the MHC peptide-binding groove. The probabilities for specific amino acids occurring at each position of the peptide are calculated based on these sequences, and these probabilities show a good agreement with amino acid distributions derived from a MHC-binding peptide database. The method also enables prediction of the three-dimensional structure of MHC-peptide complexes. Docking, linking, and optimization procedures were performed with the XPLOR program [1].

  18. Filaggrin peptides with β-hairpin structure bind rheumatoid arthritis antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sabrina; Geyer, Armin

    2014-04-07

    In the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synthetic filaggrin peptides serve as antigens for rheumatoid-specific autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated peptide antibody, ACPA) in ELISA tests. In this work we present a peptide that exhibits the binding epitope of ACPA in the form of a stable folding β-hairpin. The homogeneity of the peptide folding was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and might lead to the first proposed structure of the antibody-bound conformation of the epitope.

  19. Exploring high-affinity binding properties of octamer peptides by principal component analysis of tetramer peptides.

    PubMed

    Kume, Akiko; Kawai, Shun; Kato, Ryuji; Iwata, Shinmei; Shimizu, Kazunori; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the binding properties of a peptide sequence, we conducted principal component analysis (PCA) of the physicochemical features of a tetramer peptide library comprised of 512 peptides, and the variables were reduced to two principal components. We selected IL-2 and IgG as model proteins and the binding affinity to these proteins was assayed using the 512 peptides mentioned above. PCA of binding affinity data showed that 16 and 18 variables were suitable for localizing IL-2 and IgG high-affinity binding peptides, respectively, into a restricted region of the PCA plot. We then investigated whether the binding affinity of octamer peptide libraries could be predicted using the identified region in the tetramer PCA. The results show that octamer high-affinity binding peptides were also concentrated in the tetramer high-affinity binding region of both IL-2 and IgG. The average fluorescence intensity of high-affinity binding peptides was 3.3- and 2.1-fold higher than that of low-affinity binding peptides for IL-2 and IgG, respectively. We conclude that PCA may be used to identify octamer peptides with high- or low-affinity binding properties from data from a tetramer peptide library. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, L.M.

    1990-10-16

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4--20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte. 5 figs.

  1. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4-20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte.

  2. Peptide-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles: effects of peptide sequence and nature of binding on physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Tang, Zhenghua; Prasad, Paras N; Knecht, Marc R; Swihart, Mark T

    2014-03-21

    Biomimetic nanotechnologies that use peptides to guide the growth and assembly of nanostructures offer new avenues for the creation of functional nanomaterials and manipulation of their physicochemical properties. However, the impacts of peptide sequence and binding motif upon the surface characteristics and physicochemical properties of nanoparticles remain poorly understood. The configurations of the biomolecules are expected to be extremely important for directing the synthesis and achieving desired material functionality, and these binding motifs will vary with the peptide sequence. Here, we have prepared a series of Au nanoparticles capped with a variety of materials-directing peptides with known affinity for metal surfaces. These nanomaterials were characterized by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopies, transmission electron microscopy, and ζ-potential measurement. Then their catalytic activity for 4-nitrophenol reduction was analyzed. The results indicate that substantially different Au-peptide interfaces are generated using different peptide sequences, even when these sequences have similar binding affinity. This is consistent with recent work showing that Au-peptide binding affinity can have varying entropic and enthalpic contributions, with enthalpically- and entropically-driven binders exhibiting quite different ensembles of configurations on the Au surface. The catalytic activity, as reflected by the measured activation energy, did not correlate with the particle size or with the binding affinity of the peptides, suggesting that the reactivity of these materials is governed by the more subtle details of the conformation of the bound peptide and on the nanoparticle surface reconstruction as dictated by the peptide structure. Such variations in both nanoparticle surface reconstruction and peptide configuration could potentially be used to program specific functionality into the peptide-capped nanomaterials.

  3. Efficient conformational sampling of peptides adsorbed onto inorganic surfaces: insights from a quartz binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise B; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2013-04-07

    Harnessing the properties of biomolecules, such as peptides, adsorbed on inorganic surfaces is of interest to many cross-disciplinary areas of science, ranging from biomineralisation to nanomedicine. Key to advancing research in this area is determination of the peptide conformation(s) in its adsorbed state, at the aqueous interface. Molecular simulation is one such approach for accomplishing this goal. In this respect, use of temperature-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) can yield enhanced sampling of the interfacial conformations, but does so at great computational expense, chiefly because of the need to include an explicit representation of water at the interface. Here, we investigate a number of more economical variations on REMD, chiefly those based on Replica Exchange with Solvent Tempering (REST), using the aqueous quartz-binding peptide S1-(100) α-quartz interfacial system as a benchmark. We also incorporate additional implementation details specifically targeted at improving sampling of biomolecules at interfaces. We find the REST-based variants yield configurational sampling of the peptide-surface system comparable with T-REMD, at a fraction of the computational time and resource. Our findings also deliver novel insights into the binding behaviour of the S1 peptide at the quartz (100) surface that are consistent with available experimental data.

  4. Synthetic peptides mimicking the binding site of human acetylcholinesterase for its inhibitor fasciculin 2.

    PubMed

    Kafurke, Uwe; Erijman, Ariel; Aizner, Yonatan; Shifman, Julia M; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking protein binding and/or functional sites present useful tools for a range of biomedical applications, including the inhibition of protein-ligand interactions. Such mimics of protein binding sites can currently be generated through structure-based design and chemical synthesis. Computational protein design could be further used to optimize protein binding site mimetics through rationally designed mutations that improve intermolecular interactions or peptide stability. Here, as a model for the study, we chose an interaction between human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and its inhibitor fasciculin-2 (Fas) because the structure and function of this complex is well understood. Structure-based design of mimics of the hAChE binding site for Fas yielded a peptide that binds to Fas at micromolar concentrations. Replacement of hAChE residues known to be essential for its interaction with Fas with alanine, in this peptide, resulted in almost complete loss of binding to Fas. Computational optimization of the hAChE mimetic peptide yielded a variant with slightly improved affinity to Fas, indicating that more rounds of computational optimization will be required to obtain peptide variants with greatly improved affinity for Fas. CD spectra in the absence and presence of Fas point to conformational changes in the peptide upon binding to Fas. Furthermore, binding of the optimized hAChE mimetic peptide to Fas could be inhibited by hAChE, providing evidence for a hAChE-specific peptide-Fas interaction.

  5. Evidence of widespread binding of HLA class I molecules to peptides

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have tested the binding of HLA class I proteins to peptides using a solid-phase binding assay. We tested 102 peptides, mostly derived from the HIV gag and HIV pol sequences. Most peptides did not bind to any class I protein tested. The pattern of binding among the three class I proteins tested, HLA-A2, -B27, and -B8, was approximately 85% concordant. Further, all five of the known HIV-1 gag T cell epitopes detected by human CTL bound at least one class I protein. Binding of class I to the peptides could be detected either by directly iodinated class I proteins, or indirectly using monoclonal antibodies specific for class I. The binding to the plates could be blocked with MA2.1, which binds in the alpha 1 region of A2, but not by W6/32, which binds elsewhere. The data presented here show that binding of class I to peptides is specific, but that many peptides bind to more than a single class I protein. PMID:2201749

  6. Computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

    PubMed

    Rhinehardt, Kristen L; Mohan, Ram V; Srinivas, Goundla

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is the progressive process that holds each living creature in its grasp. From strands of DNA evolution shapes life with response to our ever-changing environment and time. It is the continued study of this most primitive process that has led to the advancement of modern biology. The success and failure in the reading, processing, replication, and expression of genetic code and its resulting biomolecules keep the delicate balance of life. Investigations into these fundamental processes continue to make headlines as science continues to explore smaller scale interactions with increasing complexity. New applications and advanced understanding of DNA, RNA, peptides, and proteins are pushing technology and science forward and together. Today the addition of computers and advances in science has led to the fields of computational biology and chemistry. Through these computational advances it is now possible not only to quantify the end results but also visualize, analyze, and fully understand mechanisms by gaining deeper insights. The biomolecular motion that exists governing the physical and chemical phenomena can now be analyzed with the advent of computational modeling. Ever-increasing computational power combined with efficient algorithms and components are further expanding the fidelity and scope of such modeling and simulations. This chapter discusses computational methods that apply biological processes, in particular computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

  7. Crystal Structures of Beryllium Fluoride-Free and Beryllium Fluoride-Bound CheY in Complex with the Conserved C-Terminal Peptide of CheZ Reveal Dual Binding Modes Specific to CheY Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Guhaniyogi, Jayita; Robinson, Victoria L.; Stock, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis, the environment-specific swimming behavior of a bacterial cell is controlled by flagellar rotation. The steady-state level of the phosphorylated or activated form of the response regulator CheY dictates the direction of flagellar rotation. CheY phosphorylation is regulated by a fine equilibrium of three phosphotransfer activities: phosphorylation by the kinase CheA, its auto-dephosphorylation and dephosphorylation by its phosphatase CheZ. Efficient dephosphorylation of CheY by CheZ requires two spatially distinct protein-protein contacts: tethering of the two proteins to each other and formation of an active site for dephosphorylation. The latter involves interaction of phosphorylated CheY with the small highly conserved C-terminal helix of CheZ (CheZC), an indispensable structural component of the functional CheZ protein. To understand how the CheZC helix, representing less than 1% of the full-length protein, ascertains molecular specificity of binding to CheY, we have determined crystal structures of CheY in complex with a synthetic peptide corresponding to 15 C-terminal residues of CheZ (CheZ200-214) at resolutions ranging from 2.0 Å to 2.3 Å. These structures provide a detailed view of the CheZC peptide interaction both in the presence and absence of the phosphoryl analog, BeF3−. Our studies reveal that two different modes of binding the CheZ200-214 peptide are dictated by the conformational state of CheY in the complex. Our structures suggest that the CheZC helix binds to a “meta-active” conformation of inactive CheY and it does so in an orientation that is distinct from the one in which it binds activated CheY. Our dual binding mode hypothesis provides implications for reverse information flow in CheY and extends previous observations on inherent resilience in CheY-like signaling domains. PMID:16674976

  8. Crystal Structures of Beryllium Fluoride-Free and Beryllium Fluoride-Bound CheY in Complex with the Conserved C-Terminal Peptide of CheZ Reveal Dual Binding Modes Specific to CheY Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Guhaniyogi,J.; Robinson, V.; Stock, A.

    2006-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the environment-specific swimming behavior of a bacterial cell is controlled by flagellar rotation. The steady-state level of the phosphorylated or activated form of the response regulator CheY dictates the direction of flagellar rotation. CheY phosphorylation is regulated by a fine equilibrium of three phosphotransfer activities: phosphorylation by the kinase CheA, its auto-dephosphorylation and dephosphorylation by its phosphatase CheZ. Efficient dephosphorylation of CheY by CheZ requires two spatially distinct protein-protein contacts: tethering of the two proteins to each other and formation of an active site for dephosphorylation. The former involves interaction of phosphorylated CheY with the small highly conserved C-terminal helix of CheZ (CheZ{sub C}), an indispensable structural component of the functional CheZ protein. To understand how the CheZ{sub C} helix, representing less than 10% of the full-length protein, ascertains molecular specificity of binding to CheY, we have determined crystal structures of CheY in complex with a synthetic peptide corresponding to 15 C-terminal residues of CheZ (CheZ{sub 200-214}) at resolutions ranging from 2.0 Angstroms to 2.3 Angstroms. These structures provide a detailed view of the CheZC peptide interaction both in the presence and absence of the phosphoryl analog, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}. Our studies reveal that two different modes of binding the CheZ{sub 200-214} peptide are dictated by the conformational state of CheY in the complex. Our structures suggest that the CheZ{sub C} helix binds to a 'meta-active' conformation of inactive CheY and it does so in an orientation that is distinct from the one in which it binds activated CheY. Our dual binding mode hypothesis provides implications for reverse information flow in CheY and extends previous observations on inherent resilience in CheY-like signaling domains.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    PubMed

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s).

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data*

    PubMed Central

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B.; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C. C.; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s). PMID:26929215

  11. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex conformational epitopes are peptide specific

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Serologically distinct forms of H-2Kb are stabilized by loading cells expressing "empty" class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with different H-2Kb binding peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 28.8.6 was stabilized by ovalbumin (OVA) (257-264) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) pp89 (168- 176) peptides, but not by vesicular stomatic virus nucleoprotein (VSV NP) (52-59) and influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by mAb 34.4.20 was stabilized by VSV NP (52-59) peptide but not by OVA (257-264), MCMV pp89 (168-176), or influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. Immunoprecipitation of H-2Kb molecules from normal cells showed that 28.8.6 and 34.4.20 epitopes were only present on a subset of all conformationally reactive H-2Kb molecules. Using alanine- substituted derivatives of the VSV peptide, the 28.8.6 epitope was completely stabilized by substitution of the first residue and partially stabilized by substitution of the third or the fifth residues in the peptides. These results indicate that distinct conformational MHC epitopes are dependent on the specific peptide that occupies the antigenic peptide binding groove on individual MHC molecules. The changes in MHC epitopes observed may also be important in understanding the diversity of T cell receptors used in an immune response and the influence of peptides on development of the T cell repertoire. PMID:1281212

  13. The multiple-specificity landscape of modular peptide recognition domains

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, David; Butty, Frank; Wierzbicka, Marta; Verschueren, Erik; Vanhee, Peter; Huang, Haiming; Ernst, Andreas; Dar, Nisa; Stagljar, Igor; Serrano, Luis; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Bader, Gary D; Kim, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    Modular protein interaction domains form the building blocks of eukaryotic signaling pathways. Many of them, known as peptide recognition domains, mediate protein interactions by recognizing short, linear amino acid stretches on the surface of their cognate partners with high specificity. Residues in these stretches are usually assumed to contribute independently to binding, which has led to a simplified understanding of protein interactions. Conversely, we observe in large binding peptide data sets that different residue positions display highly significant correlations for many domains in three distinct families (PDZ, SH3 and WW). These correlation patterns reveal a widespread occurrence of multiple binding specificities and give novel structural insights into protein interactions. For example, we predict a new binding mode of PDZ domains and structurally rationalize it for DLG1 PDZ1. We show that multiple specificity more accurately predicts protein interactions and experimentally validate some of the predictions for the human proteins DLG1 and SCRIB. Overall, our results reveal a rich specificity landscape in peptide recognition domains, suggesting new ways of encoding specificity in protein interaction networks. PMID:21525870

  14. The Inhibition of Stat5 by a Peptide Aptamer Ligand Specific for the DNA Binding Domain Prevents Target Gene Transactivation and the Growth of Breast and Prostate Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Axel; Borghouts, Corina; Brendel, Christian; Moriggl, Richard; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription Stat5 is transiently activated by growth factor and cytokine signals in normal cells, but its persistent activation has been observed in a wide range of human tumors. Aberrant Stat5 activity was initially observed in leukemias, but subsequently also found in carcinomas. We investigated the importance of Stat5 in human tumor cell lines. shRNA mediated downregulation of Stat5 revealed the dependence of prostate and breast cancer cells on the expression of this transcription factor. We extended these inhibition studies and derived a peptide aptamer (PA) ligand, which directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Stat5 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen. The Stat5 specific PA sequence is embedded in a thioredoxin (hTRX) scaffold protein. The resulting recombinant protein S5-DBD-PA was expressed in bacteria, purified and introduced into tumor cells by protein transduction. Alternatively, S5-DBD-PA was expressed in the tumor cells after infection with a S5-DBD-PA encoding gene transfer vector. Both strategies impaired the DNA-binding ability of Stat5, suppressed Stat5 dependent transactivation and caused its intracellular degradation. Our experiments describe a peptide based inhibitor of Stat5 protein activity which can serve as a lead for the development of a clinically useful compound for cancer treatment. PMID:24276378

  15. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Methods Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Results Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Conclusions Network analysis is a

  16. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Mattes, William; Mendrick, Donna; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Network analysis is a useful approach for analyzing large and

  17. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  18. Engineering of the function of diamond-like carbon binding peptides through structural design.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Singh, Vivek K; Mikkilä, Joona; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Koskinen, Jari; Linder, Markus B

    2015-02-09

    The use of phage display to select material-specific peptides provides a general route towards modification and functionalization of surfaces and interfaces. However, a rational structural engineering of the peptides for optimal affinity is typically not feasible because of insufficient structure-function understanding. Here, we investigate the influence of multivalency of diamond-like carbon (DLC) binding peptides on binding characteristics. We show that facile linking of peptides together using different lengths of spacers and multivalency leads to a tuning of affinity and kinetics. Notably, increased length of spacers in divalent systems led to significantly increased affinities. Making multimers influenced also kinetic aspects of surface competition. Additionally, the multivalent peptides were applied as surface functionalization components for a colloidal form of DLC. The work suggests the use of a set of linking systems to screen parameters for functional optimization of selected material-specific peptides.

  19. Machine Learning Methods for Predicting HLA–Peptide Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    As major histocompatibility complexes in humans, the human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have important functions to present antigen peptides onto T-cell receptors for immunological recognition and responses. Interpreting and predicting HLA–peptide binding are important to study T-cell epitopes, immune reactions, and the mechanisms of adverse drug reactions. We review different types of machine learning methods and tools that have been used for HLA–peptide binding prediction. We also summarize the descriptors based on which the HLA–peptide binding prediction models have been constructed and discuss the limitation and challenges of the current methods. Lastly, we give a future perspective on the HLA–peptide binding prediction method based on network analysis. PMID:26512199

  20. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  1. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  2. Evolution of domain–peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain–peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain–peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain–peptide interactions. Thus, domain–peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved. PMID:27317745

  3. Evolution of domain-peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-07-05

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain-peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain-peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain-peptide interactions. Thus, domain-peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved.

  4. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  5. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  6. Autoradiographic demonstration of gastrin-releasing peptide-binding sites in the rat gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Oda, M.; Kaneko, K.; Akaiwa, Y.; Tsukada, N.; Komatsu, H.; Tsuchiya, M.

    1988-04-01

    The location of (/sup 125/I)iodotyrosyl gastrin-releasing peptide-binding sites in the rat fundic mucosa was studied. Peptide specificity was demonstrated by competitive binding studies using the addition of a large amount of cold gastrin-releasing peptide or substance P. Autoradiography of the stomach tissue was carried out by freeze-drying, embedding in Epon, wet-sectioning with ethylene glycol, and dry-mounting the emulsion film by the wire-loop method to prevent loss of the labeled substance. Specific binding sites of gastrin-releasing peptide were found on D cells, surface mucus cells, and parietal cells, whereas few binding sites were seen on the chief or mucus neck cells.

  7. Predicting peptide binding sites on protein surfaces by clustering chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-05

    Short peptides play important roles in cellular processes including signal transduction, immune response, and transcription regulation. Correct identification of the peptide binding site on a given protein surface is of great importance not only for mechanistic investigation of these biological processes but also for therapeutic development. In this study, we developed a novel computational approach, referred to as ACCLUSTER, for predicting the peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. Specifically, we use the 20 standard amino acids as probes to globally scan the protein surface. The poses forming good chemical interactions with the protein are identified, followed by clustering with the density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise technique. Finally, these clusters are ranked based on their sizes. The cluster with the largest size is predicted as the putative binding site. Assessment of ACCLUSTER was performed on a diverse test set of 251 nonredundant protein-peptide complexes. The results were compared with the performance of POCASA, a pocket detection method for ligand binding site prediction. Peptidb, another protein-peptide database that contains both bound structures and unbound or homologous structures was used to test the robustness of ACCLUSTER. The performance of ACCLUSTER was also compared with PepSite2 and PeptiMap, two recently developed methods developed for identifying peptide binding sites. The results showed that ACCLUSTER is a promising method for peptide binding site prediction. Additionally, ACCLUSTER was also shown to be applicable to nonpeptide ligand binding site prediction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stepwise Evolution Improves Identification of Diverse Peptides Binding to a Protein Target.

    PubMed

    Lyamichev, Victor I; Goodrich, Lauren E; Sullivan, Eric H; Bannen, Ryan M; Benz, Joerg; Albert, Thomas J; Patel, Jigar J

    2017-09-21

    Considerable efforts have been made to develop technologies for selection of peptidic molecules that act as substrates or binders to a protein of interest. Here we demonstrate the combination of rational peptide array library design, parallel screening and stepwise evolution, to discover novel peptide hotspots. These hotspots can be systematically evolved to create high-affinity, high-specificity binding peptides to a protein target in a reproducible and digitally controlled process. The method can be applied to synthesize both linear and cyclic peptides, as well as peptides composed of natural and non-natural amino acid analogs, thereby enabling screens in a much diverse chemical space. We apply this method to stepwise evolve peptide binders to streptavidin, a protein studied for over two decades and report novel peptides that mimic key interactions of biotin to streptavidin.

  9. Differential peptide binding to CD40 evokes counteractive responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Srijit; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Alonso, Livan; Roduit, Charles; Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Singh, Shailza; Saha, Shipra; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Roy, Somenath; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor; Das, Pradeep; Krishnasastry, M V; Saha, Bhaskar

    2012-05-01

    The antigen-presenting cell–expressed CD40 is implied in the regulation of counteractive immune responses such as induction of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)–12 and IL-10, respectively. The mechanism of this duality in CD40 function remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether such duality depends on ligand binding. Based on CD40 binding, we identifed two dodecameric peptides, peptide-7 and peptide-19, from the phage peptide library. Peptide-7 induces IL-10 and increases Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages, whereas peptide-19 induces IL-12 and reduces L. donovani infection. CD40-peptide interaction analyses by surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy suggest that the functional differences are not associated with the studied interaction parameters. The molecular dynamic simulation of the CD40-peptides interaction suggests that these two peptides bind to two different places on CD40. Thus, we suggest for the first time that differential binding of the ligands imparts functional duality to CD40.

  10. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  11. HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 molecules bind largely nonoverlapping sets of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Carreno, B M; Anderson, R W; Coligan, J E; Biddison, W E

    1990-01-01

    T-cell recognition of peptides that are bound and presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules is highly specific. At present it is unclear what role class I peptide binding plays relative to T-cell receptor specificity in determination of immune recognition. A previous study from our group demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 molecule could bind to 25% of the members of a panel of unrelated synthetic peptides as assessed by a functional peptide competition assay. To determine the peptide-binding specificity of another HLA class I molecule, we have examined the capacity of this panel of peptides to compete for the presentation of influenza virus nucleoprotein peptide NP-(335-350) by HLA-B37 to NP-peptide-specific HLA-B37-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lines. Forty-two percent of peptides tested were capable of inhibiting NP-(335-350) presentation by HLA-B37. Remarkably, none of these HLA-B37-binding peptides belong to the subset that was previously shown to bind to the HLA-A2.1 molecule. Only the NP-(335-350) peptide was capable of binding to both HLA-A2.1 and HLA-B37. These findings demonstrate that the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-B37 and HLA-A2.1 are largely nonoverlapping and suggest that, from the universe of peptides, individual HLA class I molecules can bind to clearly distinct subsets of these peptides. PMID:2333291

  12. Critical contribution of beta chain residue 57 in peptide binding ability of both HLA-DR and -DQ molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Nepom, B S; Nepom, G T; Coleman, M; Kwok, W W

    1996-01-01

    Position 57 in the beta chain of HLA class II molecules maintains an Asp/non-Asp dimorphism that has been conserved through evolution and is implicated in susceptibility to some autoimmune diseases. The latter effect may be due to the influence of this residue on the ability of class II alleles to bind specific pathogenic peptides. We utilized highly homologous pairs of both DR and DQ alleles that varied at residue 57 to investigate the impact of this dimorphism on binding of model peptides. Using a direct binding assay of biotinylated peptides on whole cells expressing the desired alleles, we report several peptides that bind differentially to the allele pairs depending on the presence or absence of Asp at position 57. Peptides with negatively charged residues at anchor position 9 bind well to alleles not containing Asp at position 57 in the beta chain but cannot bind well to homologous Asp-positive alleles. By changing the peptides at the single residue predicted to interact with this position 57, we demonstrate a drastically altered or reversed pattern of binding. Ala analog peptides confirm these interactions and identify a limited set of interaction sites between the bound peptides and the class II molecules. Clarification of the impact of specific class II polymorphisms on generating unique allele-specific peptide binding "repertoires" will aid in our understanding of the development of specific immune responses and HLA-associated diseases. PMID:8692969

  13. Secondary structure propensity and chirality of the amyloidophilic peptide p5 and its analogues impacts ligand binding - In vitro characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Williams, Angela; Wooliver, Craig; Martin, Emily B.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heidel, R. Eric; Kennel, Stephen J.

    2016-08-11

    Here, polybasic helical peptides, such as peptide p5, bind human amyloid extracts and synthetic amyloid fibrils. When radio labeled, peptide p5 has been shown to specifically bind amyloid in vivo thereby allowing imaging of the disease. Structural requirements for heparin and amyloid binding have been studied using analogues of p5 that modify helicity and chirality.

  14. PepComposer: computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface

    PubMed Central

    Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide interest in designing peptides able to bind to a specific region of a protein with the aim of interfering with a known interaction or as starting point for the design of inhibitors. Here we describe PepComposer, a new pipeline for the computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface. PepComposer only requires the target protein structure and an approximate definition of the binding site as input. We first retrieve a set of peptide backbone scaffolds from monomeric proteins that harbor the same backbone arrangement as the binding site of the protein of interest. Next, we design optimal sequences for the identified peptide scaffolds. The method is fully automatic and available as a web server at http://biocomputing.it/pepcomposer/webserver. PMID:27131789

  15. Semi-empirical quantum evaluation of peptide - MHC class II binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Ronald; Suárez, Carlos F.; Bohórquez, Hugo J.; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key process for triggering a specific immune response. Studying peptide-MHC (pMHC) binding from a structural-based approach has potential for reducing the costs of investigation into vaccine development. This study involved using two semi-empirical quantum chemistry methods (PM7 and FMO-DFTB) for computing the binding energies of peptides bonded to HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR2. We found that key stabilising water molecules involved in the peptide binding mechanism were required for finding high correlation with IC50 experimental values. Our proposal is computationally non-intensive, and is a reliable alternative for studying pMHC binding interactions.

  16. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  17. Evaluation of Phosphatidylserine-Binding Peptides Radiolabeled with Fluorine 18 for in vivo Imaging of Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapty, Janice Sarah

    We currently do not have a clinical method to directly assess apoptosis induced by cancer therapies. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging apoptosis since it is on the exterior of the apoptotic cells and PS externalization is an early marker of apoptosis. PS-binding peptides are an attractive option for developing an imaging probe to detect apoptosis using positron emission tomography. In this study we evaluated binding characteristics of PS-binding peptides for ability to bind to PS, radiolabeled PS-binding peptides with fluorine-18, and performed in vitro and in vivo analysis of 18F radiolabeled PS-binding peptides including biodistribution analysis and dynamic PET imaging in a murine tumor model of apoptosis. Four peptides were evaluated for PS binding characteristics using a plate based assay system, a liposome mimic of cell membrane PS presentation, and a cell assay of apoptosis. The results indicate that all four peptides bind to PS and are specific to apoptotic cells. The widely used 18 F prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) and the recently developed N-[6-(4-[ 18F]fluorobenzylidene) aminooxyhexyl]maleimide ([18F]FBAM) were investigated for radiolabeling of two representative phosphatidylserine-binding peptides. The prosthetic groups were compared with respect to required reaction conditions for optimum labeling, radiolabeling yield and chemoselectivity. The N-terminus labeled product produced by reaction of [18F]SFB with binding peptide LIKKPF was produced in 18% radiochemical yield while no N-terminus labeled product could be isolated following [18F]SFB reaction with PDGLSR. When the peptides were modified by addition of a cysteine residue at the N-terminus they provided almost quantitative radiochemical yields with [18F]FBAM. Results indicate that for the peptides in this study, [18F]FBAM is a more useful prosthetic group compared to [18F]SFB due to its excellent chemo-selectivity and high radiochemical

  18. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  19. Peptide-based identification of functional motifs and their binding partners.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Martin N; Huang, Ming Bo; Ali, Syed; Johnson, Kateena; Roth, William; Powell, Michael; Bond, Vincent

    2013-06-30

    Specific short peptides derived from motifs found in full-length proteins, in our case HIV-1 Nef, not only retain their biological function, but can also competitively inhibit the function of the full-length protein. A set of 20 Nef scanning peptides, 20 amino acids in length with each overlapping 10 amino acids of its neighbor, were used to identify motifs in Nef responsible for its induction of apoptosis. Peptides containing these apoptotic motifs induced apoptosis at levels comparable to the full-length Nef protein. A second peptide, derived from the Secretion Modification Region (SMR) of Nef, retained the ability to interact with cellular proteins involved in Nef's secretion in exosomes (exNef). This SMRwt peptide was used as the "bait" protein in co-immunoprecipitation experiments to isolate cellular proteins that bind specifically to Nef's SMR motif. Protein transfection and antibody inhibition was used to physically disrupt the interaction between Nef and mortalin, one of the isolated SMR-binding proteins, and the effect was measured with a fluorescent-based exNef secretion assay. The SMRwt peptide's ability to outcompete full-length Nef for cellular proteins that bind the SMR motif, make it the first inhibitor of exNef secretion. Thus, by employing the techniques described here, which utilize the unique properties of specific short peptides derived from motifs found in full-length proteins, one may accelerate the identification of functional motifs in proteins and the development of peptide-based inhibitors of pathogenic functions.

  20. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  1. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  2. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-02-23

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin.

  3. Novel p16 binding peptide development for p16-overexpressing cancer cell detection using phage display.

    PubMed

    Khemthongcharoen, Numfon; Ruangpracha, Athisake; Sarapukdee, Pongsak; Rattanavarin, Santi; Jolivot, Romuald; Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Plaimas, Kitiporn; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Piyawattanametha, Wibool

    2015-04-01

    Protein p(16INK4a) (p16) is a well-known biomarker for diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers. In this work, we identify novel p16 binding peptides by using phage display selection method. A random heptamer phage display library was screened on purified recombinant p16 protein-coated plates to elute only the bound phages from p16 surfaces. Binding affinity of the bound phages was compared with each other by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescence imaging technique, and bioinformatic computations. Binding specificity and binding selectivity of the best candidate phage-displayed p16 binding peptide were evaluated by peptide blocking experiment in competition with p16 monoclonal antibody and fluorescence imaging technique, respectively. Five candidate phage-displayed peptides were isolated from the phage display selection method. All candidate p16 binding phages show better binding affinity than wild-type phage in ELISA test, but only three of them can discriminate p16-overexpressing cancer cell, CaSki, from normal uterine fibroblast cell, HUF, with relative fluorescence intensities from 2.6 to 4.2-fold greater than those of wild-type phage. Bioinformatic results indicate that peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' binds to p16 molecule with the best binding score and does not interfere with the common protein functions of p16. Peptide blocking experiment shows that the phage-displayed peptide 'Ser-His-Ser-Leu-Leu-Ser-Ser' can conceal p16 from monoclonal antibody interaction. This phage clone also selectively interacts with the p16 positive cell lines, and thus, it can be applied for p16-overexpressing cell detection. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Apparent lack of MHC restriction in binding of class I HLA molecules to solid-phase peptides

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The specificity of binding of solubilized, purified HLA-A,B molecules to solid-phase peptides has been examined using the assay described by Bouillet et al. [1989. Nature (Lond.). 339:473.] 64 peptides derived from the sequences of viral antigens, HLA-A,B,C heavy chains, and clathrin light chains were tested for binding to HLA-A2.1, Aw68.1, Aw69, B44, and B5, molecules that differ by 5-17 residues of the peptide binding groove. 15 of the peptides, including those known to be T cell epitopes, gave significant binding. The pattern of peptide binding for each of the five HLA-A,B molecules was not significantly different. Binding was demonstrated to be a property of native beta 2m- associated HLA-A,B molecules that preserved conformational antigenic determinants after binding to peptide. In comparison to our previous results from solution-based assays the proportion of HLA-A,B molecules that can bind solid-phase peptides is very high. This accessibility of solid-phase peptides to the binding site of MHC molecules may be directly related to the observed absence of MHC specificity in the binding. PMID:1696957

  5. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  6. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Peptides That Bind Human Prosurvival Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBartolo, Joe; Taipale, Mikko; Keating, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death is regulated by interactions between pro-apoptotic and prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. Pro-apoptotic family members contain a weakly conserved BH3 motif that can adopt an alpha-helical structure and bind to a groove on prosurvival partners Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Peptides corresponding to roughly 13 reported BH3 motifs have been verified to bind in this manner. Due to their short lengths and low sequence conservation, BH3 motifs are not detected using standard sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Thus, it is possible that many additional proteins harbor BH3-like sequences that can mediate interactions with the Bcl-2 family. In this work, we used structure-based and data-based Bcl-2 interaction models to find new BH3-like peptides in the human proteome. We used peptide SPOT arrays to test candidate peptides for interaction with one or more of the prosurvival proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. For the 36 most promising array candidates, we quantified binding to all five human receptors using direct and competition binding assays in solution. All 36 peptides showed evidence of interaction with at least one prosurvival protein, and 22 peptides bound at least one prosurvival protein with a dissociation constant between 1 and 500 nM; many peptides had specificity profiles not previously observed. We also screened the full-length parent proteins of a subset of array-tested peptides for binding to Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Finally, we used the peptide binding data, in conjunction with previously reported interactions, to assess the affinity and specificity prediction performance of different models. PMID:24967846

  7. The binding of myristoylated N-terminal nonapeptide from neuro-specific protein CAP-23/NAP-22 to calmodulin does not induce the globular structure observed for the calmodulin-nonmyristylated peptide complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, N.; Izumi, Y.; Titani, K.; Matsushima, N.

    2000-01-01

    CAP-23/NAP-22, a neuron-specific protein kinase C substrate, is Nalpha-myristoylated and interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Takasaki et al. (1999, J Biol Chem 274:11848-11853) have recently found that the myristoylated N-terminal nonapeptide of CAP-23/NAP-22 (mC/N9) binds to Ca2+ -bound CaM (Ca2+/CaM). In the present study, small-angle X-ray scattering was used to investigate structural changes of Ca2+/CaM induced by its binding to mC/N9 in solution. The binding of one mC/N9 molecule induced an insignificant structural change in Ca2+/CaM. The 1:1 complex appeared to retain the extended conformation much like that of Ca2+/CaM in isolation. However, it could be seen that the binding of two mC/N9 molecules induced a drastic structural change in Ca2+/CaM, followed by a slight structural change by the binding of more than two but less than four mC/N9 molecules. Under the saturated condition (the molar ratio of 1:4), the radius of gyration (Rg) for the Ca2+/CaM-mC/N9 complex was 19.8 +/- 0.3 A. This value was significantly smaller than that of Ca2+/CaM (21.9 +/- 0.3 A), which adopted a dumbbell structure and was conversely 2-3 A larger than those of the complexes of Ca2+/CaM with the nonmyristoylated target peptides of myosin light chain kinase or CaM kinase II, which adopted a compact globular structure. The pair distance distribution function had no shoulder peak at around 40 A, which was mainly due to the dumbbell structure. These results suggest that Ca2+/CaM interacts with Nalpha-myristoylated CAP-23/NAP-22 differently than it does with other nonmyristoylated target proteins. The N-terminal amino acid sequence alignment of CAP-23/NAP-22 and other myristoylated proteins suggests that the protein myristoylation plays important roles not only in the binding of CAP-23/NAP-22 to Ca2+/CaM, but also in the protein-protein interactions related to other myristoylated proteins. PMID:11106163

  8. Properties of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cadmium-binding peptide(s). Unique non-metallothionein cadmium ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, R N; Wagner, G J

    1987-01-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of Cd-binding peptides isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and suspension-cultured tobacco cells were determined and compared with properties of rat liver Cd,Zn-thionein. Some emphasis was placed on metal-binding and specificity properties. Cd-peptides of apparent Mr 6000 and 2000 were induced in tobacco leaves by growth of plants with 90 microM-Cd. Only the apparent-Mr-2000 Cd-peptide was induced in the leaves of tobacco plants grown in the presence of 3 microM-Cd. In cultured tobacco cells exposed to a wide range of Cd levels (3-180 microM), a peptide of apparent Mr 2000 was observed. Under denaturing conditions [6 M-guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) with or without 100 mM-2-mercaptoethanol], all of the above forms were shown to have an Mr of approx. 1300, compared with an Mr of 6000 for Cd,Zn-thionein. The apparent disaggregation of the Mr-6000 form by GdmCl to what appears to be the unit Cd-binding peptide was reversible. Tobacco-derived Cd-peptide contained approx. 40, 35 and 15 residues of glutamate/glutamine, cysteine and glycine respectively, with serine, lysine, and aromatic residues being absent. Tobacco Cd-peptide had an isoelectric point (pI) of 3.15, which is lower than the pI greater than or equal to 4 reported for metallothionein. A 50% dissociation of Cd occurred at pH 5 and 3.5 for the tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein respectively, and GdmCl was shown to cause Cd dissociation from tobacco peptide, but not from metallothionein. No evidence was obtained for Zn induction in vivo of, or Zn binding in vitro to, tobacco Cd-peptide. Copper induced a low-Mr metal-binding component in cultured tobacco cells which did not appear to be identical with the peptide induced by Cd. Properties of tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein, including metal affinity and selectivity, are greatly different, except for the common presence of 30 residues of cysteine/100 residues. PMID:3593213

  9. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas; Harndahl, Mikkel; Golde, William T.; Barlow, John; Nene, Vishvanath; Buus, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate how a combination of high-throughput assays using positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries, peptide dissociation, and peptide-binding affinity binding measurements can be combined with bioinformatics to effectively characterize the functionality of BoLA-I molecules. Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight cases, stable and high affinity binding was confirmed. A set of peptides were tested for binding affinity to the eight BoLA proteins and used to refine the predictors of peptide–MHC binding NetMHC and NetMHCpan. The inclusion of BoLA-specific peptide-binding data led to a significant improvement in prediction accuracy for reported T. parva CTL epitopes. For reported CTL epitopes with weak or no predicted binding, these refined prediction methods suggested presence of nested minimal epitopes with high-predicted binding affinity. The enhanced affinity of the alternative peptides was in all cases confirmed experimentally. This study demonstrates how biochemical high-throughput assays combined with immunoinformatics can be used to characterize the peptide-binding motifs of BoLA-I molecules, boosting performance of MHC peptide-binding prediction methods, and empowering rational epitope discovery in cattle. PMID:25186069

  10. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency.

  11. Quantitative peptide binding motifs for 19 human and mouse MHC class I molecules derived using positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Assarsson, Erika; Moore, Carrie; Ngo, Sandy; Pinilla, Clemencia; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background It has been previously shown that combinatorial peptide libraries are a useful tool to characterize the binding specificity of class I MHC molecules. Compared to other methodologies, such as pool sequencing or measuring the affinities of individual peptides, utilizing positional scanning combinatorial libraries provides a baseline characterization of MHC molecular specificity that is cost effective, quantitative and unbiased. Results Here, we present a large-scale application of this technology to 19 different human and mouse class I alleles. These include very well characterized alleles (e.g. HLA A*0201), alleles with little previous data available (e.g. HLA A*3201), and alleles with conflicting previous reports on specificity (e.g. HLA A*3001). For all alleles, the positional scanning combinatorial libraries were able to elucidate distinct binding patterns defined with a uniform approach, which we make available here. We introduce a heuristic method to translate this data into classical definitions of main and secondary anchor positions and their preferred residues. Finally, we validate that these matrices can be used to identify candidate MHC binding peptides and T cell epitopes in the vaccinia virus and influenza virus systems, respectively. Conclusion These data confirm, on a large scale, including 15 human and 4 mouse class I alleles, the efficacy of the positional scanning combinatorial library approach for describing MHC class I binding specificity and identifying high affinity binding peptides. These libraries were shown to be useful for identifying specific primary and secondary anchor positions, and thereby simpler motifs, analogous to those described by other approaches. The present study also provides matrices useful for predicting high affinity binders for several alleles for which detailed quantitative descriptions of binding specificity were previously unavailable, including A*3001, A*3201, B*0801, B*1501 and B*1503. PMID:18221540

  12. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  13. Evolution of class-specific peptides targeting a hot spot of the Galphas subunit.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan J; Ja, William W; Roberts, Richard W

    2008-04-11

    The four classes of heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits act as molecular routers inside cells, gating signals based on a bound guanosine nucleotide (guanosine 5'-triphosphate versus guanosine 5'-diphosphate). Ligands that specifically target individual subunits provide new tools for monitoring and modulating these networks, but are challenging to design due to the high sequence homology and structural plasticity of the Galpha-binding surface. Here we have created an mRNA display library of peptides based on the short Galpha-modulating peptide R6A-1 and selected variants that target a convergent protein-binding surface of Galphas.guanosine 5'-diphosphate. After selection/evolution, the most Galphas-specific peptide, Galphas(s)-binding peptide (GSP), was used to design a second-generation library, resulting in several new affinity- and selectivity-matured peptides denoted as mGSPs. The two-step evolutionary walk from R6A-1 to mGSP-1 resulted in an 8000-fold inversion in binding specificity, altered seven out of nine residues in the starting peptide core, and incorporated both positive and negative design steps. The resulting mGSP-1 peptide shows remarkable selectivity and affinity, exhibiting little or no binding to nine homologous Galpha subunits or human H-Ras, and even discriminates the Galphas splice variant Galphas(l). Selected peptides make specific contacts with the effector-binding region of Galpha, which may explain an interesting bifunctional activity observed in GSP. Overall, our work demonstrates a design of simple, linear, highly specific peptides that target a protein-binding surface of Galphas and argues that mRNA display-based selection/evolution is a powerful route for targeting protein families with high class specificity and state specificity.

  14. A peptide affinity column for the identification of integrin alpha IIb-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Daxecker, Heide; Raab, Markus; Bernard, Elise; Devocelle, Marc; Treumann, Achim; Moran, Niamh

    2008-03-01

    To understand the regulation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a critical platelet adhesion molecule, we have developed a peptide affinity chromatography method using the known integrin regulatory motif, LAMWKVGFFKR. Using standard Fmoc chemistry, this peptide was synthesized onto a Toyopearl AF-Amino-650 M resin on a 6-aminohexanoic acid (Ahx) linker. Peptide density was controlled by acetylation of 83% of the Ahx amino groups. Four recombinant human proteins (CIB1, PP1, ICln and RN181), previously identified as binding to this integrin regulatory motif, were specifically retained by the column containing the integrin peptide but not by a column presenting an irrelevant peptide. Hemoglobin, creatine kinase, bovine serum albumin, fibrinogen and alpha-tubulin failed to bind under the chosen conditions. Immunodetection methods confirmed the binding of endogenous platelet proteins, including CIB1, PP1, ICln RN181, AUP-1 and beta3-integrin, from a detergent-free platelet lysate. Thus, we describe a reproducible method that facilitates the reliable extraction of specific integrin-binding proteins from complex biological matrices. This methodology may enable the sensitive and specific identification of proteins that interact with linear, membrane-proximal peptide motifs such as the integrin regulatory motif LAMWKVGFFKR.

  15. Trends in the Binding of Cell Penetrating Peptides to siRNA: A Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunathunge, B. G. C. M.; Wimalasiri, P. N.; Karunaratne, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene therapeutics, including short interfering RNA (siRNA), is limited by the lack of efficient delivery systems. An appealing approach to deliver gene therapeutics involves noncovalent complexation with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which are able to penetrate the cell membranes of mammals. Although a number of CPPs have been discovered, our understanding of their complexation and translocation of siRNA is as yet insufficient. Here, we report on computational studies comparing the binding affinities of CPPs with siRNA, considering a variety of CPPs. Specifically, seventeen CPPs from three different categories, cationic, amphipathic, and hydrophobic CPPs, were studied. Molecular mechanics were used to minimize structures, while molecular docking calculations were used to predict the orientation and favorability of sequentially binding multiple peptides to siRNA. Binding scores from docking calculations were highest for amphipathic peptides over cationic and hydrophobic peptides. Results indicate that initial complexation of peptides will likely occur along the major groove of the siRNA, driven by electrostatic interactions. Subsequent binding of CPPs is likely to occur in the minor groove and later on bind randomly, to siRNA or previously bound CPPs, through hydrophobic interactions. However, hydrophobic CPPs do not show this binding pattern. Ultimately binding yields a positively charged nanoparticle capable of noninvasive cellular import of therapeutic molecules. PMID:28321253

  16. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Specificity and promiscuity among naturally processed peptides bound to HLA-DR alleles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Naturally processed peptides were acid extracted from immunoaffinity- purified HLA-DR2, DR3, DR4, DR7, and DR8. Using the complementary techniques of mass spectrometry and Edman microsequencing, > 200 unique peptide masses were identified from each allele, ranging from 1,200 to 4,000 daltons (10-34 residues in length), and a total of 201 peptide sequences were obtained. These peptides were derived from 66 different source proteins and represented sets nested at both the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends with an average length of 15-18 amino acids. Strikingly, most of the peptides (> 85%) were derived from endogenous proteins that intersect the endocytic/class II pathway, even though class II molecules are thought to function mainly in the presentation of exogenous foreign peptide antigens. The predominant endogenous peptides were derived from major histocompatibility complex-related molecules. A few peptides derived from exogenous bovine serum proteins were also bound to every allele. Four prominent promiscuous self- peptide sets (capable of binding to multiple HLA-DR alleles) as well as 84 allele-specific peptide sets were identified. Binding experiments confirmed that the promiscuous peptides have high affinity for the binding groove of all HLA-DR alleles examined. A potential physiologic role for these endogenous self-peptides as immunomodulators of the cellular immune response is discussed. PMID:8315383

  18. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity. PMID:20622157

  19. Increasing the affinity of selective bZIP-binding peptides through surface residue redesign

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jenifer B; Reinke, Aaron W; Keating, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    The coiled-coil dimer is a prevalent protein interaction motif that is important for many cellular processes. The basic leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are one family of proteins for which coiled-coil mediated dimerization is essential for function, and misregulation of bZIPs can lead to disease states including cancer. This makes coiled coils attractive protein–protein interaction targets to disrupt using engineered molecules. Previous work designing peptides to compete with native coiled-coil interactions focused primarily on designing the core residues of the interface to achieve affinity and specificity. However, folding studies on the model bZIP GCN4 show that coiled-coil surface residues also contribute to binding affinity. Here we extend a prior study in which peptides were designed to bind tightly and specifically to representative members of each of 20 human bZIP families. These “anti-bZIP” peptides were designed with an emphasis on target-binding specificity, with contributions to design-target specificity and affinity engineered considering only the coiled-coil core residues. High-throughput testing using peptide arrays indicated many successes. We have now measured the binding affinities and specificities of anti-bZIPs that bind to FOS, XBP1, ATF6, and CREBZF in solution and tested whether redesigning the surface residues can increase design–target affinity. Incorporating residues that favor helix formation into the designs increased binding affinities in all cases, providing low-nanomolar binders of each target. However, changes in surface electrostatic interactions sometimes changed the binding specificity of the designed peptides. Impact Statement Designing molecules to bind native proteins is a fundamental objective in protein engineering. Ideally, designs should bind their targets both tightly and selectively. This paper reports binding affinities and specificities for computationally designed peptides that interact with human b

  20. Novel thrombopoietin mimetic peptides bind c-Mpl receptor: Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaquan; Tian, Fang; Zhi, Dejuan; Wang, Haiqing; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Hongyu

    2017-02-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) acts in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and by initiating specific maturation events in megakaryocytes. Now, TPO-mimetic peptides with amino acid sequences unrelated to TPO are of considerable pharmaceutical interest. In the present paper, four new TPO mimetic peptides that bind and activate c-Mpl receptor have been identified, synthesized and tested by Dual-Luciferase reporter gene assay for biological activities. The molecular modeling research was also approached to understand key molecular mechanisms and structural features responsible for peptide binding with c-Mpl receptor. The results presented that three of four mimetic peptides showed significant activities. In addition, the molecular modeling approaches proved hydrophobic interactions were the driven positive forces for binding behavior between peptides and c-Mpl receptor. TPO peptide residues in P7, P13 and P7' positions were identified by the analysis of hydrogen bonds and energy decompositions as the key ones for benefiting better biological activities. Our data suggested the synthesized peptides have considerable potential for the future development of stable and highly active TPO mimetic peptides.

  1. Biogenic and Synthetic Peptides with Oppositely Charged Amino Acids as Binding Sites for Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Altintoprak, Klara; Wege, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M.; Rothenstein, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Proteins regulate diverse biological processes by the specific interaction with, e.g., nucleic acids, proteins and inorganic molecules. The generation of inorganic hybrid materials, such as shell formation in mollusks, is a protein-controlled mineralization process. Moreover, inorganic-binding peptides are attractive for the bioinspired mineralization of non-natural inorganic functional materials for technical applications. However, it is still challenging to identify mineral-binding peptide motifs from biological systems as well as for technical systems. Here, three complementary approaches were combined to analyze protein motifs consisting of alternating positively and negatively charged amino acids: (i) the screening of natural biomineralization proteins; (ii) the selection of inorganic-binding peptides derived from phage display; and (iii) the mineralization of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based templates. A respective peptide motif displayed on the TMV surface had a major impact on the SiO2 mineralization. In addition, similar motifs were found in zinc oxide- and zirconia-binding peptides indicating a general binding feature. The comparative analysis presented here raises new questions regarding whether or not there is a common design principle based on acidic and basic amino acids for peptides interacting with minerals. PMID:28772478

  2. Fluorogenic Probes for Monitoring Peptide Binding to Class II MHC Proteins in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman,P.; Nguyen, T.; Sainlos, M.; Bilsel, o.; Chitta, S.; Imperiali, B.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    A crucial step in the immune response is the binding of antigenic peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Class II MHC proteins present their bound peptides to CD4+ T cells, thereby helping to activate both the humoral and the cellular arms of the adaptive immune response. Peptide loading onto class II MHC proteins is regulated temporally, spatially and developmentally in antigen-presenting cells1. To help visualize these processes, we have developed a series of novel fluorogenic probes that incorporate the environment-sensitive amino acid analogs 6-N,N-dimethylamino-2-3-naphthalimidoalanine and 4-N,N-dimethylaminophthalimidoalanine. Upon binding to class II MHC proteins these fluorophores show large changes in emission spectra, quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime. Peptides incorporating these fluorophores bind specifically to class II MHC proteins on antigen-presenting cells and can be used to follow peptide binding in vivo. Using these probes we have tracked a developmentally regulated cell-surface peptide-binding activity in primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

  3. Chemokine CCR3 ligands-binding peptides derived from a random phage-epitope library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effectors cells implicated in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The human chemokine receptor C-C receptor 3 (hCCR3) provides a mechanism for the recruitment of eosinophils into tissue and thus has recently become an attractive biological target for therapeutic intervention. In order to develop peptides antagonists of hCCR3-hCCL11 (human eotaxin) interactions, a random bacteriophage hexapeptide library was used to map structural features of hCCR3 by determining the epitopes of neutralizing anti-hCCR3 mAb 7B11. This mAb t is selective for hCCR3 and exhibit potent antagonist activity in receptor binding and functional assays. After three rounds of biopanning, four mAb7B11-binding peptides were identified from a 6-mer linear peptide library. The phage bearing the peptides showed specific binding to immobilized mAb 7B11 with over 94% of phages bound being competitively inhibited by free synthetic peptides. In FACScan analysis all selected phage peptides were able to strongly inhibit the binding of mAb 7B11 to hCCR3-transfected preB-300-19 murine cells. Furthermore, synthetic peptides of the corresponding phage epitopes were effective in blocking the antibody-hCCR3 interactions and to inhibit the binding of hCCL11 to hCCR3 transfectants. Chemically synthesized peptides CKGERF, FERKGK, SSMKVK and RHVSSQ, effectively competed for (125)I-hCCL11 binding to hCCR3 with IC(50) ranging from 3.5 to 9.7μM. Calcium release and chemotaxis of hCCR3 transfectants or human eosinophils were inhibited by all peptides in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, they showed inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human eosinophils induced by hCCL11, hCCL5, hCCL7, hCCL8, and hCCL24. Specificities of all selected peptides were assessed with hCXCR1, hCXCR2, hCXCR3, and hCCR5 receptors. Peptides CKGERF and FERKGK showed inhibitory effects on eosinophil chemotaxis in a murine model of mCCL11-induced

  4. Binding and thermodynamics of REV peptide-ctDNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamics of DNA-ligand binding is important as it provides useful information to understand the details of binding processes. HIV-1 REV response element (RRE) located in the env coding region of the viral genome is reported to be well conserved across different HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the binding characteristics of Calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and REV peptide from HIV-1 were investigated using spectroscopic (UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD)) and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) techniques. Thermal stability and ligand binding properties of the ctDNA revealed that native ctDNA had a Tm of 75.5 °C, whereas the ctDNA-REV peptide complex exhibited an incremental shift in the Tm by 8 °C, indicating thermal stability of the complex. CD data indicated increased ellipticity due to large conformational changes in ctDNA molecule upon binding with REV peptide and two binding stoichiometric modes are apparent. The ctDNA experienced condensation due to large conformational changes in the presence of REV peptide and positive B→Ψ transition was observed at higher molar charge ratios. Fluorescence studies performed at several ligand concentrations revealed a gradual decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EtBr-bound ctDNA in response to increasing ligand concentrations. The fluorescence data further confirmed two stoichiometric modes of binding for ctDNA-REV peptide complex as previously observed with CD studies. The binding enthalpies were determined using ITC in the temperature range of 293 K-308 K. The ITC binding isotherm was exothermic at all temperatures examined, with low ΔH values indicating that the ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is driven largely by entropy. The heat capacity change (ΔCp ) was insignificant, an unusual finding in the area of DNA-peptide interaction studies. The variation in the values obtained for ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG with temperature further suggests that ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is entropically

  5. Peptide binding to sheet silicate and metal nanoparticles: Insight from atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pandey, Ras B.; Drummy, Lawrence; Vaia, Richard A.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Farmer, Barry L.

    2008-03-01

    Short peptides (8 to 12 amino acids, excluding Cys) bind selectively to nanoparticles composed of Au, Pd, and montmorillonite depending on the sequence of amino acids, as evidenced by laboratory screening of several billion peptides. The molecular reasons for binding versus non-binding and the specificity toward a certain surface are analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation, using recent force field extensions for fcc metals and sheet silicates to reproduce surface and interface energies with <10% deviation compared to experiment. Polarization on even metal surfaces ranges from 3 to 5 kcal/mol and non-covalent binding energies from 0 and 80 kcal/mol per dodecapeptide. Adsorption energies, changes in chain conformation, Ramachandran plots, and orientational parameters, are analyzed in conjunction with NMR, TEM, and other experimental data. On montmorillonite, an ion exchange reaction of Lys side groups against alkali ions as well as interactions between alkali cations and polar groups in the peptide are explained.

  6. Inhibition of the angiogenesis by the MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Young; Byeon, Cheol Woo; Hong, Kyung Hee; Han, Ki Hoon; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2005-03-14

    The CC chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), plays a crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and has direct effects that promote angiogenesis. To develop a specific inhibitor for MCP-1-induced angiogenesis, we performed in vitro selection employing phage display random peptide libraries. Most of the selected peptides were found to be homologous to the second extracellular loops of CCR2 and CCR3. We synthesized the peptide encoding the homologous sequences of the receptors and tested its effect on the MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated specific binding of the peptide to MCP-1 but not to the other homologous protein, MCP-3. Flow cytometry revealed that the peptide inhibited the MCP-1 binding to THP-1 monocytes. Moreover, CAM and rat aortic ring assays showed that the peptide inhibited MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Our observations indicate that the MCP-1-binding peptide exerts its anti-angiogenic effect by interfering with the interaction between MCP-1 and its receptor.

  7. Effect of clustered peptide binding on DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jennifer; Kabiru, Paul; Geng, Yan

    2010-01-01

    DNA condensation in-vitro has been studied as a model system to reveal common principles underlying gene packaging in biology, and as the critical first step towards the development of non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we use a bio-inspired approach, where small DNA-binding peptides are controllably clustered by an amphiphilic block copolymer scaffold, to reveal the effect of clustered peptide binding on the energetics, size, shape and physical properties of DNA condensation in-vitro. This provides insights into the general architectural effect of gene-binding proteins on DNA condensation process. Moreover, the versatility afforded by regulating the clustering density and composition of peptides may provide a novel design platform for gene delivery applications in the future.

  8. Multidrug-resistance drug-binding peptides generated by using a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Popkov, M; Lussier, I; Medvedkine, V; Estève, P O; Alakhov, V; Mandeville, R

    1998-01-15

    A phage display library of random decapeptides was used to generate peptide ligands that can bind multidrug-resistance (MDR) drugs mimicking, in this respect, the drug-binding activity of P-glycoprotein. Seven peptide sequences were identified that specifically bound doxorubicin. Five of these sequences expressed the core consensus motif WXXW. The displacement assay showed that the phages expressing these peptides bound MDR type drugs (vinblastine, doxorubicin, verapamil, and genistein) with the same selectivity as P-glycoprotein and did not interact with non-MDR type drugs, such as arabinosylcytosine (Ara-C) and melphalan. One of the selected peptides that showed a highest capacity for the binding (VCDWWGWGIC) was synthesized and displayed competition with the phage for doxorubicin binding. The structure modeling suggested that all the selected sequences contained a hydrophobic envelope in which MDR drugs could be docked with substantial energy minimization. Western blot analysis showed that monospecific antibody obtained against the phage expressing VCDWWGWGIC peptide could specifically recognize P-glycoprotein in the membrane fraction of MDR phenotype MCF-7ADR cells. The MDR drug-binding sequences generated during this work could provide an important tool for design and screening of new chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Identification of IgE binding to Api g 1-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Elvira; Aÿ, Bernhard; Boisguerin, Prisca; Dölle, Sabine; Worm, Margitta; Volkmer, Rudolf

    2010-11-02

    Celery is a frequent cause of food allergy in pollen-sensitized patients and can induce severe allergic reactions. Clinical symptoms cannot be predicted by skin prick tests (SPTs) or by determining allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Our aim was to identify specific IgE binding peptides by using an array technique. For our study, the sera of 21 patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to celery, as well as the sera of 17 healthy patients were used. Additionally, all patients underwent skin tests along with determinations of specific IgE binding. The major allergen of celery Api g 1.0101 (Apium graveolens) was synthesized as an array of overlapping peptides and probed with the patients' sera. We developed an improved immunoassay protocol by investigating peptide lengths, peptide densities, incubation parameters, and readout systems, which could influence IgE binding. Sera of celery-allergic patients showed binding to three distinct regions of Api g 1.0101. The region including amino acids 100 to 126 of Api g 1.0101 is the most important region for IgE binding. This region caused a fivefold higher binding of IgE from the sera of celery-allergic patients compared to those of healthy individuals. In particular, one peptide (VLVPTADGGSIC) was recognized by all sera of celery-allergic patients. In contrast, no binding to this peptide was detected in sera of the healthy controls. Our improved assay strategy allows us to distinguish between celery-allergic and healthy individuals, but needs to be explored in a larger cohort of well-defined patients.

  10. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Song, Jie [Shrewsbury, MA; Lee, Seung-Wuk [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  11. Determination of the peptide binding motif and high-affinity ligands for HLA-DQ4 using synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Volz, Thomas; Schwarz, Gerold; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Schepp, Carsten P; Haug, Markus; Roth, Johannes; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Dannecker, Günther E

    2004-06-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is considered to be an autoimmune disease. Various human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations for different subgroups of this heterogeneous disease have been found. For early-onset pauciarticular arthritis (now oligoarthritic JIA), a strong association with the HLA class II haplotype DQA1*0401/DQB1*0402 (DQ4) has been described. We determined the peptide-binding specificities of this HLA-DQ molecule by screening a synthetic acetylated nonapeptide amide library with one defined and eight random sequence positions. A characteristic binding motif could be deduced. By use of these data, we designed defined specific nonapeptides and identified high-affinity ligands binding to HLA-DQ4. The peptide binding motif of HLA-DQ4 is very similar to the motif of HLA-DQ7, also associated with oligoarthritic JIA. It is, however, different from binding motifs of neutral or protective HLA-DQ molecules. Our results further support the idea of differential peptide presentation in the pathogenesis of oligoarthritic JIA.

  12. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  13. Improvement of binding of Puumala virus neutralization site resembling peptide with a second-generation phage library.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Tuomas; Li, Xiao-Dong; Hepojoki, Jussi; Gustafsson, Elisabeth; Lundkvist, Ake; Vaheri, Antti; Lankinen, Hilkka

    2003-06-01

    We have previously selected a peptide insert FPCDRLSGYWERGIPSPCVR recognizing the Puumala virus (PUUV) G2-glycoprotein-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1C9 with Kd of 2.85 x 10(-8) from a random peptide library X2CX14CX2 expressed on the pIII protein of the filamentous phage fd-tet. We have now created a second-generation phage-displayed peptide library in which each amino acid of the peptide was mutated randomly to another with a certain probability. Peptides were selected for higher affinity for MAb 1C9 and for a common binding motif for MAb 4G2 having an overlapping epitope with MAb 1C9 in G2 glycoprotein. The resulting peptides were synthesized as spots on cellulose membrane. Amino acid changes which improved the reactivity of the peptides to MAb 1C9 were combined in the peptide ATCDKLFGYYERGIPLPCAL with Kd of 1.49 x 10(-9) in biosensor measurements. Our results show that the binding properties of peptides, the affinity and the specificity can be improved and the binding specificity determining amino acids and structural factors can be analyzed by combining binding assays with synthetic peptides on membrane with the use of second-generation phage display libraries.

  14. The molecular basis for the prolonged blood circulation of lipidated incretin peptides: Peptide oligomerization or binding to serum albumin?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Kanai, Sonoko; Alex, Rainer; Belli, Sara; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Benedek, George B

    2016-11-10

    Hybrid incretin peptides are a new generation of drugs for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Despite their biological potency, the effectiveness of these peptides as drugs is limited by their short circulation time in blood (typically within minutes). In this work, we show that lipid conjugated forms of a GLP-1/GIP/glucagon hybrid peptides stay in circulation for hours. We studied the oligomerization and albumin-binding of the unconjugated hybrid peptide as well as its lipidated variants. These lipidated peptides differ in the N-terminal mutation, the position of lipidation and the linkage to lipid. We found that these lipidated peptides form stable oligomers at concentrations above 1mg/mL. This concentration range is relevant to formulation and storage of the peptides. We observed no binding between the peptide oligomers and human serum albumin. However, at the expected therapeutic concentration range (~10-100ng/mL), the oligomers dissociate into monomers. The monomers of lipidated peptides bind to albumin. We have determined the dissociation constants of binding between the lipidated peptides and serum albumin. The dissociation constants of albumin-binding of our lipidated peptides are all very close and similar to that of the fatty acid binding of albumin. Our findings suggest that the monomeric lipidated peptides bind to HSA mainly by the fatty acid chain. Therefore, albumin binding is likely to be a universal mechanism of the prolonged circulating duration of lipidated pharmaceutical peptides.

  15. Staphylococcal Surface Display of Metal-Binding Polyhistidyl Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Patrik; Wernérus, Henrik; Svedberg, Malin; Ståhl, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus strains were generated with surface-exposed chimeric proteins containing polyhistidyl peptides designed for binding to divalent metal ions. Surface accessibility of the chimeric surface proteins was demonstrated and the chimeric surface proteins were found to be functional in terms of metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococcal cells were shown to have gained Ni2+- and Cd2+-binding capacity, suggesting that such bacteria could find use in bioremediation of heavy metals. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that recombinant, surface-exposed metal-binding peptides have been expressed on gram-positive bacteria. Potential environmental or biosensor applications for such recombinant staphylococci as biosorbents are discussed. PMID:10698802

  16. Achieving stability through editing and chaperoning: regulation of MHC class II peptide binding and expression.

    PubMed

    Busch, Robert; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Roh, Sujin; Lee, Andrew W; Harding, James J; Burster, Timo; Hornell, Tara M C; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2005-10-01

    In antigen-presenting cells (APCs), loading of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules with peptides is regulated by invariant chain (Ii), which blocks MHC II antigen-binding sites in pre-endosomal compartments. Several molecules then act upon MHC II molecules in endosomes to facilitate peptide loading: Ii-degrading proteases, the peptide exchange factor, human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM), and its modulator, HLA-DO (DO). Here, we review our findings arguing that DM stabilizes a globally altered conformation of the antigen-binding groove by binding to a lateral surface of the MHC II molecule. Our data imply changes in the interactions between specificity pockets and peptide side chains, complementing data from others that suggest DM affects hydrogen bonds. Selective weakening of peptide/MHC interactions allows DM to alter the peptide repertoire. We also review our studies in cells that highlight the ability of several factors to modulate surface expression of MHC II molecules via post-Golgi mechanisms; these factors include MHC class II-associated Ii peptides (CLIP), DM, and microbial products that modulate MHC II traffic from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this context, we discuss possible mechanisms by which the association of some MHC II alleles with autoimmune diseases may be linked to their low CLIP affinity.

  17. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    SciTech Connect

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-05-23

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides with Differential Bacterial Binding Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    WITH DIFFERENTIAL BACTERIAL BINDING CHARACTERISTICS by Laurel A. Doherty Morris Slutsky and Jason W. Soares March 2013...per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...AUTHOR(S) Laurel A. Doherty , Morris Slutsky*, and Jason W. Soares 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  19. Binding of an oligopeptide to a specific plane of ice.

    PubMed

    Houston, M E; Chao, H; Hodges, R S; Sykes, B D; Kay, C M; Sönnichsen, F D; Loewen, M C; Davies, P L

    1998-05-08

    The alpha-helical antifreeze protein (AFP) from winter flounder inhibits ice growth by binding to a specific set of pyramidal surface planes that are not otherwise macroscopically expressed. The 37-residue AFP contains three 11-amino acid repeats that make a stereo-specific fit to the ice lattice along the <01-12> direction of the (20-21) and equivalent binding planes. When the AFP was shortened to delete two of the three 11-amino acid ice-binding repeats, the resulting 15-residue peptide and its variants were less helical and showed no antifreeze activity. However, when the helicity of the peptide was reinforced by an internal lactam bridge between Glu-7 and Lys-11, the minimized AFP was able to stably express the pyramidal plane (20-21) on the surface of growing ice crystals. This dynamic shaping of the ice surface by a single ice-binding repeat provides evidence that AFP adsorption to the ice lattice is not an "all-or-nothing" interaction. Instead, a partial interaction can help develop the binding site on ice to which the remainder of the AFP (or other AFP molecules) can orient and bind.

  20. Selection of novel nickel-binding peptides from flagella displayed secondary peptide library.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Jie; Xin, Zhong-Tao; Yang, Guang; Gao, Bo; Mao, Can-Quan; Liu, Nong-Le; Wang, Fang; Shao, Ning-Sheng; Fan, Ming; Xue, Yan-Ning

    2006-08-01

    Nickel (Ni) performs its biological or toxic functions in nickel-protein coordination form. Novel Ni-binding peptides were isolated from a random dodecapeptide library displayed on the flagella of Escherichia coli against immobilized ions. On the basis of isolated sequences rich in histidine residues, two secondary libraries were constructed respectively. By consequent selection, more Ni-chelating peptides were identified and the consensus motif RHXHR (where X was always H) was deduced. The result suggested that not only histidine, but also arginine, play an important role in Ni-binding. Furthermore, two selected clones (1035 and 2022) were chosen for further identification. They exhibited similar relative binding affinity, which was about nine times that of the original library derived clones and statistically much more significant than the positive control with polyhistidine insert. Free nickel ions could almost completely inhibit the binding of the clones 1035 and 2022 to immobilized nickel, implicating that the peptides were able to chelate nickel ions. These studies reveal that bacterial surface displayed peptide libraries may have promising future potential for the development of metal bioadsorbents. Furthermore, novel Ni-binding peptides may provide lead molecules for Ni-chelation and applications thereof.

  1. Identification of a peptide sequence involved in homophilic binding in the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM is capable of mediating cell- cell adhesion via homophilic interactions. In this study, three strategies have been combined to identify regions of NCAM that participate directly in NCAM-NCAM binding: analysis of domain deletion mutations, mapping of epitopes of monoclonal antibodies, and use of synthetic peptides to inhibit NCAM activity. Studies on L cells transfected with NCAM mutant cDNAs using cell aggregation and NCAM- covasphere binding assays indicate that the third immunoglobulin-like domain is involved in homophilic binding. The epitopes of four monoclonal antibodies that have been previously shown to affect cell- cell adhesion mediated by NCAM were also mapped to domain 3. Overlapping hexapeptides were synthesized on plastic pins and assayed for binding with these monoclonal antibodies. One of them (PP) reacted specifically with the sequence KYSFNY. Synthetic oligopeptides containing the PP epitope were potent and specific inhibitors of NCAM binding activity. A substratum containing immobilized peptide conjugates also exhibited adhesiveness for neural retinal cells. Cell attachment was specifically inhibited by peptides that contained the PP- epitope and by anti-NCAM univalent antibodies. The shortest active peptide has the sequence KYSFNYDGSE, suggesting that this site is directly involved in NCAM homophilic interaction. PMID:1380002

  2. Interaction of Hyaluronan Binding Peptides with Glycosaminoglycans in Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide–hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  3. Access to site-specific Fc-cRGD peptide conjugates through streamlined expressed protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, S; Jordan, J B; Bio, M M; Muir, T W; Thiel, O R; Vila-Perelló, M

    2016-10-12

    An ideal drug should be highly effective, non-toxic and be delivered by a convenient and painless single dose. We are still far from such optimal treatment but peptides, with their high target selectivity and low toxicity profiles, provide a very attractive platform from which to strive towards it. One of the major limitations of peptide drugs is their high clearance rates, which limit dosage regimen options. Conjugation to antibody Fc domains is a viable strategy to improve peptide stability by increasing their hydrodynamic radius and hijacking the Fc recycling pathway. We report the use of a split-intein based semi-synthetic approach to site-specifically conjugate a synthetic integrin binding peptide to an Fc domain. The strategy described here allows conjugating synthetic peptides to Fc domains, which is not possible via genetic methods, fully maintaining the ability of both the Fc domain and the bioactive peptide to interact with their binding partners.

  4. Adsorption behavior of linear and cyclic genetically engineered platinum binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Dincer, Sevil; Kim, Il Won; Oren, Ersin Emre; Evans, John Spencer; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2007-07-17

    Recently, phage and cell-surface display libraries have been adapted for genetically selecting short peptides for a variety of inorganic materials. Despite the enormous number of inorganic-binding peptides reported and their bionanotechnological utility as synthesizers and molecular linkers, there is still a limited understanding of molecular mechanisms of peptide recognition of and binding to solid materials. As part of our goal of genetically designing these peptides, understanding the binding kinetics and thermodynamics, and using the peptides as molecular erectors, in this report we discuss molecular structural constraints imposed upon the quantitative binding characteristics of peptides with an affinity for inorganics. Specifically, we use a high-affinity seven amino acid Pt-binding sequence, PTSTGQA, as we reported in earlier studies and build two constructs: one is a Cys-Cys constrained "loop" sequence (CPTSTGQAC) that mimics the domain used in the pIII tail sequence of the phage library construction, and the second is the linear form, a septapeptide, without the loop. Both sequences were analyzed for their adsorption behavior on Pt thin films by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and for their conformational properties by circular dichroism (CD). We find that the cyclic peptide of the integral Pt-binding sequence possesses single or 1:1 Langmuir adsorption behavior and displays equilibrium and adsorption rate constants that are significantly larger than those obtained for the linear form. Conversely, the linear form exhibits biexponential Langmuir isotherm behavior with slower and weaker binding. Furthermore, the structure of the cyclic version was found to adopt a random coil molecular conformation, whereas the linear version adopts a polyproline type II conformation in equilibrium with the random coil. The 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol titration experiments indicate that TFE has a different effect on the secondary structures of the linear and cyclic

  5. Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1 erythrocyte binding peptides implicate AMA-1 as erythrocyte binding protein.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, M; Suarez, J E; Cardenas, C; Lopez, R; Puentes, A; Chavez, F; Calvo, J C; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-10-15

    The role of AMA-1 during merozoite invasion has not yet been determined. However, reported experimental evidence suggests that this protein can be used, in particular as erythrocyte-binding protein, since, Fab fragments against this protein are able to block merozoite invasion. Using a previously described methodology, eight peptides with high binding activity to human erythrocyte, scattered along the different domains and having around 130 nM affinity constants, were identified in the Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1 protein. Their binding activity was sialic acid independent. Some of these peptides showed homology with the erythrocyte binding domains of one of the apical organelle protein family, MAEBL, identified in rodent malarial parasites. One of these peptides shares amino acid sequence with a previously reported B-cell epitope which induces antibodies to block parasite growth. The critical residues were identified for erythrocyte binding conserved peptides 4313 (DAEVAGTQYRLPSGKCPVFG), 4321 (VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFG), 4325 (MIKSAFLPTGAFKADRYKSH) and 4337 (WGEEKRASHTTPVLMEKPYY). All conserved peptides were able to block merozoite invasion of new RBC and development, suggesting that these peptides are involved in P. falciparum invasion.

  6. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  7. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  8. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  9. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  10. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G; Greenbaum, Jason A; Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Lund, Ole; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given task. To provide a solid basis on which to compare different prediction tools, we here describe a framework for the automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding prediction tools. The framework runs weekly benchmarks on data that are newly entered into the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), giving the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding capability. Upon experimental binding validation, these peptides entered the benchmark study. The benchmark has run for 15 weeks and includes evaluation of 44 datasets covering 17 MHC alleles and more than 4000 peptide-MHC binding measurements. Inspection of the results allows the end-user to make educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/weekly. All prediction tool developers are invited to participate in the benchmark. Sign-up instructions are available at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/join. mniel@cbs.dtu.dk or bpeters@liai.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    PubMed Central

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Lund, Ole; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given task. To provide a solid basis on which to compare different prediction tools, we here describe a framework for the automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding prediction tools. The framework runs weekly benchmarks on data that are newly entered into the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), giving the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding capability. Upon experimental binding validation, these peptides entered the benchmark study. Results: The benchmark has run for 15 weeks and includes evaluation of 44 datasets covering 17 MHC alleles and more than 4000 peptide-MHC binding measurements. Inspection of the results allows the end-user to make educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Availability and implementation: Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/weekly. All prediction tool developers are invited to participate in the benchmark. Sign-up instructions are available at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/join. Contact: mniel@cbs.dtu.dk or bpeters@liai.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25717196

  12. Biochemical Identification of a Linear Cholesterol-Binding Domain within Alzheimer’s β Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can self-organize into amyloid pores that may induce acute neurotoxic effects in brain cells. Membrane cholesterol, which regulates Aβ production and oligomerization, plays a key role in this process. Although several data suggested that cholesterol could bind to Aβ peptides, the molecular mechanisms underlying cholesterol/Aβ interactions are mostly unknown. On the basis of docking studies, we identified the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ as a potential cholesterol-binding domain. This domain consists of an atypical concatenation of polar/apolar amino acid residues that was not previously found in cholesterol-binding motifs. Using the Langmuir film balance technique, we showed that synthetic peptides Aβ17–40 and Aβ22–35, but not Aβ1–16, could efficiently penetrate into cholesterol monolayers. The interaction between Aβ22–35 and cholesterol was fully saturable and lipid-specific. Single-point mutations of Val-24 and Lys-28 in Aβ22–35 prevented cholesterol binding, whereas mutations at residues 29, 33, and 34 had little to no effect. These data were consistent with the in silico identification of Val-24 and Lys-28 as critical residues for cholesterol binding. We conclude that the linear fragment 22–35 of Aβ is a functional cholesterol-binding domain that could promote the insertion of β-amyloid peptides or amyloid pore formation in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. PMID:23509984

  13. A combined NMR and computational approach to investigate peptide binding to a designed Armadillo repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Christina; Christen, Martin T; Watson, Randall P; Mihajlovic, Maja; Zhou, Ting; Honegger, Annemarie; Plückthun, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver

    2015-05-22

    The specific recognition of peptide sequences by proteins plays an important role both in biology and in diagnostic applications. Here we characterize the relatively weak binding of the peptide neurotensin (NT) to the previously developed Armadillo repeat protein VG_328 by a multidisciplinary approach based on solution NMR spectroscopy, mutational studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, totaling 20μs for all MD runs. We describe assignment challenges arising from the repetitive nature of the protein sequence, and we present novel approaches to address them. Partial assignments obtained for VG_328 in combination with chemical shift perturbations allowed us to identify the repeats not involved in binding. Their subsequent elimination resulted in a reduced-size binder with very similar affinity for NT, for which near-complete backbone assignments were achieved. A binding mode suggested by automatic docking and further validated by explicit solvent MD simulations is consistent with paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data collected using spin-labeled NT. Favorable intermolecular interactions are observed in the MD simulations for the residues that were previously shown to contribute to binding in an Ala scan of NT. We further characterized the role of residues within the N-cap for protein stability and peptide binding. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that an initial low-resolution picture for a low-micromolar-peptide binder can be refined through the combination of NMR, protein design, docking, and MD simulations to establish its binding mode, even in the absence of crystallographic data, thereby providing valuable information for further design.

  14. A peptide core motif for binding to heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed

    Ja, William W; Adhikari, Anirban; Austin, Ryan J; Sprang, Stephen R; Roberts, Richard W

    2005-09-16

    Recently, in vitro selection using mRNA display was used to identify a novel peptide sequence that binds with high affinity to Galpha(i1). The peptide was minimized to a 9-residue sequence (R6A-1) that retains high affinity and specificity for the GDP-bound state of Galpha(i1) and acts as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI). Here we demonstrate that the R6A-1 peptide interacts with Galpha subunits representing all four G protein classes, acting as a core motif for Galpha interaction. This contrasts with the consensus G protein regulatory(GPR) sequence, a 28-mer peptide GDI derived from the GoLoco (Galpha(i/0)-Loco interaction)/GPR motif that shares no homology with R6A-1 and binds only to Galpha(i1-3) in this assay. Binding of R6A-1 is generally specific to the GDP-bound state of the Galpha subunits and excludes association with Gbetagamma. R6A-Galpha(i1) complexes are resistant to trypsin digestion and exhibit distinct stability in the presence of Mg(2+), suggesting that the R6A and GPR peptides exert their activities using different mechanisms. Studies using Galpha(i1)/Galpha(s) chimeras identify two regions of Galpha(i1) (residues 1-35 and 57-88) as determinants for strong R6A-G(ialpha1) interaction. Residues flanking the R6A-1 peptide confer unique binding properties, indicating that the core motif could be used as a starting point for the development of peptides exhibiting novel activities and/or specificity for particular G protein subclasses or nucleotide-bound states.

  15. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Site-specific, covalent incorporation of Tus, a DNA-binding protein, on ionic-complementary self-assembling peptide hydrogels using transpeptidase Sortase A as a conjugation tool†Dedicated to the memory of Joachim H. G. Steinke.‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further experimental data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3sm00131hClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Piluso, Susanna; Cassell, Heather C; Gibbons, Jonathan L; Waller, Thomas E; Plant, Nick J; Miller, Aline F; Cavalli, Gabriel

    2013-08-07

    The site-specific conjugation of DNA-binding protein (Tus) to self-assembling peptide FEFEFKFKK was demonstrated. Rheology studies and TEM of the corresponding hydrogels (including PNIPAAm-containing systems) showed no significant variation in properties and hydrogel morphology compared to FEFEFKFKK. Critically, we demonstrate that Tus is accessible within the gel network displaying DNA-binding properties.

  17. Receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in rat anterior pituitary glands: Localization of binding to lactotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, I.E.; Rorstad, O.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been implicated as a physiological PRL-releasing factor; however, characterization of VIP receptors on normal pituitaries using radioligand-binding methods has been problematic. In this study we demonstrated specific receptors for VIP in anterior pituitary glands of female rats using HPLC-purified monoiodinated (Tyr(125I)10)VIP. Binding of VIP was reversible, saturable to receptor and radioligand, regulated by guanine nucleotides, and dependent on time and temperature. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated high and low affinity binding sites, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 28 +/- 16 nM, respectively. The corresponding maximum numbers of binding sites were 158 +/- 34 fmol/mg and 11.7 +/- 6.9 pmol/mg. Binding was specific, as peptides with structural homology to VIP were less than 100th as potent as VIP. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was VIP greater than rat (r) peptide histidine isoleucine = human (h) PHI greater than rGRF greater than bovine GRF = porcine PHI = VIP-(10-28) greater than hGRF greater than secretin greater than apamin greater than glucagon. Radioligand binding was associated primarily with lactotrope-enriched fractions prepared by unit gravity sedimentation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells. VIP stimulated PRL release from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, with an ED50 of 1 nM. These results, comprising the first identification of specific VIP receptors in normal rat anterior pituitary tissue using radioligand-binding methods, provide additional support for a biological role of VIP in lactotrope function.

  18. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Specific gonadotropin binding to Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Richert, N D; Ryan, R J

    1977-03-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to Pseudomonas maltophilia is dependent on time, temperature, and pH and the binding to this procaryotic species is hormone-specific and saturable. The equilibrium dissociation constant is 2.3 X 10(-9) M. There are no cooperative interactions between binding sites (Hill coefficient, 1.05). The number of sites is estimaated as 240 fmol/100 mug of protein. NaCl and KCl, at concentrations from 1 to 10 mM, have no effect on binding. Divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) and 1 mM EDTA inhibit hormone binding. Binding is destroyed by heat or by treatment with Pronase of alpha-chymotrypsin and is increased by phospholipase C. Binding of the labeled gonadotropin is not observed with other gram-negative organisms--e.g., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, or Enterobacter cloacae.

  20. MHC2NNZ: A novel peptide binding prediction approach for HLA DQ molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiang; Zeng, Xu; Lu, Dongfang; Liu, Zhixiang; Wang, Jiao

    2017-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecule plays a crucial role in immunology. Computational prediction of MHC-II binding peptides can help researchers understand the mechanism of immune systems and design vaccines. Most of the prediction algorithms for MHC-II to date have made large efforts in human leukocyte antigen (HLA, the name of MHC in Human) molecules encoded in the DR locus. However, HLA DQ molecules are equally important and have only been made less progress because it is more difficult to handle them experimentally. In this study, we propose an artificial neural network-based approach called MHC2NNZ to predict peptides binding to HLA DQ molecules. Unlike previous artificial neural network-based methods, MHC2NNZ not only considers sequence similarity features but also captures the chemical and physical properties, and a novel method incorporating these properties is proposed to represent peptide flanking regions (PFR). Furthermore, MHC2NNZ improves the prediction accuracy by combining with amino acid preference at more specific positions of the peptides binding core. By evaluating on 3549 peptides binding to six most frequent HLA DQ molecules, MHC2NNZ is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC-II prediction methods.

  1. Advances in the design and engineering of peptide-binding repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Patrick; Plückthun, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The specific recognition of peptides, which we define to include unstructured regions or denatured forms of proteins, is an intrinsic part of a multitude of biochemical assays and procedures. Many cellular interactions are also based on this principle as well. While it would be highly desirable to have a stockpile of sequence-specific binders for essentially any sequence, a de novo selection of individual binders against every possible target peptide sequence would be rather difficult to reduce to practice. Modular peptide binders could overcome this problem, as preselected and/or predesigned modules could be reused for the generation of new binders and thereby revolutionize the generation of binding proteins. This minireview summarizes advances in the development of peptide binders and possible scaffolds for their design.

  2. Membrane-active peptides: binding, translocation, and flux in lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Paulo F.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new and improved methods have been developed to measure translocation of membrane-active peptides (antimicrobial, cytolytic, and amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides) across lipid bilayer membranes. The hypothesis that translocation of membrane-active peptides across a lipid bilayer is determined by the Gibbs energy of insertion of the peptide into the bilayer is re-examined in the light of new experimental tests. The original hypothesis and its motivation are first revisited, examining some specific predictions it generated and the results of initial tests. Translocation is understood as requiring two previous steps: binding and insertion in the membrane. The problem of peptide binding to membranes, its prediction, measurement, and calculation are addressed. Particular attention is given to understanding the reason for the need for amphipathic structures in the function of membrane-active peptides. Insertion into the membrane is then examined. Hydrophobicity scales are compared, and their influence on calculations is discussed. The relation between translocation and graded or all-or-none peptide-induced flux from or into lipid vesicles is also considered. Finally, the most recent work on translocation is examined, both experimental and from molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24769436

  3. Binding Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and the Cationic Amphiphilic Peptides Polymyxin B and WLBU2

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Matthew P.; Wu, Xiangming; McKelvey, GregR.; McGuire, Joseph; Schilke, Karl F.

    2014-01-01

    Passage of blood through a sorbent device for removal of bacteria and endotoxin by specific binding with immobilized, membrane-active, bactericidal peptides holds promise for treating severe blood infections. Peptide insertion in the target membrane and rapid/strong binding is desirable, while membrane disruption and release of degradation products to the circulating blood is not. Here we describe interactions between bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and the membrane-active, bactericidal peptides WLBU2 and polymyxin B (PmB). Analysis of the interfacial behavior of mixtures of LPS and peptide using air-water interfacial tensiometry and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy strongly suggests insertion of intact LPS vesicles by the peptide WLBU2 without vesicle destabilization. In contrast, dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies show that LPS vesicles appear to undergo peptide-induced destabilization in the presence of PmB. Circular dichroism spectra further confirm that WLBU2, which shows disordered structure in aqueous solution and substantially helical structure in membrane-mimetic environments, is stably located within the LPS membrane in peptide-vesicle mixtures. We therefore expect that presentation of WLBU2 at an interface, if tethered in a fashion which preserves its mobility and solvent accessibility, will enable the capture of bacteria and endotoxin without promoting reintroduction of endotoxin to the circulating blood, thus minimizing adverse clinical outcomes. On the other hand, our results suggest no such favorable outcome of LPS interactions with polymyxin B. PMID:24905681

  4. Phage display screen for peptides that bind Bcl-2 protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Joungmok; Cho, June-Haeng; Moon, Ji Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2011-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of apoptosis associated with human disease, including cancer. Bcl-2 protein has been found to be overexpressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, Bcl-2 protein is a potential diagnostic target for cancer detection. In the present study, the authors have identified several Bcl-2 binding peptides with high affinity (picomolar range) from a 5-round M13 phage display library screening. These peptides can be used to develop novel diagnostic probes or potent inhibitors with diverse polyvalencies.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins. PMID:16131654

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein implicated in specific binding to human cell lines.

    PubMed

    García, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Luis; Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Lopez, Ramses; Valbuena, John; Cortes, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Barrero, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Urquiza, Mauricio; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-09-01

    The gene encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2536 protein is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (as assayed by PCR) and transcribed (as determined by RT-PCR) in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. bovis BCG, and M. africanum strains. Rabbits immunized with synthetic polymer peptides from this protein produced antibodies specifically recognizing a 25-kDa band in mycobacterial sonicate. U937 and A549 cells were used in binding assays involving 20-amino-acid-long synthetic peptides covering the whole Rv2536 protein sequence. Peptide 11207 (161DVFSAVRADDSPTGEMQVAQY180) presented high specific binding to both types of cells; the binding was saturable and presented nanomolar affinity constants. Cross-linking assays revealed that this peptide specifically binds to 50 kDa U937 cell membrane and 45 kDa A549 cell membrane proteins.

  7. Determining the specificity of monoclonal antibody HPT-101 to tau-peptides with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Stangner, Tim; Wagner, Carolin; Singer, David; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Gutsche, Christof; Dzubiella, Joachim; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-12-23

    Optical tweezers-assisted dynamic force spectroscopy is employed to investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions on the level of single binding events. In particular, we analyze binding of the phosphorylation-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HPT-101 to synthetic tau-peptides with two potential phosphorylation sites (Thr231 and Ser235), being the most probable markers for Alzheimer's disease. Whereas the typical interpretation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggests that this monoclonal antibody binds exclusively to the double-phosphorylated tau-peptide, we show here by DFS that the specificity of only mAb HPT-101 is apparent. In fact, binding occurs also to each sort of monophosphorylated peptide. Therefore, we characterize the unbinding process by analyzing the measured rupture force distributions, from which the lifetime of the bond without force τ0, its characteristic length xts, and the free energy of activation ΔG are extracted for the three mAb/peptide combinations. This information is used to build a simple theoretical model to predict features of the unbinding process for the double-phosphorylated peptide purely based on data on the monophosphorylated ones. Finally, we introduce a method to combine binding and unbinding measurements to estimate the relative affinity of the bonds. The values obtained for this quantity are in accordance with ELISA, showing how DFS can offer important insights about the dynamic binding process that are not accessible with this common and widespread assay.

  8. Biofunctional peptides from milk proteins: mineral binding and cytomodulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Meisel, H; FitzGerald, R J

    2003-01-01

    The protein fraction of milk contains many valuable components and biologically active substances. Moreover, milk proteins are precursors of many different biologically active peptides which are inactive within the sequence of the precursor protein but can be released by enzymatic proteolysis. Many milk protein-derived peptides, such as caseinophosphopeptides, reveal multi-functional bioactivities. Caseinophosphopeptides can form soluble organophosphate salts and may function as carriers for different minerals, especially calcium. Furthermore, they have been shown to exert cytomodulatory effects. Cytomodulatory peptides inhibit cancer cell growth or they stimulate the activity of immunocompetent cells and neonatal intestinal cells, respectively. Several bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins are potential modulators of various regulatory processes in the body and thus may exert beneficial physiological effects. Caseinophosphopeptides are already produced on an industrial-scale and as a consequence these peptides have been considered for application as ingredients in both 'functional foods' and pharmaceutical preparations. Although the physiological significance as exogenous regulatory substances is not yet fully understood, both mineral binding and cytomodulatory peptides derived from bovine milk proteins are claimed to be health enhancing components that can be used to reduce the risk of disease or to enhance a certain physiological function.

  9. Thermodynamics of engineered gold binding peptides: establishing the structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Wilson, Brandon; Kulp, John L; Evans, John S; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2014-07-14

    l-GBP does not fold in the presence of TFE, 3l-GBP1 adopted two types of secondary structure (β-strand, α-helix) and that peptide's binding to the solid is enhanced by the presence of low percentages of TFE solvent. Not only do these kinetics and thermodynamics results provide adsorption behavior and binding of genetically engineered peptides for inorganics (GEPI), but they could also provide considerable insights into fundamental understanding peptide molecular recognition and their selective specificity for the solids. Moreover, comprehensive work described herein suggests that multiple repeat forms of the solid binding peptides possess a conformational component that can be exploited to further tailor affinity and binding of a given sequence to a solid material followed by ordered assembly as a convenient tool in future practical applications.

  10. A Fluorescent Protein Scaffold for Presenting Structurally Constrained Peptides Provides an Effective Screening System to Identify High Affinity Target-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Yabe, Etsuri; Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamano, Akihiro; Tsubaki, Takuya; Sekine, Takuya; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-01-01

    Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131–L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides. PMID:25084350

  11. Stapled peptide inhibitors of RAB25 target context-specific phenotypes in cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Recent evidence has established a role for the small GTPase RAB25, as well as related effector proteins, in enacting both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic phenotypes in specific cellular contexts. Here we report the development of all-hydrocarbon stabilized peptides derived from the RAB-binding FIP-family of proteins to target RAB25. Relative to unmodified peptides, optimized stapled peptides exhibit increased structural stability, binding affinity, cell permeability, and inhibition of RAB25:FIP complex formation.

  12. Identification and characterization of Strychnine binding peptide using phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Min; Qiu, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Xu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Xia

    2017-04-04

    Phage display has been proved in drug development as a high-throughput method for identifying specific cellular target of different drugs. However, phage display remains an intricate process for insoluble small chemicals because of the difficulty of presenting the molecules to the phages without occupying or destroying the very limited functional groups. In the present study, with Strychnine (Stry) selected as a model compound, we have developed an alternative in vitro bio-panning method against insoluble suspension. In this study, a phage library displaying random sequences of fifteen peptides was employed to screen for interactions between Stry and its cellular selective binding peptides, which are of great value to have a complete understanding of the mechanism of Stry for its antitumor activity. After four rounds of biopanning, a selection of 100 binding clones were randomly selected and subjected to modified anti-proliferation assays and diffusion assays to evaluate their binding affinity to Stry, after which eleven clones were identified as positive binding clones. After DNA sequencing and characterization, the corresponding peptides were found to be associated with tumorigenesis, indicating that Stry may play its antitumor activity by mediating several related actions of tumor development. Our study provided a feasible scheme for the interaction of chemical compounds with cellular binding peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  14. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c

  15. Specificity of the thrombin receptor for agonist peptide is defined by its extracellular surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerszten, Robert E.; Chen, Ji; Ishli, Maki; Ishil, Kenji; Wang, Ling; Nanevicz, Tania; Turck, Christoph W.; Vu, Thien-Khai H.; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    1994-04-01

    G-PROTEIN-COUPLED receptors for catecholamines and some other small ligands are activated when agonists bind to the transmem-brane region of the receptor1. The docking interactions through which peptide agonists activate their receptors are less well characterized2-7. The thrombin receptor is a specialized peptide receptor. It is activated by binding its tethered ligand domain, which is unmasked upon receptor cleavage by thrombin8,9. Human and Xenopus thrombin receptor homologues are each selectively activated by the agonist peptide representing their respective tethered ligand domains. Here we identify receptor domains that confer this agonist specificity by replacing the Xenopus receptor's amino-terminal exodomain and three extracellular loops with the corresponding human structures. This switches receptor specificity from Xenopus to human. The specificity of these thrombin receptors for their respective peptide agonists is thus determined by their extracellular surfaces. Our results indicate that agonist interaction with extracellular domains is important for thrombin receptor activation.

  16. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  17. Heterochiral Jun and Fos bZIP peptides form a coiled-coil heterodimer that is competent for DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Rui; Nakagawa, Natsumi; Oyama, Taiji; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-07-01

    Coiled coils, consisting of at least two α-helices, have important roles in the regulation of transcription, cell differentiation, and cell growth. Peptides composed of d-amino acids (d-peptides) have received great attention for their potential in biomedical applications, because they give large diversity for the design of peptidyl drug and are more resistant to proteolytic digestion than l-peptides. However, the interactions between l-peptides/l-protein and d-peptides in the formation of complex are poorly understood. In this study, stereoisomer-specific peptides were constructed corresponding to regions of the basic-leucine-zipper domains of Jun and Fos proteins. basic-leucine-zipper domains consist of an N-terminal basic domain, which is responsible for DNA binding, and a C-terminal domain that enables homodimerization or heterodimerization via formation of a coiled-coil. By combining peptides with different stereochemistries, the d-l heterochiral Jun-Fos heterodimer formation induced DNA binding by the basic domains of Jun-Fos. Our study provides new insight into the interaction between l-peptide and d-peptide enantiomers for developing d-peptide materials and drugs. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Characterization of rat spinal cord receptors to FLFQPQRFamide, a mammalian morphine modulating peptide: a binding study.

    PubMed

    Allard, M; Geoffre, S; Legendre, P; Vincent, J D; Simonnet, G

    1989-10-23

    An in vitro binding assay, using 125I-YLFQPQRFamide, a newly synthetized iodinated analog of FLFQPQRFamide, in which Phe1 (F) has been substituted by a Tyr (Y), was developed to demonstrate and characterize putative binding sites of this brain morphine modulating peptide. This radioligand bound in a time-dependent manner to rat spinal cord membrane preparation. This binding was dose-dependent, saturable and reversible. Both kinetic data and saturation measured at equilibrium lead to the existence of a homogenous population of high affinity binding sites with a Kd value of 0.09-0.1 nM and a maximal capacity Bmax of 14.5 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein. Results of competition experiments show that both FLFQPQRFamide and its analog YLFQPQRFamide had a similar capacity to inhibit the 125I-YLFQPQRFamide binding, suggesting that this radioiodinated analog is a good tool to study binding characteristics of FLFQPQRFamide receptors. The related octadecapeptide AGEGLSSPFWSLAAPQRFamide, another mammalian morphine modulating peptide competes for radioligand binding with similar potency. Our results also show that mu, delta and kappa opiate receptor agonists as well as the antagonist naloxone were not able to affect binding either in presence or in absence of 120 mM NaCl. Together, these data demonstrate that FLFQPQRFamide does not function as an endogenous opiate receptor antagonist and that is capacity to reduce opiate-induced analgesia is supported by specific binding sites.

  19. A Review on Recent Patents and Applications of Inorganic Material Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Thota, Veeranjaneyulu; Perry, Carole C

    2017-01-01

    Although the popularity of using combinatorial display techniques for recognising unique peptides having high affinity for inorganic (nano) particles has grown rapidly, there are no systematic reviews showcasing current developments or patents on binding peptides specific to these materials. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent progress in patents on material binding peptides specifically exploring inorganic nano surfaces such as metals, metal oxides, minerals, carbonbased materials, polymer based materials, magnetic materials and semiconductors. We consider both the peptide display strategies used and the exploitation of the identified peptides in the generation of advanced nanomaterials. In order to get a clear picture on the number of patents and literature present to date relevant to inorganic material binding biomolecules and their applications, a thorough online search was conducted using national and worldwide databases. The literature search include standard bibliographic databases while patents included EPO Espacenet, WIPO patent scope, USPTO, Google patent search, Patent lens, etc. along with commercial databases such as Derwent and Patbase. Both English and American spellings were included in the searches. The initial number of patents found related to material binders were 981. After reading and excluding irrelevant patents such as organic binding peptides, works published before 2001, repeated patents, documents not in English etc., 51 highly relevant patents published from 2001 onwards were selected and analysed. These patents were further separated into six categories based on their target inorganic material and combinatorial library used. They include relevant patents on metal, metal oxide or combination binding peptides (19), magnetic and semiconductor binding peptides (8), carbon based (3), mineral (5), polymer (8) and other binders (9). Further, how these material specific binders have been used to synthesize simple to complex bio- or

  20. Insights into the C-terminal Peptide Binding Specificity of the PDZ Domain of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERACTION WITH THE TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEIN CLAUDIN-3.

    PubMed

    Merino-Gracia, Javier; Costas-Insua, Carlos; Canales, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2016-05-27

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, displays a PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain located at its N terminus involved in subcellular targeting. The C termini of various cellular proteins insert within the binding groove of this PDZ domain and determine the subcellular distribution of neuronal NOS (nNOS). The molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are poorly understood because the PDZ domain of nNOS can apparently exhibit class I, class II, and class III binding specificity. In addition, it has been recently suggested that the PDZ domain of nNOS binds with very low affinity to the C termini of target proteins, and a necessary simultaneous lateral interaction must take place for binding to occur. We describe herein that the PDZ domain of nNOS can behave as a bona fide class III PDZ domain and bind to C-terminal sequences with acidic residues at the P-2 position with low micromolar binding constants. Binding to C-terminal sequences with a hydrophobic residue at the P-2 position plus an acidic residue at the P-3 position (class II) can also occur, although interactions involving residues extending up to the P-7 position mediate this type of binding. This promiscuous behavior also extends to its association to class I sequences, which must display a Glu residue at P-3 and a Thr residue at P-2 By means of site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy, we have been able to identify the residues involved in each specific type of binding and rationalize the mechanisms used to recognize binding partners. Finally, we have analyzed the high affinity association of the PDZ domain of nNOS to claudin-3 and claudin-14, two tight junction tetraspan membrane proteins that are essential components of the paracellular barrier. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  2. Combinatorial peptide libraries reveal the ligand-binding mechanism of the oligopeptide receptor OppA of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Detmers, Frank J. M.; Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Abele, Rupert; Jack, Ralph W.; Tampé, Robert; Konings, Wil N.; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    The oligopeptide transport system (Opp) of Lactococcus lactis has the unique capacity to mediate the transport of peptides from 4 up to at least 18 residues. The substrate specificity of this binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter is determined mainly by the receptor protein OppA. To study the specificity and ligand-binding mechanism of OppA, the following strategy was used: (i) OppA was purified and anchored via the lipid moiety to the surface of liposomes; (ii) the proteoliposomes were used in a rapid filtration-based binding assay with radiolabeled nonameric bradykinin as a reporter peptide; and (iii) combinatorial peptide libraries were used to determine the specificity and selectivity of OppA. The studies show that (i) OppA is able to bind peptides up to at least 35 residues, but there is a clear optimum in affinity for nonameric peptides; (ii) the specificity for nonameric peptides is not equally distributed over the whole peptide, because positions 4, 5, and 6 in the binding site are more selective; and (iii) the differences in affinity for given side chains is relatively small, but overall hydrophobic residues are favored—whereas glycine, proline, and negatively charged residues lower the binding affinity. The data indicate that not only the first six residues (enclosed by the protein) but also the C-terminal three residues interact in a nonopportunistic manner with (the surface of) OppA. This binding mechanism is different from the one generally accepted for receptors of ATP-binding cassette-transporter systems. PMID:11050157

  3. Preferential labeling of alpha-amino N-terminal groups in peptides by biotin: application to the detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies by enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sélo, I; Négroni, L; Créminon, C; Grassi, J; Wal, J M

    1996-12-15

    Experimental conditions (pH 6.5, 24 h reaction, peptide:biotin ratio 1:5) were defined for preferential incorporation of the biotin molecule in the N-terminal alpha-amino group of peptides. This strategy could be helpful in numerous applications when an entire peptide chain must remain accessible for antibody or receptor binding. We illustrate this advantage in a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay designed to detect antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin present in rabbit or human sera. This test involves synthetic peptides biotinylated in different positions and immobilized on a solid phase. The use of biotin/streptavidin interactions permitted more efficient detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies than solid phases prepared using conventional passive-adsorption techniques. The highest levels of antibody binding were measured when biotinylation occurred at the N-terminal extremity of immobilized peptides.

  4. Thermodynamics of RTA3 peptide binding to membranes and consequences for antimicrobial activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Hawrani, Ayman; Howe, Robin A.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    RTA3 is an α-helical, amphipathic peptide with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative bacteria and low mammalian cell toxicity. RTA3 contains a cysteine residue, replacement of which with an alanine or serine (RTA3-C15S) virtually abolishes antimicrobial activity. Much of the activity of RTA3 can be recovered in RTA3-C15L, indicating that the C15 residue functions largely as a bulky hydrophobic side chain promoting target cell membrane interactions. The poorly active RTA3-C15S is a useful variant for assessing the mechanistic aspects of RTA3 activity. Binding and membrane perturbation in vesicles containing different proportions of negative surface charge are analyzed in terms of amino acid-specific free energy contributions to interfacial binding, which likely underlie variations in antimicrobial activity amongst RTA3 variants. Comparison with published free energy scales indicates that the reduced electrostatic contribution to binding to membranes having reduced negative surface charge can be compensated in RTA3 (but not RTA3-C15S) by a slightly deeper insertion of the C-terminus of the peptide to maximize hydrophobic contributions to binding. Analysis of inner membrane (IM)- and outer membrane (OM)-selective permeabilization of Escherichiacoli demonstrates a broad similarity between peptide effects on vesicles with low negative surface charge (20% negatively charged lipids), E.coli membrane perturbation, and antimicrobial activity, supporting a role for membrane perturbation in the killing mechanism of RTA3. The results demonstrate that large variations in antimicrobial activity on subtle changes in amino acid sequence in helical amphipathic peptides can be rationalized in terms of the thermodynamics of peptide binding to membranes, allowing a more systematic understanding of antimicrobial activity in these peptides. PMID:20346912

  5. Identification and Tumour-Binding Properties of a Peptide with High Affinity to the Disialoganglioside GD2

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jan; Reichel, Robin; Vogt, Sebastian; Müller, Stefan P.; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Brandau, Wolfgang; Eggert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Neuroectodermal tumours are characterized by aberrant processing of disialogangliosides concomitant with high expression of GD2 or GD3 on cell surfaces. Antibodies targeting GD2 are already in clinical use for therapy of neuroblastoma, a solid tumour of early childhood. Here, we set out to identify peptides with high affinity to human disialoganglioside GD2. To this end, we performed a combined in vivo and in vitro screen using a recombinant phage displayed peptide library. We isolated a phage displaying the peptide sequence WHWRLPS that specifically binds to the human disialoganglioside GD2. Binding specificity was confirmed by mutational scanning and by comparative analyses using structurally related disialogangliosides. In vivo, significant enrichment of phage binding to xenografts of human neuroblastoma cells in mice was observed. Tumour-specific phage accumulation could be blocked by intravenous coinjection of the corresponding peptide. Comparative pharmacokinetic analyses revealed higher specific accumulation of 68Ga-labelled GD2-binding peptide compared to 111In-labelled peptide in xenografts of human neuroblastoma. In contrast to 124I-MIBG, which is currently evaluated as a neuroblastoma marker in PET/CT, 68Ga-labelled GD2-specific peptide spared the thyroid but was enriched in the kidneys, which could be partially blocked by infusion of amino acids.In summary, we here report on a novel tumour-homing peptide that specifically binds to the disialoganglioside GD2, accumulates in xenografts of neuroblastoma cells in mice and bears the potential for tumour detection using PET/CT. Thus, this peptide may serve as a new scaffold for diagnosing GD2-positive tumours of neuroectodermal origin. PMID:27716771

  6. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Increased antitumor activity of tumor-specific peptide modified thymopentin.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xingzhen; Li, Bin; Liu, Meng; Chen, Jiao; Gao, Xiangdong; Zheng, Heng

    2014-12-01

    Thymopoietin pentapeptide (thymopentin, TP5), an immunomodulatory peptide, has been successfully used as an immune system enhancer for treating immune deficiency, cancer, and infectious diseases. However, poor penetration into tumors remains a key limitation to the efficacy and application of TP5. iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC) has been introduced to certain anticancer agents, and increased specific tumor penetrability of drugs and cell internalization have been observed. In the present study, we fused this iRGD fragment with the C-terminal of TP5 to yield a new product, TP5-iRGD. Cell attachment assay showed that TP5-iRGD exhibits more extensive attachment to the melanoma cell line B16F10 than wild-type TP5. Tumor cell viability assay showed that iRGD conjugation with the TP5 C-terminus increases the basal antiproliferative activity of the pentapeptide against the melanoma cell line B16F10, the human lung cancer cell line H460, and the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Subsequent injections of TP5-iRGD inhibited in vivo melanoma progression more efficiently than the native TP5. Murine spleen lymphocyte proliferation assay also showed that TP5-iRGD and the parent pentapeptide feature nearly identical spleen lymphocyte proliferation activities. We built an integrin αvβ3 and TP5-iRGD computational binding model to investigate the mechanism by which TP5-iRGD promotes increased activity further. Conjugation with iRGD promotes binding to integrin αvβ3, thereby increasing the tumor-homing efficiency of the resultant peptide. These experimental and computational observations of increased TP5-iRGD activity help broaden the usage of TP5 and reflect the great application potential of the peptide as an anticancer agent.

  8. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  9. Enhancing peptide ligand binding to vascular endothelial growth factor by covalent bond formation.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Bernadette V; Beck, Heather E; Aweda, Tolulope A; Phinney, Brett; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Jewell, William; Tran, Diana; Day, Jeffrey J; Peiris, Malalage N; Nwosu, Charles; Lebrilla, Carlito; Meares, Claude F

    2012-05-16

    Formation of a stable covalent bond between a synthetic probe molecule and a specific site on a target protein has many potential applications in biomedical science. For example, the properties of probes used as receptor-imaging ligands may be improved by increasing their residence time on the targeted receptor. Among the more interesting cases are peptide ligands, the strongest of which typically bind to receptors with micromolar dissociation constants, and which may depend on processes other than simple binding to provide images. The side chains of cysteine, histidine, or lysine are attractive for chemical attachment to improve binding to a receptor protein, and a system based on acryloyl probes attaching to engineered cysteine provides excellent positron emission tomographic images in animal models (Wei et al. (2008) J. Nucl. Med. 49, 1828-1835). In nature, lysine is a more common but less reactive residue than cysteine, making it an interesting challenge to modify. To seek practically useful cross-linking yields with naturally occurring lysine side chains, we have explored not only acryloyl but also other reactive linkers with different chemical properties. We employed a peptide-VEGF model system to discover that a 19mer peptide ligand, which carried a lysine-tagged dinitrofluorobenzene group, became attached stably and with good yield to a unique lysine residue on human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), even in the presence of 70% fetal bovine serum. The same peptide carrying acryloyl and related Michael acceptors gave low yields of attachment to VEGF, as did the chloroacetyl peptide.

  10. Peptides from the Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR putative protein bind with high affinity to normal human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    García, Javier E; Puentes, Alvaro; Curtidor, Hernando; Vera, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Luis; Valbuena, John; López, Ramses; Ocampo, Marisol; Cortés, Jimena; Vanegas, Magnolia; Rosas, Jaiver; Reyes, Claudia; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic 20-mer long non-overlapped peptides, from STEVOR protein, were tested in RBC binding assays for identifying STEVOR protein regions having high RBC binding activity and evaluating whether these regions inhibit Plasmodium falciparum in vitro invasion. Affinity constants, binding site number per cell and Hill coefficients were determined by saturation assay with high activity binding peptides (HABPs). HABP binding assays using RBCs previously treated with enzymes were carried out to study the nature of the receptor. The molecular weight of RBC surface proteins interacting with HABPs was determined by cross-linking assays and SDS-PAGE analysis. RBC binding assays revealed that peptides 30561 (41MKSRRLAEIQLPKCPHYNND60), 30562 (61PELKKIIDKLNEERIKKYIE80) and 30567 (161ASCCKVHDNYLDNLKKGCFG180) bound saturably and with high binding activity, presenting nanomolar affinity constants. HABP binding activity to RBCs previously treated with neuraminidase and trypsin decreased, suggesting that these peptides bound to RBC surface proteins and that such binding could be sialic acid dependent. Cross-linking and SDS-PAGE assays showed that the three HABPs specifically bound to 30 and 40 kDa molecular weight RBC membrane proteins. Peptides 30561, 30562 and 30567 inhibited P. falciparum in vitro invasion of red blood cells in a concentration-dependent way. Goat sera having STEVOR protein polymeric peptides antibodies inhibit parasite in vitro invasion depending on concentration. Three peptides localized in STEVOR N-terminal and central regions had high, saturable, binding activity to 30 and 40 kDa RBC membrane proteins. These peptides inhibited the parasite's in vitro invasion, suggesting that STEVOR protein regions are involved in P. falciparum invasion processes during intra-erythrocyte stage.

  11. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  12. Compensating Stereochemical Changes Allow Murein Tripeptide to Be Accommodated in a Conventional Peptide-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Abbas; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena V.; Hervé, Mireille; Horler, Richard S. P.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2011-01-01

    The oligopeptide permease (Opp) of Escherichia coli is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that uses the substrate-binding protein (SBP) OppA to bind peptides and deliver them to the membrane components (OppBCDF) for transport. OppA binds conventional peptides 2–5 residues in length regardless of their sequence, but does not facilitate transport of the cell wall component murein tripeptide (Mtp, l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-Dap), which contains a d-amino acid and a γ-peptide linkage. Instead, MppA, a homologous substrate-binding protein, forms a functional transporter with OppBCDF for uptake of this unusual tripeptide. Here we have purified MppA and demonstrated biochemically that it binds Mtp with high affinity (KD ∼ 250 nm). The crystal structure of MppA in complex with Mtp has revealed that Mtp is bound in a relatively extended conformation with its three carboxylates projecting from one side of the molecule and its two amino groups projecting from the opposite face. Specificity for Mtp is conferred by charge-charge and dipole-charge interactions with ionic and polar residues of MppA. Comparison of the structure of MppA-Mtp with structures of conventional tripeptides bound to OppA, reveals that the peptide ligands superimpose remarkably closely given the profound differences in their structures. Strikingly, the effect of the d-stereochemistry, which projects the side chain of the d-Glu residue at position 2 in the direction of the main chain in a conventional tripeptide, is compensated by the formation of a γ-linkage to the amino group of diaminopimelic acid, mimicking the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of a conventional tripeptide. PMID:21705338

  13. Ab initio molecular simulations for proposing novel peptide inhibitors blocking the ligand-binding pocket of urokinase receptor.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Tatsuroh; Sugimoto, Takuya; Kasumi, Tomoyo; Araki, Kohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Recent biochemical experiments have revealed that a variety of proteases play important roles in cancer invasion and metastasis. Among these proteases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is particularly important, since its specific binding to the receptor (uPAR) existing on the surface of a cancer cell is considered to be a trigger for cancer invasion. It is thus expected that the blocking of the binding can inhibit cancer invasion in the cancer patients and improve their prognosis dramatically. To develop a potent inhibitor for the binding, many types of peptides of amino acids were produced and their effect on the cancer invasion was investigated in the previous biochemical experiments. On the other hand, our previous ab initio molecular simulations have clarified that some amino acid residues of uPA play important roles in the specific binding between uPA and uPAR. In the present study, we propose some peptides composed of these important residues and investigate the specific interactions and the binding affinity between uPAR and the peptides at an electronic level, using ab initio molecular simulations. Base on the results simulated, we elucidate which peptide can bind more strongly to uPAR and propose a novel potent peptide which can inhibit the binding between uPAR and uPA efficiently.

  14. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  15. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  16. A Small Subset of Signal Peptidase Residues are Perturbed by Signal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Musial-Siwek, Monika; Yeagle, Philip L.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Perturbations of the chemical shifts of a small subset of residues in the catalytically active domain of Escherichia coli signal peptidase I (SPase I) upon binding signal peptide suggest the contact surface on the enzyme for the substrate. SPase I, an integral membrane protein, is vital to preprotein transport in prokaryotic and eukaryotic secretory systems; it binds and proteolyses the N-terminal signal peptide of the preprotein, permitting folding and localization of the mature protein. Employing isotopically labeled C-terminal E. coli SPase I Δ2–75 and an unlabeled soluble synthetic alkaline phosphatase signal peptide, SPase I Δ2–75 was titrated with the signal peptide and 2Δ 1H-15N hetero-nuclear single-quantum correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed chemical shifts of specific enzyme residues sensitive to substrate binding. These residues were identified by 3D HNCACB, 3D CBCA(CO)NH, and 3D HN(CO) experiments. Residues Ile80, Glu82, Gln85, Ile86, Ser88, Gly89, Ser90, Met91, Leu95, Ile101, Gly109, Val132, Lys134, Asp142, Ile144, Lys145, and Thr234, alter conformation and are likely all in, or adjacent to, the substrate binding site. The remainder of the enzyme structure is unperturbed. Ramifications for conformational changes for substrate docking and catalysis are discussed. PMID:18637988

  17. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    PubMed

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  18. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.; Stöcklein, Walter F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  19. Peptide-binding motifs of two common equine class I MHC molecules in Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Tobias; Lindvall, Mikaela; Moore, Erin; Moore, Eugene; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Myers, Paisley T; Malaker, Stacy A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Hunt, Donald F; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I alleles provide a valuable tool to efficiently identify putative T cell epitopes. Detailed information on equine MHC class I alleles is still very limited, and to date, only a single equine MHC class I allele, Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3 haplotype), has been characterized. The present study extends the number of characterized ELA class I specificities in two additional haplotypes found commonly in the Thoroughbred breed. Accordingly, we here report quantitative binding motifs for the ELA-A2 allele Eqca-16*00101 and the ELA-A9 allele Eqca-1*00201. Utilizing analyses of endogenously bound and eluted ligands and the screening of positional scanning combinatorial libraries, detailed and quantitative peptide-binding motifs were derived for both alleles. Eqca-16*00101 preferentially binds peptides with aliphatic/hydrophobic residues in position 2 and at the C-terminus, and Eqca-1*00201 has a preference for peptides with arginine in position 2 and hydrophobic/aliphatic residues at the C-terminus. Interestingly, the Eqca-16*00101 motif resembles that of the human HLA A02-supertype, while the Eqca-1*00201 motif resembles that of the HLA B27-supertype and two macaque class I alleles. It is expected that the identified motifs will facilitate the selection of candidate epitopes for the study of immune responses in horses.

  20. The identification of affinity peptide ligands specific to the variable region of human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Nogami, Masahiro; Ozawa, Kazumichi; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Sakura, Naoki; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Of all potential biological therapeutics, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies are becoming the dominant focus of clinical research. In particular, smaller recombinant antibody fragments such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have become the subject of intense focus. However, an efficient affinity ligand for antibody fragment purification has not been developed. In the present study, we designed a consensus sequence for the human antibody heavy or light chain-variable regions (Fv) based on the antibody sequences available in the ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), and synthesized these consensus sequences as template Fv antibodies. We then screened peptide ligands that specifically bind to the repertoire-derived human Fv consensus antibody using a 12-mer-peptide library expressed-phage display method. Subsequently, 1 peptide for the VH template and 8 peptides for the VK template were selected as the candidate ligands after 4 rounds of panning the phage display. Using peptide-bead-based immunoprecipitation, the code-4 and code-13 peptides showed recovery rates of the VH and VK templates that were 20-30% and 40-50%, respectively. Both peptides exhibited better recovery rates for trastuzumab scFv (approximately 40%). If it were possible to identify the best combination of VH and VK-binding peptides among the ligand peptides suitable for the human mAb Fv sequence, the result could be a promising purification tool that might greatly improve the cost efficiencies of the purification process.

  1. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules: which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Keşmir, Can

    2015-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA molecule has never been shown. To experimentally quantify the contribution of a single amino acid change to the peptide repertoire of even a single HLA molecule requires an immense number of HLA peptide-binding measurements. Therefore, we used an in silico method to study the effect of single mutations on the peptide repertoires. We predicted the peptide-binding repertoire of a large set of HLA molecules and used the overlap of the peptide-binding repertoires of each pair of HLA molecules that differ on a single position to measure how much single substitutions change the peptide binding. We found that the effect of a single substitution in the peptide-binding groove depends on the substituted position and the amino acids involved. The positions that alter peptide binding most are the most polymorphic ones, while those that are hardly variable among HLA molecules have the lowest effect on the peptide repertoire. Although expected, the relationship between functional divergence and polymorphism of HLA molecules has never been shown before. Additionally, we show that a single substitution in HLA-B molecules has more effect on the peptide-binding repertoire compared to that in HLA-A molecules. This provides an (alternative) explanation for the larger polymorphism of HLA-B molecules compared to HLA-A molecules.

  2. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  3. Engineering and analysis of peptide-recognition domain specificities by phage display and deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Megan E; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction networks depend in part on the specific recognition of unstructured peptides by folded domains. Understanding how members of a domain family use a similar fold to recognize different peptide sequences selectively is a fundamental question. One way to advance our understanding of peptide recognition is to apply an existing model of peptide recognition for a particular domain toward engineering synthetic domain variants with desired properties. Successes, failures, and unintended outcomes can help refine the model and can illuminate more general principles of peptide recognition. Using the PDZ domain fold as an example, we describe methods for (1) structure-based combinatorial library design and directed evolution of domain variants and (2) specificity profiling of large repertoires of synthetic variants using multiplexed deep sequencing. Peptide-binding preferences for hundreds of variants can be decoded in parallel, enabling comparisons between different library designs and selection pressures. The tremendous depth of coverage of the binding peptide profiles also permits robust computational analysis. This approach to studying peptide recognition can be applied to other domains and to a variety of structural and functional models by tailoring the combinatorial library design and selection pressures accordingly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Peptide ligands specific to the oxidized form of escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Banach, B. S.; Hamdan, S. M.; Richardson, C. C.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Amunix, Inc.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Harvard Medical School

    2008-11-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a highly conserved redox protein involved in several essential cellular processes. In this study, our goal was to isolate peptide ligands to Escherichia coli Trx that mimic protein-protein interactions, specifically the T7 polymerase-Trx interaction. To do this, we subjected Trx to affinity selection against a panel of linear and cysteine-constrained peptides using M13 phage display. A novel cyclized conserved peptide sequence, with a motif of C(D/N/S/T/G)D(S/T)-hydrophobic-C-X-hydrophobic-P, was isolated to Trx. These peptides bound specifically to the E. coli Trx when compared to the human and spirulina homologs. An alanine substitution of the active site cysteines (CGPC) resulted in a significant loss of peptide binding affinity to the Cys-32 mutant. The peptides were also characterized in the context of Trx's role as a processivity factor of the T7 DNA polymerase (gp5). As the interaction between gp5 and Trx normally takes place under reducing conditions, which might interfere with the conformation of the disulfide-bridged peptides, we made use of a 22 residue deletion mutant of gp5 in the thioredoxin binding domain (gp5{Delta}22) that bypassed the requirements of reducing conditions to interact with Trx. A competition study revealed that the peptide selectively inhibits the interaction of gp5{Delta}22 with Trx, under oxidizing conditions, with an IC50 of {approx} 10 {micro}M.

  5. Enhanced Cellular Adhesion on Titanium by Silk Functionalized with titanium binding and RGD peptides

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Guillaume; Blanchi, Thomas; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Calabrese, Rossella; Rossi, Claire; Vigneron, Pascale; Duval, Jean-Luc; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on titanium represents a challenge for implantable materials. In order to improve adhesion at the cell/material interface we used a new approach based on the molecular recognition of titanium by specific peptides. Silk fibroin protein was chemically grafted with titanium binding peptide (TiBP) to increase adsorption of these chimeric proteins to the metal surface. Quartz Crystal Microbalance was used to quantify the specific adsorption of TiBP-functionalized silk and an increase in protein deposition by more than 35% was demonstrated due to the presence of the binding peptide. A silk protein grafted with TiBP and fibronectin-derived RGD peptide was then prepared. The adherence of fibroblasts on the titanium surface modified with the multifunctional silk coating demonstrated an increase in the number of adhering cells by 60%. The improved adhesion was demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunocytochemical staining of focal contact points. Chick embryo organotypic culture also revealed strong adhesion of endothelial cells expanding on the multifunctional silk-peptide coating. These results demonstrated that silk functionalized with TiBP and RGD represents a promising approach to modify cell-biomaterial interfaces, opening new perspectives for implantable medical devices, especially when reendothelialization is required. PMID:22975628

  6. Cholesterol Changes the Mechanisms of Aβ Peptide Binding to the DMPC Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2017-10-02

    Using isobaric-isothermal all-atom replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, we investigated the equilibrium binding of Aβ10-40 monomers to the zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer containing cholesterol. Our previous REMD simulations, which studied binding of the same peptide to the cholesterol-free DMPC bilayer, served as a control, against which we measured the impact of cholesterol. Our findings are as follows. First, addition of cholesterol to the DMPC bilayer partially expels the Aβ peptide from the hydrophobic core and promotes its binding to bilayer polar headgroups. Using thermodynamic and energetics analyses, we argued that Aβ partial expulsion is not related to cholesterol-induced changes in lateral pressure within the bilayer but is caused by binding energetics, which favors Aβ binding to the surface of the densely packed cholesterol-rich bilayer. Second, cholesterol has a protective effect on the DMPC bilayer structure against perturbations caused by Aβ binding. More specifically, cholesterol reduces bilayer thinning and overall depletion of bilayer density beneath the Aβ binding footprint. Third, we found that the Aβ peptide contains a single cholesterol binding site, which involves hydrophobic C-terminal amino acids (Ile31-Val36), Phe19, and Phe20 from the central hydrophobic cluster, and cationic Lys28 from the turn region. This binding site accounts for about 76% of all Aβ-cholesterol interactions. Because cholesterol binding site in the Aβ10-40 peptide does not contain the GXXXG motif featured in cholesterol interactions with the transmembrane domain C99 of the β-amyloid precursor protein, we argued that the binding mechanisms for Aβ and C99 are distinct reflecting their different conformations and positions in the lipid bilayer. Fourth, cholesterol sharply reduces the helical propensity in the bound Aβ peptide. As a result, cholesterol largely eliminates the emergence of helical structure observed

  7. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  8. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum EBA-175 homologue sequences that specifically bind to human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, John Jairo; Bravo, Ricardo Vera; Ocampo, Marisol; Lopez, Ramses; Rodriguez, Luis E; Curtidor, Hernando; Puentes, Alvaro; Garcia, Javier E; Tovar, Diana; Gomez, Johana; Leiton, Jesus; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-09-03

    Erythrocyte binding antigen-160 (EBA-160) protein is a Plasmodium falciparum antigen homologue from the erythrocyte binding protein family (EBP). It has been shown that the EBP family plays a role in parasite binding to the erythrocyte surface. The EBA-160 sequence has been chemically synthesised in seventy 20-mer sequential peptides covering the entire 3D7 protein strain, each of which was tested in erythrocyte binding assays to identify possible EBA-160 functional regions. Five EBA-160 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) specifically binding to erythrocytes with high affinity were identified. Dissociation constants lay between 200 and 460 nM and Hill coefficients between 1.5 and 2.3. Erythrocyte membrane protein binding peptide cross-linking assays using SDS-PAGE showed that these peptides bound specifically to 12, 28, and 44 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. The nature of these receptor sites was studied in peptide binding assays using enzyme-treated erythrocytes. HABPs were able to block merozoite in vitro invasion of erythrocytes. HABPs' potential as anti-malarial vaccine candidates is also discussed.

  9. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Sébastien; Marchand, Mario; Laviolette, François; Drouin, Alexandre; Corbeil, Jacques

    2013-03-05

    The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it's approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting peptide-protein binding

  10. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  11. Camptothecin binds to a synthetic peptide identified by a T7 phage display screen.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2005-11-01

    An analysis of non-biotinylated camptothecin (CPT) binding to the C-20-biotinylated CPT binding peptide NSSQSARR was carried out using two methods, quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide was immobilized peptide on a sensor chip and showed a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 0.1 microM against CPT in QCM and SPR experiments.

  12. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  13. Rabies virus binding to an acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit peptide.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1990-04-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled rabies virus to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated. Binding of rabies virus to the receptor peptide was dependent on pH, could be competed with by unlabeled homologous virus particles, and was saturable. Synthetic peptides of snake venom, curaremimetic neurotoxins and of the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein, were effective in competing with labeled virus binding to the receptor peptide at micromolar concentrations. Similarly, synthetic peptides of the binding domain on the acetylcholine receptor competed for binding. These findings suggest that both rabies virus and neurotoxins bind to residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Competition studies with shorter alpha-subunit peptides within this region indicate that the highest affinity virus binding determinants are located within residues 179-192. A rat nerve alpha 3-subunit peptide, that does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin, inhibited binding of virus to the alpha 1 peptide, suggesting that rabies binds to neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These studies indicate that synthetic peptides of the glycoprotein binding domain and of the receptor binding domain may represent useful antiviral agents by targeting the recognition event between the viral attachment protein and the host cell receptor, and inhibiting attachment of virus to the receptor.

  14. Lock and key binding of the HOX YPWM peptide to the PBX homeodomain.

    PubMed

    Sprules, Tara; Green, Nancy; Featherstone, Mark; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-10

    HOX homeodomain proteins bind short core DNA sequences to control very specific developmental processes. DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are increased by the formation of cooperative complexes with the PBX homeodomain protein. A conserved YPWM motif in the HOX protein is necessary for cooperative binding with PBX. We have determined the structure of a PBX homeodomain bound to a 14-mer DNA duplex. A relaxation-optimized procedure was developed to measure DNA residual dipolar couplings at natural abundance in the 20-kDa binary complex. When the PBX homeodomain binds to DNA, a fourth alpha-helix is formed in the homeodomain. This helix rigidifies the DNA recognition helix of PBX and forms a hydrophobic binding site for the HOX YPWM peptide. The HOX peptide itself shows some structure in solution and suggests that the interaction between PBX and HOX is an example of "lock and key" binding. The NMR structure explains the requirement of DNA for the PBX-HOX interaction and the increased affinity of DNA binding.

  15. Lock and Key Binding of the HOX YPWM Peptide to the PBX Homeodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Sprules, Tara; Green, N.; Featherstone, M.; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-10

    HOX homeodomain proteins bind short core DNA sequences to control very specific developmental processes. DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are increased by the formation of cooperative complexes with the PBX homeodomain protein. A conserved YPWM motif in the HOX protein is necessary for cooperative binding with PBX. We have determined the structure of a PBX homeodomain bound to a 14-mer DNA duplex. A relaxation-optimized procedure was developed to measure DNA residual dipolar couplings at natural abundance in the 20-kDa binary complex. When the PBX homeodomain binds to DNA, a fourth alpha-helix is formed in the homeodomain. This helix rigidifies the DNA recognition helix of PBX and forms a hydrophobic binding site for the HOX YPWM peptide. The HOX peptide itself shows some structure in solution and suggests that the interaction between PBX and HOX is an example of "lock and key" binding. The NMR structure explains the requirement of DNA for the PBX-HOX interaction and the increased affinity of DNA binding.

  16. Visualization of Surface-tethered Large DNA Molecules with a Fluorescent Protein DNA Binding Peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonghyun; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-06-23

    Large DNA molecules tethered on the functionalized glass surface have been utilized in polymer physics and biochemistry particularly for investigating interactions between DNA and its binding proteins. Here, we report a method that uses fluorescent microscopy for visualizing large DNA molecules tethered on the surface. First, glass coverslips are biotinylated and passivated by coating with biotinylated polyethylene glycol, which specifically binds biotinylated DNA via avidin protein linkers and significantly reduces undesirable binding from non-specific interactions of proteins or DNA molecules on the surface. Second, the DNA molecules are biotinylated by two different methods depending on their terminals. The blunt ended DNA is tagged with biotinylated dUTP at its 3' hydroxyl terminus, by terminal transferase, while the sticky ended DNA is hybridized with biotinylated complimentary oligonucleotides by DNA ligase. Finally, a microfluidic shear flow makes single DNA molecules stretch to their full contour lengths after being stained with fluorescent protein-DNA binding peptide (FP-DBP).

  17. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  18. Zinc(II) binds to the neuroprotective peptide humanin.

    PubMed

    Armas, Ambar; Sonois, Vanessa; Mothes, Emmanuelle; Mazarguil, Honoré; Faller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The abnormal accumulation of the peptide amyloid-beta in the form of senile (or amyloid) plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Zinc ions have been implicated in AD and plaques formation. Recently, the peptide humanin has been discovered. Humanin showed neuroprotective activity against amyloid-beta insults. Here the question investigated is if humanin could interact directly with Zn(II). It is shown that Zn(II) and its substitutes Cd(II)/Co(II) bind to humanin via a thiolate bond from the side chain of the single cysteine at position 8. The low intensity of the d-d bands of Co(II)-humanin indicated an octahedral coordination geometry. Titration experiments suggest that Zn(II) binds to humanin with an apparent affinity in the low muM range. This apparent Zn-binding affinity is in the same order as for amyloid-beta and glutathione and could thus be of physiological relevance.

  19. Species-Specific Peptide Ligands for the Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David D.; Benedek, Orsolya; Turnbough, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Currently available detectors for spores of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, are inadequate for frontline use and general monitoring. There is a critical need for simple, rugged, and inexpensive detectors capable of accurate and direct identification of B. anthracis spores. Necessary components in such detectors are stable ligands that bind tightly and specifically to target spores. By screening a phage display peptide library, we identified a family of peptides, with the consensus sequence TYPXPXR, that bind selectively to B. anthracis spores. We extended this work by identifying a peptide variant, ATYPLPIR, with enhanced ability to bind to B. anthracis spores and an additional peptide, SLLPGLP, that preferentially binds to spores of species phylogenetically similar to, but distinct from, B. anthracis. These two peptides were used in tandem in simple assays to rapidly and unambiguously identify B. anthracis spores. We envision that these peptides can be used as sensors in economical and portable B. anthracis spore detectors that are essentially free of false-positive signals due to other environmental Bacillus spores. PMID:14532093

  20. Synthetic peptides from Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) specifically interacting with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, J; Rodríguez, L; Vera, R; Puentes, A; Curtidor, H; Cortés, J; Rosas, J; Patarroyo, M E

    2006-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is expressed during both the sporozoite and merozoite stage of the parasite's life cycle. The role placed by AMA-1 during sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes has not been made sufficiently clear to date. Identifying the sequences involved in binding to hepatocytes is an important step towards understanding the structural basis for sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction. Binding assays between P. falciparum AMA-1 peptides and HepG2 cell were performed in this study to identify possible AMA-1 functional regions. Four AMA-1 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to hepatocytes: 4310 ((74)QHAYPIDHEGAEPAPQEQNL(93)), 4316 ((194)TLDEMRHFYKDNKYVKNLDE(213)), 4321 ((294)VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFGY(313)) and 4332 ((514)AEVTSNNEVVVKEEYKDEYA(533)). Their binding to these cells became saturable and resistant to treatment with neuraminidase. Most of these peptides were located in AMA-1 domains I and III, these being target regions for protective antibody responses. These peptides interacted with 36 and 58 kDa proteins on the erythrocyte surface. Some of the peptides were found in exposed regions of the AMA-1 protein, thereby facilitating their interaction with host cells. It is thus probable that AMA-1 regions defined by the four peptides mentioned above are involved in sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction.

  1. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  2. Non-ionic detergents facilitate non-specific binding of M13 bacteriophage to polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Abdulrahim R; Ball, Jonathan K; Tarr, Alexander W

    2015-09-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are widely used for identifying peptide interactions with proteins and other substrates. Selection of peptide ligands involves iterative rounds of affinity enrichment. The binding properties of the selected phage clones are routinely tested using immunoassay after propagation to high titre in a bacterial host and precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and high salt concentration. These immunoassays can suffer from low sensitivity and high background signals. Polysorbate 20 (Tween(®) 20) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used in immunoassay washing buffers to reduce non-specific binding, and is also used as a blocking reagent. We have observed that Tween 20 enhances non-specific M13 library phage binding in a peptide-independent manner. Other non-ionic detergents were also found to promote significant, dose-dependent non-specific phage binding in ELISA. This effect was not observed for assays using phage concentrated by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that interactions occur between detergents and the PEG-precipitated phage, irrespective of the displayed peptide motif. This artefact may impact on successful affinity selection of peptides from phage-display libraries. We propose alternative methods for screening phage libraries for identifying binding interactions with target ligands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fibronectin peptides that bind PDGF-BB enhance survival of cells and tissue under stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fubao; Zhu, Jia; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Taira, Breena R.; McClain, Steve A.; Singer, Adam J.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Stressors after injury from a multitude of factors can lead to cell death. We have identified four fibronectin (FN) peptides, two from the first FN type III repeat (FNIII1), one from the 13th FN type III repeat (FNIII13), and one from FN variable region (IIICS), that when tethered to a surface acted as platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) enhancers to promote cell survival. One of the FNIII1 peptides and its smallest (14mer) bioactive form (P12) were also active in solution. Specifically, P12 bound PDGF-BB (KD = 200nM), enhanced adult human dermal fibroblast (AHDF) survival under serum starvation, oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors, and limited burn injury progression in a rat hot comb model. Furthermore, P12 inhibited ER stress-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Although many growth factors have been found to bind FN directly or indirectly, this is the first report to identify peptide sequences of growth factor-binding sites in FN. The finding of these novel peptides further delineated how the extracellular matrix protein FN can support cell survival. Since the peptide P12 is active in either soluble form or tethered to a substrate, it will have multifactorial uses as a bioactive in tissue engineering. PMID:24126844

  4. Interaction of the Heparin-Binding Consensus Sequence of β-Amyloid Peptides with Heparin and Heparin-Derived Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2016-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the AD brain. Comprised primarily of the 40- and 42-residue β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, there is evidence that the heparan sulfate (HS) of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) plays a role in amyloid plaque formation and stability; however, details of the interaction of Aβ peptides with HS are not known. We have characterized the interaction of heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides with a model peptide for the heparin- and HS-binding domain of Aβ peptides (Ac-VHHQKLV-NH2; Aβ(12-18)), with mutants of Aβ(12-18), and with additional histidine-containing peptides. The nature of the binding interaction was characterized by NMR, binding constants and other thermodynamic parameters were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and relative binding affinities were determined by heparin affinity chromatography. The binding of Aβ(12-18) by heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides is pH-dependent, with the imidazolium groups of the histidine side chains interacting site-specifically within a cleft created by a trisaccharide sequence of heparin, the binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant entropic contribution to the binding free energy as a result of displacement of Na(+) ions from heparin upon binding of cationic Aβ(12-18). The binding constant decreases as the size of the heparin-derived oligosaccharide decreases and as the concentration of Na(+) ion in the bulk solution increases. Structure-binding relationships characterized in this study are analyzed and discussed in terms of the counterion condensation theory of the binding of cationic peptides by anionic polyelectrolytes.

  5. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  6. In vivo imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma using a glypican-3-binding peptide based probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Han, Zhihao; Zhang, Wancun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a heparin sulfate proteoglycan linked to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI) and is expressed by 75% of all hepatocellular carcinomas but undetectable in healthy liver tissue or liver with focal lesions. What's more, GPC3 has been gradually applied in clinical applications as a specific indicator for the early detection and prognosis of HCC. As GPC3 can also regulate many pathways in HCC pathogenesis including Wnt, Hh and Yap signaling, it has been shown that GPC3 knockdown can inhibit HCC growth, reinforcing the important roles of GPC3 in HCC development. For HCC early detection, we designed a peptide targeting GPC3 that allows to establish a fluorescent dyes-labeled probe. Firstly, according to the structure of the GPC3 antibody GC33 and the positive peptide reported in the literature, we generated a peptide consisting of twelve amino acids named 12P that may bind to GPC3 with tight binding ability and specificity. In vitro testing, we utilized FCM and laser confocal microscopy to verify its specificity of targeting to the high expression cells of GPC3. What's more, we linked 12P with a near infrared dye to verify its in vivo targeting ability. All results indicated that 12P possessed potent binding capacity which could be used as a targeting module in GPC3 detection probe.

  7. ARSENITE BINDING TO SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES: THE EFFECT OF INCREASING LENGTH BETWEEN TWO CYSTEINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binding of trivalent arsenicals to peptides and proteins can alter peptide/protein structure and enzyme function and thereby contribute to arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. We utilized radioactive 73As- labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the bindi...

  8. ARSENITE BINDING TO SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES: THE EFFECT OF INCREASING LENGTH BETWEEN TWO CYSTEINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binding of trivalent arsenicals to peptides and proteins can alter peptide/protein structure and enzyme function and thereby contribute to arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. We utilized radioactive 73As- labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the bindi...

  9. PSSMHCpan: a novel PSSM-based software for predicting class I peptide-HLA binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Geng; Li, Dongli; Li, Zhang; Qiu, Si; Li, Wenhui; Chao, Cheng-chi; Yang, Naibo; Li, Handong; Cheng, Zhen; Song, Xin; Cheng, Le; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Predicting peptide binding affinity with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is a crucial step in developing powerful antitumor vaccine for cancer immunotherapy. Currently available methods work quite well in predicting peptide binding affinity with HLA alleles such as HLA-A*0201, HLA-A*0101, and HLA-B*0702 in terms of sensitivity and specificity. However, quite a few types of HLA alleles that are present in the majority of human populations including HLA-A*0202, HLA-A*0203, HLA-A*6802, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*5301, HLA-B*5401, and HLA-B*5701 still cannot be predicted with satisfactory accuracy using currently available methods. Furthermore, currently the most popularly used methods for predicting peptide binding affinity are inefficient in identifying neoantigens from a large quantity of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing data. Here we present a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM)-based software called PSSMHCpan to accurately and efficiently predict peptide binding affinity with a broad coverage of HLA class I alleles. We evaluated the performance of PSSMHCpan by analyzing 10-fold cross-validation on a training database containing 87 HLA alleles and obtained an average area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.94 and accuracy (ACC) of 0.85. In an independent dataset (Peptide Database of Cancer Immunity) evaluation, PSSMHCpan is substantially better than the popularly used NetMHC-4.0, NetMHCpan-3.0, PickPocket, Nebula, and SMM with a sensitivity of 0.90, as compared to 0.74, 0.81, 0.77, 0.24, and 0.79. In addition, PSSMHCpan is more than 197 times faster than NetMHC-4.0, NetMHCpan-3.0, PickPocket, sNebula, and SMM when predicting neoantigens from 661 263 peptides from a breast tumor sample. Finally, we built a neoantigen prediction pipeline and identified 117 017 neoantigens from 467 cancer samples of various cancers from TCGA. PSSMHCpan is superior to the currently available methods in predicting peptide binding affinity with a

  10. Hierarchy of simulation models in predicting molecular recognition mechanisms from the binding energy landscapes: structural analysis of the peptide complexes with SH2 domains.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M; Bouzida, D; Gehlhaar, D K; Rejto, P A; Schaffer, L; Arthurs, S; Colson, A B; Freer, S T; Larson, V; Luty, B A; Marrone, T; Rose, P W

    2001-12-01

    Computer simulations using the simplified energy function and simulated tempering dynamics have accurately determined the native structure of the pYVPML, SVLpYTAVQPNE, and SPGEpYVNIEF peptides in the complexes with SH2 domains. Structural and equilibrium aspects of the peptide binding with SH2 domains have been studied by generating temperature-dependent binding free energy landscapes. Once some native peptide-SH2 domain contacts are constrained, the underlying binding free energy profile has the funnel-like shape that leads to a rapid and consistent acquisition of the native structure. The dominant native topology of the peptide-SH2 domain complexes represents an extended peptide conformation with strong specific interactions in the phosphotyrosine pocket and hydrophobic interactions of the peptide residues C-terminal to the pTyr group. The topological features of the peptide-protein interface are primarily determined by the thermodynamically stable phosphotyrosyl group. A diversity of structurally different binding orientations has been observed for the amino-terminal residues to the phosphotyrosine. The dominant native topology for the peptide residues carboxy-terminal to the phosphotyrosine is tolerant to flexibility in this region of the peptide-SH2 domain interface observed in equilibrium simulations. The energy landscape analysis has revealed a broad, entropically favorable topology of the native binding mode for the bound peptides, which is robust to structural perturbations. This could provide an additional positive mechanism underlying tolerance of the SH2 domains to hydrophobic conservative substitutions in the peptide specificity region.

  11. Identification of peptide motif that binds to the surface of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A zirconia-binding peptide motif was identified using a peptide phage display system. Yttria stabilized zirconia beads and discs were used as the target. Quartz crystal microbalance was used to monitor the binding of phages to zirconia. Starting from a library of phages displaying random sequences of 12-mer peptides, we repeated cycles of biopanning against zirconia beads. After four cycles of biopanning, we isolated a phage clone Φ#17. DNA sequencing of the corresponding portion of Φ#17 unexpectedly revealed that it displayed a 58-mer peptide (amino acid sequence: WMPSDVDINDPQGGGSRPNLHQPKPAAEAASKKKSENRKVPFYSHSWY-SSMSEDKRGW). We found that Φ#17 had a 300-fold, significantly higher binding affinity for zirconia discs than phages displaying no peptide. In quartz crystal microbalance assay, a rapid increase in energy dissipation was observed from Φ#17 but not from the control phages, indicating that Φ#17 binds to the surface of zirconia via its displayed peptide. We successfully identified a peptide motif that binds zirconia.

  12. Promiscuous binding of invariant chain-derived CLIP peptide to distinct HLA-I molecules revealed in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    van Luijn, Marvin M; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Lampen, Margit H; van Veelen, Peter A; Zevenbergen, Adri; Kester, Michel G D; de Ru, Arnoud H; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van Hall, Thorbald; van Ham, S Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Antigen presentation by HLA class I (HLA-I) and HLA class II (HLA-II) complexes is achieved by proteins that are specific for their respective processing pathway. The invariant chain (Ii)-derived peptide CLIP is required for HLA-II-mediated antigen presentation by stabilizing HLA-II molecules before antigen loading through transient and promiscuous binding to different HLA-II peptide grooves. Here, we demonstrate alternative binding of CLIP to surface HLA-I molecules on leukemic cells. In HLA-II-negative AML cells, we found plasma membrane display of the CLIP peptide. Silencing Ii in AML cells resulted in reduced HLA-I cell surface display, which indicated a direct role of CLIP in the HLA-I antigen presentation pathway. In HLA-I-specific peptide eluates from B-LCLs, five Ii-derived peptides were identified, of which two were from the CLIP region. In vitro peptide binding assays strikingly revealed that the eluted CLIP peptide RMATPLLMQALPM efficiently bound to four distinct HLA-I supertypes (-A2, -B7, -A3, -B40). Furthermore, shorter length variants of this CLIP peptide also bound to these four supertypes, although in silico algorithms only predicted binding to HLA-A2 or -B7. Immunization of HLA-A2 transgenic mice with these peptides did not induce CTL responses. Together these data show a remarkable promiscuity of CLIP for binding to a wide variety of HLA-I molecules. The found participation of CLIP in the HLA-I antigen presentation pathway could reflect an aberrant mechanism in leukemic cells, but might also lead to elucidation of novel processing pathways or immune escape mechanisms.

  13. Attaching the phage display-selected GLA peptide to liposomes: factors influencing target binding.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Inge; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2012-02-14

    In our previous study, phage display selections were performed by in situ perfusion of a random peptide library through a mouse brain. This yielded two peptides (GLA and GYR) that showed significant binding to human brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) when displayed on phage particles, but not to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, these peptides were produced synthetically and coupled to liposomes to investigate the capacity of the peptides to act as ligands for targeting to hCMEC/D3 cells. Flow cytometry studies showed that these peptides when coupled to liposomes showed weak binding to the target brain endothelial cells. We hypothesized that the weak endothelial cell binding of the selected peptides when coupled to liposomes as compared to the binding of the peptides displayed on phage particles may be ascribed to: change of vehicle shape, change of peptide density, or change of peptide conformation. Peptide density on the liposomes influenced binding of the liposomes to the cells, however, this effect was minor. To study the influence of the peptide conformation, the GLA peptide was recombinantly produced fused to the N1-N2 domains of the phage p3 minor coat protein (p3-GLA) to mimic its conformation when displayed on phage particles. Binding of liposomes modified with either the GLA peptide or the p3-GLA protein to hCMEC/D3 cells was studied, and the p3-GLA-liposomes showed a higher binding to the cells compared to the GLA-liposomes. The experiments demonstrate that bringing the GLA peptide into the original phage protein environment restores and improves the peptide binding capacity and suggest that the GLA peptide, with some modifications, may be used as a brain-targeting ligand in the future.

  14. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; Mcdougal, Owen M.

    2017-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  15. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  16. Determinants of BH3 Binding Specificity for Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x[subscript L

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T. Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-25

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Prosurvival members of the family interact with proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2-homology-3)-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the {alpha}-helical BH3 region of the proapoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the prosurvival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding prosurvival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work, we used two complementary techniques - yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis - to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-x{sub L} versus Mcl-1, two prominent prosurvival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-x{sub L} selectively or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1-selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-2, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-x{sub L}-selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x{sub L} binders.

  17. Determinants of BH3 binding specificity for Mcl-1 vs. Bcl-xL

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T. Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Pro-survival members of the family interact with pro-apoptotic BH3-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the alpha-helical BH3 region of the pro-apoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the pro-survival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding pro-survival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work we used two complementary techniques, yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis, to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-xL vs. Mcl-1, two prominent pro-survival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-xL selectively, or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1 selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-xL selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 vs. Bcl-xL binders. PMID:20363230

  18. Baculoviral capsid display of His-tagged ZnO inorganic binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lei; Liu, Yingying

    2010-01-01

    Virus-templated fabrication of compound structures can be made through incorporating the specifically inorganic-binding peptide into the viral scaffold, widely used is phage display system. Compared to prokaryotic phages, insect cell-based baculovirus has some strengths such as the adaptability to the proteins’ posttranslational modification and non-replication in mammalian cells. As an attempt to explore the baculovirus-mediated bioconjugates, we show in this study that a genetically engineered baculovirus, with a hexahistidine (His6) tagged ZnO binding peptide fused to the N-terminus of the viral capsid protein vp39 of AcNPV, was constructed. It maintains both the viral infectivity and the fusion protein’s activity. The presence of the fusion protein on the baculovirus particle was demonstrated by western blot analysis of purified budded virus. Its display on the virus capsid was revealed by virus fractionation analysis. The binding of nanosized ZnO powders to the virus capsid was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is the first report of the display of the inorganic-binding peptide on the capsid of eukaryotic baculovirus. Aimed at the nanomaterials’ application in the biological field, this research could find useful in the biotracking of the baculovirus transduction process and the preparation of novel functional nanodevices. PMID:20407822

  19. Peptide binding identifies an ERalpha conformation that generates selective activity in multiple in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher J; Osburn, Deborah L; Schmitz, Katherine; Giampa, Leslie; Mong, Shau-Ming; Marschke, Keith; Seidel, H Martin; Rosen, Jonathan; Negro-Vilar, Andrés

    2005-09-01

    Drugs such as tamoxifen, which act at the estrogen receptor (ER), have very different in vitro and in vivo effects from those of the native hormone. Previous research has established that different ligands induce distinct conformational changes in the ER, thus affecting the interactions of the receptor with cell-specific co-activating or co-repressing proteins (cofactors) and estrogen response elements (EREs), thus potentially driving differing biological effects. Affinity-selected peptides have been used to probe the conformational changes that occur within the ER upon binding various ligands. In this study, the authors characterize the ability of several peptides to be recruited to liganded ER under cellular conditions. Approximating ER conformation via recruitment of this peptide to the ER is concluded to be a better predictor of the agonist nature of an ER ligand under these different cellular contexts than is a canonical cotransfection transactivation assay.

  20. A novel phage-library-selected peptide inhibits human TNF-α binding to its receptors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Lelli, Barbara; Scali, Silvia; Falciani, Chiara; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2014-06-03

    We report the identification of a new human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) specific peptide selected by competitive panning of a phage library. Competitive elution of phages was obtained using the monoclonal antibody adalimumab, which neutralizes pro-inflammatory processes caused by over-production of TNF-α in vivo, and is used to treat severe symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The selected peptide was synthesized in monomeric and branched form and analyzed for binding to TNF-α and competition with adalimumab and TNF-α receptors. Results of competition with TNF-α receptors in surface plasmon resonance and melanoma cells expressing both TNF receptors make the peptide a candidate compound for the development of a novel anti-TNF-α drug.

  1. Identification of MHC class II restricted T-cell-mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila T; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune; Larsen, Mette V; Dziegiel, Morten H; Lewinsohn, David M; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide-based vaccines. In the present work, bioinformatics technology was employed to predict binding motifs of 9mer peptides derived from M. tuberculosis for the 12 HLA-I supertypes. Subsequently, the predicted peptides were synthesized and assayed for binding to HLA-I molecules in a biochemically based system. The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA-I molecules of K(D) ≤ 500 nM were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T-cell responses. As judged from blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan-HLA class II and anti-HLA-DR antibodies. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell depletion before the 10 days of expansion, resulted in total loss of reactivity in the ELISPOT culture for most peptide specificities. FACS analyses with intracellular interferon-γ staining of T cells expanded in the presence of M. tuberculosis peptides confirmed that the responsive cells were indeed CD4(+). In conclusion, T-cell immunity against HLA-I binding 9mer M. tuberculosis-derived peptides might in many cases turn out to be mediated by CD4(+) T cells and restricted by HLA-II molecules. The use of 9mer peptides recognized by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells might be of importance for the development of future M. tuberculosis peptide-based vaccines.

  2. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  3. Structure of Calmodulin Bound to a Calcineurin Peptide: A New Way of Making an Old Binding Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ye,Q.; Li, X.; Wong, A.; Wei, Q.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Calcineurin is a calmodulin-binding protein in brain and the only serine/threonine protein phosphatase under the control of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM), which plays a critical role in coupling Ca{sup 2+} signals to cellular responses. CaM up-regulates the phosphatase activity of calcineurin by binding to the CaM-binding domain (CBD) of calcineurin subunit A. Here, we report crystal structural studies of CaM bound to a CBD peptide. The chimeric protein containing CaM and the CBD peptide forms an intimate homodimer, in which CaM displays a native-like extended conformation and the CBD peptide shows -helical structure. Unexpectedly, the N-terminal lobe from one CaM and the C-terminal lobe from the second molecule form a combined binding site to trap the peptide. Thus, the dimer provides two binding sites, each of which is reminiscent of the fully collapsed conformation of CaM commonly observed in complex with, for example, the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) peptide. The interaction between the peptide and CaM is highly specific and similar to MLCK.

  4. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  5. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaloki, M.; Vitalyos, G.; Harfalvi, J.; Hegedus, Cs

    2013-12-01

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated.

  6. Biomaterials functionalization using a novel peptide that selectively binds to a conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, Archit B.; Miller, Kiley P.-H.; Belcher, Angela M.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2005-06-01

    The goal in biomaterial surface modification is to retain a material's bulk properties while modifying only its surface to possess desired recognition and specificity. Here we develop a unique strategy for surface functionalization of an electrically conductive polymer, chlorine-doped polypyrrole (PPyCl), which has been widely researched for various electronic and biomedical applications. An M13 bacteriophage library was used to screen 109 different 12-mer peptide inserts against PPyCl. A binding phage (ϕT59) was isolated, and its binding stability and specificity to PPyCl was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and titer count analysis. The relative binding strength and mechanism of the corresponding 12-mer peptide and its variants was studied using atomic force microscopy and fluorescamine assays. Further, the T59 peptide was joined to a cell adhesive sequence and used to promote cell attachment on PPyCl. This strategy can be extended to immobilize a variety of molecules to PPyCl for numerous applications. In addition, phage display can be applied to other polymers to develop bioactive materials without altering their bulk properties.

  7. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  8. A peptide isolated from phage display libraries is a structural and functional mimic of an RGD-binding site on integrins

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Many integrins recognize short RGD-containing amino acid sequences and such peptide sequences can be identified from phage libraries by panning with an integrin. Here, in a reverse strategy, we have used such libraries to isolate minimal receptor sequences that bind to fibronectin and RGD-containing fibronectin fragments in affinity panning. A predominant cyclic motif, *CWDDG/LWLC*, was obtained (the asterisks denote a potential disulfide bond). Studies using the purified phage and the corresponding synthetic cyclic peptides showed that *CWDDGWLC*-expressing phage binds specifically to fibronectin and to fibronectin fragments containing the RGD sequence. The binding did not require divalent cations and was inhibited by both RGD and *CWDDGWLC*-containing synthetic peptides. Conversely, RGD-expressing phage attached specifically to immobilized *CWDDGWLC*-peptide and the binding could be blocked by the respective synthetic peptides in solution. Moreover, fibronectin bound to a *CWDDGWLC*-peptide affinity column, and could be eluted with an RGD-containing peptide. The *CWDDGWLC*-peptide inhibited RGD-dependent cell attachment to fibronectin and vitronectin, but not to collagen. A region of the beta subunit of RGD-binding integrins that has been previously demonstrated to be involved in ligand binding includes a polypeptide stretch, KDDLW (in beta 3) similar to WDDG/LWL. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region in beta 3 were found to bind RGD-displaying phage and conversion of its two aspartic residues into alanines greatly reduced the RGD binding. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the *CWDDGWLC*- peptide recognized beta 1 and beta 3 in immunoblots. These data indicate that the *CWDDGWLC*-peptide is a functional mimic of ligand binding sites of RGD-directed integrins, and that the structurally similar site in the integrin beta subunit is a binding site for RGD. PMID:7657703

  9. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  10. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells.

  11. Novel Peptide-specific QSAR Analysis Applied to Collagen IV Peptides with Antiangiogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Corban G.; Rosca, Elena V.; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Bader, Joel S.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from existing vasculature. Excessive vascularization is associated with a number of diseases including cancer. Anti-angiogenic therapies have the potential to stunt cancer progression. Peptides derived from type IV collagen are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. We wanted to gain a better understanding of collagen IV structure-activity relationships using a ligand-based approach. We developed novel peptide-specific QSAR models to study the activity of the peptides in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion inhibition assays. We found that the models produced quantitatively accurate predictions of activity and provided insight into collagen IV derived peptide structure-activity relationships. PMID:21866962

  12. Enhancing In Silico Protein-Based Vaccine Discovery for Eukaryotic Pathogens Using Predicted Peptide-MHC Binding and Peptide Conservation Scores

    PubMed Central

    Goodswen, Stephen J.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Ellis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein’s potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response–one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine

  13. Enhancing in silico protein-based vaccine discovery for eukaryotic pathogens using predicted peptide-MHC binding and peptide conservation scores.

    PubMed

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein's potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response-one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine discovery

  14. Discovery of pan-VEGF inhibitory peptides directed to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the VEGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Redondo, Alexandre R.; Magalhães, Leila S.; Cambui, Caio C.; Giordano, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key molecules in numerous cellular processes, the inhibitors of which play an important role in the clinic. Among them are the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members and their receptors (VEGFR), which are essential in the formation of new blood vessels by angiogenesis. Anti-VEGF therapy has already shown promising results in oncology and ophthalmology, but one of the challenges in the field is the design of specific small-molecule inhibitors for these receptors. We show the identification and characterization of small 6-mer peptides that target the extracellular ligand-binding domain of all three VEGF receptors. These peptides specifically prevent the binding of VEGF family members to all three receptors and downstream signaling but do not affect other angiogenic RTKs and their ligands. One of the selected peptides was also very effective at preventing pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of retinopathy, normalizing the vasculature to levels similar to those of a normal developing retina. Collectively, our results suggest that these peptides are pan-VEGF inhibitors directed at a common binding pocket shared by all three VEGFRs. These peptides and the druggable binding site they target might be important for the development of novel and selective small-molecule, extracellular ligand-binding inhibitors of RTKs (eTKIs) for angiogenic-dependent diseases. PMID:27819042

  15. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  16. Designing new surfactant peptides for binding to carbon nanotubes via computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Mahnam, Karim

    2017-03-14

    The non-covalent interaction between single-walled carbon nanotube and surfactant peptides makes them soluble in biological media to be used in nano-medicine, drug delivery and gene therapy. Pervious study has shown that two important parameters in binding peptides into nanotubes are hydrophobic effect and the number of aromatic amino acids. Ten surfactant peptides with the length of eight residue, including Lys, Trp, Tyr, Phe and Val, were designed to investigate the important parameters in binding peptides to a (6, 6) carbon nanotube. 500ns MD simulation was performed for free surfactant peptides in water or near to a nanotube. Our results have indicated that the binding affinity of peptides to nanotube increases with the increase of aromatic residue content. Also, among aromatic residues, the peptides containing Trp residues have higher binding affinity to nanotube compared to the peptides with Phe or Tyr residue. Steric hindrance between bulky aromatic residues in peptide sequence has negative influence in binding peptide to nanotube, and in designing a surfactant peptide, the number and distance of aromatic residue and polarity of them should be taken into account. Our results also show that in docking peptides to nanotube, full-flexible docking leads to incorrect results.

  17. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells.

    PubMed

    Rayner, D C; Orr, F W; Shiu, R P

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, we evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-[3H]P in Hanks' balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-[3H]P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP. In whole cells, displacement curves demonstrated a Kd of 1.9 +/- 0.1 X 10(-7) M, whereas in homogenates there was a background of low affinity (Kd greater than 10(-5) M) nonsaturable binding, but also a high-affinity component with Kd of 4.9 +/- 1.8 X 10(-8) M. Both chemotaxis and binding were inhibited by the oligopeptide, N-carbobenzoxy-L-phenylalanyl-L-methionine, which is a competitive inhibitor of formyl peptide

  18. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms.

  19. Inhibition of LtxA Toxicity by Blocking Cholesterol Binding With Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Koufos, Evan; Balashova, Nataliya; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of 334LEEYSKR340, in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC336 motif of LtxA (CRAC336WT). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of RTX-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  20. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  1. Thermodynamic Characterization of the Folding Coupled DNA Binding by the Monomeric Transcription Activator GCN4 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Cao, Wei; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2003-01-01

    Dimerization is a widely believed critical requirement for the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 specifically recognizing its DNA target sites. Nonetheless, the binding of the monomeric GCN4 to DNA target sites AP-1 and ATF/CREB was recently detected by kinetic studies. Here, for the first time, we present a detailed description of the thermodynamics of a monomeric peptide GCN4-br, the basic region (226–252) of GCN4, binding to AP-1, and ATF/CREB. GCN4 specifically binds to AP-1 and ATF/CREB in the monomeric form as shown by our circular dichroism thermal unfolding measurements. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the binding process of GCN4-br with DNA is enthalpically driven, accompanied by an unfavorable entropy change. The temperature dependence of ΔH0 reveals negative changes in heat capacity ΔCp: ΔCp = −0.92 kJ · mol−1 K−1 and ΔCp = −0.95 kJ · mol−1 K−1 for GCN4-br binding to AP-1 and ATF/CREB, respectively, which is a striking manifestation of GCN4-br specifically recognizing DNA target sites. These thermodynamic characteristics may give new insight into the mechanism by which GCN4 protein binds to DNA target sites for its transcriptional regulation. PMID:12609888

  2. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC-I complex stability; a correlate of T cell immunogenicity1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anne Bregnballe; Nielsen, Ida Kallehauge; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of antigens to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally been quantified by the strength of the interaction, i.e. the binding affinity, yet it has been show that the stability of the peptide-MHC-I complex is a better correlate of immunogenicity compared to binding affinity. Here, we have experimentally analyzed peptide-MHC-I complex stability of a large panel of human MHC-I allotypes and generated a body of data sufficient to develop neural networks based pan-specific predictor of peptide-MHC-I complex stability. Integrating the neural networks predictors of peptide-MHC-I complex stability with state-of-the-art predictors of peptide-MHC-I binding is shown to significantly improve the prediction of CTL epitopes. The method is publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCstabpan. PMID:27402703

  3. Copper binding to prion octarepeat peptides, a combined metal chelate affinity and immunochemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Todorova-Balvay, Daniela; Simon, Stéphanie; Créminon, Christophe; Grassi, Jacques; Srikrishnan, Thamarapu; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2005-04-15

    Based on the hypothetical proposal of Sulkowski [E. Sulkowski, FEBS Lett. 307 (2) (1992) 129] for the implication of transition metal ions in the structural changes/oligomerisation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) resulting in the pathological isoform (PrPsc), we focused our study on the octarepat domain of this protein which has been supposed to be the metal binding site. We have studied the copper binding to synthetic prion octarepeat peptides (PHGGGWGQ)n (n=1, 3, 6) using metal chelate and size-exclusion modes of chromatographies. This copper binding induces oligomerisation resulting in multiple aggregates. Moreover, heterogeneity of metal bound octarepeat oligomers by ESI-MS has been demonstrated. In addition, anti prion antibodies specific to the octarepeat region were used to discriminate between metal free and copper, nickel and zinc bound hexamer octarepeat peptide. Differential recognition of Cu(II) and Zn(II) bound complexes has been observed which signify differences in exposed epitopes of aggregated peptides.

  4. A Tubulin Binding Peptide Targets Glioma Cells Disrupting Their Microtubules, Blocking Migration, and Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Peterson, Alan C; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment regimes, glioma remains a largely fatal disease. Current treatment limitations are attributed to the precarious locations within the brain where such tumors grow, their highly infiltrative nature precluding complete resection and lack of specificity among agents capable of attenuating their growth. Here, we show that in vitro, glioma cells of diverse origins internalize a peptide encompassing a tubulin-binding site (TBS) on the neurofilament light protein. The internalized peptide disrupts the microtubule network, inhibits migration and proliferation, and leads to apoptosis. Using an intracerebral transplant model, we show that most, if not all, of these responses to peptide exposure also occur in vivo. Notably, a single intratumor injection significantly attenuates tumor growth, while neither peptide uptake nor downstream consequences are observed elsewhere in the host nervous system. Such preferential uptake suggests that the peptide may have potential as a primary or supplementary glioblastoma treatment modality by exploiting its autonomous microtubule-disrupting activity or engaging its capacity to selectively target glioma cells with other cell-disrupting cargos. PMID:22491214

  5. Adsorption kinetics of an engineered gold binding Peptide by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Oren, Ersin Emre; Duman, Memed; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2006-08-29

    The adsorption kinetics of an engineered gold binding peptide on gold surface was studied by using both quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy systems. The gold binding peptide was originally selected as a 14-amino acid sequence by cell surface display and then engineered to have a 3-repeat form (3R-GBP1) with improved binding characteristics. Both sets of adsorption data for 3R-GBP1 were fit to Langmuir models to extract kinetics and thermodynamics parameters. In SPR, the adsorption onto the surface shows a biexponential behavior and this is explained as the effect of bimodal surface topology of the polycrystalline gold substrate on 3R-GBP1 binding. Depending on the concentration of the peptide, a preferential adsorption on the surface takes place with different energy levels. The kinetic parameters (e.g., K(eq) approximately 10(7) M(-1)) and the binding energy (approximately -8.0 kcal/mol) are comparable to synthetic-based self-assembled monolayers. The results demonstrate the potential utilization of genetically engineered inorganic surface-specific peptides as molecular substrates due to their binding specificity, stability, and functionality in an aqueous-based environment.

  6. Increased Peptide Contacts Govern High Affinity Binding of a Modified TCR Whilst Maintaining a Native pMHC Docking Mode.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Sami, Malkit; Scott, Daniel R; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Todorov, Penio T; Moysey, Ruth K; Jakobsen, Bent K; Boulter, Jonathan M; Baker, Brian M; Yi Li

    2013-01-01

    Natural T cell receptors (TCRs) generally bind to their cognate pMHC molecules with weak affinity and fast kinetics, limiting their use as therapeutic agents. Using phage display, we have engineered a high affinity version of the A6 wild-type TCR (A6wt), specific for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A(∗)0201) complexed with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 111-19 peptide (A2-Tax). Mutations in just 4 residues in the CDR3β loop region of the A6wt TCR were selected that improved binding to A2-Tax by nearly 1000-fold. Biophysical measurements of this mutant TCR (A6c134) demonstrated that the enhanced binding was derived through favorable enthalpy and a slower off-rate. The structure of the free A6c134 TCR and the A6c134/A2-Tax complex revealed a native binding mode, similar to the A6wt/A2-Tax complex. However, concordant with the more favorable binding enthalpy, the A6c134 TCR made increased contacts with the Tax peptide compared with the A6wt/A2-Tax complex, demonstrating a peptide-focused mechanism for the enhanced affinity that directly involved the mutated residues in the A6c134 TCR CDR3β loop. This peptide-focused enhanced TCR binding may represent an important approach for developing antigen specific high affinity TCR reagents for use in T cell based therapies.

  7. Quality specifications for peptide drugs: a regulatory-pharmaceutical approach.

    PubMed

    Vergote, Valentijn; Burvenich, Christian; Van de Wiele, Christophe; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2009-11-01

    Peptide drugs, as all types of pharmaceuticals, require adequate specifications (i.e. quality attributes, procedures and acceptance criteria) as part of their quality assurance to ensure the safety and efficacy of drug substances (i.e. active pharmaceutical ingredients) and drug products (i.e. finished pharmaceutical dosage forms). Compendial monographs are updated regularly to keep up with the most recent advances in peptide synthesis (e.g. reduced by-products) and analytical technology. Nevertheless, currently applied pharmacopoeial peptide specifications are barely harmonized yet (e.g. large differences between the European Pharmacopoeia and the United States Pharmacopeia), increasing the manufacturers' burden of performing analytical procedures in different ways, using different acceptance criteria. Additionally, the peptide monographs are not always consistent within a single pharmacopoeia. In this review, we highlight the main differences and similarities in compendial peptide specifications (including identification, purity and assay). Based on comparison, and together with additional information from peptide drug substance manufacturers and public evaluation reports on registration files of non-pharmacopoeial peptide drugs, a consistent monograph structure is proposed.

  8. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules bind natural peptide ligands lacking the amino-terminal binding residue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yague, J; Marina, A; Vazquez, J; Lopez De Castro, J A

    2001-11-23

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-peptide complexes are stabilized by multiple interactions, including those of the peptidic NH(2)-terminal group in the A pocket of the MHC molecule. In this study, the characterization of four natural HLA-B39 ligands lacking the amino-terminal binding residue is reported. These peptides were found in the endogenous peptide pool of one or more of the B*3901, B*3905, and B*3909 allotypes and sequenced by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Control experiments ruled out that they resulted from exopeptidase trimming of their NH(2)-terminally extended counterparts: NAc-SHVAVENAL, EHGPNPIL, IHEPEPHIL, and EHAGVISVL, also present in the same peptide pools, during purification. HAGVISVL and HVAVENAL behaved similarly to the corresponding NH(2)-terminally extended peptides in their binding to B*3901 and B*3909 at the cell surface in vitro, and in cell surface stabilization of B*3901. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that peptides lacking the amino-terminal binding residue bind in vivo to classical MHC class I molecules. The results indicate that canonical MHC-peptide interactions in the A pocket are not always necessary for endogenous peptide presentation.

  9. Identification of lanthanum-specific peptides for future recycling of rare earth elements from compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Franziska L; Curtis, Susan B; Bachmann, Stefanie; Dunbar, W Scott; MacGillivray, Ross T A

    2017-05-01

    As components of electronic scrap, rare earth minerals are an interesting but little used source of raw materials that are highly important for the recycling industry. Currently, there exists no cost-efficient technology to separate rare earth minerals from an electronic scrap mixture. In this study, phage surface display has been used as a key method to develop peptides with high specificity for particular inorganic targets in electronic scrap. Lanthanum phosphate doped with cerium and terbium as part of the fluorescent phosphors of spent compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) was used as a target material of economic interest to test the suitability of the phage display method to the separation of rare earth minerals. One random pVIII phage library was screened for peptide sequences that bind specifically to the fluorescent phosphor LaPO4 :Ce(3+) ,Tb(3+) (LAP). The library contained at least 100 binding pVIII peptides per phage particle with a diversity of 1 × 10(9) different phage per library. After three rounds of enrichment, a phage clone containing the surface peptide loop RCQYPLCS was found to bind specifically to LAP. Specificity and affinity of the identified phage bound peptide was confirmed by using binding and competition assays, immunofluorescence assays, and zeta potential measurements. Binding and immunofluorescence assays identified the peptide's affinity for the fluorescent phosphor components CAT (CeMgAl11 O19 :Tb(3+) ) and BAM (BaMgAl10 O17 :Eu(2+) ). No affinity was found for other fluorescent phosphor components such as YOX (Y2 O3 :Eu(3+) ). The binding specificity of the RCQYPLCS peptide loop was improved 3-51-fold by using alanine scanning mutagenesis. The identification of peptides with high specificity and affinity for special components in the fluorescent phosphor in CFLs provides a potentially new strategic approach to rare earth recycling. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1016-1024. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of fibronectin binding and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion to collagen by a peptide from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The platelet and extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin interacts with various types of cells as both a positive and negative modulator of cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation. These effects may be mediated by binding of thrombospondin to cell surface receptors or indirectly by binding to other extracellular matrix components. The role of peptide sequences from the type I repeats of thrombospondin in its interaction with fibronectin were investigated. Fibronectin bound specifically to the peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin but not to the corresponding peptides from the first or third repeats or flanking sequences from the second repeat. The two Trp residues and the His residue were essential for binding, and the two Gly residues enhanced the affinity of binding. Binding of the peptide and intact thrombospondin to fibronectin were inhibited by the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin. The peptide specifically inhibited binding of fibronectin to gelatin or type I collagen and inhibited fibronectin-mediated adhesion of breast carcinoma and melanoma cells to gelatin or type I collagen substrates but not direct adhesion of the cells to fibronectin, which was inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. Thus, the fibronectin- binding thrombospondin peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp is a selective inhibitor of fibronectin-mediated interactions of cells with collagen in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8468356

  12. Characterization of the Escherichia coli SecA Signal Peptide-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Lorry M.; Michtavy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    SecA signal peptide interaction is critical for initiating protein translocation in the bacterial Sec-dependent pathway. Here, we have utilized the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Förster resonance energy transfer studies that mapped the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding site to design and isolate signal peptide-binding-defective secA mutants. Biochemical characterization of the mutant SecA proteins showed that Ser226, Val310, Ile789, Glu806, and Phe808 are important for signal peptide binding. A genetic system utilizing alkaline phosphatase secretion driven by different signal peptides was employed to demonstrate that both the PhoA and LamB signal peptides appear to recognize a common set of residues at the SecA signal peptide-binding site. A similar system containing either SecA-dependent or signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent signal peptides along with the prlA suppressor mutation that is defective in signal peptide proofreading activity were employed to distinguish between SecA residues that are utilized more exclusively for signal peptide recognition or those that also participate in the proofreading and translocation functions of SecA. Collectively, our data allowed us to propose a model for the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding site that is more consistent with recent structural insights into this protein translocation system. PMID:22056930

  13. Relative free energy of binding between antimicrobial peptides and SDS or DPC micelles

    PubMed Central

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2010-01-01

    We present relative binding free energy calculations for six antimicrobial peptide–micelle systems, three peptides interacting with two types of micelles. The peptides are the scorpion derived antimicrobial peptide (AMP), IsCT and two of its analogues. The micelles are dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles. The interfacial electrostatic properties of DPC and SDS micelles are assumed to be similar to those of zwitterionic mammalian and anionic bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively. We test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the anionic micelle SDS can provide information on peptide antimicrobial activity, since it is widely accepted that AMPs function by binding to and disrupting the predominantly anionic lipid bilayer of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We also test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the zwitterionic micelle DPC can provide information on peptide haemolytic activities, since it is accepted that they also bind to and disrupt the zwitterionic membrane of mammalian cells. Equilibrium structures of the peptides, micelles and peptide–micelle complexes are obtained from more than 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic cycle is introduced to compute the binding free energy from electrostatic, non-electrostatic and entropic contributions. We find relative binding free energy strengths between peptides and SDS to correlate with the experimentally measured rankings for peptide antimicrobial activities, and relative free energy binding strengths between peptides and DPC to correlate with the observed rankings for peptide haemolytic toxicities. These findings point to the importance of peptide–membrane binding strength for antimicrobial activity and haemolytic activity. PMID:21113423

  14. Construction of peptides with nucleobase amino acids: design and synthesis of the nucleobase-conjugated peptides derived from HIV-1 Rev and their binding properties to HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hamasaki, K; Ueno, A; Mihara, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to develop a novel molecule that recognizes a specific structure of RNA, we have attempted to design peptides having L-alpha-amino acids with a nucleobase at the side chain (nucleobase amino acid (NBA)), expecting that the function of a nucleobase which can specifically recognize a base in RNA is regulated in a peptide conformation. In this study, to demonstrate the applicability of the NBA units in the peptide to RNA recognition, we designed and synthesized a variety of NBA-conjugated peptides, derived from HIV-1 Rev. Circular dichroism study revealed that the conjugation of the Rev peptide with an NBA unit did not disturb the peptide conformation. RNA-binding affinities of the designed peptides with RRE IIB RNA were dependent on the structure of the nucleobase moieties in the peptides. The peptide having the cytosine NBA at the position of the Asn40 site in the Rev showed a higher binding ability for RRE IIB RNA, despite the diminishing the Asn40 function. Furthermore, the peptide having the guanine NBA at the position of the Arg44 site, which is the most important residue for the RNA binding in the Rev, bound to RRE IIB RNA in an ability similar to Rev34-50 with native sequence. These results demonstrate that an appropriate NBA unit in the peptide plays an important role in the RNA binding with a specific contact such as hydrogen bonding, and the interaction between the nucleobase in the peptide and the base in the RNA can enhance the RNA-binding affinity and specificity.

  15. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  16. Specific binding of phorbol ester tumor promoters

    PubMed Central

    Driedger, Paul E.; Blumberg, Peter M.

    1980-01-01

    [20-3H]Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate bound to particulate preparations from chicken embryo fibroblasts in a specific, saturable, reversible fashion. Equilibrium binding occurred with a Kd of 25 nM; this value is very close to the 50% effective dose (ED50), 50 nM, previously determined for the biological response (induction of fibronectin loss) in growing chicken embryo fibroblasts. At saturation, 1.4 pmol of [20-3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate was bound per mg of protein (approximately 7 × 104 molecules per cell). Binding was inhibited by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (Ki = 2 nM), mezerein (Ki = 180 nM), phorbol 12,13-dibenzoate (Ki = 180 nM), phorbol 12,13-diacetate (Ki = 1.7 μM), phorbol 12,13,20-triacetate (Ki = 39 μM), and phorbol 13-acetate (Ki = 120 μM). The measured Ki values are all within a factor of 3.5 of the ED50 values of these derivatives for inducing loss of fibronectin in intact cells. Binding was not inhibited by the inactive compounds phorbol (10 μg/ml) and 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (10 μg/ml) or by the inflammatory but nonpromoting phorbol-related diterpene esters resiniferatoxin (100 ng/ml) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-isobutyrate 20-acetate (100 ng/ml). These data suggest that biological responses to the phorbol esters in chicken embryo fibroblasts are mediated by this binding activity and that the binding activity corresponds to the phorbol ester target in mouse skin involved in tumor promotion. Binding was not inhibited by the nonphorbol promoters anthralin (1 μM), phenol (1 mM), iodoacetic acid (1.7 μM), and cantharidin (75 μM), or by epidermal growth factor (100 ng/ml), dexamethasone acetate (2 μM), retinoic acid (10 μM), or prostaglandin E2 (1 μM). These agents thus appear to act at a target distinct from that of the phorbol esters. PMID:6965793

  17. Screening specific polypeptides of breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Qi, Chun-Ling; Kong, Mian; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Lei; Li, Bao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify polypeptides that specifically bond to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random 12 peptide library, in addition to the affinity and specificity of polypeptides. A phage display random 12 peptide library was screened using breast cancer stem cells as targets isolated from the MDA-MB-231 cell line using the serum-free culture technique with hs578bst and MDA-MB-231 cells as subtract-screening cells. Positive and specific binding clones were amplified and sent for sequencing. The affinity and specificity of the positive clones were subsequently identified by ELISA and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine staining. The results demonstrated that phages were gathered ~500 times following three rounds of biopanning. ELISA identified that the affinity to breast cancer stem cells of the no. 6 phage was 6.14 times higher than that in the control group. In addition, immunohistochemistry observed that the no. 6 phage exhibited high-specificity bonding to breast cancer stem cells, and the peptide sequence of the positive phage was GYSASRSTIPGK following DNA sequencing and translation. Thus, the present study isolated a specific peptide that bonds to breast cancer stem cells from a phage display random peptide library, which may facilitate further studies regarding the stem cell-targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:28105180

  18. Investigating the Structural Variability and Binding Modes of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide on Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Yoann; Savarin, Philippe; Robert, Charles H; Takahashi, Masayuki; Eyer, Joel; Prevost, Chantal; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2015-06-16

    NFL-TBS.40-63 is a 24 amino acid peptide corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, which selectively enters glioblastoma cells, where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. We investigated its structural variability and binding modes on a tubulin heterodimer using a combination of NMR experiments, docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that, while lacking a stable structure, the peptide preferentially binds on a specific single site located near the β-tubulin C-terminal end, thus giving us precious hints regarding the mechanism of action of the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide's antimitotic activity at the molecular level.

  19. Pocketcheck: updating the HLA class I peptide specificity roadmap.

    PubMed

    Huyton, T; Ladas, N; Schumacher, H; Blasczyk, R; Bade-Doeding, C

    2012-09-01

    The structural determination of peptide:HLA (human leucocyte antigen) class I complexes by X-ray crystallography has provided valuable information for understanding how peptides bind to individual HLA class I molecules and how this may influence the immune response. We compared 101 crystal structures of 9-mer peptide:HLA class I complexes available in the protein data bank (PDB) by performing a contact analysis using the Contact Map Analysis webserver http://ligin.weizmann.ac.il/cma. An InterSystems Caché 'post-relational' database containing residue position, amino acid (AA) and buried surface that contact a particular peptide position was then created allowing data comparison for all the structures (Pocketcheck). The analysis illustrates that the HLA class I residues 24, 45, 63 and 67 show high contact frequencies to both the p1 and/or p2 position of bound peptides, indicating that they might influence the nature of a peptide anchor. To determine the influence of these residues we utilized soluble HLA technology and mass spectrometry to analyze peptides derived from HLA-B*44:06 since it differs from the previously described allele B*44:02 by seven AA exchanges located in the alpha 1 domain (residues 24, 32, 41, 45, 63, 67 and 80). HLA-B*44:06 features an anchor motif of P or A at p2 and Y or W at the C-terminal. Additionally B*44:06-derived peptides feature an auxiliary anchor motif at p1, comprising D or E. Our results illustrate that structural analysis can provide valuable information to understand allogenicity and provides a further step towards intelligent HLA mismatching. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjun; Larsen, Mette V.; Nielsen, Morten; Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune; Dziegiel, Morten H.; Buus, Søren; Tang, Sheila T.; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict 9mer peptides derived from available influenza A viral proteins with binding affinity for at least one of the 12 HLA-I supertypes. The predicted peptides were then selected in a way that ensured maximal coverage of the available influenza A strains. One hundred and thirty one peptides were synthesized and their binding affinities for the HLA-I supertypes were measured in a biochemical assay. Influenza-specific T cell responses towards the peptides were quantified using IFNγ ELISPOT assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult healthy HLA-I typed donors as responder cells. Of the 131 peptides, 21 were found to induce T cell responses in 19 donors. In the ELISPOT assay, five peptides induced responses that could be totally blocked by the pan-specific anti-HLA-I antibody W6/32, whereas 15 peptides induced responses that could be completely blocked in the presence of the pan-specific anti-HLA class II (HLA-II) antibody IVA12. Blocking of HLA-II subtype reactivity revealed that 8 and 6 peptide responses were blocked by anti-HLA-DR and -DP antibodies, respectively. Peptide reactivity of PBMC depleted of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells prior to the ELISPOT culture revealed that effectors are either CD4+ (the majority of reactivities) or CD8+ T cells, never a mixture of these subsets. Three of the peptides, recognized by CD4+ T cells showed binding to recombinant DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 or DRA1*0101/DRB5*0101 molecules in a recently developed biochemical assay. Conclusions/Significance HLA-I binding 9mer influenza virus-derived peptides induce in many cases CD4+ T cell responses restricted by HLA-II molecules. PMID:20479886

  1. Rat vas deferens: a specific bioassay for endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, S; Magnan, J; Regoli, D

    1978-01-01

    The electrically-evoked contractions of the rat vas deferens were selectively inhibited by beta-endorphin, the preparation being much less sensitive to enkephalins and narcotic analgesic drugs. However, introduction of D-Ala in position 2 of [Leu]-enkephalin enhanced the activity of the opioid peptide to the order of that of beta-endorphin. It is concluded that the rat vas deferens preparation constitutes a specific bioassay for endogenous opioid peptides and related compounds. PMID:719230

  2. Specific peptide for functionalization of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estephan, E.; Larroque, C.; Cloitre, T.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Gergely, C.

    2008-04-01

    Nanobiotechnology aims to exploit biomolecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities for integrating advanced materials into medicine and biology. However frequent problems are encountered at the interface of substrate-biological molecule, as the direct physical adsorption of biological molecules is dependent of unpredictable non-specific interactions with the surface, often causing their denaturation. Therefore, a proper functionalization of the substrate should avoid a loss of biological activity. In this work we address the functionalization of the semiconductor GaN (0001) for biosensing applications. The basic interest of using III-V class semiconductors is their good light emitting properties and a fair chemical stability that allows various applications of these materials. The technology chosen to elaborate GaN-specific peptides is the combinatorial phage-display method, a biological screening procedure based on affinity selection. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 10 10 different peptides against the GaN (0001) surface to finally isolate one specific peptide. The preferential attachment of the biotinylated selected peptide onto the GaN (0001), in close proximity to a surface of different chemical and structural composition has been demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Further physicochemical studies have been initiated to evaluate the semiconductor-peptide interface and understand the details in the specific recognition of peptides for semiconductor substrates. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in Attenuated Total Reflection mode (FTIR-ATR) has been employed to prove the presence of peptides on the surface. Our Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) studies on the morphology of the GaN surface after functionalization revealed a total surface coverage by a very thin, homogeneous peptide layer. Due to its good biocompatibility, functionalized GaN devices might evolve in a new class of implantable biosensors for medical applications.

  3. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Dinglin; Zhang, Yuxin; Li, Guohui

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors. PMID:22408446

  4. Specificity of inhibitory KIRs enables NK cells to detect changes in an altered peptide environment.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; de Boer, Rob J; Keşmir, Can

    2017-07-10

    The activity of natural killer (NK) cells is tightly regulated by inhibitory and activating receptors. Inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIRs) survey the surface of target cells by monitoring the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. The binding of iKIRs has been shown to be sensitive to the peptides presented by HLA class I, implying that iKIRs have the ability to detect the changes in the repertoire of peptide-HLA class I complexes (pHLA), a process occurring during viral infection and in tumor cells. To study how the pHLA repertoire changes upon infection, and whether an iKIR is able to detect these changes, we study peptides eluted from cells prior and after infection with measles virus (MV). Remarkably, most changes in the repertoire of potential iKIR ligands are predicted to be caused by the altered expression of self-peptides. We show that an iKIR can detect these changes in the presented peptides only if it is sufficiently specific, e.g., if iKIRs can distinguish between different amino acids in the contact residues (e.g., position 7 and 8). Our analysis further indicates that one single iKIR per host is not sufficient to detect changes in the peptide repertoire, suggesting that a multigene family encoding for different iKIRs is required for successful peptide recognition.

  5. Controlling Affinity Binding with Peptide-Functionalized Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels**

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with peptide moieties have been widely used in regenerative medicine applications. While many studies have suggested the importance of affinity binding within PEG hydrogels, the relationships between the structures of the peptide motifs and their binding to protein therapeutics remain largely unexplored, especially in the recently developed thiol-acrylate photopolymerization systems. Herein, we employ Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and thiol-acrylate photopolymerizations to investigate how the architectures of affinity peptides in crosslinked hydrogels affect their binding to diffusible proteins. The binding between diffusible streptavidin and biotinylated peptide immobilized to PEG hydrogel network was used as a model system to reveal the interplay between affinity binding and peptide sequences/architectures. In addition, we design peptides with different structures to enhance affinity binding within PEG hydrogels and to provide tunable affinity-based controlled delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). This study demonstrates the importance of affinity binding in controlling the availability of hydrogel-encapsulated proteins and provides strategies for enhancing affinity binding of protein therapeutics to bound peptide moieties in thiol-acrylate photopolymerized PEG hydrogels. The results presented herein should find useful on the design and fabrication of hydrogels to retain and sustained release of growth factors for promoting tissue regeneration. PMID:20148198

  6. Specificity of Milk Peptide Utilization by Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Juillard, Vincent; Guillot, Alain; Le Bars, Dominique; Gripon, Jean-Claude

    1998-01-01

    To study the substrate specificity of the oligopeptide transport system of Lactococcus lactis for its natural substrates, the growth of L. lactis MG1363 was studied in a chemically defined medium containing milk peptides or a tryptic digest of αs2-casein as the source of amino acids. Peptides were separated into acidic, neutral, and basic pools by solid-phase extraction or by cation-exchange liquid chromatography. Their ability to sustain growth and the time course of their utilization demonstrated the preferential use of hydrophobic basic peptides with molecular masses ranging between 600 and 1,100 Da by L. lactis MG1363 and the inability to use large, acidic peptides. These peptide utilization preferences reflect the substrate specificity of the oligopeptide transport system of the strain, since no significant cell lysis was inferred. Considering the free amino acid content of milk and these findings on peptide utilization, it was demonstrated that the cessation of growth of L. lactis MG1363 in milk was due to deprivation of leucine and methionine. PMID:9546157

  7. Binding proteins for linear renin-inhibiting peptides in basolateral plasma membranes of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, K; Sänger, U

    1992-01-31

    A linear hydrophobic peptide, (Code no. EMD 55068), a synthetic renin-antagonist, competitively inhibits the uptake of taurocholate and of another linear peptide (EMD 51921) but not of oleic acid, serine or thiamin hydrochloride into isolated rat liver cells. EMD 55068 was attached to a gel matrix at a position that is not involved in the protein ligand interaction. The gel matrix used did not interact nonspecifically with solubilized proteins from rat liver. The quantity of bound ligand was determined to be 3.6 mg/ml of gel matrix. In the fraction of EDTA extracted hydrophilic membrane-associated proteins, no binding proteins were detected. Affinity chromatography of integral plasma membrane proteins resulted in four protein bands with molecular masses of 46, 49, 53 and 56 kDa in SDS-PAGE. In contrast, solubilized plasma membrane proteins from AS-30D ascites hepatoma cells, which are unable to transport bile acids and linear peptides, did not bind specifically to the affinity matrix.

  8. Determination of the sequence specificity of XIAP BIR domains by screening a combinatorial peptide library.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael C; Wang, Xianxi; Park, Junguk; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2006-12-12

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins regulate programmed cell death by inhibiting members of the caspase family of proteases. The X-chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP) contains three baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR) domains, which bind directly to the N-termini of target proteins including those of caspases-3, -7, and -9. In the present study, we defined the consensus sequences of the motifs that interact with the three BIR domains in an unbiased manner. A combinatorial peptide library containing four random residues at the N-terminus was constructed and screened using BIR domains as probes. We found that the BIR3 domain binds a highly specific motif containing an alanine or valine at the N-terminus (P1 position), an arginine or proline at the P3 position, and a hydrophobic residue (Phe, Ile, and Tyr) at the P4 position. The BIR2-binding motif is less stringent. Although it still requires an N-terminal alanine, it tolerates a wide variety of amino acids at P2-P4 positions. The BIR1 failed to bind to any peptides in the library. SPR analysis of individually synthesized peptides confirmed the library screening results. Database searches with the BIR2- and BIR3-binding consensus sequences revealed a large number of potential target proteins. The combinatorial library method should be readily applicable to other BIR domains or other types of protein modular domains.

  9. Metacaspase-binding peptide inhibits heat shock-induced death in Leishmania (L.) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Mauricio S; Cabral, Guilherme C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Perez, Katia R; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2017-03-02

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is an important agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. This parasite faces cell death in some situations during transmission to the vertebrate host, and this process seems to be dependent on the activity of metacaspase (MCA), an enzyme bearing trypsin-like activity present in protozoans, plants and fungi. In fact, the association between MCA expression and cell death induced by different stimuli has been demonstrated for several Leishmania species. Regulators and natural substrates of MCA are poorly known. To fulfill this gap, we have employed phage display over recombinant L. (L.) amazonensis MCA to identify peptides that could interact with the enzyme and modulate its activity. Four peptides were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to MCA and interfere with its activity. One of these peptides, similar to ecotin-like ISP3 of L. (L.) major, decreases trypsin-like activity of promastigotes under heat shock, and significantly decreases parasite heat shock-induced death. These findings indicate that peptide ligands identified by phage display affect trypsin-like activity and parasite death, and that an endogenous peptidase inhibitor is a possible natural regulator of the enzyme.

  10. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Use of functional polymorphisms to elucidate the peptide binding site of TAP complexes

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jie; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen to enable immune surveillance by CD8+ T cells. Peptide transport is preceded by peptide binding to a cytosol-accessible surface of TAP1/TAP2 complexes, but the location of the TAP peptide-binding pocket remains unknown. Guided by the known contributions of polymorphic TAP variants to peptide selection, we combined homology modeling of TAP with experimental measurements to identify several TAP residues that interact with peptides. Models for peptide-TAP complexes were generated, which indicate bent conformation for peptides. The peptide-binding site of TAP is located at the hydrophobic boundary of the cytosolic membrane leaflet, with striking parallels to the glutathione binding site of NaAtm1, a transporter that functions in bacterial heavy metal detoxification. These studies illustrate the conservation of the ligand recognition modes of bacterial and mammalians transporters involved in peptide-guided cellular surveillance. PMID:26324772

  12. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Søren; Thorn, Mette; Stryhn, Anette; Leisner, Christian; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Development of methods for efficient in vitro stimulation and expansion of peptide specific CD8(+) T cells is compelling not only with respect to adoptive T cell therapy but also regarding analysis of T cell responses and search for new immunogenic peptides. In the present study, a new approach to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NA-PBMCs) with PB-MHC/CMVp resulted in significant expansion of CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, which was comparable to that achieved by CMVp pulsed mature dendritic cells (DCs). By repeated exposure of NA-PBMCs to PB-MHC/CMVp more than 60% CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, representing a 240-fold expansion, were reached after only two stimulations. Although stimulation with PB-MHC/CMVp clearly demonstrated efficient peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells, there was a tendency to proliferative exhaustion of the cells after 3-4 stimulations. Thus, it will be of interest to examine the effect of new stimulatory cocktails, e.g. cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, by use of the present rapid and easy-to-use method of expanding peptide specific T cells.

  13. Protein nanopore-based, single-molecule exploration of copper binding to an antimicrobial-derived, histidine-containing chimera peptide.

    PubMed

    Mereuta, Loredana; Schiopu, Irina; Asandei, Alina; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Luchian, Tudor

    2012-12-11

    Metal ions binding exert a crucial influence upon the aggregation properties and stability of peptides, and the propensity of folding in various substates. Herein, we demonstrate the use of the α-HL protein as a powerful nanoscopic tool to probe Cu(2+)-triggered physicochemical changes of a 20 aminoacids long, antimicrobial-derived chimera peptide with a His residue as metal-binding site, and simultaneously dissect the kinetics of the free- and Cu(2+)-bound peptide interaction to the α-HL pore. Combining single-molecule electrophysiology on reconstituted lipid membranes and fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that the association rate constant between the α-HL pore and a Cu(2+)-free peptide is higher than that of a Cu(2+)-complexed peptide. We posit that mainly due to conformational changes induced by the bound Cu(2+) on the peptide, the resulting complex encounters a higher energy barrier toward its association with the protein pore, stemming most likely from an extra entropy cost needed to fit the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide within the α-HL lumen region. The lower dissociation rate constant of the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide from α-HL pore, as compared to that of Cu(2+)-free peptide, supports the existence of a deeper free energy well for the protein interaction with a Cu(2+)-complexed peptide, which may be indicative of specific Cu(2+)-mediated contributions to the binding of the Cu(2+)-complexed peptide within the pore lumen.

  14. Bacterial SPOR domains are recruited to septal peptidoglycan by binding to glycan strands that lack stem peptides.

    PubMed

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A; Weiss, David S

    2015-09-08

    Bacterial SPOR domains bind peptidoglycan (PG) and are thought to target proteins to the cell division site by binding to "denuded" glycan strands that lack stem peptides, but uncertainties remain, in part because septal-specific binding has yet to be studied in a purified system. Here we show that fusions of GFP to SPOR domains from the Escherichia coli cell-division proteins DamX, DedD, FtsN, and RlpA all localize to septal regions of purified PG sacculi obtained from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Treatment of sacculi with an amidase that removes stem peptides enhanced SPOR domain binding, whereas treatment with a lytic transglycosylase that removes denuded glycans reduced SPOR domain binding. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that SPOR domains localize by binding to septal PG, that the physiologically relevant binding site is indeed a denuded glycan, and that denuded glycans are enriched in septal PG rather than distributed uniformly around the sacculus. Accumulation of denuded glycans in the septal PG of both E. coli and B. subtilis, organisms separated by 1 billion years of evolution, suggests that sequential removal of stem peptides followed by degradation of the glycan backbone is an ancient feature of PG turnover during bacterial cell division. Linking SPOR domain localization to the abundance of a structure (denuded glycans) present only transiently during biogenesis of septal PG provides a mechanism for coordinating the function of SPOR domain proteins with the progress of cell division.

  15. Specificity analysis of protein lysine methyltransferases using SPOT peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-11-29

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs.

  16. Specificity Analysis of Protein Lysine Methyltransferases Using SPOT Peptide Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lysine methylation is an emerging post-translation modification and it has been identified on several histone and non-histone proteins, where it plays crucial roles in cell development and many diseases. Approximately 5,000 lysine methylation sites were identified on different proteins, which are set by few dozens of protein lysine methyltransferases. This suggests that each PKMT methylates multiple proteins, however till now only one or two substrates have been identified for several of these enzymes. To approach this problem, we have introduced peptide array based substrate specificity analyses of PKMTs. Peptide arrays are powerful tools to characterize the specificity of PKMTs because methylation of several substrates with different sequences can be tested on one array. We synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membrane using an Intavis SPOT synthesizer and analyzed the specificity of various PKMTs. Based on the results, for several of these enzymes, novel substrates could be identified. For example, for NSD1 by employing peptide arrays, we showed that it methylates K44 of H4 instead of the reported H4K20 and in addition H1.5K168 is the highly preferred substrate over the previously known H3K36. Hence, peptide arrays are powerful tools to biochemically characterize the PKMTs. PMID:25489813

  17. Specificity profiling of dual specificity phosphatase vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) reveals two distinct substrate binding modes.

    PubMed

    Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Taha, Hashem A; Vyas, Shubham; Guan, Xiaoyan; Freitas, Michael A; Hadad, Christopher M; Pei, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) is a dual specificity phosphatase that consists of only a single catalytic domain. Although several protein substrates have been identified for VHR, the elements that control the in vivo substrate specificity of this enzyme remain unclear. In this work, the in vitro substrate specificity of VHR was systematically profiled by screening combinatorial peptide libraries. VHR exhibits more stringent substrate specificity than classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases and recognizes two distinct classes of Tyr(P) peptides. The class I substrates are similar to the Tyr(P) motifs derived from the VHR protein substrates, having sequences of (D/E/ϕ)(D/S/N/T/E)(P/I/M/S/A/V)pY(G/A/S/Q) or (D/E/ϕ)(T/S)(D/E)pY(G/A/S/Q) (where ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid and pY is phosphotyrosine). The class II substrates have the consensus sequence of (V/A)P(I/L/M/V/F)X1-6pY (where X is any amino acid) with V/A preferably at the N terminus of the peptide. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies suggest that the class II peptides bind to VHR in an opposite orientation relative to the canonical binding mode of the class I substrates. In this alternative binding mode, the Tyr(P) side chain binds to the active site pocket, but the N terminus of the peptide interacts with the carboxylate side chain of Asp(164), which normally interacts with the Tyr(P) + 3 residue of a class I substrate. Proteins containing the class II motifs are efficient VHR substrates in vitro, suggesting that VHR may act on a novel class of yet unidentified Tyr(P) proteins in vivo.

  18. The Baculovirus-Expressed Binding Region of Plasmodium falciparum EBA-140 Ligand and Its Glycophorin C Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rydzak, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Czerwinski, Marcin; Lukasiewicz, Jolanta; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Szewczyk, Boguslaw; Jaskiewicz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte binding ligand 140 (EBA-140) is a member of the Plasmodium falciparum DBL family of erythrocyte binding proteins, which are considered as prospective candidates for malaria vaccine development. The EBA-140 ligand is a paralogue of the well-characterized P. falciparum EBA-175 protein. They share homology of domain structure, including Region II, which consists of two homologous F1 and F2 domains and is responsible for ligand-erythrocyte receptor interaction during invasion. In this report we describe, for the first time, the glycophorin C specificity of the recombinant, baculovirus-expressed binding region (Region II) of P. falciparum EBA-140 ligand. It was found that the recombinant EBA-140 Region II binds to the endogenous and recombinant glycophorin C, but does not bind to Gerbich-type glycophorin C, neither normal nor recombinant, which lacks amino acid residues 36–63 of its polypeptide chain. Our results emphasize the crucial role of this glycophorin C region in EBA-140 ligand binding. Moreover, the EBA-140 Region II did not bind either to glycophorin D, the truncated form of glycophorin C lacking the N-glycan or to desialylated GPC. These results draw attention to the role of glycophorin C glycans in EBA-140 binding. The full identification of the EBA-140 binding site on glycophorin C molecule, consisting most likely of its glycans and peptide backbone, may help to design therapeutics or vaccines that target the erythrocyte binding merozoite ligands. PMID:25588042

  19. Membrane fluidity in the presence of membrane-binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Arf proteins are GTP-ases that participate in vesicle trafficking inside cells. They are able to interact with membranes through their N-terminus when they are bound to GTP, and they detach from the membrane when GTP is hydrolyzed. The N-terminus of Arf1 (amino acids 2-17) folds into an amphipathic helix that can insert into lipid bilayers. Arf1 is also myristoylated; it has myristic acid, a 14-carbon fatty acid `tail', attached to it. We set out to test the hypothesis that the binding of the myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 to lipid membranes changes the mechanical properties of the membrane, in ways that myristic acid alone or amphipathic peptides alone do not. We use three reporter molecules embedded in vesicles, whose fluorescence emission spectrum depends on the properties of the environment in which they are found, to measure three distinct aspects of membrane fluidity: Bispyrene is sensitive to lateral motion along the membrane, Prodan's emission gives a measure of the packing of the head groups, and DPH polarization reflects the packing of the hydrophobic tails. We will present effects found for four molecules (myristic acid, myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and the ALPS domain of KES) in a concentration-dependent manner, and discuss the importance of these results in the vesicle-trafficking picture.

  20. Identification and analysis of the sap genes from Vibrio fischeri belonging to the ATP-binding cassette gene family required for peptide transport and resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, H Y; Weng, S F; Lin, J W

    2000-03-24

    Partial nucleotide sequences of the sapD and sapF genes of the sap operon (GenBank Accession No. AF178651) from Vibrio fischeri ATCC 7744 have been determined, and the peptide transport system of ATP-binding proteins SapD and SapF encoded by the genes have been deduced. Alignment and comparison of the Sap proteins of V. fischeri, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Haemophilus influenzae Rd show that these proteins are homologous. The sap operon residing in the genome enables V. fischeri to transport peptides and resist antimicrobial peptides. Nucleotide sequence and functional analyses confirm that the specific regulatory-region-like sequence R&R* that resides inside the sapD gene and before the sapF gene functions in gene expression and regulation; also, it is regulated by the LuxR-AI complex of the V. fischeri lux regulon. The putative upstream activator binding sequences SigmaUASI, SigmaUASII, SigmaUASIII TGTCGACTTGGGCCTCGCTGTCCGTATGCACA (72nd to 103rd bp), TGTCCGTATGCACA (90th to 103rd bp), and TGTTCAAGTACCAGAAAGACA (111st to 133rd bp) in the R&R* sequence, which are similar to the two-component regulator binding sequence TGT-N(8-12)-ACA and the LuxR-AI binding sequence ACCTGTAGGATCGTACAGGT in the regulatory region of the V. fischeri lux regulon, might be the specific sequences recognized by the LuxR-AI complex for enhancement.

  1. HLA class I alleles are associated with peptide-binding repertoires of different size, affinity, and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sinu; Weiskopf, Daniela; Angelo, Michael A; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-12-15

    Prediction of HLA binding affinity is widely used to identify candidate T cell epitopes, and an affinity of 500 nM is routinely used as a threshold for peptide selection. However, the fraction (percentage) of peptides predicted to bind with affinities of 500 nM varies by allele. For example, of a large collection of ~30,000 dengue virus-derived peptides only 0.3% were predicted to bind HLA A*0101, whereas nearly 5% were predicted for A*0201. This striking difference could not be ascribed to variation in accuracy of the algorithms used, as predicted values closely correlated with affinity measured in vitro with purified HLA molecules. These data raised the question whether different alleles would also vary in terms of epitope repertoire size, defined as the number of associated epitopes or, alternatively, whether alleles vary drastically in terms of the affinity threshold associated with immunogenicity. To address this issue, strains of HLA transgenic mice with wide (A*0201), intermediate (B*0702), or narrow (A*0101) repertoires were immunized with peptides of varying binding affinity and relative percentile ranking. The results show that absolute binding capacity is a better predictor of immunogenicity, and analysis of epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database revealed that predictive efficacy is increased using allele-specific affinity thresholds. Finally, we investigated the genetic and structural basis of the phenomenon. Although no stringent correlate was defined, on average HLA B alleles are associated with significantly narrower repertoires than are HLA A alleles.

  2. Altering the Peptide Binding Selectivity of Polymeric Reverse Micelle Assemblies via Metal Ion Loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meizhe; Zhao, Bo; Gao, Jingjing; He, Huan; Castellanos, Laura J; Thayumanavan, S; Vachet, Richard W

    2017-08-31

    Supramolecular reverse micelle assemblies, formed by amphiphilic copolymers, can selectively encapsulate molecules in their interiors depending on the functional groups present in the polymers. Altering the binding selectivity of these materials typically requires the synthesis of alternate functional groups. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of Zr(IV) ions to the interiors of reverse micelles having phosphonate functional groups transforms the supramolecular materials from ones that selectively bind positively charged peptides into materials that selectively bind phosphorylated peptides. We also show that the binding selectivity of these reverse micelle assemblies can be further tuned by varying the fractions of phosphonate groups in the copolymer structure. The optimized reverse micelle materials can selectively transfer and bind phosphorylated peptides from aqueous solutions over a wide range of pH conditions and can selectively enrich phosphorylated peptides even in complicated mixtures.

  3. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    PubMed

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  4. In silico designing breast cancer peptide vaccine for binding to MHC class I and II: A molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Manijeh; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-12-01

    Antigenic peptides or cancer peptide vaccines can be directly delivered to cancer patients to produce immunologic responses against cancer cells. Specifically, designed peptides can associate with Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I or II molecules on the cell surface of antigen presenting cells activating anti-tumor effector mechanisms by triggering helper T cell (Th) or cytotoxic T cells (CTL). In general, high binding to MHCs approximately correlates with in vivo immunogenicity. Consequently, a molecular docking technique was run on a library of novel discontinuous peptides predicted by PEPOP from Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 ECD) subdomain III. This technique is expected to improve the prediction accuracy in order to identify the best MHC class I and II binder peptides. Molecular docking analysis through GOLD identified the peptide 1412 as the best MHC binder peptide to both MHC class I and II molecules used in the study. The GOLD results predicted HLA-DR4, HLA-DP2 and TCR as the most often targeted receptors by the peptide 1412. These findings, based on bioinformatics analyses, can be exploited in further experimental analyses in vaccine design and cancer therapy to find possible proper approaches providing beneficial effects.

  5. Identification and grafting of a unique peptide-binding site in the Fab framework of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Joshua M.; Zer, Cindy; Avery, Kendra N.; Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Horne, David A.; Williams, John C.

    2013-10-07

    Capitalizing on their extraordinary specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most reengineered classes of biological molecules. A major goal in many of these engineering efforts is to add new functionality to the parental mAb, including the addition of cytotoxins and imaging agents for medical applications. Herein, we present a unique peptide-binding site within the central cavity of the fragment antigen binding framework region of the chimeric, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor mAb cetuximab. We demonstrate through diffraction methods, biophysical studies, and sequence analysis that this peptide, a meditope, has moderate affinity for the Fab, is specific to cetuximab (i.e., does not bind to human IgGs), and has no significant effect on antigen binding. We further demonstrate by diffraction studies and biophysical methods that the meditope binding site can be grafted onto the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mAb trastuzumab, and that the antigen binding affinity of the grafted trastuzumab is indistinguishable from the parental mAb. Lastly, we demonstrate a bivalent meditope variant binds specifically and stably to antigen-bearing cells only in the presence of the meditope-enabled mAbs. Collectively, this finding and the subsequent characterization and engineering efforts indicate that this unique interface could serve as a noncovalent “linker” for any meditope-enabled mAb with applications in multiple mAb-based technologies including diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic delivery.

  6. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, O Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-10-03

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways.

  7. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    PubMed

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  8. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits.

  9. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  10. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-terminal peptide sequence of the rat GH-BP (GH-BP263-279) was synthesized and used as an immunogen in rabbits. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of four GH-BP263-279 segments onto a tetravalent Lys2-Lys-β-Ala-OH core peptide was carried out using N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl chemistry. The mass of the RP-HPLC purified synthetic product, 8398 Da, determined by ESI-MS, was identical to expected mass. Three anti-rat GH-BP263-279 MAP antisera, BETO-8039, BETO-8040 and BETO-8041, at dilutions of 10-3, recognized both the rat GH-BP263-279 MAP and recombinant mouse GH-BP with ED50s within a range of 5-10 fmol but did not cross-react with BSA in dot blot analyses. BETO-8041 antisera (10-3 dilution) recognized GH-BPs of rat serum and liver having Mrs ranging from 35-130 kDa but did not recognize full-length rat GH-Rs. The antisera also detected recombinant mouse GH-BPs. In summary, the tetravalent rat GH-BP263-279 MAP dendrimer served as an effective immunogenic antigen in eliciting high titer antisera specific for the C-termini of both rat and mouse GH-BPs. The antisera will facilitate studies aimed at improving our understanding of the biology of GH-BPs. PMID:19089805

  11. The Development and Application of a Quantitative Peptide Microarray Based Approach to Protein Interaction Domain Specificity Space*

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Brett W.; Kim, Yohan; Wang, Miaoyan; Peters, Bjoern; Rock, Ronald S.; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein interaction domain (PID) linear peptide motif interactions direct diverse cellular processes in a specific and coordinated fashion. PID specificity, or the interaction selectivity derived from affinity preferences between possible PID-peptide pairs is the basis of this ability. Here, we develop an integrated experimental and computational cellulose peptide conjugate microarray (CPCMA) based approach for the high throughput analysis of PID specificity that provides unprecedented quantitative resolution and reproducibility. As a test system, we quantify the specificity preferences of four Src Homology 2 domains and 124 physiological phosphopeptides to produce a novel quantitative interactome. The quantitative data set covers a broad affinity range, is highly precise, and agrees well with orthogonal biophysical validation, in vivo interactions, and peptide library trained algorithm predictions. In contrast to preceding approaches, the CPCMAs proved capable of confidently assigning interactions into affinity categories, resolving the subtle affinity contributions of residue correlations, and yielded predictive peptide motif affinity matrices. Unique CPCMA enabled modes of systems level analysis reveal a physiological interactome with expected node degree value decreasing as a function of affinity, resulting in minimal high affinity binding overlap between domains; uncover that Src Homology 2 domains bind ligands with a similar average affinity yet strikingly different levels of promiscuity and binding dynamic range; and parse with unprecedented quantitative resolution contextual factors directing specificity. The CPCMA platform promises broad application within the fields of PID specificity, synthetic biology, specificity focused drug design, and network biology. PMID:25135669

  12. Synthetic peptide derivatives that bind to fibrinogen and prevent the polymerization of fibrin monomers

    PubMed Central

    Laudano, Andrew P.; Doolittle, Russell F.

    1978-01-01

    A series of small peptides corresponding to the amino termini of the fibrin α- and β-chains has been synthesized. The peptides glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginyl-L-proline and glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginylsarcosine are potent inhibitors of fibrin polymerization. Moreover, these peptides have a natural stability stemming from their inherent resistance to proteolysis because of the involvement of amino acids in each of their peptide bonds. The peptide glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginyl-L-proline binds to fibrinogen and to fragment D, in both cases with an association constant of approximately 5 × 104; it does not bind to fragment E. The number of binding sites is two for fibrinogen and one for fragment D. The tripeptide glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine binds less tightly and is less than half as effective in preventing polymerization. The peptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-arginyl-L-proline, which corresponds exactly to the amino terminus of the fibrin β-chain, does not inhibit the aggregation of fibrin monomers under the conditions used. It does bind weakly to fibrinogen, however, suggesting the involvement of sites other than those binding the α-chain analogues. Various other peptides were found not to inhibit polymerization; these included glycine-L-proline, L-prolyl-L-arginine and glycyl-L-prolyl-L-seryl-L-proline. The last-named corresponds to the serine/arginine amino acid replacement previously reported for a defective human fibrinogen. PMID:277910

  13. Prediction of HLA-A2 binding peptides using Bayesian network.

    PubMed

    Astakhov, Vadim; Cherkasov, Artem

    2005-10-11

    Prediction of peptides binding to HLA (human leukocyte antigen) finds application in peptide vaccine design. A number of statistical and structural models have been developed in recent years for HLA binding peptide prediction. However, a Bayesian Network (BNT) model is not available. In this study we describe a BNT model for HLA-A2 binding peptide prediction. It has been demonstrated that the BNT model allows up to 99 % accurate identification of the HLA-A2 binding peptides and provides similar prediction accuracy compared to HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and ANN (Artificial Neural Network). At the same time, it has been shown that the BNT has that advantage that it allows more accurate performance for smaller sets of empirical data compared to the HMM and the ANN methods. When the size of the training set has been reduced to 40% from the original data, the identification of the HLA-A2 binding peptides by the BNT, ANN and HMM methods produced ARoc (area under receiver operating characteristic) values 0.88, 0.85, 0.85 respectively. The results of the work demonstrate certain advantages of using the Bayesian Networks in predicting the HLA binding peptides using smaller datasets.

  14. Prediction of HLA-A2 binding peptides using Bayesian network

    PubMed Central

    Astakhov, Vadim; Cherkasov, Artem

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of peptides binding to HLA (human leukocyte antigen) finds application in peptide vaccine design. A number of statistical and structural models have been developed in recent years for HLA binding peptide prediction. However, a Bayesian Network (BNT) model is not available. In this study we describe a BNT model for HLA-A2 binding peptide prediction. It has been demonstrated that the BNT model allows up to 99 % accurate identification of the HLA-A2 binding peptides and provides similar prediction accuracy compared to HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and ANN (Artificial Neural Network). At the same time, it has been shown that the BNT has that advantage that it allows more accurate performance for smaller sets of empirical data compared to the HMM and the ANN methods. When the size of the training set has been reduced to 40% from the original data, the identification of the HLA-A2 binding peptides by the BNT, ANN and HMM methods produced ARoc (area under receiver operating characteristic) values 0.88, 0.85, 0.85 respectively. The results of the work demonstrate certain advantages of using the Bayesian Networks in predicting the HLA binding peptides using smaller datasets. PMID:17597855

  15. Identification of peptide sequences that selectively bind to pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate-a surrogate of PETN, via phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Kubas, George; Rees, William; Caguiat, Jonathan; Asch, David; Fagan, Diana; Cortes, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    The present research investigates the identification of amino acid sequences that selectively bind to a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) explosive surrogate. Through the use of a phage display technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), a peptide library was tested against pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate (PETNH), a surrogate of PETN, to screen for those with amino acids having affinity toward the explosive. The results suggest that the library contains peptides selective to PETNH. Following three rounds of panning, clones were picked and tested for specificity toward PETNH. ELISA results from these samples show that each phage clone has some level of selectivity for binding to PETNH. The peptides from these clones have been sequenced and shown to contain certain common amino acid segments among them. This work represents a technological platform for identifying amino-acid sequences selective toward any bio-chem analyte of interest.

  16. Peptide aptamers: The versatile role of specific protein function inhibitors in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Monica; Mizzotti, Chiara; Masiero, Simona; Kater, Martin M; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, peptide aptamers have emerged as novel molecular tools that have attracted the attention of researchers in various fields of basic and applied science, ranging from medicine to analytical chemistry. These artificial short peptides are able to specifically bind, track, and inhibit a given target molecule with high affinity, even molecules with poor immunogenicity or high toxicity, and represent a remarkable alternative to antibodies in many different applications. Their use is on the rise, driven mainly by the medical and pharmaceutical sector. Here we discuss the enormous potential of peptide aptamers in both basic and applied aspects of plant biotechnology and food safety. The different peptide aptamer selection methods available both in vivo and in vitro are introduced, and the most important possible applications in plant biotechnology are illustrated. In particular, we discuss the generation of broad-based virus resistance in crops, "reverse genetics" and aptasensors in bioassays for detecting contaminations in food and feed. Furthermore, we suggest an alternative to the transfer of peptide aptamers into plant cells via genetic transformation, based on the use of cell-penetrating peptides that overcome the limits imposed by both crop transformation and Genetically Modified Organism commercialization. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. PEGylation enables the specific tumor accumulation of a peptide identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Mier, Walter; Krämer, Susanne; Zitzmann, Sabine; Altmann, Annette; Leotta, Karin; Schierbaum, Ursula; Schnölzer, Martina; Eisenhut, Michael; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2013-04-28

    Peptides are excellent alternatives to small molecules and proteinaceous drugs. Their high medicinal potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications has prompted the development of tumor targeting peptides. Despite its excellent tumor binding capacity, FROP-DOTA (H-Glu-Asn-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Met-Asp-Leu-Leu-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Lys(DOTA)-NH2), a peptide that we had identified in phage display libraries, revealed slow binding kinetics. Consequently, biodistribution studies showed that its excretion forestalled a significant tumor accumulation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the conjugation of PEG to FROP-DOTA resulted in a derivative with a prolonged residence time in the blood. A synthetic method for the PEGylation of the tumor specific peptide FROP-DOTA was developed. Thereafter, binding studies were done in vitro and a biodistribution was performed in tumor bearing animals. These were compared to the data obtained with FROP-DOTA. The binding kinetics of the PEGylated FROP-DOTA was even slower than that of FROP-DOTA. Biodistribution studies of the labeled conjugate in mice bearing human FRO82-2 tumors showed a time dependent increased uptake of the PEGylated peptide with a high retention (at 24 h p.i. 76% of the maximal activity concentration persisted in the tumor). The highest uptake values were determined at 120 min p.i. reaching 2.3%ID/g tumor as compared to 0.06%ID/g observed for the non-PEGylated derivative at 135 min p.i. Apparently, PEGylation provides a substantially improved stabilization in the circulation which allowed a stable tumor accumulation.

  18. Identification of an Orthogonal Peptide Binding Motif for Biarsenical Multiuse Affinity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Haishi; Yan, Ping; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-07-01

    Biarsenical multiuse affinity probes (MAPs) complexed with ethanedithiol (EDT) permit the selective cellular labeling of proteins engineered with tetracysteine motifs, but are limited by the availability of a single binding motif (i.e., CCPGCC or PG tag) that prevents the differential labeling of co-expressed proteins. To overcome this problem, we have used a high-throughput peptide screen to identify an alternate binding motif (i.e., CCKACC or KA tag), which has a similar brightness to the classical sequence upon MAP binding, but displays altered rates and affinities of association that permit the differential labeling of these peptide sequences by the red probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithiarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH-EDT2) or its green cognate 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein-(1,2-ethanedithiol)2 (FLAsH-EDT2). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated following the expression of PG- and KA-tagged subunits of RNA polymerase expressed in E. coli. Specific labeling of two subunits of RNA polymerase in cellular lysates was achieved, whereby ReAsH-EDT2 is shown to selectively label the PG-tag on RNA polymerase alpha subunit prior to the labeling of the KA-tag sequence of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase with FlAsH-EDT2. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively label multiple individual proteins with orthogonal sequence tags in complex cellular lystates with spectroscopically distinct MAPs, and indicate the absolute specificity of ReAsH to target expressed proteins with essentially no nonspecific binding interactions.

  19. Liver stage antigen 3 Plasmodium falciparum peptides specifically interacting with HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    García, Javier E; Curtidor, Hernando; López, Ramses; Rodríguez, Luis; Vera, Ricardo; Valbuena, John; Rosas, Jaiver; Ocampo, Marisol; Puentes, Alvaro; Forero, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-09-01

    Binding assays were carried out with 20 amino acid long peptides covering the complete 200-kDa Liver stage antigen (LSA) 3 protein sequence to identify its HepG2 cell binding regions. Seventeen HepG2 cell high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified in the LSA-3 protein. Seven HABPs were found in the nonrepeat (NRA) region A; five of these formed a 100 amino acid long HepG2 cell binding region located between residues 21Ile and 120Thr. Six HABPs were found in the R2 region and another four in the NRB2 region. LSA-3 protein HABPS bound saturably to HepG2 cells having nanomolar affinity constants and bound specifically to 31, 44, and 70 kDa HepG2 cell membrane proteins. Some of them were located in antigenic and immunogenic LSA-3 protein regions. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays using goat sera immunized with LSA-3 protein peptides recognized P. falciparum (FCB-2 strain) erythrocyte stage proteins (58, 68, 72, 81, 86, 160, and 175 kDa). This reactivity was due mainly to the VEESVAEN motif present in some erythrocyte stage proteins. However, our results suggest that antibodies against LSA-3 regions had a crossed reaction with another 86-kDa protein, and that this crossed reaction was due to a motif present in the NRA region.

  20. Changing the peptide specificity of a human T cell receptor by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Wang, Yuhang; Baylon, Javier L.; Singh, Nishant K.; Baker, Brian M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a T cell receptor (TCR) to a peptide/major histocompatibility complex is the key interaction involved in antigen specificity of T cells. The recognition involves up to six complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the TCR. Efforts to examine the structural basis of these interactions and to exploit them in adoptive T cell therapies has required the isolation of specific T cell clones and their clonotypic TCRs. Here we describe a strategy using in vitro, directed evolution of a single TCR to change its peptide specificity, thereby avoiding the need to isolate T cell clones. The human TCR A6, which recognizes the viral peptide Tax/HLA-A2, was converted to TCR variants that recognized the cancer peptide MART1/HLA-A2. Mutational studies and molecular dynamics simulations identified CDR residues that were predicted to be important in the specificity switch. Thus, in vitro engineering strategies alone can be used to discover TCRs with desired specificities. PMID:25376839

  1. Investigating the Binding of Peptides to Graphene Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garley, Amanda; Saikia, Nabanita; Barr, Stephen; Leuty, Gary; Berry, Rajiv; Heinz, Hendrik

    The Air Force Research Lab is focused on developing highly selective and sensitive graphene-based sensors functionalized with peptides for biomolecule detection. To achieve this there is a need to model interfacial binding interactions between the organic and inorganic components to complement ongoing experimental investigations. It is important to characterize the binding behavior of individual amino acids, with the goal of predicting binding of large peptides. Since polarization is important in graphene systems, a new force field which includes polarizability is used. This allows for an in depth exploration of pi-pi interactions, electrostatics and van der Waals forces involved with binding. The binding strength is determined via enthalpy and free energy calculations. Additionally, structural quantities are computed, such as how aromatic rings align with the graphene surface and the arrangement of various residue substituents in relation to the surface and water layers. Computational results are useful in guiding experimental methods focused on rapidly screening optimal peptide sequence for binding.

  2. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  3. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  4. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  5. Peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles: the influence of pH on binding efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Emma; Hamilton, Jeremy W. J.; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Dixon, Dorian

    2017-07-01

    We report herein on the synthesis of mixed monolayer gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and one of three peptides. Either a receptor-mediated endocytosis peptide, an endosomal escape pathway (H5WYG) peptide or the Nrp-1 targeting RGD peptide (CRGDK) labeled with FITC. All three peptides have a thiol containing cysteine residue which can be used to bind the peptides to the AuNPs. In order to investigate the influence of pH on peptide attachment, PEGylated AuNPs were centrifuged, the supernatant removed, and the nanoparticles were then re-suspended in a range of pH buffer solutions above, below and at the respective isoelectric points of the peptides before co-functionalization. Peptide attachment was investigated using dynamic light scattering, Ultra-violet visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis), FTIR and photo luminescence spectroscopy. UV/Vis analysis coupled with protein assay results and photoluminescence of the FITC tagged RGD peptide concluded that a pH of ∼8 optimized the cysteine binding and stability, irrespective of the peptide used.

  6. Binding modes of thioflavin T molecules to prion peptide assemblies identified by using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaobo; Guo, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chenxuan; Zhang, Min; Ma, Xiaojing; Liu, Lei; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qingdao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-06-15

    The widely used method to monitor the aggregation process of amyloid peptide is thioflavin T (ThT) assay, while the detailed molecular mechanism is still not clear. In this work, we report here the direct identification of the binding modes of ThT molecules with the prion peptide GNNQQNY by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The assembly structures of GNNQQNY were first observed by STM on a graphite surface, and the introduction of ThT molecules to the surface facilitated the STM observations of the adsorption conformations of ThT with peptide strands. ThT molecules are apt to adsorb on the peptide assembly with β-sheet structure and oriented parallel with the peptide strands adopting four different binding modes. This effort could benefit the understanding of the mechanisms of the interactions between labeling species or inhibitory ligands and amyloid peptides, which is keenly needed for developing diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  7. In-silico discovery of cancer-specific peptide-HLA complexes for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanik, Ankur; Kirshner, Jessica R; MacDonald, Douglas; Thurston, Gavin; Lin, Hsin C; Murphy, Andrew J; Zhang, Wen

    2016-07-20

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) or Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I molecules bind to peptide fragments of proteins degraded inside the cell and display them on the cell surface. We are interested in peptide-HLA complexes involving peptides that are derived from proteins specifically expressed in cancer cells. Such complexes have been shown to provide an effective means of precisely targeting cancer cells by engineered T-cells and antibodies, which would be an improvement over current chemotherapeutic agents that indiscriminately kill proliferating cells. An important concern with the targeting of peptide-HLA complexes is off-target toxicity that could occur due to the presence of complexes similar to the target complex in cells from essential, normal tissues. We developed a novel computational strategy for identifying potential peptide-HLA cancer targets and evaluating the likelihood of off-target toxicity associated with these targets. Our strategy combines sequence-based and structure-based approaches in a unique way to predict potential off-targets. The focus of our work is on the complexes involving the most frequent HLA class I allele HLA-A*02:01. Using our strategy, we predicted the off-target toxicity observed in past clinical trials. We employed it to perform a first-ever comprehensive exploration of the human peptidome to identify cancer-specific targets utilizing gene expression data from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) and GTEx (Gene Tissue Expression), and structural data from PDB (Protein Data Bank). We have thus identified a list of 627 peptide-HLA complexes across various TCGA cancer types. Peptide-HLA complexes identified using our novel strategy could enable discovery of cancer-specific targets for engineered T-cells or antibody based therapy with minimal off-target toxicity.

  8. Processing Binding Relations in Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hestvik, Arild; Seiger-Gardner, Liat; Almodovar, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This sentence processing experiment examined the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language development (TD) to establish relations between pronouns or reflexives and their antecedents in real time. Method Twenty-two children with SLI and 24 age-matched children with TD (7;3–10;11 [years;months]) participated in a cross-modal picture priming experiment to determine whether they selectively activated the correct referent at the pronoun or reflexive in sentences. Triplets of auditory sentences, identical except for the presence of a pronoun, a reflexive, or a noun phrase along with a picture probe were used. Results The children with TD were slightly more accurate in their animacy judgments of pictures, but the groups exhibited the same reaction time (RT) pattern. Both groups were slower for sentences with pronouns than with reflexives or noun phrases. The children with SLI had longer RTs than their peers with TD. Conclusions Children with SLI activated only the appropriate antecedent at the pronoun or reflexive, reflecting intact core knowledge of binding as was true for their TD peers. The overall slower RT for children with SLI suggests that any deficit may be the result of processing deficits, perhaps attributable to interference effects. PMID:27788275

  9. Processing Binding Relations in Specific Language Impairment.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard G; Hestvik, Arild; Seiger-Gardner, Liat; Almodovar, Diana

    2016-12-01

    This sentence processing experiment examined the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language development (TD) to establish relations between pronouns or reflexives and their antecedents in real time. Twenty-two children with SLI and 24 age-matched children with TD (7;3-10;11 [years;months]) participated in a cross-modal picture priming experiment to determine whether they selectively activated the correct referent at the pronoun or reflexive in sentences. Triplets of auditory sentences, identical except for the presence of a pronoun, a reflexive, or a noun phrase along with a picture probe were used. The children with TD were slightly more accurate in their animacy judgments of pictures, but the groups exhibited the same reaction time (RT) pattern. Both groups were slower for sentences with pronouns than with reflexives or noun phrases. The children with SLI had longer RTs than their peers with TD. Children with SLI activated only the appropriate antecedent at the pronoun or reflexive, reflecting intact core knowledge of binding as was true for their TD peers. The overall slower RT for children with SLI suggests that any deficit may be the result of processing deficits, perhaps attributable to interference effects.

  10. The Same Major Histocompatibility Complex Polymorphism Involved in Control of HIV Influences Peptide Binding in the Mouse H-2Ld System*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Samanthi; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Single-site polymorphisms in human class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products (HLA-B) have recently been shown to correlate with HIV disease progression or control. An identical single-site polymorphism (at residue 97) in the mouse class I product H-2Ld influences stability of the complex. To gain insight into the human polymorphisms, here we examined peptide binding, stability, and structures of the corresponding Ld polymorphisms, Trp97 and Arg97. Expression of LdW97 and LdR97 genes in a cell line that is antigen-processing competent showed that LdR97 was expressed at higher levels than LdW97, consistent with enhanced stability of self-peptide·LdR97 complexes. To further examine peptide-binding capacities of these two allelic variants, we used a high affinity pep-Ld specific probe to quantitatively examine a collection of self- and foreign peptides that bind to Ld. LdR97 bound more effectively than LdW97 to most peptides, although LdW97 bound more effectively to two peptides. The results support the view that many self-peptides in the Ld system (or the HLA-B system) would exhibit enhanced binding to Arg97 alleles compared with Trp97 alleles. Accordingly, the self-peptide·MHC-Arg97 complexes would influence T-cell selection behavior, impacting the T-cell repertoire of these individuals, and could also impact peripheral T cell activity through effects of self-peptide·Ld interacting with TCR and/or CD8. The structures of several peptide·LdR97 and peptide·LdW97 complexes provided a framework of how this single polymorphism could impact peptide binding. PMID:24064213

  11. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Soren; Golde, William; Barlow, John

    2015-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Imolecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network-based predictions (NetMHCpan). The updated NetMHCpan server was used to predict BoLA-I binding peptides within the P1 structural polyprotein sequence of FMDV (strain A24 Cruzeiro) for Bo-LA-1*01901, BoLA-2*00801, BoLA-2*01201, and BoLA-4*02401. Peptide binding affinity and stability were determined for these BoLA-I molecules using the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay (LOCI) and scintillation proximity assay (SPA). The functional diversity of known BoLA alleles was predicted using theMHCcluster tool, and functional predictions for peptide motifs were compared to observed data from this and prior studies. The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define BBoLA supertypes.^ This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination.

  12. Peptide Inhibitors of the amyloidogenesis of IAPP: verification of the hairpin-binding geometry hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sivanesam, Kalkena; Shu, Irene; Huggins, Kelly N L; Tatarek-Nossol, Marianna; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Andersen, Niels H

    2016-08-01

    Versions of a previously discovered β-hairpin peptide inhibitor of IAPP aggregation that are stabilized in that conformation, or even forced to remain in the hairpin conformation by a backbone cyclization constraint, display superior activity as inhibitors. The cyclized hairpin, cyclo-WW2, displays inhibitory activity at substoichiometric concentrations relative to this amyloidogenic peptide. The hairpin-binding hypothesis stands confirmed.

  13. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  14. A novel Chk1-binding peptide that enhances genotoxic sensitivity through the cellular redistribution of nuclear Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Seok; Choi, Kyu Jin; Bae, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Since checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is an essential factor for cell viability following DNA damage, the inhibition of Chk1 has been a major focus of pharmaceutical development to enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy that damage DNA. However, due to the off-target effects of conventional Chk1-targeting strategies and the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors, alternative strategies are required to target Chk1. To facilitate such efforts, in this study, we identified a specific Chk1-binding 12-mer peptide from the screening of a phage display library and characterized the peptide in terms of cellular cytotoxicity, and in terms of its effect on Chk1 activity and sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This peptide, named N-terminal Chk1-binding peptide (Chk1-NP), bound the kinase domain of Chk1. Simulation of the binding revealed that the very N-terminus of the Chk1 kinase domain is the potential peptide binding site. Of note, the polyarginine-mediated internalization of Chk1-NP redistributed nuclear Chk1 with a prominent decrease in the nucleus in the absence of DNA damage. Treatment with Chk1-NP peptide alone decreased the viability of p53-defective HeLa cells, but not that of p53-functional NCI-H460 cells under normal conditions. The treatment of HeLa or NCI-H460 cells with the peptide significantly enhanced radiation sensitivity following ionizing radiation (IR) with a greater enhancement observed in HeLa cells. Moreover, the IR-induced destabilization of Chk1 was aggravated by treatment with Chk1-NP. Therefore, the decreased nuclear localization and protein levels of Chk1 seem to be responsible for the enhanced cancer cell killing following combined treatment with IR and Chk1-NP. The approach using the specific Chk1-binding peptide may facilitate the mechanistic understanding and potential modulation of Chk1 activities and may provide a novel rationale for the development of specific Chk1-targeting agents. PMID:28025997

  15. Identification of the core regulators of the HLA I-peptide binding process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Xing, Zhihao; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, ShaoPeng; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong; Kong, Xiangyin

    2017-01-01

    During the display of peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -I complex for further immune recognition, the cleaved and transported antigenic peptides have to bind to HLA-I protein and the binding affinity between peptide epitopes and HLA proteins directly influences the immune recognition ability in human beings. Key factors affecting the binding affinity during the generation, selection and presentation processes of HLA-I complex have not yet been fully discovered. In this study, a new method describing the HLA class I-peptide interactions was proposed. Three hundred and forty features of HLA I proteins and peptide sequences were utilized for analysis by four candidate algorithms, screening the optimal classifier. Features derived from the optimal classifier were further selected and systematically analyzed, revealing the core regulators. The results validated the hypothesis that features of HLA I proteins and related peptides simultaneously affect the binding process, though with discrepant redundancy. Besides, the high relative ratio (16/20) of the amino acid composition features suggests the unique role of sequence signatures for the binding processes. Integrating biological, evolutionary and chemical features of both HLA I molecules and peptides, this study may provide a new perspective of the underlying mechanisms of HLA I-mediated immune reactions. PMID:28211542

  16. Conformational contribution to thermodynamics of binding in protein-peptide complexes through microscopic simulation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-03-19

    We extract the thermodynamics of conformational changes in biomacromolecular complexes from the distributions of the dihedral angles of the macromolecules. These distributions are obtained from the equilibrium configurations generated via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational thermodynamics data we obtained for calmodulin-peptide complexes using our methodology corroborate well with the experimentally observed conformational and binding entropies. The conformational free-energy changes and their contributions for different peptide-binding regions of calmodulin are evaluated microscopically.

  17. Single Diastereomer of a Macrolactam Core Binds Specifically to Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 (MCL1).

    PubMed

    Fang, Chao; D'Souza, Brendan; Thompson, Christopher F; Clifton, Matthew C; Fairman, James W; Fulroth, Ben; Leed, Alison; McCarren, Patrick; Wang, Lili; Wang, Yikai; Feau, Clementine; Kaushik, Virendar K; Palmer, Michelle; Wei, Guo; Golub, Todd R; Hubbard, Brian K; Serrano-Wu, Michael H

    2014-12-11

    A direct binding screen of 100 000 sp(3)-rich molecules identified a single diastereomer of a macrolactam core that binds specifically to myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1). A comprehensive toolbox of biophysical methods was applied to validate the original hit and subsequent analogues and also established a binding mode competitive with NOXA BH3 peptide. X-ray crystallography of ligand bound to MCL1 reveals a remarkable ligand/protein shape complementarity that diverges from previously disclosed MCL1 inhibitor costructures.

  18. Single Diastereomer of a Macrolactam Core Binds Specifically to Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 (MCL1)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A direct binding screen of 100 000 sp3-rich molecules identified a single diastereomer of a macrolactam core that binds specifically to myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL1). A comprehensive toolbox of biophysical methods was applied to validate the original hit and subsequent analogues and also established a binding mode competitive with NOXA BH3 peptide. X-ray crystallography of ligand bound to MCL1 reveals a remarkable ligand/protein shape complementarity that diverges from previously disclosed MCL1 inhibitor costructures. PMID:25516789

  19. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  20. Prediction of peptide binding to a major histocompatibility complex class I molecule based on docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Binding between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and immunogenic epitopes is one of the most important processes for cell-mediated immunity. Consequently, computational prediction of amino acid sequences of MHC class I binding peptides from a given sequence may lead to important biomedical advances. In this study, an efficient structure-based method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules was developed, in which the binding free energy of the peptide was evaluated by two individual docking simulations. An original penalty function and restriction of degrees of freedom were determined by analysis of 361 published X-ray structures of the complex and were then introduced into the docking simulations. To validate the method, calculations using a 50-amino acid sequence as a prediction target were performed. In 27 calculations, the binding free energy of the known peptide was within the top 5 of 166 peptides generated from the 50-amino acid sequence. Finally, demonstrative calculations using a whole sequence of a protein as a prediction target were performed. These data clearly demonstrate high potential of this method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules.

  1. The primary structure of the Cytisus scoparius seed lectin and a carbohydrate-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-09-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose-binding Cytisus scoparius seed lectin II (CSII) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSII with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSII with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid residues of concanavalin A (Con A) involved in the metal binding site are highly conserved among those of CSII. A carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSII was obtained from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSII by affinity chromatography on a column of GalNAc-Gel. This peptide was retained on the GalNAc-Gel column and was presumed to have affinity for the column. The amino acid sequence of the retarded peptide was determined using a protein sequencer. The retarded peptide was found to correspond to the putative metal-binding region of Con A. These results strongly suggest that this peptide represents the carbohydrate-binding and metal ion-binding sites of CSII.

  2. Selective lead adsorption by recombinant Escherichia coli displaying a lead-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuong T L; Lee, Hae Ryong; Hong, Soon Ho; Jang, Ji-Ryang; Choe, Woo-Seok; Yoo, Ik-Keun

    2013-02-01

    A highly specific lead-binding peptide ThrAsnThrLeuSerAsnAsn was displayed on Escherichia coli, and lead adsorption characteristics of the recombinant bacteria were investigated. Cell surface-displayed peptide was expressed under the control of an arabinose promoter using outer membrane protein C (OmpC(t)) as an anchoring motif. The optimal induction period and arabinose concentration for the expression of peptide-fused OmpC(t) were determined to be 2 h and 0.001 g/L, respectively. Selective adsorption of Pb(2+) onto recombinant cells was verified with individual or combinatory use of four metal ions, Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+); the amount of bound Pb(2+) onto the biosorbents was significantly higher than the other metal ions. The adsorption isotherm of recombinant cells for Pb(2+) followed the Langmuir isotherm with a maximum adsorption loading (q (max)) of 526 μmol/g dry cell weight.

  3. Caseins from bovine colostrum and milk strongly bind piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish.

    PubMed

    Kütt, Mary-Liis; Stagsted, Jan

    2014-09-01

    A model system of bovine colostrum and piscidin, a fish-derived antimicrobial peptide, was developed to study potential interactions of antimicrobial peptides in colostrum. We did not detect any antimicrobial activity of colostrum using the radial plate diffusion assay; in fact colostrum completely abrogated activity of added piscidin. This could not be explained by degradation of piscidin by colostrum, which was less than ten percent. We found that colostrum even protected piscidin against degradation by added proteases. We further observed that colostrum and milk rapidly quenched the fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin but not that of fluorescein. This effect was not seen with BSA and the specific quenching of fluorescein-piscidin by colostrum was saturably inhibited with unlabeled piscidin. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that fluorescein-piscidin bound to casein micelles with no apparent binding to IgG or whey proteins. Further, addition of pure caseins was able to quench fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin and to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of piscidin. The interaction between caseins and piscidin could be dissociated by guanidine hydrochloride and recovered piscidin had antimicrobial activity against bacteria. Based on our results we propose that caseins could be carriers for antimicrobial peptides in colostrum and milk.

  4. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  5. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  6. HLA-B27 (B*2701) specificity for peptides lacking Arg2 is determined by polymorphism outside the B pocket.

    PubMed

    García, F; Galocha, B; Villadangos, J A; Lamas, J R; Albar, J P; Marina, A; Lópaz de Castro, J A

    1997-06-01

    B*2701 differs from B*2705-by three amino acid changes: D-->Y74, D-->N77, L-->A81, and from B*2702 only by two: D-->Y74 and T-->I80. Tyr74 is located in the C/F cavity of the peptide-binding site, and is unique to B*2701 among HLA-B27 subtypes. Binding of natural B*2705 and B*2702 ligands to B*2701, and to mutants mimicking subtype changes, was analyzed. In addition, sequencing of the peptides bound in vivo by B*2701 and the Y74 mutant was carried out. The main distinctive feature of B*2701 was its presentation of peptides with Gln2. Synthetic analogs bound in vitro similarly as the corresponding ligands with Arg2. Moreover, both Gln2 and Arg2 were dominant upon pool sequencing of B*2701-bound peptides, and 2 of 8 natural ligands contained Gln2. Suitability of Gln2 was largely determined by the Y74 change, as indicated by: 1) binding of Gln2 analogs to this mutant, and 2) detection of Gln2 by pool sequencing of Y74-bound peptides. B*2701 bound peptides with C-terminal aromatic or Leu residues, and interacted with these motifs more strongly than B*2702. The Y74 mutation alone was not responsible for poor binding of peptides with C-terminal basic residues to B*2701, since they bound efficiently and at least one was presented in vivo by this mutant. Most peptides bound to the A81 mutant worse than to B*2705, but frequently better than to B*2701 or B*2702, suggesting that other subtype changes were compensatory. The peptide specificity of B*2701 suggests that this subtype may determine susceptibility to spondyloarthropathy.

  7. In vitro selection of state-specific peptide modulators of G protein signaling using mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Ja, William W; Roberts, Richard W

    2004-07-20

    The G protein regulatory (GPR) motif is a approximately 20-residue conserved domain that acts as a guanine dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for G(i/o)(alpha) subunits. Here, we describe the isolation of peptides derived from a GPR consensus sequence using mRNA display selection libraries. Biotinylated G(i)(alpha)(1), modified at either the N or C terminus, serves as a high-affinity binding target for mRNA-displayed GPR peptides. In vitro selection using mRNA display libraries based on the C terminus of the GPR motif revealed novel peptide sequences with conserved residues. Surprisingly, selected peptides contain mutations to a highly conserved Arg in the GPR motif, previously shown to be crucial for binding and inhibition activities. The dominant peptide from the selection, R6A, and a minimal 9-mer peptide, R6A-1, do not contain Arg residues yet retain high affinity (K(D) = 60 and 200 nM, respectively) and specificity for the GDP-bound state of G(i)(alpha)(1), as measured by surface plasmon resonance. The selected peptides also maintain GDI activity for G(i)(alpha)(1), inhibiting both the exchange of GDP in GTPgammaS binding assays and the AlF(4)(-)-stimulated enhancement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The kinetics of GDI activity, however, are different for the selected peptides and demonstrate biphasic kinetics, suggesting a complex mechanism for inhibition. Like the GPR motif, the R6A and R6A-1 peptides compete with G(betagamma) subunits for binding to G(i)(alpha)(1), suggesting their use as activators of G(betagamma) signaling.

  8. Gel Scaffolds of BMP-2-binding Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers for Spinal Arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Marco; Ghodasra, Jason; Nickoli, Michael S.; Ashtekar, Amruta; Polavarapu, Mahesh; Babu, Jacob; Riaz, Rehan M.; Nicolas, Joseph D.; Nelson, David; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; Kaltz, Start R.; Earhart, Jeffrey S.; Merk, Bradley R.; McKee, Jeff S.; Bairstow, Shawn F.; Shah, Ramille N.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers formed by self-assembly can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine through the use of molecules that display bioactive signals on their surfaces. We report here on the use of PA nanofibers with binding affinity for the bone promoting growth factor BMP-2 to create a gel scaffold for osteogenesis. With the objective of reducing the amount of BMP-2 used clinically for successful arthrodesis in the spine, we used amounts of growth factor incorporated in the scaffolds that are 10 to 100 times lower than that those used clinically in collagen scaffolds. The efficacy of the bioactive PA system to promote BMP-2-induced osteogenesis in vivo was investigated in a rat posterolateral lumbar intertransverse spinal fusion model. PA nanofiber gels displaying BMP-2-binding segments exhibited superior spinal fusion rates relative to controls, effectively decreasing the required therapeutic dose of BMP-2 by ten-fold. Interestingly, a 42% fusion rate was observed for gels containing the bioactive nanofibers without the use of exogenous BMP-2, suggesting the ability of the nanofiber to recruit endogenous growth factor. Results obtained here demonstrate that bioactive biomaterials with capacity to bind specific growth factors by design are great targets for regenerative medicine. PMID:24753455

  9. On the ion selectivity in Ca-binding proteins: the cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 peptide as a model.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, F; Weinstein, H

    1989-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. Its functions are directly dependent on the high specificity for Ca2+ exhibited by the proteins and ion carriers that bind divalent ions. To elucidate the basis for this specificity we have calculated the relative energies of solvation of calcium and magnesium ions in complexes with cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3, a small synthetic peptide that binds Ca2+ with an affinity comparable to those of the naturally occurring proteins. The results show that the ion selectivity of the peptide resides in the difference in the solvation energies of the competing ions in water. Although the peptide is able to complex Mg2+ better than Ca2+ in the stoichiometries in which cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 binds divalent ions, it is not always able to provide as much stabilization for Mg2+ as water does. These results also explain why cyclo(-L-Pro-Gly-)3 binds Ca2+ and Mg2+ with different stoichiometries and indicate the source for expected differences in the structures of complexes of the two ions. Images PMID:2813364

  10. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  11. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramić, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft (“entropy reservoir”) as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies. PMID:22493238

  12. Entropy-driven binding of opioid peptides induces a large domain motion in human dipeptidyl peptidase III.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Gustavo A; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Viertlmayr, Roland; Dong, Aiping; Binter, Alexandra; Abramic, Marija; Macheroux, Peter; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Gruber, Karl

    2012-04-24

    Opioid peptides are involved in various essential physiological processes, most notably nociception. Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is one of the most important enkephalin-degrading enzymes associated with the mammalian pain modulatory system. Here we describe the X-ray structures of human DPP III and its complex with the opioid peptide tynorphin, which rationalize the enzyme's substrate specificity and reveal an exceptionally large domain motion upon ligand binding. Microcalorimetric analyses point at an entropy-dominated process, with the release of water molecules from the binding cleft ("entropy reservoir") as the major thermodynamic driving force. Our results provide the basis for the design of specific inhibitors that enable the elucidation of the exact role of DPP III and the exploration of its potential as a target of pain intervention strategies.

  13. Functional and Selective Bacterial Interfaces Using Cross-Scaffold Gold Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Jahnke, Justin P.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the functional and selective activity of three phage-derived gold-binding peptides on the Escherichia coli ( E. coli) bacterial cell surface display scaffold (eCPX) for the first time. Gold-binding peptides, p3-Au12 (LKAHLPPSRLPS), p8#9 (VSGSSPDS), and Midas-2 (TGTSVLIATPYV), were compared side-by-side through experiment and simulation. All exhibited strong binding to an evaporated gold film, with approximately a 4-log difference in binding between each peptide and the control sample. The increased affinity for gold was also confirmed by direct visualization of samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Peptide dynamics in solution were performed to analyze innate structure, and all three were found to have a high degree of flexibility. Preferential binding to gold over silicon for all three peptides was demonstrated, with up to four orders of magnitude selectivity exhibited by p3-Au12. The selectivity was also clearly evident through SEM analysis of the boundary between the gold film and silicon substrate. Functional activity of bound E. coli cells was further demonstrated by stimulating filamentation and all three peptides were characterized as prolific relative to control samples. This work shows great promise towards functional and active bacterial-hybrid gold surfaces and the potential to enable the next generation living material interfaces.

  14. High-order neural networks and kernel methods for peptide-MHC binding prediction.

    PubMed

    Kuksa, Pavel P; Min, Martin Renqiang; Dugar, Rishabh; Gerstein, Mark

    2015-11-15

    Effective computational methods for peptide-protein binding prediction can greatly help clinical peptide vaccine search and design. However, previous computational methods fail to capture key nonlinear high-order dependencies between different amino acid positions. As a result, they often produce low-quality rankings of strong binding peptides. To solve this problem, we propose nonlinear high-order machine learning methods including high-order neural networks (HONNs) with possible deep extensions and high-order kernel support vector machines to predict major histocompatibility complex-peptide binding. The proposed high-order methods improve quality of binding predictions over other prediction methods. With the proposed methods, a significant gain of up to 25-40% is observed on the benchmark and reference peptide datasets and tasks. In addition, for the first time, our experiments show that pre-training with high-order semi-restricted Boltzmann machines significantly improves the performance of feed-forward HONNs. Moreover, our experiments show that the proposed shallow HONN outperform the popular pre-trained deep neural network on most tasks, which demonstrates the effectiveness of modelling high-order feature interactions for predicting major histocompatibility complex-peptide binding. There is no associated distributable software. renqiang@nec-labs.com or mark.gerstein@yale.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Peptide length variants p2Ca and QL9 present distinct conformations to L(d)-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Hornell, T M; Martin, S M; Myers, N B; Connolly, J M

    2001-10-15

    Recent advances have provided insights into how the TCR interacts with MHC/peptide complexes and a rationale to predict optimal epitopes for MHC binding and T cell recognition. For example, peptides of nine residues are predicted to be optimal for binding to H2-L(d), although 8 mer epitopes have also been identified. It has been predicted that 8 mer and 9 mer length variant peptides bound to L(d) present identical epitopes to T cells. However, in contrast to this prediction, we demonstrate here that the 8 mer peptide p2Ca and its 9 mer length variant QL9, extended by an N-terminal glutamine, assume distinct conformations when bound to L(d). We generated self-L(d)-restricted CTL clones specific for p2Ca that recognize L(d)/QL9 poorly if at all. This result is in sharp contrast to what has been observed with L(d)-alloreactive T cells that possess a much higher affinity for L(d)/QL9 than for L(d)/p2Ca. Alanine substitutions of the N-terminal residues of the QL9 peptide rescue detection by these self-L(d)/p2Ca-specific T cells, but decrease recognition by the L(d)-alloreactive 2C T cell clone. In addition, 2C T cell recognition of the p2Ca peptide is affected by different alanine substitutions compared with 2C T cell recognition of the QL9 peptide. These data clearly demonstrate that the p2Ca and QL9 peptides assume distinct conformations when bound to L(d) and, furthermore, demonstrate that there is flexibility in peptide binding within the MHC class I cleft.

  16. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L.; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Jones, Norman G.; Hanson, Carl V.; Hoober, J. Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-galactose (Gal)/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6)GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8)Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6)Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C has

  17. Density-dependent cooperative non-specific binding in solid-phase SELEX affinity selection.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Abdullah; White, Brian S; Lis, John T; Shalloway, David

    2013-08-01

    The non-specific binding of undesired ligands to a target is the primary factor limiting the enrichment of tight-binding ligands in affinity selection. Solution-phase non-specific affinity is determined by the free-energy of ligand binding to a single target. However, the solid-phase affinity might be higher if a ligand bound concurrently to multiple adjacent immobilized targets in a cooperative manner. Cooperativity could emerge in this case as a simple consequence of the relationship between the free energy of binding, localization entropy and the spatial distribution of the immobilized targets. We tested this hypothesis using a SELEX experimental design and found that non-specific RNA aptamer ligands can concurrently bind up to four bead-immobilized peptide targets, and that this can increase their effective binding affinity by two orders-of-magnitude. Binding curves were quantitatively explained by a new statistical mechanical model of density-dependent cooperative binding, which relates cooperative binding to both the target concentration and the target surface density on the immobilizing substrate. Target immobilization plays a key role in SELEX and other ligand enrichment methods, particularly in new multiplexed microfluidic purification devices, and these results have strong implications for optimizing their performance.

  18. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  19. The Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide binds to the anionic DMPS lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2016-06-01

    We have applied isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and the all-atom explicit water model to study binding of Aβ10-40 peptide to the anionic DMPS bilayer. To provide comparison with a zwitterionic bilayer, we used our previous REMD simulations probing binding of the same peptide to the DMPC bilayer. Using two sets of simulations, we comparatively analyzed the equilibrium Aβ conformational ensemble, peptide-bilayer interactions, and changes in the bilayer structure induced by Aβ binding. Our results are six-fold. (1) Binding to the DMPS bilayer triggers the formation of stable helix in the Aβ C-terminal, although the helix-inducing effect caused by DMPS lipids is weaker than that of DMPC. (2) Compared to the DMPC-bound Aβ monomer, the anionic bilayer weakens intrapeptide interactions, particularly, formed by charged amino acids. (3) Binding of Aβ peptide to the DMPS bilayer is primarily governed by electrostatic interactions between charged amino acids and charged lipid groups. In contrast, these interactions play minor role in Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (4) Aβ peptide generally resides on the DMPS bilayer surface causing relatively minor bilayer thinning. The opposite scenario applies to Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (5) In contrast to DMPC simulations, Aβ largely expels anionic lipids from its binding "footprint" forming a ring of charged amino acids mixed with charged lipid groups around the peptide. (6) Aβ binding disorders proximal DMPS lipids more strongly than their DMPC counterparts. Our simulations show that Aβ monomers fail to perturb anionic or zwitterionic bilayers across both leaflets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.<