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Sample records for peptide bond hydrolysis

  1. Peptide synthesis in aqueous environments: the role of extreme conditions on peptide bond formation and peptide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Eduard; Nair, Nisanth N; Marx, Dominik

    2009-09-30

    The mechanisms and free energetics underlying the formation of peptides from alpha-amino acids and alpha-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) in bulk water at both ambient and extreme temperature and pressure conditions were investigated using accelerated ab initio molecular dynamics. In particular, peptide bond formation using an activated amino acid in form of its NCA, subsequent decarboxylation, as well as hydrolysis of the formed peptide were studied using glycine. It is shown to what extent thermodynamic conditions affect the reaction mechanisms qualitatively and the energetics quantitatively in solution. In particular, the zwitterionic intermediate in the peptidization step found in ambient water degenerates into a transient species in hot-pressurized water, whereas the hydrolysis reaction is found to follow qualitatively different pathways at ambient and extreme conditions. The work also quantifies the impact of extreme solvent conditions on both peptide bond formation and peptide hydrolysis in aqueous media. Beyond the specific case, the results provide important insights into how elevated temperatures and increased pressures affect organic reactions in aqueous solutions.

  2. A density functional theory study on peptide bond cleavage at aspartic residues: direct vs cyclic intermediate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sang-aroon, Wichien; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-12-01

    In this work, peptide bond cleavages at carboxy- and amino-sides of the aspartic residue in a peptide model via direct (concerted and step-wise) and cyclic intermediate hydrolysis reaction pathways were explored computationally. The energetics, thermodynamic properties, rate constants, and equilibrium constants of all hydrolysis reactions, as well as their energy profiles were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The result indicated that peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue occurred most preferentially via the cyclic intermediate hydrolysis pathway. In all reaction pathways, cleavage of the peptide bond at the amino-side occurred less preferentially than at the carboxy-side. The overall reaction rate constants of peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue at the carboxy-side for the assisted system were, in increasing order: concerted < step-wise < cyclic intermediate.

  3. Hydrolysis activities of the particle of agarose-Ce4+ complex for compounds containing phosphodiester or peptide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lina; Wang, Dongfeng; Su, Lin; Luo, Yi; Sun, Liping; Xue, Changhu

    2005-07-01

    Hydrolysis activities of PACC (particle of agarose-Ce4+ complex, newly made through double emulsification) for compounds containing phosphodiester or peptide bonds were studied. The results showed that PACC could hydrolyze organophosphorous pesticides not only in water but also in vegetable juice or tea extract. Hydrolysis rates of methamidophos, omethoate and chlorpyrifos in water are 32.39%, 27.12% and 46.62% respectively, those of chlorpyrifos and methamidophos in mung sprout juice 38.28% and 35.45% respectively, and that of chlorpyrifos in tea extract 59.76%. Hydrolysis rates of BSA (bovine serum albumin) in water and protein in tea extract by PACC increase by 54.30% and 86.46% respectively as compared with the control.

  4. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  6. Formation versus hydrolysis of the peptide bond from a quantum-mechanical viewpoint: The role of mineral surfaces and implications for the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Ugliengo, Piero; Sodupe, Mariona

    2009-03-01

    The condensation (polymerization by water elimination) of molecular building blocks to yield the first active biopolymers (e.g. of amino acids to form peptides) during primitive Earth is an intriguing question that nowadays still remains open since these processes are thermodynamically disfavoured in highly dilute water solutions. In the present contribution, formation and hydrolysis of glycine oligopeptides occurring on a cluster model of sanidine feldspar (001) surface have been simulated by quantum mechanical methods. Results indicate that the catalytic interplay between Lewis and Brønsted sites both present at the sanidine surface, in cooperation with the London forces acting between the biomolecules and the inorganic surface, plays a crucial role to: i) favour the condensation of glycine to yield oligopeptides as reaction products; ii) inhibit the hydrolysis of the newly formed oligopeptides. Both facts suggest that mineral surfaces may have helped in catalyzing, stabilizing and protecting from hydration the oligopeptides formed in the prebiotic era.

  7. Formation versus Hydrolysis of the Peptide Bond from a Quantum-mechanical Viewpoint: The Role of Mineral Surfaces and Implications for the Origin of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rimola, Albert; Ugliengo, Piero; Sodupe, Mariona

    2009-01-01

    The condensation (polymerization by water elimination) of molecular building blocks to yield the first active biopolymers (e.g. of amino acids to form peptides) during primitive Earth is an intriguing question that nowadays still remains open since these processes are thermodynamically disfavoured in highly dilute water solutions. In the present contribution, formation and hydrolysis of glycine oligopeptides occurring on a cluster model of sanidine feldspar (001) surface have been simulated by quantum mechanical methods. Results indicate that the catalytic interplay between Lewis and Brønsted sites both present at the sanidine surface, in cooperation with the London forces acting between the biomolecules and the inorganic surface, plays a crucial role to: i) favour the condensation of glycine to yield oligopeptides as reaction products; ii) inhibit the hydrolysis of the newly formed oligopeptides. Both facts suggest that mineral surfaces may have helped in catalyzing, stabilizing and protecting from hydration the oligopeptides formed in the prebiotic era. PMID:19399219

  8. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  9. Scandium(iii) triflate-promoted serine/threonine-selective peptide bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jizhi; Sohma, Youhei; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-02-01

    The site-selective cleavage of peptide bonds is an important chemical modification that is useful not only for the structural determination of peptides, but also as an artificial modulator of peptide/protein function and properties. Here we report site-selective hydrolysis of peptide bonds at the Ser and Thr positions with a high conversion yield. This chemical cleavage relies on Sc(iii)-promoted N,O-acyl rearrangement and subsequent hydrolysis. The method is applicable to a broad scope of polypeptides with various functional groups, including a post-translationally modified peptide that is unsuitable for enzymatic hydrolysis. The system was further extended to site-selective cleavage of a native protein, Aβ1-42, which is closely related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Mechanistic role of each metal ion in Streptomyces dinuclear aminopeptidase: PEPTIDE hydrolysis and 7x10(10)-fold rate enhancement of phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Altan; Tay, William M; Grossman, Steven H; Ming, Li-June

    2010-01-01

    The dinuclear aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus (SgAP) and its metal derivatives catalyze the hydrolysis of the phosphoester bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) and the phosphonate ester p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonate with extraordinary rate enhancements at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C [A. Ercan, H. I. Park, L.-J. Ming, Biochemistry 45, (2006) 13779-13793.], reaching 6.7 billion-fold in terms of the first-order rate constant of the di-Co(II) derivative with respect to the autohydrolytic rates. Since phosphoesters are transition state-like inhibitors in peptide hydrolysis, their hydrolysis by SgAP is quite novel. Herein, we report the investigation of this proficient alternative catalysis of SgAP and the role of each metal ion in the dinuclear site toward peptide and BNPP hydrolysis. Mn(II) selectively binds to one of the dinuclear metal sites (M1), affording MnE-SgAP with an empty (E) second site for the binding of another metal (M2), including Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II). Peptide hydrolysis is controlled by M2, wherein the k(cat) values for the derivatives MnM2-SgAP are different yet similar between MnCo- and CoCo-SgAP and pairs of other metal derivatives. On the other hand, BNPP hydrolysis is affected by metals in both sites. Thus, the two hydrolytic catalyses must follow different mechanisms. Based on crystal structures, docking, and the results presented herein, the M1 site is close to the hydrophobic specific site and the M2 site is next to Tyr246 that is H-bonded to a coordinated nucleophilic water molecule in peptide hydrolysis; whereas a coordinated water molecule on M1 becomes available as the nucleophile in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

  11. Catalytic RNA and synthesis of the peptide bond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Kozlowski, M.; Zou, X.

    1991-01-01

    We are studying whether the L-19 IVS ribozyme from Tetrahymena thermophila can catalyze the formation of the peptide bond when it is supplied with synthetic aminoacyl oligonucleotides. If this reaction works, it could give us some insight into the mechanism of peptide bond formation and the origin of coded protein synthesis. Two short oligoribonucleotides, CCCCC and a protected form of CCCCU were prepared; the former was made by the controlled hydrolysis of Poly(C), and the later by multistep chemical synthesis from the protected monomers. The homopentamer was then aminocylated using C-14 labelled Boc-protected glycine imidazolide. This aminoacylated oligo-nucleotide has now been shown to enter the active site of the L-19 IVS, and aminoacyl transfer, and peptide bond formation reactions are being sought. Our synthesis of CCCCU made us aware of the inadequacy of many of the 2'- hydroxyl protecting groups that are in use today and we therefore designed a new 2'- protecting group that is presently being tested.

  12. Protein-based peptide-bond formation by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazunori; Toh, Yukimatsu; Suto, Kyoko; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Oka, Natsuhisa; Wada, Takeshi; Tomita, Kozo

    2007-10-18

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase (LF-transferase) catalyses peptide-bond formation by using Leu-tRNA(Leu) (or Phe-tRNA(Phe)) and an amino-terminal Arg (or Lys) of a protein, as donor and acceptor substrates, respectively. However, the catalytic mechanism of peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase remained obscure. Here we determine the structures of complexes of LF-transferase and phenylalanyl adenosine, with and without a short peptide bearing an N-terminal Arg. Combining the two separate structures into one structure as well as mutation studies reveal the mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase. The electron relay from Asp 186 to Gln 188 helps Gln 188 to attract a proton from the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal Arg of the acceptor peptide. This generates the attacking nucleophile for the carbonyl carbon of the aminoacyl bond of the aminoacyl-tRNA, thus facilitating peptide-bond formation. The protein-based mechanism for peptide-bond formation by LF-transferase is similar to the reverse reaction of the acylation step observed in the peptide hydrolysis reaction by serine proteases.

  13. Interaction of molybdocene dichloride with cysteine-containing peptides: coordination, regioselective hydrolysis, and intramolecular aminolysis.

    PubMed

    Erxleben, Andrea

    2005-02-21

    Reactions of the organometallic compound molybdocene dichloride (Cp2MoCl2, Cp = eta5-cyclopentadienyl) with the cysteine-containing peptides L-cysteinylglycine (Cys-Gly), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (AcCys), glycyl-L-cysteine (Gly-Cys), glycyl-L-cysteinylglycine (Gly-Cys-Gly), and gamma-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine (glutathione, GSH) have been studied in aqueous solution in the pH range 2-9. The dipeptides Cys-Gly and Gly-Cys and the acetylated amino acid AcCys form 1:1 and 2:1 complexes of composition [Cp2Mo(peptide-S)(OH(2))]n+/- and [Cp2Mo(peptide-S)2]n+/- as well as the chelates [Cp2Mo(AcCys-S,O)], [Cp2Mo(Gly-Cys-S,O)]+, and [Cp2Mo(Cys-Gly-S,N)] with the Cp2Mo2+ unit binding to the deprotonated thiolate group and the free amino or carboxylate group of the cysteine residue. Upon treatment of Gly-Cys-Gly and the naturally occurring tripeptide GSH with Cp2MoCl2 at elevated temperature, release of free glycine was observed. The Cp2Mo2+ entity coordinates to the thiolate group of GSH and mediates regioselective hydrolysis of the Cys-Gly peptide bond by intramolecular metal hydroxide activation. Cp2Mo2+-promoted hydrolysis of GSH was followed at pD 7.4 and 5.2 and 40 and 60 degrees C. By contrast, the Cys-Gly bond in [Cp2Mo(Gly-Cys-Gly-S,N)] is cleaved by intramolecular aminolysis at pD > or = 7.4 and 60 degrees C leading to glycine and the Cp2Mo2+ complex of the 2,5-diketopiperazine derivative cyclo-(Gly-Cys). Chelating coordination of the Cp2Mo2+ moiety to the thiolate group and to the deprotonated amide nitrogen of the tripeptide changes the configuration of the peptide bond from (preferred) trans to cis, thus enabling nucleophilic attack of the primary amino group at the Cys-Gly bond. The reaction product [Cp2Mo{cyclo-(Gly-Cys)}] x 2H2O has been characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  14. Cellular disulfide bond formation in bioactive peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Tailhades, Julien; Hughes, Richard Anthony; Separovic, Frances; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2015-01-14

    Bioactive peptides play important roles in metabolic regulation and modulation and many are used as therapeutics. These peptides often possess disulfide bonds, which are important for their structure, function and stability. A systematic network of enzymes--a disulfide bond generating enzyme, a disulfide bond donor enzyme and a redox cofactor--that function inside the cell dictates the formation and maintenance of disulfide bonds. The main pathways that catalyze disulfide bond formation in peptides and proteins in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are remarkably similar and share several mechanistic features. This review summarizes the formation of disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins by cellular and recombinant machinery.

  15. [Hydrolysis by enteropeptidase of nonspecific (model) peptide sequences and possible physiological role of this phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Likhareva, V V; Mikhaĭlova, A G; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase) (EC 3.4.21.9), a highly specific processing protease, initiating a cascade of reactions activating the digestion enzymes. Catalyzing trypsinogen activation enteropeptidase exhibits unique properties for high efficiency hydrolysis of the polypeptide chain after lysine-15 residue in the -DDDDK15- sequence. In 1998 we found an unusual calcium-dependent autolysis of the enteropeptidase heavy chain leading to the drastic loss of its activity towards trypsinogen: after lysine-360 (-NNYEK360-INCN-), -), arginine-384 (-NEWER384-TQGS-), arginine-422 (-GRRER422-VGLL-) and lysine-465 (-QNMEK465-TIFQ-) residues. We used hepta-nona-peptides as the model substrates for autolysys: human angiotensin II--DRVYIHPF and cattle hemoglobin b-chain fragments: LTAEEKA and MLTAEEKAA. Kinetic parameters of enteropeptidase hydrolysis for these substrates were determined. Recent study demonstrates the ability of enteropeptidase to hydrolyze peptide bonds formed by carboxyl groups of Lys or Arg residues if less than four but at least one negative charged amino acid residue is in any of substrate P2-P5 positions. Ca(2+)-dependent autolysis of enteropeptidase heavy chain and of trypsin were compared; the second one serves as the natural defense mechanism against the undesirable premature proenzymes activation in pancreas leading to pancreatitis. The corresponding enteropeptidase inactivation in low Ca2+ environment ought to be the component of the same protective mechanism.

  16. Structural analysis of peptide fragments following the hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin by trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Akten, E Demet; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-05-01

    Peptide bond hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by chymotrypsin and trypsin was investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As a fluorescent cross-linking reagent, N-(1-pyrenyl) maleimide (PM) was attached to BSA, through all free amine groups of arginine, lysine, and/or single free thiol (Cys34). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor fluorescence decays analyzed by exponential series method to obtain the changes in lifetime distributions. After the exposure of synthesized protein substrate PM-BSA to chymotrypsin and trypsin, it is observed that each protease produced a distinct change in the lifetime distribution profile, which was attributed to distinct chemical environments created by short peptide fragments in each hydrolysate. The persistence of excimer emission at longer lifetime regions for chymotrypsin, as opposed to trypsin, suggested the presence of small-scale hydrophobic clusters that might prevent some excimers from being completely quenched. It is most likely that the formation of these clusters is due to hydrophobic end groups of peptide fragments in chymotrypsin hydrolysate. A similar hydrophobic shield was not suggested for trypsin hydrolysis, as the end groups of peptide fragments would be either arginine or lysine. Overall, in case the target protein's 3D structure is known, the structural analysis of possible excimer formation presented here can be used as a tool to explain the differences in activity between two proteases, i.e. the peak's intensity and location in the profile. Furthermore, this structural evaluation might be helpful in obtaining the optimum experimental conditions in order to generate the highest amount of PM-BSA complexes.

  17. Understanding regioselective cleavage in peptide hydrolysis by a palladium(II) aqua complex: a theoretical point of view.

    PubMed

    Yeguas, Violeta; Campomanes, Pablo; López, Ramón; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2010-07-01

    Hydrolytic cleavage of the oligopeptides Ace-Ala-Lys-Tyr-Gly approximately Gly-Met-Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala and Ace-Lys-Gly-Gly-Ala-Gly approximately Pro-Met-Ala-Ala-Arg-Gly by [Pd(H(2)O)(4)](2+) was theoretically investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations. The Pd anchorage to the peptide sequence is crucial to provoke the cleavage of the second bond upstream from the anchored methionine. For both cases, the most favorable reaction mechanism is a three-step route. The first step coincides with the experimental suggestion found for the Gly approximately Pro-Met sequence on a cleavage caused by an external attack of a water molecule to a complex in trans conformation of the scissile Gly approximately Gly and Gly approximately Pro peptide bonds. However, our results uncover the important role played by the presence of a Pd-coordinated water molecule, which simultaneously interacts with the carbonyl oxygen atom of the Gly amino acid in the Gly approximately Gly and Gly approximately Pro bonds. In accordance with experimental facts, the rise of the hydrolysis reaction rate when the Pro amino acid is located in the scissile peptide bond was also corroborated. The findings obtained at a molecular level from the present computations not only are relevant to rationalize the previously reported experiments but also could be of importance in designing new Pd(II) complexes for the regioselective cleavage of peptides and proteins.

  18. Pilot-scale base hydrolysis processing of HMX-based plastic-bonded explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Flesner, R.L.; Dell`orco, P.C.; Spontarelli, T.; Bishop, R.L.; Skidmore, C.; Uher, K.J.; Kramer, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated that many energetic materials can be rendered non-energetic via reaction with sodium hydroxide or ammonia. This process is known as base hydrolysis. A pilot scale reactor has been developed to process up to 20 kg of plastic bonded explosive in a single batch operation. In this report, we discuss the design and operation of the pilot scale reactor for the processing of PBX 9404, a standard Department of Energy plastic bonded explosive containing HMX and nitrocellulose. Products from base hydrolysis, although non-energetic, still require additional processing before release to the environment Decomposition products, destruction efficiencies, and rates of reaction for base hydrolysis will be presented. Hydrothermal processing, previously known as supercritical water oxidation, has been proposed for converting organic products from hydrolysis to carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide. Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing may yield a viable alternative to open burning/open detonation for destruction of many energetic materials.

  19. Pilot-scale base hydrolysis processing of HMX-based plastic-bonded explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Flesner, R.L.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Spontarelli, T.; Bishop, R.L.; Skidmore, C.B.; Uher, K.; Kramer, J.F.

    1997-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated that many energetic materials can be rendered non-energetic via reaction with sodium hydroxide or ammonia. This process is known as base hydrolysis. A pilot scale reactor has been developed to process up to 20 kg of plastic bonded explosive in a single batch operation. In this report, we discuss the design and operation of the pilot scale reactor for the processing of PBX 9404, a standard Department of Energy plastic bonded explosive containing HMX and nitrocellulose. Products from base hydrolysis, although non-energetic, still require additional processing before release to the environment. Decomposition products, destruction efficiencies, and rates of reaction for base hydrolysis will be presented. Hydrothermal processing, previously known as supercritical water oxidation, has been proposed for converting organic products from hydrolysis to carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide. Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing may yield a viable alternative to open burning/open detonation for destruction of many energetic materials.

  20. Peptide Bond Formation Mechanism Catalyzed by Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Marti, Sergio; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Bertran, Juan

    2015-09-23

    In this paper we present a study of the peptide bond formation reaction catalyzed by ribosome. Different mechanistic proposals have been explored by means of Free Energy Perturbation methods within hybrid QM/MM potentials, where the chemical system has been described by the M06-2X functional and the environment by means of the AMBER force field. According to our results, the most favorable mechanism in the ribosome would proceed through an eight-membered ring transition state, involving a proton shuttle mechanism through the hydroxyl group of the sugar and a water molecule. This transition state is similar to that described for the reaction in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 8708-8719), but the reaction mechanisms are noticeably different. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally determined catalytic effect of ribosome that can be explained by the different behavior of the two environments. While the solvent reorganizes during the chemical process involving an entropic penalty, the ribosome is preorganized in the formation of the Michaelis complex and does not suffer important changes along the reaction, dampening the charge redistribution of the chemical system.

  1. Peptide Bond Formation Mechanism Catalyzed by Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Marti, Sergio; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Bertran, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of the peptide bond formation reaction catalyzed by ribosome. Different mechanistic proposals have been explored by means of Free Energy Perturbation methods within hybrid QM/MM potentials, where the chemical system has been described by the M06-2X functional and the environment by means of the AMBER force field. According to our results, the most favourable mechanism in the ribosome would proceed through an eight-membered ring transition state, involving a proton shuttle mechanism through the hydroxyl group of the sugar and a water molecule. This transition state is similar to that described for the reaction in solution (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 8708–8719) but the reaction mechanisms are noticeable different. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally determined catalytic effect of ribosome that can be explained by the different behaviour of the two environments. While the solvent reorganizes during the chemical process involving an entropic penalty, the ribosome is preorganized in the formation of the Michaelis complex and does not suffer important changes along the reaction, dampening the charge redistribution of the chemical system. PMID:26325003

  2. Hydrolysis of triple-helical collagen peptide models by matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Lauer-Fields, J L; Tuzinski, K A; Shimokawa, K i; Nagase, H; Fields, G B

    2000-05-05

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has been implicated in the process of a variety of diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and tumor cell metastasis. To study the mechanisms of MMP action on collagenous substrates, we have constructed homotrimeric triple-helical peptide (THP) models of the collagenase cleavage sites in types I and II collagen. The THPs incorporate either the alpha1(I)772-786 or the alpha1(II)772-783 sequence. The alpha1(I)772-786 and alpha1(II)772-783 THPs were hydrolyzed by MMP-1 at the Gly-Ile and Gly-Leu bonds, respectively, analogous to the bonds cleaved in corresponding native collagens. Thus, the THPs contained all necessary information to direct MMP-1 binding and proteolysis. Subsequent investigations using the alpha1(I)772-786 THP showed hydrolysis by MMP-2, MMP-13, and a COOH-terminal domain-deleted MMP-1 (MMP-1(Delta(243-450))) but not by MMP-3 or a COOH-terminal domain-deleted MMP-3 (MMP-3(Delta(248-460))). Kinetic analyses showed a k(cat)/K(m) value of 1,808 s(-1) m(-1) for MMP-1 hydrolysis of alpha1(I)772-786 THP, approximately 10-fold lower than for type I collagen. The effect is caused primarily by relative K(m) values. MMP-2 and MMP-13 cleaved the THP more rapidly than MMP-1, but MMP-2 cleavage occurred at distinct multiple sites. Comparison of MMP-1 and MMP-1(Delta(243-450)) hydrolysis of alpha1(I)772-786 THP showed that both can cleave a triple-helical substrate with a slightly higher K(m) value for MMP-1(Delta(243-450)). We propose that the COOH-terminal domain of MMPs is necessary for orienting whole, native collagen molecules but may not be necessary for binding to and cleaving a THP. This proposal is consistent with the large distance between the MMP-1 catalytic and COOH-terminal domains observed by three-dimensional structural analysis and supports previous suggestions that the features of the catalytic domain contribute significantly toward enzyme specificity.

  3. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of soybean peptides with different degrees of hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Mio; Taira, Toshiaki; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the degree of hydrolysis on the interfacial and emulsifying properties of soybean peptides were evaluated based on surface and interfacial tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) analyses. Of the five evaluated soybean peptides (SP95, SP87, SP75, SP49, and SP23), those with higher degrees of hydrolysis (SP95 and SP87) did not exhibit noticeable surface-active properties in water, whereas those with relatively low degrees of hydrolysis (SP75, SP49, and SP23) exhibited remarkable surface tension-lowering activity. The latter set (SP75, SP49, and SP23) also formed giant associates with average sizes ranging from 64.5 nm to 82.6 nm above their critical association concentration (CAC). Moreover, SP23 with the lowest degree of hydrolysis exhibited excellent emulsifying activity for soybean oil, and FF-TEM analysis demonstrated that the emulsions were stabilized by a lamella-like multilayer peptide structure on the oil droplets that prevented coagulation. The peptide with the lowest degree of hydrolysis (SP23) was effective not only for soybean oil emulsification, but also for the emulsification of liquid paraffin and silicon oil that are generally difficult to emulsify.

  4. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  5. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Peanut Flour Produces Bioactive Peptides with Reduced Allergenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut allergy is one of the most severe food allergies due to its life-threatening nature and persistency. Current immunotherapy methods, though effective, are often accompanied by allergic side-effects. Enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut flour has the potential to produce bioactive peptides with impro...

  6. Evolutionary Importance of the Intramolecular Pathways of Hydrolysis of Phosphate Ester Mixed Anhydrides with Amino Acids and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziwei; Beaufils, Damien; Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Pascal, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Aminoacyl adenylates (aa-AMPs) constitute essential intermediates of protein biosynthesis. Their polymerization in aqueous solution has often been claimed as a potential route to abiotic peptides in spite of a highly efficient CO2-promoted pathway of hydrolysis. Here we investigate the efficiency and relevance of this frequently overlooked pathway from model amino acid phosphate mixed anhydrides including aa-AMPs. Its predominance was demonstrated at CO2 concentrations matching that of physiological fluids or that of the present-day ocean, making a direct polymerization pathway unlikely. By contrast, the occurrence of the CO2-promoted pathway was observed to increase the efficiency of peptide bond formation owing to the high reactivity of the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) intermediate. Even considering CO2 concentrations in early Earth liquid environments equivalent to present levels, mixed anhydrides would have polymerized predominantly through NCAs. The issue of a potential involvement of NCAs as biochemical metabolites could even be raised. The formation of peptide-phosphate mixed anhydrides from 5(4H)-oxazolones (transiently formed through prebiotically relevant peptide activation pathways) was also observed as well as the occurrence of the reverse cyclization process in the reactions of these mixed anhydrides. These processes constitute the core of a reaction network that could potentially have evolved towards the emergence of translation.

  7. Evolutionary importance of the intramolecular pathways of hydrolysis of phosphate ester mixed anhydrides with amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziwei; Beaufils, Damien; Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Pascal, Robert

    2014-12-11

    Aminoacyl adenylates (aa-AMPs) constitute essential intermediates of protein biosynthesis. Their polymerization in aqueous solution has often been claimed as a potential route to abiotic peptides in spite of a highly efficient CO2-promoted pathway of hydrolysis. Here we investigate the efficiency and relevance of this frequently overlooked pathway from model amino acid phosphate mixed anhydrides including aa-AMPs. Its predominance was demonstrated at CO2 concentrations matching that of physiological fluids or that of the present-day ocean, making a direct polymerization pathway unlikely. By contrast, the occurrence of the CO2-promoted pathway was observed to increase the efficiency of peptide bond formation owing to the high reactivity of the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) intermediate. Even considering CO2 concentrations in early Earth liquid environments equivalent to present levels, mixed anhydrides would have polymerized predominantly through NCAs. The issue of a potential involvement of NCAs as biochemical metabolites could even be raised. The formation of peptide-phosphate mixed anhydrides from 5(4H)-oxazolones (transiently formed through prebiotically relevant peptide activation pathways) was also observed as well as the occurrence of the reverse cyclization process in the reactions of these mixed anhydrides. These processes constitute the core of a reaction network that could potentially have evolved towards the emergence of translation.

  8. Peptide Bond Formation in Water Mediated by Carbon Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Leman, Luke J; Huang, Zheng-Zheng; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2015-09-01

    Demonstrating plausible nonenzymatic polymerization mechanisms for prebiotic monomers represents a fundamental goal in prebiotic chemistry. While a great deal is now known about the potentially prebiotic synthesis of amino acids, our understanding of abiogenic polymerization processes to form polypeptides is less well developed. Here, we show that carbon disulfide (CS2), a component of volcanic emission and sulfide mineral weathering, and a widely used synthetic reagent and solvent, promotes peptide bond formation in modest yields (up to ∼20%) from α-amino acids under mild aqueous conditions. Exposure of a variety of α-amino acids to CS2 initially yields aminoacyl dithiocarbamates, which in turn generate reactive 2-thiono-5-oxazolidone intermediates, the thio analogues of N-carboxyanhydrides. Along with peptides, thiourea and thiohydantoin species are produced. Amino acid stereochemistry was preserved in the formation of peptides. Our findings reveal that CS2 could contribute to peptide bond formation, and possibly other condensation reactions, in abiogenic settings.

  9. Counting peptide-water hydrogen bonds in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haipeng; Porter, Lauren L; Rose, George D

    2011-02-01

    It is often assumed that the peptide backbone forms a substantial number of additional hydrogen bonds when a protein unfolds. We challenge that assumption in this article. Early surveys of hydrogen bonding in proteins of known structure typically found that most, but not all, backbone polar groups are satisfied, either by intramolecular partners or by water. When the protein is folded, these groups form approximately two hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one donor or acceptor for each carbonyl oxygen or amide hydrogen, respectively. But when unfolded, the backbone chain is often believed to form three hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one partner for each oxygen lone pair or amide hydrogen. This assumption is based on the properties of small model compounds, like N-methylacetamide, or simply accepted as self-evident fact. If valid, a chain of N residues would have approximately 2N backbone hydrogen bonds when folded but 3N backbone hydrogen bonds when unfolded, a sufficient difference to overshadow any uncertainties involved in calculating these per-residue averages. Here, we use exhaustive conformational sampling to monitor the number of H-bonds in a statistically adequate population of blocked polyalanyl-six-mers as the solvent quality ranges from good to poor. Solvent quality is represented by a scalar parameter used to Boltzmann-weight the population energy. Recent experimental studies show that a repeating (Gly-Ser) polypeptide undergoes a denaturant-induced expansion accompanied by breaking intramolecular peptide H-bonds. Results from our simulations augment this experimental finding by showing that the number of H-bonds is approximately conserved during such expansion⇋compaction transitions.

  10. Molecular modeling of bioorganometallic compounds: thermodynamic properties of molybdocene-glutathione complexes and mechanism of Peptide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Dimas; Díaz, Natalia

    2015-06-08

    The computational study of bioinorganic complexes between transition metals and flexible ligands is still challenging, given that, besides requiring extensive conformational searches, the treatment of metal-ligand bonds demands the application of quantum chemical methods. Herein, the adducts formed between molybdocene, which exhibits antitumor activity and reacts with thiol groups to give stable water-soluble complexes, and the tripeptide glutathione, which is a major source of biological thiols, are studied. Conformational searches are performed using the semiempirical PM6 method followed by geometry optimizations and single-point calculations using density functional theory methods. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations of the molybdocene-glutathione complex involved in the regioselective hydrolysis of the Cys-Gly linkage are performed in explicit solvent. The reactive process is also studied theoretically on cluster models of both the molybdocene-bound and the free peptide.

  11. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  12. Bioactive properties of peptides obtained from Argentinian defatted soy flour protein by Corolase PP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Amorim, Maria M; Voss, Glenise B; Nerli, Bibiana B; Picó, Guillermo A; Pintado, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of soybean meal protein isolate (SPI) obtained under two temperature conditions with Corolase PP was studied, assessing the impact of hydrolysis on potential antioxidant and antihypertensive activities. The protein was isolated from soybean meal under controlled conditions of time and temperature (70 °C, 1h; 90 °C, 30 min). Degree of hydrolysis assessed the progress of hydrolysis at different sampling times. For hydrolysates the antioxidant and angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities were measured. As observed, the DH was increasing until reaching 20% at 10h with disappearance of globular proteins and generation of low molecular weight peptides (less than 3kDa). A significant increase in antioxidant and ACE inhibitory capacities was observed. Five main peptides were identified, which may explain through their sequences the bioactive properties analyzed. Through this study was possible to obtain for the first time with Corolase PP soy hydrolysates with potential antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities, which can be used to obtain new added value functional ingredients from soy meal.

  13. Influence of ion-associated water on the hydrolysis of Si-O bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam F; Gibbs, G V; Dove, Patricia M

    2010-02-25

    Previous studies show the demineralization of biogenic, amorphous, and crystalline forms of silica is enhanced in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth cations. The origins of this effect are difficult to explain in light of work suggesting predominantly weak outer-sphere type interactions between these ions and silica. Here we investigate the ability of M(II) aqua ions to promote the hydrolysis of Si-O bonded interactions relative to ion-free water using electronic structure methods. Reaction pathways for Si-O hydrolysis are calculated with the B3LYP and PBE1PBE density functionals at the 6-31G(d) and 6-311+G(d,p) levels in the presence of water, and both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption complexes of Mg(2+)(6H(2)O) and Ca(2+)(6H(2)O). All reaction trajectories involving hydrated ions are characterized by one or more surmountable barriers associated with the rearrangement of ion-associated water molecules, and a single formidable barrier corresponding to hydrolysis of the Si-O bonded interaction. The hydrolysis step for outer-sphere adsorption is slightly less favorable than the water-induced reaction. In contrast, the barrier opposing Si-O hydrolysis in the presence of inner-sphere species is generally reduced relative to the water-induced pathway, indicating that the formation of inner-sphere complexes may be prerequisite to the detachment of Si species from highly coordinated surface sites. The results suggest a two-part physical model for ion-promoted Si-O hydrolysis that is consistent with experimental rate measurements. First, a bond path is formed between the cation and a bridging oxygen site on the silica surface that weakens the surrounding Si-O interactions, making them more susceptible to attack by water. Second, Si-O hydrolysis occurs adjacent to these inner-sphere species in proportion to the frequency of ion-associated solvent reorganization events. Both processes are dependent upon the particular ion hydration environment, which suggests

  14. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics. 2. A computational study of the conformational ramifications of peptide bond replacement.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brian E; Urban, Joseph J

    2010-01-21

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to examine the conformational ramifications of replacing peptide bonds with fluoroalkene moieties, thus generating peptidomimetics. The alanine dipeptide analogue (ADA) was chosen as a model compound. Three peptidomimetic systems were investigated including one generated by replacement of both peptide bonds of ADA, designated as DFA, and those generated by the single replacement of the C-terminal peptide bond and N-terminal peptide bond, designated as CFA and NFA, respectively. Conformations for all three systems were generated by exhaustive Monte Carlo searching. Relative conformational energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ/MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ (for DFA), MP2/-aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-311+G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(d)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d), and MMFF levels of theory. Aqueous phase conformational preferences were determined through calculations making use of continuum hydration models. The results indicate that replacement of both peptide bonds of ADA generates a peptidomimetic with conformational preferences where extended conformations are favored and the conformational profile is relatively insensitive to the nature of the surrounding medium. This is in contrast to ADA where the conformational preferences depend highly on the surrounding medium and where folded conformations with intramolecular hydrogen bonds are important in the absence of an interacting solvent. CFA and NFA are found to exhibit conformational preferences that do in some ways more closely resemble those of the alanine dipeptide analogue. This is particularly true in the case of NFA where interactions between the NH and CF groups are reminiscent of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding possible in ADA.

  15. Evolutionary Importance of the Intramolecular Pathways of Hydrolysis of Phosphate Ester Mixed Anhydrides with Amino Acids and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziwei; Beaufils, Damien; Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Pascal, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl adenylates (aa-AMPs) constitute essential intermediates of protein biosynthesis. Their polymerization in aqueous solution has often been claimed as a potential route to abiotic peptides in spite of a highly efficient CO2-promoted pathway of hydrolysis. Here we investigate the efficiency and relevance of this frequently overlooked pathway from model amino acid phosphate mixed anhydrides including aa-AMPs. Its predominance was demonstrated at CO2 concentrations matching that of physiological fluids or that of the present-day ocean, making a direct polymerization pathway unlikely. By contrast, the occurrence of the CO2-promoted pathway was observed to increase the efficiency of peptide bond formation owing to the high reactivity of the N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) intermediate. Even considering CO2 concentrations in early Earth liquid environments equivalent to present levels, mixed anhydrides would have polymerized predominantly through NCAs. The issue of a potential involvement of NCAs as biochemical metabolites could even be raised. The formation of peptide–phosphate mixed anhydrides from 5(4H)-oxazolones (transiently formed through prebiotically relevant peptide activation pathways) was also observed as well as the occurrence of the reverse cyclization process in the reactions of these mixed anhydrides. These processes constitute the core of a reaction network that could potentially have evolved towards the emergence of translation. PMID:25501391

  16. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-07

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases.

  17. cis-Peptide Bonds: A Key for Intestinal Permeability of Peptides? .

    PubMed

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Ovadia, Oded; Frank, Andreas Oliver; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Gilon, Chaim; Hoffman, Amnon; Kessler, Horst

    2015-10-19

    Recent structural studies on libraries of cyclic hexapeptides led to the identification of common backbone conformations that may be instrumental to the oral availability of peptides. Furthermore, the observation of differential Caco-2 permeabilities of enantiomeric pairs of some of these peptides strongly supports the concept of conformational specificity driven uptake and also suggests a pivotal role of carrier-mediated pathways for peptide transport, especially for scaffolds of polar nature. This work presents investigations on the Caco-2 and PAMPA permeability profiles of 13 selected N-methylated cyclic pentaalanine peptides derived from the basic cyclo(-D-Ala-Ala4 -) template. These molecules generally showed moderate to low transport in intestinal epithelia with a few of them exhibiting a Caco-2 permeability equal to or slightly higher than that of mannitol, a marker for paracellular permeability. We identified that the majority of the permeable cyclic penta- and hexapeptides possess an N-methylated cis-peptide bond, a structural feature that is also present in the orally available peptides cyclosporine A and the tri-N-methylated analogue of the Veber-Hirschmann peptide. Based on these observations it appears that the presence of N-methylated cis-peptide bonds at certain locations may promote the intestinal permeability of peptides through a suitable conformational preorganization.

  18. Controlling hydrolysis reaction rates with binary ionic liquid mixtures by tuning hydrogen-bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Weber, Cameron C; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2012-02-16

    The ability of a binary ionic liquid (IL) system consisting of a phosphonium transition state analogue (TSA) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][NTf(2)]) to accelerate the rate of the well-studied hydrolysis of a tert-alkyl picolinium salt by influencing the solvent structure was investigated. A significant rate enhancement was observed in the presence of the TSA; however, comparison with other cations illustrated that this enhancement was not unique to the chosen TSA. Instead, the rate enhancements were correlated with the dilution of hydrogen bonding by the added cations. This phenomenon was further examined by the use of 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([BMMIM][NTf(2)]) as a cosolvent and the use of Reichardt's dye to measure the extent of hydrogen bonding on solutes in these systems. The rate increases are rationalized in terms of weaker hydrogen bonding from the solvent system to water.

  19. Characterization of P-S bond hydrolysis in organophosphorothioate pesticides by organophosphorus hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Lai, K; Stolowich, N J; Wild, J R

    1995-04-01

    The extensive use of organophosphorothioate insecticides in agriculture has resulted in the risk of environmental contamination with a variety of broadly based neurotoxins that inhibit the acetylcholinesterases of many different animal species. Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH, EC 3.1.8.1) is a broad-spectrum phosphotriesterase that is capable of detoxifying a variety of organophosphorus neurotoxins by hydrolyzing various phosphorus-ester bonds (P-O, P-F, P-CN, and P-S) between the phosphorus center and an electrophilic leaving group. OPH is capable of hydrolyzing the P-X bond of various organophosphorus compounds at quite different catalytic rates: P-O bonds (kcat = 67-5000 s-1), P-F bonds (kcat = 0.01-500 s-1), and P-S bonds (kcat = 0.0067 to 167 s-1). P-S bond cleavage was readily demonstrated and characterized in these studies by quantifying the released free thiol groups using 5,5'-dithio-bis-2-nitrobenzoic acid or by monitoring an upfield shift of approximately 31 ppm by 31P NMR. A decrease in the toxicity of hydrolyzed products was demonstrated by directly quantifying the loss of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. Phosphorothiolate esters, such as demeton-S, provided noncompetitive inhibition for paraoxon (a P-O triester) hydrolysis, suggesting that the binding of these two different classes of substrates was not identical.

  20. Evolutionary optimization of peptide substrates for proteases that exhibit rapid hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Boulware, Kevin T; Jabaiah, Abeer; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2010-06-15

    Protease cleavage site recognition motifs can be identified using protease substrate discovery methodologies, but typically exhibit non-optimal specificity and activity. To enable evolutionary optimization of substrate cleavage kinetics, a two-color cellular library of peptide substrates (CLiPS) methodology was developed. Two-color CLiPS was applied to identify peptide substrates for the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease from a random pentapeptide library, which were then optimized by screening of a focused, extended substrate library. Quantitative library screening yielded seven amino acid substrates exhibiting rapid hydrolysis by TEV protease and high sequence similarity to the native seven-amino-acid substrate, with a strong consensus of EXLYPhiQG. Comparison of hydrolysis rates for a family of closely related substrates indicates that the native seven-residue TEV substrate co-evolved with TEV protease to facilitate highly efficient hydrolysis. Consensus motifs revealed by screening enabled database identification of a family of related, putative viral protease substrates. More generally, our results suggest that substrate evolution using CLiPS may be useful for optimizing substrate selectivity and activity to enable the design of more effective protease activity probes, molecular imaging agents, and prodrugs.

  1. Peptide synthesis in aqueous environments: the role of extreme conditions and pyrite mineral surfaces on formation and hydrolysis of peptides.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Eduard; Nair, Nisanth N; Wittekindt, Carsten; Marx, Dominik

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive study of free energy landscapes and mechanisms of COS-mediated polymerization of glycine via N-carboxy anhydrides (NCAs, "Leuchs anhydrides") and peptide hydrolysis at the water-pyrite interface at extreme thermodynamic conditions is presented. Particular emphasis is set on the catalytic effects of the mineral surface including the putative role of the ubiquitous sulfur vacancy defects. It is found that the mere presence of a surface is able to change the free energetics of the elementary reaction steps. This effect can be understood in terms of a reduction of entropic contributions to the reactant state by immobilizing the reactants and/or screening them from bulk water in a purely geometric ("steric") sense. Additionally, the pyrite directly participates chemically in some of the reaction steps, thus changing the reaction mechanism qualitatively compared to the situation in bulk water. First, the adsorption of reactants on the surface can preform a product-like structure due to immobilizing and scaffolding them appropriately. Second, pyrite can act as a proton acceptor, thus replacing water in this role. Third, sulfur vacancies are found to increase the reactivity of the surface. The finding that the presence of pyrite speeds up the rate-determining step in the formation of peptides with respect to the situation in bulk solvent while stabilizing the produced peptide against hydrolysis is of particular interest to the hypothesis of prebiotic peptide formation at hydrothermal aqueous conditions. Apart from these implications, the generality of the studied organic reactions are of immediate relevance to many fields such as (bio)geochemistry, biomineralization, and environmental chemistry.

  2. N-Acetylglycine Cation Tautomerization Enabled by the Peptide Bond.

    PubMed

    Kocisek, Jaroslav; Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Huber, Bernd A; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Kopyra, Janina; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-09-17

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the ionization of N-acetylglycine molecules by 48 keV O(6+) ions. We focus on the single ionization channel of this interaction. In addition to the prompt fragmentation of the N-acetylglycine cation, we also observe the formation of metastable parent ions with lifetimes in the microsecond range. On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we assign these metastable ions to the diol tautomer of N-acetylglycine. In comparison with the simple amino acids, the tautomerization rate is higher because of the presence of the peptide bond. The study of a simple biologically relevant molecule containing a peptide bond allows us to demonstrate how increasing the complexity of the structure influences the behavior of the ionized molecule.

  3. Study of nonplanarity of peptide bond using theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Selvarengan, P; Kolandaivel, P

    2005-08-01

    The conformational dependence of nonplanarity of the peptide bond of formylglycinamide has been studied using ab initio and density functional theory methods. Hartree-Fock self-consistent field theory (HF), Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) of ab initio and B3LYP level of theory of dft method have been used employing 6-31++G** basis set. The MP2 method predicts better results than HF and B3LYP levels of theory for conformational stability dependence of nonplanarity. Systematic dependence of planarity deviation has been observed in MP2 theory. The chemical hardness values successfully predict the conformational region, but fail to obey maximum hardness principle. It is concluded that the most reliable dft method could not successfully predict the planarity of peptide bond in comparison with electron correlated method of ab initio method.

  4. Variability of hydrolysis of β-, αs1-, and αs2-caseins by 10 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus and resulting bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Miclo, Laurent; Roux, Emeline; Genay, Magali; Brusseaux, Emilie; Poirson, Chantal; Jameh, Nawara; Perrin, Clarisse; Dary, Annie

    2012-01-18

    Milk proteins contain numerous potential bioactive peptides, which may be released by digestive proteases or by the proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria during food processing. The capacity of Streptococcus thermophilus to generate peptides, especially bioactive peptides, from bovine caseins was investigated. Strains expressing various levels of the cell envelope proteinase, PrtS, were incubated with α(s1)-, α(s2)-, or β-casein. Analysis of the supernatants by LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that the β-casein was preferentially hydrolyzed, followed by α(s2)-casein and then α(s1)-casein. Numbers and types of peptides released were strain-dependent. Hydrolysis appeared to be linked with the accessibility of different casein regions by protease. Analysis of bonds hydrolyzed in the region 1-23 of α(s1)-casein suggests that PrtS is at least in part responsible for the peptide production. Finally, among the generated peptides, 13 peptides from β-casein, 5 from α(s2)-casein, and 2 from α(s1)-casein have been reported as bioactive, 15 of them being angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  5. Amide and Peptide Bond Formation in Water at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christopher M; Keener, Megan; Gallou, Fabrice; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2015-08-21

    A general and environmentally responsible method for the formation of amide/peptide bonds in an aqueous micellar medium is described. Use of uronium salt (1-cyano-2-ethoxy-2-oxoethylidenaminooxy)dimethylaminomorpholinocarbenium hexafluorophosphate (COMU) as a coupling reagent, 2,6-lutidine, and TPGS-750-M represents mild conditions associated with these valuable types of couplings. The aqueous reaction medium is recyclable leading to low E Factors.

  6. Identification of small peptides arising from hydrolysis of meat proteins in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    López, Constanza M; Bru, Elena; Vignolo, Graciela M; Fadda, Silvina G

    2015-06-01

    In this study, proteolysis and low molecular weight (LMW) peptides (<3kDa) from commercial Argentinean fermented sausages were characterized by applying a peptidomic approach. Protein profiles and peptides obtained by Tricine-SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC-MS, respectively, allowed distinguishing two different types of fermented sausages, although no specific biomarkers relating to commercial brands or quality were recognized. From electrophoresis, α-actin, myoglobin, creatine kinase M-type and L-lactate dehydrogenase were degraded at different intensities. In addition, a partial characterization of fermented sausage peptidome through the identification of 36 peptides, in the range of 1000-2100 Da, arising from sarcoplasmic (28) and myofibrillar (8) proteins was achieved. These peptides had been originated from α-actin, myoglobin, and creatine kinase M-type, but also from the hydrolysis of other proteins not previously reported. Although muscle enzymes exerted a major role on peptidogenesis, microbial contribution cannot be excluded as it was postulated herein. This work represents a first peptidomic approach for fermented sausages, thereby providing a baseline to define key peptides acting as potential biomarkers.

  7. Covalent-bonded immobilization of lipase on poly(phenylene sulfide) dendrimers and their hydrolysis ability.

    PubMed

    Yemul, Omprakash; Imae, Toyoko

    2005-01-01

    Covalent-bonded immobilization of lipase from burkholderia cepacia onto two poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) dendrimers with different generations (two and three) was achieved using carbodiimide as a coupling reagent. The hydrolysis activity of olive oil to fatty acid was studied on enzyme-immobilized PPS dendrimers. Enzyme activity was proportional to the enzyme loading, and highest recovered activity was obtained at the medium enzyme loading for both G2 and G3 dendrimers. The immobilization improved the optimum pH and caused the temperature range to widen. Immobilization of enzyme has enhanced the thermal stability of enzyme activity in comparison with free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme as a biocatalyst for batch hydrolysis of olive oil retained 80 approximately 90% activity even after 20 times of recycling. This retention of activity after recycle is very valuable and powerful in enzyme technology. The present noteworthy and vital availability on enzyme reaction of the covalently bonded immobilized lipase on dendrimer came from the structure of dendrimer with a large number of functional terminal groups, which are easily available for immobilization of many lipases at the situation keeping reactive enzymes on the surface of dendrimer.

  8. Peptide bond formation via glycine condensation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Van Dornshuld, Eric; Vergenz, Robert A; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2014-07-24

    Four unique gas phase mechanisms for peptide bond formation between two glycine molecules have been mapped out with quantum mechanical electronic structure methods. Both concerted and stepwise mechanisms, each leading to a cis and trans glycylglycine product (four mechanisms total), were examined with the B3LYP and MP2 methods and Gaussian atomic orbital basis sets as large as aug-cc-pVTZ. Electronic energies of the stationary points along the reaction pathways were also computed with explicitly correlated MP2-F12 and CCSD(T)-F12 methods. The CCSD(T)-F12 computations indicate that the electronic barriers to peptide bond formation are similar for all four mechanisms (ca. 32-39 kcal mol(-1) relative to two isolated glycine fragments). The smallest barrier (32 kcal mol(-1)) is associated with the lone transition state for the concerted mechanism leading to the formation of a trans peptide bond, whereas the largest barrier (39 kcal mol(-1)) was encountered along the concerted pathway leading to the cis configuration of the glycylglycine dipeptide. Two significant barriers are encountered for the stepwise mechanisms. For both the cis and trans pathways, the early electronic barrier is 36 kcal mol(-1) and the subsequent barrier is approximately 1 kcal mol(-1) lower. A host of intermediates and transition states lie between these two barriers, but they all have very small relative electronic energies (ca. ± 4 kcal mol(-1)). The isolated cis products (glycylglycine + H2O) are virtually isoenergetic with the isolated reactants (within -1 kcal mol(-1)), whereas the trans products are about 5 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy. In both products, however, the water can hydrogen bond to the dipeptide and lower the energy by roughly 5-9 kcal mol(-1). This study indicates that the concerted process leading to a trans configuration about the peptide bond is marginally favored both thermodynamically (exothermic by ca. 5 kcal mol(-1)) and kinetically (barrier height ≈ 32 kcal mol(-1

  9. Hydrolysis of milk-derived bioactive peptides by cell-associated extracellular peptidases of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Zeeshan; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Jardin, Julien; Perrin, Clarisse; Dary, Annie; Miclo, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    The trend to confer new functional properties to fermented dairy products by supplementation with bioactive peptides is growing in order to encounter the challenge of health-promoting foods. But these functional ingredients have not to be hydrolysed by proteases of bacteria used in the manufacture of these products. One of the two yoghurt bacteria, Streptococcus thermophilus, has long been considered as weakly proteolytic since its only cell wall-associated subtilisin-like protease, called PrtS, is not always present. Nevertheless, a recent study pointed out a possible peptidase activity in certain strains. In this present study, the stability of milk-derived bioactive peptides, e.g. the anxiolytic peptide, αs1-CN-(f91-97), in the presence of two different S. thermophilus strains with PrtS+ or PrtS− phenotype was studied. Both strains appeared to be capable of hydrolysing the αs1-CN-(f91-97) and other bioactive peptides by recurrent removal of N-terminal residues. The hydrolysis was neither due to intracellular peptidases nor to HtrA protease. Results obtained showed that the observed activity originates from the presence at the surface of both strains of an extracellular aminopeptidase activity. Moreover, a cell wall-associated X-prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase activity was also highlighted when β-casomorphin-7 was used as substrate. All of these findings suggest that, in order to use fermented milks as vector of bioactive peptides, the stability of these bioactive peptides in this kind of products implies to carefully characterize the potential action of the surface proteolytic enzymes of S. thermophilus.

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of heated whey: iron-binding ability of peptides and antigenic protein fractions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Seo, I S; Khan, M A; Ki, K S; Lee, W S; Lee, H J; Shin, H S; Kim, H S

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of various enzymes on the hydrolysis of whey protein concentrate (WPC) to reduce its antigenic fractions and to quantify the peptides having iron-binding ability in its hydrolysates. Heated (for 10 min at 100 degrees C) WPC (2% protein solution) was incubated with 2% each of Alcalase, Flavourzyme, papain, and trypsin for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min at 50 degrees C. The highest hydrolysis of WPC was observed after 240 min of incubation with Alcalase (12.4%), followed by Flavourzyme (12.0%), trypsin (10.4%), and papain (8.53%). The nonprotein nitrogen contents of WPC hydrolysate followed the hydrolytic pattern of whey. The major antigenic fractions (beta-lactoglobulin) in WPC were degraded within 60 min of its incubation with Alcalase, Flavourzyme, or papain. Chromatograms of enzymatic hydrolysates of heated WPC also indicated complete degradation of beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and BSA. The highest iron solubility was noticed in hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (95%), followed by those produced with trypsin (90%), papain (87%), and Flavourzyme (81%). Eluted fraction 1 (F-1) and fraction 2 (F-2) were the respective peaks for the 0.25 and 0.5 M NaCl chromatographic step gradient for analysis of hydrolysates. Iron-binding ability was noticeably higher in F-1 than in F-2 of all hydrolysates of WPC. The highest iron contents in F-1 were observed in WPC hydrolysates derived with Alcalase (0.2 mg/kg), followed by hydrolysates derived with Flavourzyme (0.14 mg/kg), trypsin (0.14 mg/kg), and papain (0.08 mg/kg). Iron concentrations in the F-2 fraction of all enzymatic hydrolysates of WPC were low and ranged from 0.03 to 0.05 mg/kg. Fraction 1 may describe a new class of iron chelates based on the reaction of FeSO4 x 7 H2O with a mixture of peptides obtained by the enzymatic hydrolysis of WPC. The chromatogram of Alcalase F-1 indicated numerous small peaks of shorter wavelengths, which probably indicated a variety of

  11. Peptide-Like Molecules (PLMs): A Journey from Peptide Bond Isosteres to Gramicidin S Mimetics and Mitochondrial Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Peter; Xiao, Jingbo; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are natural ligands and substrates for receptors and enzymes and exhibit broad physiological effects. However, their use as therapeutic agents often suffers from poor bioavailability and insufficient membrane permeability. The success of peptide mimicry hinges on the ability of bioisosteres, in particular peptide bond replacements, to adopt suitable secondary structures relevant to peptide strands and position functional groups in equivalent space. This perspective highlights past and ongoing studies in our group that involve new methods development as well as specific synthetic library preparations and applications in chemical biology, with the goal to enhance the use of alkene and cyclopropane peptide bond isosteres. PMID:20725595

  12. Protein Sequence Alignment Taking the Structure of Peptide Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toshihide; Sato, Keiko; Ohya, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    In a previous paper1 we proposed a new method for performing pairwise alignment of protein sequences. The method, called MTRAP, achieves the highest performance compared with other alignment methods such as ClustalW22,3 on two benchmarks for alignment accuracy. In this paper, we introduce a new measure between two amino acids based on the formation of peptide bonds. The measure is implemented into MTRAP software to further improve alignment accuracy. Our alignment software is available at

  13. Bivalent cation binding effect on formation of the peptide bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Rode, Bernd Michael

    2000-01-01

    The reactions between formic acid (or glycine) and ammonia, without and with Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cations as catalysts, have been studied as model reactions for peptide bond formation using the Becke3LYP functional and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set of DFT theory. Enthalpies and free energies for the stationary points of each reaction have been calculated to determine the thermodynamics of reactions investigated. A substantial decrease in reaction enthalpies and free energies was found for formic acid-ammonia and glycine-ammonia reactions catalysed by Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ ions compared with those of the uncatalysed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the transition metal ions Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ is of similar strength and more pronounced than that of the Mg 2+ cation.

  14. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Peptide and Modified Jeffamine Organogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Daniel; Richardson, Adam

    2011-03-01

    In these studies, we present two systems whereby supramolecular assembly results in rigid organogels. First, a series of AB diblock copolymers consisting of poly(Lysine(Z)) (P(Lys(Z)) blocks were synthesized and found to form stable, rigid organogels in THF (ca. 1 - 1.5 wt.% solutions) and chloroform at room temperature. In these systems, the protecting group on the P(Lys) side-chains remains intact and gel formation results from the assembly of the solventphobic P(Lys(Z)) chains through intermolecular beta-sheet formation. The non-peptide block was found to have an effect on organogel properties due to interfacial frustration, which disrupts H-bonding. Second, Jeffamine polymers were modified in a facile way to incorporate intermolecular H-bonding groups to yield networks able to gel various solvents as well as mineral and canola oil. We present the physical and rheological properties of the organogels produced.

  15. DNA-specific autoantibody cleaves DNA by hydrolysis of phosphodiester and glycosidic bond.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hang Thi Thu; Jang, Young-Ju; Jeong, Sunjoo; Yu, Jaehoon

    2003-11-21

    The DNA-recognizing autoantibodies were prepared in milligram scale and their catalytic activities were investigated using various standard substrates for hydrolysis of natural biomolecules such as DNA, carbohydrates, and proteins. Only phosphatase and glycosidase activity was found and no peptidase, sulfatase, or esterase activity was detected in most of anti-DNA monoclonal autoantibodies we tested. Antibody G1-2 showed the highest catalytic activities and its enzymatic characteristics were further investigated. The antibody showed phosphatase activity with sub-millimolar substrate specificity and 10(4)-10(5) rate enhancements. However, Ab G1-2 showed low micro-molar specificity with p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamide with 10(4)-10(5) rate enhancements. Both of the catalytic activities showed pH maximum at 4-5, suggesting that the carboxylate(s) in antigen-binding site is involved in the catalytic mechanism. Chemical protection of carboxylate(s) with diazoacetamide showed much reduced activity of the Ab, confirming that the catalytic activity comes from carboxylate(s) in the Ag-binding region. The activities of phosphatase and glycosidase were thoroughly inhibited by DNA with almost identical K(i) values. These data suggest that DNA-binding site(s) is the enzymatic active site of the catalytic Abs. Capabilities of the DNA recognition might make it possible to confer the Ab the catalytic activity of phosphate and glycosidic bond hydrolysis, which can be the main cause of DNA cleavage.

  16. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry as a Tool for the Structural Characterization of Peptides Bearing Intramolecular Disulfide Bond(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonnet, Philippe; Haler, Jean R. N.; Upert, Gregory; Degueldre, Michel; Morsa, Denis; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mourier, Gilles; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-10-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translationnal modifications that can be crucial for the stability and the biological activities of natural peptides. Considering the importance of these disulfide bond-containing peptides, the development of new techniques in order to characterize these modifications is of great interest. For this purpose, collision cross cections (CCS) of a large data set of 118 peptides (displaying various sequences) bearing zero, one, two, or three disulfide bond(s) have been measured in this study at different charge states using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. From an experimental point of view, CCS differences (ΔCCS) between peptides bearing various numbers of disulfide bonds and peptides having no disulfide bonds have been calculated. The ΔCCS calculations have also been applied to peptides bearing two disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivities (Cys1-Cys2/Cys3-Cys4; Cys1-Cys3/Cys2-Cys4; Cys1-Cys4/Cys2-Cys3). The effect of the replacement of a proton by a potassium adduct on a peptidic structure has also been investigated.

  17. Which one among aspartyl protease, metallopeptidase, and artificial metallopeptidase is the most efficient catalyst in peptide hydrolysis?

    PubMed

    Bora, Ram Prasad; Barman, Arghya; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ozbil, Mehmet; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2010-08-26

    In this comparative DFT study, the hydrolysis of a peptide bond (Phe1-Phe2) by the following three types of catalysts has been studied: (1) beta-secretase (BACE2), (2) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), and (3) [Pd(H(2)O)(4)](2+) (I(MPC)) and [Pd(2)(mu-OH)([18]aneN(6))](3+) (I(DPC)). The computed energetics predict that among these catalysts, the Zn(2+) metal center containing MMP is the most efficient in catalyzing this reaction. The two active site aspartate residues containing BACE2 catalyze this reaction with 5.0 kcal/mol higher barrier than MMP. The substitution of a His ligand with Glu in the metal center of MMP generates the active site of IDE that catalyzes the reaction with a 6.9 kcal/mol higher barrier than MMP. Both artificial peptidases I(MPC) and I(DPC) catalyze this reaction with significantly high barriers of 35.4 and 31.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The computed energetics of all the catalysts are in line with the available experimental and theoretical data.

  18. Partial Molecular Characterization of Arctium minus Aspartylendopeptidase and Preparation of Bioactive Peptides by Whey Protein Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Cecilia V; Colombo, María Laura; Liggieri, Constanza; Bruno, Mariela; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report the cloning of an aspartic protease (AP) from flowers of Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Asteraceae) along with the use of depigmented aqueous flower extracts, as a source of APs, for the hydrolysis of whey proteins. The isolated cDNA encoded a protein product with 509 amino acids called arctiumisin, with the characteristic primary structure organization of typical plant APs. Bovine whey protein hydrolysates, obtained employing the enzyme extracts of A. minus flowers, displayed inhibitory angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and antioxidant activities. Hydrolysates after 3 and 5 h of reaction (degree of hydrolysis 2.4 and 5.6, respectively) and the associated peptide fraction with molecular weight below 3 kDa were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry, and reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the viability of using proteases from A. minus to increase the antioxidant and inhibitory ACE capacity of whey proteins.

  19. Hydrolysis of Surfactants Containing Ester Bonds: Modulation of Reaction Kinetics and Important Aspects of Surfactant Self-Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Dan; Stjerndahl, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-assembly on the hydrolysis kinetics of surfactants that contain ester bonds are discussed. A number of examples on how reaction rates and apparent reaction orders can be modulated by changes in the conditions, including an instance of apparent zero-order kinetics, are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the examples on…

  20. Performance of coupled enzymatic hydrolysis and membrane separation bioreactor for antihypertensive peptides production from Porphyra yezoensis protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore more efficient production methods of antihypertensive peptides from Porphyra yezoensis protein, three methods of coupling of enzymatic hydrolysis and membrane separation (CEH-MS) were studied and compared with the traditional EH and offline MS method. The results showed that the conversio...

  1. Influence of denaturation and aggregation of β-lactoglobulin on its tryptic hydrolysis and the release of functional peptides.

    PubMed

    Leeb, Elena; Götz, Alexander; Letzel, Thomas; Cheison, Seronei Chelulei; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2015-11-15

    Whereas previous studies showed that thermal pre-treatment of whey proteins promote their enzymatic hydrolysis, to date no correlation between the conformation of denatured protein and the release of individual peptides has been considered. Hence, in this study total denaturation of β-lactoglobulin was performed at defined pH-values to enable the generation of different denatured particles. The denatured proteins were used as substrate for tryptic hydrolysis and the hydrolysis progress was characterised by the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the release of functional peptides, detected using LC-ESI-TOF/MS. Denaturation and subsequent aggregation of β-lactoglobulin, induced by thermal treatment at pH 5.1, altered the DH slightly, whereas the release of investigated peptides was significantly decreased. Contrary, denaturation at pH 6.8 and 8.0 led to formation of non-native monomers and reduced the DH to 75%, but showed promoting as well as reducing effects on the release of peptides, depending on their location within the protein.

  2. Formation of activated biomolecules by condensation on mineral surfaces--a comparison of peptide bond formation and phosphate condensation.

    PubMed

    Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Bazzi, Houssein; Lambert, Jean-François

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have reported condensation reactions of prebiotic molecules, such as the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids, to occur to some degree on mineral surfaces. We have studied several such reactions on the same divided silica. When drying steps are applied, the equilibria of peptide formation from glycine, and polyphosphate formation from monophosphate, are displaced to the right because these reactions are dehydrating condensations, accompanied by the emission of water. In contrast, the equilibrium of AMP dismutation is not significantly favored by drying. The silica surface plays little role (if any) in the thermochemistry of the condensation reactions, but is does play a significant kinetic role by acting as a catalyst, lowering the condensation temperatures with respect to bulk solids. Of course, the surface also catalyzes the inverse hydrolysis reactions.

  3. Disulfide bond cleavage in TEMPO-free radical initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee; Lee, Younjin; Kang, Minhyuk; Park, Hyeyeon; Seong, Yeonmi; Sung, Bong June; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2011-08-01

    The gas-phase free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) fragmentation behavior of o-TEMPO-Bz-conjugated peptides with an intra- and intermolecular disulfide bond was investigated using MS(n) tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Investigated peptides included four peptides with an intramolecular cyclic disulfide bond, Bactenecin (RLCRIVVIRVCR), TGF-α (CHSGYVGVRC), MCH (DFDMLRCMLGRVFRPCWQY) and Adrenomedullin (16-31) (CRFGTCTVQKLAHQIY), and two peptides with an intermolecular disulfide bond. Collisional activation of the benzyl radical conjugated peptide cation, which was generated through the release of a TEMPO radical from o-TEMPO-Bz-conjugated peptides upon initial collisional activation, produced a large number of peptide backbone fragments in which the S-S or C-S bond was readily cleaved. The observed peptide backbone fragments included a-, c-, x- or z-types, which indicates that the radical-driven peptide fragmentation mechanism plays an important role in TEMPO-FRIPS mass spectrometry. FRIPS application of the linearly linked disulfide peptides further showed that the S-S or C-S bond was selectively and preferentially cleaved, followed by peptide backbone dissociations. In the FRIPS mass spectra, the loss of •SH or •SSH was also abundantly found. On the basis of these findings, FRIPS fragmentation pathways for peptides with a disulfide bond are proposed. For the cleavage of the S-S bond, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom at C(β) by the benzyl radical is proposed to be the initial radical abstraction/transfer reaction. On the other hand, H-abstraction at C(α) is suggested to lead to C-S bond cleavage, which yields [ion ± S] fragments or the loss of •SH or •SSH.

  4. Heterologous expression of five disulfide-bonded insecticidal spider peptides.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Silva, Anita O; Villegas, Elba; Ortiz, Ernesto; Beirão, Paulo S L; Corzo, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    The genes of the five disulfide-bonded peptide toxins 1 and 2 (named Oxytoxins or Oxotoxins) from the spider Oxyopes lineatus were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a Factor Xa proteolytic cleavage region. These two recombinant vectors were transfected into Escherichia coli BL21 cells and expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The product of each gene was named HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2, and the protein expression was ca 14 and 6 mg/L of culture medium, respectively. Either recombinant toxin HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 were found exclusively in inclusion bodies, which were solubilized using a chaotropic agent, and then, purified using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). The HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 products, obtained from the affinity chromatographic step, showed several peptide fractions having the same molecular mass of 9913.1 and 8030.1 Da, respectively, indicating that both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 were oxidized forming several distinct disulfide bridge arrangements. The isoforms of both HisrOxyTx1 and HisrOxyTx2 after DTT reduction eluted from the column as a single protein component of 9923 and 8040 Da, respectively. In vitro folding of either HisrOxyTx1 or HisrOxyTx2 yielded single oxidized components, which were cleaved independently by the proteolytic enzyme Factor Xa to give the recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2. The experimental molecular masses of rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 were 8059.0 and 6176.4 Da, respectively, which agree with their expected theoretical masses. The recombinant peptides rOxyTx1 and rOxyTx2 showed lower but comparable toxicity to the native toxins when injected into lepidopteran larvae; furthermore, rOxyTx1 was able to inhibit calcium ion currents on dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons from Periplaneta americana.

  5. Relay stations for electron hole migration in peptides: possibility for formation of three-electron bonds along peptide chains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Jilai; Wang, Wen; Bu, Yuxiang

    2008-11-13

    Our calculations found that the O thereforeO three-electron (3e) bonds (2.16 approximately 2.27 A) can be formed not only between two neighboring peptide units in a main chain but also between two adjacent peptide units in two different main chains in proteins. This finding may address electron hole migration from one peptide unit to the next in proteins. Evidently, stability of the O thereforeO 3e bonded species is strongly dependent on the component of the oligopeptides and is reduced owing to the steric hindrance of the side chains when the big chains present in oligopeptides. Besides, formation of the O thereforeO 3e bonds competes with the formation of the other forms of three-electron bonds depending on the component of the polypeptides. Formation of the O thereforeS 3e bond is thermodynamically more favorable than that of the O thereforeO 3e bond for the oligopeptides containing sulfur atom in their side chains. Similarly, formation of the O thereforepi 3e bond between aromatic ring of the side chain and the neighboring peptide unit is more stable than that of the O thereforeO 3e bond when the aromatic amino acids present in the oligopeptides. We infer that a series of three-electron bonds may be formed during the electron hole migration along the peptide backbone in proteins and assist electron hole transport as relay stations, supporting the peptide chain as a conduction wire. The ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the polypeptides also support this conclusion.

  6. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis; Betancur Ancona, David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5-2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427-455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system.

  7. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5–2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427–455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system. PMID:26904588

  8. Ala-His Mediated Peptide Bond Formation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Deana C.; Martinis, Susan A.; Roberts, Deborah J.; Fox, George E.

    2001-12-01

    The historical origin of the translation machinery remains unresolved. Although the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is almost certainly the catalytic component of the peptidyl transferase center in the modern ribosome, it is likely that greatly simplified systems were initially employed in the late stages of the prebiotic world. In particular, it has been suggested that small RNAs carrying amino acids were important for the genesis of protein synthesis. Consistent with this, a dipeptide, Ala-His, was previously claimed to be a prebiotically feasible catalyst mediating peptide bond formation in the presence of aminoacylated tRNA and cognate mRNA template, in the absence of other ribosomal components (Shimizu, 1996). We herein report a detailed study of putative dipeptide formation by Ala-His and RNAs carrying leucine. Based on the results presented here, it is unlikely that the dipeptide, Ala-His, catalyzes significant levels of Leu-Leu dipeptide formation in solution. A product is produced which can be readily mistaken for a dipeptide in the TLC separation systems employed in earlier work. We offer explanations for the formation of this product as well as another unexpected product. The results presented here are consistent with the notion that the translation machinery was likely based on catalytic RNA from its very inception.

  9. Selectivity of peptide bond dissociation on excitation of a core electron: Effects of a phenyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Jien-Lian; Hu, Wei-Ping; Lin, Yi-Shiue; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lee, Tsai-Yun; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Liu, Chen-Lin

    2016-09-01

    The selective dissociation of a peptide bond upon excitation of a core electron in acetanilide and N-benzylacetamide was investigated. The total-ion-yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were recorded and compared with the predictions from time-dependent density functional theory. The branching ratios for the dissociation of a peptide bond are observed as 16-34% which is quite significant. This study explores the core-excitation, the X-ray photodissociation pathways, and the theoretical explanation of the NEXAFS spectra of organic molecules containing both a peptide bond and a phenyl group.

  10. Chemical methods for producing disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins to study folding regulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the folding of secretory and membrane proteins. Oxidative folding reactions of disulfide bond-containing proteins typically require several hours or days, and numerous misbridged disulfide isomers are often observed as intermediates. The rate-determining step in refolding is thought to be the disulfide-exchange reaction from nonnative to native disulfide bonds in folding intermediates, which often precipitate during the refolding process because of their hydrophobic properties. To overcome this, chemical additives or a disulfide catalyst, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), are generally used in refolding experiments to regulate disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding. This unit describes such methods in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding, including (1) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptides and protein folding assisted by chemical additives, (2) reductive unfolding of disulfide-containing peptides and proteins, and (3) regulation of disulfide-coupled peptide and protein folding using PDI.

  11. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation, chaperone assistance and antibiotics activity.

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2005-08-31

    The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) is located in a protein free environment, thus confirming that the ribosome is a ribozyme. This arched void has dimensions suitable for accommodating the 3' ends of the A-and the P-site tRNAs, and is situated within a universal sizable symmetry-related region that connects all ribosomal functional centers involved in amino-acid polymerization. The linkage between the elaborate PTC architecture and the A-site tRNA position revealed that the A- to P-site passage of the tRNA 3' end is performed by a rotatory motion, which leads to stereochemistry suitable for peptide bond formation and for substrate mediated catalysis, thus suggesting that the PTC evolved by gene-fusion. Adjacent to the PTC is the entrance of the protein exit tunnel, shown to play active roles in sequence-specific gating of nascent chains and in responding to cellular signals. This tunnel also provides a site that may be exploited for local co-translational folding and seems to assist in nascent chain trafficking into the hydrophobic space formed by the first bacterial chaperone, the trigger factor. Many antibiotics target ribosomes. Although the ribosome is highly conserved, subtle sequence and/or conformational variations enable drug selectivity, thus facilitating clinical usage. Comparisons of high-resolution structures of complexes of antibiotics bound to ribosomes from eubacteria resembling pathogens, to an archaeon that shares properties with eukaryotes and to its mutant that allows antibiotics binding, demonstrated the unambiguous difference between mere binding and therapeutical effectiveness. The observed variability in antibiotics inhibitory modes, accompanied by the elucidation of the structural basis to antibiotics mechanism justifies expectations for structural based improved properties of existing compounds as well as for the development of novel drugs.

  12. Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage within peptides via ultraviolet irradiation of an electrospray plume.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2013-05-21

    Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage in peptides was demonstrated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) plume using a low pressure mercury (LP-Hg) lamp. Tandem mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements confirmed that the primary reaction products were due to disulfide bond cleavage to form thiol (-SH) and sulfinyl radical (-SO˙). Mechanistic studies showed that the 185 nm emission from a LP-Hg lamp was responsible for UV photolysis of atmospheric O2, which further initiated secondary radical formation and subsequent disulfide bond cleavage by radical attack. The radical induced disulfide bond cleavage was found to be analytically useful in providing rich sequence information for naturally occurring peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds. The utility of this method was also demonstrated for facile disulfide peptide identification and characterization from protein digests.

  13. In situ observation of peptide bond formation at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-09-25

    We report unambiguous spectroscopic evidence of peptide bond formation at the air-water interface, yielding a possible mechanism providing insight into the formation of modern ribosomal peptide bonds, and a means for the emergence of peptides on early Earth. Protein synthesis in aqueous environments, facilitated by sequential amino acid condensation forming peptides, is a ubiquitous process in modern biology, and a fundamental reaction necessary in prebiotic chemistry. Such reactions, however, are condensation reactions, requiring the elimination of a water molecule for every peptide bond formed, and are thus unfavorable in aqueous environments both from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We use the hydrophobic environment of the air-water interface as a favorable venue for peptide bond synthesis, and demonstrate the occurrence of this chemistry with in situ techniques using Langmuir-trough methods and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. Leucine ethyl ester (a small amino acid ester) first partitions to the water surface, then coordinates with Cu(2+) ions at the interface, and subsequently undergoes a condensation reaction selectively forming peptide bonds at the air-water interface.

  14. Spontaneous intermolecular amide bond formation between side chains for irreversible peptide targeting.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Howarth, Mark

    2010-04-07

    Peptides and synthetic peptide-like molecules are powerful tools for analysis and control of biological function. One major limitation of peptides is the instability of their interactions with biomolecules, because of the limited accessible surface area for noncovalent interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of peptides. Peptide tags are nonetheless fundamental for protein detection and purification, because their small size minimizes the perturbation to protein function. Here we have designed a 16 amino acid peptide that spontaneously forms an amide bond to a protein partner, via reaction between lysine and asparagine side chains. This depended upon splitting a pilin subunit from a human pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes, which usually undergoes intramolecular amide bond formation to impart mechanical and proteolytic stability to pili. Reaction of the protein partner was able to proceed to 98% conversion. The amide bond formation was independent of redox state and occurred at pH 5-8. The reaction was efficient in phosphate buffered saline and a wide range of biological buffers. Surprisingly, amide bond formation occurred at a similar rate at 4 and 37 degrees C. Both peptide and protein partners are composed of the regular 20 amino acids and reconstituted efficiently inside living E. coli. Labeling also showed high specificity on the surface of mammalian cells. Irreversible targeting of a peptide tag may have application in bioassembly, in cellular imaging, and to lock together proteins subject to high biological forces.

  15. Insect kinin analogs with cis-peptide bond motif 4-aminopyroglutamate: Optimal stereochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect kinins are present in a wide variety of insects and function as potent diuretic peptides, though they are subject to rapid degradation by internal peptidases. Insect kinin analogs incorporating stereochemical variants of (2S,4S)-4-aminopyroglutamate (APy), a cis-peptide bond motif, demon...

  16. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun-Jian; Le, Guo-Wei; Wang, Jie-Yun; Li, Ya-Xin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Sun, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid). The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain), with an optimum condition of: (1) ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2) concentration of substrate, 4%; (3) reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4) pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01) under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen. PMID:21151439

  17. Identification of the major ACE-inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate from cuttlefish wastewater.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-03-10

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC₅₀ = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL⁻¹) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC₅₀ value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL⁻¹. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A-D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC₅₀ values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL⁻¹, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions.

  18. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Amado, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A–D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions. PMID:24619242

  19. Exploration of an imide capture/N,N-acyl shift sequence for asparagine native peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Mhidia, Reda; Boll, Emmanuelle; Fécourt, Fabien; Ermolenko, Mikhail; Ollivier, Nathalie; Sasaki, Kaname; Crich, David; Delpech, Bernard; Melnyk, Oleg

    2013-06-15

    Imide capture of a C-terminal peptidylazide with a side-chain thioacid derivative of an N-terminally protected aspartyl peptide leads to the formation of an imide bond bringing the two peptide ends into close proximity. Unmasking of the N(α) protecting group and intramolecular acyl migration results in the formation of a native peptide bond to asparagine.

  20. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific (13)C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)(+) ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H](+) ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  2. Characterization of Secondary Amide Peptide Bonds Isomerization: Thermodynamics and Kinetics from 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Germann, Markus W.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary amide cis peptide bonds are of even lower abundance than the cis tertiary amide bonds of prolines, yet they are of biochemical importance. Using 2D NMR exchange spectroscopy we investigated the formation of cis peptide bonds in several oligopeptides: Ac-G-G-G-NH2, Ac-I-G-G-NH2, Ac-I-G-G-N-NH2 and its cyclic form: I-G-G-N in DMSO. From the NMR studies, using the amide protons as monitors, an occurrenc.e of 0.13% – 0.23% of cis bonds was obtained at 296 K. The rate constants for the trans to cis conversion determined from 2D EXSY spectroscopy were 4–9·10−3 s−1. Multiple minor conformations were detected for most peptide bonds. From their thermodynamic and kinetic properties the cis isomers are distinguished from minor trans isomers that appear because of an adjacent cis peptide bond. Solvent and sequence effects were investigated utilizing N-methylacetamide and various peptides, which revealed an unique enthalpy profile in DMSO. The cyclization of a tetrapeptide resulted in greatly lowered cis populations and slower isomerization rate compared to its linear counterpart, further highlighting the impact of structural constraints. PMID:21538331

  3. Energies of peptide peptide and peptide water hydrogen bonds in collagen: Evidences from infrared spectroscopy, quartz piezogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boryskina, O. P.; Bolbukh, T. V.; Semenov, M. A.; Gasan, A. I.; Maleev, V. Ya.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present work is a quantitative estimation of energies of peptide-peptide N 1sbnd H 1⋯O 2dbnd C 2 and peptide-water hydrogen bonds in collagen type I and model collagen polypeptide poly(Gly-Pro-Pro). Being a challenging theoretical task this is also an issue that can clarify the physical basis of stability of collagen structures that play a very important structural role in connective tissue. The study was performed on the basis of a complex approach of a number of experimental techniques, namely infrared spectroscopy, quartz piezogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Our results indicate that binding of 3-4 water molecules of the internal hydration shell to each -Gly-X-Y- unit of poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen leads to simultaneous conformational reorganization of the triple helix and strengthening of the peptide-peptide hydrogen bonds. Enthalpies of hydration of poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen constitute -10.9 and -12.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Enthalpies of peptide-peptide N 1sbnd H 1⋯O 2dbnd C 2 hydrogen bonds are -7.6 and -6.0 kJ/mol in poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen, correspondently. The results obtained can be used for evaluation of the impacts of energies of different types of interactions into the total energy of stabilization of native triple helical collagen and poly(Gly-Pro-Pro).

  4. Overview of the regulation of disulfide bond formation in Peptide and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the maintenance of the native conformation of proteins under thermodynamic control. In general, disulfide bond formation is associated with protein folding, and this restricts the formation of folding intermediates such as misbridged disulfide isomers or kinetically trapped conformations, which provide important information related to how proteins fold into their native conformation. Therefore, numerous studies have focused on the structural analysis of folding intermediates in vitro. However, isolating or trapping folding intermediates, as well as the entire proteins, including mutant proteins, is not an easy task. Several chemical methods have recently been developed for examining peptide and protein folding and for producing, e.g., intact, post-translationally modified, or kinetically trapped proteins, or proteins with misbridged disulfide bonds. This overview introduces chemical methods for regulating the formation of disulfide bonds of peptides and proteins in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding.

  5. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  6. The Effects of H-Bond Cooperativity upon the Secondary Structures of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, J. J.

    2006-08-01

    Molecular orbital calculations show that amidic H-bonds within peptide structures can be extremely cooperative in some cases (α-helices), or not (collagen-like triple helices), while in others (β-sheets) cooperativity becomes masked by interactions that are weakened when new H-bonds are formed. There are cases where cooperativity is unimportant and H-bonding interactions can reasonably be approximated as being additive. In such cases, empirically derived pair-wise additive potentials might be expected to reproduce structures. However, those cases where cooperativity is important require more sophisticated analysis as the cooperative interactions between the individual H-bonds can become the dominant energetic driving force for the observed peptide structures. As in the case of many molecular crystals, pairwise additivity of the interactions of individual H-bonds can seriously underestimate the stability of the structure(s), leading to erroneous predicted structures.

  7. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  8. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate with Bacillus licheniformis protease: aggregating capacities of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-11-12

    In a previous study, peptides aggregating at pH 7.0 derived from a whey protein hydrolysate made with Bacillus licheniformis protease were fractionated and identified. The objective of the present work was to investigate the solubility of the fractionated aggregating peptides, as a function of concentration, and their aggregating capacities toward added intact proteins. The amount of aggregated material and the composition of the aggregates obtained were measured by nitrogen concentration and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. The results showed that of the four fractions obtained from the aggregating peptides, two were insoluble, while the other two consisted of 1:1 mixture of low and high solubility peptides. Therefore, insoluble peptides coaggregated, assumedly via hydrophobic interactions, other relatively more soluble peptides. It was also shown that aggregating peptides could aggregate intact protein nonspecifically since the same peptides were involved in the aggregation of whey proteins, beta-casein, and bovine serum albumin. Both insoluble and partly insoluble peptides were required for the aggregation of intact protein. These results are of interest for the applications of protein hydrolysates, as mixtures of intact protein and peptides are often present in these applications.

  9. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  10. Valorisation of tuna processing waste biomass for recovery of functional and antioxidant peptides using enzymatic hydrolysis and membrane fractionation process.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Sami; Ben Amar, Raja

    2016-10-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis using Prolyve BS coupled to membrane process (Ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF)) is a means of biotransformation of tuna protein waste to Tuna protein hydrolysate (TPH) with higher added values. This method could be an effective solution for the production of bioactive compounds used in various biotechnological applications and minimizing the pollution problems generated by the seafood processing industries. The amino acid composition, functional and antioxidant properties of produced TPH were evaluated. The results show that the glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine, alaline, valine and leucine were the major amino acids detected in the TPH profile. After membrane fractionation process, those major amino acids were concentrated in the NF retentate (NFR). The NFR and NF permeate (NFP) have a higher protein solubility (>95 %) when compared to TPH (80 %). Higher oil and water binding capacity were observed in TPH and higher emulsifying and foam stability was found in UF retentate. The NFP showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity (65 %). The NFR contained antioxidant amino acid (30.3 %) showed the highest superoxide radical and reducing power activities. The TPH showed the highest iron chelating activity (75 %) compared to other peptide fractions. The effect of the membrane fractionation on the molecular weight distribution of the peptide and their bioactivities was underlined. We concluded that the TPH is a valuable source of bioactive peptides and their peptide fractions may serve as useful ingredients for application in food industry and formulation of nutritional products.

  11. REACTION OF AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDE BONDS WITH FORMALDEHYDE AS MEASURED BY CHANGES IN THE ULTRA-VIOLET SPECTRA,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINO ACIDS , CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*PEPTIDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*FORMALDEHYDE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY, PROTEINS), ABSORPTION SPECTRA, CHEMICAL BONDS, AMIDES, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, REACTION KINETICS

  12. Fragmentation of intra-peptide and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nanoESI collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mormann, Michael; Eble, Johannes; Schwöppe, Christian; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Pohlentz, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    Characterisation and identification of disulfide bridges is an important aspect of structural elucidation of proteins. Covalent cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein give rise to stabilisation of the native tertiary structure of the molecules. Bottom-up identification and sequencing of proteins by mass spectrometry most frequently involves reductive cleavage and alkylation of disulfide links followed by enzymatic digestion. However, when using this approach, information on cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein is lost. Mass spectrometric characterisation of peptides containing intra-chain disulfides is a challenging analytical task, because peptide bonds within the disulfide loop are believed to be resistant to fragmentation. In this contribution we show recent results on the fragmentation of intra and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nano electrospray ionisation collision-induced dissociation (nanoESI CID). Disulfide bridge-containing peptides obtained from proteolytic digests were submitted to low-energy nanoESI CID using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument as a mass analyser. Fragmentation of the gaseous peptide ions gave rise to a set of b and y-type fragment ions which enabled derivation of the sequence of the amino acids located outside the disulfide loop. Surprisingly, careful examination of the fragment-ion spectra of peptide ions comprising an intramolecular disulfide bridge revealed the presence of low-abundance fragment ions formed by the cleavage of peptide bonds within the disulfide loop. These fragmentations are preceded by proton-induced asymmetric cleavage of the disulfide bridge giving rise to a modified cysteine containing a disulfohydryl substituent and a dehydroalanine residue on the C-S cleavage site.

  13. Uncommonly thorough hydrolysis of peptides during ripening of Ragusano cheese revealed by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Valérie; Carpino, Stefania; Pediliggieri, Concetta; Jardin, Julien; Lortal, Sylvie; Licitra, Giuseppe

    2011-12-14

    Ragusano is a pasta filata cheese produced from raw milk in Sicily. The proteolysis was extensively analyzed after stretching (day 0), at 4 and 7 months of ripening through soluble nitrogen, urea-PAGE, and peptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry. After stretching, 123 peptides were identified: 72 arising from β-casein, 34 from α(s1)-casein, and 17 from α(s2)-casein. The main protein splitting corresponded to the action of plasmin, chymosin, cathepsin D, cell envelope proteinase, and peptidase activities of lactic acid bacteria. Unlike other types of cheeses, <10% residual β- and α(s)-caseins remained intact at 7 months, indicating original network organization based on large casein fragments. The number of identified soluble peptides also dramatically decreased after 4 and 7 months of ripening, to 47 and 25, respectively. Among them, bioactive peptides were found, that is, mineral carrier, antihypertensive, and immunomodulating peptides and phosphopeptides.

  14. Aspartate-bond isomerization affects the major conformations of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Szendrei, G I; Fabian, H; Mantsch, H H; Lovas, S; Nyéki, O; Schön, I; Otvos, L

    1994-12-15

    The aspartic acid bond changes to an beta-aspartate bond frequently as a side-reaction during peptide synthesis and often as a post-translational modification of proteins. The formation of beta-asparate bonds is reported to play a major role not only in protein metabolism, activation and deactivation, but also in pathological processes such as deposition of the neuritic plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, we reported how conformational changes following the aspartic-acid-bond isomerization may help the selective aggregation and retention of the amyloid beta peptide in affected brains (Fabian et al., 1994). In the current study we used circular dichroism, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular modeling to characterize the general effect of the beta-aspartate-bond formation on the conformation of five sets of synthetic model peptides. Each of the non-modified, parent peptides has one of the major secondary structures as the dominant spectroscopically determined conformation: a type I beta turn, a type II beta turn, short segments of alpha or 3(10) helices, or extended beta strands. We found that both types of turn structures are stabilized by the aspartic acid-bond isomerization. The isomerization at a terminal position did not affect the helix propensity, but placing it in mid-chain broke both the helix and the beta-pleated sheet with the formation of reverse turns. The alteration of the geometry of the lowest energy reverse turn was also supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The tendency of the aspartic acid-bond isomerization to stabilize turns is very similar to the effect of incorporating sugars into synthetic peptides and suggests a common feature of these post-translational modifications in defining the secondary structure of protein fragments.

  15. Efficient and directed peptide bond formation in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-01-28

    Amide linkages are among the most important chemical bonds in living systems, constituting the connections between amino acids in peptides and proteins. We demonstrate the controlled formation of amide bonds between amino acids or peptides in the gas phase using ion/ion reactions in a mass spectrometer. Individual amino acids or peptides can be prepared as reagents by (i) incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to silence otherwise reactive functional groups, such as the N terminus; (ii) converting the carboxyl groups to the active ester of N-hydroxysuccinimide; and (iii) incorporating a charge site. Protonation renders basic sites (nucleophiles) unreactive toward the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents, resulting in sites with the greatest gas phase basicities being, in large part, unreactive. The N-terminal amines of most naturally occurring amino acids have lower gas phase basicities than the side chains of the basic amino acids (i.e., those of histidine, lysine, or arginine). Therefore, reagents may be directed to the N terminus of an existing "anchor" peptide to form an amide bond by protonating the anchor peptide's basic residues, while leaving the N-terminal amine unprotonated and therefore reactive. Reaction efficiencies of greater than 30% have been observed. We propose this method as a step toward the controlled synthesis of peptides in the gas phase.

  16. Minimal transition state charge stabilization of the oxyanion during peptide bond formation by the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Nicolas; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2011-12-06

    Peptide bond formation during ribosomal protein synthesis involves an aminolysis reaction between the aminoacyl α-amino group and the carbonyl ester of the growing peptide via a transition state with a developing negative charge, the oxyanion. Structural and molecular dynamic studies have suggested that the ribosome may stabilize the oxyanion in the transition state of peptide bond formation via a highly ordered water molecule. To biochemically investigate this mechanistic hypothesis, we estimated the energetic contribution to catalytic charge stabilization of the oxyanion using a series of transition state mimics that contain different charge distributions and hydrogen bond potential on the functional group mimicking the oxyanion. Inhibitors containing an oxyanion mimic that carried a neutral charge and a mimic that preserved the negative charge but could not form hydrogen bonds had less than a 3-fold effect on inhibitor binding affinity. These observations argue that the ribosome provides minimal transition state charge stabilization to the oxyanion during peptide bond formation via the water molecule. This is in contrast to the substantial level of oxyanion stabilization provided by serine proteases. This suggests that the oxyanion may be neutralized via a proton shuttle, resulting in an uncharged transition state.

  17. LEAP-1, a novel highly disulfide-bonded human peptide, exhibits antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Neitz, S; Mägert, H J; Schulz, A; Forssmann, W G; Schulz-Knappe, P; Adermann, K

    2000-09-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a novel human peptide with antimicrobial activity, termed LEAP-1 (liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide). Using a mass spectrometric assay detecting cysteine-rich peptides, a 25-residue peptide containing four disulfide bonds was identified in human blood ultrafiltrate. LEAP-1 expression was predominantly detected in the liver, and, to a much lower extent, in the heart. In radial diffusion assays, Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus carnosus, and Gram-negative Neisseria cinerea as well as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae dose-dependently exhibited sensitivity upon treatment with synthetic LEAP-1. The discovery of LEAP-1 extends the known families of mammalian peptides with antimicrobial activity by its novel disulfide motif and distinct expression pattern.

  18. Tumor-targeted liposomal drug delivery mediated by a diseleno bond-stabilized cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    Peptide ligands have played an important role in tumor-targeted drug delivery as targeting moieties. The in vivo fate of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and the following antitumor effects may greatly depend on the stability of the peptide ligand. In the current study, a tumor-targeting cyclic peptide screened by phage display, Lyp-1 (a peptide that specifically binds to tumor and endothelial cells of tumor lymphatics in certain tumors), was structurally modified by replacement of the original intramolecular disulfide bond with a diseleno bond. The produced analog Syp-1 (seleno derivative of Lyp-1) maintained specific binding ability to the target protein p32 (Kd = 18.54 nM), which is similar to that of Lyp-1 (Kd = 10.59 nM), indicated by surface plasmon resonance assay. Compared with Lyp-1, Syp-1 showed significantly improved stability against serum. After the peptide attached onto the surface of fluorophore-encapsulating liposomes, the more efficient tumor uptake of liposomal fluorophore mediated by Syp-1 was observed. Furthermore, Syp-1 modified liposomal doxorubicin presented the most potent tumor growth inhibitory ability among all the therapeutic groups, with a low half maximal inhibitory concentration of 588 nM against MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro and a high tumor inhibition rate of 73.5% in vivo. These findings clearly indicated that Syp-1 was a stable and effective tumor targeting ligand and suggest that the sulfur-to-selenium replacement strategy may help stabilize the phage-displayed cyclic peptide containing disulfide-bond under physiological conditions and strongly support the validity of peptide-mediated drug targeting. PMID:23515368

  19. Cutting edge: HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange functions normally on MHC class II-peptide complexes that have been weakened by elimination of a conserved hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Andrea; Gorski, Jack

    2010-02-01

    The mechanism by which HLA-DM (DM) promotes exchange of peptides bound to HLA-DR (DR) is still unclear. We have shown that peptide interaction with DR1 can be considered a folding process as evidenced by cooperativity. However, in DM-mediated ligand exchange, prebound peptide release is noncooperative, which could be a function of the breaking of a critical interaction. The hydrogen bond (H-bond) between beta-chain His(81) and the peptide backbone at the -1 position is a candidate for such a target. In this study, we analyze the exchange of peptides bound to a DR1 mutant in which formation of this H-bond is impaired. We observe that DM still functions normally. However, as expected of a cooperative model, this H-bond contributes to the overall energetics of the complex and its disruption impacts the ability of the exchange ligand to fold with the binding groove into a stable complex.

  20. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme-Inhibitory Peptides and Isolation of a Novel Peptide from Lizard Fish (Saurida elongata) Muscle Protein Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shanguang; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa; Lan, Xiongdiao; Zhao, Zhongxing; Liao, Dankui

    2012-01-01

    Lizard fish (Saurida elongata) muscle protein was hydrolyzed using neutral protease to produce protein hydrolysate (LFPH), and the hydrolysis conditions were investigated using response-surface methodology. The optimum conditions for producing peptides with the highest angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity were the following: enzyme-to-substrate ratio of 10,000 U/g, temperature of 48 °C, pH 7.0, and hydrolysis time of 2 h. Under these conditions, the ACE-inhibitory activity of LFPH and the degree of hydrolysis were 84% and 24%, respectively. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide was isolated from LFPH using ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-15, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the ACE-inhibitory peptide was identified as Ser-Pro-Arg-Cys-Arg (SPRCR), and its IC50 was 41 ± 1 µM. PMID:22822357

  1. Enhancement of peptide bond formation by polyribonucleotides on clay surfaces in fluctuating environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The selective effects of polyribonucleotides on the formation of glycine peptide bonds in glycine on clay surfaces are investigated as a model for a template mechanism for the effects of polynucleotides on peptide bond formation. Free oligoglycine yields were determined for the cycling reaction of glycine in the presence and absence of clay and polyribonucleotides or polydeoxyribonucleotides. The polyribonucleotides are observed to lead to increases of up to fourfold increases in oligoglycine formed, with greater enhancements for poly-G nucleotides than for poly-A, poly-U and poly-C, indicating a codonic bias. Polydeoxyribonucleotides are found to provide no enhancement in peptide formation rates, and yields were also greatly reduced in the absence of clay. A mechanism for peptide synthesis is proposed which involves the activation of glycine on the clay surface, followed by the formation of esters between glycine and the 2-prime OH groups of the polyribonucleotide and peptide bonds between adjacent amino acyl esters. It is pointed out that if this mechanism is correct, it may provide a basis for a direct template translation process, which would produce a singlet genetic code.

  2. The evolving ribosome: from non-coded peptide bond formation to sophisticated translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Davidovich, Chen; Belousoff, Matthew; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2009-09-01

    Structural analysis supported by biochemical, mutagenesis and computational evidence, revealed that the contemporary ribosome's active site is a universal symmetrical pocket made of ribosomal RNA. This pocket seems to be the remnant of the proto-ribosome, a dimeric RNA assembly evolved by gene duplication, capable of autonomously catalyzing peptide bond formation and non-coded amino acid polymerization.

  3. Peptide tag forming a rapid covalent bond to a protein, through engineering a bacterial adhesin.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Fierer, Jacob O; Celik, Emrah; Chittock, Emily C; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich; Moy, Vincent T; Howarth, Mark

    2012-03-20

    Protein interactions with peptides generally have low thermodynamic and mechanical stability. Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB contains a domain with a spontaneous isopeptide bond between Lys and Asp. By splitting this domain and rational engineering of the fragments, we obtained a peptide (SpyTag) which formed an amide bond to its protein partner (SpyCatcher) in minutes. Reaction occurred in high yield simply upon mixing and amidst diverse conditions of pH, temperature, and buffer. SpyTag could be fused at either terminus or internally and reacted specifically at the mammalian cell surface. Peptide binding was not reversed by boiling or competing peptide. Single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy showed that SpyTag did not separate from SpyCatcher until the force exceeded 1 nN, where covalent bonds snap. The robust reaction conditions and irreversible linkage of SpyTag shed light on spontaneous isopeptide bond formation and should provide a targetable lock in cells and a stable module for new protein architectures.

  4. Do zwitterionic species exist in the non-enzymatic peptide bond formation?

    PubMed

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Bertrán, Juan

    2012-11-25

    The use of proper computational methods and models has allowed answering the controversial question of whether zwitterionic species exist in the mechanism of peptide bond synthesis in aqueous solution. In fact, the different conformations of zwitterionic species open the door to different mechanistic paths.

  5. A structural view on the mechanism of the ribosome-catalyzed peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Simonović, Miljan; Steitz, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    The ribosome is a large ribonucleoprotein particle that translates genetic information encoded in mRNA into specific proteins. Its highly conserved active site, the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC), is located on the large (50S) ribosomal subunit and is comprised solely of rRNA, which makes the ribosome the only natural ribozyme with polymerase activity. The last decade witnessed a rapid accumulation of atomic-resolution structural data on both ribosomal subunits as well as on the entire ribosome. This has allowed studies on the mechanism of peptide bond formation at a level of detail that surpasses that for the classical protein enzymes. A current understanding of the mechanism of the ribosome-catalyzed peptide bond formation is the focus of this review. Implications on the mechanism of peptide release are discussed as well.

  6. Induction of peptide bond dipoles drives cooperative helix formation in the (AAQAA)3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-08-19

    Cooperativity is a central feature in the formation of secondary structures in proteins. However, the driving forces behind this cooperativity are poorly understood. The present work shows that the cooperativity of helix formation in the acetyl-(AAQAA)3-NH2 peptide is significantly enhanced using an empirical force field that explicitly includes the treatment of electronic polarizability. Polarizable simulations yield helical content consistent with experimental measurements and indicate that the dependence of helical content on temperature is improved over additive models, though further sampling is required to fully validate this conclusion. Cooperativity is indicated by the peptide sampling either the coiled state or long helices with relatively low populations of short helices. The cooperativity is shown to be associated with enhanced dipole moments of the peptide backbone upon helix formation. These results indicate the polarizable force field to more accurately model peptide-folding cooperativity based on its physically realistic treatment of electronic polarizability.

  7. Induction of Peptide Bond Dipoles Drives Cooperative Helix Formation in the (AAQAA)3 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperativity is a central feature in the formation of secondary structures in proteins. However, the driving forces behind this cooperativity are poorly understood. The present work shows that the cooperativity of helix formation in the acetyl-(AAQAA)3-NH2 peptide is significantly enhanced using an empirical force field that explicitly includes the treatment of electronic polarizability. Polarizable simulations yield helical content consistent with experimental measurements and indicate that the dependence of helical content on temperature is improved over additive models, though further sampling is required to fully validate this conclusion. Cooperativity is indicated by the peptide sampling either the coiled state or long helices with relatively low populations of short helices. The cooperativity is shown to be associated with enhanced dipole moments of the peptide backbone upon helix formation. These results indicate the polarizable force field to more accurately model peptide-folding cooperativity based on its physically realistic treatment of electronic polarizability. PMID:25140435

  8. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  9. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases, but with notable differences such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional co-crystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently-bound transition state mimic, provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMID:22035792

  10. Mechanism of peptide hydrolysis by co-catalytic metal centers containing leucine aminopeptidase enzyme: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Barman, Arghya; Ozbil, Mehmet; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Shanghao; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2012-02-01

    In this density functional theory study, reaction mechanisms of a co-catalytic binuclear metal center (Zn1-Zn2) containing enzyme leucine aminopeptidase for two different metal bridging nucleophiles (H(2)O and -OH) have been investigated. In addition, the effects of the substrate (L-leucine-p-nitroanilide → L-leucyl-p-anisidine) and metal (Zn1 → Mg and Zn2 → Co, i.e., Mg1-Zn2 and Mg1-Co2 variants) substitutions on the energetics of the mechanism have been investigated. The general acid/base mechanism utilizing a bicarbonate ion followed by this enzyme is divided into two steps: (1) the formation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and (2) the cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol, the mechanism utilizing a hydroxyl nucleophile was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 18.7 kcal/mol. The rate-limiting step for reaction with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide is the cleavage of the peptide bond with a barrier of 17.8 kcal/mol. However, for L-leucyl-p-anisidine all steps of the mechanism were found to occur with similar barriers (18.0-19.0 kcal/mol). For the metallovariants, cleavage of the peptide bond occurs in the rate-limiting step with barriers of 17.8, 18.0, and 24.2 kcal/mol for the Zn1-Zn2, Mg1-Zn2, and Mg1-Co2 enzymes, respectively. The nature of the metal ion was found to affect only the creation of the gem-diolate intermediate, and after that all three enzymes follow essentially the same energetics. The results reported in this study have elucidated specific roles of both metal centers, the nucleophile, indirect ligands, and substrates in the catalytic functioning of this important class of binuclear metallopeptidases.

  11. Drosophila Ebony: a novel type of nonribosomal peptide synthetase related enzyme with unusually fast peptide bond formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Silvia; Dovengerds, Christine; Herrmann, Christian; Hovemann, Bernhard T

    2014-11-01

    Drosophila Ebony is a β-alanyl biogenic amine synthetase with proven function in cuticle and in glia of the nervous system. It is closely related to nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), which typically consist of at least an adenylation, a peptidyl carrier protein and a peptide bond forming condensation domain. Besides its role in cuticle formation, Ebony is in most glia of the brain thought to convert biogenic amines to β-alanyl conjugates. If the metabolization of the neurotransmitter histamine to β-alanyl histamine requires a fast reaction in visual signal transduction, Ebony must be able to fulfill this requirement. Since NRPSs are in general slowly acting multi-modular protein machineries, the enigma of how Ebony quickly facilitates this inactivation remains a key question for understanding its role in vision. To quantitatively analyze the reaction kinetics, we used phosphopantetheinylated holo-Ebony prepared from Baculovirus infected Sf9 cells. Kinetic parameters for the loading reaction, e.g. the formation of β-alanyl-Ebony thioester, complied with those of slow NRPSs. In contrast, single-turnover analysis of the last reaction step, peptide bond formation between pre-activated β-alanyl Ebony thioester and histamine, revealed a very rapid conjugation reaction. This biphasic nature of activity identifies Ebony as a novel type of NRPS related molecule that combines a slow amino acid activation phase with a very fast product formation step.

  12. Conformations of heterochiral and homochiral proline-pseudoproline segments in peptides: context dependent cis-trans peptide bond isomerization.

    PubMed

    Raghothama, Srinivasarao; Raghavender, Upadhyayula Surya; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Shamala, Narayanaswamy; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2009-01-01

    The pseudoproline residue (Psi Pro, L-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid) has been introduced into heterochiral diproline segments that have been previously shown to facilitate the formation of beta-hairpins, containing central two and three residue turns. NMR studies of the octapeptide Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-(D)Pro-Psi Pro-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe (1), Boc-Leu-Val-Val-(D)Pro-Psi Pro-Leu-Val-Val-OMe (2), and the nonapeptide sequence Boc-Leu-Phe-Val-(D)Pro-Psi Pro-(D)Ala-Leu-Phe-Val-OMe (3) established well-registered beta-hairpin structures in chloroform solution, with the almost exclusive population of the trans conformation for the peptide bond preceding the Psi Pro residue. The beta-hairpin conformation of 1 is confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Truncation of the strand length in Boc-Val-(D)Pro-Psi Pro-Leu-OMe (4) results in an increase in the population of the cis conformer, with a cis/trans ratio of 3.65. Replacement of Psi Pro in 4 by (L)Pro in 5, results in almost exclusive population of the trans form, resulting in an incipient beta-hairpin conformation, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Further truncation of the sequence gives an appreciable rise in the population of cis conformers in the tripeptide Piv-(D)Pro-Psi Pro-Leu-OMe (6). In the homochiral segment Piv-Pro-Psi Pro-Leu-OMe (7) only the cis form is observed with the NMR evidence strongly supporting a type VIa beta-turn conformation, stabilized by a 4-->1 hydrogen bond between the Piv (CO) and Leu (3) NH groups. The crystal structure of the analog peptide 7a (Piv-Pro-Psi(H,CH3)Pro-Leu-NHMe) confirms the cis peptide bond geometry for the Pro-Psi(H,CH3)Pro peptide bond, resulting in a type VIa beta-turn conformation.

  13. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed.

  14. Increasing the hydrolysis constant of the reactive site upon introduction of an engineered Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond into the ovomucoid third domain from silver pheasant.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Hikaru; Kumazaki, Takashi; Kojima, Shuichi; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Miura, Kin-Ichiro; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2011-08-01

    P14C/N39C is the disulfide variant of the ovomucoid third domain from silver pheasant (OMSVP3) introducing an engineered Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond near the reactive site on the basis of the sequence homology between OMSVP3 and ascidian trypsin inhibitor. This variant exhibits a narrower inhibitory specificity. We have examined the effects of introducing a Cys¹⁴-Cys³⁹ bond into the flexible N-terminal loop of OMSVP3 on the thermodynamics of the reactive site peptide bond hydrolysis, as well as the thermal stability of reactive site intact inhibitors. P14C/N39C can be selectively cleaved by Streptomyces griseus protease B at the reactive site of OMSVP3 to form a reactive site modified inhibitor. The conversion rate of intact to modified P14C/N39C is much faster than that for wild type under any pH condition. The pH-independent hydrolysis constant (K(hyd) °) is estimated to be approximately 5.5 for P14C/N39C, which is higher than the value of 1.6 for natural OMSVP3. The reactive site modified form of P14C/N39C is thermodynamically more stable than the intact one. Thermal denaturation experiments using intact inhibitors show that the temperature at the midpoint of unfolding at pH 2.0 is 59 °C for P14C/N39C and 58 °C for wild type. There have been no examples, except P14C/N39C, where introducing an engineered disulfide causes a significant increase in K(hyd) °, but has no effect on the thermal stability. The site-specific disulfide introduction into the flexible N-terminal loop of natural Kazal-type inhibitors would be useful to further characterize the thermodynamics of the reactive site peptide bond hydrolysis.

  15. Desolvation penalty for burying hydrogen-bonded peptide groups in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L

    2010-12-16

    A novel analysis of the enthalpy of protein unfolding is proposed and used to test for a desolvation penalty when hydrogen-bonded peptide groups are desolvated via folding. The unfolding enthalpy has three components, (1) the change when peptide hydrogen bonds are broken and the exposed -CO and -NH groups are solvated, (2) the change when protein-protein van der Waals interactions are broken and replaced by protein-water van der Waals interactions, and (3) the change produced by the hydrophobic interaction when nonpolar groups in the protein interior (represented as a liquid hydrocarbon) are transferred to water. A key feature of the analysis is that the enthalpy change from the hydrophobic interaction goes through 0 at 22 °C according to the liquid hydrocarbon model. Protein unfolding enthalpies are smaller at 22 °C than the enthalpy change for unfolding an alanine peptide helix. Data in the literature indicate that the van der Waals contribution to the unfolding enthalpy is considerably larger than the unfolding enthalpy itself at 22 °C, and therefore, a sizable desolvation penalty is predicted. Such a desolvation penalty was predicted earlier from electrostatic calculations of a stabilizing interaction between water and the hydrogen-bonded peptide group.

  16. Is the peptide bond formation activated by Cu(2+) interactions? Insights from density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Rimola, A; Rodríguez-Santiago, L; Ugliengo, P; Sodupe, M

    2007-05-24

    The catalytic role that Cu(2+) cations play in the peptide bond formation has been addressed by means of density functional calculations. First, the Cu(2+)-(glycine)2 --> Cu(2+)-(glycylglycine) + H2O reaction was investigated since mass spectrometry low collision activated dissociation (CAD) spectra of Cu(2+)-(glycine)2 led to the elimination of a water molecule, which suggested that an intracomplex peptide bond formation might have occurred. Results show that this intracomplex condensation is associated to a very high free energy barrier (97 kcal mol(-1)) and reaction free energy (66 kcal mol(-1)) because of the loss of metal coordination during the reaction. Second, on the basis of the salt-induced peptide formation theory, the condensation reaction between two glycines was studied in aqueous solution using discrete water molecules and the conductor polarized continuum model (CPCM) continuous method. It is found that the synergy between the interaction of glycines with Cu(2+) and the presence of water molecules acting as proton-transfer helpers significantly lower the activation barrier (from 55 kcal/mol for the uncatalyzed system to 20 kcal/mol for the Cu(2+) solvated system) which largely favors the formation of the peptide bond.

  17. UV resonance Raman finds peptide bond-Arg side chain electronic interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhavya; Asher, Sanford A

    2011-05-12

    We measured the UV resonance Raman excitation profiles and Raman depolarization ratios of the arginine (Arg) vibrations of the amino acid monomer as well as Arg in the 21-residue predominantly alanine peptide AAAAA(AAARA)(3)A (AP) between 194 and 218 nm. Excitation within the π → π* peptide bond electronic transitions result in UVRR spectra dominated by amide peptide bond vibrations. The Raman cross sections and excitation profiles indicate that the Arg side chain electronic transitions mix with the AP peptide bond electronic transitions. The Arg Raman bands in AP exhibit Raman excitation profiles similar to those of the amide bands in AP which are conformation specific. These Arg excitation profiles distinctly differ from the Arg monomer. The Raman depolarization ratios of Arg in monomeric solution are quite simple with ρ = 0.33 indicating enhancement by a single electronic transition. In contrast, we see very complex depolarization ratios of Arg in AP that indicate that the Arg residues are resonance enhanced by multiple electronic transitions.

  18. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-02-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51–60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61–67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation.

  19. Free Energy Diagram for the Heterogeneous Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Glycosidic Bonds in Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-09-04

    Kinetic and thermodynamic data have been analyzed according to transition state theory and a simplified reaction scheme for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose. For the cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), we were able to measure or collect relevant values for all stable and activated complexes defined by the reaction scheme and hence propose a free energy diagram for the full heterogeneous process. For other Cel7A enzymes, including variants with and without carbohydrate binding module (CBM), we obtained activation parameters for the association and dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex. The results showed that the kinetics of enzyme-substrate association (i.e. formation of the Michaelis complex) was almost entirely entropy-controlled and that the activation entropy corresponded approximately to the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the dissolved enzyme. This implied that the transition state occurred early in the path where the enzyme has lost these degrees of freedom but not yet established extensive contact interactions in the binding tunnel. For dissociation, a similar analysis suggested that the transition state was late in the path where most enzyme-substrate contacts were broken. Activation enthalpies revealed that the rate of dissociation was far more temperature-sensitive than the rates of both association and the inner catalytic cycle. Comparisons of one- and two-domain variants showed that the CBM had no influence on the transition state for association but increased the free energy barrier for dissociation. Hence, the CBM appeared to promote the stability of the complex by delaying dissociation rather than accelerating association.

  20. Free Energy Diagram for the Heterogeneous Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Glycosidic Bonds in Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic data have been analyzed according to transition state theory and a simplified reaction scheme for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose. For the cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), we were able to measure or collect relevant values for all stable and activated complexes defined by the reaction scheme and hence propose a free energy diagram for the full heterogeneous process. For other Cel7A enzymes, including variants with and without carbohydrate binding module (CBM), we obtained activation parameters for the association and dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex. The results showed that the kinetics of enzyme-substrate association (i.e. formation of the Michaelis complex) was almost entirely entropy-controlled and that the activation entropy corresponded approximately to the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the dissolved enzyme. This implied that the transition state occurred early in the path where the enzyme has lost these degrees of freedom but not yet established extensive contact interactions in the binding tunnel. For dissociation, a similar analysis suggested that the transition state was late in the path where most enzyme-substrate contacts were broken. Activation enthalpies revealed that the rate of dissociation was far more temperature-sensitive than the rates of both association and the inner catalytic cycle. Comparisons of one- and two-domain variants showed that the CBM had no influence on the transition state for association but increased the free energy barrier for dissociation. Hence, the CBM appeared to promote the stability of the complex by delaying dissociation rather than accelerating association. PMID:26183776

  1. Efficient routes to carbon-silicon bond formation for the synthesis of silicon-containing peptides and azasilaheterocycles.

    PubMed

    Min, Geanna K; Hernández, Dácil; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-02-19

    Silasubstitution, where silicon is substituted for carbon at specific sites of the substrate, has become a growing practice in medicinal chemistry. Introducing silicon into bioactive compounds provides slight physical and electronic alterations to the parent compound, which in certain instances could make the substrate a more viable candidate for a drug target. One application is in the field of protease inhibition. Various silane diol isosteres can act as potent inhibitors of aspartic and metalloproteases because of their ability to mimic the high-energy tetrahedral intermediate in peptide bond hydrolysis. In particular, since 1998, the Sieburth group has prepared a number of functionalized peptide silane diol isosteres. In a seminal study, they demonstrated that these molecules can bind to the active site of the enzymes. Inspired by these results, we initiated a study to develop a concise and straightforward route to access highly functionalized silicon diol based peptidomimetic analogs, which we describe in this Account. The synthesis of such analogs is challenging because the dipeptide mimics require the formation of two carbon-silicon bonds as well as two chiral carbon centers. Our first strategy was to assemble the two C-Si bonds from diphenylsilane through an initial regioselective hydrosilylation step of a terminal alkene, followed by lithiation of the formed alkyldiphenylsilane by a simple lithium metal reduction. Subsequent diastereoselective addition of this silyllithium species to a tert-butylsulfinimine provided a rapid method to assemble the dipeptide mimic with stereochemical control at the new chiral carbon center adjacent to the silicon. This strategy worked with a wide range of functional groups. However, there were some limitations with the more elaborate targets. In particular, we needed to exchange the phenyl groups of the diphenylsilane with aryl groups that were more labile under acidic conditions in order to introduce Si-O bonds in the end

  2. ONIOM and ab-initio calculations on the mechanism of uncatalyzed peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Monajemi, Hadieh; Daud, Mohammad Noh; Mohd Zain, Sharifuddin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin

    2012-12-01

    Finding a proper transition structure for the peptide bond formation process can lead one to a better understanding of the role of ribosome in catalyzing this reaction. Using computer simulations, we performed the potential energy surface scan on the ester bond dissociation of P-site aminoacyl-tRNA and the peptide bond formation of P-site and A-site amino acids. The full fragments of initiator tRNA(i)(met) and elongator tRNA(phe) are attached to both cognate and non-cognate amino acids as the P-site substrate. The A-site amino acid for all four calculations is methionine. We used ONIOM calculations to reduce the computational cost. Our study illustrates the reduced rate of peptide bond formation for misacylated tRNA(i)(met) in the absence of ribosomal bases. The misacylated elongator tRNA(phe), however, did not show any difference in its PES compared with that for the phe-tRNA(phe). This demonstrates the structural specification of initiator tRNA(i)(met) for the amino acids side chain.

  3. An activated triple bond linker enables 'click' attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides on solid support.

    PubMed

    Wenska, Malgorzata; Alvira, Margarita; Steunenberg, Peter; Stenberg, Asa; Murtola, Merita; Strömberg, Roger

    2011-11-01

    A general procedure, based on a new activated alkyne linker, for the preparation of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) on solid support has been developed. With this linker, conjugation is effective at room temperature (RT) in millimolar concentration and submicromolar amounts. This is made possible since the use of a readily attachable activated triple bond linker enhances the Cu(I) catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition ('click' reaction). The preferred scheme for conjugate preparation involves sequential conjugation to oligonucleotides on solid support of (i) an H-phosphonate-based aminolinker; (ii) the triple bond donor p-(N-propynoylamino)toluic acid (PATA); and (iii) azido-functionalized peptides. The method gives conversion of oligonucleotide to the POC on solid support, and only involves a single purification step after complete assembly. The synthesis is flexible and can be carried out without the need for specific automated synthesizers since it has been designed to utilize commercially available oligonucleotide and peptide derivatives on solid support or in solution. Methodology for the ready conversion of peptides into 'clickable' azidopeptides with the possibility of selecting either N-terminus or C-terminus connection also adds to the flexibility and usability of the method. Examples of synthesis of POCs include conjugates of oligonucleotides with peptides known to be membrane penetrating and nuclear localization signals.

  4. Nonenzymatic oxidative cleavage of peptide bonds in apoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Fong, L G; Parthasarathy, S; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1987-12-01

    Incubation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) with endothelial cells converts it to a form that is avidly degraded by macrophages via the acetyl LDL receptor. This modification has previously been shown to be accompanied by extensive breakdown of the major LDL protein (apoB-100) to smaller peptides. ApoB-100 is known to undergo partial degradation during isolation and purification which is commonly attributed to proteolytic enzymes derived from plasma or to contaminant bacteria. In the present studies addition of any of ten different inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes failed to inhibit the endothelial cell-induced degradation of LDL apoB-100 or its subsequent enhanced rate of degradation by macrophages (termed biological modification). Conversely, deliberate digestion of LDL with any of five well-characterized proteolytic enzymes degraded apoB-100 extensively but did not cause biological modification. The disappearance of intact apoB-100 during incubation with endothelial cells paralleled the formation of thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substances and the breakdown could be completely prevented by the addition of antioxidants or metal chelators. Finally, the incubation of LDL with a free radical-generating system (dihydroxyfumaric acid and Fe3+-ADP) in the absence of cells resulted in the breakdown of apoB-100. These results suggest that the breakdown of apoB-100 during oxidative modification of LDL, whether cell-induced or catalyzed by transition metals, is not mediated by proteolytic enzymes but rather is linked to oxidative attack on the polypeptide chain, either directly or secondary to peroxidation of closely associated LDL lipids.

  5. Oxytocin, the peptide that bonds the sexes also divides them

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Becker, Benjamin; Luo, Lizhu; Geng, Yayuan; Zhao, Weihua; Yin, Yu; Hu, Jiehui; Gao, Zhao; Gong, Qiyong; Hurlemann, Rene; Yao, Dezhong; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Facilitation of social attraction and bonding by the evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide oxytocin is well-established in female mammals. However, accumulating behavioral evidence suggests that oxytocin may have evolved sex-specific functional roles in the domain of human social cognition. A critical question is how oxytocin differentially modulates neural processing of social information in men and women, leading to divergent behavioral responses. Here we show that intranasal oxytocin treatment produces sex- and valence-dependent increases in amygdala activation when women view individuals identified as praising others but in men those who criticize them. Women subsequently show increased liking for the faces of these individuals, whereas in men it is reduced. Thus, oxytocin may act differentially via the amygdala to enhance the salience of positive social attributes in women but negative ones in men. We hypothesize that oxytocin may have evolved different but complementary roles to help ensure successful reproduction by encouraging mothers to promote a prosocial rearing environment for offspring and fathers to protect against antisocial influences. PMID:27325780

  6. Peptide bond formation of alanine on silica and alumina surfaces as a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Arenillas, M.; Mateo-Martí, E.

    2012-09-01

    Polymerization of amino acids has been important for the origin of life because the peptides may have been the first self-replicating systems. The amino acid concentrations in the oceans may have been too diluted in the early phases of the Earth. The formation of the biopolymers could have been due to the catalytic action of various minerals (such as silica or alumina). Our work is based on the comparison between alumina and silica minerals with and without prior activation of their silanol groups for the formation of peptide bonds using alanina like amino acid which it is the simplest quiral amino acid.

  7. Enhancement of gene delivery using novel homodimeric tat peptide formed by disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Doh, Kyung-Oh

    2011-08-01

    Cationic liposomes have been actively used as gene delivery vehicle because of their minimal toxicity, but their relatively low efficiency of gene delivery is the major disadvantage of these vectors. Recently, cysteine residue incorporation to HIV-1 Tat peptide increased liposomemediated transfection compared with unmodified Tat peptide. Therefore, we designed a novel modified Tat peptide having a homodimeric (Tat-CTHD, Tat-NTHD) and closed structure (cyclic Tat) simply by using the disulfide bond between cysteines to develop a more efficient and safe nonviral gene delivery system. The mixing of Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine increased the transfection efficiency compared with unmodified Tat peptide and lipofectamine only in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and rat vascular smooth muscle cells. However, cyclic Tat did not show any improvement in the transfection efficiency. In the gel retardation assay, Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD showed more strong binding with DNA than unmodified Tat and cyclic Tat peptide. This enhancement was only shown when Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD were mixed with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine. The effects of Tat- CTHD and Tat-NTHD were also valid in the experiment using DOTAP and DMRIE instead of lipofectamine. We could not find any significant cytotoxicity in the working concentration and more usage of these peptides. In conclusion, we have designed a novel transfection-enhancing peptide by easy homodimerization of Tat peptide, and the simple mix of these novel peptides with DNA increased the gene transfer of cationic lipids more efficiently with no additional cytotoxicity.

  8. Does silica surface catalyse peptide bond formation? New insights from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Tosoni, Sergio; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2006-01-16

    The role that silica surface could have played in prebiotic chemistry as a catalyst for peptide bond formation has been addressed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level for a model reaction involving glycine and ammonia on a silica cluster mimicking an isolated terminal silanol group present at the silica surface. Hydrogen-bond complexation between glycine and the silanol is followed by the formation of the mixed surface anhydride Si(surf)-O-C(=O)-R, which has been suggested in the literature to activate the C=O bond towards nucleophilic attack by a second glycine molecule, here simulated by the simpler NH3 molecule. However, B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) calculations show that formation of the surface mixed anhydride Si(surf)-O-C(=O)-R is disfavoured (delta(r)G298 approximately 6 kcal mol(-1)), and that the surface bond only moderately lowers the free-energy barrier of the nucleophilic attack responsible for peptide bond formation (deltaG298(double dagger) approximately 48 kcal mol(-1)) in comparison with the uncatalysed reaction (deltaG298(double dagger) approximately 52 kcal mol(-1)). A further decrease of the free-energy barrier of peptide bond formation (deltaG298(double dagger) approximately 41 kcal mol(-1)) is achieved by a single water molecule close to the reaction centre acting as a proton-transfer helper in the activated complex. A possible role of strained silica surface defects on the formation of the surface mixed anhydride Si(surf)-O-C(=O)-R has also been addressed.

  9. The transition state for formation of the peptide bond in the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gindulyte, Asta; Bashan, Anat; Agmon, Ilana; Massa, Lou; Yonath, Ada; Karle, Jerome

    2006-09-05

    Using quantum mechanics and exploiting known crystallographic coordinates of tRNA substrate located in the ribosome peptidyl transferase center around the 2-fold axis, we have investigated the mechanism for peptide-bond formation. The calculation is based on a choice of 50 atoms assumed to be important in the mechanism. We used density functional theory to optimize the geometry and energy of the transition state (TS) for peptide-bond formation. The TS is formed simultaneously with the rotatory motion enabling the translocation of the A-site tRNA 3' end into the P site, and we estimated the magnitude of rotation angle between the A-site starting position and the place at which the TS occurs. The calculated TS activation energy, E(a), is 35.5 kcal (1 kcal = 4.18 kJ)/mol, and the increase in hydrogen bonding between the rotating A-site tRNA and ribosome nucleotides as the TS forms appears to stabilize it to a value qualitatively estimated to be approximately 18 kcal/mol. The optimized geometry corresponds to a structure in which the peptide bond is being formed as other bonds are being broken, in such a manner as to release the P-site tRNA so that it may exit as a free molecule and be replaced by the translocating A-site tRNA. At TS formation the 2' OH group of the P-site tRNA A76 forms a hydrogen bond with the oxygen atom of the carboxyl group of the amino acid attached to the A-site tRNA, which may be indicative of its catalytic role, consistent with recent biochemical experiments.

  10. Immobilization of RGD peptide on HA coating through a chemical bonding approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunli; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian; Yang, Chunyu

    2009-11-01

    In this work, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence containing peptide was immobilized on hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings through a chemical bonding approach in two steps, surface modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and RGD immobilization. The results indicate that RGD has been successfully immobilized on HA coatings. Comparing with physical adsorption coatings, the chemically bonded RGD on the coatings shows much better anti-wash-out ability. Since RGD is able to recognize cell-membrane integrins on biointerfaces, the present method will be an effective way to favor interaction of cells with HA coatings.

  11. Catalysis of peptide bond formation by histidyl-histidine in a fluctuating clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The condensation of glycine to form oligoglycines during wet-dry fluctuations on clay surfaces was enhanced up to threefold or greater by small amounts of histidyl-histidine. In addition, higher relative yields of the longer oligomers were produced. Other specific dipeptides tested gave no enhancement, and imidazole, histidine, and N-acetylhistidine gave only slight enhancements. Histidyl-histidine apparently acts as a true catalyst (in the sense of repeatedly catalyzing the reaction), since up to 52 nmol of additional glycine were incorporated into oligoglycine for each nmol of catalyst added. This is the first known instance of a peptide or similar molecule demonstrating a catalytic turnover number greater than unity in a prebiotic oligomer synthesis reaction, and suggests that histidyl-histidine is a model for a primitive prebiotic proto-enzyme. Catalysis of peptide bond synthesis by a molecule which is itself a peptide implies that related systems may be capable of exhibiting autocatalytic growth.

  12. Computational study of peptide bond formation in the gas phase through ion-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pilar; Martínez, Henar; Cimas, Alvaro; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2013-08-21

    A computational study of peptide bond formation from gas-phase ion-molecule reactions has been carried out. We have considered the reaction between protonated glycine and neutral glycine, as well as the reaction between two neutral glycine molecules for comparison purposes. Two different mechanisms, concerted and stepwise, were studied. Both mechanisms show significant energy barriers for the neutral reaction. The energy requirements for peptide bond formation are considerably reduced upon protonation of one of the glycine molecules. For the reaction between neutral glycine and N-protonated glycine the lowest energy barrier is observed for the concerted mechanism. For the reaction between neutral glycine and protonated glycine at carbonyl oxygen, the preferred mechanism is the stepwise one, with a relatively small energy barrier (23 kJ mol(-1) at 0 K) and leading to the lowest-lying protonated glycylglycine isomer. In the case that the reaction could be initiated by protonated glycine at hydroxyl oxygen the process would be barrier-free and clearly exothermic. In that case peptide bond formation could take place even under interstellar conditions if glycine is present in space.

  13. A two-step chemical mechanism for ribosome-catalysed peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, David A; Singh, Vipender; Zhong, Minghong; Strobel, Scott A

    2011-07-17

    The chemical step of natural protein synthesis, peptide bond formation, is catalysed by the large subunit of the ribosome. Crystal structures have shown that the active site for peptide bond formation is composed entirely of RNA. Recent work has focused on how an RNA active site is able to catalyse this fundamental biological reaction at a suitable rate for protein synthesis. On the basis of the absence of important ribosomal functional groups, lack of a dependence on pH, and the dominant contribution of entropy to catalysis, it has been suggested that the role of the ribosome is limited to bringing the substrates into close proximity. Alternatively, the importance of the 2'-hydroxyl of the peptidyl-transfer RNA and a Brønsted coefficient near zero have been taken as evidence that the ribosome coordinates a proton-transfer network. Here we report the transition state of peptide bond formation, based on analysis of the kinetic isotope effect at five positions within the reaction centre of a peptidyl-transfer RNA mimic. Our results indicate that in contrast to the uncatalysed reaction, formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and proton transfer from the nucleophilic nitrogen both occur in the rate-limiting step. Unlike in previous proposals, the reaction is not fully concerted; instead, breakdown of the tetrahedral intermediate occurs in a separate fast step. This suggests that in addition to substrate positioning, the ribosome is contributing to chemical catalysis by changing the rate-limiting transition state.

  14. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  15. Peptide-drug conjugate linked via a disulfide bond for kidney targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qian; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong

    2012-06-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, and unfortunately, the therapeutic index of clinically available drugs is limited. Thus, there is a great need to exploit effective treatment strategies, and the carrier-drug approach is an attractive method to improve the kidney specificity of the therapeutic agents. The aim of this present study is to develop a peptide-drug conjugate for the kidney targeted delivery of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril (CAP), since G3-C12 peptide (ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR) could specifically accumulate in the kidney after intravenous injection. Therefore, FITC labeled G3-C12 peptide (G3-C12-FITC) and peptide-drug conjugate (G3-C12-CAP) with a disulfide bond which can be cleaved by reduced glutathione in the kidney were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The fluorescence imaging of G3-C12-FITC revealed that the labeled peptide specifically accumulated in the kidney soon after i.v. injection to mice, and the accumulation is due largely to the reabsorption of the peptide by the proximal renal tubule cells. Furthermore, in comparison with the corresponding nonconjugated form, a 2.7-fold increase in renal area under concentration-time curve produced by the conjugate was observed in mice. Interestingly, the CAP entirely released in the kidney even at 0.05 h postinjection through disulfide reduction. As a consequence, the in vivo renal ACE inhibition was significantly increased. In conclusion, these findings suggest the potential of G3-C12 peptide serving as a suitable candidate carrier for kidney-targeted drug delivery.

  16. The role of 23S ribosomal RNA residue A2451 in peptide bond synthesis revealed by atomic mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Kathrin; Erlacher, Matthias; Wilson, Daniel N; Micura, Ronald; Polacek, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    Peptide bond formation is a fundamental reaction in biology, catalyzed by the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase ribozyme. Although all active-site 23S ribosomal RNA nucleotides are universally conserved, atomic mutagenesis suggests that these nucleobases do not carry functional groups directly involved in peptide bond formation. Instead, a single ribose 2'-hydroxyl group at A2451 was identified to be of pivotal importance. Here, we altered the chemical characteristics by replacing its 2'-hydroxyl with selected functional groups and demonstrate that hydrogen donor capability is essential for transpeptidation. We propose that the A2451-2'-hydroxyl directly hydrogen bonds to the P-site tRNA-A76 ribose. This promotes an effective A76 ribose C2'-endo conformation to support amide synthesis via a proton shuttle mechanism. Simultaneously, the direct interaction of A2451 with A76 renders the intramolecular transesterification of the peptide from the 3'- to 2'-oxygen unfeasible, thus promoting effective peptide bond synthesis.

  17. UV Resonance Raman Elucidation of the Terminal and Internal Peptide Bond Conformations of Crystalline and Solution Oligoglycines

    PubMed Central

    Bykov, Sergei V.; Asher, Sanford A.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic investigations of macromolecules generally attempt to interpret the measured spectra in terms of the summed contributions of the different molecular fragments. This is the basis of the local mode approximation in vibrational spectroscopy. In the case of resonance Raman spectroscopy independent contributions of molecular fragments require both a local mode-like behavior and the uncoupled electronic transitions. Here we show that the deep UV resonance Raman spectra of aqueous solution phase oligoglycines show independent peptide bond molecular fragment contributions indicating that peptide bonds electronic transitions and vibrational modes are uncoupled. We utilize this result to separately determine the conformational distributions of the internal and penultimate peptide bonds of oligoglycines. Our data indicate that in aqueous solution the oligoglycine terminal residues populate conformations similar to those found in crystals (31-helices and β-strands), but with a broader distribution, while the internal peptide bond conformations are centered around the 31-helix Ramachandran angles. PMID:20657703

  18. Preparation and analysis of peptide fragments produced by pepsin hydrolysis of human plasma albumin and their relationship to its structure

    PubMed Central

    Franglen, G.; Swaniker, G. R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Human plasma albumin was prepared and subjected to proteolysis by pepsin at pH2·45 at 25° for 10min. with albumin/pepsin ratio 3000:1. Five peptide fragments were detected in the proteolysate by means of zone electrophoresis and gel filtration; these were separated and purified. Molecular weights, amino acid composition and disulphide bond content of the purified fragments were determined. The results show that a high proportion of the polypeptide chain of albumin appears to have a low cystine content, and at low pH values the molecule would be expected to have a considerable degree of freedom in its structure in these regions of the chain. A tripartite model for the structure of plasma albumin is proposed. PMID:4876098

  19. Enhancing peptide ligand binding to vascular endothelial growth factor by covalent bond formation.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Bernadette V; Beck, Heather E; Aweda, Tolulope A; Phinney, Brett; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Jewell, William; Tran, Diana; Day, Jeffrey J; Peiris, Malalage N; Nwosu, Charles; Lebrilla, Carlito; Meares, Claude F

    2012-05-16

    Formation of a stable covalent bond between a synthetic probe molecule and a specific site on a target protein has many potential applications in biomedical science. For example, the properties of probes used as receptor-imaging ligands may be improved by increasing their residence time on the targeted receptor. Among the more interesting cases are peptide ligands, the strongest of which typically bind to receptors with micromolar dissociation constants, and which may depend on processes other than simple binding to provide images. The side chains of cysteine, histidine, or lysine are attractive for chemical attachment to improve binding to a receptor protein, and a system based on acryloyl probes attaching to engineered cysteine provides excellent positron emission tomographic images in animal models (Wei et al. (2008) J. Nucl. Med. 49, 1828-1835). In nature, lysine is a more common but less reactive residue than cysteine, making it an interesting challenge to modify. To seek practically useful cross-linking yields with naturally occurring lysine side chains, we have explored not only acryloyl but also other reactive linkers with different chemical properties. We employed a peptide-VEGF model system to discover that a 19mer peptide ligand, which carried a lysine-tagged dinitrofluorobenzene group, became attached stably and with good yield to a unique lysine residue on human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), even in the presence of 70% fetal bovine serum. The same peptide carrying acryloyl and related Michael acceptors gave low yields of attachment to VEGF, as did the chloroacetyl peptide.

  20. Intramolecular general acid catalysis of the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl phosphate, and bond length-reactivity correlations for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Tiago A S; Orth, Elisa S; Rocha, Willian R; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Bunton, Clifford A; Nome, Faruk

    2007-05-11

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl hydrogen phosphate (IMPP) in water at pH<6 indicate that activation by the imidazolium moiety disappears with the deprotonation of the phosphate group, and the reaction involves the hydrogen-bonding of the imidazolium NH with the aryl oxygen leaving group. The reaction should involve a near-planar conformation of the imidazolium and the phenyl groups in the activated complex, which favors proton-transfer. The crystal structure of IMPP was solved, and a bond length-reactivity correlation for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions is described.

  1. Characterization of Sviceucin from Streptomyces Provides Insight into Enzyme Exchangeability and Disulfide Bond Formation in Lasso Peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Ducasse, Rémi; Zirah, Séverine; Blond, Alain; Goulard, Christophe; Lescop, Ewen; Giraud, Caroline; Hartke, Axel; Guittet, Eric; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Rebuffat, Sylvie

    2015-11-20

    Lasso peptides are bacterial ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. They have sparked increasing interest in peptide-based drug development because of their compact, interlocked structure, which offers superior stability and protein-binding capacity. Disulfide bond-containing lasso peptides are rare and exhibit highly sought-after activities. In an effort to expand the repertoire of such molecules, we heterologously expressed, in Streptomyces coelicolor, the gene cluster encoding sviceucin, a type I lasso peptide with two disulfide bridges originating from Streptomyces sviceus, which allowed it to be fully characterized. Sviceucin and its reduced forms were characterized by mass spectrometry and peptidase digestion. The three-dimensional structure of sviceucin was determined using NMR. Sviceucin displayed antimicrobial activity selectively against Gram-positive bacteria and inhibition of fsr quorum sensing in Enterococcus faecalis. This study adds sviceucin to the type I lasso peptide family as a new representative. Moreover, new clusters encoding disulfide-bond containing lasso peptides from Actinobacteria were identified by genome mining. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the formation of disulfide bonds in sviceucin does not require a pathway-encoded thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase. Most importantly, we demonstrated the functional exchangeability of the sviceucin and microcin J25 (a non-disulfide-bridged lasso peptide) macrolactam synthetases in vitro, highlighting the potential of hybrid lasso synthetases in lasso peptide engineering.

  2. Mass spectral study of hybrid peptides derived from (R)-aminoxy ester and [beta]-amino acids: The influence of aminoxy peptide bond (CO-NH-O) on peptide fragmentation under electrospray ionization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Ramesh, M.; Srinivas, R.; Sharma, G. V. M.; Manohar, V.

    2009-04-01

    A new class of Boc-protected aminoxy hybrid peptides containing repeats of [beta]-hAla-(R)-Ama-, and [beta]-Caa-(R)-Ama- ([beta]-hAla = [beta]3-(S)-hAlanine, (R)-Ama = (R)-aminoxy ester, and [beta]-Caa = (R)-C-linked carbo-[beta]3-amino acid) have been studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap and quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) of their protonated, cationized, and negative ions. MS3 CID of protonated aminoxy peptides of [beta]-hAla-(R)-Ama- yield intense [beta]-amino acid characteristic retro-Mannich fragmentation. The bn+ and [bn-methyl imine]+ (n = 3, 5) ions formed by cleavage of aminoxy peptide bond (CO-NH-O) are more intense than bn+ (n = 2, 4) formed by that of peptide bond (CO-NH-C) cleavage. Another characteristic ion observed is due to loss of H3NO from yn+ ions. The cationized (Li+, and Na+) peptides dissociate differently compared to protonated peptides. Intense cationized cn and zn ions are formed due to the cleavage of N-O bond. The deprotonated peptides also show abundant cn- and zn- ions (n = 1, 3, 5) and do not form any yn- ions. All these results clearly indicate the influence of aminoxy peptide bond on fragmentation of these hybrid peptides.

  3. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations.

  4. Properties of synthetic ferrihydrite as an amino acid adsorbent and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Matrajt, G; Blanot, D

    2004-03-01

    Ferrihydrite, an iron oxide hydroxide, is found in all kinds of environments, from hydrothermal hot springs to extraterrestrial materials. It has been shown that this material is nanoporous, and because of its high surface area, it has outstanding adsorption properties and in some cases catalysis properties. In this work we studied the adsorption properties of ferrihydrite with respect to amino acids. Samples of pure ferrihydrite were synthesised and exposed to solutions of amino acids including both proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous species. These experiments revealed important characteristics of this mineral as both an adsorbent of amino acids and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

  5. Zymogen activation confers thermodynamic stability on a key peptide bond and protects human cationic trypsin from degradation.

    PubMed

    Szabó, András; Radisky, Evette S; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2014-02-21

    Human cationic trypsinogen, precursor of the digestive enzyme trypsin, can be rapidly degraded to protect the pancreas when pathological conditions threaten, while trypsin itself is impressively resistant to degradation. For either form, degradation is controlled by two necessary initial proteolytic events: cleavage of the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond by chymotrypsin C (CTRC) and cleavage of the Arg122-Val123 peptide bond by trypsin. Here we demonstrate that the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond of human cationic trypsin, but not trypsinogen, is thermodynamically stable, such that cleavage by CTRC leads to an equilibrium mixture containing 10% cleaved and 90% uncleaved trypsin. When cleaved trypsin was incubated with CTRC, the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond was re-synthesized to establish the same equilibrium. The thermodynamic stability of the scissile peptide bond was not dependent on CTRC or Leu-81, as re-synthesis was also accomplished by other proteases acting on mutated cationic trypsin. The Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond is located within a calcium binding loop, and thermodynamic stability of the bond was strictly dependent on calcium and on the calcium-coordinated residue Glu-85. Trypsinolytic cleavage of the Arg122-Val123 site was also delayed in trypsin relative to trypsinogen in a calcium-dependent manner, but for this bond cleavage was modulated by kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. Our results reveal that the trypsinogen to trypsin conformational switch modulates cleavage susceptibility of nick sites by altering both the thermodynamics and kinetics of cleavage to protect human cationic trypsin from premature degradation.

  6. Photo-stability of peptide-bond aggregates: N-methylformamide dimers.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Mardykov, Artur; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Sander, Wolfram; Barbatti, Mario

    2014-09-21

    The formation of weakly-bound dimers of N-methylformamide (NMF) and the photochemistry of these dimers after irradiation at 248 nm were explored using matrix-isolation spectroscopy. Calculations were used to characterize the diverse isomers and assign their IR spectra; non-adiabatic dynamics was simulated to understand their photo-deactivation mechanism. The most stable dimers, and , were obtained by trans-trans aggregation (N-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]C interactions) and could be identified in the matrix. The main products formed after irradiation are the trans-cis dimers ( and ), also stabilized by N-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]C interactions. In contrast to the photochemistry of the monomers, no dissociative products were observed after 248 nm irradiation of the dimers. The absence of dissociative products can be explained by a proton-transfer mechanism in the excited state that is faster than the photo-dissociative mechanism. The fact that hydrogen bonding has such a significant effect on the photochemical stability of NMF has important implications to understand the stability of peptide-bonded systems to UV irradiation.

  7. Magnesium ion catalyzed P-N bond hydrolysis in imidazolide-activated nucleotides - Relevance to template-directed synthesis of polynucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Bernasconi, Claude F.; Doodokyan, Donald L.; Alberas, Diann J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a detailed study of the P-N bond hydrolysis in guanosine 5-prime-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) and in guanosine 5-prime-imidazolide (ImpG) in the presence of 0-0.50 M Mg(2+). Pseudo-first-order rate constants of these compounds were obtained as a function of Mg(2+) concentration, for pH values between 6 and 10 and 37 C. It was found that Mg(2+) catalysis was most effective at pH 10, where a 15-fold increase in hydrolysis was achieved in 0.02 M Mg; at 0.2 M, a 115-fold increase was observed. Implication of these results for the mechanism of template-directed oligomerization is discussed.

  8. Identification of active sites in amidase: Evolutionary relationship between amide bond- and peptide bond-cleaving enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiko; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Goda, Masahiko; Komeda, Hidenobu; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1997-01-01

    Mainly based on various inhibitor studies previously performed, amidases came to be regarded as sulfhydryl enzymes. Not completely satisfied with this generally accepted interpretation, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis studies on one particular amidase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 that was involved in its nitrile metabolism. For these experiments, the recombinant amidase was produced as the inclusion body in Escherichia coli to greatly facilitate its recovery and subsequent purification. With regard to the presumptive active site residue Cys203, a Cys203 → Ala mutant enzyme still retained 11.5% of the original specific activity. In sharp contrast, substitutions in certain other positions in the neighborhood of Cys203 had a far more dramatic effect on the amidase. Glutamic acid substitution of Asp191 reduced the specific activity of the mutant enzyme to 1.33% of the wild-type activity. Furthermore, Asp191 → Asn substitution as well as Ser195 → Ala substitution completely abolished the specific activity. It would thus appear that, among various conserved residues residing within the so-called signature sequence common to all amidases, the real active site residues are Asp191 and Ser195 rather than Cys203. Inasmuch as an amide bond (CO-NH2) in the amide substrate is not too far structurally removed from a peptide bond (CO-NH-), the signature sequences of various amidases were compared with the active site sequences of various types of proteases. It was found that aspartic acid and serine residues corresponding to Asp191 and Ser195 of the Rhodococcus amidase are present within the active site sequences of aspartic proteinases, thus suggesting the evolutionary relationship between the two. PMID:9342349

  9. Invention of stimulus-responsive peptide-bond-cleaving residue (Spr) and its application to chemical biology tools.

    PubMed

    Shigenaga, Akira; Yamamoto, Jun; Kohiki, Taiki; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Otaka, Akira

    2017-01-19

    Elucidation of biological functions of peptides and proteins is essential for understanding peptide/protein-related biological events and developing drugs. Caged peptides and proteins that release a parent active peptide/protein by photo-irradiation have successfully been employed to elucidate the functions. Whereas the usual caged peptide/protein enables conversion of an inactive form to an active form (OFF-to-ON conversion) by photo-induced deprotection, photo-triggered main chain cleavage is reported to be applicable to ON-to-OFF conversion. These peptides and proteins are photo-responsive; however, if peptides and proteins could respond to other stimuli such as disease-related environment or enzymes, their range of application should be widened. To convert the photo-responsive peptide/protein into other stimulus-responsive peptide/protein, quite laborious de novo design and synthesis of the stimulus-responsive unit are required. In this context, we designed a stimulus-responsive peptide-bond-cleaving residue (Spr) in which the stimuli available for the main chain cleavage vary according to the choice of protecting groups on the residue. In this review, design and synthesis of Spr are introduced, and challenges to apply Spr to other fields to enable, for example, functional control, localization control, delivery of cargos, labeling of a protein of interest in living cells, and identification of target proteins of bioactive ligands are discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Multinuclear diffusion NMR spectroscopy and DFT modeling: a powerful combination for unraveling the mechanism of phosphoester bond hydrolysis catalyzed by metal-substituted polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Shestakova, Pavletta; Mihaylov, Tzvetan T; Absillis, Gregory; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-03-09

    A detailed reaction mechanism is proposed for the hydrolysis of the phosphoester bonds in the DNA model substrate bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) in the presence of the Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin type polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]⋅7 H2O (ZrK 2:2) at pD 6.4. Low-temperature (31)P DOSY spectra at pD 6.4 gave the first experimental evidence for the presence of ZrK 1:1 in fast equilibrium with ZrK 2:2 in purely aqueous solution. Moreover, theoretical calculations identified the ZrK 1:1 form as the potentially active species in solution. The reaction intermediates involved in the hydrolysis were identified by means of (1)H/(31)P NMR studies, including EXSY and DOSY NMR spectroscopy, which were supported by DFT calculations. This experimental/theoretical approach enabled the determination of the structures of four intermediate species in which the starting compound BNPP, nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP), or the end product phosphate (P) is coordinated to ZrK 1:1. In the proposed reaction mechanism, BNPP initially coordinates to ZrK 1:1 in a monodentate fashion, which results in hydrolysis of the first phosphoester bond in BNPP and formation of NPP. EXSY NMR studies showed that the bidentate complex between NPP and ZrK 1:1 is in equilibrium with monobound and free NPP. Subsequently, hydrolysis of NPP results in P, which is in equilibrium with its monobound form.

  11. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-07

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  12. Production of disulfide bond-rich peptides by fusion expression using small transmembrane proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ziwei; Lu, Ming; Ma, Yunqi; Kwag, Dong-Geon; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, Ji-Min; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Young-Ok; An, Cheul-Min; Li, Huayue; Jung, Jee H; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli allows the simple, economical, and effective production of bioactive peptides. On the other hand, the production of native peptides, particularly those rich in disulfide bonds, is a major problem. Previous studies have reported that the use of carrier proteins for fusion expression can result in good peptide yields, but few are folded correctly. In this study, two transmembrane small proteins in E. coli, YoaJ and YkgR, which both orientate with their N-termini in cytoplasm and their C-termini in periplasm, were used for fusion expression. The recombinant production of two peptides, asteropsin A (ASPA) and β-defensin (BD), was induced in the periplasm of E. coli using a selected carrier protein. Both peptides were expressed at high levels, at yields of approximately 5-10 mg/L of culture. Mass spectrometry showed that the resulting peptide had the same molecular weight as their natural forms. After purification, single peaks were observed by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), demonstrating the absence of isoforms. Furthermore, cytoplasmically expressed fusion proteins with a carrier at their C-termini did not contain disulfide bonds. This study provides new carrier proteins for fusion expression of disulfide bond-rich peptides in E. coli.

  13. Low molecular weight bioactive peptides derived from the enzymatic hydrolysis of collagen after isoelectric solubilization/precipitation process of turkey by-products.

    PubMed

    Khiari, Zied; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Betti, Mirko

    2014-09-01

    A process based on the isoelectric solubilization/precipitation (ISP) method was developed to recover collagen from low value poultry by-products. The application of the ISP process to turkey heads generated protein isolates and an insoluble biomass that was used to extract collagen. Isolated turkey head collagen was then enzymatically hydrolyzed for different time periods using alcalase, flavorzyme, and trypsin. The enzymatic hydrolysis approaches consisted of digesting collagen with each one of the 3 enzymes alone (alcalase, flavorzyme, or trypsin), or one of the 3 combinations of 2 enzymes (alcalase/flavorzyme, alcalase/trypsin, or flavorzyme/trypsin), or a cocktail of all 3 enzymes together (alcalase/flavorzyme/trypsin). The molecular weight distribution of turkey head collagen hydrolysates was determined using size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. The enzyme cocktail produced collagen hydrolysates with the greatest amount of low molecular weight peptides ranging from 555.26 to 2,093.74 Da. These collagen peptides showed excellent solubility over a wide pH range (2 -: 8) and were able to bind cholic and deoxycholic acids and significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited plasma amine oxidase in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ISP process combined with enzyme cocktail hydrolysis represents a potential new way to produce low molecular weight bioactive collagen peptides from low value poultry by-products.

  14. Analysis of hydrogen bonds in peptides, based on the hydration affinity of amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perczel, András; Lengyel, Istvan; Mantsch, Henry H.; Fasman, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01

    The difference in the affinity for water of peptide groups embedded in different molecular environments was investigated. The chemical shift of an amide proton is sensitive to conformational variations, as well as to changes in the molecular environment [D.S. Wishat, B.D. Sykes and F.M. Richards, J. Mol. Biol., 222 (1991) 311-333]. Therefore, if the conformational motions are minimized or excluded, the observed changes in the chemical shift can simply be related to the environmental effects. The conformation(s) of the cyclic β-turn models studied in this work has been previously reported using X-ray, NMR, circular dichroism, and (FT-IR) spectroscopic methods, as well as MD calculations. [M. Hollósi, K.E. Köver, S. Holly, L. Radics and G.D. Fasman, Biopolymers, 26 (1987) 1527-1572; A. Perczel, M. Hollósi, B.M. Foxman and G.D. Fasman, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 113 (1991) 9772-9784; and H.H. Mantsch, A. Perczel, M. Hollósi and G.D. Fasman, Biopolymers, 33 (1993) 201-207]. The backbone of the cyclo[(δ)Ava—Gly—Pro—Aaa—Gly] (where Aaa = Ser(O tBu), Ser or Thr(O tBu), and δ(Ava) is δ-aminovaleric acid) compounds was found to be rigidly incorporated in the structure and to contain two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. These β-turn models also include one (or two) "free" amide group(s) that are not involved in any type of interaction. The "water titration" of these amide groups in acetonitrile, where they are involved in various degrees of hydrogen bonding, revealed their molecular environment. Owing to the rigidity of these structures, the observed changes in the amide proton chemical shifts, during titration were attributed to their involvement in hydrogen bonding. This was confirmed by monitoring the water titration simultaneously with FT-IR spectroscopy. The phenomenon described here, with the proposed characterization of the investigated peptide/water system, comprise an improvement in the NMR method for analyzing the hydrogen bonding of small rigid peptides.

  15. Disruption of disulfide bond formation alters the trafficking of prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH)-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Barker, Alison J; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2006-01-15

    Rat prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH) is processed in the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells yielding five TRH peptides and several non-TRH peptides. It is not understood how these peptides are targeted to the RSP. We show here that a disulfide bond in the carboxy-terminus of proTRH plays an important role in the trafficking of this prohormone. Recombinant proTRH was observed to migrate faster on a native gel when treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) suggesting the presence of a disulfide bond. In vitro disulfide bond formation was prevented either by DTT treatment or by mutating cysteines 213 and 219 to glycines. In both cases the peptides derived from these mutants exhibited increased constitutive release and processing defects when expressed in AtT20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line used in our prior studies on proTRH processing. Immunocytochemistry revealed that wild-type proTRH and mutant proTRH localized in a punctate pattern typical of proteins sorted to the regulated secretory pathway. These data suggest that the proposed disulfide bond of proTRH is involved in sorting of proTRH-derived peptides and in their retention within maturing secretory granules. This is the first evidence of structural motifs being important for the sorting of proTRH.

  16. Peptide bond cleavage site determination of novel proteolytic enzymes found in ROS 17/2.8 cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Perrin, D; Harrison, P

    1996-02-01

    We have identified proteolytic activities in the rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line ROS 17/2.8 which are capable of cleaving a peptide substrate for protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation (PSPKC, Pro-Leu-Ser-Arg-Thr-Leu-Ser-Val-Ala-Ala-Lys). Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions similar to those used to resolve small molecular weight proteins, the peptide bonds of PSPKC which are cleaved by the proteolytic activities present in ROS 17/2.8 cell lysates have been determined. These activities cleave the Ser-Arg, Thr-Leu, and Ser-Val peptide bonds. To date, no proteolytic activities present in osteoblast cell lysates have been described with the aforementioned peptide bond specificities, suggesting that these activities are novel. The PSPKC-cleaved peptide fragment pattern generated was similar for several different osteoblast cell lysates. Lysates generated from different rat tissues were also able to cleave PSPKC, but the peptide fragment pattern generated by ROS 17/2.8 cell lysates appeared to be unique amongst these tissues.

  17. Intermolecular charge flux as the origin of infrared intensity enhancement upon halogen-bond formation of the peptide group.

    PubMed

    Torii, Hajime

    2010-07-21

    The changes in the vibrational properties of the peptide group upon formation of O...X and N...X halogen bonds are studied theoretically. Calculations are carried out for complexes of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a well known model molecule of the peptide group, with halogen-containing molecules. For comparison, calculations are also carried out for some NMA-water hydrogen-bonding complexes. It is shown that the infrared (IR) intensity of the amide I mode of the peptide group is enhanced significantly (up to about 520 km mol(-1) or 2.6 times) upon C=O...X halogen-bond formation, in spite of rather modest magnitudes of the intermolecular electric field and of the changes in the C=O bond length and in the amide I vibrational frequency as compared with the cases of the C=O...H(D) hydrogen bonding. From the analysis of the changes in the dipole derivative and in the electronic structure, it is shown that this IR intensity enhancement arises from the intermolecular charge flux. For the N...X halogen bonding complexes, some characteristic changes in the vibrational properties are seen, among which the IR intensity enhancement of the ND out-of-plane wagging mode is most notable. The reason why such large IR intensity enhancements are seen for these particular vibrational modes is examined.

  18. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  19. A novel peptide-processing activity of insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A (angiotensin I-converting enzyme): the hydrolysis of lysyl-arginine and arginyl-arginine from the C-terminus of an insect prohormone peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R; Schoofs, L; Williams, T A; Veelaert, D; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1998-01-01

    Insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A [angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)] is a soluble single-domain peptidyl-dipeptidase that has many properties in common with the C-domain of mammalian somatic ACE and with the single-domain mammalian germinal ACE. Mammalian somatic ACE is important in blood homoeostasis, but the role of ACE in insects is not known. Immunocytochemistry has been used to localize ACE in the neuroendocrine system of the locust, Locusta migratoria. Staining was observed in five groups of neurosecretory cells in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion, in the nervi corpori cardiaci, the storage part of the corpora cardiaca and in the nervi corpori allati. In three groups of neurosecretory cells, ACE co-localized with locustamyotropins, suggesting a possible role for the enzyme in the metabolism of these neuropeptides. We demonstrate in vitro a novel activity of ACE that removes pairs of basic amino acid residues from a locustamyotropin peptide extended at the C-terminus with either Gly-Lys-Arg or Gly-Arg-Arg, corresponding to a consensus recognition sequence for endoproteolysis of prohormone proteins by prohormone convertases. The low Km and high kcat values (Km 7.3 and 5.0 microM, kcat 226 and 207 s-1 for the hydrolysis of Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Lys-Arg and Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Arg-Arg, respectively) obtained for the hydrolysis of these two peptides by insect ACE means that these peptides, along with mammalian bradykinin, are the most favoured in vitro ACE substrates so far identified. The discovery of this in vitro prohormone-processing activity of insect ACE provides a possible explanation for the intracellular co-localization of the enzyme with locustamyotropin peptides, and provides evidence for a new role for ACE in the biosynthesis of peptide hormones and transmitters. PMID:9461491

  20. Papain-catalyzed peptide bond formation: enzyme-specific activation with guanidinophenyl esters.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Jans, Sander C B; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2011-09-19

    The substrate mimetics approach is a versatile method for small-scale enzymatic peptide-bond synthesis in aqueous systems. The protease-recognized amino acid side chain is incorporated in an ester leaving group, the substrate mimetic. This shift of the specific moiety enables the acceptance of amino acids and peptide sequences that are normally not recognized by the enzyme. The guanidinophenyl group (OGp), a known substrate mimetic for the serine proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin, has now been applied for the first time in combination with papain, a cheap and commercially available cysteine protease. To provide insight in the binding mode of various Z-X(AA)-OGp esters, computational docking studies were performed. The results strongly point at enzyme-specific activation of the OGp esters in papain through a novel mode of action, rather than their functioning as mimetics. Furthermore, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis was investigated with respect to both the amino acid donor and the nucleophile. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to prioritize 22 natural and unnatural amino acid donors for synthesis. Experimental results correlate well with the predicted ranking and show that nearly all amino acids are accepted by papain.

  1. Quantum-mechanical study on the mechanism of peptide bond formation in the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Silva, Carles; Bertran, Joan; Branchadell, Vicenç; Oliva, Antoni

    2012-04-04

    Ribosomes transform the genetic information encoded within genes into proteins. In recent years, there has been much progress in the study of this complex molecular machine, but the mechanism of peptide bond formation and the origin of the catalytic power of this ancient enzymatic system are still an unsolved puzzle. A quantum-mechanical study of different possible mechanisms of peptide synthesis in the ribosome has been carried out using the M06-2X density functional. The uncatalyzed processes in solution have been treated with the SMD solvation model. Concerted and two-step mechanisms have been explored. Three main points suggested in this work deserve to be deeply analyzed. First, no zwitterionic intermediates are found when the process takes place in the ribosome. Second, the proton shuttle mechanism is suggested to be efficient only through the participation of the A2451 2'-OH and two crystallographic water molecules. Finally, the mechanisms in solution and in the ribosome are very different, and this difference may help us to understand the origin of the efficient catalytic role played by the ribosome.

  2. Synthesis of oligopeptides containing an oxirane ring in the place of a peptidic bond.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M

    1999-01-01

    Oligopeptides containing an oxirane ring have recently been identified as inhibitors of a variety of proteases (1-3). These peptidomimetics have the potential to coordinate with metal present in the active site and, after nucleophilic ring opening, irreversibly blocking the enzyme. For this reason, oxirane containing peptidomimetics are good candidates to became transition states analogs or suicide inhibitors with long term efficacy in vivo (3). Synthetic routes to a variety of terminal (4-8) and internal epoxide peptidomimetics (9-11) have been reported but there are no examples of incorporation of such epoxides into oligopeptides. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of oligopeptides (up to a three-peptide) containing an epoxide in the place of the peptide bond. The structures prepared here can be identified, using the notation suggested by Spatola (12) as AAxψ[traws-epoxy]-AAy. The general synthetic approach described in this chapter is based on the aldol type reaction of a silylketene thioacetal and a β-amino α-selenyl aldehyde derived from an oligopeptide. This reaction stereoselectively generates a vicinal hydroxy selenide which can be further oxidized to epoxide (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Retrosynthetic analysis of oxirane peptidomimetrics.

  3. Cyclodipeptide synthases are a family of tRNA-dependent peptide bond-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gondry, Muriel; Sauguet, Ludovic; Belin, Pascal; Thai, Robert; Amouroux, Rachel; Tellier, Carine; Tuphile, Karine; Jacquet, Mickaël; Braud, Sandrine; Courçon, Marie; Masson, Cédric; Dubois, Steven; Lautru, Sylvie; Lecoq, Alain; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Genet, Roger; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2009-06-01

    Cyclodipeptides and their derivatives belong to the diketopiperazine (DKP) family, which is comprised of a broad array of natural products that exhibit useful biological properties. In the few known DKP biosynthetic pathways, nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are involved in the synthesis of cyclodipeptides that constitute the DKP scaffold, except in the albonoursin (1) pathway. Albonoursin, or cyclo(alpha,beta-dehydroPhe-alpha,beta-dehydroLeu), is an antibacterial DKP produced by Streptomyces noursei. In this pathway, the formation of the cyclo(Phe-Leu) (2) intermediate is catalyzed by AlbC, a small protein unrelated to NRPSs. We demonstrated that AlbC uses aminoacyl-tRNAs as substrates to catalyze the formation of the DKP peptide bonds. Moreover, several other bacterial proteins, presenting moderate similarity to AlbC, also use aminoacyl-tRNAs to synthesize various cyclodipeptides. Therefore, AlbC and these related proteins belong to a newly defined family of enzymes that we have named cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs).

  4. Effects of hydrogen bonding on amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy in a proline-containing model peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichumani, Kumar; George, Gijo; Hebbar, Sankeerth; Chatterjee, Bhaswati; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2015-05-01

    Longitudinal relaxation due to cross-correlation between dipolar (1HN-1Hα) and amide-proton chemical shift anisotropy (1HN CSA) has been measured in a model tripeptide Piv-LPro-LPro-LPhe-OMe. The peptide bond across diproline segment is known to undergo cis/trans isomerization and only in the cis form does the lone Phe amide-proton become involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The strength of the cross correlated relaxation interference is found to be significantly different between cis and trans forms, and this difference is shown as an influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on the amide-proton CSA.

  5. Note: Charge transfer in a hydrated peptide group is determined mainly by its intrinsic hydrogen-bond energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkin, Noemi G.; Krimm, Samuel

    2014-01-28

    Charge transfer in a hydrogen-bonded N-methylacetamide(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} system is obtained from ωB97X-D/6-31++G** and CHelpG atomic charge calculations of individual peptide-water interactions as well as that of the entire complex. In the latter, the electron transfer to water is 0.19 e, influenced primarily by the hydrogen bonds to the C=O group. The values of such charge transfer are paralleled by the corresponding intrinsic hydrogen-bond energies. These results support the desirability of incorporating charge transfer in molecular mechanics energy functions.

  6. Presolvated Low Energy Electron Attachment to Peptide Methyl esters in Aqueous Solution: C-O Bond Cleavage at 77K

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Jeanette; Chomicz, Lidia; Engle, Alyson; Rak, Janusz; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the reactions of presolvated electrons with glycine methyl ester and N-acetylalanylalanine methyl ester (N-aAAMe) are investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Electrons were produced by gamma irradiation in neutral 7.5 M LiCl-D2O aqueous glasses at low temperatures. For glycine methyl ester electron addition at 77K results in both N-terminal deamination to form a glycyl radical and C-O ester bond cleavage to form methyl radicals. For samples of N-acetylalanylalanine methyl ester electrons are found to add to the peptide bonds at 77K and cleave the carboxyl ester groups to produce methyl radicals. On annealing to 160K electron adducts at the peptide links undergo chain scission to produce alanyl radicals and further annealing to 170K α-carbon peptide backbone radicals are produced by hydrogen abstraction. DFT calculations for electron addition to the methyl ester portion of N-aAAMe show the cleavage reaction is highly favorable (free energy equals to −30.7 kcal/mol) with the kinetic barrier of only 9.9 kcal/mol. A substantial electron affinity of the ester link (38.0 kcal/mol) provides more than sufficient energy to overcome this small barrier. Protonated peptide bond electron adducts, also show favorable N-C chain cleavage reactions of −12.7 to −15.5 kcal/mol with a barrier from 7.4 to 10.0 kcal/mol. The substantial adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of the peptide bond and ester groups provides sufficient energy for the bond dissociation. PMID:23406302

  7. Presolvated low energy electron attachment to peptide methyl esters in aqueous solution: C-O bond cleavage at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Jeanette; Chomicz, Lidia; Engle, Alyson; Rak, Janusz; Sevilla, Michael D

    2013-03-14

    In this study, the reactions of presolvated electrons with glycine methyl ester and N-acetylalanylalanine methyl ester (N-aAAMe) are investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Electrons were produced by γ-irradiation in neutral 7.5 M LiCl-D2O aqueous glasses at low temperatures. For glycine methyl ester, electron addition at 77 K results in both N-terminal deamination to form a glycyl radical and C-O ester bond cleavage to form methyl radicals. For samples of N-acetylalanylalanine methyl ester, electrons are found to add to the peptide bonds at 77 K and cleave the carboxyl ester groups to produce methyl radicals. On annealing to 160 K, electron adducts at the peptide links undergo chain scission to produce alanyl radicals and on further annealing to 170 K α-carbon peptide backbone radicals are produced by hydrogen abstraction. DFT calculations for electron addition to the methyl ester portion of N-aAAMe show the cleavage reaction is highly favorable (free energy equals to -30.7 kcal/mol) with the kinetic barrier of only 9.9 kcal/mol. A substantial electron affinity of the ester link (38.0 kcal/mol) provides more than sufficient energy to overcome this small barrier. Protonated peptide bond electron adducts also show favorable N-C chain cleavage reactions of -12.7 to -15.5 kcal/mol with a barrier from 7.4 to 10.0 kcal/mol. The substantial adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of the peptide bond and ester groups provides sufficient energy for the bond dissociation.

  8. Investigation of Serine-Proteinase-Catalyzed Peptide Splicing in Analogues of Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1).

    PubMed

    Karna, Natalia; Łęgowska, Anna; Malicki, Stanisław; Dębowski, Dawid; Golik, Przemysław; Gitlin, Agata; Grudnik, Przemysław; Wladyka, Benedykt; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2015-09-21

    Serine-proteinase-catalyzed peptide splicing was demonstrated in analogues of the trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1: both single peptides and two-peptide chains (C- and N-terminal peptide chains linked by a disulfide bridge). In the second series, peptide splicing with catalytic amount of proteinase was observed only when formation of acyl-enzyme intermediate was preceded by hydrolysis of the substrate Lys-Ser peptide bond. Here we demonstrate that with an equimolar amount of the proteinase, splicing occurs in all the two-peptide-chain analogues. This conclusion was supported by high resolution crystal structures of selected analogues in complex with trypsin. We showed that the process followed a direct transpeptidation mechanism. Thus, the acyl-enzyme intermediate was formed and was immediately used for a new peptide bond formation; products associated with the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme were not observed. The peptide splicing was sequence- not structure-specific.

  9. An unusual interstrand H-bond stabilizes the heteroassembly of helical αβγ-chimeras with natural peptides.

    PubMed

    Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Rezaei Araghi, Raheleh; Mortier, Jérémie; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Baldauf, Carsten; Wolber, Gerhard; Koksch, Beate

    2014-03-21

    The substitution of α-amino acids by homologated amino acids has a strong impact on the overall structure and topology of peptides, usually leading to a loss in thermal stability. Here, we report on the identification of an ideal core packing between an α-helical peptide and an αβγ-chimera via phage display. Selected peptides assemble with the chimeric sequence with thermal stabilities that are comparable to that of the parent bundle consisting purely of α-amino acids. With the help of MD simulations and mutational analysis this stability could be explained by the formation of an interhelical H-bond between the selected cysteine and a backbone carbonyl of the β/γ-segment. Gained results can be directly applied in the design of biologically relevant peptides containing β- and γ-amino acids.

  10. Cα-C bond cleavage of the peptide backbone in MALDI in-source decay using salicylic acid derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H](+). The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H](+) to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H](+) of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the Cα-C bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the Cα-C bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  11. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P{sub 1} by serine proteases with hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Qasim, Mohammad A.; Song, Jikui; Markley, John L.; Laskowski, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. {yields} Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. {yields} Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S{sub 1} pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and {approx}10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  12. [Chemical ribonucleases. 3. Synthesis of organic catalysts of hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds based on quaternary salts of 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane].

    PubMed

    Konevets, D A; Bekk, I E; Sil'nikov, V N; Zenkova, M A; Shishkin, G V

    2000-11-01

    On the basis of imidazole and bisquaternary salts of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, a number of highly effective catalysts of the nDm series (here, n is the number of positive charges at neutral pH values and m is the digital code of the catalytically active fragment: 1, histamine, and 2, histidine methyl ester) were synthesized for the cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds in ribonucleic acids. A general method for the synthesis of chemical ribonucleases was suggested, which helps vary both the number of positive charges in their RNA-binding domain and the catalytic center. By the example of hydrolysis under physiological conditions of the in vitro transcript of tRNA(Lys) from human mitochondria, it was shown that the RNA cleavage rate with the nDm conjugates increases approximately 30-fold along with the increase in the number of positive charges from two to four.

  13. Fluorescent primuline derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus NS3-catalyzed RNA unwinding, peptide hydrolysis and viral replicase formation.

    PubMed

    Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Mukherjee, Sourav; Shadrick, William R; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) multifunctional nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a protease that cleaves viral and host proteins and a helicase that separates DNA and RNA structures in reactions fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Li et al. (2012) recently synthesized a series of new NS3 helicase inhibitors from the benzothiazole dimer component of the fluorescent yellow dye primuline. This study further characterizes a subset of these primuline derivatives with respect to their specificity, mechanism of action, and effect on cells harboring HCV subgenomic replicons. All compounds inhibited DNA and RNA unwinding catalyzed by NS3 from different HCV genotypes, but only some inhibited the NS3 protease function, and few had any effect on HCV NS3 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. A different subset contained potent inhibitors of RNA stimulated ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the related NS3 protein from Dengue virus. In assays monitoring intrinsic protein fluorescence in the absence of nucleic acids, the compounds cooperatively bound NS3 with K(d)s that reflect their potency in assays. The fluorescent properties of the primuline derivatives both in vitro and in cells are also described. The primuline derivative that was the most active against subgenomic replicons in cells caused a 14-fold drop in HCV RNA levels (IC(50)=5±2μM). In cells, the most effective primuline derivative did not inhibit the cellular activity of NS3 protease but disrupted HCV replicase structures.

  14. Hydrolysis of substance P in the presence of the osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2: release of free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Antonella; Marini, Mario; Roda, L Giorgio; Tarantino, Umberto; Valenti, Angela

    2011-12-01

    The possible hydrolysis of substance P (Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-Phe-Gly-Leu-Met) in presence of the osteoblastic cell line SaOS-2 was measured by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass detection. The results obtained indicate that a very rapid disappearance of the intact undecapeptide was associated to a slower appearance of seven of its eight component amino acids. These results can be interpreted as indicating that an extremely fast hydrolysis of substance P by endopeptidases, which released peptidic by-products, was followed by a noticeably slower secondary degradation which released free amino acids. In decreasing quantitative importance, these phenomena appear to originate by the hydrolysis of the Pro(4)-Gln(5) bond, followed by C-terminal sequential degradation of the Arg(1)-Pro(4) tetrapeptide; by the hydrolysis of or Phe(7)-Phe(8) bond (or, possibly, of Gln(6)-Phe(7)) leading to release of free Phe and Gln; by hydrolysis of the Gly(9)-Leu(10) bond with subsequent release of Met and Leu. Results obtained appear to be compatible with the expression by SaOS-2 cells of enzymes already known to catalyze substance P hydrolysis, together with an apparent low efficiency of aminopeptidases. Because of the activity of C-terminal fragments on NK1 receptors, the delay between primary hydrolysis of substance P and secondary hydrolysis of its peptidic fragments indicated by the data shown implies a possible persistence of substance P physiological effects even after degradation of the intact peptide.

  15. Phosphate triester hydrolysis promoted by an N2S(thiolate)Zn complex: mechanistic implications for the metal-dependent reactivity of peptide deformylase.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David P; diTargiani, Robert C; Namuswe, Frances; Minnihan, Ellen C; Chang, SeChin; Zakharov, Lev N; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2005-10-17

    The zinc(II) complex (PATH)ZnOH, where PATH is an N2S(thiolate) ligand, has been investigated for its ability to promote the hydrolysis of the phosphate triester tris(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (TNP). The hydrolysis of TNP was examined as a function of PATH-zinc(II) complex concentration, substrate concentration, and pH in a water/ethanol mixture (66:33 v/v) at 25 degrees C. The reaction is first order in both zinc(II) complex and substrate, and the second-order rate constants were derived from linear plots of the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants versus zinc complex concentration at different pH values. A pH-rate profile yielded a kinetic pK(a) of 8.52(5) for the zinc-bound water molecule and a pH-independent rate constant of 16.1(7) M(-1) s(-1). Temperature-dependent studies showed linear Eyring behavior, yielding the activation parameters DeltaH++ = 36.9(1) kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS++ = -106.7(4) J mol(-1) K(-1). Interpretation of the kinetic data leads to the conclusion that hydrolysis of TNP takes place through a hybrid mechanism, in which the metal center plays a dual role of providing a nucleophilic hydroxide and activating the substrate through a Lewis acid effect. The synthesis and structural characterization of the related nickel(II) and iron(II) complexes [(PATH)2Ni2]Br2 (2) and (PATH)2Fe2Cl2 (3) are also described. Taken together, these data suggest a possible explanation for the low reactivity of the zinc(II) form of peptide deformylase as compared to the iron(II) form.

  16. Antioxidant activities of the synthesized thiol-contained peptides derived from computer-aided pepsin hydrolysis of yam tuber storage protein, dioscorin.

    PubMed

    Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Liu, Ju-Chi; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2013-06-01

    Our previous report showed that yam dioscorin and its peptic hydrolysates exhibit radical scavenging activities; however, the functions of these peptic hydrolases are still under investigation. In this study, the thiol-containing peptides derived from computer-aided simulation of pepsin hydrolysis of dioscorin, namely, KTCGNGME (diotide1), PPCSE (diotide2), CDDRVIRTPLT (diotide3), KTCGY (diotide4), and PPCTE (diotide5) were synthesized to compare their antioxidant activities with GSH and/or carnosine by examining hydroxyl radical scavenging activity by electron spin resonance spectrometry, anti-low-density lipoprotein peroxidation, anti-AAPH-induced hemolysis, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity activity. We found that while all the synthesized diotides showed antioxidant activity, diotide4 exhibited the highest levels. Moreover, all diotides (100 μM) showed protective effects against methylglyoxal-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell death. These results suggest that thiol-containing diotides derived from dioscorin hydrolysis exhibit antioxidant activities and reveal the benefits of yam tuber as an antioxidant-rich food.

  17. The use of sub-critical water hydrolysis for the recovery of peptides and free amino acids from food processing wastes. Review of sources and main parameters.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Ismael; Álvarez, Carlos; Paredes, Benjamín; Díaz, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Food industry processing wastes are produced in enormous amounts every year, such wastes are usually disposed with the corresponding economical cost it implies, in the best scenario they can be used for pet food or composting. However new promising technologies and tools have been developed in the last years aimed at recovering valuable compounds from this type of materials. In particular, sub-critical water hydrolysis (SWH) has been revealed as an interesting way for recovering high added-value molecules, and its applications have been broadly referred in the bibliography. Special interest has been focused on recovering protein hydrolysates in form of peptides or amino acids, from both animal and vegetable wastes, by means of SWH. These recovered biomolecules have a capital importance in fields such as biotechnology research, nutraceuticals, and above all in food industry, where such products can be applied with very different objectives. Present work reviews the current state of art of using sub-critical water hydrolysis for protein recovering from food industry wastes. Key parameters as reaction time, temperature, amino acid degradation and kinetic constants have been discussed. Besides, the characteristics of the raw material and the type of products that can be obtained depending on the substrate have been reviewed. Finally, the application of these hydrolysates based on their functional properties and antioxidant activity is described.

  18. Role of solvent on nonenzymatic peptide bond formation mechanisms and kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Bertrán, Juan

    2013-06-12

    Based on the hypothesis that similar mechanisms are involved in the peptide bond formation in aqueous solution and in the ribosome, the aminolysis of esters in aqueous solution has been the subject of numerous studies as the reference reaction for the catalyzed process. The mechanisms proposed in the literature have been explored in the present paper by hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations. The free energy profiles have been computed with the QM region of the system described at semiempirical AM1 level and by DFT within the M06-2X functional. According to the results, the formation of adduct zwitterion species is a preliminary step required for all possible mechanisms. Then, from different conformers of this species, four different paths were found: three of them taking place through concerted mechanisms of four-, six- and eight-membered ring transition states, and a stepwise mechanism through a neutral intermediate. Comparison of the free energy profiles indicates that the concerted mechanisms would be kinetically favored, with free energy barriers in very good agreement with experimental data. Calculations of kinetic isotope effects, when including the solute interactions with the first solvation shell, show that the 8-membered ring TS renders values in better agreement with available experimental data. Quantitative discrepancies can be attributed to different employed models in experiments and calculations.

  19. The transition state for peptide bond formation reveals the ribosome as a water trap.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Göran; Aqvist, Johan

    2010-02-02

    Recent progress in elucidating the peptide bond formation process on the ribosome has led to notion of a proton shuttle mechanism where the 2'-hydroxyl group of the P-site tRNA plays a key role in mediating proton transfer between the nucleophile and leaving group, whereas ribosomal groups do not actively participate in the reaction. Despite these advances, the detailed nature of the transition state for peptidyl transfer and the role of several trapped water molecules in the peptidyl transferase center remain major open questions. Here, we employ high-level quantum chemical ab initio calculations to locate and characterize global transition states for the reaction, described by a molecular model encompassing all the key elements of the reaction center. The calculated activation enthalpy as well as structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data and point to feasibility of an eight-membered "double proton shuttle" mechanism in which an auxiliary water molecule, observed both in computer simulations and crystal structures, actively participates. A second conserved water molecule is found to be of key importance for stabilizing developing negative charge on the substrate oxyanion and its presence is catalytically favorable both in terms of activation enthalpy and entropy. Transition states calculated both for six- and eight-membered mechanisms are invariably late and do not involve significant charge development on the attacking amino group. Predicted kinetic isotope effects consistent with this picture are similar to those observed for uncatalyzed ester aminolysis reactions in solution.

  20. The Pediocin PA-1 Accessory Protein Ensures Correct Disulfide Bond Formation in the Antimicrobial Peptide Pediocin PA-1.

    PubMed

    Oppegård, Camilla; Fimland, Gunnar; Anonsen, Jan Haug; Nissen-Meyer, Jon

    2015-05-19

    Peptides, in contrast to proteins, are generally not large enough to form stable and well-defined three-dimensional structures. However, peptides are still able to form correct disulfide bonds. Using pediocin-like bacteriocins, we have examined how this may be achieved. Some pediocin-like bacteriocins, such as pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C], have four cysteines. There are three possible ways by which the four cysteines may combine to form two disulfide bonds, and the three variants are expected to be produced in approximately equal amounts if their formation is random. Pediocin PA-1 and sakacin P[N24C+44C] with correct disulfide bonds were the main products when they were secreted by the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and accessory protein, but when they were secreted by the corresponding secretion machinery for sakacin A, a pediocin-like bacteriocin with one disulfide bond (two cysteines), peptides with all three possible disulfide bonds were produced in approximately equal amounts. All five cysteines in the pediocin PA-1 ABC transporter and the two cysteines (that form a CxxC motif) in the accessory protein were individually replaced with serines to examine their involvement in disulfide bond formation in pediocin PA-1. The Cys86Ser mutation in the accessory protein caused a 2-fold decrease in the amount of pediocin PA-1 with correct disulfide bonds, while the Cys83Ser mutation nearly abolished the production of pediocin PA-1 and resulted in the production of all three disufide bond variants in equal amounts. The Cys19Ser mutation in the ABC transporter completely abolished secretion of pediocin PA-1, suggesting that Cys19 is in the proteolytic active site and involved in cleaving the prebacteriocin. Replacing the other four cysteines in the ABC transporter with serines caused a slight reduction in the overall amount of secreted pediocin PA-1, but the relative amount with the correct disulfide bonds remained large. These results indicate that the pediocin

  1. Synthesis of a fluorine-substituted puromycin derivative for Brønsted studies of ribosomal-catalyzed peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kensuke; Hirota, Takashi; Kingery, David A; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2009-03-20

    The mechanism by which the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation remains controversial. Here we describe the synthesis of a nucleoside that can be used in Brønsted experiments to assess the transition state of ribosome catalyzed peptide bond formation. This substrate is the nucleoside 3'-amino-3'-deoxy-3'-[(3''R)-3-fluoro-l-phenyl-alanyl]-N(6),N(6)-dimethyladenosine, which was prepared from (1R,2R)-2-amino-1-phenylpropane-1,3-diol. This substrate is active in peptide bond formation on the ribosome and is a useful probe for Brønsted analysis experiments on the ribosome.

  2. Simultaneous determination of interfacial molarities of amide bonds, carboxylate groups, and water by chemical trapping in micelles of amphiphiles containing peptide bond models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Romsted, Laurence S; Zhuang, Lanzhen; de Jong, Sander

    2013-01-15

    Chemical trapping is a powerful approach for obtaining experimental estimates of interfacial molarities of weakly basic nucleophiles in the interfacial regions of amphiphile aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical probe 4-hexadecyl-2,6-dimethylbenzenediazonium ion (16-ArN(2)(+)) reacts competitively with interfacial water, with the amide carbonyl followed by cleavage of the headgroups from the tail at the amide oxygen, and with the terminal carboxylate groups in micelles of two N-acyl amino-acid amphiphiles, sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SLS) and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SLG), simple peptide bond model amphiphiles. Interfacial molarities (in moles per liter of interfacial volume) of these three groups were obtained from product yields, assuming that selectivity toward a particular nucleophile compared to water is the same in an aqueous reference solution and in the interfacial region. Interfacial carboxylate group molarities are ~1.5 M in both SLS and SLG micelles, but the concentration of the amide carbonyl for SLS micelles is ~4.6-5 times less (ca. 0.7 M) than that of SLG micelles (~3 M). The proton on the secondary N of SLG helps solubilize the amide bond in the aqueous region, but the methyl on the tertiary N of SLS helps solubilize the amide bond in the micellar core, reducing its reaction with 16-ArN(2)(+). Application of chemical trapping to proteins in membrane mimetic interfaces should provide insight into the topology of the protein within the interface because trapping of the amide carbonyl and cleavage at the C-N bond occurs only within the interface, and fragment characterization marks those peptide bonds located within the interface.

  3. A proton wire to couple aminoacyl-tRNA accommodation and peptide-bond formation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Steitz, Thomas A; Innis, C Axel

    2014-09-01

    During peptide-bond formation on the ribosome, the α-amine of an aminoacyl-tRNA attacks the ester carbonyl carbon of a peptidyl-tRNA to yield a peptide lengthened by one amino acid. Although the ribosome's contribution to catalysis is predominantly entropic, the lack of high-resolution structural data for the complete active site in complex with full-length ligands has made it difficult to assess how the ribosome might influence the pathway of the reaction. Here, we present crystal structures of preattack and postcatalysis complexes of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome at ~2.6-Å resolution. These structures reveal a network of hydrogen bonds along which proton transfer could take place to ensure the concerted, rate-limiting formation of a tetrahedral intermediate. We propose that, unlike earlier models, the ribosome and the A-site tRNA facilitate the deprotonation of the nucleophile through the activation of a water molecule.

  4. Mechanism of the discrepancy in the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency between defatted peanut flour and peanut protein isolate by Flavorzyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Zhao, Yijun; Xiao, Chuqiao; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan

    2015-02-01

    Both defatted peanut flour (DPF) and peanut protein isolate (PPI) are widely used to prepare peanut protein hydrolysates. To compare their enzymatic hydrolysis efficiencies, DPF and PPI were hydrolysed by Alcalase, Neutrase, Papain, Protamex and Flavorzyme. Alcalase and Flavorzyme were found to be the most efficient proteases to hydrolyse both DPF and PPI. The efficiency was comparable to each other when using Alcalase, while PPI was hydrolysed less efficiently than DPF when using Flavorzyme. Analysis of changes in the protein solubility, subunit and conformation, and amino acid composition of DPF, PPI and their Flavorzyme hydrolysis residues indicated that the PPI preparation process had minimal effect on it, but peptide aggregation via non-covalent bonding (including hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds) during hydrolysis and/or thermal treatment after hydrolysis were likely responsible for the reduced hydrolysis efficiency of PPI by Flavorzyme.

  5. Application of MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation for the identification of disulfide-bonded peptides.

    PubMed

    Janecki, Dariusz J; Nemeth, Jennifer F

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a method for the fast identification and composition of disulfide-bonded peptides. A unique fragmentation signature of inter-disulfide-bonded peptides is detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). This fragmentation pattern identifies peptides with an interconnected disulfide bond and provides information regarding the composition of the peptides involved in the pairing. The distinctive signature produced using CID is a triplet of ions resulting from the cleavage of the disulfide bond to produce dehydroalanine, cysteine or thiocysteine product ions. This method is not applicable to intra-peptide disulfide bonds, as the cleavage mechanism is not the same and a triplet pattern is not observed. This method has been successfully applied to identifying disulfide-bonded peptides in a number of control digestions, as well as study samples where disulfide bond networks were postulated and/or unknown.

  6. Ion mobility mass spectrometry as a potential tool to assign disulfide bonds arrangements in peptides with multiple disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Echterbille, Julien; Quinton, Loïc; Gilles, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-05-07

    Disulfide bridges play a major role in defining the structural properties of peptides and proteins. However, the determination of the cysteine pairing is still challenging. Peptide sequences are usually achieved using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of the totally reduced unfolded species, but the cysteine pairing information is lost. On the other hand, MS/MS experiments performed on native folded species show complex spectra composed of nonclassical ions. MS/MS alone does not allow either the cysteine pairing or the full sequence of an unknown peptide to be determined. The major goal of this work is to set up a strategy for the full structural characterization of peptides including disulfide bridges annotation in the sequence. This strategy was developed by combining ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). It is assumed that the opening of one S-S bridge in a peptide leads to a structural evolution which results in a modification of IMS drift time. In the presence of multiple S-S bridges, the shift in arrival time will depend on which disulfide(s) has (have) been reduced and on the shape adopted by the generated species. Due to specific fragmentations observed for each species, CID experiments performed after the mobility separation could provide not only information on peptide sequence but also on the localization of the disulfide bridges. To achieve this goal, synthetic peptides containing two disulfides were studied. The openings of the bridges were carried out following different experimental conditions such as reduction, reduction/alkylation, or oxidation. Due to disulfide scrambling highlighted with the reduction approaches, oxidation of S-S bonds into cysteic acids appeared to be the best strategy. Cysteine connectivity was then unambiguously determined for the two peptides, without any disulfide scrambling interference.

  7. Immobilization of collagen peptide on dialdehyde bacterial cellulose nanofibers via covalent bonds for tissue engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Yudong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Lu-Ning; Yuan, Zhenya; Peng, Jiang; Meng, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative nanostructured biomaterial to be utilized for a wide range of biomedical applications. Because of its low bioactivity, which restricted its practical application, collagen and collagen hydrolysate were usually composited into BC. It is necessary to develop a new method to generate covalent bonds between collagen and cellulose to improve the immobilization of collagen on BC. This study describes a facile dialdehyde BC/collagen peptide nanocomposite. BC was oxidized into dialdehyde bacterial cellulose (DBC) by regioselective oxidation, and then composited with collagen peptide (Col-p) via covalent bonds to form Schiff’s base type compounds, which was demonstrated by the results of microstructures, contact angle, Col-p content, and peptide-binding ratio. The peptide-binding ratio was further affected by the degree of oxidation, pH value, and zeta potential. In vitro desorption measurement of Col-p suggested a controlled release mechanism of the nanocomposite. Cell tests indicated that the prepared DBC/Col-p composite was bioactive and suitable for cell adhesion and attachment. This work demonstrates that the DBC/Col-p composite is a promising material for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:26229466

  8. Does the cis/trans configuration of peptide bonds in bioactive tripeptides play a role in ACE-1 enzyme inhibition?

    PubMed Central

    Siltari, Aino; Viitanen, Riikka; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Valjakka, Jarkko

    2014-01-01

    Background The milk casein-derived bioactive tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP) have been shown to prevent development of hypertension in animal models and to lower blood pressure in moderately hypertensive subjects in most but not all clinical trials. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE-1) has been suggested as the explanation for these antihypertensive and beneficial vascular effects. Previously, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have not been used to test ACE-1 inhibiting properties of casein derived tripeptides in vasculature. Purpose We focused on the cis/trans configurations of the peptide bonds in proline-containing tripeptides in order to discover whether the different structural properties of these peptides influence their activity in ACE-1 inhibition. We hypothesized that the configuration of proline-containing peptides plays a significant role in enzyme inhibition. Methods AutoDock 4.2 docking software was used to predict suitable peptide bond configurations of the tripeptides. Besides modeling studies, we completed ACE-1 activity measurements in vitro using HUVEC cultures. Results In HUVEC cells, both IPP and VPP inhibited ACE-1. Based on molecular docking studies, we propose that in ACE-1 inhibition IPP and VPP share a similar cis configuration between the first aliphatic (isoleucine or valine) and the second (proline) amino acid residues and more different configurations between two proline residues. In vivo experiments are needed to validate the significance of the present findings. PMID:24596454

  9. Immobilization of collagen peptide on dialdehyde bacterial cellulose nanofibers via covalent bonds for tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Yudong; Wu, Jian; Wang, Lu-Ning; Yuan, Zhenya; Peng, Jiang; Meng, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is an alternative nanostructured biomaterial to be utilized for a wide range of biomedical applications. Because of its low bioactivity, which restricted its practical application, collagen and collagen hydrolysate were usually composited into BC. It is necessary to develop a new method to generate covalent bonds between collagen and cellulose to improve the immobilization of collagen on BC. This study describes a facile dialdehyde BC/collagen peptide nanocomposite. BC was oxidized into dialdehyde bacterial cellulose (DBC) by regioselective oxidation, and then composited with collagen peptide (Col-p) via covalent bonds to form Schiff's base type compounds, which was demonstrated by the results of microstructures, contact angle, Col-p content, and peptide-binding ratio. The peptide-binding ratio was further affected by the degree of oxidation, pH value, and zeta potential. In vitro desorption measurement of Col-p suggested a controlled release mechanism of the nanocomposite. Cell tests indicated that the prepared DBC/Col-p composite was bioactive and suitable for cell adhesion and attachment. This work demonstrates that the DBC/Col-p composite is a promising material for tissue engineering and regeneration.

  10. Interaction between the antibiotic spiramycin and a ribosomal complex active in peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Dinos, G; Synetos, D; Coutsogeorgopoulos, C

    1993-10-12

    The inhibition of peptide bond formation by spiramycin was studied in an in vitro system derived from Escherichia coli. Peptide bonds are formed between puromycin (S) and Ac-Phe-tRNA, which is a component of complex C, i.e., of the [Ac-Phe-tRNA-70S ribosome-poly(U)] complex, according to the puromycin reaction: C+S (Ks)<==>CS (k3)==>C'+P [Synetos, D., & Coutsogeorgopoulos, C. (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 923, 275-285]. It is shown that spiramycin (A) reacts with complex C and forms the spiramycin complex C*A, which is inactive toward puromycin. C*A is the tightest complex formed between complex C and any of a number of antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, blasticidin S, lincomycin, or sparsomycin. C*A remains stable following gel chromatography on Sephadex G-200 and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Detailed kinetic study suggests that C*A is formed in a variation of a two-step mechanism in which the initial encounter complex CA is kinetically insignificant and C*A is the product of a conformational change of complex CA according to the equation, C+A (kassoc)<==>(kdissoc) C*A. The rate constants of this reaction (spiramycin reaction) are kassoc = 3.0 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 and kdissoc = 5.0 x 10(-5) s-1. Such values allow the classification of spiramycin as a slow-binding, slowly reversible inhibitor; they also lead to the calculation of an apparent overall dissociation constant equal to 1.8 nM for the C*A complex. Furthermore, they render spiramycin a useful tool in the study of antibiotic action on protein synthesis in vitro. Thus, the spiramycin reaction, in conjunction with the puromycin reaction, is applied (i) to detect a strong preincubation effect exerted by chloramphenicol and lincomycin (this effect constitutes further evidence that these two antibiotics combine with complex C as slow-binding inhibitors) and (ii) to determine the rate constant for the regeneration (k7 = 2.0 x 10(-3) s-1) of complex C from the sparsomycin complex C*I [Theocharis, D. A

  11. Role of the P-F bond in fluoride-promoted aqueous VX hydrolysis: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Daniele; Columbus, Ishay; Elias, Shlomi; Goldvaser, Michael; Shoshanim, Ofir; Ashkenazi, Nissan; Zafrani, Yossi

    2012-11-16

    Following our ongoing studies on the reactivity of the fluoride ion toward organophosphorus compounds, we established that the extremely toxic and environmentally persistent chemical warfare agent VX (O-ethyl S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothioate) is exclusively and rapidly degraded to the nontoxic product EMPA (ethyl methylphosphonic acid) even in dilute aqueous solutions of fluoride. The unique role of the P-F bond formation in the reaction mechanism was explored using both experimental and computational mechanistic studies. In most cases, the "G-analogue" (O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate, Et-G) was observed as an intermediate. Noteworthy and of practical importance is the fact that the toxic side product desethyl-VX, which is formed in substantial quantities during the slow degradation of VX in unbuffered water, is completely avoided in the presence of fluoride. A computational study on a VX-model, O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothioate (1), clarifies the distinctive tendency of aqueous fluoride ions to react with such organophosphorus compounds. The facility of the degradation process even in dilute fluoride solutions is due to the increased reactivity of fluoride, which is caused by the significant low activation barrier for the P-F bond formation. In addition, the unique nucleophilicity of fluoride versus hydroxide toward VX, in contrast to their relative basicity, is discussed. Although the reaction outcomes were similar, much slower reaction rates were observed experimentally for the VX-model (1) in comparison to VX.

  12. The amino acid sequences of eleven tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parente, A; Short, M N; Self, R; Parsley, K R

    1982-04-01

    Eleven of the fourteen tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein have been sequenced by electron ionization mass spectrometry using chemical and enzymic hydrolyses and mixture analysis as required. Mid-chain cleavages of N-C bonds produced secondary ion series which allowed up to 16 residues to be sequenced without further hydrolysis. Mixture analysis on hydrolysis products enabled a 24 residue tryptic peptide to be sequenced from the data recorded in a single mass spectrum.

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory peptides generated by tryptic hydrolysis of a whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Silvana T; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Recio, Isidra; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca

    2013-11-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) is a serine protease involved in the degradation and inactivation of incretin hormones that act by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion after meal ingestion. DPP-IV inhibitors have emerged as new and promising oral agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of β-lactoglobulin as natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. A whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin was hydrolysed with trypsin and fractionated using a chromatographic separation at semipreparative scale. Two of the six collected fractions showed notable DPP-IV inhibitory activity. These fractions were analysed by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify peptides responsible for the observed activity. The most potent fragment (IPAVF) corresponded to β-lactoglobulin f(78-82) which IC50 value was 44.7μM. The results suggest that peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin would be beneficial ingredients of foods against type 2 diabetes.

  14. Inefficient delivery but fast peptide bond formation of unnatural L-aminoacyl-tRNAs in translation.

    PubMed

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Forster, Anthony C; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2012-10-31

    Translations with unnatural amino acids (AAs) are generally inefficient, and kinetic studies of their incorporations from transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are few. Here, the incorporations of small and large, non-N-alkylated, unnatural l-AAs into dipeptides were compared with those of natural AAs using quench-flow techniques. Surprisingly, all incorporations occurred in two phases: fast then slow, and the incorporations of unnatural AA-tRNAs proceeded with rates of fast and slow phases similar to those for natural Phe-tRNA(Phe). The slow phases were much more pronounced with unnatural AA-tRNAs, correlating with their known inefficient incorporations. Importantly, even for unnatural AA-tRNAs the fast phases could be made dominant by using high EF-Tu concentrations and/or lower reaction temperature, which may be generally useful for improving incorporations. Also, our observed effects of EF-Tu concentration on the fraction of the fast phase of incorporation enabled direct assay of the affinities of the AA-tRNAs for EF-Tu during translation. Our unmodified tRNA(Phe) derivative adaptor charged with a large unnatural AA, biotinyl-lysine, had a very low affinity for EF-Tu:GTP, while the small unnatural AAs on the same tRNA body had essentially the same affinities to EF-Tu:GTP as natural AAs on this tRNA, but still 2-fold less than natural Phe-tRNA(Phe). We conclude that the inefficiencies of unnatural AA-tRNA incorporations were caused by inefficient delivery to the ribosome by EF-Tu, not slow peptide bond formation on the ribosome.

  15. Cationic reverse micelles create water with super hydrogen-bond-donor capacity for enzymatic catalysis: hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate by alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Fernando; Falcone, R Dario; Mejuto, J C; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2010-08-02

    Reverse micelles (RMs) are very good nanoreactors because they can create a unique microenvironment for carrying out a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions. The aim of the present work is to determine the influence of different RM interfaces on the hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA) by alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT). The reaction was studied in water/benzyl-n-hexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC)/benzene RMs and, its efficiency compared with that observed in pure water and in sodium 1,4-bis-2-ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT) RMs. Thus, the hydrolysis rates of 2-NA catalyzed by alpha-CT were determined by spectroscopic measurements. In addition, the method used allows the joint evaluation of the substrate partition constant K(p) between the organic and the micellar pseudophase and the kinetic parameters: catalytic rate constant k(cat), and the Michaelis constant K(M) of the enzymatic reaction. The effect of the surfactant concentration on the kinetics parameters was determined at constant W(0)=[H(2)O]/[surfactant], and the variation of W(0) with surfactant constant concentration was investigated. The results show that the classical Michaelis-Menten mechanism is valid for alpha-CT in all of the RMs systems studied and that the reaction takes place at both RM interfaces. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency values k(cat)/K(M) obtained in the RMs systems are higher than that reported in water. Furthermore, there is a remarkable increase in alpha-CT efficiency in the cationic RMs in comparison with the anionic system, presumably due to the unique water properties found in these confined media. The results show that in cationic RMs the hydrogen-bond donor capacity of water is enhanced due to its interaction with the cationic interface. Hence, entrapped water can be converted into "super-water" for the enzymatic reaction studied in this work.

  16. Route of uptake of palmitoylated encephalitogenic peptides of myelin proteolipid protein by antigen-presenting cells: importance of the type of bond between lipid chain and peptide and relevance to autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Nadège A; Grosch, Sylvie; Roussel, Guy; Koch, Marc; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; Greer, Judith M

    2008-02-01

    Previously, we have shown that thiopalmitoylation of peptides of myelin proteolipid protein, as occurs naturally in vivo, increases their ability to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis, and skews the autoimmune response toward a CD4(+)-mediated response. In contrast, the same peptide, when synthesized with a stable amide bond between peptide and lipid, inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and skews the response toward a CD8(+) response. The aim of the current study was to determine the mechanisms responsible for these observations. We show that proteolipid protein lipopeptides, when synthesized with a thioester bond between the lipid and the peptide, are taken up into APCs via an actin-independent endocytic route, the thioester bond is cleaved in the endosome, and the peptide is subsequently displayed on the surface of the APC in the context of MHC class II. The same peptide, when synthesized with the lipid attached via a stable amide bond, rapidly enters into the cytoplasm of the APC and forms micelles; however, the bond between peptide and lipid is not cleaved, and the micelles travel via the endoplasmic reticulum to complex with MHC class I. These findings have implications for vaccine development and for the development of MHC class II-restricted autoimmune diseases, as many human autoantigens thus far identified are thioacylated.

  17. Amide-I relaxation-induced hydrogen bond distortion: An intermediate in electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of alpha-helical peptides?

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent; Tsybin, Yury O

    2008-09-07

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) of peptides and proteins in the gas phase is a powerful tool in tandem mass spectrometry whose current description is not sufficient to explain many experimental observations. Here, we attempt to bridge the current understanding of the vibrational dynamics in alpha-helices with the recent experimental results on ECD of alpha-helical peptides through consideration of amide-I relaxation-induced hydrogen bond distortion. Based on a single spine of H-bonded peptide units, we assume that charge neutralization upon electron capture by a charged alpha-helix excites a nearby amide-I mode, which relaxes over a few picoseconds due to Fermi resonances with intramolecular normal modes. The amide-I population plays the role of an external force, which drives the displacements of each peptide unit. It induces a large immobile contraction of the H bonds surrounding the excited site whose lifetime is about the amide-I lifetime. In addition, it creates two lattice deformations describing H bond stretchings, which propagate from the excited region toward both termini of the alpha-helix, get reflected at the termini and yield H bond contractions which move back to the excited region. Consequently, we show that H bonds experience rather large contractions whose amplitude depends on general features such as the position of the amide-I mode, the peptide length and the H bond force constants. When an H bond contraction is sufficiently large, it may promote a hydrogen atom transfer between two neighboring peptide units leading to the formation of a radical at charge site remote carbonyl carbon which is known to be a precursor to the rupture of the corresponding N[Single Bond]C(alpha) bond. The introduced here way of excitation energy generation and transfer may significantly advance ECD understanding and complement existing ECD mechanisms.

  18. Structural Basis of Proline-Proline Peptide Bond Specificity of the Metalloprotease Zmp1 Implicated in Motility of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Pichlo, Christian; Neundorf, Ines; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogenic bacterium causing gastrointestinal diseases from mild diarrhea to toxic megacolon. In common with other pathogenic bacteria, C. difficile secretes proteins involved in adhesion, colonization, and dissemination. The recently identified Zmp1 is an extracellular metalloprotease showing a unique specificity for Pro-Pro peptide bonds. The endogenous substrates of Zmp1 are two surface proteins implicated in adhesion of C. difficile to surface proteins of human cells. Thus, Zmp1 is believed to be involved in the regulation of the adhesion-motility balance of C. difficile. Here, we report crystal structures of Zmp1 from C. difficile in its unbound and peptide-bound forms. The structure analysis revealed a fold similar to Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Crystal structures in the open and closed conformation of the S-loop shed light on the mode of binding of the substrate, and reveal important residues for substrate recognition and the strict specificity of Zmp1 for Pro-Pro peptide bonds.

  19. Couplings between peptide linkages across a 3(10)-helical hydrogen bond revealed by two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hiroaki; De Poli, Matteo; Toniolo, Claudio; Ge, Nien-Hui

    2009-02-18

    Vibrational couplings between the amide modes are keenly dependent on peptide structure. Site-specific couplings can inform us of molecular conformation in detail. For example, when an amide-I mode couples to an amide-II mode that is three residues away because they are brought into proximity in the presence of an intramolecular C=O...H-N hydrogen bond, the coupling can provide direct evidence for single helical turn formation, a proposed key step in coil-helix transition. In this work, we measure 2D IR spectra of a 3(10)-helical hexapeptide, Z-Aib-l-Leu-(Aib)(2)-Gly-Aib-OtBu, and its (13)C=(18)O-Leu monolabeled and (13)C=(18)O-Leu/(15)N-Gly bis-labeled isotopomers in CDCl(3). The isotope-dependent amide-I/II cross-peaks clearly reveal the existence of vibrational coupling between the second and fourth peptide linkages that are connected through a 3(10)-helical hydrogen bond. Our results demonstrate that the combination of 2D IR and (13)C=(18)O/(15)N labeling is a useful structural method for probing local peptide conformation with residue-level specificity.

  20. The Inherent Conformational Preferences of Glutamine-Containing Peptides: the Role for Side-Chain Backbone Hydrogen Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; McBurney, Carl; Gellman, Samuel H.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Glutamine is widely known to be found in critical regions of peptides which readily fold into amyloid fibrils, the structures commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease and glutamine repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Building on previous single-conformation data on Gln-containing peptides containing an aromatic cap on the N-terminus (Z-Gln-OH and Z-Gln-NHMe), we present here single-conformation UV and IR spectra of Ac-Gln-NHBn and Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn, with its C-terminal benzyl cap. These results point towards side-chain to backbone hydrogen bonds dominating the structures observed in the cold, isolated environment of a molecular beam. We have identified and assigned three main conformers for Ac-Gln-NHBn all involving primary side-chain to backbone interactions. Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn extends the peptide chain by one amino acid, but affords an improvement in the conformational flexibility. Despite this increase in the flexibility, only a single conformation is observed in the gas-phase: a structure which makes use of both side-chain-to-backbone and backbone-to-backbone hydrogen bonds.

  1. Mechanistic examination of Cβ-Cγ bond cleavages of tryptophan residues during dissociations of molecular peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [G(n)W](•+) (n = 2-4) and [GXW](•+) (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO(2)](•+)) can generate [M - CO(2) - 116](+), [M - CO(2) - 117](•+), and [1H-indole](•+) (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO(2) - 116](+) and [1H-indole](•+) systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2, the decarboxylated species that is active against C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage, can efficiently isomerize to form a more stable π-radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WG(n)R](•+) (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M - 116](+) product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote C(β)-C(γ) bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted that the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  2. Mechanistic Examination of Cβ–Cγ Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

    2013-02-14

    In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan γ-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote Cβ–Cγ bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

  3. Coupling of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis to peptide hormone receptors expressed from adrenal and pituitary mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.P.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The expression of several neurotransmitter and drug receptors from injected exogenous mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes has been demonstrated by electrophysiological measurements of ion channel activation. The expression of specific receptors for peptide hormones in such a translation system would facilitate studies on the structure and regulation of cell-surface receptors as well as their coupling to membrane transduction mechanisms. The expression of receptors for calcium-mobilizing hormones in Xenopus oocytes was sought by analysis of phospholipid turnover in hormone-stimulated oocytes. For this purpose, Xenopus oocytes were injected with mRNA extracted from bovine adrenal and pituitary glands and incubated with myo-(/sup 3/H)inositol to label plasma-membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. The expression of functionally active receptors for angiotensin II (AII) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was demonstrated by the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate production by AII and TRH in the mRNA-injected, (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled oocytes. The ability of AII and TRH to act by way of newly synthesized receptors from mammalian endocrine tissues to stimulate phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate hydrolysis in Xenopus oocytes suggests a generalized and conserved mechanism of receptor coupling to the transduction mechanism responsible for activation of phospholipase C in the plasma membrane.

  4. Laser enhanced hydrolysis of selected polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzts, Mary Paige

    This project serves as a preliminary examination of selectively enhancing bond cleavage during chemical reactions in biological molecules by using continuous wave infrared lasers. To analyze protein content, polypeptides are broken into their constituent amino acids through hydrolysis. The cleaving of the peptide bond has traditionally been accomplished under harsh conditions, 110°C in 6 N hydrochloric acid for 24 hours. In this project hydrolysis was strongly enhanced by irradiating the dipeptides, threonyl-aspartate and alanyl-alanine, for 30 minutes with coherent infrared radiation from a tunable carbon dioxide laser. The dipeptide tyrosyl-tyrosine, the chemical N- methylacetimide, and the protein BSA were successfully hydrolyzed with the laser. The effect of reaction parameters such as laser power and HCl concentration were studied, as well as the effect of the primary parameter, the beam wavelength. The samples were analyzed using standard biological methods for determining the amino acid concentration, thin layer chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. These methods gave consistent results for the irradiated samples as well as for standard amino acids and polypeptide samples. The results from these methods were used to create the hydrolysis spectra. The catalytic action of the laser was strongly wavelength dependent. The hydrolysis spectra of the molecules were compared to the absorption spectra of the samples. Laser enhanced hydrolysis occurred when the laser wavelength coincided with a line in the dipeptide spectra. This weak line in each of the dipeptide spectra is consistent both in position and strength with a line in NMA, which has been identified as a fundamental mode associated with the peptide bond. From the experimental results, the enhanced process appears to occur in the vapor phase. The initially liquid sample was progressively evaporated, and fully hydrolyzed material was carried to a collection trap by the vapor. It can, in principle

  5. Methyl group dynamics in paracetamol and acetanilide: probing the static properties of intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed by peptide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Neumann, M. A.; Kearley, G. J.; Wilson, C. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements of tunnelling and librational excitations for the methyl group in paracetamol and tunnelling excitations for the methyl group in acetanilide are reported. In both cases, results are compared with molecular mechanics calculations, based on the measured low temperature crystal structures, which follow an established recipe. Agreement between calculated and measured methyl group observables is not as good as expected and this is attributed to the presence of comprehensive hydrogen bond networks formed by the peptide groups. Good agreement is obtained with a periodic quantum chemistry calculation which uses density functional methods, these calculations confirming the validity of the one-dimensional rotational model used and the crystal structures. A correction to the Coulomb contribution to the rotational potential in the established recipe using semi-emipircal quantum chemistry methods, which accommodates the modified charge distribution due to the hydrogen bonds, is investigated.

  6. Phosphate Ester Bond Hydrolysis Promoted by Lanthanide-Substituted Keggin-type Polyoxometalates Studied by a Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theory Approach.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Mihaylov, Tzvetan T; Absillis, Gregory; Shestakova, Pavletta; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2016-10-03

    Hydrolytic cleavage of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP), a commonly used DNA model substrate, was examined in the presence of series of lanthanide-substituted Keggin-type polyoxometalates (POMs) [Me2NH2]11[Ce(III)(PW11O39)2], [Me2NH2]10[Ce(IV)(PW11O39)2] (abbreviated as (Ce(IV)(PW11)2), and K4[EuPW11O39] by means of NMR and luminescence spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Among the examined complexes, the Ce(IV)-substituted Keggin POM (Ce(IV)(PW11)2) showed the highest reactivity, and its aqueous speciation was fully determined under different conditions of pD, temperature, concentration, and ionic strength by means of (31)P and (31)P diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy. The cleavage of the phosphoester bond of NPP in the presence of (Ce(IV)(PW11)2) proceeded with an observed rate constant kobs = (5.31 ± 0.06) × 10(-6) s(-1) at pD 6.4 and 50 °C. The pD dependence of NPP hydrolysis exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest rate observed at pD 6.4. The formation constant (Kf = 127 M(-1)) and catalytic rate constant (kc = 19.41 × 10(-5) s(-1)) for the NPP-Ce(IV)-Keggin POM complex were calculated, and binding between Ce(IV)(PW11)2 and the phosphate group of NPP was also evidenced by the change of the chemical shift of the (31)P nucleus in NPP upon addition of the POM complex. DFT calculations revealed that binding of NPP to the parent catalyst Ce(IV)(PW11)2 is thermodynamically unlikely. On the contrary, formation of complexes with the monomeric 1:1 species, Ce(IV)PW11, is considered to be more favorable, and the most stable complex, [Ce(IV)PW11(H2O)2(NPP-κO)2](7-), was found to involve two NPP ligands coordinated to the Ce(IV)center of Ce(IV)PW11 in the monodentate fashion. The formation of such species is considered to be responsible for the hydrolytic activity of Ce(IV)(PW11)2 toward phosphomonoesters. On the basis of these findings a principle mechanism for the hydrolysis of NPP by the POM is proposed.

  7. Air oxidation method employed for the disulfide bond formation of natural and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Amodeo, Pietro; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Among the available protocols, chemically driven approaches to oxidize cysteine may not be required for molecules that, under the native-like conditions, naturally fold in conformations ensuring an effective pairing of the right disulfide bridge pattern. In this contest, we successfully prepared the distinctin, a natural heterodimeric peptide, and some synthetic cyclic peptides that are inhibitors of the CXCR4 receptor. In the first case, the air oxidation reaction allowed to connect two peptide chains via disulfide bridge, while in the second case allowed the cyclization of rationally designed peptides by an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Computational approaches helped to either drive de-novo design or suggest structural modifications and optimal oxidization protocols for disulfide-containing molecules. They are able to both predict and to rationalize the propensity of molecules to spontaneously fold in suitable conformations to achieve the right disulfide bridges.

  8. Disulphide bonds in wheat gluten: further cystine peptides from high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) subunits of glutenin and from gamma-gliadins.

    PubMed

    Köhler, P; Belitz, H D; Wieser, H

    1993-03-01

    Glutenin was prepared from gluten of the wheat variety Rektor by extraction of gliadin with aqueous ethanol. It was cleaved successively into soluble peptides by the enzymes trypsin and thermolysin. Separation of the peptide mixtures was performed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) on Sephadex G25 and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on ODS-Hypersil. Cystine peptides were detected by differential chromatography of the samples prior to and after reduction. After isolation by multi-step RP-HPLC, the cystine peptides were reduced. The resulting cysteine peptides were alkylated with 4-vinylpyridine, separated by RP-HPLC and sequenced by means of the Edman degradation. The isolated cystine peptides represented a considerable portion of the total cysteine in glutenin: four out of seven cysteine residues of HMW subunits, and eight out of nine cysteine residues of LMW subunits are documented by at least one cystine peptide. Most of the peptides corresponded to known sequences of gluten protein components. From the structures of some tryptic peptides, inter- and intramolecular disulphide bonds for HMW subunits of glutenin have been proven. Cystine peptides from the thermolytic digest have been assigned to LMW subunits of glutenin and to gamma-gliadins. Other peptides have been closely related to partial sequences of these protein components. The results have allowed several conclusions about the arrangement of intra- and intermolecular disulphide bridges in gluten proteins.

  9. Cloning, sequencing and overexpression of the gene for prokaryotic factor EF-P involved in peptide bond synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, H; Adams, S L; Chung, D G; Yaguchi, M; Chuang, S E; Ganoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A soluble protein EF-P (elongation factor P) from Escherichia coli has been purified and shown to stimulate efficient translation and peptide-bond synthesis on native or reconstituted 70S ribosomes in vitro. Based on the partial amino acid sequence of EF-P, 18- and 24-nucleotide DNA probes were synthesized and used to screen lambda phage clones from the Kohara Gene Bank. The entire EF-P gene was detected on lambda clone #650 which contains sequences from the 94 minute region of the E.coli genome. Two DNA fragments, 3.0 and 0.78 kilobases in length encompassing the gene, were isolated and cloned into pUC18 and pUC19. Partially purified extracts from cells transformed with these plasmids overrepresented a protein which co-migrates with EF-P upon SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and also exhibited increased EF-P mediated peptide-bond synthetic activity. Based on DNA sequence analysis of this gene, the EF-P protein consists of 187 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 20,447. The sequence and chromosomal location of EF-P establishes it as a unique gene product. Images PMID:1956781

  10. Formation of the First Peptide Bond: The Structure of EF-P Bound to the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, Gregor; Stanley, Robin E.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Yale

    2009-10-21

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is an essential protein that stimulates the formation of the first peptide bond in protein synthesis. Here we report the crystal structure of EF-P bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome along with the initiator transfer RNA N-formyl-methionyl-tRNAi (fMet-tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet}) and a short piece of messenger RNA (mRNA) at a resolution of 3.5 angstroms. EF-P binds to a site located between the binding site for the peptidyl tRNA (P site) and the exiting tRNA (E site). It spans both ribosomal subunits with its amino-terminal domain positioned adjacent to the aminoacyl acceptor stem and its carboxyl-terminal domain positioned next to the anticodon stem-loop of the P site-bound initiator tRNA. Domain II of EF-P interacts with the ribosomal protein L1, which results in the largest movement of the L1 stalk that has been observed in the absence of ratcheting of the ribosomal subunits. EF-P facilitates the proper positioning of the fMet-tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} for the formation of the first peptide bond during translation initiation.

  11. Formation of the First Peptid Bond: the Structure of EF-P Bound to the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, G.; Stanley, R; Steitz, T

    2009-01-01

    Elongation factor P (EF-P) is an essential protein that stimulates the formation of the first peptide bond in protein synthesis. Here we report the crystal structure of EF-P bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome along with the initiator transfer RNA N-formyl-methionyl-tRNAi (fMet-tRNAifMet) and a short piece of messenger RNA (mRNA) at a resolution of 3.5 angstroms. EF-P binds to a site located between the binding site for the peptidyl tRNA (P site) and the exiting tRNA (E site). It spans both ribosomal subunits with its amino-terminal domain positioned adjacent to the aminoacyl acceptor stem and its carboxyl-terminal domain positioned next to the anticodon stem-loop of the P site-bound initiator tRNA. Domain II of EF-P interacts with the ribosomal protein L1, which results in the largest movement of the L1 stalk that has been observed in the absence of ratcheting of the ribosomal subunits. EF-P facilitates the proper positioning of the fMet-tRNAifMet for the formation of the first peptide bond during translation initiation.

  12. An alternative mechanism for the catalysis of peptide bond formation by L/F transferase: substrate binding and orientation.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela W; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Abeysundara, Heshani; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Fahlman, Richard P

    2011-06-17

    Eubacterial leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase (L/F transferase) catalyzes the transfer of a leucine or a phenylalanine from an aminoacyl-tRNA to the N-terminus of a protein substrate. This N-terminal addition of an amino acid is analogous to that of peptide synthesis by ribosomes. A previously proposed catalytic mechanism for Escherichia coli L/F transferase identified the conserved aspartate 186 (D186) and glutamine 188 (Q188) as key catalytic residues. We have reassessed the role of D186 and Q188 by investigating the enzymatic reactions and kinetics of enzymes possessing mutations to these active-site residues. Additionally three other amino acids proposed to be involved in aminoacyl-tRNA substrate binding are investigated for comparison. By quantitatively measuring product formation using a quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based assay, our results clearly demonstrate that, despite significant reduction in enzymatic activity as a result of different point mutations introduced into the active site of L/F transferase, the formation of product is still observed upon extended incubations. Our kinetic data and existing X-ray crystal structures result in a proposal that the critical roles of D186 and Q188, like the other amino acids in the active site, are for substrate binding and orientation and do not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation. Overall, we propose that L/F transferase does not directly participate in the chemistry of peptide bond formation but catalyzes the reaction by binding and orientating the substrates for reaction in an analogous mechanism that has been described for ribosomes.

  13. Immunological and structural characterization of sarafotoxin/endothelin family of peptides.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Bousso-Mittler, D; Bdolah, A; Kloog, Y; Sokolovsky, M

    1989-08-15

    A highly specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the potent vasoconstrictor peptides, sarafotoxin-b and human endothelin. The antigenic determinants of the antibodies employed in studies with these assays were found to be localized within the amino acid sequence at positions 4-7. This was confirmed by CNBr cleavage of the methionyl residue at position 6 in the sarafotoxin and at position 7 in the endothelin. The chemically characterized modified peptides showed very low cross reactivity in the RIAs. On the other hand, the binding properties as well as the ability to induce phosphoinositide hydrolysis were very similar in the modified and native peptides, indicating that despite cleavage of the peptide bond the biologically active conformation responsible for either binding or phosphoinositide hydrolysis is retained, probably because of the disulfide bonds. Thus, structural alteration might be a valuable means of curtailing some of the various activities induced by the sarafotoxin/endothelin family of peptides.

  14. A mechanistic study supports a two-step mechanism for peptide bond formation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Byun, Byung Jin; Kang, Young Kee

    2013-09-28

    We report the feasible pathways of the quaternary model system for the ribosome-catalyzed PT reaction obtained by density functional calculations. Our results indicate that the step from the reactant complex to the first six-membered TS involving a proton shuttle via the 2'-OH of the P-site A76 in the stepwise pathway is the most favored rate-limiting step in solution. It is found that the C-O3' bond-breaking of A76 is not significant but the C-N bond formation with a tetrahedral intermediate occurs in the rate-limiting step and that the fast breakdown of the C-O3' bond is followed in the second transition state. These are consistent with recent kinetic experiments.

  15. Rational derivation of CETP self-binding helical peptides by π-π stacking and halogen bonding: Therapeutic implication for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Meijuan; Zhu, Lixia

    2016-10-01

    The human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to other lipoproteins and has been established as an attractive target for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. Here, an amphipathic α-helix peptide, namely SBH-peptide ((465)EHLLVDFLQSLS(476)), was derived from the C-terminal tail of CETP. The peptide exhibits self-binding capability towards the CETP. Crystal structure analysis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and ab initio electron correlation characterizations of CETP-SBH-peptide complex system revealed that the Phe471 residue plays a key role in SBH-peptide binding, which can form a π-π stacking with the Phe197 residue of CETP. In addition, substitution of the hydrogen atom H4 of Phe471 with halogen atoms, in particular the bromine atom Br4, can constitute a geometrically satisfactory halogen bonding with the oxygen atom O of CETP Ile193 residue. Fluorescence polarization assays substantiated that (i) mutation of the aromatic Phe471 to small Ala residue would impair the SBH-peptide affinity with Kd change from 10.5 to 26.4μM, indicating that the π-π stacking should exist in Phe471⋯Phe197 adduct, and (ii) substitution with Br4 can considerably improve SBH-peptide affinity by ∼3-fold, but the SBH-peptide binding does not change essentially upon substitution with Br3 (a negative control that is theoretically unable to form the halogen bonding), indicating that the rationally designed halogen bonding should form between the Phe471(Br4) residue of SBH-peptide and the Ile193 residue of CETP protein.

  16. Phosphate Triester Hydrolysis Promoted by an N2S (thiolate) Zinc Complex: Mechanistic Implications for the Metal-Dependent Reactivity of Peptide Deformylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The zinc(II) complex (PATH)ZnOH, where PATH is an N2S(thiolate) ligand, has been investigated for its ability to promote the hydrolysis of the phosphate triester tris(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (TNP). The hydrolysis of TNP was examined as a function of PATH-zinc(II) complex concentration, substrate co...

  17. Large Scale Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptide Drugs: Use of Commercial Anion Exchange Resin as Quenching Agent for Removal of Iodine during Disulphide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K M Bhaskara; Kumari, Y Bharathi; Mallikharjunasarma, Dokka; Bulliraju, Kamana; Sreelatha, Vanjivaka; Ananda, Kuppanna

    2012-01-01

    The S-acetamidomethyl (Acm) or trityl (Trt) protecting groups are widely used in the chemical synthesis of peptides that contain one or more disulfide bonds. Treatment of peptides containing S-Acm protecting group with iodine results in simultaneous removal of the sulfhydryl protecting group and disulfide formation. However, the excess iodine needs to be quenched or adsorbed as quickly as possible after completion of the disulfide bond formation in order to minimize side reactions that are often associated with the iodination step. We report here a simple method for simultaneous quenching and removal of iodine and isolation of disulphide bridge peptides. The use of excess inexpensive anion exchange resin to the oxidized peptide from the aqueous acetic acid/methanol solution affords quantitative removal of iodine and other color impurities. This improves the resin life time of expensive chromatography media that is used in preparative HPLC column during the purification of peptide using preparative HPLC. Further, it is very useful for the conversion of TFA salt to acetate in situ. It was successfully applied commercially, to the large scale synthesis of various peptides including Desmopressin, Oxytocin, and Octreotide. This new approach offers significant advantages such as more simple utility, minimal side reactions, large scale synthesis of peptide drugs, and greater cost effectiveness.

  18. Large Scale Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptide Drugs: Use of Commercial Anion Exchange Resin as Quenching Agent for Removal of Iodine during Disulphide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. M. Bhaskara; Kumari, Y. Bharathi; Mallikharjunasarma, Dokka; Bulliraju, Kamana; Sreelatha, Vanjivaka; Ananda, Kuppanna

    2012-01-01

    The S-acetamidomethyl (Acm) or trityl (Trt) protecting groups are widely used in the chemical synthesis of peptides that contain one or more disulfide bonds. Treatment of peptides containing S-Acm protecting group with iodine results in simultaneous removal of the sulfhydryl protecting group and disulfide formation. However, the excess iodine needs to be quenched or adsorbed as quickly as possible after completion of the disulfide bond formation in order to minimize side reactions that are often associated with the iodination step. We report here a simple method for simultaneous quenching and removal of iodine and isolation of disulphide bridge peptides. The use of excess inexpensive anion exchange resin to the oxidized peptide from the aqueous acetic acid/methanol solution affords quantitative removal of iodine and other color impurities. This improves the resin life time of expensive chromatography media that is used in preparative HPLC column during the purification of peptide using preparative HPLC. Further, it is very useful for the conversion of TFA salt to acetate in situ. It was successfully applied commercially, to the large scale synthesis of various peptides including Desmopressin, Oxytocin, and Octreotide. This new approach offers significant advantages such as more simple utility, minimal side reactions, large scale synthesis of peptide drugs, and greater cost effectiveness. PMID:23118772

  19. Orthogonal halogen and hydrogen bonds involving a peptide bond model† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental part, DSC, IR spectroscopic and crystallographic data. CCDC 899779–899785. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4ce01514b Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Vasylyeva, Vera; Nayak, Susanta K.; Cavallo, Gabriella; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The peptide bond model N-methylacetamide self-assembles with a range of dihalotetrafluorobenzenes forming co-crystals that all show the occurrence of orthogonal hydrogen and halogen bonds. PMID:25663816

  20. Hydroxamate-based colorimetric assay to assess amide bond formation by adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Hara, Ryotaro; Suzuki, Ryohei; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrated the usefulness of a hydroxamate-based colorimetric assay for predicting amide bond formation (through an aminoacyl-AMP intermediate) by the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases. By using a typical adenylation domain of tyrocidine synthetase (involved in tyrocidine biosynthesis), we confirmed the correlation between the absorbance at 490 nm of the l-Trp-hydroxamate-Fe(3+) complex and the formation of l-Trp-l-Pro, where l-Pro was used instead of hydroxylamine. Furthermore, this assay was adapted to the adenylation domains of surfactin synthetase (involved in surfactin biosynthesis) and bacitracin synthetase (involved in bacitracin biosynthesis). Consequently, the formation of various aminoacyl l-Pro formations was observed.

  1. Peptide bond-forming reagents HOAt and HATU are not mutagenic in the bacterial reverse mutation test.

    PubMed

    Nicolette, John; Neft, Robin E; Vanosdol, Jessica; Murray, Joel

    2016-04-01

    The peptide bond-forming reagents 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt, CAS 39968-33-7) and O-(7-Azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU, CAS 148893-10-1) either have structural alerts, unclassified features or are considered out of domain when evaluated for potential mutagenicity with in silico programs DEREK and CaseUltra. Since they are commonly used reagents in pharmaceutical drug syntheses, they may become drug substance or drug product impurities and would need to be either controlled to appropriately safe levels or tested for mutagenicity. Both reagents were tested in the bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test at Covance, under GLP conditions, following the OECD test guideline and ICH S2(R1) recommendations and found to be negative. Our data show that HOAt and HATU-common pharmaceutical synthesis reagents-are not mutagenic, and can be treated as ordinary drug impurities.

  2. The Disulfide Bond of the Peptide Thanatin Is Dispensible for Its Antimicrobial Activity In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Niu, Chao; Zhou, Ying; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing; Hou, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Thanatin (THA) displays potent antibiotic activity, especially against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli both in vitro and in vivo, with minimal hemolytic toxicity and satisfactory stability in plasma. However, the high cost of thanatin significantly limits its development and clinical application. To reduce the cost of peptide synthesis, a formulation of cyclic thanatin (C-thanatin) called linear thanatin (L-thanatin) was synthesized and its activity was evaluated in vivo and in vitro Results showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin MICs did not differ against eight Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacterial strains. Furthermore, the survival rates of ESBL-producing-E. coli-infected mice were consistent after C-thanatin or L-thanatin treatment at 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight. Neither C-thanatin nor L-thanatin showed toxicity for human red blood cells (hRBCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at a concentration as high as 256 μg/ml. Results of circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of L-thanatin is extremely similar to that of C-thanatin. Membrane permeabilization and depolarization assays showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin have similar abilities to permeabilize the outer and inner membranes and to induce membrane depolarization in ESBL-producing E. coli However, neither of them caused significant HUVEC membrane permeability. These findings indicate that the two peptides have similar effects on bacterial cell membranes and that the disulfide bond in thanatin is not essential for its antimicrobial activities in vivo and in vitro L-thanatin is thus a promising low-cost peptide candidate for treating ESBL-producing E. coli infections.

  3. The Disulfide Bond of the Peptide Thanatin Is Dispensible for Its Antimicrobial Activity In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Niu, Chao; Zhou, Ying; Xue, Xiaoyan; Meng, Jingru

    2016-01-01

    Thanatin (THA) displays potent antibiotic activity, especially against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli both in vitro and in vivo, with minimal hemolytic toxicity and satisfactory stability in plasma. However, the high cost of thanatin significantly limits its development and clinical application. To reduce the cost of peptide synthesis, a formulation of cyclic thanatin (C-thanatin) called linear thanatin (L-thanatin) was synthesized and its activity was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. Results showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin MICs did not differ against eight Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacterial strains. Furthermore, the survival rates of ESBL-producing-E. coli-infected mice were consistent after C-thanatin or L-thanatin treatment at 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight. Neither C-thanatin nor L-thanatin showed toxicity for human red blood cells (hRBCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at a concentration as high as 256 μg/ml. Results of circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of L-thanatin is extremely similar to that of C-thanatin. Membrane permeabilization and depolarization assays showed that C-thanatin and L-thanatin have similar abilities to permeabilize the outer and inner membranes and to induce membrane depolarization in ESBL-producing E. coli. However, neither of them caused significant HUVEC membrane permeability. These findings indicate that the two peptides have similar effects on bacterial cell membranes and that the disulfide bond in thanatin is not essential for its antimicrobial activities in vivo and in vitro. L-thanatin is thus a promising low-cost peptide candidate for treating ESBL-producing E. coli infections. PMID:27161645

  4. Effect of ester chemical structure and peptide bond conformation in fragmentation pathways of differently metal cationized cyclodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Raja; Sudarslal, S; Ranganayaki, R S; Raghothama, S

    2011-09-21

    Fragmentation behavior of two classes of cyclodepsipeptides, isariins and isaridins, obtained from the fungus Isaria, was investigated in the presence of different metal ions using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) with collision induced dissociation (CID) and validated by NMR spectroscopy. During MS(n) process, both protonated and metal-cationized isariins generated product ions belonging to the identical 'b-ion' series, exhibiting initial backbone cleavage explicitly at the β-ester bond. Fragmentation behavior for the protonated and metal-cationized acyclic methyl ester derivative of isariins was very similar. On the contrary, isaridins during fragmentation produced ions belonging to the 'b' or/and the 'y' ion series depending on the nature of interacting metal ions, due to initial backbone cleavages at the α-ester linkage or/and at a specific amide linkage. Interestingly, independent of the nature of the interacting metal ions, the product ions formed from the acyclic methyl ester derivative of isaridins belonged only to the 'y-type'. Complementary NMR data showed that, while all metal ions were located around the β-ester group of isariins, the metal ion interacting sites varied across the backbone for isaridins. Combined MS and NMR data suggest that the different behavior in sequence specific charge-driven fragmentation of isariins and isaridins is predetermined because of the constituent β-hydroxy acid residue in isariins and the cis peptide bond in isaridins.

  5. Use of a temporary "solubilizing" peptide tag for the Fmoc solid-phase synthesis of human insulin glargine via use of regioselective disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Belgi, Alessia; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Suode; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Chan, Linda; Belyea, Chris; Truong, Hue-Trung; Blair, Amy R; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Tregear, Geoffrey W; Wade, John D

    2009-07-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis has been refined to a stage where efficient preparation of long and complex peptides is now achievable. However, the postsynthesis handling of poorly soluble peptides often remains a significant hindrance to their purification and further use. Several synthetic schemes have been developed for the preparation of such peptides containing modifications to aid their solubility. However, these require the use of complex chemistry or yield non-native sequences. We describe a simple approach based on the use of penta-lysine "tags" that are linked to the C-terminus of the peptide of interest via a base-labile linker. After ready purification of the now freely solubilized peptide, the "tag" is removed by simple, brief base treatment giving the native sequence in much higher overall yield. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by the novel preparation of insulin glargine via solid-phase synthesis of each of the two chains--including the notoriously poorly soluble A-chain--followed by their combination in solution via regioselective disulfide bond formation. At the conclusion of the chain combination, the solubilizing peptide tag was removed from the A-chain to provide synthetic human glargine in nearly 10% overall yield. This approach should facilitate the development of new insulin analogues as well as be widely applicable to the improved purification and acquisition of otherwise poorly soluble synthetic peptides.

  6. Collision-activated cleavage of a peptide/antibiotic disulfide linkage: possible evidence for intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement upon collisional activation.

    PubMed

    Fagerquist, Clifton K

    2004-01-01

    Ceftiofur is an important veterinary beta-lactam antibiotic whose bioactive metabolite, desfuroylceftiofur, has a free thiol group. Desfuroylceftiofur (DFC) was reacted with two peptides, [Arg8]-vasopressin and reduced glutathione, both of which have cysteine residues to form disulfide-linked peptide/antibiotic complexes. The products of the reaction, [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, [(vasopressin+H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ and [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, were analyzed using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) with a quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. MS/MS of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in facile dissociative loss of one and two covalently bound DFC moieties. Loss of one DFC resulted from either homolytic or heterolytic dissociation of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond with equal or unequal partitioning of the two sulfur atoms between the fragment ion and neutral loss. Hydrogen migration preceded heterolytic dissociation. Loss of two DFC moieties from [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ appears to result from collision-activated intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement (IDBR) to produce cyclic [vasopressin + H]+ (at m/z 1084) as well as other cyclic fragment ions at m/z 1084 +/- 32 and +64. The cyclic structure of these ions could only be inferred as MS/MS may result in rearrangement to non-cyclic structures prior to dissociative loss. IDBR was also detected from MS(3) experiments of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ fragment ions. MS/MS of [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in cleavage of the peptide backbone with retention of the DFC moiety as well as heterolytic cleavage of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond to produce the fragment ion: [(DFC-2H) + H]+. These results demonstrate the facile dissociative loss by CAD of DFC moieties covalently attached to peptides through disulfide bonds. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Streptothricin biosynthesis is catalyzed by enzymes related to nonribosomal peptide bond formation.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, M A; Vallín, C; Malpartida, F

    1997-01-01

    In a search for strains producing biocides with a wide spectrum of activity, a new strain was isolated. This strain was taxonomically characterized as Streptomyces rochei F20, and the chemical structure of the bioactive product extracted from its fermentation broth was determined to be a mixture of streptothricins. From a genomic library of the producer strain prepared in the heterologous host Streptomyces lividans, a 7.2-kb DNA fragment which conferred resistance to the antibiotic was isolated. DNA sequencing of 5.2 kb from the cloned fragment revealed five open reading frames (ORFs) such that ORF1, -2, -3, and -4 were transcribed in the same direction while ORF5 was convergently arranged. The deduced product of ORF1 strongly resembled those of genes involved in peptide formation by a nonribosomal mechanism; the ORF2 product strongly resembled that of mphA and mphB isolated from Escherichia coli, which determines resistance to several macrolides by a macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase activity; the ORF3 product had similarities with several hydrolases; and the ORF5 product strongly resembled streptothricin acetyltransferases from different gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. ORF5 was shown to be responsible for acetyl coenzyme A-dependent streptothricin acetylation. No similarities in the databases for the ORF4 product were found. Unlike other peptide synthases, that for streptothricin biosynthesis was arranged as a multienzymatic system rather than a multifunctional protein. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2 (and to a lesser degree, of ORF3) abolishes antibiotic biosynthesis, suggesting their involvement in the streptothricin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9371436

  8. Substrate stereoselectivity of poly(Asp) hydrolase-1 capable of cleaving β-amide bonds as revealed by investigation of enzymatic hydrolysis of stereoisomeric β-tri(Asp)s.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro; Abe, Hideki; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported that poly(Asp) hydrolase-1 (PahZ1KP-2) from Pedobacter sp. KP-2 selectively, but not completely, cleaved the amide bonds between β-Asp units in thermally synthesized poly(Asp) (tPAA). In the present study, the enzymatic hydrolysis of stereoisomeric β-tri(Asp)s by PahZ1KP-2 was investigated to clarify the substrate stereoselectivity of PahZ1KP-2 in the hydrolysis of tPAA. The results suggest the following structural features of PahZ1KP-2 at its substrate binding site: (1) the active site contains four subsites (2, 1, -1, and -2), three of which need to be occupied by Asp units for cleavage to occur; (2) for the hydrolysis to proceed, subsite 1 should be occupied by an L-Asp unit, whereas the other three subsites may accept both L- and D-Asp units; (3) for the two central subsites between which cleavage occurs, the (L-Asp)-(D-Asp) sequence is the most favorable for cleavage.

  9. Application of gas-liquid film theory to base hydrolysis of HMX powder and HMX-based plastic-bonded explosives using sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R.L.; Flesner, R.L.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Spontarelli, T.; Larson, S.A.; Bell, D.A.

    1998-12-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) is identified as a hydrolysis reagent for decomposing HMX and HMX-based explosives to water-soluble, nonenergetic products. The reaction kinetics of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hydrolysis are examined, and a reaction rate model is developed. Greater than 99% of the explosive at an initial concentration of 10 wt % PBX 9404 was destroyed in less than 5 min at 150 C. The primary products from Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} hydrolysis were nitrite (NO{sub 2}), formate (HCOO{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), and acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}) ions, hexamethylenetetramine, (hexamine: C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}), nitrogen gas (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}). The rate of hydrolysis was characterized for HMX powder and PBX 9404 molding powder from 110 to 150 C. The rate was found to be dependent on both the chemical kinetics and the mass transfer resistance. Since the HMX particles are nonporous and external mass transfer dominates, gas-liquid film theory for fast chemical kinetics was used to model the reaction rate.

  10. A comparative study of the catalysis of peptide bond formation by oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jean-François; Jaber, Maguy; Georgelin, Thomas; Stievano, Lorenzo

    2013-08-28

    It is well-known that amino acids deposited on some inorganic oxides undergo peptidic condensation. It is seldom realised however that a large diversity of behaviours can be observed in such systems. Here we use the apparently simple case of glycine-non-porous silica as a reference system, in which glycine (Gly) dimerisation to diketopiperazine (DKP) is easy to evidence, especially when using TG in combination with NMR. We then proceed to compare it with other AA deposited on the same support on the one hand, with Gly deposited on other mineral surfaces on the other hand. In a final section, we provide more detailed mechanistic information on the glycine condensation process on silica, including kinetic data and a (13)C solid-state NMR follow up of the species at various stages of thermal condensation. The best mechanism to rationalise these data involves a crucial step of isomerisation from zwitterion to neutral glycine, and the participation of several distinct types of surface sites probably consisting of silanol ensembles.

  11. Redefining an epitope of a malaria vaccine candidate, with antibodies against the N-terminal MSA-2 antigen of Plasmodium harboring non-natural peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Lozano, José Manuel; Guerrero, Yuly Andrea; Alba, Martha Patricia; Lesmes, Liliana Patricia; Escobar, José Oswaldo; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2013-10-01

    The aim of obtaining novel vaccine candidates against malaria and other transmissible diseases can be partly based on selecting non-polymorphic peptides from relevant antigens of pathogens, which have to be then precisely modified for inducing a protective immunity against the disease. Bearing in mind the high degree of the MSA-2(21-40) peptide primary structure's genetic conservation among malaria species, and its crucial role in the high RBC binding ability of Plasmodium falciparum (the main agent causing malaria), structurally defined probes based on non-natural peptide-bond isosteres were thus designed. Thus, two peptide mimetics were obtained (so-called reduced amide pseudopeptides), in which naturally made amide bonds of the (30)FIN(32)-binding motif of MSA-2 were replaced with ψ-[CH2-NH] methylene amide isostere bonds, one between the F-I and the second between I-N amino acid pairs, respectively, coded as ψ-128 ψ-130. These peptide mimetics were used to produce poly- and monoclonal antibodies in Aotus monkeys and BALB/c mice. Parent reactive mice-derived IgM isotype cell clones were induced to Ig isotype switching to IgG sub-classes by controlled in vitro immunization experiments. These mature isotype immunoglobulins revealed a novel epitope in the MSA-2(25-32) antigen and two polypeptides of rodent malaria species. Also, these antibodies' functional activity against malaria was tested by in vitro assays, demonstrating high efficacy in controlling infection and evidencing neutralizing capacity for the rodent in vivo malaria infection. The neutralizing effect of antibodies induced by site-directed designed peptide mimetics on Plasmodium's biological development make these pseudopeptides a valuable tool for future development of immunoprophylactic strategies for controlling malarial infection.

  12. Helix formation in preorganized beta/gamma-peptide foldamers: hydrogen-bond analogy to the alpha-helix without alpha-amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Almeida, Aaron M; Zhang, Weicheng; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guzei, Ilia A; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-06-16

    We report the first high-resolution structural data for the beta/gamma-peptide 13-helix (i,i+3 C=O...H-N H-bonds), a secondary structure that is formed by oligomers with a 1:1 alternation of beta- and gamma-amino acid residues. Our characterization includes both crystallographic and 2D NMR data. Previous studies suggested that beta/gamma-peptides constructed from conformationally flexible residues adopt a different helical secondary structure in solution. Our design features preorganized beta- and gamma-residues, which strongly promote 13-helical folding by the 1:1 beta/gamma backbone.

  13. New La(III) complex immobilized on 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica as an efficient and reusable catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphate ester bonds.

    PubMed

    Muxel, Alfredo A; Neves, Ademir; Camargo, Maryene A; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Castellano, Eduardo E; Castilho, Nathalia; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán

    2014-03-17

    Described herein is the synthesis, structure, and monoesterase and diesterase activities of a new mononuclear [La(III)(L(1))(NO3)2] (1) complex (H2L(1) = 2-bis[{(2-pyridylmethyl)-aminomethyl}-6-[N-(2-pyridylmethyl) aminomethyl)])-4-methyl-6-formylphenol) in the hydrolysis of 2,4-bis(dinitrophenyl)phosphate (2,4-BDNPP). When covalently linked to 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica, 1 undergoes disproportionation to form a dinuclear species (APS-1), whose catalytic efficiency is increased when compared to the homogeneous reaction due to second coordination sphere effects which increase the substrate to complex association constant. The anchored catalyst APS-1 can be recovered and reused for subsequent hydrolysis reactions (five times) with only a slight loss in activity. In the presence of DNA, we suggest that 1 is also converted into the dinuclear active species as observed with APS-1, and both were shown to be efficient in DNA cleavage.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations on pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) reveal the role of glycosylation and disulfide bonds in its enhanced structural stability and function.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Mohanty, Debasisa; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2012-01-01

    Fucosylation of Thr 9 in pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) enhances its structural stability and functional ability as a serine protease inhibitor. In order to understand the role of disulfide bonds and glycosylation on the structure and function of PMP-C, we have carried out multiple explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on fucosylated and non-fucosylated forms of PMP-C, both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bonds. Our simulations revealed that there were no significant structural changes in the native disulfide bonded forms of PMP-C due to fucosylation. On the other hand, the non-fucosylated form of PMP-C without disulfide bonds showed larger deviations from the starting structure than the fucosylated form. However, the structural deviations were restricted to the terminal regions while core β-sheet retained its hydrogen bonded structure even in absence of disulfide bonds as well as fucosylation. Interestingly, fucosylation of disulfide bonded native PMP-C led to a decreased thermal flexibility in the residue stretch 29-32 which is known to interact with the active site of the target proteases. Our analysis revealed that disulfide bonds covalently connect the residue stretch 29-32 to the central β-sheet of PMP-C and using a novel network of side chain interactions and disulfide bonds fucosylation at Thr 9 is altering the flexibility of the stretch 29-32 located at a distal site. Thus, our simulations explain for the first time, how presence of disulfide bonds between conserved cysteines and fucosylation enhance the function of PMP-C as a protease inhibitor.

  15. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  16. Impact of commercial precooking of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on the generation of peptides, after pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis, capable to inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Luis; Chen, Karen; de Mejía, Elvira González

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the bioactive properties of the released peptides from commercially available precook common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Bioactive properties and peptide profiles were evaluated in protein hydrolysates of raw and commercially precooked common beans. Five varieties (Black, Pinto, Red, Navy, and Great Northern) were selected for protein extraction, protein and peptide molecular mass profiles, and peptide sequences. Potential bioactivities of hydrolysates, including antioxidant capacity and inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), and angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) were analyzed after digestion with pepsin/pancreatin. Hydrolysates from Navy beans were the most potent inhibitors of DPP-IV with no statistical differences between precooked and raw (IC50 = 0.093 and 0.095 mg protein/mL, respectively). α-Amylase inhibition was higher for raw Red, Navy and Great Northern beans (36%, 31%, 27% relative to acarbose (rel ac)/mg protein, respectively). α-Glucosidase inhibition among all bean hydrolysates did not show significant differences; however, inhibition values were above 40% rel ac/mg protein. IC50 values for ACE were not significantly different among all bean hydrolysates (range 0.20 to 0.34 mg protein/mL), except for Red bean that presented higher IC50 values. Peptide molecular mass profile ranged from 500 to 3000 Da. A total of 11 and 17 biologically active peptide sequences were identified in raw and precooked beans, respectively. Peptide sequences YAGGS and YAAGS from raw Great Northern and precooked Pinto showed similar amino acid sequences and same potential ACE inhibition activity. Processing did not affect the bioactive properties of released peptides from precooked beans. Commercially precooked beans could contribute to the intake of bioactive peptides and promote health.

  17. Role of the intra-A-chain disulfide bond of insulin-like peptide 3 in binding and activation of its receptor, RXFP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suode; Hughes, Richard A; Bathgate, Ross A D; Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hossain, M Akhter; Lin, Feng; van Lierop, Bianca; Robinson, Andrea J; Wade, John D

    2010-09-01

    INSL3 is a member of the insulin-IGF-relaxin superfamily and plays a key role in male fetal development and in adult germ cell maturation. It is the cognate ligand for RXFP2, a leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein coupled receptor. To date, and in contrast to our current knowledge of the key structural features that are required for the binding of INSL3 to RXFP2, comparatively little is known about the key residues that are required to elicit receptor activation and downstream cell signaling. Early evidence suggests that these are contained principally within the A-chain. To further explore this hypothesis, we have undertaken an examination of the functional role of the intra-A-chain disulfide bond. Using solid-phase peptide synthesis together with regioselective disulfide bond formation, two analogs of human INSL3 were prepared in which the intra-chain disulfide bond was replaced, one in which the corresponding Cys residues were substituted with the isosteric Ser and the other in which the Cys were removed altogether. Both of these peptides retained nearly full RXFP2 receptor binding but were devoid of cAMP activity (receptor activation), indicating that the intra-A-chain disulfide bond makes a significant contribution to the ability of INSL3 to act as an RXFP2 agonist. Replacement of the disulfide bond with a metabolically stable dicarba bond yielded two isomers of INSL3 that each exhibited bioactivity similar to native INSL3. This study highlights the critical structural role played by the intra-A-chain disulfide bond of INSL3 in mediating agonist actions through the RXFP2 receptor.

  18. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  19. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-09-23

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water.

  20. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  1. Combined use of ion mobility and collision-induced dissociation to investigate the opening of disulfide bridges by electron-transfer dissociation in peptides bearing two disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Massonnet, Philippe; Upert, Gregory; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Gilles, Nicolas; Quinton, Loïc; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are post-translational modifications (PTMs) often found in peptides and proteins. They increase their stability toward enzymatic degradations and provide the structure and (consequently) the activity of such folded proteins. The characterization of disulfide patterns, i.e., the cysteine connectivity, is crucial to achieve a global picture of the active conformation of the protein of interest. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) constitutes a valuable tool to cleave the disulfide bonds in the gas phase, avoiding chemical reduction/alkylation in solution. To characterize the cysteine pairing, the present work proposes (i) to reduce by ETD one of the two disulfide bridges of model peptides, resulting in the opening of the cyclic structures, (ii) to separate the generated species by ion mobility, and (iii) to characterize the species using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Results of this strategy applied to several peptides show different behaviors depending on the connectivity. The loss of SH· radical species, observed for all the peptides, confirms the cleavage of the disulfides during the ETD process.

  2. Synthesis of bicyclic organo-peptide hybrids via oxime/intein-mediated macrocyclization followed by disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica M; Hill, Nicholas C; Krasniak, Peter J; Fasan, Rudi

    2014-02-21

    A new strategy is described to generate bicyclic peptides that incorporate non-peptidic backbone elements starting from recombinant polypeptide precursors. These compounds are produced via a one-pot, two-step sequence, in which peptide macrocyclization by means of a bifunctional oxyamine/1,3-amino-thiol synthetic precursor is followed by intramolecular disulfide formation between the synthetic precursor-borne thiol and a cysteine embedded in the peptide sequence. This approach was found to be compatible with the cysteine residue occupying different positions within 8mer and 10mer target peptide sequences and across different synthetic precursor scaffolds, thereby enabling the formation of a variety of diverse bicyclic scaffolds.

  3. Role of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in the activity of a legume root nodule-specific, cysteine-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andreas F; Kerscher, Bernhard; Dall'Angelo, Sergio; Sani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Baloban, Mikhail; Wilson, Heather M; Mergaert, Peter; Zanda, Matteo; Ferguson, Gail P

    2012-03-30

    The root nodules of certain legumes including Medicago truncatula produce >300 different nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. Medicago NCR antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) mediate the differentiation of the bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti into a nitrogen-fixing bacteroid within the legume root nodules. In vitro, NCR AMPs such as NCR247 induced bacteroid features and exhibited antimicrobial activity against S. meliloti. The bacterial BacA protein is critical to prevent S. meliloti from being hypersensitive toward NCR AMPs. NCR AMPs are cationic and have conserved cysteine residues, which form disulfide (S-S) bridges. However, the natural configuration of NCR AMP S-S bridges and the role of these in the activity of the peptide are unknown. In this study, we found that either cysteine replacements or S-S bond modifications influenced the activity of NCR247 against S. meliloti. Specifically, either substitution of cysteines for serines, changing the S-S bridges from cysteines 1-2, 3-4 to 1-3, 2-4 or oxidation of NCR247 lowered its activity against S. meliloti. We also determined that BacA specifically protected S. meliloti against oxidized NCR247. Due to the large number of different NCRs synthesized by legume root nodules and the importance of bacterial BacA proteins for prolonged host infections, these findings have important implications for analyzing the function of these novel peptides and the protective role of BacA in the bacterial response toward these peptides.

  4. The attack of the phytopathogens and the trumpet solo: Identification of a novel plant antifungal peptide with distinct fold and disulfide bond pattern.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Porto, William F; Dey, Prabuddha; Maiti, Mrinal K; Ghosh, Ananta K; Franco, Octavio L

    2013-10-01

    Phytopathogens cause economic losses in agribusiness. Plant-derived compounds have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This paper reports the identification of Ps-AFP1, a novel AMP isolated from the Pisum sativum radicle. Ps-AFP1 was purified and evaluated against phytopathogenic fungi, showing clear effectiveness. In silico analyses were performed, suggesting an unusual fold and disulfide bond pattern. A novel fold and a novel AMP class were here proposed, the αβ-trumpet fold and αβ-trumpet peptides, respectively. The name αβ-trumpet was created due to the peptide's fold, which resembles the musical instrument. The Ps-AFP1 mechanism of action was also proposed. Microscopic analyses revealed that Ps-AFP1 could affect the fungus during the hyphal elongation from spore germination. Furthermore, confocal microscopy performed with Ps-AFP1 labeled with FITC shows that the peptide was localized at high concentration along the fungal cell surface. Due to low cellular disruption rates, it seems that the main target is the fungal cell wall. The binding thermogram and isothermal titration, molecular dynamics and docking analyses were also performed, showing that Ps-AFP1 could bind to chitin producing a stable complex. Data here reported provided novel structural-functional insights into the αβ-trumpet peptide fold.

  5. Kinetics of the competitive reactions of isomerization and peptide bond cleavage at l-α- and d-β-aspartyl residues in an αA-crystallin fragment.

    PubMed

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    d-β-aspartyl (Asp) residue has been found in a living body such as aged lens crystallin, although l-α-amino acids are constituents in natural proteins. Isomerization from l-α- to d-β-Asp probably modulates structures to affect biochemical reactions. At Asp residue, isomerization and peptide bond cleavage compete with each other. To gain insight into how fast each reaction proceeds, the analysis requires the consideration of both pathways simultaneously and independently. No information has been provided, however, about these competitive processes because each reaction has been studied separately. The contribution of Asp isomers to the respective pathways has still been veiled. In this work, the two competitive reactions, isomerization and spontaneous peptide bond cleavage at Asp residue, were simultaneously observed and compared in an αA-crystallin fragment, S(51) LFRTVLD(58) SG(60) containing l-α- and d-β-Asp58 isomers. The kinetics showed that the formation of l- and d-succinimide (Suc) intermediate, as a first step of isomerization, was comparable at l-α- and d-β-Asp. Although l-Suc was converted to l-β-Asp, d-Suc was liable to return to the original d-β-Asp, the reverse reaction marked enough to consider d-β-Asp as apparently stable. d-β-Asp was also resistant to the peptide bond cleavage. Such apparent less reactivity is probably the reason for gradual and abnormal accumulation of d-β-Asp in a living body under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Peptide formation mechanism on montmorillonite under thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuchida, Shigeshi; Masuda, Harue; Shinoda, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    The oligomerization of amino acids is an essential process in the chemical evolution of proteins, which are precursors to life on Earth. Although some researchers have observed peptide formation on clay mineral surfaces, the mechanism of peptide bond formation on the clay mineral surface has not been clarified. In this study, the thermal behavior of glycine (Gly) adsorbed on montmorillonite was observed during heating experiments conducted at 150 °C for 336 h under dry, wet, and dry-wet conditions to clarify the mechanism. Approximately 13.9 % of the Gly monomers became peptides on montmorillonite under dry conditions, with diketopiperazine (cyclic dimer) being the main product. On the other hand, peptides were not synthesized in the absence of montmorillonite. Results of IR analysis showed that the Gly monomer was mainly adsorbed via hydrogen bonding between the positively charged amino groups and negatively charged surface sites (i.e., Lewis base sites) on the montmorillonite surface, indicating that the Lewis base site acts as a catalyst for peptide formation. In contrast, peptides were not detected on montmorillonite heated under wet conditions, since excess water shifted the equilibrium towards hydrolysis of the peptides. The presence of water is likely to control thermodynamic peptide production, and clay minerals, especially those with electrophilic defect sites, seem to act as a kinetic catalyst for the peptide formation reaction.

  7. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  8. Options for rapid analysis of peptides and proteins, using wide-pore, superficially porous, high-performance liquid chromatography particles with unique bonded-phase ligands.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Robert D; Woodward, Clifford B; Forrer, Kurt; Permar, Bernard J; Chen, Wu

    2008-03-01

    The large size and complexity of many proteins constrains the reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography packings that are useful for their separation. Wide-pore, superficially porous, silica-based packings with solid 4.5-microm cores and a 0.25-microm porous outer layer (Poroshell) demonstrate a variety of characteristics that are beneficial for the separation of proteins. A shorter diffusion distance allows separations of large molecules at high linear velocities. This benefit over totally porous particles is clearly shown using separations of a peptide-protein standard. The structure and reduced surface area (4.5 m2/g) of these superficially porous particles simplifies interactions with its surface, resulting in improved peak shapes and resolution. Specialized bonding chemistries for low- and high-pH operation may be used to change band-spacing and achieve atypical separations. These rapid analysis options are demonstrated using protein standards and very high molecular weight glycosylated proteins including intact monoclonal antibodies, IgM, alpha2-macroglobulin, and glycophorin. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a myoglobin peptide digest, bidentate-C18-bonded superficially porous packings achieve complete runs in 4 min and demonstrate an elution pattern that is unique from that of material bonded with sterically protected C18 ligands.

  9. tRNA-dependent peptide bond formation by the transferase PacB in biosynthesis of the pacidamycin group of pentapeptidyl nucleoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Ntai, Ioanna; Kelleher, Neil L; Walsh, Christopher T

    2011-07-26

    Pacidamycins are a family of uridyl tetra/pentapeptide antibiotics with antipseudomonal activities through inhibition of the translocase MraY in bacterial cell wall assembly. The biosynthetic gene cluster for pacidamycins has recently been identified through genome mining of the producer Streptomyces coeruleorubidus, and the highly dissociated nonribosomal peptide assembly line for the uridyl tetrapeptide scaffold of pacidamycin has been characterized. In this work a hypothetical protein PacB, conserved in known uridyl peptide antibiotics gene clusters, has been characterized by both genetic deletion and enzymatic analysis of the purified protein. PacB catalyzes the transfer of the alanyl residue from alanyl-tRNA to the N terminus of the tetrapeptide intermediate yielding a pentapeptide on the thio-templated nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly line protein PacH. PacB thus represents a new group of tRNA-dependent peptide bond-forming enzymes in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in addition to the recently identified cyclodipeptide synthases. The characterization of PacB completes the assembly line reconstitution of pacidamycin pentapeptide antibiotic scaffolds, bridging the primary and secondary metabolic pathways by hijacking an aminoacyl-tRNA to the antibiotic biosynthetic pathway.

  10. The influenza fusion peptide promotes lipid polar head intrusion through hydrogen bonding with phosphates and N-terminal membrane insertion depth.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Influenza infection requires fusion between the virus envelope and a host cell endosomal membrane. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP) is essential to viral membrane fusion. It was recently proposed that FPs would fuse membranes by increasing lipid tail protrusion, a membrane fusion transition state. The details of how FPs induce lipid tail protrusion, however, remain to be elucidated. To decipher the molecular mechanism by which FPs promote lipid tail protrusion, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type (WT) FP, fusogenic mutant F9A, and nonfusogenic mutant W14A in model bilayers. This article presents the peptide-lipid interaction responsible for lipid tail protrusion and a related lipid perturbation, polar head intrusion, where polar heads are sunk under the membrane surface. The backbone amides from the four N-terminal peptide residues, deeply inserted in the membrane, promoted both perturbations through H bonding with lipid phosphates. Polar head intrusion correlated with peptides N-terminal insertion depth and activity: the N-termini of WT and F9A were inserted deeper into the membrane than nonfusogenic W14A. Based on these results, we propose that FP-induced polar head intrusion would complement lipid tail protrusion in catalyzing membrane fusion by reducing repulsions between juxtaposed membranes headgroups. The presented model provides a framework for further research on membrane fusion and influenza antivirals.

  11. Ab initio computational study of reaction mechanism of peptide bond formation on HF/6-31G(d,p) level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, P.; Lalita, M. N. T.; Cahyono, B.; Laksitorini, M. D.; Hildayani, S. Z.

    2017-02-01

    Peptide plays an important role in modulation of various cell functions. Therefore, formation reaction of the peptide is important for chemical reactions. One way to probe the reaction of peptide synthesis is a computational method. The purpose of this research is to determine the reaction mechanism for peptide bond formation on Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine by ab initio computational approach. The calculations were carried out by theory and basis set HF/6-31G(d,p) for four mechanisms (path 1 to 4) that proposed in this research. The results show that the highest of the rate determining step between reactant and transition state (TS) for path 1, 2, 3, and 4 are 163.06 kJ.mol-1, 1868 kJ.mol-1, 5685 kJ.mol-1, and 1837 kJ.mol-1. The calculation shows that the most preferred reaction of Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine are on the path 1 (initiated with the termination of H+ in proline amino acid) that produce Ac-PV-NH2.

  12. A single molecule study of cellulase hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-San; Luo, Yonghua; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Smith, Steve; Ding, Shi-You

    2010-02-01

    Cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I), a processive exoglucanase secreted by Trichoderma reesei, is one of the key enzyme components in a commercial cellulase mixture currently used for processing biomass to biofuels. CBH I contains a family 7 glycoside hydrolase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), and a highlyglycosylated linker peptide. It has been proposed that the CBH I cellulase initiates the hydrolysis from the reducing end of one cellulose chain and successively cleaves alternate β-1,4-glycosidic bonds to release cellobiose as its principal end product. The role each module of CBH I plays in the processive hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose has yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, we use a single-molecule approach that combines optical (Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy, or TIRF-M) and non-optical (Atomic Force Microscopy, or AFM) imaging techniques to analyze the molecular motion of CBM tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBM and CBH I. The preliminary results have revealed a confined nanometer-scale movement of the TrCBM1-GFP bound to cellulose, and decreases in cellulose crystal size as well as increases in surface roughness during CBH I hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

  13. Processive degradation of unstructured protein by Escherichia coli Lon occurs via the slow, sequential delivery of multiple scissile sites followed by rapid and synchronized peptide bond cleavage events.

    PubMed

    Mikita, Natalie; Cheng, Iteen; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Huang, Jonathan; Lee, Irene

    2013-08-20

    Processive protein degradation is a common feature found in ATP-dependent proteases. This study utilized a physiological substrate of Escherichia coli Lon protease known as the lambda N protein (λN) to initiate the first kinetic analysis of the proteolytic mechanism of this enzyme. To this end, experiments were designed to determine the timing of three selected scissile sites in λN approaching the proteolytic site of ELon and their subsequent cleavages to gain insight into the mechanism by which ATP-dependent proteases attain processivity in protein degradation. The kinetic profile of peptide bond cleavage at different regions of λN was first detected by the iTRAQ/mass spectrometry technique. Fluorogenic λN constructs were then generated as reporter substrates for transient kinetic characterization of the ATP- versus AMPPNP-dependent peptide bond cleavage and the delivery of the scissile sites near the amino- versus carboxyl-terminal of the λN protein to the proteolytic site of ELon. Collectively, our results support a mechanism by which the cleavage of multiple peptide bonds awaits the "almost complete" delivery of all the scissile sites in λN to the proteolytic site in an ATP-dependent manner. Comparing the time courses of delivery to the active site of the selected scissile sites further implicates the existence of a preferred directionality in the final stage of substrate delivery, which begins at the carboxyl-terminal. The subsequent cleavage of the scissile sites in λN, however, appears to lack a specific directionality and occurs at a much faster rate than the substrate delivery step.

  14. Selective cleavage of an azaGly peptide bond by copper(II). Long-range effect of histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Mhidia, Reda; Melnyk, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    Several reports have highlighted the interest of replacing Gly, a frequent amino acid within bioactive peptides, by azaGly (Agly) to improve their stability, activity or for the design of prodrugs. Because metal catalysis is increasingly used for tailoring peptide molecules, we have studied the stability of Agly peptides in the presence of metal ions. In this study, we show that Cu(II), unlike other metal ions such as Fe(II), Fe(III), Pd(II), or Pt(II), induces the cleavage of Agly peptides at room temperature and pH 7.3. The cleavage occurred in the absence of an anchoring His residue within the peptide but it was accelerated when this amino acid was present in the sequence. The influence of His residue on the cleavage rate was minimal when His and Agly were adjacent, whereas large effects were observed for distant His residues. The reaction between Cu(II) and Agly peptides induced the formation of Cu(I) species, which could be detected using bicinchoninic acid as a probe. The nature of products formed in this reaction allowed suggesting a mechanism for the Cu(II)-induced cleavage of Agly peptides.

  15. Determination of the optimal position of adjacent proton-donor centers for the activation or inhibition of peptide bond formation--a computational model study.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Miroslav A; Petrova, Galina P; Yomtova, Vihra M; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2011-09-01

    The study reports a computational analysis of the influence of proton donor group adjacent to the reaction center during ester ammonolysis of an acylated diol as a model reaction for peptide bond formation. This analysis was performed using catalytic maps constructed after a detailed scanning of the available space around the reaction centers in different transition states, a water molecule acting as a typical proton donor. The calculations suggest that an adjacent proton donor center can reduce the activation barrier of the rate determining transition states by up to 7.2 kcal/mol, while no inhibition of the reaction can be achieved by such a group.

  16. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  17. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-04-01

    The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9‧ and H15‧ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome.

  18. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1982-02-26

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of aggregates of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings which are connected and made soluble by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. During this past quarter the following studies were conducted on Illinois No. 6 coal: extraction with benzylamine (BnH/sub 2/), ethanolamine, ethylenediamine (EDA), pyridine; saponification of some toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble (TIPS) fraction; cleavages by amines; oxidation with aqueous NaOCl of butylated and methylated pyridine-extracted coal; decarboxylation on black acids. The investigations dealt with two kinds of connecting links in coal, which are designated as ester and ether groups. The ester groups are cleaved by strongly basic amines (to give amides) at 25/sup 0/C and by alcoholic KOH at 100/sup 0/C (to give salts and alcohols or phenols). Both esters and ethers are cleaved by HI or ZnCL/sub 2/ in pyridine at or below 50/sup 0/C. The ethers are also cleaved by BnNH/sub 2/, EDA, and EDA/DMSO to nearly the same extent on several days heating at 100/sup 0/C. Although a cleavage of model ethers by amines were not established, the parallel easy reactions of HI and ZnCl/sub 2/ and the slow 100/sup 0/C reactions of amines on coal lead the authors to designate the non-ester cleavages as ether cleavages. (ATT)

  19. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 12, June 1-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    We assume that bituminous coal consists mostly of an aggregate of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings, connected and made insoluble (but swellable) by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the proportions of the various kinds of connecting links and how they can best be broken - in other words, to determine the structure of bituminous coal, with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. The program began with an investigation of the structure of the TIPS fraction of Illinois No. 6 coal, that is, the two-thirds of the 16% extracted by pyridine that is toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble, mostly through changes in molecular weight during cleavage reactions in pyridine solution. The most promising of these cleavage reactions are now being applied to the 84% of coal that is insoluble in pyridine and presents the main problem in coal liquefaction, following the progress of the reactions by formation of soluble material and swelling of the insoluble portion. We found that benzylamine (BnNH/sub 2/) would extract an additional 14% (of the original weight of coal) of material from pyridine-extracted coal, and later that an ethylenediamine/dimethyl sulfoxide (EDA/DMSO) mixture would dissolve another 21% of the original coal. The BnNH/sub 2/ extract is soluble in pyridine. Our best present guess is that the BnNH/sub 2/ extract cleaves most of the ester groups in coal and that EDA/DMSO cleaves the remaining ester and most of the ether groups.

  20. Importance of tRNA interactions with 23S rRNA for peptide bond formation on the ribosome: studies with substrate analogs.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Malte; Rodnina, Marina V

    2007-07-01

    The major enzymatic activity of the ribosome is the catalysis of peptide bond formation. The active site -- the peptidyl transferase center -- is composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and interactions between rRNA and the reactants, peptidyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA, are crucial for the reaction to proceed rapidly and efficiently. Here, we describe the influence of rRNA interactions with cytidine residues in A-site substrate analogs (C-puromycin or CC-puromycin), mimicking C74 and C75 of tRNA on the reaction. Base-pairing of C75 with G2553 of 23S rRNA accelerates peptide bond formation, presumably by stabilizing the peptidyl transferase center in its productive conformation. When C74 is also present in the substrate analog, the reaction is slowed down considerably, indicating a slow step in substrate binding to the active site, which limits the reaction rate. The tRNA-rRNA interactions lead to a robust reaction that is insensitive to pH changes or base substitutions in 23S rRNA at the active site of the ribosome.

  1. Centipede venom peptide SsmTX-I with two intramolecular disulfide bonds shows analgesic activities in animal models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaojie; Yang, Meifeng; Wu, Chunyun; Zou, Zhirong; Tang, Jing; Yang, Xinwang

    2017-03-01

    Pain is a major symptom of many diseases and results in enormous pressures on human body or society. Currently, clinically used analgesic drugs, including opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have adverse reactions, and thus, the development of new types of analgesic drug candidates is urgently needed. Animal venom peptides have proven to have potential as new types of analgesic medicine. In this research, we describe the isolation and characterization of an analgesic peptide from the crude venom of centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. The amino acid sequence of this peptide was identical with SsmTX-I that was previously reported as a specific Kv2.1 ion channel blocker. Our results revealed that SsmTX-I was produced by posttranslational processing of a 73-residue prepropeptide. The intramolecular disulfide bridge motifs of SsmTX-I was Cys1-Cys3 and Cys2-Cys4. Functional assay revealed that SsmTX-I showed potential analgesic activities in formalin-induced paw licking, thermal pain, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing mice models. Our research provides the first report of cDNA sequences, disulfide motif, successful synthesis, and analgesic potential of SsmTX-I for the development of pain-killing drugs. It indicates that centipede peptide toxins could be a treasure trove for the search of novel analgesic drug candidates. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Helices with additional H-bonds: crystallographic conformations of α,γ-hybrid peptides helices composed of β-hydroxy γ-amino acids (statines).

    PubMed

    Malik, Ankita; Kumar, Mothukuri Ganesh; Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2017-01-01

    β-Hydroxy-γ-amino acids (Statines) are a class of naturally occurring non-ribosomal amino acids frequently found in many peptide natural products. Peptidomimetics constituted with statines have been used as inhibitors for various aspartic acid proteases. In contrast to the synthetic γ-amino acids, very little is known about the folding behavior of these naturally occurring β-hydroxy γ-amino acids. To understand the folding behavior of statines, three α,γ-hybrid peptides P1 (Ac-Aib-γPhe-Aib-(R, S)Phesta-Aib-γPhe-Aib-CONH2 ), P2 (Ac-Aib-γPhe-Aib-(S, S)Phesta-Aib-γPhe-Aib-CONH2 ), and P3 (Ac-Aib-γPhe-Aib-(S, S)Phesta-Aib-(S, S)Phesta-Aib-CONH2 ) were synthesized on solid phase and their helical conformations in single crystals were studied. Results suggest that both syn and anti diastereoisomers of statines can be accommodated into the helix without deviating overall helical conformation of α,γ-hybrid peptides. In comparison with syn diastereoisomer, the anti diastereoisomer was found to be directly involved in the intramolecular H-bonding with the backbone carbonyl groups (i to i + 3) similar to the backbone amide NHs in the helix.

  3. Integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded α-amino acids modified at the peptide bond into the NCAD database

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Rodríguez-Ropero, Francisco; Curcó, David; Torras, Juan; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we reported a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database; http://recerca.upc.edu/imem/index.htm) that was built to compile information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, the experimentally-established conformational propensities, and applications (J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 7413). The database initially contained the information available for α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. In this work, we extend NCAD to three families of compounds, which can be used to engineer peptides and proteins incorporating modifications at the –NHCO– peptide bond. Such families are: N-substituted α-amino acids, thio-α-amino acids, and diamines and diacids used to build retropeptides. The conformational preferences of these compounds have been analyzed and described based on the information captured in the database. In addition, we provide an example of the utility of the database and of the compounds it compiles in protein and peptide engineering. Specifically, the symmetry of a sequence engineered to stabilize the 310-helix with respect to the α-helix has been broken without perturbing significantly the secondary structure through targeted replacements using the information contained in the database. PMID:21491493

  4. Quantum chemical studies of a model for peptide bond formation. 3. Role of magnesium cation in formation of amide and water from ammonia and glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oie, T.; Loew, G. H.; Burt, S. K.; MacElroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The SN2 reaction between glycine and ammonia molecules with magnesium cation Mg2+ as a catalyst has been studied as a model reaction for Mg(2+)-catalyzed peptide bond formation using the ab initio Hartree-Fock molecular orbital method. As in previous studies of the uncatalyzed and amine-catalyzed reactions between glycine and ammonia, two reaction mechanisms have been examined, i.e., a two-step and a concerted reaction. The stationary points of each reaction including intermediate and transition states have been identified and free energies calculated for all geometry-optimized reaction species to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of each reaction. Substantial decreases in free energies of activation were found for both reaction mechanisms in the Mg(2+)-catalyzed amide bond formation compared with those in the uncatalyzed and amine-catalyzed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the Mg2+ cation is to stabilize both the transition states and intermediate, and it is attributed to the neutralization of the developing negative charge on the electrophile and formation of a conformationally flexible nonplanar five-membered chelate ring structure.

  5. Energy relaxation of the amide-I mode in hydrogen-bonded peptide units: a route to conformational change.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2008-02-14

    A one-site Davydov model involving a C[Double Bond]O group engaged in a hydrogen bond is used to study the amide-I relaxation due to Fermi resonances with a bath of intramolecular normal modes. In the amide-I ground state, the hydrogen bond behaves as a harmonic oscillator whose eigenstates are phonon number states. By contrast, in the amide-I first excited state, the hydrogen bond experiences a linear distortion so that the eigenstates are superimpositions of number states. By assuming the hydrogen bond in thermal equilibrium at biological temperature, it is shown that the amide-I excitation favors the population of these excited states and the occurrence of coherences. Due to the interaction with the bath, the vibron decays according to an exponential or a biexponential law depending on whether the Fermi resonance is wide or narrow. Therefore, each excited state relaxes over a set of number states according to specific pathways. The consequence is twofold. First, the relaxation leads to a redistribution of the number state population which differs from the initial Boltzmann distribution. Then, it allows for coherence transfers so that, although the vibron has disappeared, the hydrogen keeps the memory of its initial distortion and it develops free oscillations.

  6. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  7. Novel immunodominant peptide presentation strategy: a featured HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope stabilized by intrachain hydrogen bonds from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Peng; Gao, Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Xie, Jing; Vavricka, Christopher J; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Gao, George F

    2010-11-01

    Antigenic peptides recognized by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC; or human leukocyte antigen [HLA] in humans) molecules, and the peptide selection and presentation strategy of the host has been studied to guide our understanding of cellular immunity and vaccine development. Here, a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein-derived CTL epitope, N1 (QFKDNVILL), restricted by HLA-A*2402 was identified by a series of in vitro studies, including a computer-assisted algorithm for prediction, stabilization of the peptide by co-refolding with HLA-A*2402 heavy chain and β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)m), and T2-A24 cell binding. Consequently, the antigenicity of the peptide was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), proliferation assays, and HLA-peptide complex tetramer staining using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors who had recovered from SARS donors. Furthermore, the crystal structure of HLA-A*2402 complexed with peptide N1 was determined, and the featured peptide was characterized with two unexpected intrachain hydrogen bonds which augment the central residues to bulge out of the binding groove. This may contribute to the T-cell receptor (TCR) interaction, showing a host immunodominant peptide presentation strategy. Meanwhile, a rapid and efficient strategy is presented for the determination of naturally presented CTL epitopes in the context of given HLA alleles of interest from long immunogenic overlapping peptides.

  8. Characterization of tRNA-dependent peptide bond formation by MurM in the synthesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adrian J; Gilbey, Andrea M; Blewett, Anne M; De Pascale, Gianfranco; El Zoeiby, Ahmed; Levesque, Roger C; Catherwood, Anita C; Tomasz, Alexander; Bugg, Timothy D H; Roper, David I; Dowson, Christopher G

    2008-03-07

    MurM is an aminoacyl ligase that adds l-serine or l-alanine as the first amino acid of a dipeptide branch to the stem peptide lysine of the pneumococcal peptidoglycan. MurM activity is essential for clinical pneumococcal penicillin resistance. Analysis of peptidoglycan from the highly penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strain 159 revealed that in vivo and in vitro, in the presence of the appropriate acyl-tRNA, MurM(159) alanylated the peptidoglycan epsilon-amino group of the stem peptide lysine in preference to its serylation. However, in contrast, identical analyses of the penicillin-susceptible strain Pn16 revealed that MurM(Pn16) activity supported serylation more than alanylation both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, both MurM(Pn16) acylation activities were far lower than the alanylation activity of MurM(159). The resulting differing stem peptide structures of 159 and Pn16 were caused by the profoundly greater catalytic efficiency of MurM(159) compared with MurM(Pn16) bought about by sequence variation between these enzymes and, to a lesser extent, differences in the in vivo tRNA(Ala):tRNA(Ser) ratio in 159 and Pn16. Kinetic analysis revealed that MurM(159) acted during the lipid-linked stages of peptidoglycan synthesis, that the d-alanyl-d-alanine of the stem peptide and the lipid II N-acetylglucosaminyl group were not essential for substrate recognition, that epsilon-carboxylation of the lysine of the stem peptide was not tolerated, and that lipid II-alanine was a substrate, suggesting an evolutionary link to staphylococcal homologues of MurM such as FemA. Kinetic analysis also revealed that MurM recognized the acceptor stem and/or the TPsiC loop stem of the tRNA(Ala). It is anticipated that definition of the minimal structural features of MurM substrates will allow development of novel resistance inhibitors that will restore the efficacy of beta-lactams for treatment of pneumococcal infection.

  9. Ab initio QM/MM free energy simulations of peptide bond formation in the ribosome support an eight-membered ring reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, John Z H; Xiang, Yun

    2012-10-03

    Ab initio QM/MM free-energy simulations were carried out to study the peptide bond formation reaction in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The QM part of the reaction was treated by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, while the MM part including the solvent and RNA environment was described by molecular force field. The calculated free-energy surfaces for the two popular reaction mechanisms, the six- and eight-membered ring reactions, exhibited large energetic differences which favor the eight-membered reaction mechanism. The simulated quasi-transition state structures clearly indicated a "late" feature consistent with previous theoretical studies. Also the important functional role played by water molecules in the active site of the ribosome and its implication in ribozymic catalysis was discussed in detail.

  10. Cholesterol accelerates the binding of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide to ganglioside GM1 through a universal hydrogen-bond-dependent sterol tuning of glycolipid conformation.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara; Garmy, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Age-related alterations of membrane lipids in brain cell membranes together with high blood cholesterol are considered as major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Yet the molecular mechanisms by which these factors increase Alzheimer's risk are mostly unknown. In lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane, neurotoxic Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides interact with both cholesterol and ganglioside GM1. Recent data also suggested that cholesterol could stimulate the binding of Abeta to GM1 through conformational modulation of the ganglioside headgroup. Here we used a combination of physicochemical and molecular modeling approaches to decipher the mechanisms of cholesterol-assisted binding of Abeta to GM1. With the aim of decoupling the effect of cholesterol on GM1 from direct Abeta-cholesterol interactions, we designed a minimal peptide (Abeta5-16) containing the GM1-binding domain but lacking the amino acid residues involved in cholesterol recognition. Using the Langmuir technique, we showed that cholesterol (but not phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin) significantly accelerates the interaction of Abeta5-16 with GM1. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Abeta5-16 interacts with a cholesterol-stabilized dimer of GM1. The main structural effect of cholesterol is to establish a hydrogen-bond between its own OH group and the glycosidic-bond linking ceramide to the glycone part of GM1, thereby inducing a tilt in the glycolipid headgroup. This fine conformational tuning stabilizes the active conformation of the GM1 dimer whose headgroups, oriented in two opposite directions, form a chalice-shaped receptacle for Abeta. These data give new mechanistic insights into the stimulatory effect of cholesterol on Abeta/GM1 interactions. They also support the emerging concept that cholesterol is a universal modulator of protein-glycolipid interactions in the broader context of membrane recognition processes.

  11. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  12. Impact of the environmental conditions and substrate pre-treatment on whey protein hydrolysis: A review.

    PubMed

    Cheison, Seronei Chelulei; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-01-22

    Proteins in solution are subject to myriad forces stemming from interactions with each other as well as with the solvent media. The role of the environmental conditions, namely pH, temperature, ionic strength remains under-estimated yet it impacts protein conformations and consequently its interaction with, and susceptibility to, the enzyme. Enzymes, being proteins are also amenable to the environmental conditions because they are either activated or denatured depending on the choice of the conditions. Furthermore, enzyme specificity is restricted to a narrow regime of optimal conditions while opportunities outside the optimum conditions remain untapped. In addition, the composition of protein substrate (whether mixed or single purified) have been underestimated in previous studies. In addition, protein pre-treatment methods like heat denaturation prior to hydrolysis is a complex phenomenon whose progression is influenced by the environmental conditions including the presence or absence of sugars like lactose, ionic strength, purity of the protein, and the molecular structure of the mixed proteins particularly presence of free thiol groups. In this review, we revisit protein hydrolysis with a focus on the impact of the hydrolysis environment and show that preference of peptide bonds and/or one protein over another during hydrolysis is driven by the environmental conditions. Likewise, heat-denaturing is a process which is dependent on not only the environment but the presence or absence of other proteins.

  13. Amide-I lifetime-limited vibrational energy flow in a one-dimensional lattice of hydrogen-bonded peptide units.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    A time-convolutionless master equation is established for describing the amide-I vibrational energy flow in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units. The dynamics is addressed within the small polaron formalism to account for the strong coupling between the amide-I vibron and the phonons describing the H-bond vibrations. Therefore, special attention is paid to characterize the influence of the amide-I relaxation on the polaron transport properties. This relaxation is modeled by assuming that each amide-I mode interacts with a bath of intramolecular normal modes whose displacements are strongly localized on the C=O groups. It has been shown that the energy relaxation occurs over a very short time scale which prevents any significant delocalization of the polaron. At biological temperature, the polaron explores a finite region around the excited site whose size is about one or two lattice parameters. However, two regimes occur depending on whether the vibron-phonon coupling is weak or strong. For a weak coupling, the energy propagates coherently along the lattice until the polaron disappears. By contrast, for a strong coupling, a diffusive regime occurs so that the polaron explores a finite size region incoherently. In both cases, the finite polaron lifetime favors the localization of the vibron density whose amplitude decreases exponentially.

  14. Effect of combined ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment on enzymatic preparation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from native collagenous materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Ma, Liang; Cai, Luyun; Liu, Yi; Li, Jianrong

    2017-05-01

    The combined effect of ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment for the hydrolysis of native collagenous materials and release of ACE inhibitory peptides was investigated. The ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment of pig skin could accelerate the release of the ACE inhibitory peptides from the triple helix of collagen in early stages of hydrolysis. Furthermore, the pretreatment could also accelerate collapse of the triple helix and release more ACE inhibitory peptides during hydrolysis than collagen samples left untreated. Compared to untreated and alkali pretreated samples, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could decrease the thermostability of pig skin significantly (P<0.05) because the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could weaken hydrogen bonds and break parts of covalent bonds in collagen, leading to damage of the triple helical structure in collagen. Therefore, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could damage the triple helical structure of collagen in native collagenous materials and expose more inner sites for subsequent hydrolysis, and it could be a potential way to prepare ACE inhibitory peptides effectively from collagen-rich raw material.

  15. Cell-Penetrating Cross-β Peptide Assemblies with Controlled Biodegradable Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghun; Lee, Mun-Kyung; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-01-09

    Although self-assembled peptide nanostructures (SPNs) have shown potential as promising biomaterials, there is a potential problem associated with the extremely slow hydrolysis rate of amide bonds. Here, we report the development of cell-penetrating cross-β SPNs with a controllable biodegradation rate. The designed self-assembling β-sheet peptide incorporating a hydrolyzable ester bond (self-assembling depsipeptide; SADP) can be assembled into bilayer β-sandwich one-dimensional (1D) fibers similarly to conventional β-sheet peptides. The rate of hydrolysis can be controlled by the pH, temperature, and structural characteristics of the ester unit. The 1D fiber of the SADP transforms into vesicle-like 3D structures when the hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptide segment is attached to the SADP segment. Efficient cell internalization of the 3D nanostructures was observed, and we verified the intracellular degradation and disassembly of the biodegradable nanostructures. This study illustrates the potential of biodegradable cross-β SPNs and provides a valuable toolkit that can be used with self-assembling peptides.

  16. Cleavage of the peptide bond of beta-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine) induced by a Co(III)-amine complexes: reaction, structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manas K; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Bernal, Ivan

    2004-05-07

    Cleavage of the peptide bond occurs when beta]-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine) reacts with [Co(tren)Cl2]+ (tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) to give [Co(tren)(histidine)](2+) 1 and [Co(tren)(beta-alanine)](2+) 2. [Co(tren)(histidine)](2+) 1 crystallizes in the enantiomorphic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and 2 crystallizes in the P2(1)/c space group. The mechanism of the cleavage reactions were studied in detail for the precursor [Co(tren)Cl2]+ and [Co(trien)Cl2]+, which convert into [Co(tren)(OH)2]+/[Co(tren)(OH)(OH2)]2+ and [Co(trien)(OH)2]+/[Co(trien)(OH)(OH2)]2+ in water at basic pH (trien = 1,4,7,10-tetraazadecane). At a slightly basic pH, the initial coordination of the substrate (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is by the carboxylate group for the reaction with [Co(tren)Cl2]+. This is followed by a rate-limiting nucleophilic attack of the hydroxide group at the beta-alanyl-L-histidine carbonyl group. In a strongly basic reaction medium substrate, binding of the metal was through carboxylate and amine terminals. On the other hand, for the reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine, the initial coordination of the substrate takes place via an imidazole ring nitrogen, independently, and followed by a nucleophilic attack of the hydroxide group at the beta-alanyl-L-histidine carbonyl group. The circular dichroism spectrum for 1 suggests that a very small extent of racemization of the amino acid (L-histidine) takes place during the cleavage reaction between [Co(tren)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine. Reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine also causes cleavage of the peptide bond, producing a free beta-alanyl molecule and a cationic fragment [cis-alpha-Co(trien)(histidine)](2+) 3 that crystallizes in the optically active space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). Unlike the previous case an appreciable degree of racemization of the L-histidine takes place during the reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta

  17. Self-Assembling Molecular Capsules Based on α,γ-Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ozores, Haxel Lionel; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2017-01-18

    A new capsule based on a β-sheet self-assembling cyclic peptide with the ability to recognize and release several guests is described. The host structure is composed of two self-complementary α,γ-cyclic peptides bearing a Zn porphyrin cap that is used for the selective recognition of the guest. The two components are linked through two dynamic covalent bonds. The combination of binding forces, including hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, and dynamic hydrazone bonds, allows the reversible recognition of long bipyridine guests. The affinity for these ligands showed a strong dependence on the guest length. Delivery of the encapsulated ligand can be achieved by hydrolysis of hydrazones to disrupt the sandwich complex structure.

  18. Multifunctional PEGylated 2C5-Immunoliposomes Containing pH-sensitive Bonds and TAT Peptide for Enhanced Tumor Cell Internalization and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Erez; Apte, Anjali; Jani, Ankur; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    pH-sensitive PEGylated (with PEG-PE) long-circulating liposomes (HSPC:cholesterol and Doxil®), modified with cell-penetrating TAT peptide (TATp) moieties and cancer-specific mAb 2C5 were prepared. A degradable pH-sensitive hydrazone bond between a long shielding PEG chains and PE (PEG2k-Hz-PE) was introduced. TATp was conjugated with a short PEG1k-PE spacer and mAb 2C5 was attached to a long PEG chain (2C5-PEG3.4k-PE). The “shielding” effect of TATp by long PEG chains was investigated using three liposomal models. At normal pH, surface TATp moieties are “hidden” by the long PEG chains. Upon the exposure to lowered pH, this multifunctional carrier exposes TATp moieties after the degradation of the hydrazone bond and removal of the long PEG chains. Enhanced cellular uptake of the TATp-containing immunoliposomes was observed in vitro after pre-treatment at lowered pH (using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy techniques). The presence of mAb 2C5 on the liposome surface further enhanced the interaction between the carrier and tumor cells but not normal cells. Furthermore, multifunctional immuno-Doxil® preparation showed increased cellular cytotoxicity of B16-F10, HeLa and MCF-7 cells when pre-incubated at lower pH, indicating TATp exposure and activity. In conclusion, a multifunctional immunoliposomal nanocarrier containing a pH-sensitive PEG-PE component, TATp, and the cancer cell-specific mAb 2C5 promotes enhanced cytotoxicity and carrier internalization by cancer cells and demonstrates the potential for intracellular drug delivery after exposure to lowered pH environment, typical of solid tumors. PMID:22182771

  19. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  20. Vibron phonon in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units: A criterion to discriminate between the weak and the strong coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2010-01-21

    Based on dynamical considerations, a simple and intuitive criterion is established to measure the strength of the vibron-phonon coupling in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units. The main idea is to compare separately the influence of both the vibron-phonon coupling and the dipole-dipole interaction on a specific element of the vibron reduced density matrix. This element, which refers to the coherence between the ground state and a local excited amide-I mode, generalizes the concept of survival amplitude at finite temperature. On the one hand, when the dipole-dipole interaction is neglected, it is shown that dephasing-limited coherent dynamics is induced by the vibron-phonon coupling. On the other hand, when the vibron-phonon coupling is disregarded, decoherence occurs due to dipole-dipole interactions since the local excited state couples with neighboring local excited states. Therefore, our criterion simply states that the strongest interaction is responsible for the fastest decoherence. It yields a critical coupling chi( *) approximately 25 pN at biological temperature.

  1. The hydrolysis of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoagland, P. D.; Fox, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal polymerization of aspartic acid produces a polysuccinimide (I), a chain of aspartoyl residues. An investigation was made of the alkaline hydrolysis of the imide rings of (I) which converts the polyimide to a polypeptide. The alkaline hydrolysis of polyimides can be expected to be kinetically complex due to increasing negative charge generated by carboxylate groups. For this reason, a diimide, phthaloyl-DL-aspartoyl-beta-alanine (IIA) was synthesized for a progressive study of the hydrolysis of polyimides. In addition, this diimide (IIA) can be related to thalidomide and might be expected to exhibit similar reactivity during hydrolysis of the phthalimide ring.

  2. Effect of the structural features of hydrochloric acid-deamidated wheat gluten on its susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun; Hu, Qingling; Ren, Jiaoyan; Zhao, Haifeng; You, Lijun; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-06-19

    The effect of the structural features of hydrochloric acid-deamidated wheat gluten with different degrees of deamidation (DDs) on the susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis by pancreatin was investigated. The wheat gluten deamidated by hydrochloric acid with a DD of 55% revealed the highest susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis as evaluated by the hydrolysis degree and nitrogen solubility index of the hydrolysates. An increase of peptides with MW below 3000 Da was observed as the DD increased. Raman spectra in the 1740-1800 cm⁻¹ and 521-530 cm⁻¹ range suggested that wheat gluten had taken off the deamidation with different DDs and that the disulfide bond had disrupted the sulfhydryl groups with different intensities, respectively. Results from the deconvolution of the amide I region of FTIR spectra in the 1600-1700 cm⁻¹ range showed that the content of the α-helix decreased and that the content of the β-turn and β-sheet increased with increasing DDs, which improved the molecular structure and flexibility of wheat gluten. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the image of HDG-55% presented the smoothest surface and the least uniform pore, enabling the sample to be more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. The above information will enable us to better understand the effect of structure on the susceptibility of deamidated wheat gluten.

  3. Adsorption behavior of the three species of the biprotic peptide Phe-Ala onto an end-capped C18-bonded organic/inorganic hybrid stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-12-15

    We recorded the overloaded elution band profiles of the dipeptide phenylalanine-alanine (Phe-Ala) on a column packed with C18-bonded organic (ethyl)/inorganic (silica) hybrid porous particles (BEH), eluted with a series of buffered methanol-water mobile phases (20/80, v/v). The (W)(S)pHs of the mobile phases were successively adjusted with addition of suitable buffers to values of 1.67, 2.44, 3.83, 4.94, 7.41, and 10.71 (where the notation (W)(S)pH means that the pH of the solution is directly measured in the solution (S) after the electrode was calibrated in pure water (W)). The ionic strength of the eluent was kept constant at 20 mM. The injected samples had different sizes and concentrations. The retention of the low-concentration samples was minimum at an intermediate (W)(S)pH (k' approximately 0.5) and maximum for the lowest (k' approximately 1.3) and highest (k' approximately 3.5) (W)(S)pHs showing that the zwitterion (+Phe-Ala-) is less strongly adsorbed than the positively (+Phe-Ala) and negatively (Phe-Ala-) charged species of the dipeptide onto BEH-C18. The elution profiles of the concentrated samples demonstrated that the adsorption isotherm of the zwitterionic species is an anti-Langmuirian Moreau isotherm due to significant adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, whereas the isotherms of the charged species are more conventional Langmuir isotherms. A simple ternary isotherm for the coadsorption of the three dipeptide species is proposed. It accounts well for the complex band profiles observed when large concentrated samples of the peptide are injected under controlled pH conditions. The slight departure between the calculated and the experimental band profiles obtained under uncontrolled pH conditions suggests the possible adsorption of the buffer components onto the packing material and the possible influence of microenvironment effects near the stationary phase surface, which would affect the local pH along the column. Preparative chromatography of

  4. Changes in the structural properties and rate of hydrolysis of cotton fibers during extended enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lushan; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji; Shi, Dongxia; Liu, Hongwen; Gao, Hongjun

    2006-02-20

    An extended enzymatic hydrolysis of cotton fibers by crude cellulase from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 is described with characterization of both the enzyme changes of activities and cellulose structure. The hydrolysis rates declined drastically during the early stage and then slowly and steadily throughout the whole hydrolysis process the same trend could be seen during the following re-hydrolysis process. Morphological and structural changes to the fibers, such as swelling, frequent surface erosion, and variation in the packing and orientation of microfibrils, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Observation of X-ray diffraction and IR spectra suggests that the hydrolysis process results in a gradual increase in the relative intensity of the hydrogen bond network, and a gradual decrease in the apparent crystal size of cellulose. The I(alpha) crystal phase was hydrolyzed more easily than was the I(beta) crystal phase. Apart from the inactivation of CBHs activity, changes in the packing and arrangement of microfibrils and the structural heterogeneity of cellulose during hydrolysis could be responsible for the reduction in the rate of reaction, especially in its later stages. The results indicate that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs on the outer layer of the fiber surface and that, following this, the process continues in a sub-layer manner.

  5. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  6. The interdomain disulfide bond of a homogeneous rabbit pneumococcal antibody light chain.

    PubMed

    Strosberg, A D; Margolies, M N; Haber, E

    1975-11-01

    Rabbit light chain 3315, prepared from a homogeneous antipneumococcal antibody, was subjected to hydrolysis by pepsin without prior reduction and alkylation of the intrachain disulfide bonds. Gel filtration of the hydrolysate on Sephadex G-10, G-15, and G-25 and ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sephadex yielded several disulfide bridge peptides. These were fully reduced and alkulated and sequenced by Edman degradation. The peptides were located in the light chain sequence determined in independent studies from our laboratory. The half-cystine residues in this KB rabbit chain are located at positions 23, 80, 88, 134, 171, 194, and 214. The extra disulfide bridge extends between residues 80 and 171, thus joining the variable and constant domains. This is consistent with x-ray diffraction crystallographic studies showing that the corresponding residues in human light chains are separated by a distance compatible with disulfide bond formation.

  7. Xylan hydrolysis in Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides and model substrates during hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Heather L; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Tomkins, Bruce A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hahn, Michael G; Van Berkel, Gary J; Wyman, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies defined easy and difficult to hydrolyze fractions of hemicellulose that may result from bonds among cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. To understand how such bonds affect hydrolysis, Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides, holocellulose isolated from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and birchwood xylan were subjected to hydrothermal flow-through pretreatment. Samples were characterized by glycome profiling, HPLC, and UPLC-MS. Glycome profiling revealed steady fragmentation and removal of glycans from solids during hydrolysis. The extent of polysaccharide fragmentation, hydrolysis rate, and total xylose yield were lowest for P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and greatest for birchwood xylan. Comparison of results from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and holocellulose suggested that lignin-carbohydrate complexes reduce hydrolysis rates and limit release of large xylooligomers. Smaller differences between results with holocellulose and birchwood xylan suggest xylan-cellulose hydrogen bonds limited hydrolysis, but to a lesser extent. These findings imply cell wall structure strongly influences hydrolysis.

  8. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  9. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  10. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  11. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone: effects of hydrogen bonding and α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina R; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Jorgensen, Lene; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied to evaluate the effect of α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues and the presence of guanidinium groups in the α-amino acid residues on membrane interaction. The molecular properties of the peptidomimetics in solution (surface and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, aqueous diffusion rate and molecular size) were studied along with their adsorption to lipid bilayers, cellular uptake, and toxicity. The surface hydrogen bonding ability of the peptidomimetics reflected their adsorbed amounts onto lipid bilayers as well as with their cellular uptake, indicating the importance of hydrogen bonding for their membrane interaction and cellular uptake. Ellipsometry studies further demonstrated that the presence of chiral centers in the β-peptoid residues promotes a higher adsorption to anionic lipid bilayers, whereas circular dichroism results showed that α-chirality influences their overall mean residue ellipticity. The presence of guanidinium groups and α-chiral β-peptoid residues was also found to have a significant positive effect on uptake in living cells. Together, the findings provide an improved understanding on the behavior of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics in the presence of lipid bilayers and live cells.

  12. Ester-Mediated Amide Bond Formation Driven by Wet–Dry Cycles: A Possible Path to Polypeptides on the Prebiotic Earth**

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Jay G; Yu, Sheng-Sheng; Mamajanov, Irena; Grover, Martha A; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Fernández, Facundo M; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that amino acids were present on the prebiotic Earth, the mechanism by which α-amino acids were condensed into polypeptides before the emergence of enzymes remains unsolved. Here, we demonstrate a prebiotically plausible mechanism for peptide (amide) bond formation that is enabled by α-hydroxy acids, which were likely present along with amino acids on the early Earth. Together, α-hydroxy acids and α-amino acids form depsipeptides—oligomers with a combination of ester and amide linkages—in model prebiotic reactions that are driven by wet–cool/dry–hot cycles. Through a combination of ester–amide bond exchange and ester bond hydrolysis, depsipeptides are enriched with amino acids over time. These results support a long-standing hypothesis that peptides might have arisen from ester-based precursors. PMID:26201989

  13. Ester-Mediated Amide Bond Formation Driven by Wet-Dry Cycles: A Possible Path to Polypeptides on the Prebiotic Earth.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Jay G; Yu, Sheng-Sheng; Mamajanov, Irena; Grover, Martha A; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Fernández, Facundo M; Hud, Nicholas V

    2015-08-17

    Although it is generally accepted that amino acids were present on the prebiotic Earth, the mechanism by which α-amino acids were condensed into polypeptides before the emergence of enzymes remains unsolved. Here, we demonstrate a prebiotically plausible mechanism for peptide (amide) bond formation that is enabled by α-hydroxy acids, which were likely present along with amino acids on the early Earth. Together, α-hydroxy acids and α-amino acids form depsipeptides-oligomers with a combination of ester and amide linkages-in model prebiotic reactions that are driven by wet-cool/dry-hot cycles. Through a combination of ester-amide bond exchange and ester bond hydrolysis, depsipeptides are enriched with amino acids over time. These results support a long-standing hypothesis that peptides might have arisen from ester-based precursors.

  14. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature.

  15. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  16. Deamidation, acylation and proteolysis of a model peptide in PLGA films.

    PubMed

    Houchin, M L; Heppert, K; Topp, E M

    2006-05-01

    The relative rates of deamidation, acylation and proteolysis (i.e. amide bond cleavage) were determined for a model peptide (VYPNGA) in poly (dl-lactide-co-glycolide) films. Films were stored at 70 degrees C and either 95%, 75%, 60%, 45%, 28%, or approximately 0% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C and 95% relative humidity. Peptide degradation products were identified by ESI+MS/MS and quantitated by LC/MS/MS. Extensive overlap of degradation mechanisms occurred, producing a complex mixture of products. Acylation was the dominant peptide degradation reaction (10-20% of total peptide) at early stages of PLGA hydrolysis and at intermediate relative humidity (60-45% RH). Deamidation and proteolysis were dominant (25-50% and 20-40% of total peptide, respectively) at later stages and at high relative humidity (95-75% RH). Understanding the relative rates of each peptide degradation reaction will allow for improved design of PLGA formulations that preserve the stability of peptide and protein drugs.

  17. Local NH-π interactions involving aromatic residues of proteins: influence of backbone conformation and ππ* excitation on the π H-bond strength, as revealed from studies of isolated model peptides.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Brenner, Valérie; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel

    2016-11-02

    Conformer-selective IR gas phase spectroscopy and high level quantum chemistry methods have been used to characterise the diversity of local NH-π interactions between the π ring of a phenylalanine aromatic residue and the nearby main chain amide groups. The study of model systems shows how the amide NH stretch vibrational features, in the 3410-3460 cm(-1) frequency range, can be used to monitor the strength of these local π H-bonds, which is found to depend on both the backbone conformation and the aromatic side chain orientation. This is rationalized in terms of partial electron transfer between the π cloud and the main chain NH bonds, with the help of analysis tools based on Natural Bonding Orbitals and Non-Covalent Interactions plots. The experimental study, extended to the NH-π interactions when the Phe residue is excited in its first ππ* electronic state, also demonstrates the principle of the ππ* labelling technique, i.e. a selective labelling of those NH bonds in a peptide molecule that are in close contact with an aromatic ring, as an elegant tool for IR spectroscopic assignments. The validation of theoretical predictions against experimental data (frequency change upon excitation) eventually qualifies the use of the CC2 method for the description of the ππ* excited states of systems having a phenyl ring, both in terms of structure, vibrational modes and nature of excited states.

  18. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  19. Polymer-pendant ligand chemistry. 1. Reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid with catechol ligands bonded to polystryene-divinylbenzene and regeneration of the ligand site by a simple hydrolysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.H.; Tannous, R.S.

    1985-12-18

    A novel method is reported for reactions of organoarsonic acids and arsenic acid, known to be present in oil shale and its pyrolysis products, with catechol ligands bonded to either 2% or 20% cross-linked methylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) resins. A previous study with catechol-bonded ligands on PS-DVB resins dealt with their reactions with metal ions in aqueous solution and showed a selectivity toward Hg/sup 2 +/ ions. As far as we have been able to determine, reactions of this polymer-supported ligand with organometallic compounds or inorganic anions have not been reported. 9 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  20. Exothermic Bond Breaking: A Persistent Misconception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galley, William C.

    2004-01-01

    The misconceptions regarding the nature of ATP hydrolysis and bond breaking are discussed. The students' knowledge in this area is quantitatively measured by a survey of over 600 biochemistry and physiology students.

  1. Theoretical investigation of the role of clay edges in prebiotic peptide bond formation. II - Structures and thermodynamics of the activated complex species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jack R.; Loew, Gilda H.; Luke, Brian T.; White, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations are used to study amino acid activation by anhydride formation in neutral phosphates and in tetrahedral silicate and aluminate sites on clay edges. The results agree with previous ab initio studies of Luke et al. (1984) on the reactant species. Relative heats of formation of the anhydrides indicate the extent of anhydride formation to be the greatest for Al and the least for phosphate, which is the same order as the stability of hydrolysis.

  2. Influence of the extent of hemoglobin hydrolysis on the digestive absorption of heme iron. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vaghefi, Nikta; Nedjaoum, Fouzia; Guillochon, Didier; Bureau, François; Arhan, Pierre; Bouglé, Dominique

    2002-08-14

    This study was designed to assess the interactions of heme with peptides produced by enzyme hydrolysis of hemoglobin, and their relationship with heme iron absorption. Bovine hemoglobin was hydrolyzed by pepsin or by subtilisin, which differ in their hydrolysis processes. The hydrolysis rate ranged from 0 (native hemoglobin) to 15%. Heme solubility and heme-peptides interactions were compared to iron absorption by the Ussing chamber model, at intestinal pH (7.5). Increasing hemoglobin hydrolysis enhanced iron absorption; the highest value was reached between 8 and 11% hydrolysis, whatever the enzyme used. Comparing the products of hydrolysis of the two enzymes showed that heme iron absorption depends not only on its solubility, but relies mainly on the balance between the strength of heme-peptides and the polymerization rate of heme.

  3. Characterization of disulfide bonds by planned digestion and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Na, Seungjin; Paek, Eunok; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Duwoon; Lee, Seung Jae; Kwon, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The identification of disulfide bonds provides critical information regarding the structure and function of a protein and is a key aspect in understanding signaling cascades in biological systems. Recent proteomic approaches using digestion enzymes have facilitated the characterization of disulfide-bonds and/or oxidized products from cysteine residues, although these methods have limitations in the application of MS/MS. For example, protein digestion to obtain the native form of disulfide bonds results in short lengths of amino acids, which can cause ambiguous MS/MS analysis due to false positive identifications. In this study we propose a new approach, termed planned digestion, to obtain sufficient amino acid lengths after cleavage for proteomic approaches. Application of the DBond software to planned digestion of specific proteins accurately identified disulfide-linked peptides. RNase A was used as a model protein in this study because the disulfide bonds of this protein have been well characterized. Application of this approach to peptides digested with Asp-N/C (chemical digestion) and trypsin under acid hydrolysis conditions identified the four native disulfide bonds of RNase A. Missed cleavages introduced by trypsin treatment for only 3 hours generated sufficient lengths of amino acids for identification of the disulfide bonds. Analysis using MS/MS successfully showed additional fragmentation patterns that are cleavage products of S-S and C-S bonds of disulfide-linkage peptides. These fragmentation patterns generate thioaldehydes, persulfide, and dehydroalanine. This approach of planned digestion with missed cleavages using the DBond algorithm could be applied to other proteins to determine their disulfide linkage and the oxidation patterns of cysteine residues.

  4. Effect of degree of hydrolysis of whey protein on in vivo plasma amino acid appearance in humans.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Storm, Adam C; Klitgaard, Søren; Jørgensen, Henry; Bibby, Bo M; Serena, Anja; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein is generally found to be faster digested and to promote faster and higher increases in plasma amino acid concentrations during the immediate ~60 min following protein ingestion compared to casein. The aim of the present study was to compare three different whey protein hydrolysates with varying degrees of hydrolysis (DH, % cleaved peptide bonds) to evaluate if the degree of whey protein hydrolysis influences the rate of amino acid plasma appearance in humans. A casein protein was included as reference. The three differentially hydrolysed whey proteins investigated were: High degree of hydrolysis (DH, DH = 48 %), Medium DH (DH = 27 %), and Low DH (DH = 23 %). The casein protein was intact. Additionally, since manufacturing of protein products may render some amino acids unavailable for utilisation in the body the digestibility and the biological value of all four protein fractions were evaluated in a rat study. A two-compartment model for the description of the postprandial plasma amino acid kinetics was applied to investigate the rate of postprandial total amino acid plasma appearance of the four protein products. The plasma amino acid appearance rates of the three whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) were all significantly higher than for the casein protein, however, the degree of hydrolysis of the WPH products did not influence plasma total amino acid appearance rate (estimates of DH and 95 % confidence intervals [CI] (mol L(-1) min(-1)): High DH 0.0585 [0.0454, 0.0754], Medium DH 0.0594 [0.0495, 0.0768], Low DH 0.0560 [0.0429, 0.0732], Casein 0.0194 [0.0129, 0.0291]). The four protein products were all highly digestible, while the biological value decreased with increasing degree of hydrolysis. In conclusion, the current study does not provide evidence that the degree of whey protein hydrolysis is a strong determinant for plasma amino acid appearance rate within the studied range of hydrolysis and protein dose.

  5. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  6. [A rate-limiting stage of enteropeptidase hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A G; Likhareva, V V; Rumsh, L D

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown for the first time that deacylation is the rate-limiting stage in the enteropeptidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of highly efficient oligopeptide substrates containing four Asp residues in positions P2-P5. On the other hand, the rate-limiting stage in the hydrolysis of low-efficiency peptide substrates containing less than four Asp or Glu residues in positions P2-P5 is acylation, as has previously been suggested for all amide and peptide substrates of serine proteases on the basis of the classic studies by Bender et al. The method of introduction of an additional nucleophile or another effector that selectively affects the deacylation stage was used to determine the rate-limiting stage in the enteropeptidase hydrolysis of Nalpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester, the highly efficient amide substrate GlyAsp4-Lys beta-naphthyl amide, and the low-efficiency peptide substrate VLSAADK-GNVKAAWG (where a hyphen denotes the hydrolysis site). The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2008, vol. 34, no. 2; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  7. Slow step after bond-breaking by porcine pepsin identified using solvent deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rebholz, K.L.; Northrop, D.B. )

    1991-04-15

    The relatively fast artificial substrate Leu-Ser-rho-nitro-Phe-Nle-Ala-Leu-OMe generates a solvent isotope effect of 1.51 +/- 0.02 only on the maximal velocity of peptide hydrolysis catalyzed by porcine pepsin. The absence of an isotope effect on V/K places the isotopically-sensitive step after peptide bond cleavage and the release of the first product. Reprotonation of the active site aspartic carboxyls is proposed as the most likely interpretation of this observation. Structural and kinetic similarities between pepsin and other aspartic proteinases, including the therapeutically important targets HIV protease and renin, suggest a similar slow reprotonation step after catalysis. This mechanistic feature has important implications regarding inhibitor design; if most of the enzymes are present in a product-release form during steady-state turnover, then perhaps inhibitors should be designed as product analogs instead of substrate analogs.

  8. Synthesis, properties, and application in peptide chemistry of a magnetically separable and reusable biocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liria, Cleber W.; Ungaro, Vitor A.; Fernandes, Raphaella M.; Costa, Natália J. S.; Marana, Sandro R.; Rossi, Liane M.; Machini, M. Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed chemical processes are selective, very productive, and generate little waste. Nevertheless, they may be optimized using enzymes bound to solid supports, which are particularly important for protease-mediated reactions since proteases undergo fast autolysis in solution. Magnetic nanoparticles are suitable supports for this purpose owing to their high specific surface area and to be easily separated from reaction media. Here we describe the immobilization of bovine α-chymotrypsin (αCT) on silica-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@silica) and the characterization of the enzyme-nanoparticle hybrid (Fe3O4@silica-αCT) in terms of protein content, properties, recovery from reaction media, application, and reuse in enzyme-catalyzed peptide synthesis. The results revealed that (i) full acid hydrolysis of the immobilized protease followed by amino acid analysis of the hydrolyzate is a reliable method to determine immobilization yield; (ii) despite showing lower amidase activity and a lower K cat/ K m value for a specific substrate than free αCT, the immobilized enzyme is chemically and thermally more stable, magnetically recoverable from reaction media, and can be consecutively reused for ten cycles to catalyze the amide bond hydrolysis and ester hydrolysis of the protected dipeptide Z-Ala-Phe-OMe. Altogether, these properties indicate the potential of Fe3O4@silica-αCT to act as an efficient, suitably stable, and reusable catalyst in amino acid, peptide, and protein chemistry as well as in proteomic studies.

  9. Site-Specific Hydrolysis Reaction C-Terminal of Methionine in Met-His during Metal-Catalyzed Oxidation of IgG-1.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Arora, Jayant; Toth, Ronald T; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Zhou, Shuxia; Volkin, David B; Schöneich, Christian

    2016-04-04

    The metal-catalyzed oxidation by [Fe(II)(EDTA)](2-)/H2O2 of IgG-1 leads to the site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds in the Fc region. The major hydrolytic cleavage occurs between Met428 and His429, consistent with a mechanism reported for the site-specific hydrolysis of parathyroid hormone (1-34) between Met8 and His9 (Mozziconacci, O.; et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics 2013, 10 (2), 739-755). In IgG-1, to a lesser extent, we also observe hydrolysis reactions between Met252 and Ile253. After 2 h of oxidation (at pH 5.8, 37 °C) approximately 5% of the protein is cleaved between Met428 and His429. For comparison, after 2 h of oxidation, the amount of tryptic peptides containing a Met sulfoxide residue represents less than 0.1% of the protein. The effect of this site-specific hydrolysis on the conformational stability and aggregation propensity of the antibody was also examined. No noticeable differences in structural integrity and conformational stability were observed between control and oxidized IgG-1 samples as measured by circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, and static light scattering (SLS). Small amounts of soluble and insoluble aggregates (3-6%) were, however, observed in the oxidized samples by UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Over the course of metal-catalyzed oxidation, increasing amounts of fragments were also observed by SEC. An increase in the concentration of subvisible particles was detected by microflow imaging (MFI).

  10. The structure of salt bridges between Arg(+) and Glu(-) in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-07

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu(-)) and arginine (Arg(+)) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu(-) and Arg(+), which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu(-)⋯Arg(+) salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  11. The structure of salt bridges between Arg+ and Glu- in peptides investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy: Evidence for two distinct hydrogen-bond geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Rupenyan, Alisa; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    Salt bridges play an important role in protein folding and in supramolecular chemistry, but they are difficult to detect and characterize in solution. Here, we investigate salt bridges between glutamate (Glu-) and arginine (Arg+) using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The 2D-IR spectrum of a salt-bridged dimer shows cross peaks between the vibrational modes of Glu- and Arg+, which provide a sensitive structural probe of Glu-⋯Arg+ salt bridges. We use this probe to investigate a β-turn locked by a salt bridge, an α-helical peptide whose structure is stabilized by salt bridges, and a coiled coil that is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular salt bridges. We detect a bidentate salt bridge in the β-turn, a monodentate one in the α-helical peptide, and both salt-bridge geometries in the coiled coil. To our knowledge, this is the first time 2D-IR has been used to probe tertiary side chain interactions in peptides, and our results show that 2D-IR spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating salt bridges in solution.

  12. Synthesis and [2 + 2] cycloaddition of bimethyleneketene acetals. Reaction with C[sub 60] and facile hydrolysis of the C-C bond connected to C[sub 60

    SciTech Connect

    Yamago, Shigeru; Takeichi, Atsuo; Nakamura, Eiichi )

    1994-02-09

    We report here that the O-alkylated enolates of cyclopropanecarboxylates (dimethyleneketene acetals 3) can be prepared from readily available precursors, and that they are extemely reactive, serving as useful surrogates of the elusive parent enolates. Their utility is illustrated by the [2 + 2] cycloaddition to electron-deficient olefins, which, after hydrolytic workup, gives rise to the Michael addition products: a type of reaction product previously unavailable. We also found that 3 reacts smoothly with C[sub 60] to give the [2 + 2] adduct 5 and, most remarkably, that the asterisked C[minus]C [sigma] bond in 5 directly connected to the fullerene core is hydrolytically unstable and can be quantitatively cleaved with aqueous acid. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Cleavage experiments with deoxythymidine 3',5'-bis-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) suggest that the homing endonuclease I-PpoI follows the same mechanism of phosphodiester bond hydrolysis as the non-specific Serratia nuclease.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, P; Franke, I; Krause, K L; Pingoud, A

    1999-01-25

    We show here that two nucleases, Serratia nuclease and I-PpoI, with contrasting specificities, i.e. non-specific vs. highly sequence specific, share a structurally similar active site region with conservation of the catalytically relevant histidine and asparagine residues. On the basis of a comparison of the available structures and biochemical data for wild type and mutant variants of Serratia nuclease and I-PpoI we propose that both enzymes have a common catalytic mechanism, a proposition that is supported by our finding that both enzymes accept deoxythymidine 3',5'-bis-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) as a substrate and cleave it in an identical manner. According to this mechanism a histidine residue functions as a general base and Mg2+ bound to an asparagine residue as a Lewis acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage.

  14. NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ removal from flue gas by ferrous ion-peptide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohn, D.; Chang, S.G.

    1987-04-01

    Various cysteine derivatives were studied to determine if they would be superior to cysteine in removing NO from flue gas. These include glutathione (a tripeptide) and glyclcysteine (a dipeptide) which are the subject of this study. Glutathione (glutamylcysteinylglycine, abbreviated GSH) is a thiol compound that is abundant in living cells. It is composed of the amino acids glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine linked by peptide bonds. Cysteine is the central amino acid. In a manner similar to cysteine, GSH can be oxidized to the disulfide (noted as GSSG). Glyclcysteine is readily produced by the acid hydrolysis of GSH. It also forms a disulfide when oxidized.

  15. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ashley D; Morawicki, Rubén O; Hager, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolyzed whey protein isolate (WPI) is used in the food industry for protein enrichment and modification of functional properties. The purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) on WPI and to determine the temperature and reaction time effects on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the production of peptides and free amino acids (AAs). Effects of temperature (150 to 320 °C) and time (0 to 20 min) were initially studied with a central composite rotatable design followed by a completely randomized factorial design with temperature (250 and 300 °C) and time (0 to 50 min) as factors. SWH was conducted in an electrically heated, 100-mL batch, high pressure vessel. The DH was determined by a spectrophotometric method after derivatization. The peptide molecular weights (MWs) were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and AAs were quantified by high-performance liquid chromotography. An interaction of temperature and time significantly affected the DH and AA concentration. As the DH increased, the accumulation of lower MW peptides also increased following SWH (and above 10% DH, the majority of peptides were <1000 Da). Hydrolysis at 300 °C for 40 min generated the highest total AA concentration, especially of lysine (8.894 mg/g WPI). Therefore, WPI was successfully hydrolyzed by subcritical water, and with adjustment of treatment parameters there is reasonable control of the end-products.

  16. The copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination mode of HExxH and HxxEH motif in small peptides: the role of carboxylate location and hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Magrì, Antonio; Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with two hexapeptides encompassing HExxH and HxxEH motif were characterized by means of a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Parallel tempering and density functional theory (DFT) investigations show the presence of different hydrogen bonding networks between the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with the two peptides, suggesting a significant contribution of these non-covalent interactions to the stability constant values. The glutamate carboxylate group has a direct role in metal ion binding. The location of this amino acid along the sequence of the investigated peptides is critical to determine thermodynamic and spectroscopic features of the copper(II) complex species, whereas is less relevant in the zinc(II) complexes formation. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) characterization of the zinc(II) complex species show that in the [ZnH-2L] two deprotonated amide nitrogen atoms are involved in the metal coordination environment, an uncommon behavior in zinc(II) complexes for multi-histidine ligands.

  17. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  18. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable peptide-based polymers prepared by microwave-assisted click chemistry.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Maarten; Nollet, Maria L; Weijers, Pascal; Dechesne, Annemarie C; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Hennink, Wim E; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction was used to synthesize peptide triazole-based polymers from two novel peptide-based monomers: azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (1) and azido-phenylalanyl-alanyl-glycolyl-lysyl-propargyl amide (2). The selected monomers have sites for enzymatic degradation as well as for chemical hydrolysis to render the resulting polymer biodegradable. Depending on the monomer concentration in DMF, the molecular mass of the polymers could be tailored between 4.5 and 13.9 kDa (corresponding with 33-100 amino acid residues per polymer chain). As anticipated, both polymers can be enzymatically degraded by trypsin and chymotrypsin, whereas the ester bond in the polymer of 2 undergoes chemical hydrolysis under physiological conditions, as was shown by a ninhydrin-based colorimetric assay and MALDI-TOF analysis. In conclusion, the microwave-assisted copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction is an effective tool for synthesizing biodegradable peptide polymers, and it opens up new approaches toward the synthesis of (novel) designed biomedical materials.

  19. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  20. The mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Thybring, Emil E; Johansen, Katja S; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks.

  1. Migration and transformation rule of heavy metals in sludge during hydrolysis for protein extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Xue, Fei; Li, Jiebing; Xu, Shi Hong; Li, Dengxin

    2016-03-01

    The content and speciation of heavy metals can fundamentally affect the hydrolysis of sludge. This research study investigates the migration and transformation rule of heavy metals during the hydrolysis process by measuring the content of exchangeables (F1), bound to carbonates (F2), bound to Fe-Mn oxides (F3), bound to organic matter (F4), and residuals (F5) under different periods of time undergoing hydrolysis. The results show that the hydrolysis process generally stabilized Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and As by transforming the unstable states into structurally stable states. Such transformations and stabilization were primarily caused by the changes in local metal ion environment and bonding structure, oxidation of sulfides, pyrolyzation of organic matter, and evaporation of resulting volatile materials. An X-ray diffractometry (XRD) of the residuals conducted after hydrolysis indicated that hydrolysis did have a significant influence on the transportation and transformation of heavy metals.

  2. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  3. Molecular mechanics calculations on Rous sarcoma virus protease with peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, I. T.; Harrison, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular models of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) protease and 20 peptide substrates with single amino acid substitutions at positions from P4 to P3', where the scissile bond is between P1 and P1'. were built and compared with kinetic measurements. The unsubstituted peptide substrate. Pro-Ala-Val-Ser-Leu-Ala-Met-Thr, represents the NC-PR cleavage site of RSV protease. Models were built of two intermediates in the catalytic reaction, RSV protease with peptide substrate and with the tetrahedral intermediate. The energy minimization used an algorithm that increased the speed and eliminated a cutoff for nonbonded interactions. The calculated protease-substrate interaction energies showed correlation with the relative catalytic efficiency of peptide hydrolysis. The calculated interaction energies for the 8 RSV protease-substrate models with changes in P1 to P1' next to the scissile bond gave the highest correlation coefficient of 0.79 with the kinetic measurements, whereas all 20 substrates showed the lower, but still significant correlation of 0.46. Models of the tetrahedral reaction intermediates gave a correlation of 0.72 for the 8 substrates with changes next to the scissile bond, whereas a correlation coefficient of only 0.34 was observed for all 20 substrates. The differences between the energies calculated for the tetrahedral intermediate and the bound peptide gave the most significant correlation coefficients of 0.90 for models with changes in P1 and P1', and 0.56 for all substrates. These results are compared to those from similar calculations on HIV-1 protease and discussed in relation to the rate-limiting steps in the catalytic mechanism and the entropic contributions. PMID:9385639

  4. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  5. The structure of endothiapepsin complexed with a Phe-Tyr reduced-bond inhibitor at 1.35 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Cooper, J. B.; Wood, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothiapepsin is a typical member of the aspartic proteinase family. The catalytic mechanism of this family is attributed to two conserved catalytic aspartate residues, which coordinate the hydrolysis of a peptide bond. An oligopeptide inhibitor (IC50 = 0.62 µM) based on a reduced-bond transition-state inhibitor of mucorpepsin was co-crystallized with endothiapepsin and the crystal structure of the enzyme–inhibitor complex was determined at 1.35 Å resolution. A total of 12 hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and the active-site residues were identified. The resulting structure demonstrates a number of novel subsite interactions in the active-site cleft. PMID:24419612

  6. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites.

  7. DNA-Catalyzed Amide Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cong; Avins, Joshua L.; Klauser, Paul C.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.; Lee, Yujeong; Silverman, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    DNA catalysts (deoxyribozymes) for a variety of reactions have been identified by in vitro selection. However, for certain reactions this identification has not been achieved. One important example is DNA-catalyzed amide hydrolysis, for which a previous selection experiment instead led to DNA-catalyzed DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis. Subsequent efforts in which the selection strategy deliberately avoided phosphodiester hydrolysis led to DNA-catalyzed ester and aromatic amide hydrolysis, but aliphatic amide hydrolysis has been elusive. In the present study, we show that including modified nucleotides that bear protein-like functional groups (any one of primary amino, carboxyl, or primary hydroxyl) enables identification of amide-hydrolyzing deoxyribozymes. In one case, the same deoxyribozyme sequence without the modifications still retains substantial catalytic activity. Overall, these findings establish the utility of introducing protein-like functional groups into deoxyribozymes for identifying new catalytic function. The results also suggest the longer-term feasibility of deoxyribozymes as artificial proteases. PMID:26854515

  8. [The content of individual fatty acids and numbers of double bonds, insulin, C-peptide and unesterified fatty acids in blood plasma in testing tolerance to glucose].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Sazhina, N N; Aripovskiĭ, A V; Evteeva, N M; Tkhagalizhokova, É M; Parkhimovich, R M

    2014-10-01

    The glucose tolerance test demonstrates that content of unesterified fatty acids in blood plasma decreases up to three times and the content of oleic and linoleic acids is more decreased in the pool of fatty acids lipids. Out of resistance to insulin, hormone secretion increases up to three times. The decreasing of level of individual fatty acids occurs in a larger extent. Under resistance to insulin secretion of insulin is increasing up to eight times. The decreasing of level of each fatty acid is less expressed. The effect of insulin reflects decreasing of content of double bonds in blood plasma. The number of double bonds characterizes the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in lipids of blood plasma. The higher number of double bonds is in the pool of unesterified fatty acids the more active is the effect of insulin. The hyper-secretion of insulin is directly proportional to content of palmitic fatty acid in lipids of blood plasma on fasting. According the phylogenetic theory of general pathology, the effect of insulin on metabolism of glucose is mediated by fatty acids. The insulin is blocking lipolysis in insulin-depended subcutaneous adipocytes and decreases content of unesterified fatty acids in blood plasma. The insulin is depriving all cells of possibility to absorb unesterified fatty acids and "forces" them to absorb glucose increasing hereby number of GLUT4 on cell membrane. The resistance to insulin is manifested in high concentration of unesterfied fatty acids, hyperinsulinemia, hyperalbuminemia and increasing of concentration of C-reactive protein-monomer. The resistance to insulin is groundlessly referred to as a symptom of diabetes mellitus type II. The resistance to insulin is only a functional disorder lasting for years. It can be successfully arrested. The diabetes mellitus is developed against the background of resistance to insulin only after long-term hyper-secretion of insulin and under emaciation and death of β-cells. The diabetes

  9. Base hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of PBX-9404 explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.A.; Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Kramer, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. The authors also examine products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  10. Base hydrolysis and supercritical water oxidation of PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect

    Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Kramer, J.F.; Sanchez, J.A.

    1994-11-09

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. The authors also examine products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  11. A Novel β-Peptidyl Aminopeptidase (BapA) from Strain 3-2W4 Cleaves Peptide Bonds of Synthetic β-Tri- and β-Dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    Geueke, Birgit; Namoto, Kenji; Seebach, Dieter; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain that was capable of growing on the β-tripeptide H-βhVal-βhAla-βhLeu-OH as the sole carbon and nitrogen source was isolated from an enrichment culture. On the basis of physiological characterization, partial 16S rRNA sequencing, and fatty acid analysis, strain 3-2W4 was identified as a member of the family Sphingomonadaceae. Growth on the β-tripeptide and the β-dipeptide H-βhAla-βhLeu-OH was observed, and emerging metabolites were characterized. Small amounts of a persisting metabolite, the N-acetylated β-dipeptide, were identified in both media. According to dissolved organic carbon measurements, 74 to 80% of the available carbon was dissimilated. The β-peptide-degrading enzyme was purified from the crude cell extract of cells from strain 3-2W4 grown on complex medium. The enzyme was composed of two subunits, and the N-terminal sequences of both were determined. With this information, it was possible to identify the complete nucleotide sequence and to deduce the primary structure of the gene bapA. The gene encoded a β-peptidyl aminopeptidase (BapA) of 402 amino acids that was synthesized as preprotein with a signal sequence of 29 amino acids. The enzyme was cleaved into two subunits (residues 30 to 278 and 279 to 402). It belonged to the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily. PMID:16109932

  12. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation.

  13. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  14. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  15. Structure of an Amide Bond Forming F420:γ-glutamyl Ligase from Archaeoglobus Fulgidus - A Member of a New Family of Non-ribosomal Peptide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Nocek, B.; Evdokimova, E.; Proudfoot, M.; Kudritska, M.; Grochowski, L. L.; White, R. H.; Savchenko, A.; Yakunin, A. F.; Edwards, A.

    2008-01-01

    F420 is a flavin-like redox-active coenzyme commonly used by archaea and some eubacteria in a variety of biochemical reactions in methanogenesis, the formation of secondary metabolites, the degradation of nitroaromatic compounds, activation of nitroimidazofurans, and F420-dependent photolysis in DNA repair. Coenzyme F420-2 biosynthesis from 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin (Fo) and lactaldehyde involves six enzymatic steps and five proteins (CofA, CofB, CofC, CofD, and CofE). CofE, a F420-0:γ-glutamyl ligase, is responsible for the last two enzymatic steps; it catalyses the GTP-dependent addition of two l-glutamate residues to F420-0 to form F420-2. CofE is found in archaea, the aerobic actinomycetes, and cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the apo-F420-0:γ-glutamyl ligase (CofE-AF) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and its complex with GDP at 2.5 Å and 1.35 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of CofE-AF reveals a novel protein fold with an intertwined, butterfly-like dimer formed by two-domain monomers. GDP and Mn2+ are bound within the putative active site in a large groove at the dimer interface. We show that the enzyme adds a glutamate residue to both F420-0 and F420-1 in two distinct steps. CofE represents the first member of a new structural family of non-ribosomal peptide synthases. PMID:17669425

  16. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  18. Hydrolysis reactor for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas A.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for hydrolysis of a chemical hydride is provided. The method includes adding a chemical hydride to a reaction chamber and exposing the chemical hydride in the reaction chamber to a temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. in the presence of water and in the absence of an acid or a heterogeneous catalyst, wherein the chemical hydride undergoes hydrolysis to form hydrogen gas and a byproduct material.

  19. Stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles for cancerous cells intracellular drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Mengfei; Yuan, Zhefan; Wu, Dan; Chen, Jia-da; Feng, Jie

    2016-10-01

    A novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for cancerous cells intracellular drug release. Deca-lysine sequence (K10), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, was synthesized and terminated with azido-glycine. Then a new kind of molecule, alkyne modified doxorubicin (DOX) connecting through disulfide bond (DOX-SS-alkyne), was synthesized. After coupling via Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry reaction, reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug was obtained. Due to the amphiphilic property of the prodrug, it can assemble to form micelles. To prevent the nanocarriers from unspecific cellular uptake, the prodrug micelles were subsequently modified with 2,3-dimethyl maleic anhydride to obtain MPPM with a negatively charged outer shell. In vitro studies showed that MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would be activated by charge reversal of the micelles via hydrolysis of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides and regeneration of K10, which enabled efficient internalization of MPPM by tumor cells as well as following glutathione- and protease-induced drug release inside the cancerous cells. Furthermore, since the guide peptide sequences can be accurately designed and synthesized, it can be easily changed for various functions, such as targeting peptide, apoptotic peptide, even aptamers, only need to be terminated with azido-glycine. This method can be used as a template for reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug for cancer therapy.

  20. Pretreatment of flaxseed protein isolate by high hydrostatic pressure: Impacts on protein structure, enzymatic hydrolysis and final hydrolysate antioxidant capacities.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Véronique; Hénaux, Loïc; Bazinet, Laurent; Doyen, Alain

    2017-04-15

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on flaxseed protein structure and peptide profiles, obtained after protein hydrolysis, was investigated. Isolated flaxseed protein (1%, m/v) was subjected to HHP (600MPa, 5min or 20min at 20°C) prior to hydrolysis with trypsin only and trypsin-pronase. The results demonstrated that HHP treatment induced dissociation of flaxseed proteins and generated higher molecular weight aggregates as a function of processing duration. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that HHP treatment, as well as processing duration, had an impact on flaxseed protein structure since exposition of hydrophobic amino acid tyrosine was modified. Except for some specific peptides, the concentrations of which were modified, similar peptide profiles were obtained after hydrolysis of pressure-treated proteins using trypsin. Finally, hydrolysates obtained using trypsin-pronase had a greater antioxidant capacity (ORAC) than control samples; these results confirmed that HHP enhanced the generation of antioxidant peptides.

  1. Structure-activity correlations for organophosphorus ester anticholinesterases. Part 2: CNDO/2 calculations applied to ester hydrolysis rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships are presented for the hydrolysis of organophosphorus esters, RR'P(O)X, where R and R' are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. CNDO/2 calculations provide values for molecular parameters that correlate with alkaline hydrolysis rates. For each subset of esters with the same leaving group, X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constants. For the whole set of esters with different leaving groups, equations are derived that relate charge, orbital energy and bond order to the hydrolysis rate constants.

  2. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  3. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  4. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  5. Transition-state structures for enzymatic and alkaline phosphotriester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, S.R.; Raushel, F.M. ); Weiss, P.M.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-07-30

    The primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline (KOH) and enzymatic (phosphotriesterase) hydrolysis of two phosphotriesters, O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (I) and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl) phosphate (II), are consistent with an associative mechanism with significant changes in bond order to both the phosphoryl and phenolic leaving group oxygens in the transition state. The synthesis of ({sup 15}N, phosphoryl-{sup 18}O)-,({sup 15}N, phenolic-{sup 18}O)-, and ({sup 15}N)-O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl)phosphate is described. The primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline hydrolysis of compound I are 1.0060 and 1.0063 {plus minus} 0.0001, whereas for compound II they are 1.027{plus minus}0.002 and 1.025 {plus minus} 0.002, respectively. These isotope effects are consistent with the rate-limiting addition of hydroxide and provide evidence for a S{sub N}2-like transition state with the absence of a stable phosphorane intermediate. For the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound I, the primary and secondary {sup 18}O isotope effects are very small, 1.0020 and 1.0021{plus minus}0.0004, respectively, and indicate that the chemical step in the enzymatic mechanism is not rate-limiting. The {sup 18}O isotope effects for the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II are 1.036{plus minus}0.001 and 1.0181{plus minus}0.0007, respectively, and are comparable in magnitude to the isotope effects for alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting that the chemical step is rate-limiting. The relative magnitude of the primary {sup 18}O isotope effects for the alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II reflect a transition state that is more progressed for the enzymatic reaction.

  6. Transition-state structures for enzymatic and alkaline phosphotriester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, S R; Raushel, F M; Weiss, P M; Cleland, W W

    1991-07-30

    The primary and secondary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline (KOH) and enzymatic (phosphotriesterase) hydrolysis of two phosphotriesters, O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (I) and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl) phosphate (II), are consistent with an associative mechanism with significant changes in bond order to both the phosphoryl and phenolic leaving group oxygens in the transition state. The synthesis of [15N, phosphoryl-18O]-, [15N, phenolic-18O]-, and [15N]-O,O-diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and O,O-diethyl O-(4-carbamoylphenyl)phosphate is described. The primary and secondary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline hydrolysis of compound I are 1.0060 and 1.0063 +/- 0.0001, whereas for compound II they are 1.027 +/- 0.002 and 1.025 +/- 0.002, respectively. These isotope effects are consistent with the rate-limiting addition of hydroxide and provide evidence for a SN2-like transition state with the absence of a stable phosphorane intermediate. For the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound I, the primary and secondary 18O isotope effects are very small, 1.0020 and 1.0021 +/- 0.0004, respectively, and indicate that the chemical step in the enzymatic mechanism is not rate-limiting. The 18O isotope effects for the enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II are 1.036 +/- 0.001 and 1.0181 +/- 0.0007, respectively, and are comparable in magnitude to the isotope effects for alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting that the chemical step is rate-limiting. The relative magnitude of the primary 18O isotope effects for the alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis of compound II reflect a transition state that is more progressed for the enzymatic reaction.

  7. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper.

  8. Kinetic study of sulphuric acid hydrolysis of protein feathers.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamad Bouhamed, Sana; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-02-28

    Poultry feather keratin is the most important by-product from the poultry industry due to its abundance. Different methods have been still applied to process this by-product such as enzymatic hydrolysis which is expensive and inapplicable at the industrial level. This paper presents a study of acid hydrolysis of poultry feathers using different types of acids, sulphuric acid concentration, different temperatures and solid to liquid ratio to obtain a liquid product rich in peptides. The feathers analysis revealed a crude protein content of 88.83%. A maximum peptides production of 676 mg/g was reached using sulphuric acid, 1 molar acid concentration and 50 g/l solid to liquid ratio at a temperature of 90 °C after 300 min. A reaction scheme for protein aggregation and decomposition to polypeptides and amino acids was proposed and a kinetic model for peptides production was developed. The proposed kinetic model proved to be well adapted to the experimental data with R (2) = 0.99.

  9. Nisin-induced expression of a recombinant antihypertensive peptide in dairy lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptides with antihypertensive activity have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. A 12-residue peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) shown to inhibit the angiotensin I-converting enzyme is released from the enzymatic breakdown of aS1-casein. A synthetic gene encoding this peptid...

  10. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  11. Evolving nanomaterials using enzyme-driven dynamic peptide libraries (eDPL).

    PubMed

    Das, Apurba K; Hirsth, Andrew R; Ulijn, Rein V

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the application of dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCL) towards the discovery of self-assembling nanostructures based on aromatic peptide derivatives and the continuous enzymatic exchange of amino acid sequences. Ultimately, the most thermodynamically stable self-assembling structures will dominate the system. In this respect, a library of precursor components, based on N-fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)-amino acids (serine, S and threonine, T) and nucleophiles (leucine, L-; phenylalanine, F-; tyrosine, Y-; valine, V-; glycine, G-; alanine, A-OMe amino-acid esters) were investigated to produce Fmoc-dipeptide esters, denoted Fmoc-XY-OMe. Upon exposure to a protease (thermolysin), which catalyses peptide bond formation and hydrolysis under aqueous conditions at pH 8, dynamic libraries of self-assembling gelator species were generated. Depending on the molecular composition of the precursors present in the library different behaviours were observed. Single components, Fmoc-SF-OMe and Fmoc-TF-OMe, dominated over time in Fmoc-S/(L+F+Y+V+G+A)-OMe and Fmoc-T/ (L+F+Y+V+G+A)-OMe libraries. This represented > 80% of all peptide formed suggesting that a single component molecular structure dominates in these systems. In a competition experiment between Fmoc-(S+T)/F-OMe, conversions to each peptide corresponded directly with ratios of starting materials, implying that a bi-component nanostructure, where Fmoc-TF-OMe and Fmoc-SF-OMe are incorporated equally favourably, was formed. Several techniques including HPLC, LCMS and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize library composition and molecular interactions within the self-selecting libraries. Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis suggests that the most stable peptide nanostructures show significant pi-pi intermolecular electronic communication. Overall, the paper demonstrates a novel evolution-based approach with self-selection and amplification of supramolecular peptide nanostructures from a

  12. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Characterization of bioactive peptides obtained from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Kwon; Jeon, Joong-Kyun; Kim, Se-Kwon; Byun, Hee-Guk

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive peptides as products of hydrolysis of diverse marine invertebrate (shellfish, crustacean, rotifer, etc.) proteins are the focus of current research. After much research on these muscles and by-products, some biologically active peptides were identified and applied to useful compounds for human utilization. This chapter reviews bioactive peptides from marine invertebrates in regarding to their bioactivities. Additionally, specific characteristics of antihypertensive, anti-Alzheimer, antioxidant, antimicrobial peptide enzymatic production, methods to evaluate bioactivity capacity, bioavailability, and safety concerns of peptides are reviewed.

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of organic phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis is an alternative means for characterizing organic phosphorus (Po) in animal manure. The approach is not only simple and fast, but can also provide information difficult to obtain by other methods. Currently, commercially available phosphatases are mainl...

  15. Lignocellulose hydrolysis by multienzyme complexes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable resource on the planet. Converting this material into a usable fuel is a multi-step process, the rate-limiting step being enzymatic hydrolysis of organic polymers into monomeric sugars. While the substrate can be complex and require a multitud...

  16. Microbial hydrolysis of steviol glycosides.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G; Tarka, S M

    2008-07-01

    A review of the role of gut microbiota in the metabolism of the steviol glycosides, stevioside and rebaudioside A, indicates that they are not absorbed intact but undergo hydrolysis by the intestinal microflora to steviol. Steviol is not metabolized by the intestinal flora and is absorbed from the intestine. The rate of hydrolysis for stevioside is greater than for rebaudioside A. Recent studies using mass spectrometry have shown that steviol-16,17-epoxide is not a microbial metabolite of steviol glycosides. Bacteroides species are primarily responsible for hydrolysis via their beta-glucosidase activity. Fecal incubation studies with both human and animal mixed flora provide similar results, and this indicates that the rat is an appropriate model for studies on steviol glycosides. Given the similarity in the microbial metabolism of stevioside and rebaudioside A with the formation of steviol as the single hydrolysis product that is absorbed from the intestinal tract, the toxicological data on stevioside are relevant to the risk assessment of rebaudioside A.

  17. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  18. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  19. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, Richard Wood

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  20. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  1. Rapid online nonenzymatic protein digestion combining microwave heating acid hydrolysis and electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Basile, Franco; Hauser, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We report an online nonenzymatic method for site-specific digestion of proteins to yield peptides that are well suited for collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The method combines online microwave heating acid hydrolysis at aspartic acid and online electrochemical oxidation at tryptophan and tyrosine. The combined microwave/electrochemical digestion is reproducible and produces peptides with an average sequence length of 10 amino acids. This peptide length is similar to the average peptide length of 9 amino acids obtained by digestion of proteins with the enzyme trypsin. As a result, the peptides produced by this novel nonenzymatic digestion method, when analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, produce protonated molecules with mostly +1 and +2 charge states. The combination of these two nonenzymatic methods overcomes shortcomings with each individual method in that (i) peptides generated by the microwave-hydrolysis method have an average amino acid length of 16 amino acids and (ii) the electrochemical-cleavage method is unable to reproducibly digest proteins with molecular masses above 4 kDa. Preliminary results are presented on the application and utility of this rapid online digestion (total of 6 min of digestion time) on a series of standard peptides and proteins as well as an Escherichia coli protein extract.

  2. Kinetics and thermodynamics of sucrose hydrolysis from real-time enthalpy and heat capacity measurements.

    PubMed

    Tombari, E; Salvetti, G; Ferrari, C; Johari, G P

    2007-01-25

    We report a real time study of the enthalpy release and heat capacity during the course of HCl-catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose to fructose and glucose. Measurements were performed during both isothermal conditions and during slow heating and then cooling at a controlled rate. The reaction rate constant of the first-order kinetics follows an Arrhenius relation with activation energy of 109.2 kJ/mol of sucrose. On hydrolysis, the enthalpy decreases by 14.4 kJ/mol of sucrose at 310 K, and the heat capacity, Cp, increases by 61 J mol-1 K-1 of sucrose in the solution. The enthalpy of hydrolysis decreases with increase in the temperature and DeltaCp on hydrolysis increases. The effects are attributed to change in the configurational and vibrational partition functions as one covalent bond in sucrose breaks to form two molecules, which then individually form additional hydrogen bonds and alter the water's structure in the solution. Cp of the solution increases with temperature less rapidly before sucrose hydrolysis than after it. This may reflect an increase in the configurational contribution to Cp as the hydrogen bond population changes.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  4. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  5. Transfer of oxygen from an artificial protease to peptide carbon during proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, T.M.; Meares, C.F. )

    1991-12-01

    Site-specific cleavage of proteins with metal chelates is an approach for designing artificial proteolytic reagents that are directed by proximity to a peptide bond rather than by an amino acid residue type. In the presence of ascorbate and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, an iron chelate attached to Cys-212 of the enzyme human carbonic anhydrase 1 quickly cleaved the protein between residues Leu-189 and Asp-190 to produce two discrete fragments. The transfer of an {sup 18}O atom from ({sup 18}O)H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(or({sup 18}O)O{sub 2}) to the carboxyl group of Leu-189 was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. Quantitative experiments revealed that one molecule of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and one molecule of ascorbate afforded the hydrolysis of one peptide bond (1:1:1 stoichiometry) and that the reaction required ascorbate and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The process is catalytic, since related experiments on the protein bovine serum albumin revealed two cleavage events for each polypeptide chain cleaved. Hydroxyl radical scavengers had no significant effect. Hydroxyl radical scavengers had no significant effect. These results may be explained by generation of a highly nucleophilic oxygen species, such as peroxide coordinated to the iron chelate, that attacks a carbonyl carbon nearby.

  6. Design of specific peptide inhibitors of phospholipase A2: structure of a complex formed between Russell's viper phospholipase A2 and a designed peptide Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser (LAIYS).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vikas; Jasti, Jayasankar; Kaur, Punit; Dey, Sharmistha; Srinivasan, A; Betzel, Ch; Singh, T P

    2002-10-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (EC 3.1.1.4) is a key enzyme of the cascade mechanism involved in the production of proinflammatory compounds known as eicosanoids. The binding of phospholipase A(2) to membrane surfaces and the hydrolysis of phospholipids are thought to involve the formation of a hydrophobic channel into which a single substrate molecule diffuses before cleavage. In order to regulate the production of proinflammatory compounds, a specific peptide inhibitor of PLA(2), Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser, has been designed. Phospholipase A(2) from Daboia russelli pulchella (DPLA(2)) and peptide Leu-Ala-Ile-Tyr-Ser (LAIYS) have been co-crystallized. The structure of the complex has been determined and refined to 2.0 A resolution. The structure contains two crystallographically independent molecules of DPLA(2), with one molecule of peptide specifically bound to one of them. The overall conformations of the two molecules are essentially similar except in three regions; namely, the calcium-binding loop including Trp31 (residues 25-34), the beta-wing consisting of two antiparallel beta-strands (residues 74-85) and the C-terminal region (residues 119-133). Of these, the most striking difference pertains to the orientation of Trp31 in the two molecules. The conformation of Trp31 in molecule A was suitable to allow the binding of peptide LAIYS, while that in molecule B prevented the entry of the ligand into the hydrophobic channel. The structure of the complex clearly showed that the OH group of Tyr of the inhibitor formed hydrogen bonds with both His48 N(delta1) and Asp49 O(delta1), while O(gamma)H of Ser was involved in a hydrogen bond with Trp31. Other peptide backbone atoms interact with protein through water molecules, while Leu, Ala and Ile form strong hydrophobic interactions with the residues of the hydrophobic channel.

  7. Lignin recovery from alkaline hydrolysis and glycerolysis of oil palm fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Nur Syakilla; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, two types of treatment namely alkaline hydrolysis and glycerolysis have been conducted for lignin extraction from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) fiber. Lignin has been retrieved from two sequential methods, which was the klason lignin from residue and lignin from precipitation of the filtrate. Alkaline hydrolysis was performed using 10% NaOH solution at room condition. This has extracted 13.0 % lignin. On the other hand, glycerolysis was carried out using 70% glycerol catalyzed with 5% of 1 M NaOH at 60-70 °C. This has successfully extracted 16.0% lignin. The SEM micrographs exhibited some physical changes on the surface where the impurities and waxes have been removed, exposing the, lumen. Besides that, FTIR analysis was conducted on untreated EFB, treated EFB and extracted lignin. Delignification of EFB fiber was confirmed based on the intensity reduction at 1245 cm-1 that showed lignin was removed from the fiber. The presence of CO, CC and CC aromatic peaks in the FTIR spectra of the dried filtrate gave an evidence on the presence of lignin.

  8. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  9. High Resolution Structures of p-Aminobenzamidine- and Benzamidine- VIIa/Soluble Tissue Factor: Unpredicted Conformation of the 192-193 Peptide Bond and Mapping of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ an Zn2+ Sites in Facto VIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj,S.; Schmidt, A.; Agah, S.; Bajaj, M.; Padmanabhan, K.

    2006-01-01

    Factor VIIa (FVIIa) consists of a {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain, two epidermal growth factor-like domains, and a protease domain. FVIIa binds seven Ca{sup 2+} ions in the Gla, one in the EGF1, and one in the protease domain. However, blood contains both Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, and the Ca{sup 2+} sites in FVIIa that could be specifically occupied by Mg{sup 2+} are unknown. Furthermore, FVIIa contains a Na{sup +} and two Zn{sup 2+} sites, but ligands for these cations are undefined. We obtained p-aminobenzamidine-VIIa/soluble tissue factor (sTF) crystals under conditions containing Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, and Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal diffracted to 1.8{angstrom} resolution, and the final structure has an R-factor of 19.8%. In this structure, the Gla domain has four Ca{sup 2+} and three bound Mg{sup 2+}. The EGF1 domain contains one Ca{sup 2+} site, and the protease domain contains one Ca{sup 2+}, one Na{sup +}, and two Zn{sup 2+} sites. {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} binding in the presence/absence of Mg{sup 2+} to FVIIa, Gla-domainless FVIIa, and prothrombin fragment 1 supports the crystal data. Furthermore, unlike in other serine proteases, the amide N of Gly{sup 193} in FVIIa points away from the oxyanion hole in this structure. Importantly, the oxyanion hole is also absent in the benzamidine-FVIIa/sTF structure at 1.87{angstrom} resolution. However, soaking benzamidine-FVIIa/sTF crystals with D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone results in benzamidine displacement, D-Phe-Pro-Arg incorporation, and oxyanion hole formation by a flip of the 192-193 peptide bond in FVIIa. Thus, it is the substrate and not the TF binding that induces oxyanion hole formation and functional active site geometry in FVIIa. Absence of oxyanion hole is unusual and has biologic implications for FVIIa macromolecular substrate specificity and catalysis.

  10. Circulating elastin peptides, role in vascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2014-12-01

    The atherosclerotic process starts with the degradation of elastic fibers. Their presence was demonstrated in the circulation as well as several of their biological properties elucidated. We described years ago a procedure to obtain large elastin peptides by organo-alkaline hydrolysis, κ-elastin. This method enabled also the preparation of specific antibodies used to determine elastin peptides, as well as anti-elastin antibodies in body fluids and tissue extracts. Elastin peptides were determined in a large number of human blood samples. Studies were carried out to explore their pharmacological properties. Similar recent studies by other laboratories confirmed our findings and arose new interest in circulating elastin peptides for their biological activities. This recent trend justified the publication of a review of the biological and pathological activities of elastin peptides demonstrated during our previous studies, subject of this article.

  11. Design and characterization of hirulogs: A novel class of bivalent peptide inhibitors of thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Maraganore, J.M.; Bourdon, P.; Jablonski, J.; Ramachandran, K.L. ); Fenton, J.W. II )

    1990-07-31

    A novel class of synthetic peptides has been designed that inhibit the thrombin catalytic site and exhibit specificity for the anion-binding exosite (ABE) of {alpha}-thrombin. These peptides, called hirulogs, consist of (i) an active-site specificity sequence with a restricted Arg-Pro scissile bond, (ii) a polymeric linker of glycyl residues from 6 to 18 {angstrom} in length, and (iii) an ABE recognition sequence such as that in the hirudin C-terminus. Hirulog-1 ((D-Phe)-Pro-Arg-Pro-(Gly){sub 4}-Asn-Gly-Asp-Phe-Glu-Glu-Ile-Pro-Glu-Tyr-Leu) inhibits the thrombin-catalyzed hydrolysis of a tripeptide p-nitroanilide substrate with K{sub i} = 2.3 nM. In contrast, the synthetic C-terminal hirudin peptide S-Hir{sub 53-64}, which binds to the thrombin ABE, blocked the fibrinogen clotting activity of the enzyme with K{sub i} = 144 nM but failed to inhibit the hydrolysis of p-nitroanilide substrates at concentrations as high as 1 mM. Hirulog-1, but not S-Hir{sub 53-64}, was found to inhibit the incorporation of ({sup 14}C)diisopropyl fluorophosphate in thrombin. Hirulog-1 appears specific for thrombin as it lacks inhibitory activities toward human factor Xa, human plasmin, and bovine trypsin at inhibitor:enzyme concentrations 3 orders of magnitude higher than those required to inhibit thrombin. The optimal inhibitory activity of hirulog-1 depends upon all three components of its structure. Comparison of anticoagulant activities of hirulog-1, hirudin, and S-Hir{sub 53-64} showed that the synthetic hirulog-1 is 2-fold more potent than hirudin and 100-fold more active than S-Hir{sub 53-64} in increasing the activated partial thromboplastin time of normal human plasma.

  12. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  13. A Systematic Approach to the Comparison of Cost Efficiency of Endopeptidases for the Hydrolysis of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Egede-Nissen, Henning; Oterhals, Ĺge

    2016-01-01

    Summary The hydrolytic and cost efficiencies of five endopeptidases (Alcalase 2.4L, Corolase 7089, Neutrase 0.8L, Promod 671L and Protex 7L) to hydrolyze Atlantic salmon by-products were compared at standardized activity levels based on a casein assay. The substrate was characterized prior to the hydrolytic experiments (pH=6.5, t=50 °C) to obtain substrate--specific constants for nitrogen to protein mass (in g) ratio, i.e. conversion factor fN=5.23 and total amount of peptide bonds (htot)=9.3 mmol per g of protein. At low enzyme activity to substrate ratio, all enzymes were equally efficient in hydrolyzing the substrate. At highest enzyme activity to substrate ratio, Protex 7L, Alcalase 2.4L and Promod 671L gave higher degree of hydrolysis (DH=14.2–14.6%) than Corolase 7089 (13.2%) and Neutrase 0.8L (11.6%) after 120 min of hydrolysis. No differences were observed in protein recovery (yield of solubilized protein) relative to DH. Determination of DH was followed by the pH-STAT and o-phthaldialdehyde methods. Based on pH-STAT data, response surface regression models were established based on the combined effects of hydrolysis time and enzyme activity to substrate ratio on DH and protein recovery. The modelling approach was combined with enzyme cost to identify the most cost-efficient enzyme (Protex 7L). PMID:28115899

  14. Peptide N-Amination Supports β-Sheet Conformations.

    PubMed

    Sarnowski, Matthew P; Kang, Chang Won; Elbatrawi, Yassin M; Wojtas, Lukasz; Del Valle, Juan R

    2017-02-13

    The conformational heterogeneity of backbone N-substituted peptides limits their ability to adopt stable secondary structures. Herein, we describe a practical synthesis of backbone aminated peptides that readily adopt β-sheet folds. Data derived from model N-amino peptides suggest that extended conformations are stabilized through cooperative steric, electrostatic, and hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  15. Limiting factors of starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Colonna, P; Leloup, V; Buléon, A

    1992-10-01

    Foods appear as complex structures, in which starch may be present in different forms. These, including the molecular characteristics and the crystalline organization, depend on processing conditions and compositions of ingredients. The main changes in starch macro- and microstructures are the increase of surface area to volume ratio in the solid phase, the modification of the crystallinity as affected by gelatinization and gelation, and the depolymerization of amylose and amylopectin. Starch modification may be estimated by different methodologies, which should be selected according to the level of structure considered. When amylose and amylopectin are in solution, rapid and total hydrolysis leads to the formation of a mixture of linear oligosaccharides and branched alpha-limit dextrins. However, starch usually occurs in foods as solid structures. Structural factors of starchy materials influence their enzymic hydrolysis. A better understanding of the enzymatic process enables the identification of the structural factors limiting hydrolysis: diffusion of enzyme molecules, porosity of solid substrates, adsorption of enzymes onto solid substrates, and the catalytic event. A mechanistic modelling should be possible in the future.

  16. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Marek

    2005-12-29

    Hydrolysis and condensation of simple trifluorosilanes, HSiF3 and MeSiF3, was studied by quantum mechanical methods. Hydrolysis of fluorosilanes is highly endothermic. The Gibbs free energy of the first reaction step in the gas phase is 31.4 kJ/mol, which corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 10(-6). Hydrolysis of the subsequent fluorine atoms in trifluorosilanes is thermodynamically more unfavorable than the first step of substitution. No significant difference in thermodynamics of hydrolysis was found between HSiF3 and MeSiF3. The activation energy for hydrolysis by a water dimer is significantly lower than that for hydrolysis by a water monomer. The former reaction is also less unfavorable thermodynamically, due to a high binding energy of the HF-H2O complex formed as a product of hydrolysis. Self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations show that hydrolysis of trifluorosilanes in aqueous medium has lower activation energy than in the gas phase. It is also thermodynamically less unfavorable, due to better solvation of the products. Homofunctional condensation of HSiF2OH is thermodynamically favored. The equilibrium mixture for hydrolysis/condensation of RSiF3 in water is predicted to contain ca. 2.3% disiloxane (HF2Si)2O, if 100-fold excess of water relative to silane is assumed. Further hydrolysis of (HF2Si)2O is negligible. The thermodynamics of fluorosilane hydrolysis contrasts with that of chlorosilanes, where both hydrolysis and condensation are strongly favorable. Moreover, in the case of trichlorosilanes each subsequent hydrolysis step is more facile, leading to the product of full hydrolysis, RSi(OH)3.

  17. Fluorescent, internally quenched, peptides for exploring the pH-dependent substrate specificity of cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, Paolo; Quintieri, Luigi; Osler, Alessio; Calderan, Andrea; Biondi, Barbara; Floreani, Maura; Guiotto, Andrea; Borin, Gianfranco

    2006-07-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine protease that in tumor tissues is localized in both acidic lysosomes and extracellular spaces. It can catalyze the cleavage of peptide bonds by two mechanisms: endoproteolytic attack with a pH optimum around 7.4, and attack from the C-terminus with a pH optimum at 4.5-5.5. In this work, seven fluorescent, internally quenched, decapeptides have been synthesized using the prototypical cathepsin B selective substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC as a lead, and used to identify the structural factors determining the susceptibility of peptides to hydrolysis at acidic and neutral pH values. Each peptide differs from the others in one amino acid (residue 6) and contains a highly fluorescent Nma group linked to the alpha-amino function of the N-terminal Orn residue and a Dnp group linked to the side chain of the Lys(8) residue acting as a quencher. Proteolytic cleavage was monitored by measuring the increase of fluorescence at 440 nm upon excitation at 340 nm, and the cleavage sites were determined by HPLC followed by ESI-MS analysis. Peptides containing Ala or Phe at position 6 are good substrates for the enzyme at both pH 5.0 and 7.4. By contrast, those containing Glu, Asp, Lys or Val are not cleaved at all by cathepsin B at pH 7.4, and are poorly hydrolyzed at pH 5.0. These findings provide new information for the rational design of cathepsin B-activated peptide-containing anticancer drugs.

  18. HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrolytic processes provide the baseline loss rate for any chemical in an aqueous envi- ronment. Although various hydrolytic pathways account for significant degradation of certain classes of organic chemicals, other organic structures are completely inert. Strictly speaking, hy...

  19. Novel Penicillium cellulases for total hydrolysis of lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Kaisa; Toth, Karolina; Bromann, Paul Andrew; Szakacs, George; Kruus, Kristiina

    2013-05-10

    The (hemi)cellulolytic systems of two novel lignocellulolytic Penicillium strains (Penicillium pulvillorum TUB F-2220 and P. cf. simplicissimum TUB F-2378) have been studied. The cultures of the Penicillium strains were characterized by high cellulase and β-glucosidase as well moderate xylanase activities compared to the Trichoderma reesei reference strains QM 6a and RUTC30 (volumetric or per secreted protein, respectively). Comparison of the novel Penicillium and T. reesei secreted enzyme mixtures in the hydrolysis of (ligno)cellulose substrates showed that the F-2220 enzyme mixture gave higher yields in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and similar yields in hydrolysis of pre-treated spruce and wheat straw than enzyme mixture secreted by the T. reesei reference strain. The sensitivity of the Penicillium cellulase complexes to softwood (spruce) and grass (wheat straw) lignins was lignin and temperature dependent: inhibition of cellulose hydrolysis in the presence of wheat straw lignin was minor at 35°C while at 45°C by spruce lignin a clear inhibition was observed. The two main proteins in the F-2220 (hemi)cellulase complex were partially purified and identified by peptide sequence similarity as glycosyl hydrolases (cellobiohydrolases) of families 7 and 6. Adsorption of the GH7 enzyme PpCBH1 on cellulose and lignins was studied showing that the lignin adsorption of the enzyme is temperature and pH dependent. The ppcbh1 coding sequence was obtained using PCR cloning and the translated amino acid sequence of PpCBH1 showed up to 82% amino acid sequence identity to known Penicillium cellobiohydrolases.

  20. Protein inhibitors of serine proteinases: role of backbone structure and dynamics in controlling the hydrolysis constant.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Markley, John L

    2003-05-13

    Standard mechanism protein inhibitors of serine proteinases bind as substrates and are cleaved by cognate proteinases at their reactive sites. The hydrolysis constant for this cleavage reaction at the P(1)-P(1)' peptide bond (K(hyd)) is determined by the relative concentrations at equilibrium of the "intact" (uncleaved, I) and "modified" (reactive site cleaved, I*) forms of the inhibitor. The pH dependence of K(hyd) can be explained in terms of a pH-independent term, K(hyd) degrees, plus the proton dissociation constants of the newly formed amino and carboxylate groups at the cleavage site. Two protein inhibitors that differ from one another by a single residue substitution have been found to have K(hyd) degrees values that differ by a factor of 5 [Ardelt, W., and Laskowski, M., Jr. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 220, 1041-1052]: turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) has K(hyd) degrees = 1.0, and Indian peafowl ovomucoid third domain (OMIPF3), which differs from OMTKY3 by the substitution P(2)'-Tyr(20)His, has K(hyd) degrees = 5.15. What mechanism is responsible for this small difference? Is it structural (enthalpic) or dynamic (entropic)? Does the mutation affect the free energy of the I state, the I* state, or both? We have addressed these questions through NMR investigations of the I and I forms of OMTKY3 and OMIPF3. Information about structure was derived from measurements of NMR chemical shift changes and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings; information about dynamics was obtained through measurements of (15)N relaxation rates and (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs with model-free analysis of the results. Although the I forms of each variant are more dynamic than the corresponding I forms, the study revealed no appreciable difference in the backbone dynamics of either intact inhibitor (OMIPF3 vs OMTKY3) or modified inhibitor (OMIPF3* vs OMTKY3*). Instead, changes in chemical shifts and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings suggested that the K(hyd) degrees difference arises from

  1. Characterization of Peptides Found in Unprocessed and Extruded Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) Pepsin/Pancreatin Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Rodríguez, Alvaro; Milán-Carrillo, Jorge; Reyes-Moreno, Cuauhtémoc; González de Mejía, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize peptides found in unprocessed amaranth hydrolysates (UAH) and extruded amaranth hydrolysates (EAH) and to determine the effect of the hydrolysis time on the profile of peptides produced. Amaranth grain was extruded in a single screw extruder at 125 °C of extrusion temperature and 130 rpm of screw speed. Unprocessed and extruded amaranth flour were hydrolyzed with pepsin/pancreatin enzymes following a kinetic at 10, 25, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for each enzyme. After 180 min of pepsin hydrolysis, aliquots were taken at each time during pancreatin hydrolysis to characterize the hydrolysates by MALDI-TOF/MS-MS. Molecular masses (MM) (527, 567, 802, 984, 1295, 1545, 2034 and 2064 Da) of peptides appeared consistently during hydrolysis, showing high intensity at 10 min (2064 Da), 120 min (802 Da) and 180 min (567 Da) in UAH. EAH showed high intensity at 10 min (2034 Da) and 120 min (984, 1295 and 1545 Da). Extrusion produced more peptides with MM lower than 1000 Da immediately after 10 min of hydrolysis. Hydrolysis time impacted on the peptide profile, as longer the time lower the MM in both amaranth hydrolysates. Sequences obtained were analyzed for their biological activity at BIOPEP, showing important inhibitory activities related to chronic diseases. These peptides could be used as a food ingredient/supplement in a healthy diet to prevent the risk to develop chronic diseases. PMID:25894223

  2. The Competing Mechanisms of Phosphate Monoester Dianion Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical studies on phosphate monoester hydrolysis, significant questions remain concerning the mechanistic details of these biologically critical reactions. In the present work we construct a linear free energy relationship for phosphate monoester hydrolysis to explore the effect of modulating leaving group pKa on the competition between solvent- and substrate-assisted pathways for the hydrolysis of these compounds. Through detailed comparative electronic-structure studies of methyl phosphate and a series of substituted aryl phosphate monoesters, we demonstrate that the preferred mechanism is dependent on the nature of the leaving group. For good leaving groups, a strong preference is observed for a more dissociative solvent-assisted pathway. However, the energy difference between the two pathways gradually reduces as the leaving group pKa increases and creates mechanistic ambiguity for reactions involving relatively poor alkoxy leaving groups. Our calculations show that the transition-state structures vary smoothly across the range of pKas studied and that the pathways remain discrete mechanistic alternatives. Therefore, while not impossible, a biological catalyst would have to surmount a significantly higher activation barrier to facilitate a substrate-assisted pathway than for the solvent-assisted pathway when phosphate is bonded to good leaving groups. For poor leaving groups, this intrinsic preference disappears. PMID:27471914

  3. Effect of exopolysaccharides on the hydrolysis of beta-lactoglobulin by Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636 in an in vitro gastric/pancreatic system.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Haertlé, Thomas; Mozzi, Fernanda; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Font de Valdez, Graciela

    2009-06-24

    An analysis of the peptides generated by hydrolysis of BLG by nonproliferating cells of the strain Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636 was carried out. The effect of polysaccharides (pectin, and two EPS synthesized by two Streptococcus thermophilus strains, EPS1190 and EPS804) on BLG digestibility using an in vitro gastric/pancreatic system was analyzed. Polysaccharides are commonly used in the dairy industry to improve food texture; these hydrocolloids may interact with proteins, affecting their digestibility. Nonproliferating cells of Lb. acidophilus CRL 636 were able to hydrolyze 52% of BLG. Twenty-six resulting peptides with molecular masses in the range 544-4119 Da were identified by LC-MS/MS. These peptides resulted mostly from the hydrolysis of the more accessible N-terminal part of BLG. Degradation of BLG by pepsin was poor (8%). When BLG was previously hydrolyzed by Lb. acidophilus CRL 636, peptic hydrolysis was of 54.8%, while when pectin and EPS1190 were added, hydrolysis was higher (58.2 and 57.2%, respectively). Peptides crossing 8 kDa dialysis membranes after trypsin/chymotrypsin hydrolysis were analyzed by HPSEC. The produced peptides were smaller when BLG was hydrolyzed previously by the Lb. acidophilus strain. Moreover, in the presence of pectin, the amount of the larger peptide (3.5 kDa) observed in the size exclusion chromatograms was considerably decreased. Our studies showed that prehydrolysis of BLG by Lb. acidophilus CRL 636 had a positive influence on BLG digestibility and that polysaccharides may change the peptide profile yielded by trypsin/chymotrypsin hydrolysis, releasing smaller size peptides, which are known to be less immune-reactive. Moreover, Lb. acidophilus CRL 636 was able to hydrolyze the main epitopes (41-60, 102-124, and 149-162) of BLG, reducing its allergenic content.

  4. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Chen, Jiejin; Glynn, Steven E; Nager, Andrew R; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2017-04-07

    The HslUV proteolytic machine consists of HslV, a double-ring self-compartmentalized peptidase, and one or two AAA+ HslU ring hexamers that hydrolyze ATP to power the unfolding of protein substrates and their translocation into the proteolytic chamber of HslV. Here, we use genetic tethering and disulfide bonding strategies to construct HslU pseudohexamers containing mixtures of ATPase active and inactive subunits at defined positions in the hexameric ring. Genetic tethering impairs HslV binding and degradation, even for pseudohexamers with six active subunits, but disulfide-linked pseudohexamers do not have these defects, indicating that the peptide tether interferes with HslV interactions. Importantly, pseudohexamers containing different patterns of hydrolytically active and inactive subunits retain the ability to unfold protein substrates and/or collaborate with HslV in their degradation, supporting a model in which ATP hydrolysis and linked mechanical function in the HslU ring operate by a probabilistic mechanism.

  5. N-phenylglucosylamine hydrolysis: a mechanistic probe of β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Na, Ying; Shen, Hong; Byers, Larry D

    2011-06-01

    The spontaneous hydrolysis of glycosylamines, where the aglycone is either a primary amine or ammonia, is over a hundred million-times faster than that of O- or S-glycosides. The reason for this (as pointed out by Capon and Connett in 1965) is that, in contrast to the mechanism for O- or S-glycoside hydrolysis, hydrolysis of these N-glycosides (e.g., glc-NHR) involves an endocyclic C-O bond cleavage resulting in formation of an imine (iminium ion) which then reacts with water. Since ring-opening is kinetically favored with glycosylamines, compounds such as phenylglucosylamine can be a useful probes of enzymes that have been suggested to possibly follow this mechanism. With β-glucosidase from sweet almonds, the enzyme is highly efficient in catalyzing the hydrolysis of phenyl glucoside (k(cat)/k(non)∼10(14)) and phenyl thioglucoside (k(cat)/k(non)∼10(10)) while with either the almond or the Aspergillus niger enzyme or with yeast α-glucosidase, there is no detectable catalysis of phenylglucosylamine hydrolysis (k(cat)/k(non)<20). These results are consistent with the generally accepted mechanism involving exocyclic bond cleavage by these enzymes.

  6. Antihypertensive peptides from animal products, marine organisms, and plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yun; Hur, Sun Jun

    2017-08-01

    Bioactive peptides from food proteins exert beneficial effects on human health, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive activity. Several studies have reported that ACE-inhibitory peptides can come from animal products, marine organisms, and plants-derived by hydrolyzing enzymes such as pepsin, chymotrypsin, and trypsin-and microbial enzymes such as alcalase, thermolysin, flavourzyme, and proteinase K. Different ACE-inhibitory effects are closely related with different peptide sequences and molecular weights. Sequences of ACE-inhibitory peptides are composed of hydrophobic (proline) and aliphatic amino acids (isoleucine and leucine) at the N-terminus. As result of this review, we assume that low molecular weight peptides have a greater ACE inhibition because lower molecular weight peptides have a higher absorbency in the body. Therefore, the ACE-inhibitory effect is closely related with the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis and the composition of the peptide sequence.

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of peptides derived from caprine kefir.

    PubMed

    Quirós, A; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Ramos, M; Amigo, L; Recio, I

    2005-10-01

    In this study, a potent angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity was found in a commercial kefir made from caprine milk. The low molecular mass peptides released from caseins during fermentation were mainly responsible for this activity. Sixteen peptides were identified by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Two of these peptides, with sequences PYVRYL and LVYPFTGPIPN, showed potent ACE-inhibitory properties. The impact of gastrointestinal digestion on ACE-inhibitory activity of kefir peptides was also evaluated. Some of these peptides were resistant to the incubation with pepsin followed by hydrolysis with Corolase PP. The ACE-inhibitory activity after simulated digestion was similar to or slightly lower than unhydrolyzed peptides, except for peptide beta-casein f(47-52) (DKIHPF), which exhibited an activity 8 times greater after hydrolysis.

  8. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  9. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  10. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  11. Low temperature hydrolysis for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Fischer, J.R.; Iannotti, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    Hydrolysis of corn was compared at two temperatures of 100/sup 0/C and 75/sup 0/C. Starch conversion to dextrose and then ethanol were determined. Yields were 10.69% ethanol in the fermented beer for 100/sup 0/C and 9.89% for 75/sup 0/C. The 75/sup 0/C hydrolysis required about 100 MJ less thermal energy than the 100/sup 0/C hydrolysis. The effects of contamination and respiration were also assessed.

  12. Mapping of phosphomonoester and apparent phosphodiester bonds of the oncogene product p53 from simian virus 40-transformed 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Samad, A; Anderson, C W; Carroll, R B

    1986-01-01

    The oncogene product p53, isolated from SV3T3 cells where it forms a complex with simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen) in the nucleus, has been found to be phosphorylated at at least four distinct sites on the 390 amino acid protein. Separation of tryptic phosphopeptides has permitted identification of two sites as Ser-312 and Ser-389, and permitted analysis of the types of phosphate bonds. The peptide containing Ser-312 separates electrophoretically into three charged forms; two are resistant to dephosphorylation by both alkaline phosphatase and alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting a phosphodiester. The carboxyl-terminal phosphopeptide containing Ser-389 was alkaline phosphatase-resistant and liberated four ribonucleoside monophosphates upon base or RNase hydrolysis, suggesting that Ser-389 may be covalently linked to RNA. Phosphorylation of Ser-389 decreased markedly at the nonpermissive temperature in simian virus 40 tsA58-transformed cells, indicating a dependence on native T antigen function and a possible role in transformation by T antigen. Two additional phosphorylation sites, one involving serine and one involving threonine, probably reside in the amino-terminal segment of p53 and appear to be peptide-phosphate monoesters. Images PMID:3006031

  13. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  14. Contrasting effects of hardwood and softwood organosolv lignins on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chenhuan; Tu, Maobing; Shi, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Ke; Olmos, Luis G; Yu, Shiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Identifying an appropriate parameter to elucidate effects of lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis is essential to understand the interactions between enzymes and lignin. Contrasting effects of hardwood organosolv lignin (EOL-SG) and softwood organosolv lignin (EOL-LP) on enzymatic hydrolysis were observed. The addition of EOL-SG (8 g/L) significantly improved the 72 h hydrolysis yields of organosolv pretreated sweetgum (OPSG) and loblolly pine (OPLP) from 49.3% to 68.6% and from 41.2% to 60.8%, respectively. In contrast, the addition of EOL-LP decreased the 72 h hydrolysis yields of OPSG and OPLP to 42.0% and 38.1%, respectively. A strong correlation between the distribution coefficients of cellulase enzymes on lignins and the changes of hydrolysis yields indicated that the inhibitory or stimulatory effects of organosolv lignins on enzymatic hydrolysis were governed by the distribution coefficients (R). The different R values probably were related to the electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bondings between enzymes and lignin.

  15. γ-Glutamyl Hydrolase: Kinetic Characterization of Isopeptide Hydrolysis Using Fluorogenic Substrates†

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica P.; Ryan, Thomas J.; Ballou, David P.; Coward, James K.

    2008-01-01

    γ-Glutamyl hydrolase, a cysteine peptidase, catalyzes the hydrolysis of poly-γ-glutamate derivatives of folate co-factors and many antifolate drugs. We have used internally quenched fluorogenic derivatives of glutamyl-γ-glutamate and (4,4-difluoro)glutamyl-γ-glutamate to examine the effect of fluorine substitution adjacent to the scissile isopeptide bond. Using a newly developed continuous fluorescence assay, the hydrolysis of both substrates could be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Fluorine substitution resulted in a significant decrease in observed rates of hydrolysis under steady-state conditions due primarily to a ~ 15-fold increase in Km. Using stopped-flow techniques, hydrolysis of the non-fluorinated isopeptide was characterized by a burst phase followed by a steady-state rate, indicating that formation of the acyl enzyme is not rate-limiting for hydrolysis of this isopeptide. This conclusion was confirmed by analysis of the progress curves over a wide range of substrate concentration, which demonstrated that the acylation rate (k2) is ~ 10-fold higher than the deacylation rate (k3). The increased value of Km associated with the difluoro derivative limited the ability to obtain comparable pre-steady-state kinetics data at saturating concentration of substrate due to inner filter effects. However, even under non-saturating conditions, a modest burst was observed for the difluoro derivative. These data indicate that either deacylation or rearrangement of the enzyme-product complex is rate-limiting in this isopeptide hydrolysis reaction. PMID:18171026

  16. Affinity purification of copper chelating peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-05-16

    Chickpea protein hydrolysates obtained with alcalase and flavourzyme were used for purification of copper chelating peptides by affinity chromatography using copper immobilized on solid supports. The chelating activity of purified peptides was indirectly measured by the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation in the presence of copper. Two protein hydrolysates, obtained after 10 and 100 min of hydrolysis, were the most inhibitory of beta-carotene oxidation. Purified copper chelating peptides from these protein hydrolysates contained 19.7 and 35.1% histidine, respectively, in comparison to 2.7 and 2.6% in the protein hydrolysates. Chelating peptides from hydrolysate obtained after 10 min of hydrolysis were the most antioxidative being 8.3 times more antioxidative than the hydrolysate, while chelating peptides purified from protein hydrolysate obtained after 100 min were 3.1 times more antioxidative than its hydrolysate. However, the histidine content was higher in peptides derived from the 100 min hydrolysate (19.7 against 35.1% in 10 min hydrolysate), indicating that this amino acid is not the only factor involved in the antioxidative activity, and other factors such as peptide size or amino acid sequence are also determinant. This manuscript shows that affinity chromatography is a useful procedure for purification of copper chelating peptides. This method can be extended to other metals of interest in nutrition, such as calcium, iron, or zinc. Purified chelating peptides, in addition to their antioxidative properties, may also be useful in food mineral fortification for increasing the bioavailability of these metals.

  17. Hydrolytic activity of vanadate toward serine-containing peptides studied by kinetic experiments and DFT theory.

    PubMed

    Ho, Phuong Hien; Mihaylov, Tzvetan; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2012-08-20

    Hydrolysis of dipeptides glycylserine (Gly-Ser), leucylserine (Leu-Ser), histidylserine (His-Ser), glycylalanine (Gly-Ala), and serylglycine (Ser-Gly) was examined in vanadate solutions by means of (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR spectroscopy. In the presence of a mixture of oxovanadates, the hydrolysis of the peptide bond in Gly-Ser proceeds under the physiological pH and temperature (37 °C, pD 7.4) with a rate constant of 8.9 × 10(-8) s(-1). NMR and EPR spectra did not show evidence for the formation of paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of V(V) reduction to V(IV) and indicating that the cleavage of the peptide bond is purely hydrolytic. The pD dependence of k(obs) exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest hydrolysis observed at pD 7.4. Combined (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR experiments revealed formation of three complexes between Gly-Ser and vanadate, of which only one complex, designated Complex 2, formed via coordination of amide oxygen and amino nitrogen to vanadate, is proposed to be hydrolytically active. Kinetic experiments at pD 7.4 performed by using a fixed amount of Gly-Ser and increasing amounts of Na(3)VO(4) allowed calculation of the formation constant for the Gly-Ser/VO(4)(3-) complex (K(f) = 16.1 M(-1)). The structure of the hydrolytically active Complex 2 is suggested also on the basis of DFT calculations. The energy difference between Complex 2 and the major complex detected in the reaction mixture, Complex 1, is calculated to be 7.1 kcal/mol in favor of the latter. The analysis of the molecular properties of Gly-Ser and their change upon different modes of coordination to the vanadate pointed out that only in Complex 2 the amide carbon is suitable for attack by the hydroxyl group in the Ser side chain, which acts as an effective nucleophile. The origin of the hydrolytic activity of vanadate is most likely a combination of the polarization of amide oxygen in Gly-Ser due to the binding to vanadate, followed by the intramolecular

  18. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  19. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  20. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David B

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still not clearly understood even though there is a great deal of information available about the bovine rumen. Two major problems that limit our understanding of this area are the vast diversity of organisms present in most cellulose degrading environments and the inability to culture most of them.

  1. Rate of Hydrolysis of Tertiary Halogeno Alkanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to measure the relative rate of hydrolysis of the 2-x-2 methylpropanes, where x is bromo, chloro or iodo. The results are plotted on a graph from which the relative rate of hydrolysis can be deduced. (Author/GA)

  2. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  3. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  4. A Monoclonal Antibody to Cryptococcus neoformans Glucuronoxylomannan Manifests Hydrolytic Activity for Both Peptides and Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anthony; Wear, Maggie P; Cordero, Radames J B; Oscarson, Stefan; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-01-13

    Studies in the 1980s first showed that some natural antibodies were "catalytic" and able to hydrolyze peptide or phosphodiester bonds in antigens. Many naturally occurring catalytic antibodies have since been isolated from human sera and associated with positive and negative outcomes in autoimmune disease and infection. The function and prevalence of these antibodies, however, remain unclear. A previous study suggested that the 18B7 monoclonal antibody against glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major component of the Cryptococcus neoformans polysaccharide capsule, hydrolyzed a peptide antigen mimetic. Using mass spectrometry and Förster resonance energy transfer techniques, we confirm and characterize the hydrolytic activity of 18B7 against peptide mimetics and show that 18B7 is able to hydrolyze an oligosaccharide substrate, providing the first example of a naturally occurring catalytic antibody for polysaccharides. Additionally, we show that the catalytic 18B7 antibody increases release of capsular polysaccharide from fungal cells. A serine protease inhibitor blocked peptide and oligosaccharide hydrolysis by 18B7, and a putative serine protease-like active site was identified in the light chain variable region of the antibody. An algorithm was developed to detect similar sites present in unique antibody structures in the Protein Data Bank. The putative site was found in 14 of 63 (22.2%) catalytic antibody structures and 119 of 1602 (7.4%) antibodies with no annotation of catalytic activity. The ability of many antibodies to cleave antigen, albeit slowly, supports the notion that this activity is an important immunoglobulin function in host defense. The discovery of GXM hydrolytic activity suggests new therapeutic possibilities for polysaccharide-binding antibodies.

  5. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  6. Effects of partial hydrolysis and subsequent cross-linking on wheat gluten physicochemical properties and structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiqiang; Luo, Shuizhong; Cai, Jing; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhong, Xiyang; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-04-15

    The rheological behavior and thermal properties of wheat gluten following partial hydrolysis using Alcalase and subsequent microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) cross-linking were investigated. The wheat gluten storage modulus (G') and thermal denaturation temperature (Tg) were significantly increased from 2.26 kPa and 54.43°C to 7.76 kPa and 57.69°C, respectively, by the combined action of partial hydrolysis (DH 0.187%) and cross-linking. The free SH content, surface hydrophobicity, and secondary structure analysis suggested that an appropriate degree of Alcalase-based hydrolysis allowed the compact wheat gluten structure to unfold, increasing the β-sheet content and surface hydrophobicity. This improved its molecular flexibility and exposed additional glutamine sites for MTGase cross-linking. SEM images showed that a compact 3D network formed, while SDS-PAGE profiles revealed that excessive hydrolysis resulted in high-molecular-weight subunits degrading to smaller peptides, unsuitable for cross-linking. It was also demonstrated that the combination of Alcalase-based partial hydrolysis with MTGase cross-linking might be an effective method for modifying wheat gluten rheological behavior and thermal properties.

  7. Efficient production of glucose by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binzhe; Duan, Lian; Peng, Gege; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    To improve the production of glucose from cellulose, a simple and effective route was developed. This process uses a combination of a step of cellulose dissolution in aqueous NaOH/urea solution and then regeneration with water, followed by an acid hydrolysis step under microwave irradiation. The method is effective to obtain glucose from α-cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, ramie fiber and absorbent cotton. Increased with the acid concentration the glucose yield from hydrogel hydrolysis increased from 0.42% to 44.6% at 160 °C for 10 min. Moreover, the ozone treatment of cellulose in NaOH/urea solution before regeneration significantly enhanced the hydrolysis efficiency with a glucose yield of 59.1%. It is believed that the chains in cellulose hydrogel are relatively free approached, making that the acids easily access the β-glycosidic bonds.

  8. Ring Substituent Effects on the Thiol Addition and Hydrolysis Reactions of N-Arylmaleimides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingche; Tsao, Kelvin; De Francesco, Élise; Keillor, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-18

    Maleimide groups are used extensively in bioconjugation reactions, but limited kinetic information is available regarding their thiol addition and hydrolysis reactions. We prepared a series of fluorogenic coumarin maleimide derivatives that differ by the substituent on their maleimide C═C bond. Fluorescence-based kinetic studies of the reaction with β-mercaptoethanol (BME) yielded the second-order rate constants (k2), while pH-rate studies from pH 7 to 9 gave base-catalyzed hydrolysis rate constants (kOH). Linear free-energy relationships were studied through the correlation of log k2 and log kOH to both electronic (σ(+)) and steric (Es(norm)) parameters of the C═C substituent. These correlations revealed the thiol addition reaction is primarily sensitive to the electronic effects, while steric effects dominate the hydrolysis reaction. These mechanistic studies provide the basis for the design of novel bioconjugation reactants or fluorogenic labeling agents.

  9. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  10. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Polyester Thin Films: Real-Time Analysis of Film Mass Changes and Dissipation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Michael Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; McNeill, Kristopher; Sander, Michael

    2016-01-05

    Cleavage of ester bonds by extracellular microbial hydrolases is considered a key step during the breakdown of biodegradable polyester materials in natural and engineered systems. Here we present a novel analytical approach for simultaneous detection of changes in the masses and rigidities of polyester thin films during enzymatic hydrolysis using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). In experiments with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and the lipase of Rhizopus oryzae (RoL), we detected complete hydrolysis of PBS thin films at pH 5 and 40 °C that proceeded through soft and water-rich film intermediates. Increasing the temperature from 20 to 40 °C resulted in a larger increase of the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of PBS than of nonpolymeric dibutyl adipate. This finding was ascribed to elevated accessibility of ester bonds to the catalytic site of RoL due to increasing polyester chain mobility. When the pH of the solution was changed from 5 to 7, initial hydrolysis rates were little affected, while a softer film intermediate that lead to incomplete film hydrolysis was formed. Hydrolysis dynamics of PBS, poly(butylene adipate), poly(lactic acid), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) in assays with RoL showed distinct differences that we attribute to differences in the polyester structure.

  11. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  12. Crystal structure, ferromagnetostructural behavior and evidence of cooperative Jahn-Teller interactions of the complex [CuL]Cl·H 2O (L= N-glycyl-2(aminomethyl)benzimidazol), synthesized by a novel simple method of peptide bond formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Orozco, Ivan; Tapia-Benavides, Antonio Rafael; Alvarez-Toledano, Cecilio; Toscano, Ruben A.; Ramírez-Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano-Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2002-01-01

    [CuL]Cl·H 2O 1 (L= N-glycyl-2(aminomethyl)benzimidazol) compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna2 1 with unit cell parameters a=7.140(5) Å, b=17.621(5) Å, c=9.941(5) Å. Its structure shows that the copper(II) ion is tetra coordinated with a square planar geometry. The ligand acts as a tridentate and the chloride ion is the fourth ligand. Symmetry related units stack into helicoidal columns along the ā direction producing weakly bonded strips with dihedral angles of 2.6° between two consecutive molecular planes. UV/VIS spectrum of 1 shows one broad and weak band at 622 nm, characteristic of d-d transitions, indicative of low local Cu(II) symmetry. X band ESR spectra of 1 at 300 and 77 K are axial exchange narrow lines with g∥=2.135 and g⊥=2.028. However, the axial spectrum at 6.4 K shows an increment Δ g∥=0.076(6) and Δ g⊥=0.028(4) which suggests a cooperative Jahn-Teller interactions between complexes via the hydrogen-bonding network. Magnetic susceptibility data at 18-300 K and fitted to the modified Bleany-Bowers equation indicate a weak ferromagnetic coupling with 2J≅+17 cm-1, which is compatible with the helium temperature ESR results and with the helicoidal stacking into columns of the molecules along the a-axis with 78.9° Cu'-Cl'-Cu and 81.2° Cu'-N( 1)-Cu bonds angles. The synthesis is a novel, simple and efficient method: in aqueous conditions and heterogeneous phase with basic copper(II) carbonate, which carries out the formation of the stable peptide bond.

  13. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  14. Targeting allosteric disulphide bonds in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Philip J

    2013-06-01

    Protein action in nature is generally controlled by the amount of protein produced and by chemical modification of the protein, and both are often perturbed in cancer. The amino acid side chains and the peptide and disulphide bonds that bind the polypeptide backbone can be post-translationally modified. Post-translational cleavage or the formation of disulphide bonds are now being identified in cancer-related proteins and it is timely to consider how these allosteric bonds could be targeted for new therapies.

  15. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  16. An altered mechanism of hydrolysis for a metal-complexed phosphate diester.

    PubMed

    Humphry, Tim; Forconi, Marcello; Williams, Nicholas H; Hengge, Alvan C

    2002-12-18

    Isotope effects in the nucleophile and in the leaving group were measured to gain information about the mechanism and transition state of the hydrolysis of methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate complexed to a dinuclear cobalt complex. The complexed diester undergoes hydrolysis about 1011 times faster than the corresponding uncomplexed diester. The kinetic isotope effects indicate that this rate acceleration is accompanied by a change in mechanism. A large inverse 18O isotope effect in the bridging hydroxide nucleophile (0.937 +/- 0.002) suggests that nucleophilic attack occurs before the rate-determining step. Large isotope effects in the nitrophenyl leaving group (18Olg = 1.029 +/- 0.002, 15N = 1.0026 +/- 0.0002) indicate significant fission of the P-O ester bond in the transition state of the rate-determining step. The data indicate that in contrast to uncomplexed diesters, which undergo hydrolysis by a concerted mechanism, the reaction of the complexed diester likely proceeds via an addition-elimination mechanism. The rate-limiting step is expulsion of the p-nitrophenyl leaving group from the intermediate, which proceeds by a late transition state with extensive bond fission to the leaving group. This represents a substantial change in mechanism from the hydrolysis of uncomplexed aryl phosphate diesters.

  17. Solvents effects on the mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis: A QM/MM study.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Heimermann, Andreas; Thiel, Walter

    2015-06-05

    This article reports a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) investigation on the acid hydrolysis of cellulose in water using two different models, cellobiose and a 40-unit cellulose chain. The explicitly treated solvent molecules strongly influence the conformations, intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exoanomeric effects in these models. As these features are largely responsible for the barrier to cellulose hydrolysis, the present QM/MM results for the pathways and reaction intermediates in water are expected to be more realistic than those from a former density functional theory (DFT) study with implicit solvent (CPCM). However, in a qualitative sense, there is reasonable agreement between the DFT/CPCM and QM/MM predictions for the reaction mechanism. Differences arise mainly from specific solute-solvent hydrogen bonds that are only captured by QM/MM and not by DFT/CPCM.

  18. Marine algae-derived bioactive peptides for human nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaodan; Bai, Lu; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xuewu

    2014-09-24

    Within the parent protein molecule, most peptides are inactive, and they are released with biofunctionalities after enzymatic hydrolysis. Marine algae have high protein content, up to 47% of the dry weight, depending on the season and the species. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using marine algae protein as a source of bioactive peptides due to their health promotion and disease therapy potentials. This review presents an overview of marine algae-derived bioactive peptides and especially highlights some key issues, such as in silico proteolysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies, in vivo fate of bioactive peptides, and novel technologies in bioactive peptides studies and production.

  19. Novel chromatographic resolution of chiral diacylglycerols and analysis of the stereoselective hydrolysis of triacylglycerols by lipases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Mendoza, L D; Pezzotti, F; Vanthuyne, N; Leclaire, J; Verger, R; Buono, G; Carriere, F; Fotiadu, F

    2008-04-15

    In the present study, we propose a general and accessible method for the resolution of enantiomeric 1,2-sn- and 2,3-sn-diacylglycerols based on derivatization by isocyanates, which can be easily used routinely by biochemists to evaluate the stereopreferences of lipases in a time course of triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolysis. Diacylglycerol (DAG) enantiomers were transformed into carbamates using achiral and commercially available reagents. Excellent separation and resolution factors were obtained for diacylglycerols present in lipolysis reaction mixtures. This analytical method was then applied to investigate the stereoselectivity of three model lipases (porcine pancreatic lipase, PPL; lipase from Rhizomucor miehei, MML; and recombinant dog gastric lipase, rDGL) in the time course of hydrolysis of prochiral triolein as a substrate. From the measurements of the diglyceride enantiomeric excess it was confirmed that PPL was not stereospecific (position sn-1 vs sn-3 of triolein), whereas MML and rDGL preferentially hydrolyzed the ester bond at position sn-1 and sn-3, respectively. The enantiomeric excess of DAGs was not constant with time, decreasing with the course of hydrolysis. This was due to the fact that DAGs can be products of the stereospecific hydrolysis of TAGs and substrates for stereospecific hydrolysis into monoacylglycerols.

  20. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles.

  1. Hydrolysis of cellulose catalyzed by quaternary ammonium perrhenates in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyun; Zhou, Mingdong; Yuan, Yuguo; Zhang, Quan; Fang, Xiangchen; Zang, Shuliang

    2015-12-01

    Quaternary ammonium perrhenates were applied as catalyst to promote the hydrolysis of cellulose in 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). The quaternary ammonium perrhenates displayed good catalytic performance for cellulose hydrolysis. Water was also proven to be effective to promote cellulose hydrolysis. Accordingly, 97% of total reduced sugar (TRS) and 42% of glucose yields could be obtained under the condition of using 5mol% of tetramethyl ammonium perrhenate as catalyst, 70μL of water, ca. 0.6mmol of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and 2.0g of [Amim]Cl as solvent under microwave irradiation for 30min at 150°C (optimal conditions). The influence of quaternary ammonium cation on the efficiency of cellulose hydrolysis was examined based on different cation structures of perrhenates. The mechanism on perrhenate catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis is also discussed, whereas hydrogen bonding between ReO4 anion and hydroxyl groups of cellulose is assumed to be the key step for depolymerization of cellulose.

  2. Resolving apparent conflicts between theoretical and experimental models of phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fernanda; Åqvist, Johan; Williams, Nicholas H; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2015-01-28

    Understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer is central to many biochemical processes. However, despite decades of experimental and computational studies, a consensus concerning the precise mechanistic details of these reactions has yet to be reached. In this work we perform a detailed comparative theoretical study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, methyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl sulfate, all of which have served as key model systems for understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer reactions, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of energetically similar but mechanistically distinct possibilities for phosphate monoester hydrolysis. The calculated kinetic isotope effects for p-nitrophenyl phosphate provide a means to discriminate between substrate- and solvent-assisted pathways of phosphate monoester hydrolysis, and show that the solvent-assisted pathway dominates in solution. This preferred mechanism for p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis is difficult to find computationally due to the limitations of compressing multiple bonding changes onto a 2-dimensional energy surface. This problem is compounded by the need to include implicit solvation to at least microsolvate the system and stabilize the highly charged species. In contrast, methyl phosphate hydrolysis shows a preference for a substrate-assisted mechanism. For p-nitrophenyl sulfate hydrolysis there is only one viable reaction pathway, which is similar to the solvent-assisted pathway for phosphate hydrolysis, and the substrate-assisted pathway is not accessible. Overall, our results provide a unifying mechanistic framework that is consistent with the experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects and reconciles the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental models for these biochemically ubiquitous classes of reaction.

  3. Resolving Apparent Conflicts between Theoretical and Experimental Models of Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer is central to many biochemical processes. However, despite decades of experimental and computational studies, a consensus concerning the precise mechanistic details of these reactions has yet to be reached. In this work we perform a detailed comparative theoretical study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, methyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl sulfate, all of which have served as key model systems for understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer reactions, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of energetically similar but mechanistically distinct possibilities for phosphate monoester hydrolysis. The calculated kinetic isotope effects for p-nitrophenyl phosphate provide a means to discriminate between substrate- and solvent-assisted pathways of phosphate monoester hydrolysis, and show that the solvent-assisted pathway dominates in solution. This preferred mechanism for p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis is difficult to find computationally due to the limitations of compressing multiple bonding changes onto a 2-dimensional energy surface. This problem is compounded by the need to include implicit solvation to at least microsolvate the system and stabilize the highly charged species. In contrast, methyl phosphate hydrolysis shows a preference for a substrate-assisted mechanism. For p-nitrophenyl sulfate hydrolysis there is only one viable reaction pathway, which is similar to the solvent-assisted pathway for phosphate hydrolysis, and the substrate-assisted pathway is not accessible. Overall, our results provide a unifying mechanistic framework that is consistent with the experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects and reconciles the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental models for these biochemically ubiquitous classes of reaction. PMID:25423607

  4. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  5. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  6. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  7. The thermodynamics of phosphate versus phosphorothioate ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Jamie; Hengge, Alvan C

    2005-10-14

    Phosphorothioate esters are phosphate esters in which one of the nonbridging oxygen atoms has been replaced by sulfur. In the comparative hydrolysis reactions of phosphorothioate and phosphate esters, the sulfur substitution accelerates the rates of the monoesters while slowing the rates of diesters and of triesters. Previously measured enthalpies and entropies of activation for the hydrolysis reactions of the monoesters, p-nitrophenyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate, were compared to the activation parameters measured herein for the diesters, ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate, and the triesters, diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate. A consistent trend of a greater DeltaH++ for the phosphorothioate analogue was found in all three classes of ester. In the monoester case, a more positive DeltaS++ arising from a mechanistic difference (D(N) + A(N) for the phosphorothioate versus A(N)D(N) for the phosphate) compensates, resulting in a lower DeltaG++ for the phosphorothioate monoester. Spectroscopic investigations indicate there is no significant difference in bond order to the leaving group in phosphates, as compared to their phosphorothioate analogues, ruling this out as a contribution to the consistently higher enthalpies of activation.

  8. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  9. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Faass, G.S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous hydrolysis of poplar chips by steam at 300-350 psi resulted in the separation of hemicellulose (I) cellulose and lignin components. The I fraction was readily depolymerised by steam to acetic acid, furfural, methanol, and xylose.

  10. Calcineurin hydrolysis of para-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate.

    PubMed

    Spannaus-Martin, Donna J; Martin, Bruce L

    2004-04-01

    para-Nitrophenyl phosphorothioate (pNPT) was hydrolyzed by calcineurin at initial rates slightly, but comparable to rates for para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Kinetic characterization yielded higher estimates for both Km and Vmax compared to pNPP. Metal ion activation of phosphorothioate hydrolysis was more promiscuous. Unlike the hydrolysis of with pNPP, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Ba2+ activated calcineurin as well as Mn2+.

  11. Method for synthesizing peptides with saccharide linked enzyme polymer conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing peptides using water soluble enzyme polymer conjugates. The method comprises catalyzing the peptide synthesis with enzyme which has been covalently bonded to a polymer through at least three linkers which linkers have three or more hydroxyl groups. The enzyme is conjugated at lysines or arginines.

  12. Method for synthesizing peptides with saccharide linked enzyme polymer conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-06-17

    A method is disclosed for synthesizing peptides using water soluble enzyme polymer conjugates. The method comprises catalyzing the peptide synthesis with enzyme which has been covalently bonded to a polymer through at least three linkers which linkers have three or more hydroxyl groups. The enzyme is conjugated at lysines or arginines. 19 figs.

  13. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences.

  14. Soy protein hydrolysis with microbial protease to improve antioxidant and functional properties.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cibele Freitas; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Coletto, Douglas; Daroit, Daniel Joner; Cladera-Olivera, Florencia; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-05-01

    Soybean proteins are widely used as nutritional and functional food ingredients. This investigation evaluated through a 2(3) central composite design the effect of three variables (pH, temperature and enzyme/substrate (E/S) ratio) on the production of soy protein isolate (SPI) hydrolysates with a microbial protease. Soluble peptides, antioxidant activity, and foaming and emulsifying capabilities of the hydrolysates were analyzed. All variables, as well as their interactions, were significant for the soluble peptides content of SPI hydrolysates. Optimal conditions for obtaining soluble peptides were around 30-35 °C, pH 6.5-9.5, and E/S ratios of 1,650-6,300 U g(-1). SPI hydrolysates produced at 30-45 °C, pH 8.0-9.5, and E/S ratios of 4,000-8,000 U g(-1) showed higher capacity to scavenge the 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical. Models for soluble peptides and ABTS activity of hydrolysates were obtained. In the range studied, the variables had not significant influence on the ability of hydrolysates to scavenge the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. SPI hydrolysates also presented reducing power and ability to chelate iron. Hydrolysis temperature was significant for the Fe(2+)-chelating ability of hydrolysates. Temperature of hydrolysis was significant for the foaming capacity of hydrolysates, with higher values observed at 45 °C and 8,000 U g(-1). For emulsifying capacity, only E/S ratio presented a significant effect. Temperature and E/S ratio appeared to be more significant variables influencing the properties of the SPI hydrolysates. The results of this study indicate that specific hydrolysis conditions should be selected to obtain SPI hydrolysates with preferred characteristics.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  16. Synergy between cellulases and pectinases in the hydrolysis of hemp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhua; Pakarinen, Annukka; Viikari, Liisa

    2013-02-01

    The impact of pectinases in the hydrolysis of fresh, steam-exploded and ensiled hemp was investigated and the synergy between cellulases, pectinases and xylanase in the hydrolysis was evaluated. About half; 59.3% and 46.1% of pectin in the steam-exploded and ensiled hemp, respectively, could be removed by a low dosage of pectinases used. Pectinases were more efficient than xylanase in the hydrolysis of fresh and ensiled hemp whereas xylanase showed higher hydrolytic efficiency than the pectinase preparation used in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Clear synergistic action between cellulases and xylanase could be observed in the hydrolysis of steam-exploded hemp. Supplementation of pectinase resulted in clear synergism with cellulases in the hydrolysis of all hemp substrates. Highest hydrolysis yield of steam-exploded hemp was obtained in the hydrolysis with cellulases and xylanase. In the hydrolysis of ensiled hemp, the synergistic action between cellulases and pectinases was more obvious for efficient hydrolysis.

  17. Review cyclic peptides on a merry-go-round; towards drug design.

    PubMed

    Tapeinou, Anthi; Matsoukas, Minos-Timotheos; Simal, Carmen; Tselios, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Peptides and proteins are attractive initial leads for the rational design of bioactive molecules. Several natural cyclic peptides have recently emerged as templates for drug design due to their resistance to chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis and high selectivity to receptors. The development of practical protocols that mimic the power of nature's strategies remains paramount for the advancement of novel peptide-based drugs. The de novo design of peptide mimetics (nonpeptide molecules or cyclic peptides) for the synthesis of linear or cyclic peptides has enhanced the progress of therapeutics and diverse areas of science and technology. In the case of metabolically unstable peptide ligands, the rational design and synthesis of cyclic peptide analogues has turned into an alternative approach for improved biological activity.

  18. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures.

  19. Identification and characterization of core cellulolytic enzymes from Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Yano, Shinichi; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-10-09

    Background: Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass is an essential process for the production of fermentable sugars for industrial use. A better understanding of fungal cellulase systems will provide clues for maximizing the hydrolysis of target biomass. Talaromyces cellulolyticus is a promising fungus for cellulase production and efficient biomass hydrolysis. Several cellulolytic enzymes purified from T. cellulolyticus were characterized in earlier studies, but the core enzymes critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass remain unknown. Results: Six cellulolytic enzymes critical for the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose were purified from T. cellulolyticus culture supernatant using an enzyme assay based on synergistic hydrolysis of Avicel. The purified enzymes were identified by their substrate specificities and analyses of trypsin-digested peptide fragments and were classified into the following glycosyl hydrolase (GH) families: GH3 (β-glucosidase, Bgl3A), GH5 (endoglucanase, Cel5A), GH6 (cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A), GH7 (cellobiohydrolase I and endoglucanase, Cel7A and Cel7B, respectively), and GH10 (xylanase, Xyl10A). Hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated corn stover (PCS) with mixtures of the purified enzymes showed that Cel5A, Cel7B, and Xyl10A each had synergistic effects with a mixture of Cel6A and Cel7A. Cel5A seemed to be more effective in the synergistic hydrolysis of the PCS than Cel7B. The ratio of Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, and Xyl10A was statistically optimized for the hydrolysis of PCS glucan in the presence of Bgl3A. The resultant mixture achieved higher PCS glucan hydrolysis at lower enzyme loading than a culture filtrate from T. cellulolyticus or a commercial enzyme preparation, demonstrating that the five enzymes play a role as core enzymes in the hydrolysis of PCS glucan. In Conclusion: Core cellulolytic enzymes in the T. cellulolyticus cellulase system were identified to Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, Xyl10A, and Bgl3A and

  20. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  1. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  2. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw: comparison of solids-recycling, sequential hydrolysis and batch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Sipponen, Satu; Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi; Laakso, Simo

    2014-02-01

    In the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials, the recycling of the solid residue has previously been considered within the context of enzyme recycling. In this study, a steady state investigation of a solids-recycling process was made with pretreated wheat straw and compared to sequential and batch hydrolysis at constant reaction times, substrate feed and liquid and enzyme consumption. Compared to batch hydrolysis, the recycling and sequential processes showed roughly equal hydrolysis yields, while the volumetric productivity was significantly increased. In the 72h process the improvement was 90% due to an increased reaction consistency, while the solids feed was 16% of the total process constituents. The improvement resulted primarily from product removal, which was equally efficient in solids-recycling and sequential hydrolysis processes. No evidence of accumulation of enzymes beyond the accumulation of the substrate was found in recycling. A mathematical model of solids-recycling was constructed, based on a geometrical series.

  3. Hydrolysis of DNA model substrates catalyzed by metal-substituted Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecht, Stef; Absillis, Gregory; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2012-09-07

    In this study we report the first example of phosphoester bond hydrolysis in 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP) and bis-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (BNPP), two commonly used DNA model substrates, promoted by metal-substituted polyoxometalates (POMs). Different transition metal and lanthanide ions were incorporated into the Wells-Dawson polyoxometalate framework and subsequently screened for their hydrolytic activity towards the cleavage of the phosphoester bonds in NPP and BNPP. From these complexes, the Zr(iv)-substituted POM showed the highest reactivity. At pD 7.2 and 50 °C a NPP hydrolysis rate constant of 7.71 × 10(-4) min(-1) (t(1/2) = 15 h) was calculated, representing a rate enhancement of nearly two orders of magnitude in comparison with the spontaneous hydrolysis of NPP. The catalytic (k(c) = 1.73 × 10(-3) min(-1)) and formation constant (K(f) = 520.02 M(-1)) for the NPP-Zr(iv)-POM complex were determined from kinetic experiments. The reaction proceeded faster in acidic conditions and (31)P NMR experiments showed that faster hydrolysis is proportional to the presence of the 1 : 1 monosubstituted Zr(iv)-POM at acidic pD values. The strong interaction of the 1 : 1 monosubstituted Zr(iv)-POM with the P-O bond of NPP was evidenced by the large chemical shift and the line broadening of the (31)P nucleus in NPP observed upon addition of the metal complex. Significantly, a ten-fold excess of NPP was fully hydrolyzed in the presence of the Zr(iv)-POM, proving the principles of catalysis. The NMR spectra did not show sign of any paramagnetic species, excluding an oxidative cleavage mechanism and suggesting purely hydrolytic cleavage.

  4. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  5. Is aspartate 52 essential for catalysis by chicken egg white lysozyme? The role of natural substrate-assisted hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Ichiro; Kirsch, J.F.

    1996-02-13

    The chicken and goose egg white lysozymes (ChEWL and GoEWL) are homologues, but differ in substrate specificity. ChEWL catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bonds of bacterial peptidoglycans and chitin-derived substrates, while GoEWL is specific for bacterial peptidoglycans. The active-site aspartate 52 residue of ChEWL, which is postulated to stabilize the oxocarbenium ion intermediate, has no counterpart in GoEWL. The substrate specificity of the D52A ChEWL mutant was compared with those of wild-type ChEWL and GoEWL. D52A ChEWL retains approximately 4% of the wild-type catalytic activity in reactions with three different bacterial cell suspensions. Asp52 therefore is not essential to the catalytic mechanism, accounting for only a 2 kcal/mol decrease in AG. The function of Asp52 in D52A ChEWL- and GoEWL-catalyzed cleavage of (carboxymethyl)chitin may be partially fulfilled by an appropriately positioned carboxyl group on the substrate (substrate-assisted catalysis). D52A ChEWL and GoEWL, unlike wild-type ChEWL, exhibit biphasic kinetics in the clearing of Micrococcus luteus cell suspensions, suggesting preferences for subsets of the linkages in the M. luteus peptidoglycan. These subsets do not exist in the peptidoglycans of Escherichia coli or Sarcina lutea, since neither D52A ChEWL nor GoEWL exhibits initial bursts in reactions with suspensions of these bacteria. We propose that substrate-assisted catalysis occurs in reactions of D52A ChEWL and GoEWL with M. luteus peptidoglycans, with the glycine carboxyl group of uncross-linked peptides attached to N-acetylmuramic acid partially substituting the function of the missing Asp52. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Confinement-Dependent Friction in Peptide Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  7. Silica coating of zirconia by silicon nitride hydrolysis on adhesion promotion of resin to zirconia.

    PubMed

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Liu, Dan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of silica coating on zirconia by silicon nitride hydrolysis in resin zirconia bonding was investigated. The silica coated zirconia samples were prepared in silicon nitride dispersion at 90 °C under different immersion times followed by a thermal treatment at 1400 °C. Four test groups were prepared: 1) zirconia samples treated by sandblasting, 2) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 6 h, 3) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 24 h and 4) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 48 h. The coatings were characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD and Raman. The resin zirconia bond strengths of the four test groups were evaluated under three storage conditions: dry storage, water storage in deionized water at 37 °C for 30 days and thermo-cycling for 6000 cycles between 5.0 and 55.0 °C. Surface morphology and composition of zirconia were changed after surface treatments. Phase transformation was observed for zirconia surface by sandblasting treatment but was not observed for zirconia surface treated with silicon nitride hydrolysis. Significant differences in bond strengths were found under different surface treatments (p<0.001) and under three storage conditions (p<0.005). The highest bond strength values were obtained by sandblasting treatment.

  8. Transition state differences in hydrolysis reactions of alkyl versus aryl phosphate monoester monoanions.

    PubMed

    Grzyska, Piotr K; Czyryca, Przemyslaw G; Purcell, Jamie; Hengge, Alvan C

    2003-10-29

    Although aryl phosphates have been the subject of numerous experimental studies, far less data bearing on the mechanism and transition states for alkyl phosphate reactions have been presented. Except for esters with very good leaving groups such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, the monoanion of phosphate esters is more reactive than the dianion. Several mechanisms have been proposed for the hydrolysis of the monoanion species. (18)O kinetic isotope effects in the nonbridging oxygen atoms and in the P-O(R) ester bond, and solvent deuterium isotope effects, have been measured for the hydrolysis of m-nitrobenzyl phosphate. The results rule out a proposed mechanism in which the phosphoryl group deprotonates water and then undergoes attack by hydroxide. The results are most consistent with a preequilibrium proton transfer from the phosphoryl group to the ester oxygen atom, followed by rate-limiting P-O bond fission, as originally proposed by Kirby and co-workers in 1967. The transition state for m-nitrobenzyl phosphate (leaving group pK(a) 14.9) exhibits much less P-O bond fission than the reaction of the more labile p-nitrophenyl phosphate (leaving group pK(a) = 7.14). This seemingly anti-Hammond behavior results from weakening of the P-O(R) ester bond resulting from protonation, an effect which calculations have shown is much more pronounced for aryl phosphates than for alkyl ones.

  9. A density functional theory model of mechanically activated silyl ester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pill, Michael F.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Beyer, Martin K.; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Kersch, Alfred

    2014-01-28

    To elucidate the mechanism of the mechanically activated dissociation of chemical bonds between carboxymethylated amylose (CMA) and silane functionalized silicon dioxide, we have investigated the dissociation kinetics of the bonds connecting CMA to silicon oxide surfaces with density functional calculations including the effects of force, solvent polarizability, and pH. We have determined the activation energies, the pre-exponential factors, and the reaction rate constants of candidate reactions. The weakest bond was found to be the silyl ester bond between the silicon and the alkoxy oxygen atom. Under acidic conditions, spontaneous proton addition occurs close to the silyl ester such that neutral reactions become insignificant. Upon proton addition at the most favored position, the activation energy for bond hydrolysis becomes 31 kJ mol{sup −1}, which agrees very well with experimental observation. Heterolytic bond scission in the protonated molecule has a much higher activation energy. The experimentally observed bi-exponential rupture kinetics can be explained by different side groups attached to the silicon atom of the silyl ester. The fact that different side groups lead to different dissociation kinetics provides an opportunity to deliberately modify and tune the kinetic parameters of mechanically activated bond dissociation of silyl esters.

  10. Acylglucuronide in alkaline conditions: migration vs. hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Florent; Steel, Michele; Nicolas, Picard; Marquet, Pierre; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This work rationalizes the glucuronidation process (one of the reactions of the phase II metabolism) for drugs having a carboxylic acid moiety. At this stage, acylglucuronides (AG) metabolites are produced, that have largely been reported in the literature for various drugs (e.g., mycophenolic acid (MPA), diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylacetic acids). The competition between migration and hydrolysis is rationalized by adequate quantum calculations, combing MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) methods. At the molecular scale, the former process is a real rotation of the drug around the glucuconic acid. This chemical-engine provides four different metabolites with various toxicities. Migration definitely appears feasible under alkaline conditions, making proton release from the OH groups. The latter reaction (hydrolysis) releases the free drug, so the competition is of crucial importance to tackle drug action and elimination. From the theoretical data, both migration and hydrolysis appear kinetically and thermodynamically favored, respectively.

  11. Epitope discovery and their use in peptide based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Nadine L; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in the design and delivery of peptide-based therapeutics there has been a growing interest on the use of peptides in vaccine design. Moreover, functional dissection and proteomic analysis of the immunogenic epitopes of proteins from pathogenic micro-organisms, cancers and self-tissues targeted by autoimmune responses, have broadened the range of target epitopes and given clues to enhancing peptide immunogenicity. Consistent with these observations; peptides can be synthesised with defined chemical modifications to mimic natural epitopes and/or deliberately introduce protease resistant peptide bonds to regulate their processing independent of tissue specific proteolysis and to stabilize these compounds in vivo. We discuss the potential of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of chronic viral diseases and cancer and review recent developments in the field of epitope discovery and peptide-based vaccines.

  12. How does a hydrocarbon staple affect peptide hydrophobicity?

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L; Verma, Chandra

    2015-04-15

    Water is essential for the proper folding of proteins and the assembly of protein-protein/ligand complexes. How water regulates complex formation depends on the chemical and topological details of the interface. The dynamics of water in the interdomain region between an E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2) and three different peptides derived from the tumor suppressor protein p53 are studied using molecular dynamics. The peptides show bimodal distributions of interdomain water densities across a range of distances. The addition of a hydrocarbon chain to rigidify the peptides (in a process known as stapling) results in an increase in average hydrophobicity of the peptide-protein interface. Additionally, the hydrophobic staple shields a network of water molecules, kinetically stabilizing a water chain hydrogen-bonded between the peptide and MDM2. These properties could result in a decrease in the energy barrier associated with dehydrating the peptide-protein interface, thereby regulating the kinetics of peptide binding.

  13. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  14. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  15. Hydrolysis of iodine: equilibria at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Ramette, R.W.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrolysis (or disproportionation) of molecular iodine to form iodate and iodide ions has been studied by emf measurements over the temperature range, 3.8/sup 0/ to 209.0/sup 0/C. The interpretation of these results required a knowledge of the formation constant for triiodide ion and the acid dissociation constant of iodic acid, both of which were measured as a function of temperature. The resulting thermodynamic data have been incorporated into a general computer model describing the hydrolysis equilibria of iodine as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature.

  16. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  17. Identification and characterization of core cellulolytic enzymes from Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; ...

    2014-10-09

    Background: Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass is an essential process for the production of fermentable sugars for industrial use. A better understanding of fungal cellulase systems will provide clues for maximizing the hydrolysis of target biomass. Talaromyces cellulolyticus is a promising fungus for cellulase production and efficient biomass hydrolysis. Several cellulolytic enzymes purified from T. cellulolyticus were characterized in earlier studies, but the core enzymes critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass remain unknown. Results: Six cellulolytic enzymes critical for the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose were purified from T. cellulolyticus culture supernatant using an enzyme assay based on synergistic hydrolysismore » of Avicel. The purified enzymes were identified by their substrate specificities and analyses of trypsin-digested peptide fragments and were classified into the following glycosyl hydrolase (GH) families: GH3 (β-glucosidase, Bgl3A), GH5 (endoglucanase, Cel5A), GH6 (cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A), GH7 (cellobiohydrolase I and endoglucanase, Cel7A and Cel7B, respectively), and GH10 (xylanase, Xyl10A). Hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated corn stover (PCS) with mixtures of the purified enzymes showed that Cel5A, Cel7B, and Xyl10A each had synergistic effects with a mixture of Cel6A and Cel7A. Cel5A seemed to be more effective in the synergistic hydrolysis of the PCS than Cel7B. The ratio of Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, and Xyl10A was statistically optimized for the hydrolysis of PCS glucan in the presence of Bgl3A. The resultant mixture achieved higher PCS glucan hydrolysis at lower enzyme loading than a culture filtrate from T. cellulolyticus or a commercial enzyme preparation, demonstrating that the five enzymes play a role as core enzymes in the hydrolysis of PCS glucan. In Conclusion: Core cellulolytic enzymes in the T. cellulolyticus cellulase system were identified to Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, Xyl10A, and Bgl3A

  18. Tyr39 of ran preserves the Ran.GTP gradient by inhibiting GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sven; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2010-08-06

    Ran is a member of the superfamily of small GTPases, which cycle between a GTP-bound "on" and a GDP-bound "off" state. Ran regulates nuclear transport. In order to maintain a gradient of excess Ran.GTP within the nucleoplasm and excess Ran.GDP within the cytoplasm, the hydrolysis of Ran.GTP in the nucleoplasm should be prevented, whereas in the cytoplasm, hydrolysis is catalyzed by Ran.GAP (GTPase-activating protein). In this article, we investigate the GTPase reaction of Ran in complex with its binding protein Ran-binding protein 1 by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: We show that the slowdown of the intrinsic hydrolysis of RanGTP is accomplished by tyrosine 39, which is probably misplacing the attacking water. We monitored the interaction of Ran with RanGAP, which reveals two reactions steps. By isotopic labeling of Ran and RanGAP, we were able to assign the first step to a small conformational change within the catalytic site. The following bond breakage is the rate-limiting step of hydrolysis. An intermediate of protein-bound phosphate as found for Ras or Rap systems is kinetically unresolved. This demonstrates that despite the structural similarity among the G-domain of the GTPases, different reaction mechanisms are utilized.

  19. Constant enthalpy change value during pyrophosphate hydrolysis within the physiological limits of NaCl.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Masaki, Kazuo; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-11

    A decrease in water activity was thought to result in smaller enthalpy change values during PPi hydrolysis, indicating the importance of solvation for the reaction. However, the physiological significance of this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we combined biochemistry and calorimetry to solve this problem using NaCl, a physiologically occurring water activity-reducing reagent. The pyrophosphatase activities of extremely halophilic Haloarcula japonica, which can grow at ∼4 M NaCl, and non-halophilic Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were maximal at 2.0 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. Thus, halophilic and non-halophilic pyrophosphatases exhibit distinct maximal activities at different NaCl concentration ranges. Upon calorimetry, the same exothermic enthalpy change of -35 kJ/mol was obtained for the halophile and non-halophiles at 1.5-4.0 and 0.1-2.0 M NaCl, respectively. These results show that solvation changes caused by up to 4.0 M NaCl (water activity of ∼0.84) do not affect the enthalpy change in PPi hydrolysis. It has been postulated that PPi is an ATP analog, having a so-called high energy phosphate bond, and that the hydrolysis of both compounds is enthalpically driven. Therefore, our results indicate that the hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds, which are responsible for biological energy conversion, is enthalpically driven within the physiological limits of NaCl.

  20. Peptide synthesis in early earth hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemke, K.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Bird, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    We report here results from experiments and thermodynamic calculations that demonstrate a rapid, temperature-enhanced synthesis of oligopeptides from the condensation of aqueous glycine. Experiments were conducted in custom-made hydrothermal reactors, and organic compounds were characterized with ultraviolet-visible procedures. A comparison of peptide yields at 260??C with those obtained at more moderate temperatures (160??C) gives evidence of a significant (13 kJ ?? mol-1) exergonic shift. In contrast to previous hydrothermal studies, we demonstrate that peptide synthesis is favored in hydrothermal fluids and that rates of peptide hydrolysis are controlled by the stability of the parent amino acid, with a critical dependence on reactor surface composition. From our study, we predict that rapid recycling of product peptides from cool into near-supercritical fluids in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems will enhance peptide chain elongation. It is anticipated that the abundant hydrothermal systems on early Earth could have provided a substantial source of biomolecules required for the origin of life. Astrobiology 9, 141-146. ?? 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2009.

  1. Atomic scale insights into urea-peptide interactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Nicola; Gillams, Richard J; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-02-07

    The mechanism by which proteins are denatured by urea is still not well understood, especially on the atomic scale where these interactions occur in vivo. In this study, the structure of the peptide GPG has been investigated in aqueous urea solutions in order to understand the combination of roles that both urea and water play in protein unfolding. Using a combination of neutron diffraction enhanced by isotopic substitution and computer simulations, it was found, in opposition with previous simulations studies, that urea is preferred over water around polar and charged portions of the peptides. Further, it appears that while urea directly replaces water around the nitrogen groups on GPG that urea and water occupy different positions around the peptide bond carbonyl groups. This suggests that urea may in fact weaken the peptide bond, disrupting the peptide backbone, thus ultimately causing denaturation.

  2. Housefly larvae hydrolysate: orthogonal optimization of hydrolysis, antioxidant activity, amino acid composition and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antioxidant, one of the most important food additives, is widely used in food industry. At present, antioxidant is mostly produced by chemical synthesis, which would accumulate to be pathogenic. Therefore, a great interest has been developed to identify and use natural antioxidants. It was showed that there are a lot of antioxidative peptides in protein hydrolysates, possessing strong capacity of inhibiting peroxidation of macro-biomolecular and scavenging free redicals in vivo. Enzymatic hydrolysis used for preparation of antioxidative peptides is a new hot-spot in the field of natural antioxidants. It reacts under mild conditions, with accurate site-specific degradation, good repeatability and few damages to biological activity of protein. Substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis are usually plants and aqua-animals. Insects are also gaining attention because of their rich protein and resource. Antioxidative peptides are potential to be exploited as new natural antioxidant and functional food. There is a huge potential market in medical and cosmetic field as well. Result Protein hydrolysate with antioxidant activity was prepared from housefly larvae, by a two-step hydrolysis. Through orthogonal optimization of the hydrolysis conditions, the degree of hydrolysis was determined to be approximately 60%. Fractionated hydrolysate at 25 mg/mL, 2.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL exhibited approximately 50%, 60% and 50% of scavenging capacity on superoxide radicals, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Hydrolysate did not exhibit substantial ion chelation. Using a linoneic peroxidation system, the inhibition activity of hydrolysate at 20 mg/mL was close to that of 20 μg/mL tertiary butylhydroquinone, suggesting a potential application of hydrolysate in the oil industry as an efficient antioxidant. The lyophilized hydrolysate presented almost 100% solubility at pH 3-pH 9, and maintained nearly 100% activity at pH 5-pH 8 at 0

  3. Bioactive peptides released by in vitro digestion of standard and hydrolyzed infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Hydrolyzed infant formulas serve as appropriate nutritional sources for infants afflicted with cow's milk allergy, and milk proteins in hydrolyzed formulas are industrially hydrolyzed extensively or partially. To investigate whether industrial hydrolysis may modulate the digestive trajectory of milk proteins, thereby releasing different profiles of bioactive peptides compared with standard formulas, both standard and hydrolyzed formulas were subjected to in vitro digestion and formation of bioactive peptides were compared. One standard, one extensively hydrolyzed, and one partially hydrolyzed infant formula were digested in vitro with pepsin and pancreatin, taking into account the higher gastric pH of infants, and the digesta were subjected to peptidomic analysis. The standard formula released a larger variety of bioactive peptides than from the hydrolyzed formulas, indicating that industrial hydrolysis of milk proteins may generally attenuate their indigenous bioactivities such as antibacterial, immuno-regulatory, and anti-oxidative activities. Conversely, industrial hydrolysis may facilitate the formation of bioactive peptides from hydrophobic proteins/regions such as β-LG and the "strategic zone" of β-CN, which encrypt bioactive peptides including a dipeptidyl dipeptidase-4-inhibitory, hypocholesterolemic, and opioid peptides. Infants fed hydrolyzed infant formulas may be influenced by milk protein-derived bioactive peptides in a manner different from those fed standard formula.

  4. Evidence of peptide oxidation from major myofibrillar proteins in dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a peptidomic approach has been used in the identification of naturally generated peptides during a dry-curing process, showing methionine (Met) oxidation in their sequence. A total of 656 peptides derived from major myofibrillar proteins in Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Teruel dry-cured ham have been identified by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS), including 120 peptides showing methionine oxidation. The percentage of oxidised peptides in the studied proteins ranged from 6% to 35%, being peptides derived from nebulin, titin, myosin heavy chains, and troponin I proteins, those showing the highest number of oxidised methionine. The identification of the peptide sequence incorporating the oxidised amino acid provides valuable information of neighbouring amino acids, degree of hydrolysis of the sample, and characteristics of the peptide, which might be very useful for a future better understanding of the oxidation mechanisms occurring in dry-curing processing.

  5. Amino acid sequence of atrial natriuretic peptides in human coronary sinus plasma.

    PubMed

    Yandle, T; Crozier, I; Nicholls, G; Espiner, E; Carne, A; Brennan, S

    1987-07-31

    Two atrial natriuretic peptides were purified from pooled human coronary sinus plasma by Sep-Pak extraction, immunoaffinity chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid sequences of the two peptides were homologous with 99-126 human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) and 106-126 hANP, the latter being most probably linked to 99-105 ANP by the disulphide bond. The molar ratio of the peptides in plasma, as assessed by radioimmunoassay was 10:3.

  6. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  7. Thioglycoside hydrolysis catalyzed by {beta}-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hong; Byers, Larry D.

    2007-10-26

    Sweet almond {beta}-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21) has been shown to have significant thioglycohydrolase activity. While the K{sub m} values for the S- and O-glycosides are similar, the k{sub cat} values are about 1000-times lower for the S-glycosides. Remarkably, the pH-profile for k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl thioglucoside (pNPSG) shows the identical dependence on a deprotonated carboxylate (pK{sub a} 4.5) and a protonated group (pK{sub a} 6.7) as does the pH-profile for hydrolysis of the corresponding O-glycoside. Not surprisingly, in spite of the requirement for the presence of this protonated group in catalytically active {beta}-glucosidase, thioglucoside hydrolysis does not involve general acid catalysis. There is no solvent kinetic isotope effect on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of pNPSG.

  8. Phosphatase hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphatases are diverse groups of enzymes that deserve special attention because of the significant roles they play in mineralizing organic phosphorus (P) into inorganic available form. For getting more insight on the enzymatically hydrolysis of organic P, in this work, we compared the catalytic pa...

  9. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of spent coffee ground.

    PubMed

    Jooste, T; García-Aparicio, M P; Brienzo, M; van Zyl, W H; Görgens, J F

    2013-04-01

    Spent coffee ground (SCG) is the main residue generated during the production of instant coffee by thermal water extraction from roasted coffee beans. This waste is composed mainly of polysaccharides such as cellulose and galactomannans that are not solubilised during the extraction process, thus remaining as unextractable, insoluble solids. In this context, the application of an enzyme cocktail (mannanase, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase) with more than one component that acts synergistically with each other is regarded as a promising strategy to solubilise/hydrolyse remaining solids, either to increase the soluble solids yield of instant coffee or for use as raw material in the production of bioethanol and food additives (mannitol). Wild fungi were isolated from both SCG and coffee beans and screened for enzyme production. The enzymes produced from the selected wild fungi and recombinant fungi were then evaluated for enzymatic hydrolysis of SCG, in comparison to commercial enzyme preparations. Out of the enzymes evaluated on SCG, the application of mannanase enzymes gave better yields than when only cellulase or xylanase was utilised for hydrolysis. The recombinant mannanase (Man1) provided the highest increments in soluble solids yield (17 %), even when compared with commercial preparations at the same protein concentration (0.5 mg/g SCG). The combination of Man1 with other enzyme activities revealed an additive effect on the hydrolysis yield, but not synergistic interaction, suggesting that the highest soluble solid yields was mainly due to the hydrolysis action of mannanase.

  11. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  12. Hydrolysis of ionic cellulose to glucose.

    PubMed

    Vo, Huyen Thanh; Widyaya, Vania Tanda; Jae, Jungho; Kim, Hoon Sik; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2014-09-01

    Hydrolysis of ionic cellulose (IC), 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cellulose phosphite, which could be synthesized from cellulose and dimethylimidazolium methylphosphite ([Dmim][(OCH3)(H)PO2]) ionic liquid, was conducted for the synthesis of glucose. The reaction without catalysts at 150°C for 12h produced glucose with 14.6% yield. To increase the hydrolysis yield, various acid catalysts were used, in which the sulfonated active carbon (AC-SO3H) performed the best catalytic activity in the IC hydrolysis. In the presence of AC-SO3H, the yields of glucose reached 42.4% and 53.9% at the reaction condition of 150°C for 12h and 180°C for 1.5h, respectively; however the yield decreased with longer reaction time due to the degradation of glucose. Consecutive catalyst reuse experiments on the IC hydrolysis demonstrated the catalytic activity of AC-SO3H persisted at least through four successive uses.

  13. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in microgels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Xu, Wenting; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2015-07-04

    A cellulose-based microgel, where an individual microgel contains approximately one cellulose chain on average, is synthesized via free radical polymerization of a difunctional small-molecule N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide in cellulose solution. This microgelation leads to a low-ordered cellulose, favoring enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to generate glucose.

  14. Effects of Concentration and Reaction Time of Trypsin, Pepsin, and Chymotrypsin on the Hydrolysis Efficiency of Porcine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Ye-Chul; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three proteases (trypsin, pepsin and chymotrypsin) on the hydrolysis efficiency of porcine placenta and the molecular weight (Mw) distributions of the placental hydrolysates. Because placenta was made up of insoluble collagen, the placenta was gelatinized by applying thermal treatment at 90 ℃ for 1 h and used as the sample. The placental hydrolyzing activities of the enzymes at varying concentrations and incubation times were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Based on the SDS-PAGE, the best placental hydrolysis efficiency was observed in trypsin treatments where all peptide bands disappeared after 1 h of incubation as compared to 6 h of chymotrypsin. Pepsin hardly hydrolyzed the placenta as compared to the other two enzymes. The Mw distribution revealed that the trypsin produced placental peptides with Mw of 106 and 500 Da. Peptides produced by chymotrypsin exhibited broad ranges of Mw distribution (1-20 kDa), while the pepsin treatment showed Mw greater than 7 kDa. For comparisons of pre-treatments, the subcritical water processing (37.5 MPa and 200 ℃ of raw placenta improved the efficiency of tryptic digestions to a greater level than that of a preheating treatment (90 ℃ for 1 h). Consequently, subcritical water processing followed by enzymatic digestions has the potential of an advanced collagen hydrolysis technique. PMID:26760932

  15. Metal ion catalyzed hydrolysis of ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, J; Cleland, W W; Hengge, A C

    2003-01-01

    15N isotope effects in the nitro group and 18O isotope effects in the phenolic oxygen have been measured for the hydrolysis of ethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate catalyzed by several metal ions. Co(III)-cyclen at pH 7, 50 degrees C, gave an 15N isotope effect of 0.12% and an 18O one of 2.23%, showing that P-O cleavage is rate limiting and the bond is approximately 50% broken in the transition state. The active catalyst is a dimer and the substrate is presumably coordinated to the open site of one Co(III), and is attacked by hydroxide coordinated to the other Co(III). Co(III)-tacn under the same conditions shows a similar 15N isotope effect (0.13%), but a smaller 18O one (0.8%). Zn(II)-cyclen at pH 8.5, 80 degrees C, gave an 15N isotope effect of 0.05% and an 18O one of 0.95%, suggesting an earlier transition state. The catalyst in this case is monomeric, and thus the substrate is coordinated to one position and attacked by a cis-coordinated hydroxide. Eu(III) at pH 6.5, 50 degrees C, shows a very large 15N isotope effect of 0.34% and a 1.6% 18O isotope effect. The large 15N isotope effect argues for a late transition state or Eu(III) interaction with the nitro group, and was also seen in Eu(III)-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate.

  16. Molecular-scale investigations of cellulose microstructure during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Monica; Jeoh, Tina

    2010-08-09

    Changes in cellulose microstructure have been proposed to occur throughout hydrolysis that impact enzyme access and hydrolysis rates. However, there are very few direct observations of such changes in ongoing reactions. In this study, changes in the microstructure of cellulose are measured by simultaneous confocal and atomic force microscopy and are correlated to hydrolysis extents and quantities of bound enzyme in the reaction. Minimally processed and never-dried cellulose I was hydrolyzed by a purified cellobiohydrolase, Trichoderma reesei Cel7A. Early in the reaction ( approximately 30% hydrolysis), at high hydrolysis rates and high bound cellulase quantities, untwisting of cellulose microfibrils was observed. As the hydrolysis reaction neared completion (>80% hydrolysis), extensively thinned microfibrils (diameters of 3-5 nm) and channels (0.3-0.6 nm deep) along the lengths of the microfibrils were observed. The prominent microstructural changes in cellulose due to cellobiohydrolase action are discussed in the context of the overall hydrolysis reaction.

  17. Nanocellulose prepared by acid hydrolysis of isolated cellulose from sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulandari, W. T.; Rochliadi, A.; Arcana, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cellulose in nanometer range or called by nano-cellulose has attracted much attention from researchers because of its unique properties. Nanocellulose can be obtained by acid hydrolysis of cellulose. The cellulose used in this study was isolated from sugarcane bagasse, and then it was hydrolyzed by 50% sulfuric acid at 40 °C for 10 minutes. Nanocellulose has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Particle Size Analyzer (PSA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Analysis of FTIR showed that there were not a new bond which formed during the hydrolysis process. Based on the TEM analysis, nano-cellulose has a spherical morphology with an average diameter of 111 nm and a maximum distribution of 95.9 nm determined by PSA. The XRD analysis showed that the crystallinity degree of nano-cellulose was higher than cellulose in the amount of 76.01%.

  18. QSAR for cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus esters and CNDO/2 calculations for organophosphorus ester hydrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were derived for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by various organophosphorus esters. Bimolecular inhibition rate constants correlate well with hydrophobic substituent constants, and with the presence or absence of catonic groups on the inhibitor, but not with steric substituent constants. CNDO/2 calculations were performed on a separate set of organophosphorus esters, RR'P(O)X, where R and R' are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. For each subset with the same X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom in the ester correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant. For the whole set of esters with different X, two equations were derived that relate either charge and leaving group steric bulk, or orbital energy and bond order to the hydrogen hydrolysis rate constant.

  19. Optimization of synergism of a recombinant auxiliary activity 9 from Chaetomium globosum with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Youn, Hak Jin; Lee, Hee Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    Auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9, formerly known as glycoside hydrolase family 61 or polysaccharide monooxygenase) is a group of fungal proteins that were recently found to have a significant synergism with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis via the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds of cellulose chains. In this study, we report the active expression of a recombinant fungal AA9 from Chaetomium globosum (CgAA9) in a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, and the optimization of its synergistic activity in cellulose hydrolysis by using cellulase. The recombinant CgAA9 (0.9 mg/g cellulose) exhibited 1.7-fold synergism in the hydrolysis of Avicel when incubated with 0.9 filter paper units of Celluclast 1.5 L/g cellulose. The first study of the active expression of AA9 using a bacterial host and its synergistic optimization could be useful for the industrial application of AA9 for the saccharification of lignocellulose.

  20. Kinetics of Hydrolysis and Products of Hydrolysis and Photolysis of Tetryl.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-22

    NSWC TR 84-88 Lfl KINETICS OF HYDROLYSIS AND PRODUCTS OF HYDROLYSIS AND PHOTOLYSIS OF TETRYL BY ELEONORE G. KAYSER NICHOLAS E. BURLINSON DAVID H...PHOTOLYSIS OF TETRYL Feb 1980 to Dec 1981 S.PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AU THOR(s) SCONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER11110 Eleonore G. Kayser, NLchcolas E...Library 1 Monitoring Techniques Division Dr. Ron Spanggord I Attn: RD680 (Robert B. Medz) 1 333 Rcvenswood Avenue Washington, DC 20460 Menlo Park

  1. Characterization of reducible peptide oligomers as carriers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton; Egorova, Anna; Laukkanen, Antti; Baranov, Vladislav; Urtti, Arto

    2013-01-30

    The stability of DNA-polyplexes and intracellular DNA release are important features of gene delivery systems. To study these features, we have evaluated reducible cysteine-flanked linear lysine and arginine-rich peptides, modified with histidine residues. The reducible disulfide bonds in cysteine flanked peptides and histidine residues should augment DNA release from the peptide-DNA complexes upon disintegration of the reducible bonds. Template polymerization and oxidative polycondensation were applied to obtain peptide oligomers used for DNA-polyplex preparation. The peptides and DNA-peptide complexes were investigated with physical, chemical and transfection measurements. Physicochemical and transfection properties of DNA-polyplexes depended on the amino acid sequence of the peptidic polymers and type of the polymerization. MALDI-TOF analysis of oxidatively polycondensed products revealed several forms of peptide oligomers corresponding to 5-8 amino acid monomers. DNA-peptide particles based on template-polymerized complexes were more resistant to relaxation by negatively charged heparan sulfate than polyplexes formed with oxidatively condensed peptides. Complexes of DNA with the polycations prepared by oxidative polycondensation exhibited a 100-1000-fold higher level of gene expression compared to DNA/template-polymerized peptide complexes. The most efficient transgene expression was shown with arginine-rich polyplexes. Transfection efficacy of the arginine-rich polyplexes was even 10-fold better than that of DNA/PEI complexes. On average, polyplexes based on cysteine-flanked peptide oligomers showed lower cytotoxicity than non-reducible high molecular weight polylysine/DNA particles. We conclude that reducible peptide oligomers provide efficient DNA transfection and have the potential as vehicles for gene delivery.

  2. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  3. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese.

  4. Active-site modifications of adenylation domains lead to hydrolysis of upstream nonribosomal peptidyl thioester intermediates.

    PubMed

    Uguru, Gabriel C; Milne, Claire; Borg, Matthew; Flett, Fiona; Smith, Colin P; Micklefield, Jason

    2004-04-28

    Site-directed mutagenesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) adenylation (A) domains was investigated as a means to engineer new calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA) in Streptomyces coelicolor. Single- and double-point mutants of the CDA NRPS module 7, A-domain were generated, which were predicted to alter the specificity of this domain from Asp to Asn. The double-point mutant produced a new peptide CDA2a-7N containing Asn at position 7 as expected. However, in both the single- and the double-point mutants, significant hydrolysis of the CDA-6mer intermediate was evident. One explanation for this is that the mutant module 7 A-domain activates Asn instead of Asp; however, the Asn-thioester intermediate is only weakly recognized by the upstream C-domain acceptor site (a), allowing a water molecule to intercept the hexapeptidyl intermediate in the donor site (d).

  5. alpha-Chymotrypsin as the catalyst for peptide synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morihara, K; Oka, T

    1977-01-01

    alpha-Chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1)-catalysed syntheses of peptides were performed with various N-acylated amino acid or peptide esters as donors, and amino acid derivatives, peptides or their derivatives as acceptors. Under optimal conditions the synthesis was almost quantitative. As acceptor nucleophiles, free amino acids or the ester derivatives were inadequate, but amino acid amides or hydrazides, di- or tri-peptides, or the amides, hydrazides and esters of the peptides were useful. The nucleophile specificity for synthesis was markedly similar to the leaving-group specificity in hydrolysis; hydrophobic or bulky amino acid residues were most effecient at both P1' and P2' positions [notation of Schechter & Berger (1967) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 27, 157-162], but L-proline as well as D-amino acid residues were the worst choices. The synthesis was further dependent on the solubility of the products synthesized; a higher yield of products was expected with lower solubility. As donor esters, good substrates were all useful. Accordingly, fragment condensation was possible by using N-acylated peptide esters and various peptides. The present study suggested that alpha-chymotrypsin may become a useful tool for peptide synthesis. PMID:880216

  6. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  7. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.