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Sample records for peptide derivative targeting

  1. Photocontrol of calmodulin interaction with target peptides using azobenzene derivative.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hideki; Yamada, Masafumi D; Kondo, Kazunori; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2009-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a physiologically important Ca(2+)-binding protein, participates in numerous cellular regulatory processes. It is dumbbell shaped and contains two globular domains connected by a short alpha-helix. Each of the globular domains has two Ca(2+)-binding sites, the EF hands. CaM undergoes a conformational change upon binding to Ca(2+), which enables it to bind to specific proteins for specific responses. Here, we successfully photocontrolled CaM binding to its target peptide using the photochromic compound N-(4-phenylazophenyl) maleimide (PAM), which reversibly undergoes cis-trans isomerization upon ultraviolet (UV) and visible (VIS) light irradiation. In order to specifically incorporate PAM, CaM mutants having reactive cysteine residues in the functional region were prepared; PAM was stoichiometrically incorporated into the cysteine residues in these mutants. Further, we prepared the target peptide, M13, fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to monitor the CaM-M13 peptide interaction. The binding of the PAM-CaM mutants, N60C, D64C and M124C, to M13-YFP was reversibly photocontrolled upon UV-VIS light irradiation at appropriate Ca(2+) concentrations.

  2. Fetoprotein Derived Short Peptide Coated Nanostructured Amphiphilic Surfaces for Targeting Mouse Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alexandra M.; Miranda-Alarćon, Yoliem S.; Knoll, Grant A.; Santora, Anthony M.; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    In this work, self-assembled tumor targeting nanostructured surfaces were developed from a newly designed amphiphile by conjugating boc protected isoleucine with 2,2‧ ethylenedioxy bis ethylamine (IED). To target mouse mammary tumor cells, a short peptide sequence derived from the human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), LSEDKLLACGEG was attached to the self-assembled nanostructures. Tumor targeting and cell proliferation were examined in the presence of nanoscale assemblies. To further obliterate mouse breast tumor cells, the chemotherapeutic drug tamoxifen was then entrapped into the nanoassemblies. Our studies indicated that the targeting systems were able to efficiently encapsulate and release tamoxifen. Cell proliferation studies showed that IED-AFP peptide loaded with tamoxifen decreased the proliferation of breast cancer cells while in the presence of the IED-AFP peptide nanoassemblies alone, the growth was relatively slower. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts however cell proliferation continued similar to controls. Furthermore, the nanoscale assemblies were found to induce apoptosis in mouse breast cancer cells. To examine live binding interactions, SPR analysis revealed that tamoxifen encapsulated IED-AFP peptide nanoassemblies bound to the breast cancer cells more efficiently compared to unencapsulated assemblies. Thus, we have developed nanoscale assemblies that can specifically bind to and target tumor cells, with increased toxicity in the presence of a chemotherapeutic drug.

  3. Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes using HER2 targeted peptide-lipid derivatives for targeted delivery in breast cancer cells: The effect of serine-glycine repeated peptides as a spacer.

    PubMed

    Suga, Tadaharu; Fuchigami, Yuki; Hagimori, Masayori; Kawakami, Shigeru

    2017-02-22

    Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes have been widely studied for targeted drug delivery systems. Because ligand peptides are commonly grafted using PEG as a spacer on the surface of PEGylated liposomes, the interaction between ligand peptides and their corresponding receptors can be interrupted by steric hindrance of the PEG layer. Therefore, we aimed to develop ligand peptide-lipid derivatives to enhance the targeting efficiency of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes, and designed a new ligand peptide-lipid derivatives having serine-glycine repeats (SG)n as a spacer based on the peptide length calculated by PyMol (v0.99). We selected KCCYSL (KCC) as the ligand peptide for binding to human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). We synthesized new KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7) and evaluated their cellular association in breast cancer cells. KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes dramatically increased cellular association on HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The results suggest that KCC can be grafted on the surface of KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes prepared from KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7). In summary, we succeeded in developing KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives for the preparation of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes.

  4. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D.; Vogel, Maria C.; Rabeh, Wael M.; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane–binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c. Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.—Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:28183803

  5. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Vogel, Maria C; Rabeh, Wael M; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane-binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.-Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  6. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    DOE PAGES

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; ...

    2015-03-30

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. In this paper, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues (“α/β-peptides”) that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle “Z-domain” scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.more » We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Finally, such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.« less

  7. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2015-03-30

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. In this paper, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues (“α/β-peptides”) that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle “Z-domain” scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Finally, such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  8. Peptide-based targeting of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Marr, Annabell; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Jürgen; Huber, Peter E; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to identify new ligands targeting the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ). Biopanning was carried out with a 12-amino-acid phage display library against the recombinant extracellular domain of PDGFRβ. The identified peptide PDGFR-P1 was chemically synthesized and labeled with (125)I or (131)I. In vitro studies were performed on the PDGFRβ-expressing cell lines BxPC3 and MCF7 and on PDGFRβ-transfected HEK cells in comparison to negative control wtHEK293 and CaIX-transfected HEK cells. Biodistribution experiments were performed in Balb/c nude mice, carrying subcutaneously BxPC3 tumors. In vitro studies demonstrated a higher binding to BxPC3, MCF7, and PDGFRβ-tr-HEK cells in comparison to negative control cell lines. Binding was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled PDGFR-P1 peptide. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in BxPC3 tumors than in most organs. PDGFR-P1 is a promising candidate for targeting human PDGFRβ.

  9. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity.

  10. Targeted Peptide Specificity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    the conformation of small natural peptide ligands. In the last year two peptides were investigaýed by 2D-NMR,(j2.- conotoxin SI, which targets to the...targets. Although these venoms are very complex, we have focused on three groups of peptide toxins, the a, j and w- conotoxins which target to nicotinic...grant period are summarized below.) In addition, the 2D-NMR work is continuing and in addition to examining one of the conotoxins specific for the

  11. HLA class I-restricted MYD88 L265P-derived peptides as specific targets for lymphoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelde, Annika; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Kowalewski, Daniel Johannes; Schuster, Heiko; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Peper, Janet Kerstin; Cardona Gloria, Yamel; Langerak, Anton W.; Muggen, Alice F.; Claus, Rainer; Bonzheim, Irina; Fend, Falko; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Kanz, Lothar; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Weber, Alexander N. R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome sequencing has uncovered an array of recurring somatic mutations in different non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes. If affecting protein-coding regions, such mutations may yield mutation-derived peptides that may be presented by HLA class I proteins and recognized by cytotoxic T cells. A recurring somatic and oncogenic driver mutation of the Toll-like receptor adaptor protein MYD88, Leu265Pro (L265P) was identified in up to 90% of different NHL subtype patients. We therefore screened the potential of MYD88L265P-derived peptides to elicit cytotoxic T cell responses as tumor-specific neoantigens. Based on in silico predictions, we identified potential MYD88L265P-containing HLA ligands for several HLA class I restrictions. A set of HLA class I MYD88L265P-derived ligands elicited specific cytotoxic T cell responses for HLA-B*07 and -B*15. These data highlight the potential of MYD88L265P mutation-specific peptide-based immunotherapy as a novel personalized treatment approach for patients with MYD88L265P+ NHLs that may complement pharmacological approaches targeting oncogenic MyD88 L265P signaling. PMID:28405493

  12. Peptides and peptide-derived molecules targeting the intracellular domains of Cx43: gap junctions versus hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Iyyathurai, Jegan; D'hondt, Catheleyne; Wang, Nan; De Bock, Marijke; Himpens, Bernard; Retamal, Mauricio A; Stehberg, Jimmy; Leybaert, Luc; Bultynck, Geert

    2013-12-01

    About a decade ago, the molecular determinants controlling the opening and closing of Cx43 gap junction channels have been identified. Advanced biophysical approaches revealed a critical role for structural rearrangements in the cytoplasmic loop and dimerization of the C-terminal tail, resulting in binding of the C-terminal tail to the cytoplasmic loop and Cx43 gap junction channel closure during cellular acidosis. This has spurred the development of Cx43-mimetic peptides and peptidomimetics that interfere with these loop/tail interactions, thereby preventing the closure of Cx43 gap junctions, e.g. in the heart upon ischemia. Recently, we found that loop/tail interactions control Cx43-hemichannel activity but with an opposite effect. Binding of the C-terminal tail to the cytoplasmic loop is a requisite for the opening of Cx43 hemichannels in response to different stimuli, like decreased extracellular [Ca2+], increased intracellular [Ca2+], positive membrane potentials or ischemia. Strikingly, peptides that favor the open state of Cx43 gap junctions like the L2 peptide inhibit Cx43-hemichannel opening. These tools now provide unprecedented opportunities to selectively inhibit Cx43 hemichannels while maintaining Cx43 gap junction communication, impossible to achieve with siRNA or knockdown approaches both affecting gap junctions and hemichannels. These tools not only are very helpful to unravel the role of Cx43 hemichannels in complex biological systems, but also hold therapeutic potential to counteract excessive Cx43-hemichannel activity like in ischemia/reperfusion in the brain and the heart or to prevent Cx43 hemichannel-mediated gliotransmitter release in the basal amygdala during memory consolidation in response to emotional events. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The Neurofilament-Derived Peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 Targets Neural Stem Cells and Affects Their Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lépinoux-Chambaud, Claire; Barreau, Kristell

    2016-01-01

    Targeting neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult brain represents a promising approach for developing new regenerative strategies, because these cells can proliferate, self-renew, and differentiate into new neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Previous work showed that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide, corresponding to the sequence of a tubulin-binding site on neurofilaments, can target glioblastoma cells, where it disrupts their microtubules and inhibits their proliferation. We show that this peptide targets NSCs in vitro and in vivo when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid. Although neurosphere formation was not altered by the peptide, the NSC self-renewal capacity and proliferation were reduced and were associated with increased adhesion and differentiation. These results indicate that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide represents a new molecular tool to target NSCs to develop new strategies for regenerative medicine and the treatment of brain tumors. Significance In the present study, the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide targeted neural stem cells in vitro when isolated from the subventricular zone and in vivo when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid present in the lateral ventricle. The in vitro formation of neurospheres was not altered by the peptide; however, at a high concentration of the peptide, the neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal capacity and proliferation were reduced and associated with increased adhesion and differentiation. These results indicate that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide represents a new molecular tool to target NSCs to develop new strategies for regenerative medicine and the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:27177578

  14. The Neurofilament-Derived Peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 Targets Neural Stem Cells and Affects Their Properties.

    PubMed

    Lépinoux-Chambaud, Claire; Barreau, Kristell; Eyer, Joël

    2016-07-01

    Targeting neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult brain represents a promising approach for developing new regenerative strategies, because these cells can proliferate, self-renew, and differentiate into new neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Previous work showed that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide, corresponding to the sequence of a tubulin-binding site on neurofilaments, can target glioblastoma cells, where it disrupts their microtubules and inhibits their proliferation. We show that this peptide targets NSCs in vitro and in vivo when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid. Although neurosphere formation was not altered by the peptide, the NSC self-renewal capacity and proliferation were reduced and were associated with increased adhesion and differentiation. These results indicate that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide represents a new molecular tool to target NSCs to develop new strategies for regenerative medicine and the treatment of brain tumors. In the present study, the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide targeted neural stem cells in vitro when isolated from the subventricular zone and in vivo when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid present in the lateral ventricle. The in vitro formation of neurospheres was not altered by the peptide; however, at a high concentration of the peptide, the neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal capacity and proliferation were reduced and associated with increased adhesion and differentiation. These results indicate that the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide represents a new molecular tool to target NSCs to develop new strategies for regenerative medicine and the treatment of brain tumors. ©AlphaMed Press.

  15. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27695323

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and biological activity of poly(arginine)-derived cancer-targeting peptides in HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Stesha C; Blackman, Brittany A; Kelly, Megan L; Phillips, Mariana; Beaury, Michael W; Martinez, Ivonne; Parronchi, Christopher J; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Blake, Allan D; Sabatino, David

    2014-09-01

    The solid-phase synthesis, structural characterization, and biological evaluation of a small library of cancer-targeting peptides have been determined in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells. These peptides are based on the highly specific Pep42 motif, which has been shown to target the glucose-regulated protein 78 receptors overexpressed and exclusively localized on the cell surface of tumors. In this study, Pep42 was designed to contain varying lengths (3-12) of poly(arginine) sequences to assess their influence on peptide structure and biology. Peptides were effectively synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-based solid-phase peptide synthesis, in which the use of a poly(ethylene glycol) resin provided good yields (14-46%) and crude purities >95% as analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peptide structure and biophysical properties were investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Interestingly, peptides displayed secondary structures that were contingent on solvent and length of the poly(arginine) sequences. Peptides exhibited helical and turn conformations, while retaining significant thermal stability. Structure-activity relationship studies conducted by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy revealed that the poly(arginine) derived Pep42 sequences maintained glucose-regulated protein 78 binding on HepG2 cells while exhibiting cell translocation activity that was contingent on the length of the poly(arginine) strand. In single dose (0.15 mM) and dose-response (0-1.5 mM) cell viability assays, peptides were found to be nontoxic in human HepG2 liver cancer cells, illustrating their potential as safe cancer-targeting delivery agents.

  17. Targeting TLR4 Signaling by TLR4 TIR-derived Decoy Peptides: Identification of the TLR4 TIR Dimerization Interface

    PubMed Central

    Toshchakov, Vladimir Y.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Couture, Leah A.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Vogel, Stefanie N.

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-induced dimerization of TLR4 TIR domains initiates intracellular signaling. Therefore, identification of the TLR4 TIR dimerization interface is one key to the rational design of therapeutics that block TLR4 signaling. A library of cell-permeating “decoy peptides,” each of which represents a non-fragmented patch of the TLR4 TIR surface, was designed such that the peptides entirely encompass the TLR4 TIR surface. Each peptide was synthesized in tandem with a cell-permeating Antennapedia homeodomain sequence and tested for the ability to inhibit early cytokine mRNA expression and MAPK activation in LPS-stimulated primary murine macrophages. Five peptides, 4R1, 4R3, 4BB, 4R9, and 4αE, potently inhibited all manifestations of TLR4, but not TLR2 signaling. When tested for their ability to bind directly to TLR4 TIR by FRET using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, Bodipy-TMR-X (BTX)-labeled 4R1, 4BB, and 4αE quenched fluorescence of TLR4-Cerulean (Cer) expressed in HeLa or HEK293T cells, while 4R3 was partially active and 4R9 was least active. These findings suggest that the area between BB loop of TLR4 and its fifth helical region mediates TLR4 TIR dimerization. Moreover, our data provide direct evidence for the utility of the “decoy peptide approach,” in which peptides representing various surface-exposed segments of a protein are initially probed for the ability to inhibit protein function and then their specific targets are identified by FRET, to define recognition sites in signaling proteins that may be targeted therapeutically to disrupt functional transient protein interactions. PMID:21402890

  18. Outer Surface Protein C Peptide Derived from Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Stricto as a Target for Serodiagnosis of Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnaboldi, Paul M.; Seedarnee, Rudra; Sambir, Mariya; Callister, Steven M.; Imparato, Josephine A.

    2013-01-01

    Current serodiagnostic assays for Lyme disease are inadequate at detecting early infection due to poor sensitivity and nonspecificity that arise from the use of whole bacteria or bacterial proteins as assay targets; both targets contain epitopes that are cross-reactive with epitopes found in antigens of other bacterial species. Tests utilizing peptides that contain individual epitopes highly specific for Borrelia burgdorferi as diagnostic targets are an attractive alternative to current assays. Using an overlapping peptide library, we mapped linear epitopes in OspC, a critical virulence factor of B. burgdorferi required for mammalian infection, and confirmed the results by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We identified a highly conserved 20-amino-acid peptide epitope, OspC1. Via ELISA, OspC1 detected specific IgM and/or IgG in 60 of 98 serum samples (62.1%) obtained from patients with erythema migrans (early Lyme disease) at the time of their initial presentation. By comparison, the commercially available OspC peptide PepC10 detected antibody in only 48 of 98 serum samples (49.0%). In addition, OspC1 generated fewer false-positive results among negative healthy and diseased (rheumatoid arthritis and positive Rapid Plasma Reagin [RPR+] test result) control populations than did PepC10. Both highly specific and more sensitive than currently available OspC peptides, OspC1 could have value as a component of a multipeptide Lyme disease serological assay with significantly improved capabilities for the diagnosis of early infection. PMID:23365204

  19. A facile approach to functionalizing cell membrane-coated nanoparticles with neurotoxin-derived peptide for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhilan; Hu, Xuefeng; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Lu, Linwei; Jiang, Kuan; Su, Bingxia; Ruan, Huitong; Ran, Danni; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang; Lu, Weiyue

    2017-08-24

    The blood brain barrier separates the circulating blood from the extracellular fluid in the central nervous system and thus presents an essential obstacle to brain transport of therapeutics. Herein, we report on an effective brain-targeted drug delivery system that combines a robust red blood cell membrane-coated nanoparticle (RBCNP) with a unique neurotoxin-derived targeting moiety. The RBCNPs retain the complex biological functions of natural cell membranes while exhibiting physicochemical properties that are suitable for effective drug delivery. CDX peptide is derived from candoxin and shows high binding affinity with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on the surface of brain endothelial cells. Through a facile yet robust approach, we successfully incorporate (D)CDX peptides onto the surface of RBCNPs without compromising the peptide's brain targeting ability. The resulting (D)CDX-RBCNPs show promising brain targeting efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Using a glioma mouse model, we demonstrate that doxorubicin-loaded (D)CDX-RBCNPs have superior therapeutic efficacy and markedly reduced toxicity as compared to the nontargeted drug formulations. While RBCNPs are used as a model system to evaluate the surface modification approach, the reported method can be readily generalized to various types of cell membrane-derived nanocarriers for broad medical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  1. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen-host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-TB vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, that is, Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro.

  2. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen–host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-tuberculosis vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, i.e. Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro. PMID:25041568

  3. Combinatorial discovery of tumor targeting peptides using phage display.

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Deutscher, Susan L

    2003-10-15

    Peptides possess appropriate pharmacokinetic properties to serve as cancer imaging or therapeutic targeting agents. Currently, only a small number of rationally-derived, labeled peptide analogues that target only a limited subset of antigens are available. Thus, finding new cancer targeting peptides is a central goal in the field of molecular targeting. Novel tumor-avid peptides can be efficiently identified via affinity selections using complex random peptide libraries containing millions of peptides that are displayed on bacteriophage. In vitro and in situ affinity selections may be used to identify peptides with high affinity for the target antigen in vitro. Unfortunately, it has been found that peptides selected in vitro or in situ may not effectively target tumors in vivo due to poor peptide stability and other problems. To improve in vivo targeting, methodological combinatorial chemistry innovations allow selections to be conducted in the environment of the whole animal. Thus, new targeting peptides with optimal in vivo properties can be selected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals. In vivo selections have been proven successful in identifying peptides that target the vasculature of specific organs. In addition, in vivo selections have identified peptides that bind specifically to the surface of or are internalized into tumor cells. In the future, direct selection of peptides for cancer imaging may be expedited using genetically engineered bacteriophage libraries that encode peptides with intrinsic radiometal-chelation or fluorescent sequences.

  4. A novel HLA-A*0201 restricted peptide derived from cathepsin G is an effective immunotherapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Enyenihi, Atim A; St John, Lisa S; Hunsucker, Sally A; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Sergeeva, Anna; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Al-Atrache, Zein; Ropp, Patricia A; Jakher, Haroon; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Lizee, Gregory; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Lu, Sijie; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Glish, Gary L; Armistead, Paul M; Alatrash, Gheath

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting aberrantly expressed leukemia-associated antigens has shown promise in the management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, because of the heterogeneity and clonal evolution that is a feature of myeloid leukemia, targeting single peptide epitopes has had limited success, highlighting the need for novel antigen discovery. In this study, we characterize the role of the myeloid azurophil granule protease cathepsin G (CG) as a novel target for AML immunotherapy. We used Immune Epitope Database and in vitro binding assays to identify immunogenic epitopes derived from CG. Flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy were used to characterize the expression and processing of CG in AML patient samples, leukemia stem cells, and normal neutrophils. Cytotoxicity assays determined the susceptibility of AML to CG-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Dextramer staining and cytokine flow cytometry were conducted to characterize the immune response to CG in patients. CG was highly expressed and ubiquitinated in AML blasts, and was localized outside granules in compartments that facilitate antigen presentation. We identified five HLA-A*0201 binding nonameric peptides (CG1-CG5) derived from CG, and showed immunogenicity of the highest HLA-A*0201 binding peptide, CG1. We showed killing of primary AML by CG1-CTL, but not normal bone marrow. Blocking HLA-A*0201 abrogated CG1-CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, further confirming HLA-A*0201-dependent killing. Finally, we showed functional CG1-CTLs in peripheral blood from AML patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CG is aberrantly expressed and processed in AML and is a novel immunotherapeutic target that warrants further development.

  5. A Novel HLA-A*0201 Restricted Peptide Derived From Cathepsin G Is An Effective Immunotherapeutic Target in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mao; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Enyenihi, Atim A.; St John, Lisa S.; Hunsucker, Sally A.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Sergeeva, Anna; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Atrache, Zein Al; Ropp, Patricia A.; Jakher, Haroon; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Lizee, Gregory; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Lu, Sijie; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Glish, Gary L.; Armistead, Paul M.; Alatrash, Gheath

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Immunotherapy targeting aberrantly expressed leukemia associated antigens (LAA) has shown promise in the management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, because of the heterogeneity and clonal evolution that is a feature of myeloid leukemia, targeting single peptide epitopes has had limited success, highlighting the need for novel antigen discovery. In this study, we characterize the role of the myeloid azurophil granule protease cathepsin G (CG) as a novel target for AML immunotherapy. Experimental Design We used Immune Epitope Database and in vitro binding assays to identify immunogenic epitopes derived from CG. Flow cytometry, immunoblotting and confocal microscopy were used to characterize the expression and processing of CG in AML patient samples, leukemia stem cells and normal neutrophils. Cytotoxicity assays determined the susceptibility of AML to CG-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Dextramer staining and cytokine flow cytometry were performed to characterize the immune response to CG in patients. Results CG was highly expressed and ubiquitinated in AML blasts, and was localized outside granules in compartments that facilitate antigen presentation. We identified five HLA-A*0201 binding nonameric peptides (CG1-CG5) derived from CG, and demonstrated immunogenicity of the highest HLA-A*0201 binding peptide, CG1. We showed killing of primary AML by CG1-CTL, but not normal bone marrow. Blocking HLA-A*0201 abrogated CG1-CTL mediated cytotoxicity, further confirming HLA-A*0201 dependent killing. Finally, we demonstrated functional CG1-CTLs in peripheral blood from AML patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Conclusion CG is aberrantly expressed and processed in AML and is a novel immunotherapeutic target that warrants further development. PMID:23147993

  6. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    PubMed

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P < 0.001). The sperm-zona pellucida interaction described in this paper is applied as a functional assay for molecular interactions of sperm binding and can be used to assess function for potential surface markers on gametes. It is shown here that a unique binding ligand (PPS2) can be synthesized from another complimentary ligand (PPS1) without the need for a known intermediate substrate. PPS1 and PPS2 may have properties that can be used to target processes involved in conception and assisted reproduction. A movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  7. A novel C5a-derived immunobiotic peptide reduces Streptococcus agalactiae colonization through targeted bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Courtney K; Patras, Kathryn A; Zlamal, Jaime E; Thoman, Marilyn L; Morgan, Edward L; Sanderson, Sam D; Doran, Kelly S

    2013-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a Gram-positive bacterium that colonizes the cervicovaginal tract in approximately 25% of healthy women. Although colonization is asymptomatic, GBS can be vertically transmitted to newborns peripartum, causing severe disease such as pneumonia and meningitis. Current prophylaxis, consisting of late gestation screening and intrapartum antibiotics, has failed to completely prevent transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in the United States. Lack of an effective vaccine and emerging antibiotic resistance necessitate exploring novel therapeutic strategies. We have employed a host-directed immunomodulatory therapy using a novel peptide, known as EP67, derived from the C-terminal region of human complement component C5a. Previously, we have demonstrated in vivo that EP67 engagement of the C5a receptor (CD88) effectively limits staphylococcal infection by promoting cytokine release and neutrophil infiltration. Here, using our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, we observed that EP67 treatment results in rapid clearance of GBS from the murine vagina. However, this was not dependent on functional neutrophil recruitment or CD88 signaling, as EP67 treatment reduced the vaginal bacterial load in mice lacking CD88 or the major neutrophil receptor CXCr2. Interestingly, we found that EP67 inhibits GBS growth in vitro and in vivo and that antibacterial activity was specific to Streptococcus species. Our work establishes that EP67-mediated clearance of GBS is likely due to direct bacterial killing rather than to enhanced immune stimulation. We conclude that EP67 may have potential as a therapeutic to control GBS vaginal colonization.

  8. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  9. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  10. Combination of the CCL5-Derived Peptide R4.0 with Different HIV-1 Blockers Reveals Wide Target Compatibility and Synergic Cobinding to CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25114130

  11. Combination of the CCL5-derived peptide R4.0 with different HIV-1 blockers reveals wide target compatibility and synergic cobinding to CCR5.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Massimiliano; Vassena, Lia; Morin, Sébastien; Schols, Dominique; Vangelista, Luca

    2014-10-01

    R4.0, a synthetic CCL5/RANTES-derived peptide, exerts potent anti-HIV-1 activity via its nonactivating interaction with CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor. CCR5 chronic activation may promote undesirable inflammatory effects and enhance viral infection; thus, receptor antagonism is a necessary requisite. HIV-1 gp120, CCL5, and maraviroc dock on CCR5 by sharing two receptor sites: the N terminus and the second extracellular loop. In combination studies, R4.0, CCL5, and maraviroc exhibited concomitant interactions with CCR5 and promoted synergic inhibition of HIV-1 in acute-infection assays. Furthermore, various degrees of additive/synergic HIV-1 inhibition were observed when R4.0 was tested in combination with drugs and lead compounds directed toward different viral targets (gp120, gp41, reverse transcriptase, and protease). In combination with tenofovir, R4.0 provides cross-clade synergic inhibition of primary HIV-1 isolates. Remarkably, an in vitro-generated maraviroc-resistant R5 HIV-1 strain was inhibited by R4.0 comparably to the wild-type strain, suggesting the presence of viral resistance barriers similar to those reported for CCL5. Overall, R4.0 appears to be a promising lead peptide with potential for combination in anti-HIV-1 therapy and in microbicide development to prevent sexual HIV-1 transmission.

  12. Strategies for Vaccine Design Using Phage Display-Derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Luiz R; Santos, Paula de S

    2016-01-01

    Development of peptide vaccines through the phage display technology is a powerful strategy that relies on short peptides expressed in the phage capsid surface to induce highly targeted immune responses. Phage display-derived immunogenic peptides can be used directly as a phage-fused peptide reagent or as a synthetic peptide with specific modifications, according to target molecule and disease pathogen/parasite. Peptides' selection (mimotopes) can be performed against monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to disclose determinant regions (epitopes) that can induce a neutralizing response. Validations of mimotopes are performed in vitro and in vivo, based on cell culture and animal models, to demonstrate its immunogenic potential for final vaccine formulations with an appropriate adjuvant. Here we present specific methods for the discovery of novel immunogenic peptides based on phage display.

  13. Coronavirus nsp10/nsp16 Methyltransferase Can Be Targeted by nsp10-Derived Peptide In Vitro and In Vivo To Reduce Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Wu, Andong; Xu, Shan; Pan, Ruangang; Zeng, Cong; Jin, Xu; Ge, Xingyi; Shi, Zhengli; Ahola, Tero; Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2015-08-01

    in vitro and in vivo. Coronaviruses are important pathogens of animals and human with high zoonotic potential. SARS-CoV encodes the 2'-O-MTase that is composed of the catalytic subunit nsp16 and the stimulatory subunit nsp10 and plays an important role in virus genome replication and evasion from innate immunity. Our current results demonstrate that stimulation of nsp16 2'-O-MTase activity by nsp10 is a common mechanism for coronaviruses, and nsp10 is functionally interchangeable in the stimulation of nsp16 among different coronaviruses, which underlies the rationale for developing inhibitory peptides. We demonstrate that a peptide derived from the nsp16-interacting domain of MHV nsp10 could inhibit 2'-O-MTase activity of different coronaviruses in vitro and viral replication of MHV and SARS-CoV replicon in cell culture, and it could strongly inhibit virus replication and pathogenesis in MHV-infected mice. This work makes it possible to develop broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors by targeting the nsp16/nsp10 2'-O-MTase of coronaviruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Coronavirus nsp10/nsp16 Methyltransferase Can Be Targeted by nsp10-Derived Peptide In Vitro and In Vivo To Reduce Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Wu, Andong; Xu, Shan; Pan, Ruangang; Zeng, Cong; Jin, Xu; Ge, Xingyi; Shi, Zhengli; Ahola, Tero

    2015-01-01

    -O-MTase activity can be targeted in vitro and in vivo. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are important pathogens of animals and human with high zoonotic potential. SARS-CoV encodes the 2′-O-MTase that is composed of the catalytic subunit nsp16 and the stimulatory subunit nsp10 and plays an important role in virus genome replication and evasion from innate immunity. Our current results demonstrate that stimulation of nsp16 2′-O-MTase activity by nsp10 is a common mechanism for coronaviruses, and nsp10 is functionally interchangeable in the stimulation of nsp16 among different coronaviruses, which underlies the rationale for developing inhibitory peptides. We demonstrate that a peptide derived from the nsp16-interacting domain of MHV nsp10 could inhibit 2′-O-MTase activity of different coronaviruses in vitro and viral replication of MHV and SARS-CoV replicon in cell culture, and it could strongly inhibit virus replication and pathogenesis in MHV-infected mice. This work makes it possible to develop broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors by targeting the nsp16/nsp10 2′-O-MTase of coronaviruses. PMID:26041293

  15. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Structure-based derivation of peptide inhibitors to target TGF-β1 receptor for the suppression of hypertrophic scarring fibroblast activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan; Yang, Songlin; Zheng, Jianghong; Mao, Guangyu

    2017-01-25

    The intermolecular recognition and interaction between human transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1) and its cognate receptor TβRII have been implicated in the pathological condition of hypertrophic scarring (HS). Here, we attempted to rationally derive peptide inhibitors from the complex interface of TGF-β1 with TβRII to disrupt such interaction for the suppression of fibroblast activation involved in HS. A synthetic strategy that integrated computational design and fluorescence-based assay was described to examine the structural basis and energetic property of TGF-β1-TβRII crystal structure, from which a small peptide segment in the complex binding site was stripped artificially. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the linear peptide possesses a large intrinsic disorder that would incur considerable entropy penalty upon binding to TβRII; the peptide segment was then extended and cyclized by introducing a disulfide bond across its terminal residues that were premutated to cysteine. Normal mode analysis indicated that, as expected, the peptide flexibility was largely reduced upon the cyclization, and thus, the entropy penalty was minimized substantially, consequently promoting the spontaneous binding of peptide to TβRII. Fluorescence polarization assay confirmed that all linear peptides are typical non-binders of TβRII (Kd  = ND), while the designed cyclic peptides exhibit moderate or high affinity with Kd at micromolar level.

  17. A parasitic helminth-derived peptide that targets the macrophage lysosome is a novel therapeutic option for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Raquel; O'Brien, Bronwyn; Tanaka, Akane; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2015-02-01

    Parasitic worms (helminths) reside in their mammalian hosts for many years. This is attributable, in part, to their ability to skew the host's immune system away from pro-inflammatory responses and towards anti-inflammatory or regulatory responses. This immune modulatory ability ensures helminth longevity within the host, while simultaneously minimises tissue destruction for the host. The molecules that the parasite releases clearly exert potent immune-modulatory actions, which could be exploited clinically, for example in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of pro-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have identified a novel family of immune-modulatory proteins, termed helminth defence molecules (HDMs), which are secreted by several medically important helminth parasites. These HDMs share biochemical and structural characteristics with mammalian cathelicidin-like host defence peptides (HDPs), which are significant components of the innate immune system. Like their mammalian counterparts, parasite HDMs block the activation of macrophages via toll like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling, however HDMs are significantly less cytotoxic than HDPs. HDMs can traverse the cell membrane of macrophages and enter the endolysosomal system where they reduce the acidification of lysosomal compartments by inhibiting vacuolar (v)-ATPase activity. In doing this, HDMs can modulate critical cellular functions, such as cytokine secretion and antigen processing/presentation. Here, we review the role of macrophages, specifically their lysosomal mediated activities, in the initiation and perpetuation of pro-inflammatory immune responses. We also discuss the potential of helminth defence molecules (HDMs) as therapeutics to counteract the pro-inflammatory responses underlying autoimmune disease. Given the current lack of effective, non-cytotoxic treatment options to limit the progression of autoimmune pathologies, HDMs open novel treatment avenues.

  18. Identification of human leukocyte antigen-A24-restricted epitope peptides derived from gene products upregulated in lung and esophageal cancers as novel targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suda, Takako; Tsunoda, Takuya; Daigo, Yataro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tahara, Hideaki

    2007-11-01

    For the development of cancer vaccine therapies, we have searched for possible epitope peptides that can elicit cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to the TTK protein kinase (TTK), lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus K (LY6K) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP-3), which were previously identified to be transactivated in the majority of lung and esophageal cancers. We screened 31, 17 and 17 candidate human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*2402-binding peptides to parts of TTK, LY6K and IMP-3, respectively. As a result, we successfully established strong CTL clones stimulated by TTK-567 (SYRNEIAYL), LY6K-177 (RYCNLEGPPI) and IMP-3-508 (KTVNELQNL) that have specific cytotoxic activities against the HLA-A24-positive target cells pulsed with the candidate peptides. Subsequent analysis of the CTL clones also revealed their cytotoxic activities against lung and esophageal tumor cells that endogenously express TTK, LY6K or IMP-3. A cold target inhibition assay further confirmed that the CTL cell clones specifically recognized the MHC class I–peptide complex. Our results strongly imply that TTK, LY6K and IMP-3 are novel tumor-associated antigens recognized by CTL, and TTK-567 (SYRNEIAYL), LY6K-177 (RYCNLEGPPI) and IMP-3-508 (KTVNELQNL) are HLA-A24-restricted epitope peptides that can induce potent and specific immune responses against lung and esophageal cancer cells expressing TTK, LY6K and IMP-3.

  19. Peptide mediated cancer targeting of nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Raha, Sumita; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Targeted use of nanoparticles in vitro, in cells and in vivo requires nanoparticle surface functionalization. Moieties that can be used for such a purpose include small molecules as well as polymers made of different biological and organic materials. Short amino acid polymers--peptides can often rival target binding avidity of much larger molecules. At the same time, peptides are smaller than most nanoparticles and thus allow for multiple nanoparticle modifications and creation of pluripotent nanoparticles. Most nanoparticles provide multiple binding sites for different cargo and targeting peptides which can be used for development of novel approaches for cancer targeting, diagnostics and therapy. In this review, we will focus on peptides which have been used for preparation of different nanoparticles designed for cancer research. PMID:21046660

  20. Processing and targeting of proteins derived from polyprotein with 2A and LP4/2A as peptide linkers in a maize expression system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Huang, Dafang; Lang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    In the transformation of multiple genes, gene fusion is an attractive alternative to other methods, including sexual crossing, re-transformation, and co-transformation, among others. The 2A peptide from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes the co-translational “cleavage” of polyprotein and operates in a wide variety of eukaryotic cells. LP4, a linker peptide that originates from a natural polyprotein occurring in the seed of Impatiens balsamina, can be split between the first and second amino acids in post-translational processing. LP4/2A is a hybrid linker peptide that contains the first nine amino acids of LP4 and 20 amino acids of 2A. The three linkers have been used as a suitable technique to link the expression of genes in some transgenic plants, but to date the cleavage efficiency of three linkers have not been comprehensively demonstrated in the same transformation system, especially in the staple crop. To verify the functions of 2A, LP4, and LP4/2A linker peptides in transgenic maize, six fusion protein vectors that each encoded a single open reading frame (ORF) incorporating two report genes, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS), separated by 2A (or modified 2A), LP4 or LP4/2A were assembled to compare the cleavage efficiency of the three linkers in a maize transient expression system. The results demonstrated the more protein production and higher cleavage splicing efficiency with the polyprotein construct linked by the LP4/2A peptide than those of the polyprotein constructs linked by 2A or LP4 alone. Seven other fusion proteins that each encoded a single ORF incorporating two different genes GFP and Red Fluorecent Protein (RFP) with different signal peptides were assembled to study the subcellular localization of genes linked by LP4/2A. The subcellular localization experiments suggested that both types of signal peptide, co-translational and post-translational, could lead their proteins to the target localization in

  1. Bioactive peptides in plant-derived foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2016-09-16

    A literature survey covering the presence of bioactive peptides in plant-derived foodstuffs is presented. Examples are given of plant peptides associated with a beneficial effect on human health. The main bioactive effects of these peptides are defined and their mechanism of action described, when known. Current understanding of the way in which these molecules are adsorbed, distributed, metabolized and finally excreted is discussed. A particular focus is given to potentially immunomodulatory peptides. The leading analytical assay methods used to evaluate their activity are outlined. Inspection of crop proteomic data revealed that at least 6000 proteins may harbour bioactive peptides. The analysis of these proteins using a Gene Ontology approach has provided a number of insights regarding their occurrence and relevance. The review reports an updated survey on bioactive peptides present in food crop plants, with a particular focus on immunomodulatory peptides which might be relevant for therapeutic applications. It employs a bioinformatic approach to search for proteins of crop plants potentially harboring bioactive peptides, summarising through Gene Ontology the main classes of peptide-containing proteins in food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Flatfish Genes†

    PubMed Central

    Patrzykat, Aleksander; Gallant, Jeffrey W.; Seo, Jung-Kil; Pytyck, Jennifer; Douglas, Susan E.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the identification of active novel antimicrobials determined by screening both the genomic information and the mRNA transcripts from a number of different flatfish for sequences encoding antimicrobial peptides, predicting the sequences of active peptides from the genetic information, producing the predicted peptides chemically, and testing them for their activities. We amplified 35 sequences from various species of flatfish using primers whose sequences are based on conserved flanking regions of a known antimicrobial peptide from winter flounder, pleurocidin. We analyzed the sequences of the amplified products and predicted which sequences were likely to encode functional antimicrobial peptides on the basis of charge, hydrophobicity, relation to flanking sequences, and similarity to known active peptides. Twenty peptides were then produced synthetically and tested for their activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and the yeast Candida albicans. The most active peptide (with the carboxy-terminus amidated sequence GWRTLLKKAEVKTVGKLALKHYL, derived from American plaice) showed inhibitory activity over a concentration range of 1 to 8 μg/ml against a test panel of pathogens, including the intrinsically antibiotic-resistant organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and C. albicans. The methods described here will be useful for the identification of novel peptides with good antimicrobial activities. PMID:12878506

  3. Rhenium and Technetium-oxo Complexes with Thioamide Derivatives of Pyridylhydrazine Bifunctional Chelators Conjugated to the Tumour Targeting Peptides Octreotate and Cyclic-RGDfK

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to develop new tumor targeted theranostic agents taking advantage of the similarities in coordination chemistry between technetium and rhenium. A γ-emitting radioactive isotope of technetium is commonly used in diagnostic imaging, and there are two β– emitting radioactive isotopes of rhenium that have the potential to be of use in radiotherapy. Variants of the 6-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) bifunctional ligands have been prepared by appending thioamide functional groups to 6-hydrazinonicotinamide to form pyridylthiosemicarbazide ligands (SHYNIC). The new bidentate ligands were conjugated to the tumor targeting peptides Tyr3-octreotate and cyclic-RGD. The new ligands and conjugates were used to prepare well-defined {M=O}3+ complexes (where M = 99mTc or natRe or 188Re) that feature two targeting peptides attached to the single metal ion. These new SHYNIC ligands are capable of forming well-defined rhenium and technetium complexes and offer the possibility of using the 99mTc imaging and 188/186Re therapeutic matched pairs. PMID:28766938

  4. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  5. Human Anti-Aβ IgGs Target Conformational Epitopes on Synthetic Dimer Assemblies and the AD Brain-Derived Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A.; Ehrlich, Hartmut J.; Schwarz, Hans P.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Solomon, Alan; O’Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ’s conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody’s nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody’s lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted. PMID:23209707

  6. Functional peptides derived from rice bran proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Q; Strappe, P; Shang, W T; Zhou, Z K

    2017-09-08

    Rice bran has been predominantly used in the feed industry, and only recently it has attracted greater attention in terms of human nutrition with increasing knowledge of its bioactivity. A growing interest is the analysis of physiologically active peptides derived from rice bran proteins. In this paper, the bioactivities of rice bran proteins hydrolysates and peptides are reviewed based on recent studies. These enzymatic hydrolysates and peptides exert various biological activities including antioxidant, antidiabetic, anticancer and inhibitory activity for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which may ultimately prevent certain chronic diseases. Nevertheless, these functionalities can be highly associated with their corresponding structural characteristics, in particular specific sequences and molecular weight distribution. This article may facilitate the expansion of the prospective applications of the bioactive peptides in a number of fields and provide some clues of the relationship between peptides structure and functionality for future research.

  7. [Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins].

    PubMed

    Torres-Llanez, María de Jesús; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aaron Fernando

    2005-06-01

    Milk proteins are known for having a wide range of nutritional, functional and biological properties that make them important ingredients in functional or health promoting foods. These properties are partly attributed to bioactive peptides coded in the different milk proteins. Bioactive peptides are inactive within the protein sequence but may be released by the action of native proteolitic enzymes from milk, enzymes from lactic acid bacteria or from exogenous sources or may be produced during gastrointestinal digestion or processing of foods. Peptides derived from caseins and whey proteins were shown to present several bioactive properties such as opioid, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunodulatory, mineral carrier and antithrombotic. This overview presents a perspective of the importance of dairy proteins in the production of bioactive peptides and their biological activities, as well as the main analytical tecniques that have been used for the isolation and identification of these peptides.

  8. Peptide-Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yubin; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R) and melanin are two attractive melanoma-specific targets for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Radiolabeled peptides targeting MC1-R/melanin can selectively and specifically target cytotoxic radiation generated from therapeutic radionuclides to melanoma cells for cell killing, while sparing the normal tissues and organs. This review highlights the recent advances of peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma targeting MC1R and melanin. The promising therapeutic efficacies of 188Re-(Arg11)CCMSH (188Re-[Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11]-α-MSH3-13), 177Lu- and 212Pb-labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-[ReO-(Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11)]-α-MSH3-13) and 188Re-HYNIC-4B4 (188Re-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr-Glu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Trp-His-Gly-Arg-His) in preclinical melanoma-bearing models demonstrate an optimistic outlook for peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma. Peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy for melanoma will likely contribute in an adjuvant setting, once the primary tumor has been surgically removed, to treat metastatic deposits and for treatment of end-stage disease. The lack of effective treatments for metastatic melanoma and end stage disease underscores the necessity to develop and implement new treatment strategies, such as peptide-targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:18387816

  9. A fusogenic dengue virus-derived peptide enhances antitumor efficacy of an antibody-ribonuclease fusion protein targeting the EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Kiesgen, Stefan; Liebers, Nora; Cremer, Martin; Arnold, Ulrich; Weber, Tobias; Keller, Armin; Herold-Mende, Christel; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Jäger, Dirk; Kontermann, Roland E; Arndt, Michaela A E; Krauss, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Due to its frequent overexpression in a variety of solid tumors the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a well-established target for therapeutic interventions in epithelial cancers. In order to target EGFR in head and neck cancer, we have generated a ribonuclease (RNase) fusion protein comprising a humanized anti-EGFR antibody single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) and Ranpirnase, an RNase from Rana pipiens. Fusion of Ranpirnase to the N-terminus of the scFv via a flexible glycine-serine linker (G4S)3 resulted in very poor cytotoxicity of the fusion protein. As endosomal accumulation and lysosomal degradation have been reported to diminish the antitumor efficacy of ribonuclease or toxin-based immunoagents, we explored a fusion peptide from dengue virus that has been reported to be involved in the endosomal escape of the virus. This peptide was introduced as a linker between Ranpirnase and the scFv moiety. The modified immunoRNase exhibited exceptionally high cytotoxicity toward EGFR-expressing head and neck cell lines without affecting specificity. These results indicate that endosomal entrapment needs to be considered for Ranpirnase-based immunoagents and might be overcome by the use of tailored transduction domains from viral proteins.

  10. Novel cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Carmine Pasquale; Pirisinu, Marco; Vlachos, Efstathios Nikolaos; Langel, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short, nontoxic peptides with cationic and/or amphipathic properties able to cross the cellular membrane. CPPs are used for the delivery of a wide variety of cargoes, such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and therapeutic molecules. The aim of the present study was to synthesize unusually small novel CPPs targeting mitochondria based on the Szeto-Schiller peptide (SS-31) to influence intramitochondrial processes and to improve the biologic effects. All the peptides used were synthesized manually using 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chemistry. In the first part of the study, HeLa 705, U87, and bEnd.3 cells were used as in vitro delivery model. Cells were incubated for 24 h at 37°C and 5% CO2 with different concentrations of our peptides. Cell proliferation assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. Biologic effects such as mitochondrial membrane potential and antioxidant activity were evaluated. H2O2 was used as positive control. Uptake studies were performed using peptides conjugated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (FAM). Fluorescent microscopy was used to determine presence and localization of peptides into the cells. Isolated mitochondria from pretreated cells and mitochondria treated after isolation were used to confirm the targeting ability of the peptide. Uptake of FAM alone was used as negative control. Microscopy studies confirmed the ability of peptides to penetrate cell. Localization analysis showed increase in uptake by 35% compared with SS-31. Mitochondrial CPP 1 (mtCPP-1) had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented reactive oxygen species formation in bEnd.3 cells by 2-fold compared with SS-31. No cytotoxicity was observed even at high concentration (100 µM). These data suggest that mtCPP-1 is a mitochondrial CPP and protect mitochondria from oxidative damage due to its own antioxidant activities. © FASEB.

  11. A peptide derived from phage display library exhibits anti-tumor activity by targeting GRP78 in gastric cancer multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jianqin; Zhao, Guohong; Lin, Tao; Tang, Shanhong; Xu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Bi, Qian; Guo, Changcun; Sun, Li; Han, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Biaoluo; Liang, Shuhui; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kaichun

    2013-10-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a significant challenge to the clinical treatment of gastric cancer (GC). In the present study, using a phage display approach combined with MTT assays, we screened a specific peptide GMBP1 (Gastric cancer MDR cell-specific binding peptide), ETAPLSTMLSPY, which could bind to the surface of GC MDR cells specifically and reverse their MDR phenotypes. Immunocytochemical staining showed that the potential receptor of GMBP1 was located at the membrane and cytoplasm of MDR cells. In vitro and in vivo drug sensitivity assays, FACS analysis and Western blotting confirmed that GMBP1 was able to re-sensitize MDR cells to chemical drugs. Western blotting and proteomic approaches were used to screen the receptor of GMBP1, and GRP78, a MDR-related protein, was identified as a receptor of GMBP1. This result was further supported by immunofluoresence microscopy and Western blot. Additionally, Western blotting demonstrated that pre-incubation of GMBP1 in MDR cells greatly diminished MDR1, Bcl-2 and GRP78 expression but increased the expression of Bax, whereas downregulation of GRP78, function as a receptor and directly target for GMBP1, only inhibited MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that GMBP1 could re-sensitize GC MDR cells to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents and this role might be mediated partly through down-regulating GRP78 expression and then inhibiting MDR1 expression. These findings indicate that peptide GMBP1 likely recognizes a novel GRP78 receptor and mediates cellular activities associated with the MDR phenotype, which provides new insight into research on the management of MDR in gastric cancer cells.

  12. Cullin3 - BTB Interface: A Novel Target for Stapled Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3–BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the “stapling” with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49–68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300–600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3. PMID:25848797

  13. Cullin3-BTB interface: a novel target for stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    de Paola, Ivan; Pirone, Luciano; Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3-BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the "stapling" with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49-68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300-600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3.

  14. Novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides use different antimicrobial mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Kathryn E; Spinella, Sara A; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-03-01

    The increase in multidrug resistant bacteria has sparked an interest in the development of novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides that operate by crossing the cell membrane may also have the potential to deliver drugs to intracellular targets. Buforin 2 (BF2) is an antimicrobial peptide that shares sequence identity with a fragment of histone subunit H2A and whose bactericidal mechanism depends on membrane translocation and DNA binding. Previously, novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAPs) were designed based on properties of BF2, and DesHDAP1 and DesHDAP3 showed significant antibacterial activity. In this study, their DNA binding, permeabilization, and translocation abilities were assessed independently and compared to antibacterial activity to determine whether they share a mechanism with BF2. To investigate the importance of proline in determining the peptides' mechanisms of action, proline to alanine mutants of the novel peptides were generated. DesHDAP1, which shows significant similarities to BF2 in terms of secondary structure, translocates effectively across lipid vesicle and bacterial membranes, while the DesHDAP1 proline mutant shows reduced translocation abilities and antimicrobial potency. In contrast, both DesHDAP3 and its proline mutant translocate poorly, though the DesHDAP3 proline mutant is more potent. Our findings suggest that a proline hinge can promote membrane translocation in some peptides, but that the extent of its effect on permeabilization depends on the peptide's amphipathic properties. Our results also highlight the different antimicrobial mechanisms exhibited by histone-derived peptides and suggest that histones may serve as a source of novel antimicrobial peptides with varied properties.

  15. Marine fish-derived bioactive peptides as potential antihypertensive agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Ngo, Dai-Hung; Vo, Thanh-Sang

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is the most widespread risk factor for many serious cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a crucial role in cardiovascular physiological regulation by converting angiotensin I to a potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Hence, the inhibition of ACE is a key target for antihypertensive activity. Recently, potent antihypertensive peptides have been purified widely by enzymatic hydrolysis of muscle protein, skin collagen, and gelatin of many different kinds of marine fishes. Marine fish-derived bioactive peptides can be developed as antihypertensive components in functional foods or nutraceuticals. This contribution presents an overview of the ACE inhibitory peptides derived from marine fishes and discusses their future prospects to be used as potential drug candidates for preventing and treating high blood pressure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stapled peptides for intracellular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Gregory L; Hilinski, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that engage in intracellular interactions with other proteins are widely considered among the most biologically appealing yet chemically intractable targets for drug discovery. The critical interaction surfaces of these proteins typically lack the deep hydrophobic involutions that enable potent, selective targeting by small organic molecules, and their localization within the cell puts them beyond the reach of protein therapeutics. Considerable interest has therefore arisen in next-generation targeting molecules that combine the broad target recognition capabilities of protein therapeutics with the robust cell-penetrating ability of small molecules. One type that has shown promise in early-stage studies is hydrocarbon-stapled α-helical peptides, a novel class of synthetic miniproteins locked into their bioactive α-helical fold through the site-specific introduction of a chemical brace, an all-hydrocarbon staple. Stapling can greatly improve the pharmacologic performance of peptides, increasing their target affinity, proteolytic resistance, and serum half-life while conferring on them high levels of cell penetration through endocytic vesicle trafficking. Here, we discuss considerations crucial to the successful design and evaluation of potent stapled peptide interactions, our intention being to facilitate the broad application of this technology to intractable targets of both basic biologic interest and potential therapeutic value.

  17. Frameshift-derived neoantigens constitute immunotherapeutic targets for patients with microsatellite-instable haematological malignancies: frameshift peptides for treating MSI+ blood cancers.

    PubMed

    Maletzki, Claudia; Schmidt, Fabian; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Schmitt, Michael; Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) resulting from loss of functional DNA mismatch repair was recently found in various haematological disorders. In coding sequences, MSI leads to frameshift mutations (FSMs) and the production of C-terminally altered proteins which are foreign to the immune system. Here, we wondered whether these frame-shifted peptide (FSP) sequences represent tumour-specific antigens also for MSI(+) leukaemia and lymphomas (L/L). A total of 33 coding region microsatellites were examined in MSI(+) L/L cell lines for the presence of FSMs. Thereafter, recognition of MSI(+) cells by established FSP-specific CD8(+) T cell lines was quantified using interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assays. In each experiment, MSI(+) L/L cell lines and T2 targets exogenously loaded with the cognate peptide (=internal control) were employed. Supplementary, lytic activity towards tumour cells was analysed by standard chromium release assay ((51)Cr). Mutational profiling of 33 coding microsatellite loci in nine MSI(+) L/L cell lines revealed instability in at least nine microsatellites. In each cell line, a distinct mutational profile was observed. Only three of the 33 loci were stable. FSP-specific and human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)-restricted T cells specifically recognised MSI(+) L/L cells endogenously expressing TGFβRII(-1), Caspase 5 (-1) and MSH3 (-1) in ELISpot assays. Moreover, specific killing of Caspase 5 (-1) and MSH3 (-1) expressing L/L cell lines was achieved in functional cytotoxicity assays. Data presented here expand the importance of FSPs as shared and general tumour-specific antigens. Consequently, they open new avenues for specific immunotherapies not only for solid but also for MSI(+) haematological malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2013-01-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondria often rely on disruption of protein–protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion. PMID:22946430

  19. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-08-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondira often rely on disruption of protein--protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion.

  20. Peptide therapeutics: targeting the undruggable space.

    PubMed

    Tsomaia, Natia

    2015-04-13

    Rapid advancements in genomics have brought a better understanding of molecular mechanisms for various pathologies and identified a number of highly attractive target classes. Some of these targets include intracellular protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which control many essential biological pathways. Their surfaces are part of a diverse and unexplored biological space, where traditional small molecule scaffolds are not always successful. While large biologics can effectively modulate PPIs in the extracellular region, their limitation in crossing the cellular membrane leaves intracellular protein targets outside of their reach. There is a growing need in the pharmaceutical field to push the boundaries of traditional drug design and discover innovative molecules that are able to modulate key biological pathways by inhibiting intracellular PPIs. Peptides are one of the most promising classes of molecules that could deliver such therapeutics in the near future. In this review, we describe technological advancements and emerging chemical approaches for stabilizing active peptide conformations, including stapling, hydrogen bond surrogates, beta-hairpin mimetics, grafting on stable scaffolds, and macrocyclization. These design strategies carry the promise of opening the doors for peptide therapeutics to reach the currently "undruggable" space.

  1. Mitochondrial targeted peptides for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Farsinejad, Sadaf; Gheisary, Zohre; Ebrahimi Samani, Sanaz; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are a key pharmacological target in all cancer cells, since the structure and function of this organelle is different between healthy and malignant cells. Oxidative damage, disruption of mitochondrial ATP synthesis, calcium dyshomeostasis, mtDNA damage, and induction of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) lead to the mitochondrial dysfunctionality and increase the probability of the programmed cell death or apoptosis. A variety of the signaling pathways have been developed to promote cell death including overexpression of pro-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family, overloaded calcium, and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in the promoting mitochondrial cytochrome c release through MOMP and eventually leads to cell death. There are a wide range of the therapeutic-based peptide drugs, known mitochondrial targeted peptides (MTPs), which specifically target mitochondrial pathways into death. They have prominent advantages such as low toxicity, high specificity, and easy to synthesis. Some of these therapeutic peptides have shown to increased the clinical activity alone or in combination with other agents. In this review, we will outline the biological properties of MTPs for cancer therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling cell death by MTPs can be critical for the development of the therapeutic strategies for cancer patients that would be valuable for researchers in both fields of molecular and clinical oncology.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  3. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  4. Vaccination with agonist peptide PSA: 154-163 (155L) derived from prostate specific antigen induced CD8 T-cell response to the native peptide PSA: 154-163 but failed to induce the reactivity against tumor targets expressing PSA: a phase 2 study in patients with recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Berard, Carla A; Datena, Ellen; Hussain, Arif; Dawson, Nancy; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Alexander, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of peptide prostate specific antigen (PSA): 154-163 (155L) vaccination in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 patients with detectable and rising serum PSA after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00109811). The trial was a single dose-level, phase 2 pilot trial of 1 mg of PSA: 154-163 (155L) emulsified with adjuvant (Montanide ISA-51). The primary endpoint was the determination of immunogenicity of the vaccine; secondary outcomes were determination of toxicity and effect on serum PSA. The vaccine was given subcutaneously 7 times on weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 10, 14, and 18. Peptide-specific CD8 T-cell responses in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients were measured by interferon (IFN)-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. CD8 T-cell cultures were also established by in vitro stimulation with the peptide presented by autologous dendritic cells. Five patients were enrolled and completed all vaccinations. No IFN-gamma response to PSA: 154-163 (155L) was detected in unfractioned PBMC in any patient either before or after vaccination. Three of 5 patients demonstrated strong IFN-gamma responses to PSA: 154-163 (155L) and native PSA: 154-163 peptides in CD8 T-cell cultures derived from postvaccination PBMC. However, peptide-specific T cells failed to recognize HLA-A2 positive targets expressing endogenous PSA. There were no significant changes in serum PSA level in any subject. No serious adverse events were observed. PSA: 154-163 (155L) is not an effective immunogen when given with Montanide ISA-51. The PSA: 154-163 peptide is poorly processed from endogenous PSA and therefore represents a cryptic epitope of PSA in HLA-A2 antigen-presenting cells.

  5. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Asare, B.K.; Biswas, P.K.; Rajnarayanan, R.V.

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  6. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  7. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  8. Peptide drugs to target G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2010-09-01

    Major indications for use of peptide-based therapeutics include endocrine functions (especially diabetes mellitus and obesity), infectious diseases, and cancer. Whereas some peptide pharmaceuticals are drugs, acting as agonists or antagonists to directly treat cancer, others (including peptide diagnostics and tumour-targeting pharmaceuticals) use peptides to 'shuttle' a chemotherapeutic agent or a tracer to the tumour and allow sensitive imaging or targeted therapy. Significant progress has been made in the last few years to overcome disadvantages in peptide design such as short half-life, fast proteolytic cleavage, and low oral bioavailability. These advances include peptide PEGylation, lipidisation or multimerisation; the introduction of peptidomimetic elements into the sequences; and innovative uptake strategies such as liposomal, capsule or subcutaneous formulations. This review focuses on peptides targeting G protein-coupled receptors that are promising drug candidates or that have recently entered the pharmaceutical market.

  9. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides: production, processing, and potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive peptides (BAPs), derived through enzymatic hydrolysis of food proteins, have demonstrated potential for application as health-promoting agents against numerous human health and disease conditions, including cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. The feasibility of pharmacological application of these peptides depends on absorption and bioavailability in intact forms in target tissues, which in turn depends on structure of the peptides. Therefore, production and processing of peptides based on important structure-function parameters can lead to the production of potent peptides. This article reviews the literature on BAPs with emphasis on strategic production and processing methods as well as antihypertensive, anticancer, anticalmodulin, hypocholesterolemic, and multifunctional properties of the food protein-derived peptides. It is recommended that future research efforts on BAP should be directed toward elucidation of their in vivo molecular mechanisms of action, safety at various doses, and pharmacological activity in maintaining homeostasis during aberrant health conditions in human subjects. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Identification of peptide targets in neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Green, Miyoko; Gilden, Don; Lam, Chiwah; Bautista, Katherine; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that predominantly affects the optic nerves and spinal cord. Recombinant antibodies (rAbs) generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in an NMO patient are specific to AQP4 and pathogenic. We screened phage-displayed peptide libraries with these rAbs, and identified 14 high affinity linear and conformational peptides. The linear peptides shared sequence homologies with NMO autoantigen AQP4 on the extracellular surface. Competitive inhibition ELISA and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these peptides represent epitopes of NMO autoantigen AQP4. Peptide epitopes/mimotopes may have potential uses for disease prognosis, monitoring, and therapy. PMID:21621279

  11. Egg-derived bioactive peptides with ACE-inhibitory properties: a literature update.

    PubMed

    Grootaert, Charlotte; Matthijs, Bea; Voorspoels, Stefan; Possemiers, Sam; Smagghe, Guy; Van Camp, John

    2017-09-25

    Egg proteins contain a wide set of peptide sequences which have an impact on cardiovascular health. Their modes-of-action involve, among others, the inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this review, we focus particularly on ACE-inhibition and discuss recent findings in: (i) production methods for egg protein-derived ACE-inhibitory peptides, (ii) in vitro functionality of these peptides, (iii) their intestinal digestion and absorption in order to reach the target tissue, (iv) the impact of ACE-inhibitory egg-derived peptides in vivo and (v) future perspectives for the implementation of egg-derived ACE-inhibitory peptides as functional foods.

  12. Preparation of peptide microspheres using tumor antigen-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Santwana; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Ali, Riyasat; Rao, D N

    2014-01-01

    Due to its distinct biological attributes, poly(D,L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is one of the most preferred methods for DNA/protein/peptide encapsulation for therapeutics. Importantly, PLGA acts as an adjuvant for weakly immunogenic antigens and mimics booster responses after a single dose of administration, thereby serving as a single-shot vaccine delivery vehicle. Efficient delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) has been made possible by the use of a PLGA particle-based vaccine delivery system. Also, the plasma half-life of the PLGA-encapsulated vaccine increases as it is protected from degradation, prior to its further release. PLGAs are reported to be catabolized into individual nontoxic units once inside the host and further degraded via normal metabolic pathways. In this chapter, we have described the preparation and characterization of tumor peptide encapsulated PLGA microparticles as a model for controlled-release peptide delivery system.

  13. Cell-based peptide screening to access the undruggable target space.

    PubMed

    Hennemann, Hanjo; Wirths, Sabine; Carl, Claudia

    2015-04-13

    Only 20-30% of drug target proteins can be accessed by common drug classes, like small molecules or therapeutic antibodies. The vast majority of the remaining proteins are considered "undruggable" and include drug target proteins, like transcription factors, scaffold or adapter proteins, which play important roles in disease. However over the last years innovative compound classes including nucleotide derived drugs (e.g. siRNA, antisense), macrocyclic compounds and cell-permeable peptides matured significantly and hold now the potential to modulate these hard to access target proteins for therapeutic use. This article will focus on the discovery of cell-permeable peptides and discuss intracellular screening systems for peptides, which yield highly relevant peptides, because peptide selection takes place in eukaryotic cells, under conditions, which are very similar to the later therapeutic use.

  14. Effective leveraging of targeted search spaces for improving peptide identification in MS/MS based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Avinash K.; Nesvizhski, Alexey I.

    2016-01-01

    In shotgun proteomics, peptides are typically identified using database searching which involves scoring acquired tandem mass spectra against peptides derived from standard protein sequence databases such as Uniprot, Refseq, or Ensembl. In this strategy, the sensitivity of peptide identification is known to be affected by the size of the search space. Therefore, creating a targeted sequence database containing only peptides likely to be present in the analyzed sample can be a useful technique for improving the sensitivity of peptide identification. In this study we describe how targeted peptide databases can be created based on the frequency of identification in GPMDB – the largest publicly available repository of peptide and protein identification data. We demonstrate that targeted peptide databases can be easily integrated into existing proteome analysis workflows, and describe a computational strategy for minimizing any loss of peptide identifications arising from potential search space incompleteness in the targeted search spaces. We demonstrate the performance of our workflow using several datasets of varying size and sample complexity. PMID:26569054

  15. IP3R2 levels dictate the apoptotic sensitivity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to an IP3R-derived peptide targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Akl, H; Monaco, G; La Rovere, R; Welkenhuyzen, K; Kiviluoto, S; Vervliet, T; Molgó, J; Distelhorst, C W; Missiaen, L; Mikoshiba, K; Parys, J B; De Smedt, H; Bultynck, G

    2013-05-16

    Disrupting inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R)/B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) complexes using a cell-permeable peptide (stabilized TAT-fused IP3R-derived peptide (TAT-IDP(S))) that selectively targets the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 but not that of B-cell lymphoma 2-extra large (Bcl-Xl) potentiated pro-apoptotic Ca(2+) signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. However, the molecular mechanisms rendering cancer cells but not normal cells particularly sensitive to disrupting IP3R/Bcl-2 complexes are poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of TAT-IDP(S) in a more heterogeneous Bcl-2-dependent cancer model using a set of 'primed to death' diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DL-BCL) cell lines containing elevated Bcl-2 levels. We discovered a large heterogeneity in the apoptotic responses of these cells to TAT-IDP(S) with SU-DHL-4 being most sensitive and OCI-LY-1 being most resistant. This sensitivity strongly correlated with the ability of TAT-IDP(S) to promote IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. Although total IP3R-expression levels were very similar among SU-DHL-4 and OCI-LY-1, we discovered that the IP3R2-protein level was the highest for SU-DHL-4 and the lowest for OCI-LY-1. Strikingly, TAT-IDP(S)-induced Ca(2+) rise and apoptosis in the different DL-BCL cell lines strongly correlated with their IP3R2-protein level, but not with IP3R1-, IP3R3- or total IP3R-expression levels. Inhibiting or knocking down IP3R2 activity in SU-DHL-4-reduced TAT-IDP(S)-induced apoptosis, which is compatible with its ability to dissociate Bcl-2 from IP3R2 and to promote IP3-induced pro-apoptotic Ca(2+) signaling. Thus, certain chronically activated B-cell lymphoma cells are addicted to high Bcl-2 levels for their survival not only to neutralize pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family members but also to suppress IP3R hyperactivity. In particular, cancer cells expressing high levels of IP3R2 are addicted to IP3R/Bcl-2 complex formation and disruption of these complexes using peptide tools

  16. IP3R2 levels dictate the apoptotic sensitivity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to an IP3R-derived peptide targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Akl, H; Monaco, G; La Rovere, R; Welkenhuyzen, K; Kiviluoto, S; Vervliet, T; Molgó, J; Distelhorst, C W; Missiaen, L; Mikoshiba, K; Parys, J B; De Smedt, H; Bultynck, G

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R)/B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) complexes using a cell-permeable peptide (stabilized TAT-fused IP3R-derived peptide (TAT-IDPS)) that selectively targets the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 but not that of B-cell lymphoma 2-extra large (Bcl-Xl) potentiated pro-apoptotic Ca2+ signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. However, the molecular mechanisms rendering cancer cells but not normal cells particularly sensitive to disrupting IP3R/Bcl-2 complexes are poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of TAT-IDPS in a more heterogeneous Bcl-2-dependent cancer model using a set of ‘primed to death' diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DL-BCL) cell lines containing elevated Bcl-2 levels. We discovered a large heterogeneity in the apoptotic responses of these cells to TAT-IDPS with SU-DHL-4 being most sensitive and OCI-LY-1 being most resistant. This sensitivity strongly correlated with the ability of TAT-IDPS to promote IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release. Although total IP3R-expression levels were very similar among SU-DHL-4 and OCI-LY-1, we discovered that the IP3R2-protein level was the highest for SU-DHL-4 and the lowest for OCI-LY-1. Strikingly, TAT-IDPS-induced Ca2+ rise and apoptosis in the different DL-BCL cell lines strongly correlated with their IP3R2-protein level, but not with IP3R1-, IP3R3- or total IP3R-expression levels. Inhibiting or knocking down IP3R2 activity in SU-DHL-4-reduced TAT-IDPS-induced apoptosis, which is compatible with its ability to dissociate Bcl-2 from IP3R2 and to promote IP3-induced pro-apoptotic Ca2+ signaling. Thus, certain chronically activated B-cell lymphoma cells are addicted to high Bcl-2 levels for their survival not only to neutralize pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family members but also to suppress IP3R hyperactivity. In particular, cancer cells expressing high levels of IP3R2 are addicted to IP3R/Bcl-2 complex formation and disruption of these complexes using peptide tools results in pro

  17. Targeting DNA Vaccines to Myeloid Cells Using a Small Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein antigens to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein, fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, that results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient antigen presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WN neutralizing antibodies that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses. PMID:25270431

  18. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  19. Artificial neural network study on organ-targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Kim, Junhyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Minkyoung; Rhee, Hokyoung; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Kang, Sang-Kee; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report a new approach to studying organ targeting of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. The positive control data sets consist of organ-targeting peptide sequences identified by the peroral phage-display technique for four organs, and the negative control data are prepared from random sequences. The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions is validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (the ROC score). VHSE descriptor produces statistically significant training models and the models with simple neural network architectures show slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. The training and test set statistics indicate that our models could discriminate between organ-targeting and random sequences. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of organ-targeting peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  20. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  1. Peptide phage display as a tool for drug discovery: targeting membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Molek, Peter; Strukelj, Borut; Bratkovic, Tomaz

    2011-01-21

    Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein's activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  2. Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Activities of PR-39 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Agustiandari, Herfita; van Dijk, Albert; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L. M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2014-01-01

    The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal) amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:24755622

  3. Laminin-111-derived peptides and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kikkawa, Yamato; Hozumi, Kentaro; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Kleinman, Hynda K.; Koblinski, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Laminin-111 is a large trimeric basement membrane glycoprotein with many active sites. In particular, four peptides active in tumor malignancy studies have been identified in laminin-111 using a systematic peptide screening method followed by various assays. Two of the peptides (IKVAV and AG73) are found on the α1 chain, one (YIGSR) of the β1 chain and one (C16) on the γ1 chain. The four peptides have distinct activities and receptors. Since three of the peptides (IKVAV, AG73 and C16) strongly promote tumor growth, this may explain the potent effects laminin-111 has on malignant cells. The peptide, YIGSR, decreases tumor growth and experimental metastasis via a 32/67 kD receptor while IKVAV increases tumor growth, angiogenesis and protease activity via integrin receptors. AG73 increases tumor growth and metastases via syndecan receptors. C16 increases tumor growth and angiogenesis via integrins. Identification of such sites on laminin-111 will have use in defining strategies to develop therapeutics for cancer. PMID:23263633

  4. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  5. Shredding the signal: targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2014-12-01

    The biogenesis and functionality of mitochondria and chloroplasts depend on the constant turnover of their proteins. The majority of mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are imported as precursors via their N-terminal targeting peptides. After import, the targeting peptides are cleaved off and degraded. Recent work has elucidated a pathway involved in the degradation of targeting peptides in mitochondria and chloroplasts, with two proteolytic components: the presequence protease (PreP) and the organellar oligopeptidase (OOP). PreP and OOP are specialized in degrading peptides of different lengths, with the substrate restriction being dictated by the structure of their proteolytic cavities. The importance of the intraorganellar peptide degradation is highlighted by the fact that elimination of both oligopeptidases affects growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor Microenvironment Targeting and Responsive Peptide-Based Nanoformulations for Improved Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Ding, Yanping; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-09-01

    The tumor microenvironment participates in all stages of tumor progression and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Rapid progress in the field of molecular self-assembly using various biologic molecules has resulted in the fabrication of nanoformulations that specifically target and regulate microenvironment components to inhibit tumor growth. This inhibition process is based on differentiating between biophysicochemical cues guiding tumor and normal tissue microenvironments. Peptides and peptide derivatives, owing to their biocompatibility, chemical versatility, bioactivity, environmental sensitivity, and biologic recognition abilities, have been widely used as building blocks to construct multifunctional nanostructures for targeted drug delivery and controlled release. Several groups of peptides have been identified as having the ability to penetrate plasma membranes, regulate the essential signaling pathways of angiogenesis and immune reactions, and recognize key components in the tumor microenvironment (such as vascular systems, stromal cells, and abnormal tumor biophysicochemical features). Thus, using different modules, various functional peptides, and their derivatives can be integrated into nanoformulations specifically targeting the tumor microenvironment with increased selectivity, on-demand response, elevated cellular uptake, and improved tumor therapy. In this review, we introduce several groups of functional peptides and highlight peptide-based nanoformulations that specifically target the tumor microenvironment. We also provide our perspective on the development of smart drug-delivery systems with enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. In-silico discovery of cancer-specific peptide-HLA complexes for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanik, Ankur; Kirshner, Jessica R; MacDonald, Douglas; Thurston, Gavin; Lin, Hsin C; Murphy, Andrew J; Zhang, Wen

    2016-07-20

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) or Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I molecules bind to peptide fragments of proteins degraded inside the cell and display them on the cell surface. We are interested in peptide-HLA complexes involving peptides that are derived from proteins specifically expressed in cancer cells. Such complexes have been shown to provide an effective means of precisely targeting cancer cells by engineered T-cells and antibodies, which would be an improvement over current chemotherapeutic agents that indiscriminately kill proliferating cells. An important concern with the targeting of peptide-HLA complexes is off-target toxicity that could occur due to the presence of complexes similar to the target complex in cells from essential, normal tissues. We developed a novel computational strategy for identifying potential peptide-HLA cancer targets and evaluating the likelihood of off-target toxicity associated with these targets. Our strategy combines sequence-based and structure-based approaches in a unique way to predict potential off-targets. The focus of our work is on the complexes involving the most frequent HLA class I allele HLA-A*02:01. Using our strategy, we predicted the off-target toxicity observed in past clinical trials. We employed it to perform a first-ever comprehensive exploration of the human peptidome to identify cancer-specific targets utilizing gene expression data from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) and GTEx (Gene Tissue Expression), and structural data from PDB (Protein Data Bank). We have thus identified a list of 627 peptide-HLA complexes across various TCGA cancer types. Peptide-HLA complexes identified using our novel strategy could enable discovery of cancer-specific targets for engineered T-cells or antibody based therapy with minimal off-target toxicity.

  8. Determination of the sequences of protein-derived peptides and peptide mixtures by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Howard R.; Williams, Dudley H.; Ambler, Richard P.

    1971-01-01

    Micro-quantities of protein-derived peptides have been converted into N-acetylated permethyl derivatives, and their sequences determined by low-resolution mass spectrometry without prior knowledge of their amino acid compositions or lengths. A new strategy is suggested for the mass spectrometric sequencing of oligopeptides or proteins, involving gel filtration of protein hydrolysates and subsequent sequence analysis of peptide mixtures. Finally, results are given that demonstrate for the first time the use of mass spectrometry for the analysis of a protein-derived peptide mixture, again without prior knowledge of the protein or components within the mixture. PMID:5158904

  9. T cell responses to HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides derived from human alpha fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, L H; Meng, W S; Koh, A; Vollmer, C M; Ribas, A; Dissette, V B; Faull, K; Glaspy, J A; McBride, W H; Economou, J S

    2001-04-15

    alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-derived peptide epitopes can be recognized by human T cells in the context of MHC class I. We determined the identity of AFP-derived peptides, presented in the context of HLA-A*0201, that could be recognized by the human (h) T cell repertoire. We screened 74 peptides and identified 3 new AFP epitopes, hAFP(137-145), hAFP(158-166), and hAFP(325-334), in addition to the previously reported hAFP(542-550.) Each possesses two anchor residues and stabilized HLA-A*0201 on T2 cells in a concentration-dependent class I binding assay. The peptides were stable for 2-4 h in an off-kinetics assay. Each peptide induced peptide-specific T cells in vitro from several normal HLA-A*0201 donors. Importantly, these hAFP peptide-specific T cells also were capable of recognizing HLA-A*0201(+)/AFP(+) tumor cells in both cytotoxicity assays and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The immunogenicity of each peptide was tested in vivo with HLA-A*0201/K(b)-transgenic mice. After immunization with each peptide emulsified in CFA, draining lymph node cells produced IFN-gamma on recognition of cells stably transfected with hAFP. Furthermore, AFP peptide-specific T cells could be identified in the spleens of mice immunized with dendritic cells transduced with an AFP-expressing adenovirus (AdVhAFP). Three of four AFP peptides could be identified by mass spectrometric analysis of surface peptides from an HLA-A*0201 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line. Thus, compelling immunological and physiochemical evidence is presented that at least four hAFP-derived epitopes are naturally processed and presented in the context of class I, are immunogenic, and represent potential targets for hepatocellular carcinoma immunotherapy.

  10. Peptide Inhibitors of Flavivirus Entry Derived from the E Protein Stem▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Yang, Priscilla L.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides derived from the “stem” of dengue virus (DV) type 2 (DV2) envelope (E) protein inhibit DV2 infectivity, targeting a late-stage fusion intermediate. We show here that stem peptides from all DV serotypes cross-inhibit DV1 to DV4 but that corresponding peptides derived from related flaviviruses do not. This failure to inhibit infection is not due to poor interaction with the E protein but rather to loss of association with the virion membrane. Residues 442 to 444 of the stem are determinants of inhibition; increasing hydrophobicity in this region increases inhibitory strength. These results support a two-step model of how stem-derived peptides inhibit viral entry. PMID:20881042

  11. Functional significance of bioactive peptides derived from soybean.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brij Pal; Vij, Shilpa; Hati, Subrota

    2014-04-01

    Biologically active peptides play an important role in metabolic regulation and modulation. Several studies have shown that during gastrointestinal digestion, food processing and microbial proteolysis of various animals and plant proteins, small peptides can be released which possess biofunctional properties. These peptides are to prove potential health-enhancing nutraceutical for food and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial health effects of bioactive peptides may be several like antihypertensive, antioxidative, antiobesity, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, hypocholesterolemic and anticancer. Soybeans, one of the most abundant plant sources of dietary protein, contain 36-56% of protein. Recent studies showed that soy milk, an aqueous extract of soybean, and its fermented product have great biological properties and are a good source of bioactive peptides. This review focuses on bioactive peptides derived from soybean; we illustrate their production and biofunctional attributes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  13. Peptidic Tumor Targeting Agents: The Road from Phage Display Peptide Selections to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has become the number one cause of death amongst Americans, killing approximately 1,600 people per day. Novel methods for early detection and the development of effective treatments are an eminent priority in medicine. For this reason, isolation of tumor-specific ligands is a growing area of research. Tumor-specific binding agents can be used to probe the tumor cell surface phenotype and customize treatment accordingly by conjugating the appropriate cell-targeting ligand to an anticancer drug. This refines the molecular diagnosis of the tumor and creates guided drugs that can target the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. Additionally, these targeting agents can be used as in vivo imaging agents that allow for earlier detection of tumors and micrometastasis. Phage display is a powerful technique for the isolation of peptides that bind to a particular target with high affinity and specificity. The biopanning of intact cancer cells or tumors in animals can be used to isolate peptides that bind to cancer-specific cell surface biomarkers. Over the past 10 years, unbiased biopanning of phage-displayed peptide libraries has generated a suite of cancer targeting peptidic ligands. This review discusses the recent advances in the isolation of cancer-targeting peptides by unbiased biopanning methods and highlights the use of the isolated peptides in clinical applications. PMID:20030617

  14. Peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Liu, Z; Wang, F

    2014-01-01

    A series of radiolabeled peptides have been designed and optimized for tumor-targeted peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Pre-clinical and clinical applications of PRRT have shown promising results on tumor response, overall survival, and quality of life in patients with several kinds of tumors. (90)Y-DOTA-TOC and (177)Lu-DOTA-TATE are two of the most common radiopharmaceuticals with symptomatic improvements and complete clinical data. In addition to somatostatin analogs, radiolabeled peptides have been developed to target the relative receptors overexpressed in the tumors, such as integrin αvβ3, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R), cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several strategies have been designed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of PRRT. For instance, radiolabeled peptides could be optimized by the amino acid modification and radionuclide selection. Healthy tissue protective agents and multi-cycle procedures could effectively decrease the side effects of PRRT. Furthermore, combination treatments, including PRRT combined with surgery, chemotherapeutic agents, or radiosensitizing agents could be applied to increase the effectiveness of PRRT. In this review, the current progress of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor-targeted PRRT was summarized. Radiopharmaceuticals currently under clinical investigation were also described.

  15. Taenia saginata derived synthetic peptides with potential for the diagnosis of bovine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Benitez, L; Foster-Cuevas, M; Bryce, D; Wamae, L W; Onyango-Abuje, J A; Garate, T; Harrison, L J S; Parkhouse, R M E

    2003-01-20

    Immunity in Taeniids is predominantly antibody mediated and thus many serological immuno-determinants will have potential in both protection and diagnosis. The antigenicity of six peptides derived from four potentially protective molecules cloned from a Taenia saginata oncospheres cDNA library have been evaluated as targets for the specific diagnosis of bovine cysticercosis. The six peptides consist of: two peptides (HP6-2 and HP6-3) derived from the sequence of the 18 kDa surface/secreted oncospheral adhesion antigen identified by McAb-HP6, two peptides (Ts45W-1 and Ts45W-5) derived from the sequence of the T. saginata homologue of the T. ovis 45W protective gene family, one peptide (TS45S-10) derived from a T. saginata sequence with significant similarity to the T. ovis 45S protective antigen, and one peptide (TEG-1) derived from the sequence of the T. saginata homologue of Echinococcus spp. main surface protein. Longitudinal studies indicate that T. saginata infected cattle respond to all six peptides by 3-4 weeks post-infection and that the antibody levels remain high for at least 12 weeks post-infection. As protection against Taeniid parasites is predominantly antibody mediated, some of these six peptides may be of value as immuno-prophylactic tools and hence also in assays to determine resistance to infection with the parasite. For diagnosis, on the other hand, only three peptides (HP6-2, TEG-1 and Ts45S-10) performed with the necessary sensitivity and specificity to determine exposure to infection with T. saginata, and now merit an exhaustive evaluation prior to employment as routine diagnostic tools.

  16. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  17. Peptide targeting of adenoviral vectors to augment tumor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, E N; Trinh, V T; Hogg, R T; Gerard, R D

    2012-07-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 remains one of the most promising vectors for delivering genetic material to cancer cells for imaging or therapy, but optimization of these agents to selectively promote tumor cell infection is needed to further their clinical development. Peptide sequences that bind to specific cell surface receptors have been inserted into adenoviral capsid proteins to improve tumor targeting, often in the background of mutations designed to ablate normal ligand:receptor interactions and thereby reduce off target effects and toxicities in non-target tissues. Different tumor types also express highly variable complements of cell surface receptors, so a customized targeting strategy using a particular peptide in the context of specific adenoviral mutations may be needed to achieve optimal efficacy. To further investigate peptide targeting strategies in adenoviral vectors, we used a set of peptide motifs originally isolated using phage display technology that evince tumor specificity in vivo. To demonstrate their abilities as targeting motifs, we genetically incorporated these peptides into a surface loop of the fiber capsid protein to construct targeted adenovirus vectors. We then systematically evaluated the ability of these peptide targeted vectors to infect several tumor cell types, both in vitro and in vivo, in a variety of mutational backgrounds designed to reduce CAR and/or HSG-mediated binding. Results from this study support previous observations that peptide insertions in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain are generally ineffective when used in combination with HSG detargeting mutations. The evidence also suggests that this strategy can attenuate other fiber knob interactions, such as CAR-mediated binding, and reduce overall viral infectivity. The insertion of peptides into fiber proved more effective for targeting tumor cell types expressing low levels of CAR receptor, as this strategy can partially compensate for the very low infectivity of wild

  18. Bioactive peptides derived from egg proteins: A review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Oey, Indrawati; Bremer, Phil; Carne, Alan; Silcock, Pat

    2017-06-13

    Egg proteins have various functional and biological activities which make them potential precursor proteins for bioactive peptide production. Simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and enzymatic hydrolysis using non-gastrointestinal proteases have been used as tools to produce these peptides. Bioactive peptides derived from egg proteins are reported to display various biological activities, including angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory (antihypertensive), antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and iron-/calcium-binding activities. More importantly, simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion has indicated that consumption of egg proteins has physiological benefits due to the release of such multifunctional peptides. This review encompasses studies reported to date on the bioactive peptide production from egg proteins.

  19. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo.

  20. Targeting kinase signaling pathways with constrained peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hanold, Laura E; Fulton, Melody D; Kennedy, Eileen J

    2017-02-07

    Kinases are amongst the largest families in the human proteome and serve as critical mediators of a myriad of cell signaling pathways. Since altered kinase activity is implicated in a variety of pathological diseases, kinases have become a prominent class of proteins for targeted inhibition. Although numerous small molecule and antibody-based inhibitors have already received clinical approval, several challenges may still exist with these strategies including resistance, target selection, inhibitor potency and in vivo activity profiles. Constrained peptide inhibitors have emerged as an alternative strategy for kinase inhibition. Distinct from small molecule inhibitors, peptides can provide a large binding surface area that allows them to bind shallow protein surfaces rather than defined pockets within the target protein structure. By including chemical constraints within the peptide sequence, additional benefits can be bestowed onto the peptide scaffold such as improved target affinity and target selectivity, cell permeability and proteolytic resistance. In this review, we highlight examples of diverse chemistries that are being employed to constrain kinase-targeting peptide scaffolds and highlight their application to modulate kinase signaling as well as their potential clinical implications.

  1. The problem with peptide presumption and the downfall of target-decoy false discovery rates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In proteomics, peptide-tandem mass spectrum match scores and target-decoy database derived false discovery rates (FDR) are confidence indicators describing the quality of individual and sets of tandem mass spectrum matches. A user can impose a standard by prescribing a limit to these values, equival...

  2. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection and mass spectrometry characterization of peptides targeting semiconductor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Estephan, Elias; Larroque, Christian; Bec, Nicole; Martineau, Pierre; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2009-12-15

    We report on elaboration of 12-mer peptides that reveal specific recognition for the following semiconductor (SC) surfaces: GaAs(100), InAs(100), GaN(0001), ZnSe(100), ZnTe(100), GaAs(111)A, GaSb(100), CdSe(100). A M13 bacteriophage library was used to screen 10(9) different 12-mer peptides against these substrates to finally isolate, in maximum six amplification cycles, peptides that bind to the target surfaces. The specific peptides for the InAs and ZnSe surfaces were obtained. Contrary, for the other SC surfaces several peptides with high affinities have been isolated. Aiming for a better specificity, when the phage display has been conducted through six cycles, the screening procedure got dominated by a phage present in the M13 bacteriophage library and the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide has been selected for different SCs. The high amplification potential of this phage has been observed previously with different targets. Thus, precaution should be undertaken in defining adhesion peptides with the phage display technique and real affinity of the obtained biolinkers should be studied with other methods. We employed mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) to demonstrate the preferential attachment (or not) of the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide to the different SC surfaces. This allows us to define a realistic selection of the expressed peptides presenting affinity for the studied eight SC surfaces. We demonstrate that with increasing the dielectric constants of the employed solvents, adhesion of the SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide onto GaN(0001) is hindered. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Animal peptides targeting voltage-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Billen, Bert; Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Throughout millions of years of evolution, nature has supplied various organisms with a massive arsenal of venoms to defend themselves against predators or to hunt prey. These venoms are rich cocktails of diverse bioactive compounds with divergent functions, extremely effective in immobilizing or killing the recipient. In fact, venom peptides from various animals have been shown to specifically act on ion channels and other cellular receptors, and impair their normal functioning. Because of their key role in the initiation and propagation of electrical signals in excitable tissue, it is not very surprising that several isoforms of voltage-activated sodium channels are specifically targeted by many of these venom peptides. Therefore, these peptide toxins provide tremendous opportunities to design drugs with a higher efficacy and fewer undesirable side effects. This review puts venom peptides from spiders, scorpions and cone snails that target voltage-activated sodium channels in the spotlight, and addresses their potential therapeutical applications.

  5. Tumor-targeted liposomal drug delivery mediated by a diseleno bond-stabilized cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    Peptide ligands have played an important role in tumor-targeted drug delivery as targeting moieties. The in vivo fate of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and the following antitumor effects may greatly depend on the stability of the peptide ligand. In the current study, a tumor-targeting cyclic peptide screened by phage display, Lyp-1 (a peptide that specifically binds to tumor and endothelial cells of tumor lymphatics in certain tumors), was structurally modified by replacement of the original intramolecular disulfide bond with a diseleno bond. The produced analog Syp-1 (seleno derivative of Lyp-1) maintained specific binding ability to the target protein p32 (Kd = 18.54 nM), which is similar to that of Lyp-1 (Kd = 10.59 nM), indicated by surface plasmon resonance assay. Compared with Lyp-1, Syp-1 showed significantly improved stability against serum. After the peptide attached onto the surface of fluorophore-encapsulating liposomes, the more efficient tumor uptake of liposomal fluorophore mediated by Syp-1 was observed. Furthermore, Syp-1 modified liposomal doxorubicin presented the most potent tumor growth inhibitory ability among all the therapeutic groups, with a low half maximal inhibitory concentration of 588 nM against MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro and a high tumor inhibition rate of 73.5% in vivo. These findings clearly indicated that Syp-1 was a stable and effective tumor targeting ligand and suggest that the sulfur-to-selenium replacement strategy may help stabilize the phage-displayed cyclic peptide containing disulfide-bond under physiological conditions and strongly support the validity of peptide-mediated drug targeting. PMID:23515368

  6. Marine-Derived Bioactive Peptides for Biomedical Sectors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2017-01-01

    Marine-based resources such as algae and other marine by-products have been recognized as rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive peptides. Evidently, their structural characteristics including unique amino acid residues are responsible for their biological activity. Several of the above-mentioned marine-origin species show multi-functional bioactivities that are useful for a new discovery and/or reinvention of biologically active ingredients, nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals. Therefore, in recent years, marine-derived bioactive peptides have gained a considerable attention with high-value biomedical and/or pharmaceutical potentials. Furthermore, a wider spectrum of bioactive peptides can be produced through proteolytic-assisted hydrolysis of various marine resources under controlled physicochemical (pH and temperature of the reaction media) environment. Owing to their numerous health-related beneficial effects and therapeutic potential in the treatment and/or prevention of many diseases, such marine-derived bioactive peptides exhibit a wider spectrum of biological activities such as anti-cancerous, anti-proliferative, anti-coagulant, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-tumor activities among many others. Based on emerging evidence of marine-derived peptide mining, the above-mentioned marine resources contain noteworthy levels of high-value protein. The present review article mainly summarizes the marine-derived bioactive peptides and emphasizing their potential applications in biomedical and/or pharmaceutical sectors of the modern world. In conclusion, recent literature has provided evidence that marine-derived bioactive peptides play a critical role in human health along with many possibilities of designing new functional nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals to clarify potent mechanisms of action for a wider spectrum of diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  8. Novel alpha-MSH peptide analogs for melanoma targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flook, Adam Michael

    Skin cancer is the one of the most diagnosed cancers in the United States with increasing incidence over the past two decades. There are three major forms of skin cancer but melanoma is the deadliest. It is estimated that 76,690 new diagnoses of melanoma and 9,480 deaths will occur in 2013. Melanoma accounts for approximately 1.6% of all cancer related deaths and is the 5 th leading diagnosed cancer in the United States. The mean survival rate of patients diagnosed with metastatic melanoma is six months, with five year survival rates of less than 5%. In this project, we describe the design and characterization of novel melanoma-targeting peptide analogs for use in diagnostic imaging of both primary and metastatic melanoma lesions. Novel alpha-MSH peptide conjugates were designed to target the melanocortin-1 receptor present and over-expressed on melanoma cells. These peptides were synthesized and their in-vitro melanocortin-1 receptor binding affinities were established in murine melanoma cells. Once binding affinities were determined, the peptides were radiolabeled with 99mTc utilizing a novel direct radiolabeling technique developed in our laboratory. The peptides were purified via reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and in-vivo melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing female C57BL/6 mice. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed with the promising 99m Tc-labeled peptide conjugates. All alpha-MSH peptide conjugates tested showed low nanomolar binding affinity for the melanocortin-1 receptor. All peptides were readily radiolabeld with 99mTc with greater than 95% radiochemical purity. All 99mTc-labeled peptides displayed high specific in-vivo melanoma tumor uptake while maintaining low normal organ accumulation, and were excreted through the urinary system in a timely fashion. In addition, all tested 99mTc-labeld alpha-MSH peptides demonstrated clear visualization of in

  9. CD25 targeted therapy of chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells using DR5 specific TRAIL peptide.

    PubMed

    Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Sridevi, Surapally; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are being targeted as a modern therapeutic approach to prevent disease relapse. LSCs isolated from methotrexate resistant side population (SP) of leukemic cell lines HL60 and MOLT4 exhibited high levels of CD25 and TRAIL R2/DR5 which are potential targets. Recombinant immunotoxin conjugating IL2α with TRAIL peptide mimetic was constructed for DR5 receptor specific targeting of LSCs and were tested in total cell population and LSCs. IL2-TRAIL peptide induced apoptosis in drug resistant SP cells from cell lines and showed potent cytotoxicity in PBMCs derived from leukemic patients with an efficacy of 81.25% in AML and 100% in CML, ALL and CLL. IL2-TRAIL peptide showed cytotoxicity in relapsed patient samples and was more effective than TRAIL or IL2-TRAIL proteins. Additionally, DR5 specific IL2-TRAIL peptide was effective in targeting and killing LSCs purified from cell lines [IC50: 952nM in HL60, 714nM in MOLT4] and relapsed patient blood samples with higher efficacy (85%) than IL2-TRAIL protein (46%). Hence, CD25 and DR5 specific targeting by IL2-TRAIL peptide may be an effective strategy for targeting drug resistant leukemic cells and LSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting cancer-specific glycans by cyclic peptide lectinomimics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria C; Yongye, Austin B; Cudic, Mihael; Martinez Mayorga, Karina; Liu, Enbo; Mueller, Barbara M; Ainsley, Jon; Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana; Christov, Christo Z; Cudic, Mare; Cudic, Predrag

    2017-09-11

    The transformation from normal to malignant phenotype in human cancers is associated with aberrant cell-surface glycosylation. Thus, targeting glycosylation changes in cancer is likely to provide not only better insight into the roles of carbohydrates in biological systems, but also facilitate the development of new molecular probes for bioanalytical and biomedical applications. In the reported study, we have synthesized lectinomimics based on odorranalectin 1; the smallest lectin-like cyclic peptide isolated from the frog Odorrana grahami skin, and assessed the ability of these peptides to bind specific carbohydrates on molecular and cellular levels. In addition, we have shown that the disulfide bond found in 1 can be replaced with a lactam bridge. However, the orientation of the lactam bridge, peptides 2 and 3, influenced cyclic peptide's conformation and thus these peptides' ability to bind carbohydrates. Naturally occurring 1 and its analog 3 that adopt similar conformation in water bind preferentially L-fucose, and to a lesser degree D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, typically found within the mucin O-glycan core structures. In cell-based assays, peptides 1 and 3 showed a similar binding profile to Aleuria aurantia lectin and these two peptides inhibited the migration of metastatic breast cancer cell lines in a Transwell assay. Altogether, the reported data demonstrate the feasibility of designing lectinomimics based on cyclic peptides.

  11. Stapled peptide inhibitors of RAB25 target context-specific phenotypes in cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Recent evidence has established a role for the small GTPase RAB25, as well as related effector proteins, in enacting both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic phenotypes in specific cellular contexts. Here we report the development of all-hydrocarbon stabilized peptides derived from the RAB-binding FIP-family of proteins to target RAB25. Relative to unmodified peptides, optimized stapled peptides exhibit increased structural stability, binding affinity, cell permeability, and inhibition of RAB25:FIP complex formation.

  12. Food-Derived Bioactive Peptides on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammatory processes and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of these pathological conditions. Bioactive peptides derived from food proteins have been evaluated for various beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this review, we summarize the roles of various food-derived bioactive peptides in inflammation and oxidative stress and discuss the potential benefits and limitations of using these compounds against the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:24527452

  13. SHORT PEDF-DERIVED PEPTIDE INHIBITS ANGIOGENESIS AND TUMOR GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Mirochnik, Yelena; Aurora, Arin; Schulze-Hoepfner, Frank T.; Deabes, Ahmed; Shifrin, Victor; Beckmann, Richard; Polsky, Charles; Volpert, Olga V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor with multiple other functions, some of which enhance tumor growth. Our previous studies mapped PEDF anti-angiogenic and pro-survival activities to distinct epitopes. This study was aimed to determine the minimal fragment of PEDF, which maintains anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor efficacy. Experimental Design We analyzed antigenicity, hydrophilicity, and charge distribution of the angioinhibitory epitope (the 34-mer) and designed three peptides covering its C-terminus, P14, P18 and P23. We analyzed their ability to block endothelial cell (EC) chemotaxis and induce apoptosis in vitro and their anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. The selected peptide was tested for the anti-tumor activity against mildly aggressive xenografted prostate carcinoma and highly aggressive renal cell carcinoma. To verify that P18 acts in the same manner as PEDF, we used immunohistochemistry to measure PEDF targets, VEGFR2 and CD95L expression in P18-treated vasculature. Results P14 and P18 blocked endothelial cell chemotaxis; P18 and P23 induced apoptosis. P18 showed the highest IC50 and blocked angiogenesis in vivo: P23 was inactive and P14 was pro-angiogenic. P18 increased the production of CD95L and reduced the expression of VEGFR-2 by the endothelial cells in vivo. In tumor studies, P18 was more effective in blocking the angiogenesis and growth of the prostate cancer then parental 34-mer; in the renal cell carcinoma P18 strongly decreased angiogenesis and halted the progression of established tumors. Conclusions P18 is a novel and potent anti-angiogenic biotherapeutic agent, which has potential to be developed for the treatment of prostate and renal cancer. PMID:19223494

  14. Food-derived bioactive peptides--a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Moughan, Paul J; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Montoya, Carlos A; Dave, Lakshmi A

    2014-06-01

    Food-derived bioactive peptides are regarded as important modulators of several physiological processes occurring both systemically and locally within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). However, the concentrations of food-derived bioactive peptides in the GIT, and therefore attendant physiological effects, are likely to be highly variable given the wide variation in the type and amount of dietary protein consumed either during the day or on a day-to-day basis. In contrast, gut endogenous proteins (e.g. cell proteins, mucin, serum albumin and digestive enzymes) are a consistent and significant potential source of peptides for the GIT. With up to 80% of gut endogenous proteins being digested in the GIT, it is possible that a wide range of peptides is generated, but until now the significance of the gut endogenous proteins as a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. A hypothesis is promulgated that the gut endogenous proteins may have a hidden role as a consistent and quantitatively important source of bioactive peptides in the GIT.

  15. Non-calcitonin secretory peptide derived from preprocalcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.S.; O'Neil, J.A.; Muszynski, M.; Aron, D.C.; Roos, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The terminal hexadecapeptide sequence of preprocalcitonin (termed carboxyl-adjacent peptide, CAP, for its position relative to calcitonin) has been synthesized to establish a radioimmunoassay for an investigation of cross-reacting peptides in extracts of normal and neoplastic calcitonin-producing tissues. Gel filtration chromatography of a rat thyroid extract revealed a major peak of immunoreactive peptide of approximately the same molecular weight as synthetic CAP. A minor peak of higher molecular weight immunoreactive material was also observed. The isoelectric point of both the thyroid peptide and synthetic material was about 5.2. Immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin were found in approximately equimolar amounts in normal thyroid and in anaplastic and well differentiated rat medullary thyroid carcinomas. Immunoreactive CAP was not detected in any tissue which did not contain calcitonin. Monolayer cultures of a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma contained and secreted equimolar amounts of immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin under basal (1 mM Ca/sup 2 +/) and stimulated (4 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and 1 ..mu..M glucagon) conditions. These data indicate that the thyroidal peptide is probably the hexadecapeptide CAP which is derived from the same translation product as calcitonin. The similarity between the processing of precursors to the amidated peptide melanocyte-stimulating hormone and the corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide and processing of calcitonin and CAP suggests that the sequence Gly-Lys-Lys-Arg is one amidation codon in mammalian systems.

  16. Granulysin-Derived Peptides Demonstrate Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Effects Against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    McInturff, Jamie E.; Wang, Shyh-Jeun; Machleidt, Thomas; Lin, T. Richard; Oren, Ami; Hertz, Cheryl J.; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Hart, Scott; Zeh, Karin; Anderson, Daniel H.; Gallo, Richard L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a key therapeutic target in acne, yet this bacterium has become resistant to standard antibiotic agents. We investigated whether the human antimicrobial protein granulysin is a potential candidate for the treatment of acne. Granulysin and synthetic granulysin-derived peptides possessing a helix–loop–helix motif killed P. acnes in vitro. Modification of a helix–loop–helix peptide, 31–50, by substitution of a tryptophan for the valine at amino acid 44 (peptide 31–50v44w) to increase its interaction with bacterial surfaces also increased its antimicrobial activity. Moreover, when synthesized with d- rather than l-type amino acids, this peptide (d-31– 50v44w) became less susceptible to degradation by proteases and more effective in killing P. acnes. Granulysin peptides were bactericidal, demonstrating an advantage over standard bacteriostatic antibiotics in their control of P. acnes. Moreover, peptide d-31–50v44w killed P. acnes in isolated human microcomedone preparations. Importantly, peptides 31–50, 31–50v44w, and d-31–50v44w also have potential anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by suppression of P. acnes-stimulated cytokine release. Taken together, these data suggest that granulysin peptides may be useful as topical therapeutic agents, providing alternatives to current acne therapies. PMID:16098035

  17. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  18. Synthesis of peptide sequences derived from fibril-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Denis B; Karas, John A

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), is associated with protein aggregation and the formation of amyloid, fibrillar deposits. Peptide fragments of amyloid-forming proteins have been found to form fibrils in their own right and have become important tools for unlocking the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation and the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. The synthesis and purification of peptide sequences derived from amyloid fibril-forming proteins can be extremely challenging. The synthesis may not proceed well, generating a very low quality crude product which can be difficult to purify. Even clean crude peptides can be difficult to purify, as they are often insoluble or form fibrils rapidly in solution. This chapter presents methods to recognise and to overcome the difficulties associated with the synthesis, and purification of fibril-forming peptides, illustrating the points with three synthetic examples.

  19. Milk derived bioactive peptides and their impact on human health - A review.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, D P; Mohapatra, S; Misra, S; Sahu, P S

    2016-09-01

    Milk-derived bioactive peptides have been identified as potential ingredients of health-promoting functional foods. These bioactive peptides are targeted at diet-related chronic diseases especially the non-communicable diseases viz., obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Peptides derived from the milk of cow, goat, sheep, buffalo and camel exert multifunctional properties, including anti-microbial, immune modulatory, anti-oxidant, inhibitory effect on enzymes, anti-thrombotic, and antagonistic activities against various toxic agents. Majority of those regulate immunological, gastrointestinal, hormonal and neurological responses, thereby playing a vital role in the prevention of cancer, osteoporosis, hypertension and other disorders as discussed in this review. For the commercial production of such novel bioactive peptides large scale technologies based on membrane separation and ion exchange chromatography methods have been developed. Separation and identification of those peptides and their pharmacodynamic parameters are necessary to transfer their potent functional properties into food applications. The present review summarizes the preliminary classes of bioactive milk-derived peptides along with their physiological functions, general characteristics and potential applications in health-care.

  20. Cell targeting peptides as smart ligands for targeting of therapeutic or diagnostic agents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mousavizadeh, Ali; Jabbari, Ali; Akrami, Mohammad; Bardania, Hassan

    2017-07-13

    Cell targeting peptides (CTP) are small peptides which have high affinity and specificity to a cell or tissue targets. They are typically identified by using phage display and chemical synthetic peptide library methods. CTPs have attracted considerable attention as a new class of ligands to delivery specifically therapeutic and diagnostic agents, because of the fact they have several advantages including easy synthesis, smaller physical sizes, lower immunogenicity and cytotoxicity and their simple and better conjugation to nano-carriers and therapeutic or diagnostic agents compared to conventional antibodies. In this systematic review, we will focus on the basic concepts concerning the use of cell-targeting peptides (CTPs), following the approaches of selecting them from peptide libraries. We discuss several developed strategies for cell-specific delivery of different cargos by CTPs, which are designed for drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EGFR-targeting peptide-coupled platinum(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Josef; Hager, Sonja; Koblmüller, Bettina; Klose, Matthias H M; Holste, Katharina; Fischer, Britta; Pelivan, Karla; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Kowol, Christian R; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2017-06-01

    The high mortality rate of lung cancer patients and the frequent occurrence of side effects during cancer therapy demonstrate the need for more selective and targeted drugs. An important and well-established target for lung cancer treatment is the occasionally mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). As platinum(II) drugs are still the most important therapeutics against lung cancer, we synthesized in this study the first platinum(IV) complexes coupled to the EGFR-targeting peptide LARLLT (and the shuffled RTALLL as reference). Notably, HPLC-MS measurements revealed two different peaks with the same molecular mass, which turned out to be a transcyclization reaction in the linker between maleimide and the coupled cysteine moiety. With regard to the EGFR specificity, subsequent biological investigations (3-day viability, 14-day clonogenic assays and platinum uptake) on four different cell lines with different verified EGFR expression levels were performed. Unexpectedly, the results showed neither an enhanced activity nor an EGFR expression-dependent uptake of our new compounds. Consequently, fluorophore-coupled peptides were synthesized to re-evaluate the targeting ability of LARLLT itself. However, also with these molecules, flow cytometry measurements showed no correlation of drug uptake with the EGFR expression levels. Taken together, we successfully synthesized the first platinum(IV) complexes coupled to an EGFR-targeting peptide; however, the biological investigations revealed that LARLLT is not an appropriate peptide for enhancing the specific uptake of small-molecule drugs into EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells.

  2. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  3. Inhibition of the ferric uptake regulator by peptides derived from anti-FUR peptide aptamers: coupled theoretical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Cissé, Cheickna; Mathieu, Sophie V; Abeih, Mohamed B Ould; Flanagan, Lindsey; Vitale, Sylvia; Catty, Patrice; Boturyn, Didier; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-12-19

    The FUR protein (ferric uptake regulator) is an iron-dependent global transcriptional regulator. Specific to bacteria, FUR is an attractive antibacterial target since virulence is correlated to iron bioavailability. Recently, four anti-FUR peptide aptamers, composed of 13 amino acid variable loops inserted into a thioredoxinA scaffold, were identified, which were able to interact with Escherichia coli FUR (EcFUR), inhibit its binding to DNA and to decrease the virulence of pathogenic E. coli in a fly infection model. The first characterization of anti-FUR linear peptides (pF1 6 to 13 amino acids) derived from the variable part of the F1 anti-FUR peptide aptamer is described herein. Theoretical and experimental approaches, in original combination, were used to study interactions of these peptides with FUR in order to understand their mechanism of inhibition. After modeling EcFUR by homology, docking with Autodock was combined with molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent to take into account the flexibility of the partners. All calculations were cross-checked either with other programs or with experimental data. As a result, reliable structures of EcFUR and its complex with pF1 are given and an inhibition pocket formed by the groove between the two FUR subunits is proposed. The location of the pocket was validated through experimental mutation of key EcFUR residues at the site of proposed peptide interaction. Cyclisation of pF1, mimicking the peptide constraint in F1, improved inhibition. The details of the interactions between peptide and protein were analyzed and a mechanism of inhibition of these anti-FUR molecules is proposed.

  4. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-06-08

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  5. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of bombesin derivatives on the basis of pan-bombesin peptides labeled with indium-111, lutetium-177, and yttrium-90 for targeting bombesin receptor-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwen; Chen, Jianhua; Waldherr, Christian; Hinni, Karin; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Maecke, Helmut R

    2004-09-15

    Bombesin receptors are overexpressed on a variety of human tumors like prostate, breast, and lung cancer. The aim of this study was to develop radiolabeled (Indium-111, Lutetium-177, and Yttrium-90) bombesin analogues with affinity to the three bombesin receptor subtypes for targeted radiotherapy. The following structures were synthesized: diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gamma-aminobutyric acid-[D-Tyr6, beta-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] bombesin (6-14) (BZH1) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"' -tetraacetic acid-gamma-aminobutyric acid-[D-Tyr6, beta-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] bombesin (6-14) (BZH2). [111In]-BZH1 and in particular [90Y]-BZH2 were shown to have high affinity to all three human bombesin receptor subtypes with binding affinities in the nanomolar range. In human serum metabolic cleavage was found between beta-Ala11 and His12 with an approximate half-life of 2 hours. The metabolic breakdown was inhibited by EDTA and beta-Ala11-His12 (carnosine) indicating that carnosinase is the active enzyme. Both 111In-labeled peptides were shown to internalize into gastrin-releasing peptide-receptor-positive AR4-2J and PC-3 cells with similar high rates, which were independent of the radiometal. The biodistribution studies of [111In]-BZH1 and [111In]-BZH2 ([177Lu]-BZH2) in AR4-2J tumor-bearing rats showed specific and high uptake in gastrin-releasing peptide-receptor-positive organs and in the AR4-2J tumor. A fast clearance from blood and all of the nontarget organs except the kidneys was found. These radiopeptides were composed of the first pan-bombesin radioligands, which show great promise for the early diagnosis of tumors bearing not only gastrin-releasing peptide-receptors but also the other two bombesin receptor subtypes and may be of use in targeted radiotherapy of these tumors.

  7. A new family of Conus peptides targeted to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, C; Grilley, M; Miller, C; Shon, K J; Cruz, L J; Gray, W R; Dykert, J; Rivier, J; Yoshikami, D; Olivera, B M

    1995-09-22

    In this work, a new family of Conus peptides, the alpha A-conotoxins, which target the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, is defined. The first members of this family have been characterized from the eastern Pacific species, Conus purpurascens (the purple cone); three peptides that cause paralysis in fish were purified and characterized from milked venom. The sequence and disulfide bonding pattern of one of these, alpha A-conotoxin PIVA, is as follows: [formula: see text] where O represents trans-4-hydroxyproline. The two other peptides purified from C. purpurascens venom are the under-hydroxylated derivatives, [Pro13]alpha A-conotoxin PIVA and [Pro7,13]alpha A-conotoxin PIVA. The peptides have been chemically synthesized in a biologically active form. Both electrophysiological experiments and competition binding with alpha-bungarotoxin demonstrate that alpha A-PIVA acts as an antagonist of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the postsynaptic membrane.

  8. Identification of candidate antimicrobial peptides derived from abalone hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun; Coates, Christopher J; Zhu, Hongtao; Zhu, Ping; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2015-03-01

    Hemocyanins present in invertebrate hemolymph are multifunctional proteins, responsible for oxygen transport and contributing to innate immunity through phenoloxidase-like activity. In arthropods, hemocyanin has been identified as a source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides during infection. Conversely, no hemocyanin-derived antimicrobial peptides have been reported for molluscs. The present study describes a putative antimicrobial region, termed haliotisin, located within the linking sequence between the α-helical domain and β-sheet domain of abalone (Haliotis tuberculata) hemocyanin functional unit E. A series of synthetic peptides based on overlapping fragments of the haliotisin region were tested for their bactericidal potential. Incubating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the presence of certain haliotisin peptides, notably peptides 3-4-5 (DTFDYKKFGYRYDSLELEGRSISRIDELIQQRQEKDRTFAGFLLKGFGTSAS) led to reductions in microbial growth. Furthermore, transmission electron micrographs of haliotisin-treated bacteria revealed damages to the microbial cell wall. Data discussed here provides the first evidence to suggest that molluscan hemocyanin may act as a source of anti-infective peptides.

  9. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; Pilleri, Roberta; D'Amato, Filomena; Messana, Irene; Manconi, Barbara; Ebling, Francis J P; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC) or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis.

  10. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; Pilleri, Roberta; D’Amato, Filomena; Messana, Irene; Manconi, Barbara; Ebling, Francis J. P.; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC) or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis. PMID:26555143

  11. Food derived bioactive peptides and intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-12-09

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action.

  12. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  13. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  14. A chirality change in XPC- and Sfi1-derived peptides affects their affinity for centrin.

    PubMed

    Grecu, Dora; Irudayaraj, Victor Paul Raj; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Assairi, Liliane

    2016-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein centrin binds to a hydrophobic motif (W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8)) included in the sequence of several cellular targets: XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein), Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein1), and Sac3 [the central component of the transcription and mRNA export (TREX-2) complex]. However, centrin binding occurs in a reversed orientation (L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1)) for Sfi1 and Sac3 compared with XPC. Because D-peptides have been investigated for future therapeutic use, we analyzed their centrin-binding properties. Their affinity for centrin was measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The chirality change in the target-derived peptides affected their ability to bind centrin in a specific manner depending on the sequence orientation of the centrin-binding motif. In contrast to L-XPC-P10, D-XPC-P10 bound C-HsCen1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and to a lesser extent. D-XPC-P10 exhibited a reduced affinity for C-HsCen1 (Ka=0.064 × 10(6) M(-1)) by a factor of 2000 compared with L-XPC-P10 (Ka=132 × 10(6) M(-1)). D-peptides have a lower affinity than L-peptides for centrin, and the strength of this affinity depends on the sequence orientation of the target-derived peptides. The residual affinity observed for D-XPC suggests that the use of d-peptides represents a promising strategy for inhibiting centrin binding to its targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Peptide conjugates for chromosomal gene targeting by triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Rabinovitch, Peter; Ward, David C.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are DNA-binding molecules, which offer the potential to selectively modulate gene expression. However, the biological activity of TFOs as potential antigene compounds has been limited by cellular uptake. Here, we investigate the effect of cell-penetrating peptides on the biological activity of TFOs as measured in an assay for gene-targeted mutagenesis. Using the transport peptide derived from the third helix of the homeodomain of antennapedia (Antp), we tested TFO–peptide conjugates compared with unmodified TFOs. TFOs covalently linked to Antp resulted in a 20-fold increase in mutation frequency when compared with ‘naked’ oligonucleotides. There was no increase above background in mutation frequency when Antp by itself was added to the cells or when Antp was linked to mixed or scrambled sequence control oligonucleotides. In addition, the TFO–peptide conjugates increased the mutation frequency of the target gene, and not the control gene, in a dose-responsive manner. Confocal microscopy using labeled oligonucleotides indicated increased cellular uptake of TFOs when linked to Antp, consistent with the gene-targeting data. These results suggest that peptide conjugation may enhance intranuclear delivery of reagents designed to bind to chromosomal DNA. PMID:15602001

  17. Peptide conjugates for chromosomal gene targeting by triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Faye A; Manoharan, Muthiah; Rabinovitch, Peter; Ward, David C; Glazer, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are DNA-binding molecules, which offer the potential to selectively modulate gene expression. However, the biological activity of TFOs as potential antigene compounds has been limited by cellular uptake. Here, we investigate the effect of cell-penetrating peptides on the biological activity of TFOs as measured in an assay for gene-targeted mutagenesis. Using the transport peptide derived from the third helix of the homeodomain of antennapedia (Antp), we tested TFO-peptide conjugates compared with unmodified TFOs. TFOs covalently linked to Antp resulted in a 20-fold increase in mutation frequency when compared with 'naked' oligonucleotides. There was no increase above background in mutation frequency when Antp by itself was added to the cells or when Antp was linked to mixed or scrambled sequence control oligonucleotides. In addition, the TFO-peptide conjugates increased the mutation frequency of the target gene, and not the control gene, in a dose-responsive manner. Confocal microscopy using labeled oligonucleotides indicated increased cellular uptake of TFOs when linked to Antp, consistent with the gene-targeting data. These results suggest that peptide conjugation may enhance intranuclear delivery of reagents designed to bind to chromosomal DNA.

  18. NMR-derived model for a peptide-antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zilber, B.; Scherf, T.; Anglister, J. ); Levitt, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The TE34 monoclonal antibody against cholera toxin peptide 3 (CTP3; VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA) was sequenced and investigated by two-dimensional transferred NOE difference spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The V{sub H} sequence of TE34, which does not bind cholera toxin, shares remarkable homology to that of TE32 and TE33, which are both anti-CTP3 antibodies that bind the toxin. However, due to a shortened heavy chain CDR3, TE34 assumes a radically different combining site structure. The assignment of the combining site interactions to specific peptide residues was completed by use of AcIDSQRKA, a truncated peptide analogue in which lysine-13 was substituted by arginine, specific deuteration of individual polypeptide chains of the antibody, and a computer model for the Fv fragment of TE34. NMR-derived distance restraints were then applied to the calculated model of the Fv to generate a three-dimensional structure of the TE34/CTP3 complex. The combining site was found to be a very hydrophobic cavity composed of seven aromatic residues. Charged residues are found in the periphery of the combining site. The peptide residues HIDSQKKA form a {beta}-turn inside the combining site. The contact area between the peptide and the TE34 antibody is 388 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, about half of the contact area observed in protein-antibody complexes.

  19. A stabilized peptide ligand for multifunctional glioma targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Zhan, Changyou; Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-12-10

    Peptide ligands consisting of l-amino acids are subject to proteolysis in vivo. When modified on the surface of nanocarriers, those peptide ligands would readily degrade and the targeting efficacy is significantly attenuated. It has received increasing scrutiny to design stable peptide ligands for targeted drug delivery. Here, we present the design of a stable peptide ligand by the formation of a head-to-tail amide bond as an example. Even though the linear l-peptide A7R (termed (L)A7R) can bind specifically to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) that are overexpressed on glioma cells, neovasculature and glioma vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the tumor-homing capacity of (L)A7R is greatly impaired in vivo due to proteolysis (e.g. in the serum). A cyclic A7R (cA7R) peptide was identified by computer-aided peptide design and synthesized with high yield by combining solid phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The binding of cA7R to both receptors was theoretically and experimentally assessed. In our simulated model hydrophobic and ionic interactions dominated the binding of (L)A7R to receptors. It is very interesting that cA7R adopting a different structure from (L)A7R retained high binding affinities to receptors without affecting the hydrophobic and ionic interactions. After head-to-tail cyclization by the formation of an amide bond, cA7R exhibited exceptional stability in mouse serum. Either cA7R or (L)A7R was conjugated on the surface of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded liposomes (cA7R-LS/DOX or (L)A7R-LS/DOX). The results of in vitro cellular assays indicated that cA7R-LS/DOX not only displayed stronger anti-proliferative effect against glioma cells, but also demonstrated to be more efficient in destruction of VM and HUVEC tubes in comparison to (L)A7R-LS/DOX and plain liposomes (LS/DOX, without peptide conjugation). cA7R conjugation could achieve significantly higher accumulation of liposomes in glioma than did (L

  20. Emerging biopharmaceuticals from bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Komal; Abbas, Syed Qamar; Akhter, Najeeb; Shagufta, Bibi Ibtesam; Shah, Sayed Asmat Ali; Hassan, Syed Shams Ul

    2017-07-01

    Biologically active natural products are spontaneous medicinal entrants, which encourage synthetic access for enhancing and supporting drug discovery and development. Marine bioactive peptides are considered as a rich source of natural products that may provide long-term health, in addition to many prophylactic and curative medicinal drug treatments. The large literature concerning marine peptides has been collected, which shows high potential of nutraceutical and therapeutic efficacy encompassing wide spectra of bioactivities against a number of infection-causing agents. Their antimicrobial, antimalarial, antitumor, antiviral, and cardioprotective actions have achieved the attention of the pharmaceutical industry toward new design of drug formulations, for treatment and prevention of several infections. However, the mechanism of action of many peptide molecules has been still untapped. So in this regard, this paper reviews several peptide compounds by which they interfere with human pathogenesis. This knowledge is one of the key tools to be understood especially for the biotransformation of biomolecules into targeted medicines. The fact that different diseases have the capability to fight at different sites inside the body can lead to a new wave of increasing the chances to produce targeted medicines. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  2. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  3. [Functional activity of bone marrow-derived peptides (myelopeptides)].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A A; Petrov, R V

    2009-12-01

    The review describes structure and functions of bone marrow-derived peptides (myelopeptides). The final biological effects of these endogenous bioregulators (antitumor, antiviral, anti-infectious, antileukemia etc.) are due to their immunocorrecting and differentiating activity. Myelopeptides are the integral parts of the immune homeostasis maintenance system. Nowadays, medical preparations with no side effects and natural mechanisms of action are being developed on the basis of synthesized myelopeptides.

  4. [Food-derived opioid peptides and their neurological impact].

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, E A; Sarycheva, N Y; Dubynin, V A; Kamensky, A A

    2015-01-01

    In this review the up-to-date literature data about exorphins are analysed. Exorphins are short opioid-like food-derived peptides. Different reports about their physiological impact in animals and humans are reviewed with focus on neurotropic effects. Clinical data (case reports and clinical trials' results), on the one hand, and the results of experiments with animals of different taxons, on the other hand, are summarized. The influence of exorphins on infants' development is emphasized.

  5. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  6. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  7. Exogenous loading of a tapasin-dependent peptide onto HLA-B*44:02 can be restored by acid treatment or fixation of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Stroobant, Vincent; Demotte, Nathalie; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Cresswell, Peter; Bonehill, Aude; Michaux, Alexandre; Ma, Wenbin; Mulder, Arend; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Vigneron, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Anti-tumor CTLs recognize peptides derived from cellular proteins and presented on MHC class I. One category of peptides recognized by these CTLs is derived from proteins encoded by “cancer-germline” genes, which are specifically expressed in tumors, and therefore represent optimal targets for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identify an antigenic peptide, which is derived from the MAGE-A1-encoded protein (160-169) and presented to CTLs by HLA-B*44:02. Although this peptide is encoded by MAGE-A1, processed endogenously and presented by tumor cells, the corresponding synthetic peptide is hardly able to sensitize target cells to CTL recognition when pulsed exogenously. Endogenous processing and presentation of this peptide is strictly dependent on the presence of tapasin, which is believed to help peptide loading by stabilizing a peptide-receptive form of HLA-B*44:02. Exogenous loading of the peptide can be dramatically improved by paraformaldehyde fixation of surface molecules or by peptide loading at acidic pH. Either strategy allows efficient exogenous loading of the peptide, presumably by generating or stabilizing a peptide-receptive, empty conformation of the HLA. Altogether, our results indicate a potential drawback of short peptide-based vaccination strategies and offer possible solutions regarding the use of problematic epitopes such as the one described here. PMID:22678898

  8. Data-independent-acquisition mass spectrometry for identification of targeted-peptide site-specific modifications.

    PubMed

    Porter, Caleb J; Bereman, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel strategy based on data-independent acquisition coupled to targeted data extraction for the detection and identification of site-specific modifications of targeted peptides in a completely unbiased manner. This method requires prior knowledge of the site of the modification along the peptide backbone from the protein of interest, but not the mass of the modification. The procedure, named multiplex adduct peptide profiling (MAPP), consists of three steps: 1) A fragment-ion tag is extracted from the data, consisting of the b-type and y-type ion series from the N and C-terminus, respectively, up to the amino-acid position that is believed to be modified; 2) MS1 features are matched to the fragment-ion tag in retention-time space, using the isolation window as a pre-filter to enable calculation of the mass of the modification; and 3) modified fragment ions are overlaid with the unmodified fragment ions to verify the mass calculated in step 2. We discuss the development, applications, and limitations of this new method for detection of unknown peptide modifications. We present an application of the method in profiling adducted peptides derived from abundant proteins in biological fluids with the ultimate objective of detecting biomarkers of exposure to reactive species.

  9. Peptide targeting of quantum dots to human breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Emily M.; Seale-Goldsmith, Mary-Margaret; Dhawan, Deepika; Stewart, Jane; Ramos-Vara, Jose; Cooper, Christy L.; Reece, Lisa M.; Husk, Timothy; Bergstrom, Donald; Knapp, Deborah; Leary, James F.

    2008-02-01

    Nanomedical approaches to diseases such as cancer provide great promise with respect to diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The impact of nanomedicine versus conventional therapies will be realized with regard to their specific cell targeting capabilities. Semiconductor nanoparticles have distinct advantages due to their chemical conjugation and detection characteristics. The attachment of a peptide sequence, LTVSPWY, was completed. These nanoparticles successfully targeted in vitro and in vivo systems. This technology can be utilized as a base mechanism for the construction of a multifunctional nanomedical system. Nanomedicine has great potential for impacting the treatment of specific diseases and healthcare delivery methods.

  10. Novel Peptide-Mediated Interactions Derived from High-Resolution 3-Dimensional Structures

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Amelie; Aloy, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Many biological responses to intra- and extracellular stimuli are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions where a globular domain in one protein recognizes a linear peptide from another, creating a relatively small contact interface. These peptide stretches are often found in unstructured regions of proteins, and contain a consensus motif complementary to the interaction surface displayed by their binding partners. While most current methods for the de novo discovery of such motifs exploit their tendency to occur in disordered regions, our work here focuses on another observation: upon binding to their partner domain, motifs adopt a well-defined structure. Indeed, through the analysis of all peptide-mediated interactions of known high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) structure, we found that the structure of the peptide may be as characteristic as the consensus motif, and help identify target peptides even though they do not match the established patterns. Our analyses of the structural features of known motifs reveal that they tend to have a particular stretched and elongated structure, unlike most other peptides of the same length. Accordingly, we have implemented a strategy based on a Support Vector Machine that uses this features, along with other structure-encoded information about binding interfaces, to search the set of protein interactions of known 3D structure and to identify unnoticed peptide-mediated interactions among them. We have also derived consensus patterns for these interactions, whenever enough information was available, and compared our results with established linear motif patterns and their binding domains. Finally, to cross-validate our identification strategy, we scanned interactome networks from four model organisms with our newly derived patterns to see if any of them occurred more often than expected. Indeed, we found significant over-representations for 64 domain-motif interactions, 46 of which had not been

  11. A synthetic peptide derivative that is a cholecystokinin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lignon, M F; Galas, M C; Rodriguez, M; Laur, J; Aumelas, A; Martinez, J

    1987-05-25

    So far, there are no known peptidic effective receptor antagonists of both peripheral and central effects of cholecystokinin (CCK). Here, we describe a synthetic peptide derivative of CCK, t-butyloxycarbonyl-Tyr(SO3-)-Met-Gly-D-Trp-Nle-Asp 2-phenylethyl ester 1 (where Nle is norleucine), which is a potent CCK receptor antagonist. In rat and guinea pig dispersed pancreatic acini, this peptide derivative did not alter amylase secretion, but was able to antagonize the stimulation caused by cholecystokinin-related agonists. It caused a parallel rightward shift in the dose-response curve for the stimulation of amylase secretion with half-maximal inhibition of CCK-8-stimulated amylase release at a concentration of about 0.1 microM. Compound 1 was able to inhibit the binding of labeled CCK-9 (the C-terminal nonapeptide of CCK) to rat and guinea pig pancreatic acini (IC50 = 5 X 10(-8) M) as well as to guinea pig cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 5 X 10(-7) M). These results indicate that Compound 1 is a potent competitive CCK receptor antagonist.

  12. Collagen IV and CXC chemokine derived anti-angiogenic peptides suppress glioma xenograft growth

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Lal, Bachchu; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Laterra, John

    2012-01-01

    Peptides are receiving increased attention as therapeutic agents, due to their high binding specificity and versatility to be modified as targeting or carrier molecules. Particularly, peptides with anti-angiogenic activity are of high interest due to their applicability to a wide range of cancers. In this study we investigate the biological activity of two novel antiangiogenic peptides in pre-clinical glioma models. One peptide SP2000 is derived from collagen IV and the other peptide SP3019 belongs to the CXC family. We previously characterized the capacity of SP2000 and SP3019 to inhibit multiple biological endpoints linked to angiogenesis in human endothelial cells in several assays. Here we report additional studies using endothelial cells and focus on the activity of these peptides against human glioma cell growth, migration and adhesion in vitro and growth as tumor xenografts in vivo. We found that SP2000 completely inhibits migration of the glioma cells at 50 μM and SP3019 produced 50% inhibition at 100 μM. Their relative anti-adhesion activities were similar with SP2000 and SP3019 generating 50% adhesion inhibition at 4.9 ± 0.82 μM and 21.3 ± 5.92 μM respectively. In vivo glioma growth inhibition was 63 % for SP2000 and 76% for SP3019 after 2 weeks of administration at daily doses of 10mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. The direct activity of these peptides against glioma cells in conjunction with their anti-angiogenic activities warrants their further development as either stand-alone agents or in combination with standard cytotoxic or emerging targeted therapies in malignant brain tumors. PMID:22495619

  13. A Review of Potential Marine-derived Hypotensive and Anti-obesity Peptides.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, V; Vasiljevic, T; Donkor, O N; Mathai, M L

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are food derived components, usually consisting of 3-20 amino acids, which are inactive when incorporated within their parent protein. Once liberated by enzymatic or chemical hydrolysis, during food processing and gastrointestinal transit, they can potentially provide an array of health benefits to the human body. Owing to an unprecedented increase in the worldwide incidence of obesity and hypertension, medical researchers are focusing on the hypotensive and anti-obesity properties of nutritionally derived bioactive peptides. The role of the renin-angiotensin system has long been established in the aetiology of metabolic diseases and hypertension. Targeting the renin-angiotensin system by inhibiting the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and preventing the formation of angiotensin II can be a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and obesity. Fish-derived proteins and peptides can potentially be excellent sources of bioactive components, mainly as a source of ACE inhibitors. However, increased use of marine sources, poses an unsustainable burden on particular fish stocks, so, the underutilized fish species and by-products can be exploited for this purpose. This paper provides an overview of the techniques involved in the production, isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive peptides from marine sources, as well as the evaluation of the ACE inhibitory (ACE-I) activity and bioavailability.

  14. Peptide-based carbon nanotubes for mitochondrial targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battigelli, Alessia; Russier, Julie; Venturelli, Enrica; Fabbro, Chiara; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, we report the design and synthesis of peptide-based-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to target mitochondria. Targeting these intracellular organelles might open the way to develop alternative systems to address diseases related to genetic mutations in mitochondrial (mt)-DNA, by delivering therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first step towards mitochondrial delivery of this type of nucleic acid was to target MWCNTs to mitochondria by covalent functionalization with a well-known endogenous mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). The subcellular localization of the conjugates, which were fluorescently labeled, in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and human HeLa cells was then studied using different microscopy techniques, such as wide-field epifluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The localization of the MTS-MWCNT conjugates into mitochondria was further confirmed by analyzing the isolated organelles using TEM.In the present study, we report the design and synthesis of peptide-based-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to target mitochondria. Targeting these intracellular organelles might open the way to develop alternative systems to address diseases related to genetic mutations in mitochondrial (mt)-DNA, by delivering therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first step towards mitochondrial delivery of this type of nucleic acid was to target MWCNTs to mitochondria by covalent functionalization with a well-known endogenous mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). The subcellular localization of the conjugates, which were fluorescently labeled, in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and human HeLa cells was then studied using different microscopy techniques, such as wide-field epifluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The localization of the MTS-MWCNT conjugates into mitochondria was further confirmed by analyzing the

  15. Human DMBT1-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Intracellular siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Martina; Casella, Cinzia; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Polo, Ester; Herda, Luciana M; Dawson, Kenneth A; Ditzel, Henrik J; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2017-09-15

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising molecule for gene therapy, but its therapeutic administration remains problematic. Among the recently proposed vectors, cell-penetrating peptides show great promise in in vivo trials for siRNA delivery. Human protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1) is a pattern recognition molecule that interacts with polyanions and recognizes and aggregates bacteria. Taking advantage of these properties, we investigated whether specific synthetic DMBT1-derived peptides could be used to formulate nanoparticles for siRNA administration. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and UV spectra, we identified two DMBT1 peptides that could encapsulate the siRNA with a self- and co-assembly mechanism. The complexes were stable for at least 2 hr in the presence of either fetal bovine serum (FBS) or RNase A, with peptide-dependent time span protection. ζ-potential, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy revealed negatively charged nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10-800 nm, depending on the reaction conditions, and a spherical or rice-shaped morphology, depending on the peptide and β-helix conformation. We successfully transfected human MCF7 cells with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-DMBT1-peptide-Cy3-siRNA complexes. Finally, DMBT1 peptides encapsulating an siRNA targeting a fluorescent reporter gene showed efficient gene silencing in MCF7-recombinant cells. These results lay the foundation for a new research line to exploit DMBT1-peptide nanocomplexes for therapeutic siRNA delivery. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular targets of antihypertensive peptides: understanding the mechanisms of action based on the pathophysiology of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Kaustav; Wu, Jianping

    2014-12-24

    There is growing interest in using functional foods or nutraceuticals for the prevention and treatment of hypertension or high blood pressure. Although numerous preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions are available on the market, unfortunately, many patients still suffer from poorly controlled hypertension. Furthermore, most pharmacological drugs, such as inhibitors of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE), are often associated with significant adverse effects. Many bioactive food compounds have been characterized over the past decades that may contribute to the management of hypertension; for example, bioactive peptides derived from various food proteins with antihypertensive properties have gained a great deal of attention. Some of these peptides have exhibited potent in vivo antihypertensive activity in both animal models and human clinical trials. This review provides an overview about the complex pathophysiology of hypertension and demonstrates the potential roles of food derived bioactive peptides as viable interventions targeting specific pathways involved in this disease process. This review offers a comprehensive guide for understanding and utilizing the molecular mechanisms of antihypertensive actions of food protein derived peptides.

  17. Molecular Targets of Antihypertensive Peptides: Understanding the Mechanisms of Action Based on the Pathophysiology of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kaustav; Wu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in using functional foods or nutraceuticals for the prevention and treatment of hypertension or high blood pressure. Although numerous preventive and therapeutic pharmacological interventions are available on the market, unfortunately, many patients still suffer from poorly controlled hypertension. Furthermore, most pharmacological drugs, such as inhibitors of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE), are often associated with significant adverse effects. Many bioactive food compounds have been characterized over the past decades that may contribute to the management of hypertension; for example, bioactive peptides derived from various food proteins with antihypertensive properties have gained a great deal of attention. Some of these peptides have exhibited potent in vivo antihypertensive activity in both animal models and human clinical trials. This review provides an overview about the complex pathophysiology of hypertension and demonstrates the potential roles of food derived bioactive peptides as viable interventions targeting specific pathways involved in this disease process. This review offers a comprehensive guide for understanding and utilizing the molecular mechanisms of antihypertensive actions of food protein derived peptides. PMID:25547491

  18. Lumican Peptides: Rational Design Targeting ALK5/TGFBRI

    PubMed Central

    Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Yuan, Yong; Zhang, Jianhua; Nader, Helena B.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan (SLRP), is a component of extracellular matrix which also functions as a matrikine regulating multiple cell activities. In the cornea, lumican maintains corneal transparency by regulating collagen fibrillogenesis, promoting corneal epithelial wound healing, regulating gene expression and maintaining corneal homeostasis. We have recently shown that a peptide designed from the 13 C-terminal amino acids of lumican (LumC13) binds to ALK5/TGFBR1 (type1 receptor of TGFβ) to promote wound healing. Herein we evaluate the mechanism by which this synthetic C-terminal amphiphilic peptide (LumC13), binds to ALK5. These studies clearly reveal that LumC13-ALK5 form a stable complex. In order to determine the minimal amino acids required for the formation of a stable lumican/ALK5 complex derivatives of LumC13 were designed and their binding to ALK5 investigated in silico. These LumC13 derivatives were tested both in vitro and in vivo to evaluate their ability to promote corneal epithelial cell migration and corneal wound healing, respectively. These validations add to the therapeutic value of LumC13 (Lumikine) and aid its clinical relevance of promoting the healing of corneal epithelium debridement. Moreover, our data validates the efficacy of our computational approach to design active peptides based on interactions of receptor and chemokine/ligand. PMID:28181591

  19. Lumican Peptides: Rational Design Targeting ALK5/TGFBRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J.; Yuan, Yong; Zhang, Jianhua; Nader, Helena B.; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan (SLRP), is a component of extracellular matrix which also functions as a matrikine regulating multiple cell activities. In the cornea, lumican maintains corneal transparency by regulating collagen fibrillogenesis, promoting corneal epithelial wound healing, regulating gene expression and maintaining corneal homeostasis. We have recently shown that a peptide designed from the 13 C-terminal amino acids of lumican (LumC13) binds to ALK5/TGFBR1 (type1 receptor of TGFβ) to promote wound healing. Herein we evaluate the mechanism by which this synthetic C-terminal amphiphilic peptide (LumC13), binds to ALK5. These studies clearly reveal that LumC13-ALK5 form a stable complex. In order to determine the minimal amino acids required for the formation of a stable lumican/ALK5 complex derivatives of LumC13 were designed and their binding to ALK5 investigated in silico. These LumC13 derivatives were tested both in vitro and in vivo to evaluate their ability to promote corneal epithelial cell migration and corneal wound healing, respectively. These validations add to the therapeutic value of LumC13 (Lumikine) and aid its clinical relevance of promoting the healing of corneal epithelium debridement. Moreover, our data validates the efficacy of our computational approach to design active peptides based on interactions of receptor and chemokine/ligand.

  20. Organellar oligopeptidase (OOP) provides a complementary pathway for targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F; Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Murcha, Monika W; Branca, Rui M M; Radomiljac, Jordan D; Regberg, Jakob; Svensson, Linda M; Bakali, Amin; Langel, Ulo; Lehtiö, Janne; Whelan, James; Stenmark, Pål; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-10-01

    Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain distinct proteolytic systems for precursor protein processing catalyzed by the mitochondrial and stromal processing peptidases and for the degradation of targeting peptides catalyzed by presequence protease. Here, we have identified and characterized a component of the organellar proteolytic systems in Arabidopsis thaliana, the organellar oligopeptidase, OOP (At5g65620). OOP belongs to the M3A family of peptide-degrading metalloproteases. Using two independent in vivo methods, we show that the protease is dually localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Furthermore, we localized the OPP homolog At5g10540 to the cytosol. Analysis of peptide degradation by OOP revealed substrate size restriction from 8 to 23 aa residues. Short mitochondrial targeting peptides (presequence of the ribosomal protein L29 and presequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase 1) and N- and C-terminal fragments derived from the presequence of the ATPase beta subunit ranging in size from 11 to 20 aa could be degraded. MS analysis showed that OOP does not exhibit a strict cleavage pattern but shows a weak preference for hydrophobic residues (F/L) at the P1 position. The crystal structures of OOP, at 1.8-1.9 Å, exhibit an ellipsoidal shape consisting of two major domains enclosing the catalytic cavity of 3,000 Å(3). The structural and biochemical data suggest that the protein undergoes conformational changes to allow peptide binding and proteolysis. Our results demonstrate the complementary role of OOP in targeting-peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

  1. Organellar oligopeptidase (OOP) provides a complementary pathway for targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Murcha, Monika W.; Branca, Rui M. M.; Radomiljac, Jordan D.; Regberg, Jakob; Svensson, Linda M.; Bakali, Amin; Langel, Ülo; Lehtiö, Janne; Whelan, James; Stenmark, Pål; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain distinct proteolytic systems for precursor protein processing catalyzed by the mitochondrial and stromal processing peptidases and for the degradation of targeting peptides catalyzed by presequence protease. Here, we have identified and characterized a component of the organellar proteolytic systems in Arabidopsis thaliana, the organellar oligopeptidase, OOP (At5g65620). OOP belongs to the M3A family of peptide-degrading metalloproteases. Using two independent in vivo methods, we show that the protease is dually localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Furthermore, we localized the OPP homolog At5g10540 to the cytosol. Analysis of peptide degradation by OOP revealed substrate size restriction from 8 to 23 aa residues. Short mitochondrial targeting peptides (presequence of the ribosomal protein L29 and presequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase 1) and N- and C-terminal fragments derived from the presequence of the ATPase beta subunit ranging in size from 11 to 20 aa could be degraded. MS analysis showed that OOP does not exhibit a strict cleavage pattern but shows a weak preference for hydrophobic residues (F/L) at the P1 position. The crystal structures of OOP, at 1.8–1.9 Å, exhibit an ellipsoidal shape consisting of two major domains enclosing the catalytic cavity of 3,000 Å3. The structural and biochemical data suggest that the protein undergoes conformational changes to allow peptide binding and proteolysis. Our results demonstrate the complementary role of OOP in targeting-peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts. PMID:24043784

  2. Peptide derived from anti-idiotypic single-chain antibody is a potent antifungal agent compared to its parent fungicide HM-1 killer toxin peptide.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M Enamul; Karim, Nurul; Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Selvakumar, Dakshnamurthy; Miyamoto, Masahiko; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Komiyama, Tadazumi

    2011-12-01

    Based on anti-idiotypic network theory in light of the need for new antifungal drugs, we attempted to identify biologically active fragments from HM-1 yeast killer toxin and its anti-idiotypic antibody and to compare their potency as an antifungal agent. Thirteen overlapping peptides from HM-1 killer toxin and six peptides from its anti-idiotypic single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies representing the complementarity determining regions were synthesized. The binding affinities of these peptides were investigated and measured by Dot blot and surface plasmon resonance analysis and finally their antifungal activities were investigated by inhibition of growth, colony forming unit assay. Peptide P6, containing the potential active site of HM-1 was highly capable of inhibiting the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae but was less effective on pathogenic fungi. However, peptide fragments derived from scFv antibody exerted remarkable inhibitory effect on the growth of pathogenic strains of Candida and Cryptococcus species in vitro. One scFv-derived decapeptide (SP6) was selected as the strongest killer peptide for its high binding affinity and antifungal abilities on both Candida and Cryptococcus species with IC(50) values from 2.33 × 10(-7) M to 36.0 × 10(-7) M. SP6 peptide activity was neutralized by laminarin, a β-1,3-glucan molecule, indicating this peptide derived from scFv anti-idiotypic antibody retains antifungal activity through interaction with cell wall β-glucan of their target fungal cells. Experimental evidence strongly suggested the possibility of development of anti-idiotypic scFv peptide-based antifungal agents which may lead to improve therapeutics for the management of varieties of fungal infections.

  3. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element.

  4. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element. PMID:25494332

  5. Design and development of receptor-avid peptide conjugates for in-vivo targeting of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    1999-07-01

    Radiometallated peptides that exhibit high specificity for cognate receptors over expressed on cancer cells offer important potential as site-directed diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. The formation of effective radioactive drugs for specific in vivo targeting of cancerous tumors is being facilitated by the integration of novel chelation strategies and receptor-avid derivatives. Significant efforts are being made to design Technetium-99m labeled for diagnostic imaging of cancerous tumors for use in conjunction with Single Photon Emission Tomography instrumentation in nuclear medicine. Receptor avid radiopharmaceutical are also being developed that utilize other radionuclides for imaging and therapeutic applications. Despite the technological challenges that must be overcome, radiolabeled receptor avid peptide conjugates are providing promising site-directed targeting agents for the assessment and treatment of cancerous tumors in humans.

  6. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  7. A Peptide Derived from Endostatin Ameliorates Organ Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yukie; Takihara, Takahisa; Chambers, Roger A.; Veraldi, Kristen L.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroproliferative disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis have no effective therapies and result in significant morbidity and mortality due to progressive organ fibrosis. We examined the effect of peptides derived from endostatin on existing fibrosis and fibrosis triggered by two potent mediators, transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) and bleomycin, in human and mouse tissues in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. We identified one peptide, E4, with potent antifibrotic activity. E4 prevented TGF-β–induced dermal fibrosis in vivo in a mouse model, ex vivo in human skin, and in bleomycin-induced dermal and pulmonary fibrosis in vivo, demonstrating that E4 exerts potent antifibrotic effects. In addition, E4 significantly reduced existing fibrosis in these preclinical models. E4 amelioration of fibrosis was accompanied by reduced cell apoptosis and lower levels of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme that cross-links collagen, and Egr-1 (early growth response gene–1), a transcription factor that mediates the effects of several fibrotic triggers. Our findings identify E4 as a peptide with potent antifibrotic activity and a possible therapeutic agent for organ fibrosis. PMID:22649092

  8. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    PubMed

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  9. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.; Stöcklein, Walter F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  10. Inhibition of the wine spoilage yeast Dekkera bruxellensis by bovine lactoferrin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Enrique, María; Marcos, Jose F; Yuste, María; Martínez, Mireia; Vallés, Salvador; Manzanares, Paloma

    2008-10-31

    The antimicrobial action of lactoferrin (LF)-derived peptides against Dekkera bruxellensis strains isolated from spoiled wines has been examined. The study included a fifteen-residue peptide (LfcinB(17-31)) derived from bovine lactoferricin B and a bovine LF pepsin hydrolysate (LFH). In vitro assays showed the inhibitory properties of LfcinB(17-31) on D. bruxellensis growth with IC(50) and MIC values in the micromolar range. Strains tested showed different sensitivity to the peptide. LfcinB(17-31) showed fungicidal properties towards all strains tested in laboratory growth medium. However, the extent of fungicidal activity was strain-dependent in must and wine, confirming the different antimicrobial action of peptides depending on both the food matrix and the target micro-organism. The binding of LfcinB(17-31) to D. bruxellensis cells was visualized by fluorescence microscopy and correlated with the fungicidal activity in the different matrixes. LfcinB(17-31) and LFH showed growth inhibitory properties in wine suggesting their potential use for spoilage control.

  11. Using iRT, a normalized retention time for more targeted measurement of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Escher, Claudia; Reiter, Lukas; MacLean, Brendan; Ossola, Reto; Herzog, Franz; Chilton, John; MacCoss, Michael J.; Rinner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) has recently become the method of choice for targeted quantitative measurement of proteins using mass spectrometry. The method, however, is limited in the number of peptides that can be measured in one run. This number can be markedly increased by scheduling the acquisition if the accurate retention time (RT) of each peptide is known. Here we present iRT, an empirically derived dimensionless peptide-specific value that allows for highly accurate RT prediction. The iRT of a peptide is a fixed number relative to a standard set of reference iRT-peptides that can be transferred across laboratories and chromatographic systems. We show that iRT facilitates the setup of multiplexed experiments with acquisition windows more than 4 times smaller compared to in silico RT predictions resulting in improved quantification accuracy. iRTs can be determined by any laboratory and shared transparently. The iRT concept has been implemented in Skyline, the most widely used software for MRM experiments. PMID:22577012

  12. pHLIP peptide targets nanogold particles to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lan; Daniels, Jennifer; Moshnikova, Anna; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Ahmed, Aftab; Engelman, Donald M.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in nanomedicine depends on the development of nanomaterials and targeted delivery methods. In this work, we describe a method for the preferential targeting of gold nanoparticles to a tumor in a mouse model. The method is based on the use of the pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), which targets various imaging agents to acidic tumors. We compare tumor targeting by nonfunctionalized nanogold particles with nanogold–pHLIP conjugates, where nanogold is covalently attached to the N terminus of pHLIP. Our most important finding is that both intratumoral and i.v. administration demonstrated a significant enhancement of tumor uptake of gold nanoparticles conjugated with pHLIP. Statistically significant reduction of gold accumulation was observed in acidic tumors and kidney when pH-insensitive K-pHLIP was used as a vehicle, suggesting an important role of pH in the pHLIP-mediated targeting of gold nanoparticles. The pHLIP technology can substantially improve the delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors by providing specificity of targeting, enhancing local concentration in tumors, and distributing nanoparticles throughout the entire tumor mass where they remain for an extended period (several days), which is beneficial for radiation oncology and imaging. PMID:23267062

  13. Collagen like peptide bioconjugates for targeted drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tianzhi

    the coil/globule conformational transition of the PDEGMEMA building block above its LCST with stabilization of the nanostructures by the hydrophilic CLP. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on such assembled nanostructures from collagen-like peptide containing copolymers. Due to the strong propensity for CLPs to bind to natural collagen via strand invasion processes, these nanosized vesicles may be used as drug carriers for targeted delivery. In addition to synthetic polymers, the collagen like peptide is then conjugated with a thermoresponsive elastin-like peptide (ELP). The resulting ELP-CLP diblock conjugates show a remarkable reduction in the inverse transition temperature of the ELP domain, attributed to the anchoring effect of the CLP triple helix. The lower transition temperature of the conjugate enables facile formation of well-defined vesicles at physiological temperature and the unexpected resolubilization of the vesicles at elevated temperatures upon unfolding of the CLP domain. Given the ability of CLPs to modify collagens, this work provides not only a simple and versatile avenue for controlling the inverse transition behavior of elastin-like peptides, but also suggest future opportunities for these thermoresponsive nanostructures in biologically relevant environments. In the last section, the potential of using the ELP-CLP nanoparticles as drug delivery vehicles for targeting collagen containing matrices is evaluated. A sustained release of clinically relevant amount of encapsulated modelled drug is achieved within three weeks, followed by a thermally controlled burst release. As expected, the ELP-CLP nanoparticles show strong retention on collagen substrate, via specific binding through collagen triple helix hybridization. Additionally, cell viability and proliferation studies using fibroblasts and chondrocytes suggest the nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic. Additionally, almost no TNF-alpha expression from macrophages is observed

  14. Target promiscuity and heterogeneous effects of tarantula venom peptides affecting Na+ and K+ ion channels.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-02-05

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their "canonical" gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K(+) channels, and two human Shaker-related K(+) channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na(+) channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na(+) channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K(+) channels at concentrations well above the IC(50) value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs.

  15. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  16. Convergent evolution-guided design of antimicrobial peptides derived from influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Aumelas, André; Gao, Bin

    2011-02-24

    Antimicrobial activity and solution structures of four 13-amino acid peptides derived from the fusion domain of viral hemagglutinin proteins are presented. The results show that carboxyl-terminal amidation is a key factor to switch a viral fusion domain-derived sequence into an antimicrobial peptide. Optimization of amphiphilic balance on the amidated analogue largely improves efficacy and enlarges antimicrobial spectra of these peptides. Our work indicates that viral fusion domains have potential to be engineered into potent antimicrobial peptides.

  17. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Timothy P.; Schroeter, Elena R.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa. PMID:25972464

  18. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Timothy P; Schroeter, Elena R; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2015-06-07

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa.

  19. FKBPL and Peptide Derivatives: Novel Biological Agents That Inhibit Angiogenesis by a CD44-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Andrea; O’Rourke, Martin; Yakkundi, Anita; Worthington, Jenny; Hookham, Michelle; Bicknell, Roy; McCarthy, Helen O.; McClelland, Keeva; McCallum, Lynn; Dyer, Hayder; McKeen, Hayley; Waugh, David; Roberts, Jennifer; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham; James, Iain; Harrison, Timothy; Hirst, David G.; Robson, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anti-angiogenic therapies can be an important adjunct to the management of many malignancies. Here we investigated a novel protein, FKBPL, and peptide derivative for their anti-angiogenic activity and mechanism of action. Experimental Design Recombinant FKBPL (rFKBPL) and its peptide derivative were assessed in a range of human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) assays in vitro. Their ability to inhibit proliferation, migration and Matrigel dependent tubule formation was determined. They were further evaluated in an ex-vivo rat model of neo-vascularisation and in two in vivo mouse models of angiogenesis; the sponge implantation and the intra-vital microscopy models. Anti-tumor efficacy was determined in two human tumor xenograft models grown in SCID mice. Finally, the dependence of peptide on CD44 was determined using a CD44 targeted siRNA approach or in cell lines of differing CD44 status. Results rFKBPL inhibited endothelial cell migration, tubule formation and microvessel formation in vitro and in vivo. The region responsible for FKBPL’s anti-angiogenic activity was identified and a 24 amino acid peptide (AD-01) spanning this sequence was synthesised. It was potently anti-angiogenic and inhibited growth in two human tumor xenograft models (DU145 and MDA-231) when administered systemically, either on its own, or in combination with docetaxel. The anti-angiogenic activity of FKBPL and AD-01 was dependent on the cell surface receptor CD44 and signalling downstream of this receptor promoted an anti-migratory phenotype. Conclusion FKBPL and its peptide derivative AD-01 have potent anti-angiogenic activity. Thus, these agents offer the potential of an attractive new approach to anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21364036

  20. Dual targeting to mitochondria and chloroplasts: characterization of Thr-tRNA synthetase targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Anna-Karin; Spånning, Erika; Biverståhl, Henrik; Maddalo, Gianluca; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Mäler, Lena; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2009-11-01

    There is a group of proteins that are encoded by a single gene, expressed as a single precursor protein and dually targeted to both mitochondria and chloroplasts using an ambiguous targeting peptide. Sequence analysis of 43 dual targeted proteins in comparison with 385 mitochondrial proteins and 567 chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana revealed an overall significant increase in phenylalanines, leucines, and serines and a decrease in acidic amino acids and glycine in dual targeting peptides (dTPs). The N-terminal portion of dTPs has significantly more serines than mTPs. The number of arginines is similar to those in mTPs, but almost twice as high as those in cTPs. We have investigated targeting determinants of the dual targeting peptide of Thr-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS-dTP) studying organellar import of N- and C-terminal deletion constructs of ThrRS-dTP coupled to GFP. These results show that the 23 amino acid long N-terminal portion of ThrRS-dTP is crucial but not sufficient for the organellar import. The C-terminal deletions revealed that the shortest peptide that was capable of conferring dual targeting was 60 amino acids long. We have purified the ThrRS-dTP(2-60) to homogeneity after its expression as a fusion construct with GST followed by CNBr cleavage and ion exchange chromatography. The purified ThrRS-dTP(2-60) inhibited import of pF1beta into mitochondria and of pSSU into chloroplasts at microM concentrations showing that dual and organelle-specific proteins use the same organellar import pathways. Furthermore, the CD spectra of ThrRS-dTP(2-60) indicated that the peptide has the propensity for forming alpha-helical structure in membrane mimetic environments; however, the membrane charge was not important for the amount of induced helical structure. This is the first study in which a dual targeting peptide has been purified and investigated by biochemical and biophysical means.

  1. RGD based peptide amphiphiles as drug carriers for cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, Poonam S.

    Specific interactions of ligands with receptors is one of the approaches for active targeting of anticancer drugs to cancer cells. Over expression of integrin receptors is a physiological manifestation in several cancers and is associated with cancer progression and metastasis, which makes it an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. The peptide sequence for this integrin recognition is the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Self-assembly offers a unique way of presenting ligands to target receptors for recognition and binding. This study focuses on development of integrin specific peptide amphiphile self-assemblies as carriers for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to αvbeta 3 integrin overexpressing cancers. Amphiphiles composed of conjugates of different analogs of RGD (linear, cyclic or glycosylated) and aliphatic fatty acid with or without 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid (ADA) as linker were synthesized and characterized. The amphiphiles exhibited Critical Micellar Concentration in the range of 7-30 μM. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed the formation of spherical micelles in the size range of 10-40 nm. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer studies revealed entrapment of hydrophobic dyes within a tight micellar core and provided information regarding the cargo exchange within micelles. The RGD micelles exhibited competitive binding with 55% displacement of a bound fluorescent probe by the cyclic RGD micelles. The internalization of fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC) loaded RGD micelles was significantly higher in A2058 melanoma cells compared to free FITC within 20 minutes of incubation at 37°C. The same micelles showed significantly lower internalization at 4°C and on pretreatment with 0.45M sucrose confirming endocytotic uptake of the RGD micellar carriers. The IC50 of paclitaxel in A2058 melanoma cells was lower when treated within RGD micelles as compared to treatment of free drug. On the other hand, IC50 values increased by 2 to 9 fold for micellar treatment

  2. Lipid-targeting peptide probes for extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Aaron D.; Yin, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. PMID:26909741

  3. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  4. Formyl peptide receptors and the regulation of ACTH secretion: targets for annexin A1, lipoxins, and bacterial peptides

    PubMed Central

    John, C. D.; Sahni, V.; Mehet, D.; Morris, J. F.; Christian, H. C.; Perretti, M.; Flower, R. J.; Solito, E.; Buckingham, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that respond to proinflammatory N-formylated bacterial peptides (e.g., formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, fMLF) and, thus, contribute to the host response to bacterial infection. Paradoxically, a growing body of evidence suggests that some members of this receptor family may also be targets for certain anti-inflammatory molecules, including annexin A1 (ANXA1), which is an important mediator of glucocorticoid (GC) action. To explore further the potential role of FPRs in mediating ANXA1 actions, we have focused on the pituitary gland, where ANXA1 has a well-defined role as a cell-cell mediator of the inhibitory effects of GCs on the secretion of corticotrophin (ACTH), and used molecular, genetic, and pharmacological approaches to address the question in well-established rodent models. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis identified mRNAs for four FPR family members in the mouse anterior pituitary gland, Fpr-rs1, Fpr-rs2, Fpr-rs6, and Fpr-rs7. Functional studies confirmed that, like dexamethasone, ANXA1 and two ANXA1-derived peptides (ANXA11-188 and ANXA1Ac2-26) inhibit the evoked release of ACTH from rodent anterior pituitary tissue in vitro. Fpr1 gene deletion failed to modify the pituitary responses to dexamethasone or ANXA1Ac2-26. However, lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 0.02-2μM, a lipid mediator with high affinity for Fpr-rs1) mimicked the inhibitory effects of ANXA1 on ACTH release as also did fMLF in high (1-100 μM) but not lower (10-100 nM) concentrations. Additionally, a nonselective FPR antagonist (Boc1, 100 μM) overcame the effects of dexamethasone, ANXA11-188, ANXA1Ac2-26, fMLF, and LXA4 on ACTH release, although at a lower concentration (50 μM), it was without effect. Together, the results suggest that the actions of ANXA1 in the pituitary gland are independent of Fpr1 but may involve other FPR family members, in particular, Fpr-rs1 or a closely related receptor. They

  5. Milk-derived bioactive peptides and their health promoting effects: a potential role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Simone; Belton, Orina; Fitzgerald, Desmond J

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins are food components that, in addition to their nutritional value, retain many biological properties and have therapeutic effects in several health disorders, including cardiovascular disease. Amongst these, atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of heart attack and strokes. It is a progressive dyslipidaemic and inflammatory disease where accumulation of oxidized lipids and inflammatory cells leads to the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque in the vessel wall. Milk-derived bioactive peptides can be released during gastrointestinal digestion, food processing or by enzymatic and bacterial fermentation and are considered to promote diverse beneficial effects such as lipid lowering, antihypertensive, immnomodulating, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic effects. In this review, an overview of the diverse biological effects of these compounds is given, particularly focusing on their beneficial properties on cardiovascular disease and proposing novel mechanisms of action responsible for their bioactivity. Attempts to prevent cardiovascular diseases target modifications of several risk factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, high blood concentrations of lipids or insulin resistance. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are a source of health-enhancing components and the potential health benefit of these compounds has a growing commercial potential. Consequently, they have been incorporated as ingredients in functional foods, as dietary supplements and as pharmaceuticals to promote health and reduce risk of chronic diseases. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Cell-permeable stapled peptides based on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from HIV-1 gene products.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Aikawa, Haruo; Ohashi, Nami; Urano, Emiko; Métifiot, Mathieu; Fujino, Masayuki; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Ozaki, Taro; Nozue, Ami; Narumi, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Chie; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Pommier, Yves; Yamamoto, Naoki; Komano, Jun A; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2013-10-18

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an enzyme which is indispensable for the stable infection of host cells because it catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the genome and thus is an attractive target for the development of anti-HIV agents. Earlier, we found Vpr-derived peptides with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IN. These Vpr-derived peptides are originally located in an α-helical region of the parent Vpr protein. Addition of an octa-arginyl group to the inhibitory peptides caused significant inhibition against HIV replication associated with an increase in cell permeability but also relatively high cytotoxicity. In the current study, stapled peptides, a new class of stabilized α-helical peptidomimetics were adopted to enhance the cell permeability of the above lead peptides. A series of stapled peptides, which have a hydrocarbon link formed by a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis reaction between successive turns of α-helix, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for biological activity. In cell-based assays some of the stapled peptides showed potent anti-HIV activity comparable with that of the original octa-arginine-containing peptide (2) but with lower cytotoxicity. Fluorescent imaging experiments revealed that these stapled peptides are significantly cell permeable, and CD analysis showed they form α-helical structures, whereas the unstapled congeners form β-sheet structures. The application of this stapling strategy to Vpr-derived IN inhibitory peptides led to a remarkable increase in their potency in cells and a significant reduction of their cytotoxicity.

  7. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  8. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-10-13

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers.

  9. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion-positive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-12-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50 % of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High-scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized, HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate-restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen-specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201(+) prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy.

  10. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50% of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201+ prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy. PMID:24149465

  11. Quinacrine reactivity with prion proteins and prion-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zbigniew; Šafařík, Martin; Dvořáková, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Březinová, Anna; Stibor, Ivan; Holada, Karel; Bouř, Petr; Hlaváček, Jan; Sebestík, Jaroslav

    2013-05-01

    Quinacrine is a drug that is known to heal neuronal cell culture infected with prions, which are the causative agents of neurodegenerative diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, the drug fails when it is applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed the reason for this failure. The drug was suggested to "covalently" modify the prion protein via an acridinyl exchange reaction. To investigate this hypothesis more closely, the acridine moiety of quinacrine was covalently attached to the thiol groups of cysteines belonging to prion-derived peptides and to the full-length prion protein. The labeled compounds were conveniently monitored by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. The acridine moiety demonstrated characteristic UV-vis spectrum, depending on the substituent at the C-9 position of the acridine ring. These results confirm that quinacrine almost exclusively reacts with the thiol groups present in proteins and peptides. The chemical reaction alters the prion properties and increases the concentration of the acridine moiety in the prion protein.

  12. Milk bioactive peptide database: A comprehensive database of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides and novel visualization.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Søren Drud; Beverly, Robert L; Qu, Yunyao; Dallas, David C

    2017-10-01

    During processing and digestion, milk proteins are disassembled into peptides with an array of biological functions, including antimicrobial, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, antioxidant, opioid, and immunomodulation. These functions are summarized in numerous reviews, yet information on which peptides have which functions remains scattered across hundreds of research articles. We systematically searched the literature for all instances of bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins from any mammalian source. The data were compiled into a comprehensive database, which can be used to search for specific functions, peptides, or proteins (http://mbpdb.nws.oregonstate.edu). To review this large dataset, the bioactive peptides reported in the literature were visually mapped on the parent protein sequences, providing information on sites with highest abundance of bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flexible or fixed: a comparative review of linear and cyclic cancer-targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Roxin, Áron; Zheng, Gang

    2012-08-01

    Peptides can serve as versatile cancer-targeting ligands and have been used for clinically relevant applications such as cancer imaging and therapy. A current and long-standing focus within peptide research is the creation of structurally constrained peptides generated through cyclization. Cyclization is envisioned to enhance the selective binding, uptake, potency and stability of linear precursors. This review compares closely related linear and cyclic peptides in these respects. Peptide cyclization generally improves the selective binding and stability of linear precursors; however, not all cyclization strategies and constrained geometries enhance these properties to the same extent. In some instances, linear analogues actually have better cancer-targeting properties compared with their cyclic counterparts. Although cyclization does not necessarily improve the cancer-targeting properties of linear analogues, cyclic peptides may obtain properties that allow them to be used for additional applications. This review aims to convey the advantages and limitations of cyclic cancer-targeting peptides.

  14. Peptidic targeting of phosphatidylserine for the MRI detection of apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Burtea, Carmen; Laurent, Sophie; Lancelot, Eric; Ballet, Sébastien; Murariu, Oltea; Rousseaux, Olivier; Port, Marc; Vander Elst, Luce; Corot, Claire; Muller, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    Molecular and cellular imaging of atherosclerosis has garnered more interest at the beginning of the 21st century, with aims to image in vivo biological properties of plaque lesions. Apoptosis seems an attractive target for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques prone to a thrombotic event. The aim of the present work was to screen for apoptosis peptide binders by phage display with the final purpose to detect apoptotic cells in atherosclerotic plaques by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phosphatidylserine-specific peptide identified by phage display was thus used to design an MRI contrast agent (CA), which was evaluated as a potential in vivo reporter of apoptotic cells. A library of linear 6-mer random peptides was screened in vitro against immobilized phosphatidylserine. Phage DNA was isolated and sequenced, and the affinity of peptides for phosphatidylserine was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphatidylserine-specific peptide and its scrambled homologue were attached to a linker and conjugated to DTPA-isothiocyanate. The products were purified by dialysis and by column chromatography and complexed with gadolinium chloride. After their evaluation using apoptotic cells and a mouse model of liver apoptosis, the phosphatidylserine-targeted CA was used to image atherosclerotic lesions on ApoE(-/-) transgenic mice. Apoptotic cells were detected on liver and aorta specimens by the immunostaining of phosphatidylserine and of active caspase-3. Sequencing of the phage genome highlighted nine different peptides. Their alignment with amino acid sequences of relevant proteins revealed a frequent homology with Ca2+ channels, reminiscent of the function of annexins. Alignment with molecules involved in apoptosis provides a direct correlation between peptide selection and utility. The in vivo MRI studies performed at 4.7 T provide proof of concept that apoptosis-related pathologies could be diagnosed by MRI with a low molecular weight

  15. Peptide-in-groove interactions link target proteins to the β-propeller of clathrin

    PubMed Central

    ter Haar, Ernst; Harrison, Stephen C.; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    The “WD40” domain is a widespread recognition module for linking partner proteins in intracellular networks of signaling and sorting. The clathrin amino-terminal domain, which directs incorporation of cargo into coated pits, is a β-propeller closely related in structure to WD40 modules. The crystallographically determined structures of complexes of the clathrin-terminal domain with peptides derived from two different cargo adaptors, β-arrestin 2 and the β-subunit of the AP-3 complex, reveal strikingly similar peptide-in-groove interactions. The two peptides in our structures contain related, five-residue motifs, which form the core of their contact with clathrin. A number of other proteins involved in endocytosis have similar “clathrin-box” motifs, and it therefore is likely that they all bind the terminal domain in the same way. We propose that a peptide-in-groove interaction is an important general mode by which β-propellers recognize specific target proteins. PMID:10655490

  16. Peptide redesign for inhibition of the complement system: Targeting age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rohith R.; Cabrera, Andrea P.; Harrison, Reed E. S.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To redesign a complement-inhibiting peptide with the potential to become a therapeutic for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We present a new potent peptide (Peptide 2) of the compstatin family. The peptide is developed by rational design, based on a mechanistic binding hypothesis, and structural and physicochemical properties derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The inhibitory activity, efficacy, and solubility of Peptide 2 are evaluated using a hemolytic assay, a human RPE cell–based assay, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption properties, respectively, and compared to the respective properties of its parent peptide (Peptide 1). Results The sequence of Peptide 2 contains an arginine-serine N-terminal extension (a characteristic of parent Peptide 1) and a novel 8-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block C-terminal extension. Peptide 2 has significantly improved aqueous solubility compared to Peptide 1 and comparable complement inhibitory activity. In addition, Peptide 2 is more efficacious in inhibiting complement activation in a cell-based model that mimics the pathobiology of dry AMD. Conclusions We have designed a new peptide analog of compstatin that combines N-terminal polar amino acid extensions and C-terminal PEGylation extensions. This peptide demonstrates significantly improved aqueous solubility and complement inhibitory efficacy, compared to the parent peptide. The new peptide overcomes the aggregation limitation for clinical translation of previous compstatin analogs and is a candidate to become a therapeutic for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27829783

  17. A High Affinity hRpn2-Derived Peptide That Displaces Human Rpn13 from Proteasome in 293T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Liu, Fen; Durham, Sarah E; Tarasov, Sergey G; Walters, Kylie J

    2015-01-01

    Rpn13 is a proteasome ubiquitin receptor that has emerged as a therapeutic target for human cancers. Its ubiquitin-binding activity is confined to an N-terminal Pru (pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin) domain that also docks it into the proteasome, while its C-terminal DEUBAD (DEUBiquitinase ADaptor) domain recruits deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 to the proteasome. Bis-benzylidine piperidone derivatives that were found to bind covalently to Rpn13 C88 caused the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins as well as ER stress-related apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, including bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma lines. We find that a 38-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminus of proteasome PC repeat protein hRpn2/PSMD1 binds to hRpn13 Pru domain with 12 nM affinity. By using NMR, we identify the hRpn13-interacting amino acids in this hRpn2 fragment, some of which are conserved among eukaryotes. Importantly, we find the hRpn2-derived peptide to immunoprecipitate endogenous Rpn13 from 293T cells, and to displace it from the proteasome. These findings indicate that this region of hRpn2 is the primary binding site for hRpn13 in the proteasome. Moreover, the hRpn2-derived peptide was no longer able to interact with endogenous hRpn13 when a strictly conserved phenylalanine (F948 in humans) was replaced with arginine or a stop codon, or when Y950 and I951 were substituted with aspartic acid. Finally, over-expression of the hRpn2-derived peptide leads to an increased presence of ubiquitinated proteins in 293T cells. We propose that this hRpn2-derived peptide could be used to develop peptide-based strategies that specifically target hRpn13 function in the proteasome.

  18. Cell-penetrating peptides with intracellular organelle targeting.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Carmine Pasquale; Künnapuu, Kadri; Langel, Ülo

    2017-02-01

    One of the major limiting steps in order to have an effective drug is the passage through one or more cell membranes to reach its site of action. To reach the action-site, the specific macromolecules are required to be delivered specifically to the cell compartment/organelle in their (pre)active form. Areas covered: In this review, we will discuss cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) developed in the last decade to transport small RNA/DNA, plasmids, antibodies, and nanoparticles into specific sites of the cell. The article describes CPPs in complex with cargo molecules that target specific intracellular organelles and their potential for pharmacological or clinical use. Expert opinion: Organelle targeting is the ultimate goal to ensure selective delivery to the site of action in the cells. CPP technologies represent an important strategy to address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments by covalent conjugation to targeting sequences, potentially enabling strategies to combat genomic diseases as well as infections, cancer, neurodegenerative and hereditary diseases. They have proven to be successful in delivering various therapeutic agents into cells however, further in vivo experiments and clinical trials are required to demonstrate the efficacy of this technology.

  19. Multimerized HIV-gp41-derived peptides as fusion inhibitors and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2016-11-04

    To date, several antigens based on the amino-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (NHR) region of an HIV-1 envelope protein gp41 and fusion inhibitors based on the carboxy-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (CHR) region of gp41 have been reported. We have developed a synthetic antigen targeting the membrane-fusion mechanism of HIV-1. This uses a template designed with C3-symmetric linkers and mimics the trimeric form of the NHR-derived peptide N36. The antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 trimeric antigen binds preferentially to the N36 trimer and blocks HIV-1 infection effectively, compared with the antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 monomer. Using another template designed with different C3-symmetric linkers, we have also developed a synthetic peptide mimicking the trimeric form of the CHR-derived peptide C34, with ∼100 times the inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 fusion mechanism than that of the monomer C34 peptide. A dimeric derivative of C34 has potent inhibitory activity at almost the same levels as this C34 trimer mimic, suggesting that presence of a dimeric form of C34 is structurally critical for fusion inhibitors. As examples of rising mid-size drugs, this review describes an effective strategy for the design of HIV vaccines and fusion inhibitors based on a relationship with the native structure of proteins involved in HIV fusion mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 622-628, 2016.

  20. Melanoma Therapy via Peptide-Targeted a-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Hylarides, Mark; Fisher, Darrell R.; Shelton, Tiffani; Moore, Herbert A.; Wester, Dennis W.; Fritzberg, Alan R.; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Current chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy regimens are ineffective agents against melanoma, as shown by a 10-year survival rate for patients with disseminated disease of approximately 5% (reference?). In this study, the unique combination of a melanoma targeting peptide and an in vivo generated a-particle emitting radioisotope was investigated for its melanoma therapy potential. Alpha-radiation is densely ionizing and energy is locally absorbed, resulting in high concentrations of destructive free radicals and irreparable DNA double strand breaks. This high linear-energy-transfer overcomes radiation resistant tumor cells and oxygen-enhancement effects. The melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was radiolabeled with 212Pb, the parent of 212Bi, which decays via alpha and beta decay. Biodistribution and therapy studies were performed in the B16/F1 melanoma bearing C57 mouse flank tumor model. 212Pb[DOTA]-R e(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited rapid tumor uptake and extended retention coupled with rapid whole body disappearance. Radiation dose delivered to the tumor was estimated to be 61 cGy/uCi 212Pb administered. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with 50, 100 and 200 uCi of 212Pb[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH extended mean survival of mice to 22, 28, and 49.8 days, respectively, compared to the 14.6 day mean survival of the placebo control group. Forty-five percent of the mice receiving 200 uCi survived the study disease-free.

  1. Flagellar display of bone-protein-derived peptides for studying peptide-mediated biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Newton, Salete M C; Klebba, Philip E; Mao, Chuanbin

    2012-11-27

    A bacterial flagellum is self-assembled primarily from thousands of flagellin (FliC), a protein subunit. A foreign peptide can be fully displayed on the surface of the flagellum through inserting it into every constituent protein subunit. To shed light on the role of bone proteins during the nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HAP), representative domains from type I collagen, including part of the N-,C-terminal, N-,C-zone around the hole zone and an eight repeat unit Gly-Pro-Pro (GPP8) sequence similar to the central sequence of type I collagen, were separately displayed on the surface of the flagella. Moreover, eight negatively charged, contiguous glutamic acid residues (E8) and two other characteristic sequences derived from a representative noncollagenous protein called bone sialoprotein (BSP) were also displayed on flagella. After being incubated in an HAP supersaturated precursor solution, flagella displaying E8 or GPP8 sequences were found to be coated with a layer of HAP nanocrystals. Very weak or no nucleation was observed on flagella displaying other peptides being tested. We also found that calcium ions can induce the assembly of the negatively charged E8 flagella into bundles mimicking collagen fibers, followed by the formation of HAP nanocrystals with the crystallographic c axis preferentially aligned with long axis of flagella, which is similar to that along the collagen fibrils in bone. This work demonstrates that because of the ease of the peptide display on flagella and the self-assembly of flagella, flagella can serve as a platform for studying biomineralization and as a building block to generate bonelike biomaterials.

  2. Bioactive Properties of Maillard Reaction Products Generated From Food Protein-derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    Arihara, K; Zhou, L; Ohata, M

    Food protein-derived peptides are promising food ingredients for developing functional foods, since various bioactive peptides are released from food proteins. The Maillard reaction, which plays an important role in most processed foods, generates various chemical components during processing. Although changes of amino acids or proteins and reduced sugars by the Maillard reaction have been studied extensively, such changes of peptides by the Maillard reaction are still not resolved enough. Since food protein-derived peptides are widely utilized in many processed foods, it deserves concern and research on the changes of peptides by the Maillard reaction in foods during processing or storage. This chapter initially overviewed food protein-derived bioactive peptides. Then, Maillard reaction products generated from peptides are discussed. We focused particularly on their bioactivities. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Milk-derived proteins and peptides in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michał

    2013-08-06

    Clinical trials are reviewed, involving proteins and peptides derived from milk (predominantly bovine), with the exception of lactoferrin, which will be the subject of another article. The most explored milk fraction is α-lactalbumin (LA), which is often applied with glycomacropeptide (GMP) - a casein degradation product. These milk constituents are used in health-promoting infant and adult formulae as well as in a modified form (HAMLET) to treat cancer. Lactoperoxidase (LCP) is used as an additive to mouth hygiene products and as a salivary substitute. Casein derivatives are applied, in addition, in the dry mouth syndrome. On the other hand, casein hydrolysates, containing active tripeptides, found application in hypertension and in type 2 diabetes. Lysozyme is routinely used for food conservation and in pharmaceutical products. It was successfully used in premature infants with concomitant diseases to improve health parameters. When used as prophylaxis in patients with scheduled surgery, it significantly reduced the incidence of hepatitis resulting from blood transfusion. Lysozyme was also used in infected children as an antimicrobial agent showing synergistic effects in combination with different antibiotics. Proline-rich polypeptide (PRP) was introduced to therapy of Alzheimer's disease patients. The therapeutic value of PRP was proved in several clinical trials and supported by studies on its mechanism of action. Concentrated immunoglobulin preparations from colostrum and milk of hyperimmunized cows showed efficacy in prevention of infections by bacteria, viruses and protozoa. A nutrition formula with milk-derived TGF-β2 (Modulen IBD®) found application in treatment of pediatric Crohn's disease. In conclusion, the preparations containing milk-derived products are safe and effective measures in prevention and treatment of infections as well as autoimmune and neoplastic diseases.

  4. Free tyrosine and tyrosine-rich peptide-dependent superoxide generation catalyzed by a copper-binding, threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide derived from prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Goto, Kaishi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Previously, generation of superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) catalyzed by Cu-binding peptides derived from human prion protein (model sequence for helical Cu-binding motif VNITKQHTVTTTT was most active) in the presence of catecholamines and related aromatic monoamines such as phenylethylamine and tyramine, has been reported [Kawano, T., Int J Biol Sci 2007; 3: 57-63]. The peptide sequence (corresponding to helix 2) tested here is known as threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. In the present article, the redox behaviors of aromatic monoamines, 20 amino acids and prion-derived tyrosine-rich peptide sequences were compared as putative targets of the oxidative reactions mediated with the threonine-rich prion-peptide. For detection of O(2)(*-), an O(2)(*-)-specific chemiluminescence probe, Cypridina luciferin analog was used. We found that an aromatic amino acid, tyrosine (structurally similar to tyramine) behaves as one of the best substrates for the O(2)(*-) generating reaction (conversion from hydrogen peroxide) catalyzed by Cu-bound prion helical peptide. Data suggested that phenolic moiety is required to be an active substrate while the presence of neither carboxyl group nor amino group was necessarily required. In addition to the action of free tyrosine, effect of two tyrosine-rich peptide sequences YYR and DYEDRYYRENMHR found in human prion corresponding to the tyrosine-rich region was tested as putative substrates for the threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. YYR motif (found twice in the Y-rich region) showed 2- to 3-fold higher activity compared to free tyrosine. Comparison of Y-rich sequence consisted of 13 amino acids and its Y-to-F substitution mutant sequence revealed that the tyrosine-residues on Y-rich peptide derived from prion may contribute to the higher production of O(2)(*-). These data suggest that the tyrosine residues on prion molecules could be additional targets of the prion-mediated reactions through intra- or inter-molecular interactions. Lastly, possible

  5. Cre Fused with RVG Peptide Mediates Targeted Genome Editing in Mouse Brain Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Li, Pan; Feng, Tao; Wu, Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides that can pass through cell membranes. CPPs can facilitate the cellular entry of proteins, macromolecules, nanoparticles and drugs. RVG peptide (RVG hereinafter) is a 29-amino-acid CPP derived from a rabies virus glycoprotein that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter brain cells. However, whether RVG can be used for genome editing in the brain has not been reported. In this work, we combined RVG with Cre recombinase for bacterial expression. The purified RVG-Cre protein cut plasmids in vitro and traversed cell membranes in cultured Neuro2a cells. By tail vein-injecting RVG-Cre into Cre reporter mouse lines mTmG and Rosa26lacZ, we demonstrated that RVG-Cre could target brain cells and achieve targeted somatic genome editing in adult mice. This direct delivery of the gene-editing enzyme protein into mouse brains with RVG is much safer than plasmid- or viral-based methods, holding promise for further applications in the treatment of various brain diseases. PMID:27983648

  6. Comparative syntheses of peptides and peptide thioesters derived from mouse and human prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Sebestík, Jaroslav; Zawada, Zbigniew; Safařík, Martin; Hlaváček, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Prions are suspected as causative agents of several neuropathogenic diseases, even though the mode of their action is still not clear. A combination of chemical and recombinant syntheses can provide suitable probes for explanation of prions role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the prions contain several difficult sequences for synthesis by Fmoc/tBu approach. For that reason, the peptide thioesters as the key building blocks for chemical syntheses of proteins by native chemical ligation were employed. A scan of the mouse prion domain 93-231 was carried out in order to discover availability of derived thioesters as the suitable building blocks for a total chemical synthesis of the prion protein based probes. The synthesis on 2-chlorotritylchloride resin was utilized and after a deprotection of the samples for analysis, the peptide segments were purified and characterized. If the problems were detected during the synthesis, the segment was re-synthesized either using the special pseudoproline dipeptides or by splitting its molecule to two or three smaller segments, which were prepared easier. The protected segments, prepared correctly without any deletion and in sufficient amounts, were coupled either with EtSH after DIC/DMAP activation or with p-Ac-NH-Ph-SH using PyBOP activation to yield corresponding thioesters. In some special cases, the other techniques of thioester formation, like sulfonamide-safety catch and/or trimethylaluminium approach were utilized.

  7. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  8. Glycotriazole-peptides derived from the peptide HSP1: synergistic effect of triazole and saccharide rings on the antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Junior, Eduardo F C; Guimarães, Carlos F R C; Franco, Lucas L; Alves, Ricardo J; Kato, Kelly C; Martins, Helen R; de Souza Filho, José D; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Munhoz, Victor H O; Resende, Jarbas M; Verly, Rodrigo M

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a strategy that uses solid-phase peptide synthesis associated with copper(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reaction to promote the glycosylation of an antimicrobial peptide (HSP1) containing a carboxyamidated C-terminus (HSP1-NH2). Two glycotriazole-peptides, namely [p-Glc-trz-G(1)]HSP1-NH2 and [p-GlcNAc-trz-G(1)]HSP1-NH2, were prepared using per-O-acetylated azide derivatives of glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the presence of copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O) and sodium ascorbate as a reducing agent. In order to investigate the synergistic action of the carbohydrate motif linked to the triazole-peptide structure, a triazole derivative [trz-G(1)]HSP1-NH2 was also prepared. A set of biophysical approaches such as DLS, Zeta Potential, SPR and carboxyfluorescein leakage from phospholipid vesicles confirmed higher membrane disruption and lytic activities as well as stronger peptide-LUVs interactions for the glycotriazole-peptides when compared to HSP1-NH2 and to its triazole derivative, which is in accordance with the performed biological assays: whereas HSP1-NH2 presents relatively low and [trz-G(1)]HSP1-NH2 just moderate fungicidal activity, the glycotriazole-peptides are significantly more effective antifungal agents. In addition, the glycotriazole-peptides and the triazole derivative present strong inhibition effects on ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans, when compared to HSP1-NH2 alone. In conclusion, the increased fungicidal activity of the glycotriazole-peptides seems to be the result of (A) more pronounced membrane-disruptive properties, which is related to the presence of a saccharide ring, together with (B) the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis, which seems to be related to the presence of both the monosaccharide and the triazole rings.

  9. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  10. Identification of food-derived bioactive peptides in blood and other biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenji; Iwai, Koji; Aito-Inoue, Misako

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of food-derived peptides in human blood after ingestion of enzymatic hydrolysates of food proteins, while most peptides in food are degraded into amino acids during digestion and absorption. To capture and clarify the food-derived peptides in blood, solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a mini-spin column packed with a strong cation exchanger was developed. This technique allows the use of a nonvolatile acid such as trichloroacetic acid, a strong protein denaturant, for the deproteinizing procedure. To improve resolution of hydrophilic peptide and increase specificity and sensitivity in the detection of peptide by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) after subfractionation by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), peptides are derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate. The resultant phenyl thiocarbamyl (PTC)-peptides can be resolved with high resolution and sensitivity by RP-HPLC. By comparing chromatograms of PTC derivatives from blood before and after ingestion of a peptide sample, food-derived peptide can be detected. The isolated PTC-peptide can be applied to a peptide sequencer based on the Edman degradation reaction.

  11. Phage display biopanning and isolation of target-unrelated peptides: in search of nonspecific binders hidden in a combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Neman, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Phage display is known as a powerful methodology for the identification of targeting ligands that specifically bind to a variety of targets. The high-throughput screening of phage display combinatorial peptide libraries is performed through the affinity selection method of biopanning. Although phage display selection has proven very successful in the discovery of numerous high-affinity target-binding peptides with potential application in drug discovery and delivery, the enrichment of false-positive target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) without any actual affinity towards the target remains a major problem of library screening. Selection-related TUPs may emerge because of binding to the components of the screening system rather than the target. Propagation-related TUPs may arise as a result of faster growth rate of some phage clones enabling them to outcompete slow-propagating clones. Amplification of the library between rounds of biopanning makes a significant contribution to the selection of phage clones with propagation advantage. Distinguishing nonspecific TUPs from true target binders is of particular importance for the translation of biopanning findings from basic research to clinical applications. Different experimental and in silico approaches are applied to assess the specificity of phage display-derived peptides towards the target. Bioinformatic tools are playing a rapidly growing role in the analysis of biopanning data and identification of target-irrelevant TUPs. Recent progress in the introduction of efficient strategies for TUP detection holds enormous promise for the discovery of clinically relevant cell- and tissue-homing peptides and paves the way for the development of novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms in pharmaceutical areas.

  12. Antimicrobial activity and interactions of cationic peptides derived from Galleria mellonella cecropin D-like peptide with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Oñate-Garzón, José; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Trier, Steven; Leidy, Chad; Torres, Rodrigo; Patiño, Edwin

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system against invading pathogens. The cationic charge in their structures has a strong correlation with antimicrobial activity, being responsible for the initial electrostatic interaction between peptides and the anionic microbial surface. This paper contains evidence that charge modification in the neutral peptide Gm cecropin D-like (WT) improved the antimicrobial activity of the modified peptides. Two cationic peptides derived from WT sequence named as ΔM1 and ΔM2, with net charge of +5 and +9, respectively, showed at least an eightfold increase in their antimicrobial activity in comparison to WT. The mechanism of action of these peptides was investigated using small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) as model membranes. To study permeabilization effects of the peptides on cell membranes, entrapped calcein liposomes were used and the results showed that all peptides induced calcein release from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) SUVs, whereas in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), POPC/POPG and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE)/POPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 induced a notable permeabilization. In addition, interactions of these peptides with phospholipids at the level of the glycerol backbone and hydrophobic domain were studied through observed changes in generalized polarization and fluorescence anisotropy using probes such as Laurdan and DPH, respectively. The results suggest that peptides slightly ordered the bilayer structure at the level of glycerol backbone and on the hydrophobic core in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) SUVs, whereas in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/DMPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 peptides increased the order of bilayers. Thus, peptides would be inducing clustering of phospholipids creating phospholipid domains with a higher phase transition temperature.

  13. Successful immunotherapy with matrix metalloproteinase-derived peptides in adjuvant arthritis depends on the timing of peptide administration

    PubMed Central

    van Bilsen, Jolanda HM; Wagenaar-Hilbers, Josée PA; van der Cammen, Maarten JF; van Dijk, Mariska EA; van Eden, Willem; Wauben, Marca HM

    2002-01-01

    We have recently found that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are targets for T-cell and B-cell reactivity in experimental arthritis. In the present article, we investigate whether modulation of MMP-specific T-cell responses could influence the course of adjuvant arthritis (AA). Lewis rats were treated nasally with MMP peptides prior to or after AA induction. Administration of the MMP-10 or the MMP-16 peptide prior to AA induction reduced the arthritic symptoms. In contrast, administration of the MMP-10 peptide after AA induction aggravated the arthritic symptoms. The present study shows the possible usefulness of MMP peptides for immunotherapy. However, a clear understanding of proper timing of peptide administration is crucial for the development of such therapies. PMID:12106501

  14. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  15. Production and characterization of a fusion peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jiao; Zhao, Ping-Sen; Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Hua-Lei; Zhao, Li-Li; Xue, Xiang-Hong; Gai, Wei-Wei; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-12-01

    Gene therapy targeting the brain holds great promise in curing nervous system degenerative diseases in clinical applications. With this in mind, in a previous study a 29 amino-acid peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) with a nonamer stretch of arginine residues (RVG29-9R) at its carboxy-terminus was exploited as a ligand for brain-targeting gene delivery. Importantly, the report demonstrated that the RVG29-9R vector was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. RVG29-9R is currently synthesized by commercial companies with high associated costs. In this study, in order to reduce the costs of producing RVG29-9R, we have expressed and purified 6mg of a recombinant peptide (RVG29-9R-6His) from 0.4g of cultured Escherichia coli. We assessed the physiochemical properties of RVG29-9R-6His, its cytotoxicity, and the in vitro transfection efficiency in Neuro 2a cells (which express the acetylcholine receptor). Our results reveal that the RVG29-9R-6His peptide recognized Neuro 2a cells in a dose-dependent manner and it was also able to bind plasmid DNA and deliver it into the Neuro 2a cells effectively. Therefore, our study has demonstrated that the recombinant RVG29-9R-6His peptide retains the functions of RVG29-9R and so may provide an economically viable and alternative production method for the manufacture of RVG29-9R.

  16. Attaching the phage display-selected GLA peptide to liposomes: factors influencing target binding.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Inge; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2012-02-14

    In our previous study, phage display selections were performed by in situ perfusion of a random peptide library through a mouse brain. This yielded two peptides (GLA and GYR) that showed significant binding to human brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) when displayed on phage particles, but not to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In the present study, these peptides were produced synthetically and coupled to liposomes to investigate the capacity of the peptides to act as ligands for targeting to hCMEC/D3 cells. Flow cytometry studies showed that these peptides when coupled to liposomes showed weak binding to the target brain endothelial cells. We hypothesized that the weak endothelial cell binding of the selected peptides when coupled to liposomes as compared to the binding of the peptides displayed on phage particles may be ascribed to: change of vehicle shape, change of peptide density, or change of peptide conformation. Peptide density on the liposomes influenced binding of the liposomes to the cells, however, this effect was minor. To study the influence of the peptide conformation, the GLA peptide was recombinantly produced fused to the N1-N2 domains of the phage p3 minor coat protein (p3-GLA) to mimic its conformation when displayed on phage particles. Binding of liposomes modified with either the GLA peptide or the p3-GLA protein to hCMEC/D3 cells was studied, and the p3-GLA-liposomes showed a higher binding to the cells compared to the GLA-liposomes. The experiments demonstrate that bringing the GLA peptide into the original phage protein environment restores and improves the peptide binding capacity and suggest that the GLA peptide, with some modifications, may be used as a brain-targeting ligand in the future.

  17. Diabetic wound regeneration using peptide-modified hydrogels to target re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Reis, Lewis A; Feric, Nicole; Knee, Erica J; Gu, Junhao; Cao, Shuwen; Laschinger, Carol; Londono, Camila; Antolovich, Julia; McGuigan, Alison P; Radisic, Milica

    2016-10-04

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic wounds in diabetic patients. Lack of epithelial cell migration is a hallmark of nonhealing wounds, and diabetes often involves endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, targeting re-epithelialization, which mainly involves keratinocytes, may improve therapeutic outcomes of current treatments. In this study, we present an integrin-binding prosurvival peptide derived from angiopoietin-1, QHREDGS (glutamine-histidine-arginine-glutamic acid-aspartic acid-glycine-serine), as a therapeutic candidate for diabetic wound treatments by demonstrating its efficacy in promoting the attachment, survival, and collective migration of human primary keratinocytes and the activation of protein kinase B Akt and MAPKp42/44 The QHREDGS peptide, both as a soluble supplement and when immobilized in a substrate, protected keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide stress in a dose-dependent manner. Collective migration of both normal and diabetic human keratinocytes was promoted on chitosan-collagen films with the immobilized QHREDGS peptide. The clinical relevance was demonstrated further by assessing the chitosan-collagen hydrogel with immobilized QHREDGS in full-thickness excisional wounds in a db/db diabetic mouse model; QHREDGS showed significantly accelerated and enhanced wound closure compared with a clinically approved collagen wound dressing, peptide-free hydrogel, or blank wound controls. The accelerated wound closure resulted primarily from faster re-epithelialization and increased formation of granulation tissue. There were no observable differences in blood vessel density or size within the wound; however, the total number of blood vessels was greater in the peptide-hydrogel-treated wounds. Together, these findings indicate that QHREDGS is a promising candidate for wound-healing interventions that enhance re-epithelialization and the formation of granulation tissue.

  18. Diabetic wound regeneration using peptide-modified hydrogels to target re-epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun; Reis, Lewis A.; Feric, Nicole; Knee, Erica J.; Gu, Junhao; Cao, Shuwen; Laschinger, Carol; Londono, Camila; Antolovich, Julia; McGuigan, Alison P.; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic wounds in diabetic patients. Lack of epithelial cell migration is a hallmark of nonhealing wounds, and diabetes often involves endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, targeting re-epithelialization, which mainly involves keratinocytes, may improve therapeutic outcomes of current treatments. In this study, we present an integrin-binding prosurvival peptide derived from angiopoietin-1, QHREDGS (glutamine-histidine-arginine-glutamic acid-aspartic acid-glycine-serine), as a therapeutic candidate for diabetic wound treatments by demonstrating its efficacy in promoting the attachment, survival, and collective migration of human primary keratinocytes and the activation of protein kinase B Akt and MAPKp42/44. The QHREDGS peptide, both as a soluble supplement and when immobilized in a substrate, protected keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide stress in a dose-dependent manner. Collective migration of both normal and diabetic human keratinocytes was promoted on chitosan–collagen films with the immobilized QHREDGS peptide. The clinical relevance was demonstrated further by assessing the chitosan–collagen hydrogel with immobilized QHREDGS in full-thickness excisional wounds in a db/db diabetic mouse model; QHREDGS showed significantly accelerated and enhanced wound closure compared with a clinically approved collagen wound dressing, peptide-free hydrogel, or blank wound controls. The accelerated wound closure resulted primarily from faster re-epithelialization and increased formation of granulation tissue. There were no observable differences in blood vessel density or size within the wound; however, the total number of blood vessels was greater in the peptide-hydrogel–treated wounds. Together, these findings indicate that QHREDGS is a promising candidate for wound-healing interventions that enhance re-epithelialization and the formation of granulation tissue. PMID:27647919

  19. Cytotoxic Tumor-Targeting Peptides From In Vivo Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Northup, Jessica R Newton; Deutscher, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    We previously utilized an in vivo peptide phage display selection technique, which included the use of detergent elution of phage from excised tumor, to obtain tumor-targeting phage with the ability to extravasate the vasculature and bind directly to prostate tumor tissue. It is hypothesized that this same in vivo phage selection technique can be used to functionally select for molecules that not only bind to cancer cells but also kill them. Here we analyzed two different in vivo phage display selected phage clones, G1 and H5, retrieved from PC-3 human prostate carcinoma xenografted tumors. First, cell de-attachment as an endpoint criterion for apoptosis and cell cycle was examined. After 2.5 hours incubation with G1 phage, PC-3 cell attachment was reduced by 23.8% and the percent of cell population in M phase reduced by 32.1%. In comparison, PC-3 cells incubated with H5 phage had a reduction of 25.0% cell attachment and 33.6% of cell population in M phase. These changes in combination with elevated caspase activation within cells in M phase, and no significant changes to G1/G0 or S phase cell populations suggest that the cytotoxic phages are targeting actively dividing PC-3 cells. Microscopic studies were also performed to further analyze the nature of cytotoxicity of these two phage clones. It was found that G1 phage induced and co- localized with tubulin based projections within apoptotic cells, while H5 phage did not. These phage may form the foundation for a new class of targeted prostate cancer therapeutic agents.

  20. Exoproteome and Secretome Derived Broad Spectrum Novel Drug and Vaccine Candidates in Vibrio cholerae Targeted by Piper betel Derived Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Barh, Debmalya; Barve, Neha; Gupta, Krishnakant; Chandra, Sudha; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Rodrigues dos Santos, Anderson; Hassan, Syed Shah; Almeida, Síntia; Thiago Jucá Ramos, Rommel; Augusto Carvalho de Abreu, Vinicius; Ribeiro Carneiro, Adriana; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Luiz de Paula Castro, Thiago; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Kumar, Anil; Narayan Misra, Amarendra; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R.; Azevedo, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC) for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC) are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU) can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets) against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species. PMID:23382822

  1. Exoproteome and secretome derived broad spectrum novel drug and vaccine candidates in Vibrio cholerae targeted by Piper betel derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Barh, Debmalya; Barve, Neha; Gupta, Krishnakant; Chandra, Sudha; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Hassan, Syed Shah; Almeida, Síntia; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Castro, Thiago Luiz de Paula; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Kumar, Anil; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R; Azevedo, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC) for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC) are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU) can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets) against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species.

  2. Peptide Inhibitors Targeting the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pivotal Anaerobic Respiration Factor AniA.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Aleksandra E; Mills, Robert H; Weber, Jacob V; Hamza, Adel; Passow, Bryan W; Romaine, Andrew; Williamson, Zachary A; Reed, Robert W; Zielke, Ryszard A; Korotkov, Konstantin V

    2017-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, which is highly prevalent worldwide and has a major impact on reproductive and neonatal health. The superbug status of N. gonorrhoeae necessitates the development of drugs with different mechanisms of action. Here, we focused on targeting the nitrite reductase AniA, which is a pivotal component of N. gonorrhoeae anaerobic respiration and biofilm formation. Our studies showed that gonococci expressing AniA containing the altered catalytic residues D137A and H280A failed to grow under anaerobic conditions, demonstrating that the nitrite reductase function is essential. To facilitate the pharmacological targeting of AniA, new crystal structures of AniA were refined to 1.90-Å and 2.35-Å resolutions, and a phage display approach with libraries expressing randomized linear dodecameric peptides or heptameric peptides flanked by a pair of cysteine residues was utilized. Biopanning experiments led to the identification of 29 unique peptides, with 1 of them, C7-3, being identified multiple times. Evaluation of their ability to interact with AniA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and computational docking studies revealed that C7-3 was the most promising inhibitor, binding near the type 2 copper site of the enzyme, which is responsible for interaction with nitrite. Subsequent enzymatic assays and biolayer interferometry with a synthetic C7-3 and its derivatives, C7-3m1 and C7-3m2, demonstrated potent inhibition of AniA. Finally, the MIC50 value of C7-3 and C7-3m2 against anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae was 0.6 mM. We present the first peptide inhibitors of AniA, an enzyme that should be further exploited for antigonococcal drug development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Overview of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Marine Resources: The Sources, Characteristic, Purification, and Evaluation Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, RiBang; Wu, CuiLing; Liu, Dan; Yang, XingHao; Huang, JiaFeng; Zhang, Jiang; Liao, Binqiang; He, HaiLun; Li, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Marine organisms are rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive nitrogenous components. In recent years, numerous bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of marine protein resources, such as antioxidant peptides. Many studies have approved that marine antioxidant peptides have a positive effect on human health and the food industry. Antioxidant activity of peptides can be attributed to free radicals scavenging, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and metal ion chelating. Moreover, it has also been verified that peptide structure and its amino acid sequence can mainly affect its antioxidant properties. The aim of this review is to summarize kinds of antioxidant peptides from various marine resources. Additionally, the relationship between structure and antioxidant activities of peptides is discussed in this paper. Finally, current technologies used in the preparation, purification, and evaluation of marine-derived antioxidant peptides are also reviewed.

  4. Marine-derived bioactive peptides as new anticoagulant agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Rim; Nasri, Moncef

    2013-05-01

    The development of more effective antithrombotic agents with reduced side risk is necessary for the prevention of thromboembolic events. In recent years, bioactive peptides derived from food proteins have received considerable attention because of their numerous healths beneficial. Based on their amino acids sequences these peptides can exhibit various biological activities including, antihypertensive, antioxidative and antibacterial activities. Moreover, several naturally or food proteins-derived bioactive peptides that could prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) have been isolated. Due to their therapeutic potential in the treatment or prevention of various diseases, bioactive peptides can be used as functional food ingredients, nutraceuticals or pharmaceuticals. Marine organisms represent a valuable source of new bioactive substances including bioactive peptides. This paper presents an overview of the bioactive anticoagulant peptides derived from fish protein sources, as well as the enzymatic proteolysis approach used for the development of these new biopeptides.

  5. Effects of histatin 5 and derived peptides on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ruissen, A L; Groenink, J; Helmerhorst, E J; Walgreen-Weterings, E; Van't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2001-01-01

    Three anti-microbial peptides were compared with respect to their killing activity against Candida albicans and their ability to disturb its cellular and internal membranes. Histatin 5 is an anti-fungal peptide occurring naturally in human saliva, while dhvar4 and dhvar5 are variants of its active domain, with increased anti-microbial activity. dhvar4 has increased amphipathicity compared with histatin 5, whereas dhvar5 has amphipathicity comparable with that of histatin 5. All three peptides caused depolarization of the cytoplasmic and/or mitochondrial membrane, indicating membranolytic activity. For the variant peptides both depolarization and killing occurred at a faster rate. With FITC-labelled peptides, no association with the cytoplasmic membrane was observed, contradicting the formation of permanent transmembrane multimeric peptide pores. Instead, the peptides were internalized and act on internal membranes, as demonstrated with mitochondrion- and vacuole-specific markers. In comparison with histatin 5, the variant peptides showed a more destructive effect on mitochondria. Entry of the peptides and subsequent killing were dependent on the metabolic state of the cells. Blocking of the mitochondrial activity led to complete protection against histatin 5 activity, whereas that of dhvar4 was hardly affected and that of dhvar5 was affected only intermediately. PMID:11368762

  6. Recent advances in self-assembled peptides: Implications for targeted drug delivery and vaccine engineering.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Sharareh; Guerin, Thalia; Toth, Istvan; Stephenson, Rachel J

    2017-02-01

    Self-assembled peptides have shown outstanding characteristics for vaccine delivery and drug targeting. Peptide molecules can be rationally designed to self-assemble into specific nanoarchitectures in response to changes in their assembly environment including: pH, temperature, ionic strength, and interactions between host (drug) and guest molecules. The resulting supramolecular nanostructures include nanovesicles, nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoribbons, and hydrogels and have a diverse range of mechanical and physicochemical properties. These molecules can be designed for cell-specific targeting by including adhesion ligands, receptor recognition ligands, or peptide-based antigens in their design, often in a multivalent display. Depending on their design, self-assembled peptide nanostructures have advantages in biocompatibility, stability against enzymatic degradation, encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs, sustained drug release, shear-thinning viscoelastic properties, and/or adjuvanting properties. These molecules can also act as intracellular transporters and respond to changes in the physiological environment. Furthermore, this class of materials has shown sequence- and structure-dependent impacts on the immune system that can be tailored to non-immunogenic for drug targeting, and immunogenic for vaccine delivery. This review explores self-assembled peptide nanostructures (beta sheets, alpha helices, peptide amphiphiles, amino acid pairing, elastin like polypeptides, cyclic peptides, short peptides, Fmoc peptides, and peptide hydrogels) and their application in vaccine delivery and drug targeting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stepwise Evolution Improves Identification of Diverse Peptides Binding to a Protein Target.

    PubMed

    Lyamichev, Victor I; Goodrich, Lauren E; Sullivan, Eric H; Bannen, Ryan M; Benz, Joerg; Albert, Thomas J; Patel, Jigar J

    2017-09-21

    Considerable efforts have been made to develop technologies for selection of peptidic molecules that act as substrates or binders to a protein of interest. Here we demonstrate the combination of rational peptide array library design, parallel screening and stepwise evolution, to discover novel peptide hotspots. These hotspots can be systematically evolved to create high-affinity, high-specificity binding peptides to a protein target in a reproducible and digitally controlled process. The method can be applied to synthesize both linear and cyclic peptides, as well as peptides composed of natural and non-natural amino acid analogs, thereby enabling screens in a much diverse chemical space. We apply this method to stepwise evolve peptide binders to streptavidin, a protein studied for over two decades and report novel peptides that mimic key interactions of biotin to streptavidin.

  8. Enhancing tumor-specific intracellular delivering efficiency of cell-penetrating peptide by fusion with a peptide targeting to EGFR.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long The; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Du, Xuan; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun; Dong, Yang; Li, Peng-Fei

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are well known as intracellular delivery vectors. However, unsatisfactory delivery efficiency and poor specificity are challenging barriers to CPP applications at the clinical trial stage. Here, we showed that S3, an EGFR-binding domain derived from vaccinia virus growth factor, when fused to a CPP such as HBD or TAT can substantially enhance its internalization efficiency and tumor selectivity. The uptake of S3-HBD (S3H) recombinant molecule by tumor cells was nearly 80 folds increased compared to HBD alone. By contrast, the uptake of S3H by non-neoplastic cells still remained at a low level. The specific recognition between S3 and its receptor, EGFR, as well as between HBD and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface was essential for these improvements, suggesting a syngeneic effect between the two functional domains in conjugation. This syngeneic effect is likely similar to that of the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, which is highly abundant particularly in metastatic tumors. The process that S3H entered cells was dependent on time, dosage, and energy, via macropinocytosis pathway. With excellent cell-penetrating efficacy and a novel tumor-targeting ability, S3H appears as a promising candidate vector for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery.

  9. Marine algae-derived bioactive peptides for human nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaodan; Bai, Lu; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xuewu

    2014-09-24

    Within the parent protein molecule, most peptides are inactive, and they are released with biofunctionalities after enzymatic hydrolysis. Marine algae have high protein content, up to 47% of the dry weight, depending on the season and the species. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using marine algae protein as a source of bioactive peptides due to their health promotion and disease therapy potentials. This review presents an overview of marine algae-derived bioactive peptides and especially highlights some key issues, such as in silico proteolysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies, in vivo fate of bioactive peptides, and novel technologies in bioactive peptides studies and production.

  10. Targeting prostate cancer cells with genetically engineered polypeptide-based micelles displaying gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Garg, Sanjay; Eldi, Preethi; Zhou, Fiona Huan-Huan; Johnson, Ian R D; Brooks, Doug A; Lam, Frankie; Rychkov, Grigori; Hayball, John; Albrecht, Hugo

    2016-11-20

    In recent years G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as crucial tumorigenic factors that drive aberrant cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Consequently, a number of GPCRs are strongly expressed in cancer derived cell lines and tissue samples. Therefore a rational anti-cancer strategy is the design of nano-medicines that specifically target GPCRs to bind and internalise cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells. Herein, we report the genetic engineering of a self-assembling nanoparticle based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), which has been fused with gastrin releasing peptide (GRP). These nanoparticles increased intracellular calcium concentrations when added to GRP receptor positive PC-3 prostate cancer cells, demonstrating specific receptor activation. Moreover, GRP-displaying fluorescent labelled nanoparticles showed specific cell-surface interaction with PC-3 prostate cancer cells and increased endocytic uptake. These nanoparticles therefore provide a targeted molecular carrier system for evaluating the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells.

  11. Nuclear targeting peptide scaffolds for lipofection of nondividing mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, A; Ranganathan, P; Diamond, S L

    1999-09-01

    Lipofection of nondividing cells is inefficient because much of the transfected DNA is retained in endosomes, and that which escapes to the cytoplasm enters the nucleus at low rates. To improve the final rate-limiting step of nuclear import, we conjugated a nonclassical nuclear localization signal (NLS) containing the M9 sequence of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1, to a cationic peptide scaffold derived from a scrambled sequence of the SV40 T-antigen consensus NLS (ScT). The ScT was added to improve DNA binding of the M9 sequence. Lipofection of confluent endothelium with plasmid complexed with the M9-ScT conjugate resulted in 83% transfection and a 63-fold increase in marker gene expression. The M9-ScT conjugate localized fluorescent plasmid into the nucleus of permeabilized cells, and addition of the nuclear pore blocker wheat germ agglutinin prevented nuclear import. This method of gene transfer may lead to viral- and lipid-free transfection of nondividing cells.

  12. Behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents: Implications for schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lister, Josh; Fletcher, Paul J; Nobrega, José N; Remington, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Dohan proposed that an overload of dietary peptides, such as those derived from wheat gluten and milk casein, could be a factor relevant to the development or maintenance of schizophrenia (SZ) symptoms in at least a subset of vulnerable individuals. Rodent behavioral models may offer insight into the plausibility of Dohan's exorphin hypothesis by providing a means to directly study the effects of such peptides. Accordingly, a review of the literature on the behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents was undertaken. Studies using a variety of behavioral tests to examine the effects of several classes of food-derived opioid-like peptides were identified and reviewed. Peptides derived from casein (β-casomorphins; BCMs, n=19), spinach (rubiscolins; RCs, n=4), and soy (soymorphins; SMs, n=1) were behaviorally active in various paradigms assessing nociception, spontaneous behavior, and memory. Surprisingly, only a single study evaluating a gluten-derived peptide (gliadorphin-7; GD-7, n=1) was identified and included in this review. In conclusion, food-derived peptides can affect rodent behavior, but more studies of GDs using diverse behavioral batteries are warranted. Assuming they occur in sufficient quantities during protein digestion and can access central opioid receptors (which entails crossing both the gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers intact), these peptides may affect human behavior. Although BCMs and GDs may not be directly pathogenic in SZ, documented associations of casein and gluten sensitivity with SZ justify increased patient screening and dietary intervention where necessary.

  13. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed. PMID:23476673

  14. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-09

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  15. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  16. Anti-inflammatory effect of a retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tolstrup, Martin; Johansen, Claus; Toft, Lars; Pedersen, Finn S; Funding, Anne; Bahrami, Shervin; Iversen, Lars; Østergaard, Lars; Duch, Mogens

    2013-11-18

    Short dimeric or mulitmeric peptides derived from a highly conserved stretch of amino acids from gammaretroviral envelope proteins has been found to have immunosuppressive properties in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that such immunosuppressive peptides may serve as immunomodulatory reagents for treatment of inflammatory disorders. The anti-inflammatory effect of a synthetic retrovirus-derived immunosuppressive peptide of 17 amino acids was tested in two murine skin inflammation models, a TPA-induced acute toxic contact eczema model and an oxazolone-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, mice (n = 24) treated with a topically applied cream containing the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide exhibited a reduction of 28.8% in ear thickness (range 20.1-42.5), whereas the application of a scrambled peptide dimer or a monomer of the immunosuppressive peptide remained without effect (p = 0.028). Furthermore, ear biopsies from mice treated with the dimeric immunosuppressive peptide showed a significant reduction in mRNA of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-17C, and IL-6 as well as the chemokine CXCL2 compared to mice treated with control peptides. Using two murine skin inflammation models, we show that an immunosuppressive retroviral peptide is capable of reducing inflammatory disorders. The results indicate that virus-derived immunosuppressive peptides capable of down-regulating several proinflammatory cytokines may represent a novel class of drugs for the treatment of excess inflammation.

  17. Integrin Targeting and Toxicological Assessment of Peptide-Conjugated Liposome Delivery Systems to Activated Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Villadsen, Klaus; Østrem, Ragnhild G; Jensen, Knud J; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Utilization of functionalized liposomes as the means of targeted delivery of therapeutics may enhance specific transport of biologically active drugs to target tissues, while avoiding or reducing undesired side effects. In the present investigation, peptide-conjugated cationic liposomes were constructed with the aim of targeting integrins (i.e. vitronectin and/or fibronectin receptors) on activated endothelial cells. The peptide-conjugated liposomes induced only cytotoxicity at the highest concentration in non-activated or activated endothelial cells, as well as in co-culture of endothelial cells and macrophages. There was unaltered secretion of cytokines after exposure of peptide-conjugated liposomes to endothelial cells, indicating that the materials were not inflammogenic. Liposomes with a peptide targeting the fibronectin receptor (integrin α5β1) were more effective in targeting of activated endothelial cells, as compared to a liposome with a peptide that targeted both the fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, as well as liposomes with a control peptide. The liposome targeted to the fibronectin receptor also displayed uptake in endothelial cells in co-culture with activated macrophages. Therefore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of constructing a peptide-conjugated cationic liposome, which displays targeting to activated endothelial cells at concentrations that are not cytotoxic or inflammogenic to the cells.

  18. Peptide-conjugated micelles as a targeting nanocarrier for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen Jen; Chien, Wei Hsuan

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop peptide-conjugated micelles possessing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting ability for gene delivery. A sequence-modified dodecylpeptide, GE11(2R), with enhancing EGF receptor binding affinity, was applied in this study as a targeting ligand. The active targeting micelles were composed of poly( d,l-lactide- co-glycolide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) copolymer conjugated with GE11(2R)-peptide. The particle sizes of peptide-free and peptide-conjugated micelles were 277.0 ± 5.1 and 308.7 ± 14.5 nm, respectively. The peptide-conjugated micelles demonstrated the cellular uptake significantly higher than peptide-free micelles in EGFR high-expressed MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells due to GE11(2R)-peptide specificity. Furthermore, the peptide-conjugated micelles were able to encapsulate plasmid DNA and expressed cellular transfection higher than peptide-free micelles in EGFR high-expressed cells. The EGFR-targeting delivery micelles enhanced DNA internalized into cells and achieved higher cellular transfection in EGFR high-expressed cells.

  19. Targeted drug delivery to tumor vasculature by a carbohydrate mimetic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Toshiaki K.; Nakayama, Jun; Akama, Tomoya O.; Tamura, Naoaki; Wong, Shuk-Man; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Takano, Yutaka; Ohyama, Chikara; Fukuda, Minoru; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous carbohydrates play significant roles in mammalian cells, carbohydrate-based drug discovery has not been explored due to the technical difficulty of chemically synthesizing complex carbohydrate structures. Previously, we identified a series of carbohydrate mimetic peptides and found that a 7-mer peptide, designated I-peptide, inhibits hematogenous carbohydrate-dependent cancer cell colonization. During analysis of the endothelial surface receptor for I-peptide, we found that I-peptide bound to annexin 1 (Anxa1). Because Anxa1 is a highly specific tumor vasculature surface marker, we hypothesized that an I-peptide-like peptide could target anticancer drugs to the tumor vasculature. This study identifies IFLLWQR peptide, designated IF7, as homing to tumors. When synthetic IF7 peptide was conjugated to fluorescent Alexa 488 (A488) and injected intravenously into tumor-bearing mice, IF7-A488 targeted tumors within minutes. IF7 conjugated to the potent anticancer drug SN-38 and injected intravenously into nude mice carrying human colon HCT116 tumors efficiently suppressed tumor growth at low dosages with no apparent side effects. These results suggest that IF7 serves as an efficient drug delivery vehicle by targeting Anxa1 expressed on the surface of tumor vasculature. Given its extremely specific tumor-targeting activity, IF7 may represent a clinically relevant vehicle for anticancer drugs. PMID:22114188

  20. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins and their health beneficial potentials: an update.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Behare, Pradip; Rana, Rajiv; Kumar, Ashwani; Kumar, Manoj; Arora, Sanu; Morotta, Fransesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    It has been well recognized that dietary proteins provide a rich source of biologically active peptides. Today, milk proteins are considered the most important source of bioactive peptides and an increasing number of bioactive peptides have been identified in milk protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins offer a promising approach for the promotion of health by means of a tailored diet and provide interesting opportunities to the dairy industry for expansion of its field of operation. The potential health benefits of milk protein-derived peptides have been a subject of growing commercial interest in the context of health-promoting functional foods. Hence, these peptides are being incorporated in the form of ingredients in functional and novel foods, dietary supplements and even pharmaceuticals with the purpose of delivering specific health benefits.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of antihypertensive food-derived peptides and selected alanine analogues.

    PubMed

    McClean, Stephen; Beggs, Louise B; Welch, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated four food-derived peptides with known antihypertensive activities for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms, and assessed structure-function relationships using alanine analogues. The peptides (EVSLNSGYY, barley; PGTAVFK, soybean; TTMPLW, α-casein; VHLPP, α-zein) and the six alanine substitution peptides of PGTAVFK were synthesised, characterised and evaluated for antimicrobial activity using the bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus and the yeast, Candida albicans. The peptides TTMPLW and PGTAVFK inhibited growth of all four microorganisms tested, with activities of a similar order of magnitude to ampicillin and ethanol controls. EVSLNSGYY inhibited the growth of the bacteria, but VHLPP showed no antimicrobial activity. The alanine analogue, PGAAVFK showed the highest overall antimicrobial activity and PGTAVFA showed no activity; overall, the activities of the analogues were consistent with their structures. Some peptides with antihypertensive activity also show antimicrobial activity, suggesting that food-derived peptides may exert beneficial effects via a number of mechanisms.

  2. Suppression of tumor growth by novel peptides homing to tumor-derived new blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tomohiro; Nagatsuka, Mayumi; Kuromi, Koichi; Yamakawa, Satoru; Kurohane, Kohta; Ogino, Koichi; Tanaka, Michinori; Taki, Takao; Oku, Naoto

    2002-01-16

    Novel peptides homing to angiogenic vessels were recently isolated from a phage-displayed random pentadecapeptide library. One of the isolated peptides, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR, significantly suppressed the migration of VEGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Dendoric ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide suppressed the formation of new blood vessels in dorsal air sac model mice. Furthermore, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide and the fragment peptides containing WRP, which is revealed to be an epitope sequence, significantly suppressed the tumor growth, although 15-mer shuffled peptide derived from ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR and pentapeptides with alanine substitution of each residue of WRP did not. Taken together, ASSSYPLIHWRPWAR-peptide may cause tumor dormancy through inhibition of angiogenesis, and the WRP sequence may be the minimal and essential sequence for this activity.

  3. Catalytic Metallodrugs Based on the LaR2C Peptide Target HCV SLIV IRES RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Martin James; Bradford, Seth S.; Cowan, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has demonstrated the potential effectiveness of a new class of metallopeptides as catalytic metallodrugs that target HCV IRES SLIIb RNA (Cu-GGHYrFK, 1). Herein new catalytic metallodrugs (GGHKYKETDLLILFKDDYFAKKNEERK, 2; and GGHKYKETDL, 3) are described based on the LaR2C peptide that has been shown to bind to the SLIV HCV IRES domain. In vitro fluorescence assays yielded KD values ~10 μM for both peptides and reaction of the copper derivatives with SLIV RNA demonstrated initial rates comparable across different assays as well as displaying pseudo-Michaelis-Menten behavior. The sites of reaction and cleavage mechanisms were determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The primary site of copper-promoted SLIV cleavage is shown to occur in the vicinity of the 5’-G17C18A19C20-3’ sequence that corresponds to a known binding site of the RM2 motif of the human La protein and has previously been reported to be important for viral translation. This domain also flanks the internal start codon (AUG). Both copper complexes also showed efficacy in an HCV replicon assay (IC50 = 0.75 μM for 2-Cu, and 2.17 μM for 3-Cu) and show potential for treatment of hepatitis C, complementing other marketed drugs by acting on a distinct therapeutic target by a novel mechanism of action. PMID:26583601

  4. Synergetic cytotoxic activity toward breast cancer cells enhanced by the combination of Antp-TPR hybrid peptide targeting Hsp90 and Hsp70-targeted peptide.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Torisawa, Aya; Kohno, Masayuki; Kawakami, Koji

    2014-08-26

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 are indispensable for cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind to client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across the cell membrane, and recovery of proteins from aggregates in the cell. Therefore, these proteins have recently emerged as important targets in the treatment of cancer. We previously reported that the newly designed Antp-TPR hybrid peptide targeting Hsp90 induced cytotoxic activity to cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. To further improve the cytotoxic activity of Antp-TPR toward cancer cells, we investigated the effect of a Hsp70-targeted peptide, which was made cell-permeable by adding the polyarginine with a linker sequence, on the cytotoxic activity of Antp-TPR in breast cancer cell lines. It was revealed that Antp-TPR in the presence of a Hsp70-targeted peptide induced effective cytotoxic activity toward breast cancer cells through the descrease of Hsp90 client proteins such as p53, Akt, and cRaf. Moreover, the combined treatment with these peptides did not induce the up-regulation of Hsp70 protein, as determined by western blotting, a promoter assay using a luminometer, and single-cell level imaging with the LV200 system, although a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90, 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), did induce the up-regulation of this protein. We also found that treatment with Antp-TPR, Hsp70-targeted peptide, or a combination of the two did not induce an increase in the glutathione concentrations in the cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting both Hsp90 and Hsp70 with Antp-TPR and Hsp70-targeted peptide is an attractive approach for selective cancer cell killing that might provide potent and selective therapeutic options for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  6. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  7. Formyl peptide receptors and the regulation of ACTH secretion: targets for annexin A1, lipoxins, and bacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    John, C D; Sahni, V; Mehet, D; Morris, J F; Christian, H C; Perretti, M; Flower, R J; Solito, E; Buckingham, J C

    2007-04-01

    The N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that respond to proinflammatory N-formylated bacterial peptides (e.g., formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, fMLF) and, thus, contribute to the host response to bacterial infection. Paradoxically, a growing body of evidence suggests that some members of this receptor family may also be targets for certain anti-inflammatory molecules, including annexin A1 (ANXA1), which is an important mediator of glucocorticoid (GC) action. To explore further the potential role of FPRs in mediating ANXA1 actions, we have focused on the pituitary gland, where ANXA1 has a well-defined role as a cell-cell mediator of the inhibitory effects of GCs on the secretion of corticotrophin (ACTH), and used molecular, genetic, and pharmacological approaches to address the question in well-established rodent models. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis identified mRNAs for four FPR family members in the mouse anterior pituitary gland, Fpr-rs1, Fpr-rs2, Fpr-rs6, and Fpr-rs7. Functional studies confirmed that, like dexamethasone, ANXA1 and two ANXA1-derived peptides (ANXA1(1-188) and ANXA1(Ac2-26)) inhibit the evoked release of ACTH from rodent anterior pituitary tissue in vitro. Fpr1 gene deletion failed to modify the pituitary responses to dexamethasone or ANXA1(Ac2-26). However, lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 0.02-2 microM, a lipid mediator with high affinity for Fpr-rs1) mimicked the inhibitory effects of ANXA1 on ACTH release as also did fMLF in high (1-100 microM) but not lower (10-100 nM) concentrations. Additionally, a nonselective FPR antagonist (Boc1, 100 microM) overcame the effects of dexamethasone, ANXA1(1-188), ANXA1(Ac2-26), fMLF, and LXA4 on ACTH release, although at a lower concentration (50 microM), it was without effect. Together, the results suggest that the actions of ANXA1 in the pituitary gland are independent of Fpr1 but may involve other FPR family members, in particular, Fpr-rs1 or a closely

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development. PMID:26046345

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development.

  10. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gomarasca, Marta; F. C. Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri. Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens. PMID:28096156

  11. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomarasca, Marta; F C Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  12. Disruption of disulfide bond formation alters the trafficking of prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH)-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Barker, Alison J; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2006-01-15

    Rat prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH) is processed in the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells yielding five TRH peptides and several non-TRH peptides. It is not understood how these peptides are targeted to the RSP. We show here that a disulfide bond in the carboxy-terminus of proTRH plays an important role in the trafficking of this prohormone. Recombinant proTRH was observed to migrate faster on a native gel when treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) suggesting the presence of a disulfide bond. In vitro disulfide bond formation was prevented either by DTT treatment or by mutating cysteines 213 and 219 to glycines. In both cases the peptides derived from these mutants exhibited increased constitutive release and processing defects when expressed in AtT20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line used in our prior studies on proTRH processing. Immunocytochemistry revealed that wild-type proTRH and mutant proTRH localized in a punctate pattern typical of proteins sorted to the regulated secretory pathway. These data suggest that the proposed disulfide bond of proTRH is involved in sorting of proTRH-derived peptides and in their retention within maturing secretory granules. This is the first evidence of structural motifs being important for the sorting of proTRH.

  13. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lactoferricin B-derived peptides with inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Musoles, Ricardo; López-Díez, José Javier; Torregrosa, Germán; Vallés, Salvador; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma; Salom, Juan B

    2010-10-01

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), a key peptidase in the endothelin (ET) system, cleaves inactive big ET-1 to produce active ET-1, which binds to ET(A) receptors to exert its vasoconstrictor and pressor effects. ECE inhibition could be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. In this study, a set of eight lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-derived peptides, previously characterized in our laboratory as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides, was examined for their inhibitory effects on ECE. In vitro inhibitory effects on ECE activity were assessed using both the synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrate V (FPS V) and the natural substrate big ET-1. To study vasoactive effects, an ex vivo functional assay was developed using isolated rabbit carotid artery segments. With FPS V, only four LfcinB-derived peptides induced inhibition of ECE activity, whereas the eight peptides showed ECE inhibitory effects with big ET-1 as substrate. Regarding the ex vivo assays, six LfcinB-derived peptides showed inhibition of big ET-1-induced, ECE-dependent vasoconstriction. A positive correlation between the inhibitory effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ECE activity when using big ET-1 and the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction was shown. ECE-independent vasoconstriction induced by ET-1 was not affected, thus discarding effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ET(A) receptors or intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. In conclusion, a combined in vitro and ex vivo method to assess the effects of potentially antihypertensive peptides on the ET system has been developed and applied to show the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction of six LfcinB-derived peptides, five of which were dual vasopeptidase (ACE/ECE) inhibitors.

  15. Small Peptides Derived from Penetratin as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Somlai, Csaba; Andujar, Sebastián A; Garro, Adriana D; Lima, Beatriz; Tapia, Alejandro; Feresin, Gabriela; Perczel, Andras; Tóth, Gabor; Cascales, Javier López; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation and conformational study of several small-size peptides acting as antibacterial agents are reported. Among the compounds evaluated, the peptides Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Trp-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2 , Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Arg-NH2 , and Arg-Gln-Ile-Trp-Trp-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity. These were found to be very active antibacterial compounds, considering their small molecular size. In order to better understand the antibacterial activity obtained for these peptides, an exhaustive conformational analysis was performed, using both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations using two different media (water and trifluoroethanol/water) were employed. The results of these theoretical calculations were corroborated by experimental circular dichroism measurements. A brief discussion on the possible mechanism of action of these peptides at molecular level is also presented. Some of the peptides reported here constitute very interesting structures to be used as starting compounds for the design of new small-size peptides possessing antibacterial activity.

  16. Bioactive peptides derived from natural proteins with respect to diversity of their receptors and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2015-10-01

    We have found various bioactive peptides derived from animal and plant proteins, which interact with receptors for endogenous bioactive peptides such as opioids, neurotensin, complements C3a and C5a, oxytocin, and formyl peptides etc. Among them, rubiscolin, a δ opioid peptide derived from plant RuBisCO, showed memory-consolidating, anxiolytic-like, and food intake-modulating effects. Soymorphin, a μ opioid peptide derived from β-conglycinin showed anxiolytic-like, anorexigenic, hypoglycemic, and hypotriglyceridemic effects. β-Lactotensin derived from β-lactoglobulin, the first natural ligand for the NTS2 receptor, showed memory-consolidating, anxiolytic-like, and hypocholesterolemic effects. Weak agonist peptides for the complements C3a and C5a receptors were released from many proteins and exerted various central effects. Peptides showing anxiolytic-like antihypertensive and anti-alopecia effects via different types of receptors such as OT, FPR and AT2 were also obtained. Based on these study, new functions and post-receptor mechanisms of receptor commom to endogenous and exogenous bioactive peptides have been clarified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antifungal Activities of Peptides Derived from Domain 5 of High-Molecular-Weight Kininogen

    PubMed Central

    Sonesson, Andreas; Nordahl, Emma Andersson; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2011-01-01

    In both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, Candida and Malassezia are causing or triggering clinical manifestations such as cutaneous infections and atopic eczema. The innate immune system provides rapid responses to microbial invaders, without requiring prior stimulation, through a sophisticated system of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). High molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) and components of the contact system have previously been reported to bind to Candida and other pathogens, leading to activation of the contact system. A cutaneous Candida infection is characterized by an accumulation of neutrophils, leading to an inflammatory response and release of enzymatically active substances. In the present study we demonstrate that antifungal peptide fragments are generated through proteolytic degradation of HMWK. The recombinant domain 5 (rD5) of HMWK, D5-derived peptides, as well as hydrophobically modified D5-derived peptides efficiently killed Candida and Malassezia. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of modified peptides was studied at physiological conditions. Binding of a D5-derived peptide, HKH20 (His479-His498), to the fungal cell membrane was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Our data disclose a novel antifungal activity of D5-derived peptides and also show that proteolytic cleavage of HMWK results in fragments exerting antifungal activity. Of therapeutic interest is that structurally modified peptides show an enhanced antifungal activity. PMID:21941573

  18. A peptide derived from neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) blocks neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madden, K; Janczak, J; McEnroe, G; Lim, D; Hartman, T; Liu, D; Stanton, L

    1997-06-01

    Peptides derived from neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF), a known antagonist of Mac-1, were evaluated as inhibitors of neutrophil adherence. In vitro assays of adherence employed: 1) human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), 2) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and 3) CHO cells expressing ICAM-1 (CHO-ICAM cells). Cells, pretreated with NIF-derived peptides (0.1-100 microM) for 10 minutes, were permitted to adhere for 20 min in the continued presence of peptide. Cell-based assays: 1) PMN adherence to HUVEC, 2) PMN adhesion to immobilized human serum proteins, and 3) adherence of CHO-ICAM cells to immobilized Mac-1. A NIF-derived peptide of 29 amino acids blocked PMN adherence to HUVEC, but behaved somewhat differently than the parent NIF protein. NIF specifically antagonized Mac-1 dependent adherence, but the peptide blocked neutrophil adherence that was dependent upon both Mac-1 and LFA-1 integrins. CHO-ICAM adherence to Mac-1 was blocked by NIF, but not by the peptide. Binding studies with NIF and the peptide indicate that the molecules bind to different sites. A peptide derived from NIF blocks PMN adherence but, unlike NIF, the mechanism of action is not mediated by direct antagonism Mac-1.

  19. Optimization of a Novel Peptide Ligand Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Shoaib; Nissen, Felix; Marr, Annabell; Markert, Annette; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Askoxylakis, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-regulated transmembrane protein over-expressed in various types of human cancer. Recently, a new peptide with affinity for human carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX-P1) was identified using the phage display technology. Aim of the present study is to characterize the binding site in the sequence of CaIX-P1, in order to optimize the binding and metabolic properties and use it for targeting purposes. Methodology/Principal Findings Various fragments of CaIX-P1 were synthesized on solid support using Fmoc chemistry. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the amino acids crucial for target binding. Derivatives with increased binding affinity were radiolabeled and in vitro studies were carried out on the CA IX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52 and the CA IX negative human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC3. Metabolic stability was investigated in cell culture medium and human serum. Organ distribution and planar scintigraphy studies were performed in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted SKRC 52 tumors. The results of our studies clearly identified amino acids that are important for target binding. Among various fragments and derivatives the ligand CaIX-P1-4-10 (NHVPLSPy) was found to possess increased binding potential in SKRC 52 cells, whereas no binding capacity for BxPC3 cells was observed. Binding of radiolabeled CaIX-P1-4-10 on CA IX positive cells could be inhibited by both the unlabeled and the native CaIX-P1 peptide but not by control peptides. Stability experiments indicated the degradation site in the sequence of CaIX-P1-4-10. Biodistribution studies showed a higher in vivo accumulation in the tumor than in most healthy tissues. Conclusions Our data reveal modifications in the sequence of the CA IX affine ligand CaIX-P1 that might be favorable for improvement of target affinity and metabolic stability, which are necessary prior to the use of the ligand in

  20. Using Data Independent Acquisition (DIA) to Model High-responding Peptides for Targeted Proteomics Experiments.

    PubMed

    Searle, Brian C; Egertson, Jarrett D; Bollinger, James G; Stergachis, Andrew B; MacCoss, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry is an essential tool for detecting quantitative changes in low abundant proteins throughout the proteome. Although selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is the preferred method for quantifying peptides in complex samples, the process of designing SRM assays is laborious. Peptides have widely varying signal responses dictated by sequence-specific physiochemical properties; one major challenge is in selecting representative peptides to target as a proxy for protein abundance. Here we present PREGO, a software tool that predicts high-responding peptides for SRM experiments. PREGO predicts peptide responses with an artificial neural network trained using 11 minimally redundant, maximally relevant properties. Crucial to its success, PREGO is trained using fragment ion intensities of equimolar synthetic peptides extracted from data independent acquisition experiments. Because of similarities in instrumentation and the nature of data collection, relative peptide responses from data independent acquisition experiments are a suitable substitute for SRM experiments because they both make quantitative measurements from integrated fragment ion chromatograms. Using an SRM experiment containing 12,973 peptides from 724 synthetic proteins, PREGO exhibits a 40-85% improvement over previously published approaches at selecting high-responding peptides. These results also represent a dramatic improvement over the rules-based peptide selection approaches commonly used in the literature.

  1. Liposomes derivatized with multimeric copies of KCCYSL peptide as targeting agents for HER-2-overexpressing tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ringhieri, Paola; Mannucci, Silvia; Conti, Giamaica; Nicolato, Elena; Fracasso, Giulio; Marzola, Pasquina; Morelli, Giancarlo; Accardo, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Mixed liposomes, obtained by coaggregation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and of the synthetic monomer containing a gadolinium complex ([C18]2DTPA[Gd]) have been prepared. Liposomes externally decorated with KCCYSL (P6.1 peptide) sequence in its monomeric, dimeric, and tetrameric forms are studied as target-selective delivery systems toward cancer cells overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors. Derivatization of liposomal surface with targeting peptides is achieved using the postmodification method: the alkyne-peptide derivative Pra-KCCYSL reacts, through click chemistry procedures, with a synthetic surfactant modified with 1, 2, or 4 azido moieties previously inserted in liposome formulation. Preliminary in vitro data on MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells indicated that liposomes functionalized with P6.1 peptide in its tetrameric form had better binding to and uptake into BT-474 cells compared to liposomes decorated with monomeric or dimeric versions of the P6.1 peptide. BT-474 cells treated with liposomes functionalized with the tetrameric form of P6.1 showed high degree of liposome uptake, which was comparable with the uptake of anti-HER-2 antibodies such as Herceptin. Moreover, magnetic MRI experiments have demonstrated the potential of liposomes to act as MRI contrast agents. PMID:28144135

  2. Assessing potential peptide targeting ligands by quantification of cellular adhesion of model nanoparticles under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Broda, Ellen; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Lächelt, Ulrich; Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-09-10

    Sophisticated drug delivery systems are coated with targeting ligands to improve the specific adhesion to surface receptors on diseased cells. In our study, we developed a method with which we assessed the potential of peptide ligands to specifically bind to receptor overexpressing target cells. Therefore, a microfluidic setup was used where the cellular adhesion of nanoparticles with ligand and of control nanoparticles was observed in parallel under the same experimental conditions. The effect of the ligand on cellular binding was quantified by counting the number of adhered nanoparticles with ligand and differently labeled control nanoparticles on single cells after incubation under flow conditions. To provide easy-to-synthesize, stable and reproducible nanoparticles which mimic the surface characteristics of drug delivery systems and meet the requirements for quantitative analysis, latex beads based on amine-modified polystyrene were used as model nanoparticles. Two short peptides were tested to serve as targeting ligand on the beads by increasing the specific binding to HuH7 cells. The c-Met binding peptide cMBP2 was used for hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met) targeting and the peptide B6 for transferrin receptor (TfR) targeting. The impact of the targeting peptide on binding was investigated by comparing the beads with ligand to different internal control beads: 1) without ligand and tailored surface charge (electrostatic control) and 2) with scrambled peptide and similar surface charge, but a different amino acid sequence (specificity control). Our results demonstrate that the method is very useful to select suitable targeting ligands for specific nanoparticle binding to receptor overexpressing tumor cells. We show that the cMBP2 ligand specifically enhances nanoparticle adhesion to target cells, whereas the B6 peptide mediates binding to tumor cells mainly by nonspecific interactions. All together, we suggest that cMBP2 is a suitable choice for

  3. A peptide probe for targeted brown adipose tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Azhdarinia, Ali; Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Ghosh, Sukhen C; Ghosh, Pradip; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2013-01-01

    The presence of brown adipose tissue responsible for thermogenic energy dissipation has been revealed in adult humans and has high clinical importance. Owing to limitations of current methods for brown adipose tissue detection, analysing the abundance and localization of brown adipose tissue in the body has remained challenging. Here we screen a combinatorial peptide library in mice and characterize a peptide (with the sequence CPATAERPC) that selectively binds to the vascular endothelium of brown adipose tissue, but not of intraperitoneal white adipose tissue. We show that in addition to brown adipose tissue, this peptide probe also recognizes the vasculature of brown adipose tissue-like depots of subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Our results indicate that the CPATAERPC peptide localizes to brown adipose tissue even in the absence of sympathetic nervous system stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate that this probe can be used to identify brown adipose tissue depots in mice by whole-body near-infrared fluorescence imaging.

  4. AVPdb: a database of experimentally validated antiviral peptides targeting medically important viruses

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Abid; Thakur, Nishant; Tandon, Himani; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral peptides (AVPs) have exhibited huge potential in inhibiting viruses by targeting various stages of their life cycle. Therefore, we have developed AVPdb, available online at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/avpdb, to provide a dedicated resource of experimentally verified AVPs targeting over 60 medically important viruses including Influenza, HCV, HSV, RSV, HBV, DENV, SARS, etc. However, we have separately provided HIV inhibiting peptides in ‘HIPdb’. AVPdb contains detailed information of 2683 peptides, including 624 modified peptides experimentally tested for antiviral activity. In modified peptides a chemical moiety is attached for increasing their efficacy and stability. Detailed information include: peptide sequence, length, source, virus targeted, virus family, cell line used, efficacy (qualitative/quantitative), target step/protein, assay used in determining the efficacy and PubMed reference. The database also furnishes physicochemical properties and predicted structure for each peptide. We have provided user-friendly browsing and search facility along with other analysis tools to help the users. Entering of many synthetic peptide-based drugs in various stages of clinical trials reiterate the importance for the AVP resources. AVPdb is anticipated to cater to the needs of scientific community working for the development of antiviral therapeutics. PMID:24285301

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. A novel angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptide derived from proteolytic digest of Chinese soft-shelled turtle egg white proteins.

    PubMed

    Rawendra, Reynetha D S; Aisha; Chang, Chi-I; Aulanni'am; Chen, Ho-Hsien; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Hsu, Jue-Liang

    2013-12-06

    In this study, soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) egg white (SSTEW) proteins were digested by thermolysin and the resulting small peptides were further fractionated by reverse phase chromatography. Peptides with angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) activity from these fractions were screened. A lysozyme-derived peptide, IW-11, from the fraction with the most effective ACEI was identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and its purified form showed effective ACEI activity in vitro (IC50=4.39±0.31μM). The Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated that the inhibition towards ACE caused by this peptide is a competitive inhibition. The molecular docking study further revealed that the ACEI activity of IW-11 is mainly attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the N-terminal residue of IW-11 and the S1 pocket (Ala354 and Tyr523) and the S2' region (His513 and His353) of ACE. Moreover, the digestion parameters were further optimized and the target peptide (82% purity) was readily obtained (15% yield) without any cumbersome purification procedure. Notably, lysozyme C is the most abundant protein in SSTEW, which implies that an efficient production of this ACEI peptide from SSTEW is promising. Inhibition of ACE has proven to be an effective strategy in prevention and treatment of hypertension and related diseases. Unlike typical synthetic ACE inhibitors which exert well described side effects, food-derived peptides with ACE inhibitory activity may be safer alternatives for hypertension treatment. In this study, we comprehensively identified peptides derived from SSTEW digest using a proteomic approach. IW-11, which is derived from lysozyme, the most abundant protein in SSTEW, showed remarkable inhibition towards ACE. This peptide has been demonstrated to have a competitive inhibitory property which is able to bind to ACE active site and found to be a true inhibitor against ACE according to Lineweaver-Burk plots. Using an

  7. [The synthesis of RGD peptide derivatives containing glutaric and adipic residues].

    PubMed

    Vigorov, A Iu; Demin, A M; Nizova, I A; Krasnov, V P

    2014-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of RGD peptide derivatives containing glutaric or adipic residues linked with α-amino group of L-arginine and allowing carrying out their coupling with other biomolecules and nanoparticles.

  8. KIR2DS2 recognizes conserved peptides derived from viral helicases in the context of HLA-C.

    PubMed

    Naiyer, Mohammed M; Cassidy, Sorcha A; Magri, Andrea; Cowton, Vanessa; Chen, Kevin; Mansour, Salah; Kranidioti, Hariklia; Mbirbindi, Berenice; Rettman, Pauline; Harris, Scott; Fanning, Liam J; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Franz H J; Davidson, Andrew D; Patel, Arvind H; Purbhoo, Marco A; Khakoo, Salim I

    2017-09-15

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are rapidly evolving species-specific natural killer (NK) cell receptors associated with protection against multiple different human viral infections. We report that the activating receptor KIR2DS2 directly recognizes viral peptides derived from conserved regions of flaviviral superfamily 2 RNA helicases in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I. We started by documenting that peptide LNPSVAATL from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase binds HLA-C*0102, leading to NK cell activation through engagement of KIR2DS2. Although this region is highly conserved across HCV isolates, the sequence is not present in other flaviviral helicases. Embarking on a search for a conserved target of KIR2DS2, we show that HLA-C*0102 presents a different highly conserved peptide from the helicase motif 1b region of related flaviviruses, including dengue, Zika, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, to KIR2DS2. In contrast to LNPSVAATL from HCV, these flaviviral peptides all contain an "MCHAT" motif, which is present in 61 of 63 flaviviruses. Despite the difference in the peptide sequences, we show that KIR2DS2 recognizes endogenously presented helicase peptides and that KIR2DS2 is sufficient to inhibit HCV and dengue virus replication in the context of HLA-C*0102. Targeting short, but highly conserved, viral peptides provide nonrearranging innate immune receptors with an efficient mechanism to recognize multiple, highly variable, pathogenic RNA viruses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Antibacterial activity and dual mechanisms of peptide analog derived from cell-penetrating peptide against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Shi, Yonghui; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Su, Guanfang; Le, Guowei

    2013-02-01

    A number of research have proven that antimicrobial peptides are of greatest potential as a new class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides share some similar structure characteristics. In our study, a new peptide analog, APP (GLARALTRLLRQLTRQLTRA) from the cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 (GLFRALLRLLRSLWRLLLRA), was identified simultaneously with the antibacterial mechanism of APP against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes. APP displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 2 to 4 μM. APP displayed higher cell selectivity (about 42-fold increase) as compared to the parent peptide for it decreased hemolytic activity and increased antimicrobial activity. The calcein leakage from egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk L-α-phosphatidyl-DL-glycerol and EYPC/cholesterol vesicles demonstrated that APP exhibited high selectivity. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that APP induced membrane permeabilization in a kinetic manner for membrane lesions allowing O-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside uptake into cells and potassium release from APP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that APP induced bacterial live cell membrane damage. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and gel retardation analysis confirmed that APP interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs after penetrating the cell membrane. Cell cycle assay showed that APP affected DNA synthesis in the cell. Our results suggested that peptides derived from the cell-penetrating peptide have the potential for antimicrobial agent development, and APP exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging bacterial cell membranes and binding to bacterial DNA to inhibit cellular functions, ultimately leading to cell death.

  10. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  11. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep)

    PubMed Central

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H.; Pineda, Julio M.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  12. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived from the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-27

    AD________ AD-A230 976 ARMY PROJECT NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE ENVELOPE...INO. INO r CCESSION NO I1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the...necessary and identify by block number) Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) ot dengue (DEN) virus infection in human mononuclear cells in vitro has been

  13. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of mycobactericidal ubiquitin-derived peptides in model and bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Marie H.; Powers, Katelyn M.; Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2012-01-01

    The mycobactericidal properties of macrophages include the delivery of bacteria to a hydrolytic lysosome enriched in bactericidal Ubiquitin-derived peptides (Ub-peptides). To better understand interactions of ubiquitin-derived peptides with mycobacteria, we further characterized the structure and function of the bactericidal Ub-peptide Ub2. We found that Ub2 adopts a β-sheet conformation in the context of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles and phospholipid (POPC:POPG, 1:1) vesicles that was dependent upon the primary sequence of the peptide. Point mutations in Ub2 that reduced the net charge of the peptide decreased Ub2 bactericidal activity. We investigated Ub-peptide function in the context of model membranes and intact bacteria. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis demonstrated that Ub2 inserts into and perturbs model phospholipid vesicles. In addition, we demonstrate that Ub2 disrupts the integrity of the mycobacterial membrane, equilibrates the transmembrane potential and localizes within both the mycobacterial membrane and cytoplasm of treated bacteria. Finally, we identified additional bactericidal Ub-peptides and characterized their activity and structure. This study provides new insight into the mycobactericidal mechanisms of Ub-peptides. PMID:23173767

  15. A tenascin-C mimetic peptide amphiphile nanofiber gel promotes neurite outgrowth and cell migration of neurosphere-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Berns, Eric J; Álvarez, Zaida; Goldberger, Joshua E; Boekhoven, Job; Kessler, John A; Kuhn, H Georg; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic materials that display natural bioactive signals derived from extracellular matrix molecules like laminin and fibronectin hold promise for promoting regeneration of the nervous system. In this work, we investigated a biomimetic peptide amphiphile (PA) presenting a peptide derived from the extracellular glycoprotein tenascin-C, known to promote neurite outgrowth through interaction with β1 integrin. The tenascin-C mimetic PA (TN-C PA) was found to self-assemble into supramolecular nanofibers and was incorporated through co-assembly into PA gels formed by highly aligned nanofibers. TN-C PA content in these gels increased the length and number of neurites produced from neurons differentiated from encapsulated P19 cells. Furthermore, gels containing TN-C PA were found to increase migration of cells out of neurospheres cultured on gel coatings. These bioactive gels could serve as artificial matrix therapies in regions of neuronal loss to guide neural stem cells and promote through biochemical cues neurite extension after differentiation. One example of an important target would be their use as biomaterial therapies in spinal cord injury. Tenascin-C is an important extracellular matrix molecule in the nervous system and has been shown to play a role in regenerating the spinal cord after injury and guiding neural progenitor cells during brain development, however, minimal research has been reported exploring the use of biomimetic biomaterials of tenascin-C. In this work, we describe a selfassembling biomaterial system in which peptide amphiphiles present a peptide derived from tenascin-C that promotes neurite outgrowth. Encapsulation of neurons in hydrogels of aligned nanofibers formed by tenascin-C-mimetic peptide amphiphiles resulted in enhanced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, these peptide amphiphiles promoted migration of neural progenitor cells cultured on nanofiber coatings. Tenascin-C biomimetic biomaterials such as the one described here have

  16. Peptides in Cancer Nanomedicine: Drug Carriers, Targeting Ligands and Protease Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; Eden, Henry S.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing attention as therapeutic agents, as the technologies for peptide development and manufacture continue to mature. Concurrently, with booming researches in nanotechnology for biomedical applications, peptides have been studied as an important class of components in nanomedicine, and they have been used either alone or in combination with nanomaterials of every reported composition. Peptides possess many advantages, such as smallness, ease of synthesis and modification, and good biocompatibility. Their functions in cancer nanomedicine, discussed in this review, include serving as drug carriers; as targeting ligands; and as protease-responsive substrates for drug delivery. PMID:22056916

  17. Dual-targeting peptide probe for sequence- and structure-sensitive sensing of serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Yanyan; Jin, Yulong; Zhao, Rui

    2017-08-15

    Peptide-protein interactions mediate numerous biologic processes and provide great opportunity for developing peptide probes and analytical approaches for detecting and interfering with recognition events. Molecular interactions usually take place on the heterogeneous surface of proteins, and the spatial distribution and arrangement of probes are therefore crucial for achieving high specificity and sensitivity in the bioassays. In this study, small linear peptides, homogenous peptide dimers and hetero bivalent peptides were designed for site-specific recognition of human serum albumin (HSA). Three hydrophilic regions located at different subdomains of HSA were chosen as targets for the molecular design. The binding affinity, selectivity and kinetics of the candidates were screened with surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) and fluoroimmuno assays. Benefiting from the synergistic effect from the surface-targeted peptide binders and the flexible spacer, a heterogenetic dimer peptide (heter-7) with fast binding and slow dissociation behavior was identified as the optimized probe. Heter-7 specifically recognizes the target protein HSA, and effectively blocks the binding of antibody to HSA. Its inhibitory activity was estimated as 83nM. It is noteworthy that heter-7 can distinguish serum albumins from different species despite high similarities in sequence and structure of these proteins. This hetero bivalent peptide shows promise for use in serum proteomics, disease detection and drug transport, and provides an effective approach for promoting the affinity and selectivity of ligands to achieve desirable chemical and biological outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides in management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prasad; Mandal, Surajit; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; Anand, Santosh

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D), one of the major common human health problems, is growing at an alarming rate around the globe. Alpha-glucosidase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) enzymes play a significant role in development of T2D. Hence, reduction or inhibition of their activity can be one of the important strategies in management of T2D. Studies in the field of bioactive peptides have shown that dietary proteins could be natural source of alpha-glucosidase and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of food protein-derived peptides as potential inhibitors of alpha-glucosidase and DPP-IV with major focus on milk proteins. Efforts have been made to review the available information in literature on the relationship between food protein-derived peptides and T2D. This review summarizes the current data on alpha-glucosidase and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory bioactive peptides derived from proteins and examines the potential value of these peptides in the treatment and prevention of T2D. In addition, the proposed modes of inhibition of peptide inhibitors are also discussed. Studies revealed that milk and other food proteins-derived bioactive peptides play a vital role in controlling T2D through several mechanisms, such as the satiety response, regulation of incretin hormones, insulinemia levels, and reducing the activity of carbohydrate degrading digestive enzymes. The bioactive peptides could be used in prevention and management of T2D through functional foods or nutraceutical supplements. Further clinical trials are necessary to validate the findings of in vitro studies and to confirm the efficiency of these peptides for applications.

  19. Targeted Quantification of the Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-01-01

    Glycated human serum albumin (HSA) serves as an important marker for monitoring the glycemic status. Developing methods for unambiguous identification and quantification of glycated peptides of HSA using high-throughput technologies such as mass spectrometry has a great clinical significance. The following protocol describes the construction of reference spectral libraries for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of synthetically modified HSA using high-resolution mass spectrometers. The protocol also describes work flows, for unambiguous identification and quantification of glycated modified peptides of HSA in clinical plasma using standard spectral libraries by various mass spectrometry approaches such as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH), and MS(E).

  20. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications. PMID:23046982

  1. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Jie; Cho, Chi Hin

    2012-09-19

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications.

  2. A polyalanine peptide derived from polar fish with anti-infectious activities

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marlon H.; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Nolasco, Diego O.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Felício, Mário R.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Matos, Carolina O.; Liao, Luciano M.; Santos, Nuno C.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Franco, Octávio L.; Migliolo, Ludovico

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing concern about antibiotic-resistant microbial infections, increasing support has been given to new drug discovery programs. A promising alternative to counter bacterial infections includes the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have emerged as model molecules for rational design strategies. Here we focused on the study of Pa-MAP 1.9, a rationally designed AMP derived from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP 1.9 was active against Gram-negative planktonic bacteria and biofilms, without being cytotoxic to mammalian cells. By using AFM, leakage assays, CD spectroscopy and in silico tools, we found that Pa-MAP 1.9 may be acting both on intracellular targets and on the bacterial surface, also being more efficient at interacting with anionic LUVs mimicking Gram-negative bacterial surface, where this peptide adopts α-helical conformations, than cholesterol-enriched LUVs mimicking mammalian cells. Thus, as bacteria present varied physiological features that favor antibiotic-resistance, Pa-MAP 1.9 could be a promising candidate in the development of tools against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26916401

  3. MOTS-c: A novel mitochondrial-derived peptide regulating muscle and fat metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are ancient organelles that are thought to have emerged from once free-living α-proto-bacteria. As such, they still possess several bacterial-like qualities, including a semi-autonomous genetic system, complete with an independent genome and a unique genetic code. The bacterial-like circular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been described to encode 37 genes, including 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and 13 mRNAs. Two additional peptides reported to originate from the mtDNA, namely humanin (Hashimoto et al., 2001; Ikone et al., 2003; Guo et al., 2003) [1–3] and MOTS-c (mitochondrial ORF of the twelve S c) (Lee et al., 2015) [4], indicate a larger mitochondrial genetic repertoire (Shokolenko and Alexeyev, 2015) [5]. These mitochondrial-derived peptides (MDPs) have profound and distinct biological activities and provide a paradigm-shifting concept of active mitochondrial-encoded signals that act at the cellular and organismal level (i.e. mitochondrial hormone) (da Cunha et al., 2015; Quiros et al., 2016) [6,7]. Considering that mitochondria are the single most important metabolic organelle, it is not surprising that these MDPs have metabolic actions. MOTS-c has been shown to target the skeletal muscle and enhance glucose metabolism. As such, MOTS-c has implications in the regulation of obesity, diabetes, exercise, and longevity, representing an entirely novel mitochondrial signaling mechanism to regulate metabolism within and between cells. PMID:27216708

  4. MOTS-c: A novel mitochondrial-derived peptide regulating muscle and fat metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria are ancient organelles that are thought to have emerged from once free-living α-proto-bacteria. As such, they still possess several bacterial-like qualities, including a semi-autonomous genetic system, complete with an independent genome and a unique genetic code. The bacterial-like circular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been described to encode 37 genes, including 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and 13 mRNAs. Two additional peptides reported to originate from the mtDNA, namely humanin (Hashimoto et al., 2001; Ikone et al., 2003; Guo et al., 2003) [1-3] and MOTS-c (mitochondrial ORF of the twelve S c) (Lee et al., 2015) [4], indicate a larger mitochondrial genetic repertoire (Shokolenko and Alexeyev, 2015) [5]. These mitochondrial-derived peptides (MDPs) have profound and distinct biological activities and provide a paradigm-shifting concept of active mitochondrial-encoded signals that act at the cellular and organismal level (i.e. mitochondrial hormone) (da Cunha et al., 2015; Quiros et al., 2016) [6,7]. Considering that mitochondria are the single most important metabolic organelle, it is not surprising that these MDPs have metabolic actions. MOTS-c has been shown to target the skeletal muscle and enhance glucose metabolism. As such, MOTS-c has implications in the regulation of obesity, diabetes, exercise, and longevity, representing an entirely novel mitochondrial signaling mechanism to regulate metabolism within and between cells.

  5. A polyalanine peptide derived from polar fish with anti-infectious activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Marlon H.; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Nolasco, Diego O.; de La Fuente-Núñez, César; Felício, Mário R.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Matos, Carolina O.; Liao, Luciano M.; Santos, Nuno C.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Franco, Octávio L.; Migliolo, Ludovico

    2016-02-01

    Due to the growing concern about antibiotic-resistant microbial infections, increasing support has been given to new drug discovery programs. A promising alternative to counter bacterial infections includes the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have emerged as model molecules for rational design strategies. Here we focused on the study of Pa-MAP 1.9, a rationally designed AMP derived from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP 1.9 was active against Gram-negative planktonic bacteria and biofilms, without being cytotoxic to mammalian cells. By using AFM, leakage assays, CD spectroscopy and in silico tools, we found that Pa-MAP 1.9 may be acting both on intracellular targets and on the bacterial surface, also being more efficient at interacting with anionic LUVs mimicking Gram-negative bacterial surface, where this peptide adopts α-helical conformations, than cholesterol-enriched LUVs mimicking mammalian cells. Thus, as bacteria present varied physiological features that favor antibiotic-resistance, Pa-MAP 1.9 could be a promising candidate in the development of tools against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K+ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  7. Therapeutic Effect on Targeted Hyaluronan Binding Peptide on Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Furthermore, it confers stability to the peptide at low pH and high temperature, which makes it easy to manipulate and gives it a long shelf - life . Due to...were incubated with peptides for 24 hours and the cells were washed and harvested in lysis buffer (10 mM potassium phosphate at pH 7.5, 1 mM EDTA, 5...30 min followed by incubation with FITC-conjugated anti-goat IgG (1:200) at 4 ºC for 30 min. The cells were finally stained with propidium iodide and

  8. The use of therapeutic peptides to target and to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Boohaker, R J; Lee, M W; Vishnubhotla, P; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2012-01-01

    Peptide therapeutics is a promising field for emerging anti-cancer agents. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of peptides and capacity for modifications. An existing and vast knowledge base of protein structure and function can be exploited for novel peptide design. Current research focuses on developing peptides that can (1) serve as tumor targeting moieties and (2) permeabilize membranes with cytotoxic consequences. A survey of recent findings reveals significant trends. Amphiphilic peptides with clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues are features of anti-microbial peptides that confer the ability to eradicate microbes and show considerable anti-cancer toxicity. Peptides that assemble and form pores can disrupt cell or organelle membranes and cause apoptotic or necrotic death. Cell permeable and tumor-homing peptides can carry biologically active cargo to tumors or tumor vasculature. The challenge lies in developing the clinical application of therapeutic peptides. Improving delivery to tumors, minimizing non-specific toxic effects and discerning pharmacokinetic properties are high among the needs to produce a powerful therapeutic peptide for cancer treatment.

  9. The Use of Therapeutic Peptides to Target and to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boohaker, R.J.; Lee, M.W.; Vishnubhotla, P.; Perez, J.M.; Khaled, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide therapeutics is a promising field for emerging anti-cancer agents. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of peptides and capacity for modifications. An existing and vast knowledge base of protein structure and function can be exploited for novel peptide design. Current research focuses on developing peptides that can (1) serve as tumor targeting moieties and (2) permeabilize membranes with cytotoxic consequences. A survey of recent findings reveals significant trends. Amphiphilic peptides with clusters of hydrophobic and cationic residues are features of anti-microbial peptides that confer the ability to eradicate microbes and show considerable anti-cancer toxicity. Peptides that assemble and form pores can disrupt cell or organelle membranes and cause apoptotic or necrotic death. Cell permeable and tumor-homing peptides can carry biologically active cargo to tumors or tumor vasculature. The challenge lies in developing the clinical application of therapeutic peptides. Improving delivery to tumors, minimizing non-specific toxic effects and discerning pharmacokinetic properties are high among the needs to produce a powerful therapeutic peptide for cancer treatment. PMID:22725698

  10. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and derived peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C.; Krueger, R.C.; Schwartz, N.B. )

    1990-01-30

    In order to define the domain structure of proteoglycans as well as identify primary amino acid sequences specific for attachment of the various carbohydrate substituents, reliable techniques for deglycosylating proteoglycans are required. In this study, deglycosylation of cartilage chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) with minimal core protein cleavage was accomplished by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and keratanase, followed by treatment with anhydrous HF in pyridine. Nearly complete deglycosylation of secreted proteoglycan was verified within 45 min of HF treatment by loss of incorporated ({sup 3}H)glucosamine label from the proteoglycan as a function of time of treatment, as well as by direct analysis of carbohydrate content and xylosyltransferase acceptor activity of unlabeled core protein preparations. The deglycosylated CSPG preparations were homogeneous and of high molecular weight. Comparison of the intact deglycosylated core protein preparations with newly synthesized unprocessed precursors suggested that extensive proteolytic cleavage of the core protein did not occur during normal intracellular processing. Furthermore, peptide patterns generated after clostripain digestion of core protein precursor and of deglycosylated secreted proteoglycan were comparable. With the use of the clostripain digestion procedure, peptides were produced from unlabeled proteoglycan, and two predominant peptides from the most highly glycosylated regions were isolated, characterized, and deglycosylated. These peptides were found to follow similar kinetics of deglycosylation and to acquire xylose activity comparable to the intact core protein.

  11. Mapping the HLA ligandome landscape of acute myeloid leukemia: a targeted approach toward peptide-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Berlin, C; Kowalewski, D J; Schuster, H; Mirza, N; Walz, S; Handel, M; Schmid-Horch, B; Salih, H R; Kanz, L; Rammensee, H-G; Stevanović, S; Stickel, J S

    2015-03-01

    Identification of physiologically relevant peptide vaccine targets calls for the direct analysis of the entirety of naturally presented human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands, termed the HLA ligandome. In this study, we implemented this direct approach using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated peptide vaccine targets. Mapping the HLA class I ligandomes of 15 AML patients and 35 healthy controls, more than 25 000 different naturally presented HLA ligands were identified. Target prioritization based on AML exclusivity and high presentation frequency in the AML cohort identified a panel of 132 LiTAAs (ligandome-derived tumor-associated antigens), and 341 corresponding HLA ligands (LiTAPs (ligandome-derived tumor-associated peptides)) represented subset independently in >20% of AML patients. Functional characterization of LiTAPs by interferon-γ ELISPOT (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot) and intracellular cytokine staining confirmed AML-specific CD8(+) T-cell recognition. Of note, our platform identified HLA ligands representing several established AML-associated antigens (e.g. NPM1, MAGED1, PRTN3, MPO, WT1), but found 80% of them to be also represented in healthy control samples. Mapping of HLA class II ligandomes provided additional CD4(+) T-cell epitopes and potentially synergistic embedded HLA ligands, allowing for complementation of a multipeptide vaccine for the immunotherapy of AML.

  12. Tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA using fatty acyl-CGKRK peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Do, Hung; Parang, Keykavous; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri

    2017-07-21

    Tumor-targeted carriers provide efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumor tissue. CGKRK is one of the well-known tumor targeting peptides with significant specificity for angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells. Here, we designed fatty acyl conjugated CGKRK peptides, based on the hypothesis that hydrophobically-modified CGKRK peptide could enhance cellular permeation and delivery of siRNA targeted to tumor cells for effective silencing of selected proteins. We synthesized six fatty acyl-peptide conjugates, using a diverse chain of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids to study the efficiency of this approach. At peptide:siRNA weight/weight ratio of 10:1 (N/P ≈ 13.6), almost all the peptides showed complete binding with siRNA, and at a w/w ratio of 20:1 (N/P ≈ 27.3), complete protection of siRNA from early enzymatic degradation was observed. Conjugated peptides and peptide/siRNA complexes did not show significant cytotoxicity in selected cell lines. The oleic acid-conjugated peptide showed the highest efficiency in siRNA uptake and silencing of kinesin spindle protein at peptide:siRNA w/w ratio of 80:1 (N/P ≈ 109). The siRNA internalization into non-tumorigenic kidney cells was negligible with all fatty acyl-peptide conjugates. These results indicate that conjugation of fatty acids to CGKRK could create an efficient delivery system for siRNA silencing specifically in tumor cells.

  13. Therapeutic potential of a peptide targeting BCL-2 cell guardians in cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jerry M

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to cancer therapy is to elicit apoptosis with "BH3 mimetic" drugs, which target proteins of the BCL-2 family. As of yet, however, such drugs can target only certain BCL-2 family proteins. Hence, in this issue of the JCI, LaBelle et al. assess instead the therapeutic potential of a "stapled" BH3 peptide from the BIM protein, which inactivates all its prosurvival relatives. The peptide killed cultured hematologic tumor cells and abated growth of a leukemia xenograft, without perturbing the hematopoietic compartment. Hence, such peptides might eventually provide a new way to treat refractory leukemias.

  14. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, CG; Ullrich, M; Schally, AV; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, SR

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPC) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing. PMID:23267837

  16. AP-1-Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activities of the Nanostructured, Self-Assembling S5 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Seok; Son, Young-Jin; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Soochan; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-based therapeutics have received increasing attention in medical research. However, the local delivery of such therapeutics poses unique challenges. Self-assembling peptides that use decorated nanofibers are one approach by which these therapeutics may be delivered. We previously found that the self-assembling K5 peptide affects the anti-inflammatory response. The aim of the present study was to investigate another self-assembling peptide, S5. Unlike the K5 peptide which has a positive charge, the S5 peptide has a free hydroxyl (-OH) group. We first examined whether the S5 peptide regulates the inflammatory response in primary cells and found that the S5 peptide reduced the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated bone marrow-derived macrophages. Moreover, the S5 peptide significantly downregulated cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, TNF-α, and interleukin- (IL-) 1β expression by blocking the nuclear translocation of c-Jun. Consistent with this finding, the S5 peptide diminished the activation of inflammatory signaling enzymes related to p38. The S5 peptide also inhibited the formation of the p38/c-Jun signaling complex in RAW264.7 cells. Similarly, p38 and MKK3/6 were inhibited by the S5 peptide in LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the S5 peptide could exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the c-Jun/p38 signaling pathway. PMID:26074678

  17. Isolation and characterisation of a novel antibacterial peptide from a native swine intestinal tract-derived bacterium.

    PubMed

    Xin, Haiyun; Ji, Shengyue; Peng, Jiayin; Han, Peng; An, Xiaopeng; Wang, Shan; Cao, Binyun

    2017-02-27

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are highly associated with antipathogenic activity, without generating drug resistance in targeted bacteria. In this study, the existence of AMPs in the Tibetan swine, a China-native, cold-resistant and seldom-sick breed of pig, was investigated. A peptide secreted by a Tibetan swine intestinal tract-derived Bacillus strain was isolated using reversed-phase chromatography (RPC), ultrafiltration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The peptide was identified by mass spectrometry and was characterised for activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The 16-amino acid peptide (ASVVNKLTGGVAGLLK), named TP, had a molecular mass of 1568.919 Da and exhibited inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria [minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2.5-5 µM and 10-20 µM for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively] as well as human MKN-45 and NB4 tumour cell lines [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 4.686 µM and 11.479 µM, respectively]. TP also exhibited weak haemolytic activity. Furthermore, TP enhanced cell membrane permeability and K(+) outflow, bound with E. coli genomic DNA in vitro and inhibited E. coli growth. Thus, TP represents a strong candidate as an antibacterial peptide.

  18. Fiber formation of a synthetic spider peptide derived from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji; Kontani, Ko-Ichi; Taniguchi, Rina; Saiki, Masatoshi; Yokoi, Sayoko; Yukuhiro, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Dragline silk is a high-performance biopolymer with exceptional mechanical properties. Artificial spider dragline silk is currently prepared by a recombinant technique or chemical synthesis. However, the recombinant process is costly and large-sized synthetic peptides are needed for fiber formation. In addition, the silk fibers that are produced are much weaker than a fiber derived from a native spider. In this study, a small peptide was chemically synthesized and examined for its ability to participate in fiber formation. A short synthetic peptide derived from Nephila clavata was prepared by a solid-phase peptide method, based on a prediction using the hydrophobic parameter of each individual amino acid residue. After purification of the spider peptide, fiber formation was examined under several conditions. Fiber formation proceeded in the acidic pH range, and larger fibers were produced when organic solvents such as trifluoroethanol and acetonitrile were used at an acidic pH. Circular dichroism measurements of the spider peptide indicate that the peptide has a beta-sheet structure and that the formation of a beta-sheet structure is required for the spider peptide to undergo fiber formation.

  19. "Blind" targeting in action: From phage display to breast cancer cell targeting with peptide-gold nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Elisabetta; Gambini, Luca; Civitarese, Viola; Bellini, Michela; Ambrosini, Dario; Allevi, Raffaele; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Romeo, Sergio; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Tumor homing peptides (THPs) specific for a representative breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) were carefully selected basing on a phage-displayed peptide library freely available on the web, namely the "TumorHoPe: A Database of Tumor Homing Peptides". The selected THPs were synthesized and evaluated in terms of their affinity toward MCF-7 cells. Out of 5 tested THPs, 3 best-performing peptide sequences and 1 scrambled sequence were separately conjugated to spherical gold nanoparticles yielding stable nanoconjugates. THP nanoconjugates were examined for their ability to actively target MCF-7 cells in comparison to noncancerous 3T3-L1 fibroblast cells. These THP-gold nanoconjugates exhibited good selectivity and binding affinity by flow cytometry, and low cytotoxicity as assayed by cell death experiments. The uptake of targeted nanoconjugates by the breast cancer cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. This work demonstrates that it is possible to exploit the conjugation of short peptides selected from phage-displayed libraries to develop nanomaterials reliably endowed with tumor targeting potential irrespective of a specific knowledge of the target cell biology.

  20. Determination of CK2 specificity and substrates by proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunli; Ye, Mingliang; Bian, Yangyang; Liu, Fangjie; Cheng, Kai; Dong, Mingming; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-02

    Understanding the specificity of kinases enables prediction of their substrates and uncovering kinase functions in signaling pathways. Traditionally synthesized peptide libraries are used to determine the kinase specificity. In this study, a proteomics-based method was developed to determine the specificity of kinase by taking the advantages of proteome-derived peptide libraries and quantitative proteomics. Proteome-derived peptide libraries were constructed by digesting proteins in total cell lysate followed with dephosphorylation of the resulting peptides. After incubating the peptide libraries with/without CK2 for in vitro kinase assay, stable isotopic labeling based quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to distinguish the in vitro phosphosites generated by CK2. By using the above approach, 404 CK2 in vitro phosphosites were identified by 1D LC-MS/MS. Those sites allowed the statistic determination of the CK2 specificity. In addition to the easy construction of the proteome-derived peptide library, another significant advantage of this method over the method with synthesized peptide libraries is that the identified phosphosites could be directly mapped to proteins for the screening of putative kinase substrates. It was found that the confidence for substrate identification could be significantly improved by comparing the in vitro CK2 sites with the in vivo sites identified by phosphoproteomics analysis of the same cell lines. By applying this integrated strategy, 138 phosphosites from 105 putative CK2 substrates of high confidence were determined.

  1. Bioavailability of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides: a glycaemic management perspective.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Drummond, Elaine; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-06-01

    Milk protein-derived peptides have been reported to have potential benefits for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, what the active components are and whether intact peptides exert this bioactivity has received little investigation in human subjects. Furthermore, potentially useful bioactive peptides can be limited by low bioavailability. Various peptides have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream after milk-protein ingestion, providing valuable insights into their potential bioavailability. However, these studies are currently limited and the structure and sequence of milk peptides exerting bioactivity for glycaemic management has received little investigation in human subjects. The present article reviews the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides in human studies to date, and examines the evidence on milk proteins and glycaemic management, including potential mechanisms of action. Areas in need of advancement are identified. Only by establishing the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides, the active components and the mechanistic pathways involved can the benefits of milk proteins for the prevention or management of type 2 diabetes be fully realised in future.

  2. Stability and cytotoxicity of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from bovine casein*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Pan-pan; Zhang, Feng-yang; Che, Hong-xia; Jiang, Zhan-mei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat treatment combined with acid and alkali on the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of peptides derived from bovine casein. The free amino group content, color, and cytotoxicity of the peptides were measured under different conditions. When heated at 100 °C in the pH range from 9.0 to 12.0, ACE inhibitory activity was reduced and the appearance of the peptides was significantly darkened. After thermal treatment in the presence of acid and alkali, the free amino group content of ACE inhibitory peptides decreased markedly. High temperature and prolonged heating also resulted in the loss of ACE inhibitory activity, the loss of free amino groups, and the darker coloration of bovine casein-derived peptides. However, ACE inhibitory peptides, within a concentration range of from 0.01 to 0.2 mg/ml, showed no cytotoxicity to Caco-2 and ECV-304 cell lines after heat treatment. This indicated that high temperature and alkaline heat treatment impaired the stability of bovine casein-derived ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:24510707

  3. Targeted Vault Nanoparticles Engineered with an Endosomolytic Peptide Deliver Biomolecules to the Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Han, Muri; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Rome, Leonard H.

    2011-01-01

    Vault nanoparticles were engineered to enhance their escape from the endosomal compartment by fusing a membrane lytic peptide derived from adenovirus protein VI (pVI) to the N-terminus of the major vault protein to form pVI-vaults. We demonstrate that these pVI-vaults disrupt the endosomal membrane using three different experimental protocols including: 1) enhancement of DNA transfection, 2) co-delivery of a cytosolic ribotoxin, and 3) direct visualization by fluorescence. Furthermore, direct targeting of vaults to specific cell surface epidermal growth factor receptors led to enhanced cellular uptake and efficient delivery of vaults to the cytoplasm. This process was monitored with fluorescent vaults and morphological changes in the endosomal compartment were observed. By combining targeting and endosomal escape into a single recombinant vault, high levels of transfection efficiency were achieved using low numbers of vault particles. These results demonstrate that engineered vaults are effective, efficient, and non-toxic nanoparticles for targeted delivery of biomaterials to the cell cytoplasm. PMID:21740042

  4. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  5. Cloning and expression of the tumstatin active peptides-T(7) and its derivant-T(7)-NGR.

    PubMed

    Naling, Song; Xin, He; Qiren, Zhao; Tingdong, Yan; Lei, Wen

    2009-06-01

    To enhance the role targeting, design to link NGR sequence with tumstatin active peptides-T(7)'s C-terminal, the derivant called T(7)-NGR. The cloning vector pMD-T(7) and pMD-T(7) N were constructed by PCR and gene synthesis methods, respectively, identified by digestion and DNA sequencing. After the digested plasmids were isolated by the low melting point agarose electrophoresis, the target-fragment was cut off and mixed with the recovery of the digested vector pET28a. Expression vector pET-T(7) and pET-T(7) N were constructed in low melting point agarose, identified by digestion and DNA sequencing, transformed into competent Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), induced by IPTG. Identification result shows that pET-T(7) and pET-T(7) N were correct. Tricine-SDS-PAGE results showed that IPTG concentration of 1 mM, after the induction of 25 degrees C, 8 h, T(7) peptides and T(7)-NGR peptides have achieved the optimum conditions of expression. In conclusion, the expression vectors of the two peptides has been successfully constructed, and got product, no coverage at home and abroad, laid the foundation for further activity experiments.

  6. Metal solubility enhancing peptides derived from barley protein.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Ewelina; Bamdad, Fatemeh; Chen, Lingyun

    2014-09-15

    Mineral supplements are required to be soluble as their bioavailability is highly correlated to their solubility in body fluids. In this study, metal binding capacity of barley protein hydrolysates and their purified fractions was investigated and expressed as increase in solubility of metal ions. Metal ions in the presence of hydrolysates exhibited a remarkable increase in solubility: 118, 32, 10, 29 and 35-fold for Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. A mixture of low molecular weight peptides possesses a synergistic combination of both charged and hydrophobic residues and achieves the best binding metal ions. Electrostatic interactions via charged side chains and coordination binding with His and Cys, initially attract the metal ions and, afterward, hydrophobic interactions and aromatic ring stacking stabilize the positioning of metal ions in the structure of the peptide. Barley hordein hydrolysates show potential as dietary supplements that enhance both mineral solubility and bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of epitope mimics recognized by CTL reactive to the melanoma/melanocyte-derived peptide MART-1(27-35)

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CTL reactivity to the epitope MART-1(27-35), of the melanoma (self) antigen MART-1/melan A is frequently observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and may be readily elicited from the peripheral blood of melanoma patients that express HLA-A*0201. Available data suggest that these observations contrast with those made for other HLA-A*0201- presented melanoma self antigens regarding the regularity of observed CTL responses. Based on preliminary findings, we hypothesized that the CTL response to MART-1 might be augmented in part by T cell encounters with peptides derived from sources other than MART-1, which show sequence similarity to MART-1(27-35). To test this idea, a protein database search for potential MART-1 epitope mimics was done using criteria developed from analyses of effector recognition of singly- substituted peptide analogues of MART-1(27-35). Synthetic peptides were made for a portion of the sequences retrieved; 12/40 peptides tested were able to sensitize target cells for lysis by one or more anti-MART- 1 effectors. The peptides recognized correspond to sequences occurring in a variety of proteins of viral, bacterial, and human (self) origin. One peptide derives from glycoprotein C of the common pathogen HSV-1; cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding native glycoprotein C were lysed by anti-MART-1 effectors. Our results overall indicate that sequences conforming to the A2.1 binding motif and possessing features essential to recognition by anti-MART-1 CTL occur frequently in proteins. These findings further suggest that T cells might encounter a variety of such sequences in vivo, and that epitope mimicry may play a role in modulating the CTL response to MART-1(27-35). PMID:8760818

  8. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rosemeire A.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Rocha, Viviane Z.; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S. P.; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C.; Marques, Fabio L. N.; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05), when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC) was synthesized and labeled with 111InCl3 in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases. PMID:27563889

  9. Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 PeptideAtlas: toward strategies for targeted proteomics and improved proteome coverage.

    PubMed

    Van, Phu T; Schmid, Amy K; King, Nichole L; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Whitehead, Kenia; Koide, Tie; Facciotti, Marc T; Goo, Young Ah; Deutsch, Eric W; Reiss, David J; Mallick, Parag; Baliga, Nitin S

    2008-09-01

    The relatively small numbers of proteins and fewer possible post-translational modifications in microbes provide a unique opportunity to comprehensively characterize their dynamic proteomes. We have constructed a PeptideAtlas (PA) covering 62.7% of the predicted proteome of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by compiling approximately 636 000 tandem mass spectra from 497 mass spectrometry runs in 88 experiments. Analysis of the PA with respect to biophysical properties of constituent peptides, functional properties of parent proteins of detected peptides, and performance of different mass spectrometry approaches has highlighted plausible strategies for improving proteome coverage and selecting signature peptides for targeted proteomics. Notably, discovery of a significant correlation between absolute abundances of mRNAs and proteins has helped identify low abundance of proteins as the major limitation in peptide detection. Furthermore, we have discovered that iTRAQ labeling for quantitative proteomic analysis introduces a significant bias in peptide detection by mass spectrometry. Therefore, despite identifying at least one proteotypic peptide for almost all proteins in the PA, a context-dependent selection of proteotypic peptides appears to be the most effective approach for targeted proteomics.

  10. Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 PeptideAtlas: strategies for targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Van, Phu T.; Schmid, Amy K.; King, Nichole L.; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Whitehead, Kenia; Koide, Tie; Facciotti, Marc T.; Goo, Young-Ah; Deutsch, Eric W.; Reiss, David J.; Mallick, Parag; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2009-01-01

    The relatively small numbers of proteins and fewer possible posttranslational modifications in microbes provides a unique opportunity to comprehensively characterize their dynamic proteomes. We have constructed a Peptide Atlas (PA) for 62.7% of the predicted proteome of the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by compiling approximately 636,000 tandem mass spectra from 497 mass spectrometry runs in 88 experiments. Analysis of the PA with respect to biophysical properties of constituent peptides, functional properties of parent proteins of detected peptides, and performance of different mass spectrometry approaches has helped highlight plausible strategies for improving proteome coverage and selecting signature peptides for targeted proteomics. Notably, discovery of a significant correlation between absolute abundances of mRNAs and proteins has helped identify low abundance of proteins as the major limitation in peptide detection. Furthermore we have discovered that iTRAQ labeling for quantitative proteomic analysis introduces a significant bias in peptide detection by mass spectrometry. Therefore, despite identifying at least one proteotypic peptide for almost all proteins in the PA, a context-dependent selection of proteotypic peptides appears to be the most effective approach for targeted proteomics. PMID:18652504

  11. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rosemeire A; Giordano, Ricardo J; Gutierrez, Paulo S; Rocha, Viviane Z; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S P; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C; Marques, Fabio L N; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V; Lugão, Ademar B; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-08-24

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05), when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC) was synthesized and labeled with (111)InCl₃ in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases.

  12. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    PubMed

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases.

  13. Prevention of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by a phage library-derived cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Natarajan; Im, Sin-Heyog; Balass, Moshe; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Many pathogenic antibodies in myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG), are directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). These antibodies are highly conformation dependent; hence, linear peptides derived from native receptor sequences are poor candidates for their immunoneutralization. We employed a phage-epitope library to identify peptide-mimotopes capable of preventing the pathogenicity of the anti-MIR mAb 198. We identified a 15-mer peptide (PMTLPENYFSERPYH) that binds specifically to mAb 198 and inhibits its binding to AcChoR. A 10-fold increase in the affinity of this peptide was achieved by incorporating flanking amino acid residues from the coat protein as present in the original phage library. This extended peptide (AEPMTLPENYFSERPYHPPPP) was constrained by the addition of cysteine residues on both ends of the peptide, thus generating a cyclic peptide that inhibited the binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR with a potency that is three orders of magnitude higher when compared with the parent library peptide. This cyclic peptide inhibited the in vitro binding of mAb 198 to AcChoR and prevented the antigenic modulation of AcChoR caused by mAb 198 in human muscle cell cultures. The cyclic peptide also reacted with several other anti-MIR mAbs and the sera of EAMG rats. In addition, this peptide blocked the ability of mAb 198 to passively transfer EAMG in rats. Further derivatization of the cyclic peptide may aid in the design of suitable synthetic mimotopes for modulation of MG. PMID:10639153

  14. Evolution of class-specific peptides targeting a hot spot of the Galphas subunit.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan J; Ja, William W; Roberts, Richard W

    2008-04-11

    The four classes of heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits act as molecular routers inside cells, gating signals based on a bound guanosine nucleotide (guanosine 5'-triphosphate versus guanosine 5'-diphosphate). Ligands that specifically target individual subunits provide new tools for monitoring and modulating these networks, but are challenging to design due to the high sequence homology and structural plasticity of the Galpha-binding surface. Here we have created an mRNA display library of peptides based on the short Galpha-modulating peptide R6A-1 and selected variants that target a convergent protein-binding surface of Galphas.guanosine 5'-diphosphate. After selection/evolution, the most Galphas-specific peptide, Galphas(s)-binding peptide (GSP), was used to design a second-generation library, resulting in several new affinity- and selectivity-matured peptides denoted as mGSPs. The two-step evolutionary walk from R6A-1 to mGSP-1 resulted in an 8000-fold inversion in binding specificity, altered seven out of nine residues in the starting peptide core, and incorporated both positive and negative design steps. The resulting mGSP-1 peptide shows remarkable selectivity and affinity, exhibiting little or no binding to nine homologous Galpha subunits or human H-Ras, and even discriminates the Galphas splice variant Galphas(l). Selected peptides make specific contacts with the effector-binding region of Galpha, which may explain an interesting bifunctional activity observed in GSP. Overall, our work demonstrates a design of simple, linear, highly specific peptides that target a protein-binding surface of Galphas and argues that mRNA display-based selection/evolution is a powerful route for targeting protein families with high class specificity and state specificity.

  15. Myostatin inhibition by a follistatin-derived peptide ameliorates the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy model mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, K

    2008-07-01

    Gene-targeted therapies, such as adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene therapy and cell-mediated therapy using myogenic stem cells, are hopeful molecular strategies for muscular dystrophy. In addition, drug therapies based on the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy patients are desirable. Multidisciplinary approaches to drug design would offer promising therapeutic strategies. Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, is predominantly produced by skeletal muscle and negatively regulates the growth and differentiation of cells of the skeletal muscle lineage. Myostatin inhibition would increase the skeletal muscle mass and prevent muscle degeneration, regardless of the type of muscular dystrophy. Myostatin inhibitors include myostatin antibodies, myostatin propeptide, follistatin and follistatin-related protein. Although follistatin possesses potent myostatin-inhibiting activity, it works as an efficient inhibitor of activins. Unlike myostatin, activins regulate the growth and differentiation of nearly all cell types, including cells of the gonads, pituitary gland and skeletal muscle. We have developed a myostatin-specific inhibitor derived from follistatin, designated FS I-I. Transgenic mice expressing this myostatin-inhibiting peptide under the control of a skeletal muscle-specific promoter showed increased skeletal muscle mass and strength. mdx mice were crossed with FS I-I transgenic mice and any improvement of the pathological signs was investigated. The resulting mdx/FS I-I mice exhibited increased skeletal muscle mass and reduced cell infiltration in muscles. Muscle strength was also recovered in mdx/FS I-I mice. Our data indicate that myostatin inhibition by this follistatin-derived peptide has therapeutic potential for muscular dystrophy.

  16. Identification of parathyroid hormone-related protein-derived peptides immunogenic in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-A24+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yao, A; Harada, M; Matsueda, S; Ishihara, Y; Shomura, H; Noguchi, M; Matsuoka, K; Hara, I; Kamidono, S; Itoh, K

    2004-07-19

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a key factor in the development of bone metastases, which are a major barrier in treating prostate cancer patients. In this study, we attempted to identify PTHrP-derived peptides immunogenic in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24(+) prostate cancer patients. Among four different PTHrP peptides carrying the HLA-A24 binding motif, both the PTHrP(36-44) and PTHrP(102-111) peptides efficiently induced peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients. Peptide-stimulated PBMCs showed cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cells in an HLA-A24-restricted manner. Experiments using antibodies and cold inhibition targets confirmed that their cytotoxicity was dependent on PTHrP peptide-specific and CD8(+) T cells. Immunoglobulin G reactive to the PTHrP(102-111) or PTHrP(110-119) peptide was frequently detected in the plasma of prostate cancer patients, suggesting that the PTHrP(102-111) peptide is able to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses in cancer patients. These results indicate that the PTHrP could be a promising target molecule for specific immunotherapy of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients with metastases.

  17. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  18. Role of Arginine and Lysine in the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Histone-derived Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cutrona, Kara J.; Kaufman, Bethany A.; Figueroa, Dania M.; Elmore, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides is often promoted by increased content of arginine or other guanidinum groups. However, relatively little research has considered the role of these functional groups on antimicrobial peptide activity. This study compared the activity of three histone-derived antimicrobial peptides—buforin II, DesHDAP1, and parasin— with variants that contain only lysine or arginine cationic residues. These peptides operate via different mechanisms as parasin causes membrane permeabilization while buforin II and DesHDAP1 translocate into bacteria. For all peptides, antibacterial activity increased with increased arginine content. Higher arginine content increased permeabilization for parasin while it improved translocation for buforin II and DesHDAP1. These observations provide insight into the relative importance of arginine and lysine in these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26555191

  19. Peptide B targets soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 and kills prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Gao, Shuai; Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Malla, Mamata; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2017-01-01

    Among androgen-regulated genes, soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 (sGCα1) is significant in promoting the survival and growth of prostate cancer cells and does so independent of nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Peptides were designed targeting sGCα1 to block its pro-cancer functions and one peptide is discussed here. Peptide B-8R killed both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells that expressed sGCα1, but not cells that do not express this gene. Peptide B-8R induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Importantly, Peptide B-8R does not affect nor its cytotoxicity depend on NO signaling, despite the fact that it associates with sGCα1, which dimerizes with sGCβ1 to form the sGC enzyme. Just as with a previously studied Peptide A-8R, Peptide B-8R induced elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in prostate cancer cells, but using a ROS-sequestering agent showed that ROS was not responsible the cytotoxic activity of Peptide B-8R. Interestingly, Peptide B-8R induced elevated levels of p53 and phosphorylated p38, but neither of these changes is the cause of the peptide's cytotoxicity. Additional drugs were used to alter levels of iron levels in cells and these studies showed that Peptide B-8R activity does not depend on Ferroptosis. Thus, future work will be directed at defining the mechanism of cytotoxic action of Peptide B-8R against prostate cancer cells.

  20. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  1. Discovery of peptide drug carrier candidates for targeted multi-drug delivery into prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bashari, O; Redko, B; Cohen, A; Luboshits, G; Gellerman, G; Firer, M A

    2017-09-06

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains essentially incurable. Targeted Drug Delivery (TDD) systems may overcome the limitations of current mCRPC therapies. We describe the use of strict criteria to isolate novel prostate cancer cell targeting peptides that specifically deliver drugs into target cells. Phage from a libraries displaying 7mer peptides were exposed to PC-3 cells and only internalized phage were recovered. The ability of these phage to internalize into other prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, DU-145) was validated. The displayed peptides of selected phage clones were synthesized and their specificity for target cells was validated in vitro and in vivo. One peptide (P12) which specifically targeted PC-3 tumors in vivo was incorporated into mono-drug (Chlorambucil, Combretastatin or Camptothecin) and dual-drug (Chlorambucil/Combretastatin or Chlorambucil/Camptothecin) PDCs and the cytotoxic efficacy of these conjugates for target cells was tested. Conjugation of P12 into dual-drug PDCs allowed discovery of new drug combinations with synergistic effects. The use of strict selection criteria can lead to discovery of novel peptides for use as drug carriers for TDD. PDCs represent an effective alternative to current modes of free drug chemotherapy for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A Fluorescent Protein Scaffold for Presenting Structurally Constrained Peptides Provides an Effective Screening System to Identify High Affinity Target-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Yabe, Etsuri; Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamano, Akihiro; Tsubaki, Takuya; Sekine, Takuya; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-01-01

    Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131–L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides. PMID:25084350

  3. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with therapeutic and targeted peptides for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Ma, Huili; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Keyang; Jin, Shubin; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Cao, Weipeng; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-02-01

    Functionalization of nanostructures such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with different biological molecules has many applications in biomedical imaging, clinical diagnosis and therapy. Researchers mostly employed AuNPs larger than 10 nm for different biological and medicinal applications in previous studies. Herein, we synthesized a novel small (2 nm) AuNPs, which were functionalized with the therapeutic peptide, PMI (p12), and a targeted peptide, CRGDK for selective binding to neuropilin-1(Nrp-1) receptors which overexpressed on the cancer cells and regulated the process of membrane receptor-mediated internalization. It was found that CRGDK peptides increased intracellular uptake of AuNPs compared to other surface conjugations quantified by ICP-MS. Interestingly, CRGDK functionalized AuNPs resulted in maximal binding interaction between the CRGDK peptide and targeted Nrp-1 receptor overexpressed on MDA-MB-321 cell surface, which improved the delivery of therapeutic P12 peptide inside targeted cells. Au@p12 + CRGDK nanoparticles indicated with highly effective cancer treatment by increasing p53 expression upregulated with intracellular enhanced p12 therapeutic peptide. These results have implications to design and functionalize different molecules onto AuNPs surfaces to make hybrid model system for selective target binding as well as therapeutic effects for cancer treatment.

  4. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel-derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel-derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Lactoferrin-derived Peptides Active towards Influenza: Identification of Three Potent Tetrapeptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scala, Maria Carmina; Sala, Marina; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Spensiero, Antonia; Di Micco, Simone; Agamennone, Mariangela; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M; Superti, Fabiana; Campiglia, Pietro

    2017-09-06

    Bovine lactoferrin is a biglobular multifunctional iron binding glycoprotein that plays an important role in innate immunity against infections. We have previously demonstrated that selected peptides from bovine lactoferrin C-lobe are able to prevent both Influenza virus hemagglutination and cell infection. To deeper investigate the ability of lactoferrin derived peptides to inhibit Influenza virus infection, in this study we identified new bovine lactoferrin C-lobe derived sequences and corresponding synthetic peptides were synthesized and assayed to check their ability to prevent viral hemagglutination and infection. We identified three tetrapeptides endowed with broad anti-Influenza activity and able to inhibit viral infection in a concentration range femto- to picomolar. Our data indicate that these peptides may constitute a non-toxic tool for potential applications as anti-Influenza therapeutics.

  6. Bioactive peptides derived from human milk proteins--mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins with very diverse functions, which are beneficial for the rapidly growing neonate. The large variety of bioactivities is accomplished by the combination of bioactive proteins per se and gastrointestinal release of bioactive peptides derived from them. The bioactivities exerted by these peptides include enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulation, opioid, antihypertensive and antimicrobial activities. Notably, several of the activities are not attributed to the parental proteins, but exclusively to released bioactive peptides. This article reviews studies on bioactive peptides derived from major human milk proteins, such as caseins, α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin, during gastrointestinal digestion. Studies of bovine milk counterparts are also cited as a comparison. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. "Potential health benefits of lunasin: a multifaceted soy-derived bioactive peptide".

    PubMed

    Lule, Vaibhao Kisanrao; Garg, Sheenam; Pophaly, Sarang Dilip; Hitesh; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Bioactive peptides are small protein fragments derived from enzymatic hydrolysis of food proteins, fermentation with proteolytic starter cultures, and gastrointestinal digestion. These peptides have positive impacts on a number of physiological functions in living beings. Lunasin, a soy-derived bioactive peptide, is one of the most promising among them. Lunasin encoded within 2S albumin (GM2S-1) gene, identified as a novel peptide extracted from soybean seed. It is composed of 43 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 5.5 kDa. Extensive scientific studies have shown that lunasin possesses inherent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anticancerous properties and could also play a vital role in regulating of cholesterol biosynthesis in the body. Its high bioavailability and heat stable nature allow its potential use as dietary supplement. The present review summarizes some of the potential health and therapeutic benefits of lunasin reported hitherto. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Molecular Design, Structural Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Derivatives of Peptide CGA-N46.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Zhi-Fang; Sun, Ya-Nan; Chen, Shi-Hua; Yi, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Ru; Yang, Shuo-Ye; Yu, Guang-Hai; Huang, Liang; Li, Chao-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Chromogranin A (CGA)-N46, a derived peptide of human chromogranin A, has antifungal activity. To further research the active domain of CGA-N46, a series of derivatives were designed by successively deleting amino acid from both terminus of CGA-N46, and the amino acid sequence of each derivative was analyzed by bioinformatic software. Based on the predicted physicochemical properties of the peptides, including half-life time in mammalian reticulocytes (in vitro), yeast (in vivo) and E. coli (in vivo), instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), the secondary structure, net charge, the distribution of hydrophobic residues and hydrophilic residues, the final derivatives CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The results of bioinformatic analysis showed that CGA-N46 and its derivatives were α-helix, neutral or weak positive charge, hydrophilic, and CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were more stable than the other derivatives. The results of circular dichroism confirmed that CGA-N46 and its derived peptides displayed α-helical structure in an aqueous solution and 30 mM sodium dodecylsulfate, but α-helical contents decreased in hydrophobic lipid vesicles. CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 had higher antifungal activities than their mother peptide CGA-N46. Among of the derived peptides, CGA-N12 showed the least hemolytic activity. In conclusion, we have successfully identified the active domain of CGA-N46 with strong antifungal activity and weak hemolytic activity, which provides the possibility to develop a new class of antibiotics.

  9. HIV-1 Drug Discovery: Targeting Folded RNA Structures With Branched Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an RNA virus that is prone to high rates of mutation. While the disease is managed with current antiretroviral therapies, drugs with a new mode of action are needed. A strategy towards this goal is aimed at targeting the native three-dimensional fold of conserved RNA structures. This perspective highlights medium-sized peptides and peptidomimetics used to target two conserved RNA structures of HIV-1. In particular, branched peptides have the capacity to bind in a multivalent fashion, utilizing a large surface area to achieve the necessary affinity and selectivity toward the target RNA. PMID:25958855

  10. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  11. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  12. Host defense peptide-derived privileged scaffolds for anti-infective drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2017-04-01

    'Privileged scaffolds' are molecular frameworks which have been successfully exploited for small molecule drug discovery. Peptide privileged scaffolds, featuring a strictly conserved multiple-disulfide framework and high variability in the rest of the sequence, display a broad range of biological effects, including antimicrobial and antiviral activity. Unlike small molecules, however, the cost of manufacturing these peptides is high, and their synthesis challenging. We previously described a simplified privileged scaffold corresponding to the γ-core of human β-defensin-3 (HBD3). The γ-core is a common structural signature found in virtually all host defense peptides (HDPs) stabilized by multiple disulfides, and we showed that for HBD3, it represents the evolutionary starting point of the full-length molecule and, thus, is itself a primordial HDP. Accordingly, we showed that the peptide folded rapidly and was stable in human serum, and displayed many of the biological activities of HBD3. We report here that in addition to the previously reported antibacterial activity on planktonic bacteria, the γ-core peptide is active against biofilm formation and maturation. We also show that it is readily cell penetrant, like HBD3, although with a different mechanism, which is independent from CD98. Overall, the potency of the single-disulfide, 23-amino acid γ-core is comparable with the full-length peptide across the whole spectrum of examined properties, and the peptide is not toxic to human cells. The HBD3 γ-core peptide may therefore represent the first example of an economically viable lead peptide derived from a HDP privileged scaffold. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. From Phage Display to Nanoparticle Delivery: Functionalizing Liposomes with Multivalent Peptides Improves Targeting to a Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is commonly used to isolate peptides that bind to a desired cell type. While chemical synthesis of selected peptides often results in ligands with low affinity, a multivalent tetrameric presentation of the peptides dramatically improves affinity. One of the primary uses of these peptides is conjugation to nanoparticle-based therapeutics for specific delivery to target cell types. We set out to optimize the path from phage display peptide selection to peptide presentation on a nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Here, we examine the effects of peptide valency, density, and affinity on nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic efficacy, using the αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide as a model phage-selected peptide and liposomal doxorubicin as a model therapeutic nanoparticle. Liposomes displaying the higher affinity multivalent H2009.1 tetrameric peptide demonstrate 5-10 fold higher drug delivery than liposomes displaying the lower affinity monomeric H2009.1 peptide, even when the same number of peptide subunits are displayed on the liposome. Importantly, a 6-fold greater toxicity is observed towards αvβ6-expressing cells for liposomes displaying tetrameric verses monomeric H2009.1 peptides. Additionally, liposomal targeting and toxicity increase with increasing concentrations of H2009.1 tetrameric peptide on the liposome surface. Thus, both the multivalent peptide and the multivalent liposome scaffold work together to increase targeting to αvβ6-expressing cells. This multi-layered approach to developing high affinity targeted nanoparticles may improve the utility of moderate affinity peptides. As tetramerization is known to increase affinity for a variety of phage-selected peptides, it is anticipated that the tetrameric scaffold may act as a general method for taking peptides from phage display to nanoparticle display. PMID:23186007

  14. From phage display to nanoparticle delivery: functionalizing liposomes with multivalent peptides improves targeting to a cancer biomarker.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-16

    Phage display is commonly used to isolate peptides that bind to a desired cell type. While chemical synthesis of selected peptides often results in ligands with low affinity, a multivalent tetrameric presentation of the peptides dramatically improves affinity. One of the primary uses of these peptides is conjugation to nanoparticle-based therapeutics for specific delivery to target cell types. We set out to optimize the path from phage display peptide selection to peptide presentation on a nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Here, we examine the effects of peptide valency, density, and affinity on nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic efficacy, using the α(v)β(6)-specific H2009.1 peptide as a model phage-selected peptide and liposomal doxorubicin as a model therapeutic nanoparticle. Liposomes displaying the higher affinity multivalent H2009.1 tetrameric peptide demonstrate 5-10-fold higher drug delivery than liposomes displaying the lower affinity monomeric H2009.1 peptide, even when the same number of peptide subunits are displayed on the liposome. Importantly, a 6-fold greater toxicity is observed toward α(v)β(6)-expressing cells for liposomes displaying tetrameric verses monomeric H2009.1 peptides. Additionally, liposomal targeting and toxicity increase with increasing concentrations of H2009.1 tetrameric peptide on the liposome surface. Thus, both the multivalent peptide and the multivalent liposome scaffold work together to increase targeting to α(v)β(6)-expressing cells. This multilayered approach to developing high affinity targeted nanoparticles may improve the utility of moderate affinity peptides. As tetramerization is known to increase affinity for a variety of phage-selected peptides, it is anticipated that the tetrameric scaffold may act as a general method for taking peptides from phage display to nanoparticle display.

  15. Development and Testing of a 212Pb/212Bi Peptide for Targeting Metastatic Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop a new radiolabeled peptide for imaging and treating metastatic melanoma. The immunoconjugate consists of a receptor-specific peptide that targets melanoma cells. The beta-emitter lead-212 (half-life = 10.4 hours) is linked by coordination chemistry to the peptide. After injection, the peptide targets melanoma receptors on the surfaces of melanoma cells. Lead-212 decays to the alpha-emitter bismuth-212 (half-life = 60 minutes). Alpha-particles that hit melanoma cell nuclei are likely to kill the melanoma cell. For cancer cell imaging, the lead-212 is replaced by lead-203 (half-life = 52 hours). Lead-203 emits 279 keV photons (80.1% abundance) that can be imaged and measured for biodistribution analysis, cancer imaging, and quantitative dosimetry.

  16. A General Synthetic Approach for Designing Epitope Targeted Macrocyclic Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Liang, JingXin; Bunck, David N; Umeda, Aiko; Farrow, Blake; Coppock, Matthew B; Sarkes, Deborah A; Finch, Amethist S; Agnew, Heather D; Pitram, Suresh; Lai, Bert; Yu, Mary Beth; Museth, A Katrine; Deyle, Kaycie M; Lepe, Bianca; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances P; McCarthy, Amy; Alvarez-Villalonga, Belen; Chen, Ann; Heath, John; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N; Heath, James R

    2015-11-02

    We describe a general synthetic strategy for developing high-affinity peptide binders against specific epitopes of challenging protein biomarkers. The epitope of interest is synthesized as a polypeptide, with a detection biotin tag and a strategically placed azide (or alkyne) presenting amino acid. This synthetic epitope (SynEp) is incubated with a library of complementary alkyne or azide presenting peptides. Library elements that bind the SynEp in the correct orientation undergo the Huisgen cycloaddition, and are covalently linked to the SynEp. Hit peptides are tested against the full-length protein to identify the best binder. We describe development of epitope-targeted linear or macrocycle peptide ligands against 12 different diagnostic or therapeutic analytes. The general epitope targeting capability for these low molecular weight synthetic ligands enables a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, similar to those of monoclonal antibodies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  18. Self-assembled peptide-based nanostructures: Smart nanomaterials toward targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Neda; Kamaly, Nazila; Memic, Adnan; Shafiee, Hadi

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly of peptides can yield an array of well-defined nanostructures that are highly attractive nanomaterials for many biomedical applications such as drug delivery. Some of the advantages of self-assembled peptide nanostructures over other delivery platforms include their chemical diversity, biocompatibility, high loading capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, and their ability to target molecular recognition sites. Furthermore, these self-assembled nanostructures could be designed with novel peptide motifs, making them stimuli-responsive and achieving triggered drug delivery at disease sites. The goal of this work is to present a comprehensive review of the most recent studies on self-assembled peptides with a focus on their "smart" activity for formation of targeted and responsive drug-delivery carriers.

  19. Is phage display technology on target for developing peptide-based cancer drugs?

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Zou, Jun; Deutscher, Susan L

    2004-06-01

    New tumor targeting agents are required to advance cancer diagnosis and treatment. Bacteriophage (phage) display technology, a molecular genetic means of combinatorial drug discovery, is an emerging approach to identify and improve peptide molecules as pharmaceuticals. Peptides are thought to have clinically desirable benefits over currently used biomolecules, such as antibodies, because of their rapid blood clearance, increased diffusion and tissue penetration, non-immunogenic nature and ease of synthesis. Using phage display, one can rapidly and simultaneously survey billion-clone peptide libraries, resulting in large numbers of "hits". However, only a few lead compounds resulting from the hits historically reach the drug market. Hence determining which peptide may best translate into a useful drug is of particular importance. Examination of successfully marketed drugs has highlighted key features of a winning agent, including low molecular weight, high affinity, stability, solubility, lipophilicity and conformational rigidity. Although peptide modulators of tumor cell function and cancer targeting agents have been developed, the majority of peptide-based drugs reported thus far are immune and cardiac regulators. In this review, we will highlight how phage display has been employed to isolate peptides that target key steps in cancer progression--from tumor growth to metastasis--and how phage display technology can be harnessed to select a priori peptides with inherent features essential for anti-cancer drug efficacy. In 2003, phage display provided us with several novel peptides not only in clinical trials but approved by the FDA for use as therapeutics in a variety of diseases--suggesting that the future looks bright for phage display in anti-cancer drug development.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Fusion Peptides of Influenza A Viruses, a Promising Approach to Designing Potent Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhong, Wenjing; Lin, Dongguo; Xia, Fan; Wu, Wenjiao; Zhang, Heyuan; Lv, Lin; Liu, Shuwen; He, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens have spurred the urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial agents with different mode of action. In this respect, we turned several fusogenic peptides (FPs) derived from the hemagglutinin glycoproteins (HAs) of IAV into potent antibacterials by replacing the negatively or neutrally charged residues of FPs with positively charged lysines. Their antibacterial activities were evaluated by testing the MICs against a panel of bacterial strains including S. aureus, S. mutans, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli. The results showed that peptides HA-FP-1, HA-FP-2-1, and HA-FP-3-1 were effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with MICs ranging from 1.9 to 16.0 μm, while the toxicities toward mammalian cells were low. In addition, the mode of action and the secondary structure of these peptides were also discussed. These data not only provide several potent peptides displaying promising potential in development as broad antimicrobial agents, but also present a useful strategy in designing new antimicrobial agents.

  1. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Lujuan; Fu, Qingquan; Zhou, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Wan-Gang

    2016-09-20

    Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides.

  2. Bioactive peptides derived from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food: A review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Yunpu; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2016-11-01

    There is an urgent treat of numerous chronic diseases including heart disease, stroke, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, which have a significant influence on the health of people worldwide. In addition to numerous preventive and therapeutic drug treatments, important advances have been achieved in the identification of bioactive peptides that may contribute to long-term health. Although bioactive peptides with various biological activities received unprecedented attention, as a new source of bioactive peptides, the significant role of bioactive peptides from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food has not fully appreciated compared to other bioactive components. Hence, identification and bioactivity assessment of these peptides could benefit the pharmaceutical and food industry. Furthermore, the functional properties of bioactive peptides help to demystify drug properties and health benefits of traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food. This paper reviews the generation and biofunctional properties of various bioactive peptides derived from traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food. Mechanisms of digestion, bioavailability of bioactive peptides and interactions between traditional Chinese medicine and traditional Chinese food are also summarized in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coassembly of Peptides Derived from β-Sheet Regions of β-Amyloid.

    PubMed

    Truex, Nicholas L; Nowick, James S

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we investigate the coassembly of peptides derived from the central and C-terminal regions of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). In the preceding paper, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b06000 , we established that peptides containing residues 17-23 (LVFFAED) from the central region of Aβ and residues 30-36 (AIIGLMV) from the C-terminal region of Aβ assemble to form homotetramers consisting of two hydrogen-bonded dimers. Here, we mix these tetramer-forming peptides and determine how they coassemble. Incorporation of a single (15)N isotopic label into each peptide provides a spectroscopic probe with which to elucidate the coassembly of the peptides by (1)H,(15)N HSQC. Job's method of continuous variation and nonlinear least-squares fitting reveal that the peptides form a mixture of heterotetramers in 3:1, 2:2, and 1:3 stoichiometries, in addition to the homotetramers. These studies also establish the relative stability of each tetramer and show that the 2:2 heterotetramer predominates. (15)N-Edited NOESY shows the 2:2 heterotetramer comprises two different homodimers, rather than two heterodimers. The peptides within the heterotetramer segregate in forming the homodimer subunits, but the two homodimers coassemble in forming the heterotetramer. These studies show that the central and C-terminal regions of Aβ can preferentially segregate within β-sheets and that the resulting segregated β-sheets can further coassemble.

  4. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Lujuan; Fu, Qingquan; Zhou, Guang-hong; Zhang, Wan-gang

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides. PMID:27657142

  5. Angioedema induced by a peptide derived from complement component C2

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic peptides that correspond to the COOH-terminal portion of C2b enhance vascular permeability in human and guinea pig skin. In human studies, 1 nmol of the most active peptide of 25-amino acid residues produced substantial local edema. A pentapeptide and a heptapeptide corresponding to the COOH-terminal sequence of C2b each induced contraction of estrous rat uterus in the micromole range; a peptide of 25 amino acids from this region induced a like contraction of rat uterus at a concentration 20-fold lower than the smaller peptides. The vascular permeability of guinea pig skin was enhanced by doses of these synthetic peptides in a similar fashion as that observed for the concentration of rat uterus. The induction of localized edema by intradermal injection in both the guinea pig and the human proceeds in the presence of antihistaminic drugs, suggesting that there is a histamine-independent component to the observed increase in vascular permeability. Cleavage of C2 with the enzymic subcomponent of C1, C1s, yields only C2a and C2b, and no small peptides, whereas cleavage of C2 with C1s and plasmin yields a set of small peptides. These plasmin- cleaved peptides are derived from the COOH terminus of C2b, and they induce the contraction of estrous rat uterus. PMID:2972793

  6. Novel antioxidant Peptide derived from the ultrafiltrate of ovomucin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Oun Ki; Ha, Go Eun; Han, Gi-Sung; Seol, Kuk-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Jeong, Seok-Geun; Oh, Mi-Hwa; Park, Beom-Young; Ham, Jun-Sang

    2013-07-31

    The techno-functional properties of ovomucin as a gel-forming agent and its biological properties are well-known. The aim of the present study was to investigate antioxidant activity in ovomucin hydrolysate using radical scavenging assays. Electrophoresis showed that ovomucin isolated from whole egg was well separated. Ovomucin hydrolysis was carried out using microbial protease according to different incubation times. These ovomucin hydrolysates exhibited 85% antioxidant activity as measured by the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assay after a 2 h incubation with protease and retained 90% activity until 24 h. At an incubation time of 4 h, the activity of ovomucin hydrolysates reached approximately 90%, corresponding to 115 μM gallic acid equivalent, regardless of the proteases used. The partially purified fraction of the hydrolysate by ultrafiltration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was collected and then analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Two peptides, LDEPDPL and NIQTDDFRT, in this fraction were identified. The antioxidant activities of these two synthesized peptides were measured to be 51.8 and 24.7% by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay.

  7. C-terminal Amidation of an Osteocalcin-derived Peptide Promotes Hydroxyapatite Crystallization*

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Samaneh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Mountassif, Driss; Cerruti, Marta; Vali, Hojatollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Genesis of natural biocomposite-based materials, such as bone, cartilage, and teeth, involves interactions between organic and inorganic systems. Natural biopolymers, such as peptide motif sequences, can be used as a template to direct the nucleation and crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, a natural motif sequence consisting of 13 amino acids present in the first helix of osteocalcin was selected based on its calcium binding ability and used as substrate for nucleation of HA crystals. The acidic (acidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSC)) and amidic (amidic osteocalcin-derived peptide (OSN)) forms of this sequence were synthesized to investigate the effects of different C termini on the process of biomineralization. Electron microscopy analyses show the formation of plate-like HA crystals with random size and shape in the presence of OSN. In contrast, spherical amorphous calcium phosphate is formed in the presence of OSC. Circular dichroism experiments indicate conformational changes of amidic peptide to an open and regular structure as a consequence of interaction with calcium and phosphate. There is no conformational change detectable in OSC. It is concluded that HA crystal formation, which only occurred in OSN, is attributable to C-terminal amidation of a natural peptide derived from osteocalcin. It is also proposed that natural peptides with the ability to promote biomineralization have the potential to be utilized in hard tissue regeneration. PMID:23362258

  8. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle Mediated siRNA Transfection by Melittin-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Kirk K.; Pan, Hua; Ratner, Lee; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional peptide-mediated siRNA transfection via peptide transduction domains exhibits limited cytoplasmic delivery of siRNA due to endosomal entrapment. This work overcomes these limitations with the use of membrane-destabilizing peptides derived from melittin for the knockdown of NFkB signaling in a model of adult T-Cell leukemia/lymphoma. While the mechanism of siRNA delivery into the cytoplasmic compartment by peptide transduction domains has not been well studied, our analysis of melittin derivatives indicates that concurrent nanocomplex disassembly and peptide-mediated endosomolysis are crucial to siRNA transfection. Importantly, in the case of the most active derivative, p5RHH, this process is initiated by acidic pH, indicating that endosomal acidification after macropinocytosis can trigger siRNA release into the cytoplasm. These data provide general principles regarding nanocomplex response to endocytosis which may guide the development of peptide/siRNA nanocomplex-based transfection. PMID:24053333

  9. In Vivo Efficacy of Measles Virus Fusion Protein-Derived Peptides Is Modulated by the Properties of Self-Assembly and Membrane Residence.

    PubMed

    Figueira, T N; Palermo, L M; Veiga, A S; Huey, D; Alabi, C A; Santos, N C; Welsch, J C; Mathieu, C; Horvat, B; Niewiesk, S; Moscona, A; Castanho, M A R B; Porotto, M

    2017-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection is undergoing resurgence and remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite the availability of an effective measles vaccine. MV infects its target cells by coordinated action of the MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins; upon receptor engagement by H, the prefusion F undergoes a structural transition, extending and inserting into the target cell membrane and then refolding into a postfusion structure that fuses the viral and cell membranes. By interfering with this structural transition of F, peptides derived from the heptad repeat (HR) regions of F can inhibit MV infection at the entry stage. In previous work, we have generated potent MV fusion inhibitors by dimerizing the F-derived peptides and conjugating them to cholesterol. We have shown that prophylactic intranasal administration of our lead fusion inhibitor efficiently protects from MV infection in vivo We show here that peptides tagged with lipophilic moieties self-assemble into nanoparticles until they reach the target cells, where they are integrated into cell membranes. The self-assembly feature enhances biodistribution and the half-life of the peptides, while integration into the target cell membrane increases fusion inhibitor potency. These factors together modulate in vivo efficacy. The results suggest a new framework for developing effective fusion inhibitory peptides. Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute illness that may be associated with infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and severe neurological disease. No specific treatment is available. We have shown that fusion-inhibitory peptides delivered intranasally provide effective prophylaxis against MV infection. We show here that specific biophysical properties regulate the in vivo efficacy of MV F-derived peptides. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Membrane targeting peptides toward antileishmanial activity: Design, structural determination and mechanism of interaction.

    PubMed

    Martins, Danubia Batista; Vieira, Maira Ramos; Fadel, Valmir; Santana, Viviane Aparecida Camargo; Guerra, Mirian Elisa Rodrigues; Lima, Marta Lopes; Tempone, Andre G; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez

    2017-08-02

    Leishmaniasis threatens poor areas population worldwide, requiring new drugs less prone to resistance development. Antimicrobial peptides with antileishmanial activity are considered among fulfilling alternatives, but not much is known about the mode of action of membrane-targeting peptides, considering promastigote and infected macrophage membranes. In a previous work, structural features of very active known peptides were prospected using molecular dynamics simulations. Combining sequences of these peptides, analogs were designed. The structure of analog DecP-11 was validated by NMR. In vitro bioassays determined the peptide cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells, IC50 values on promastigotes and amastigotes, and membranolytic activity compared to Decoralin, one of the parent peptides. With biophysical methods, the mechanism of interaction with membrane mimetic systems was investigated. The designed peptide exhibits potent cytolytic and membrane permeabilizing activities, and decreased antileishmanial activity compared to the parent peptide. Interactions with lipid bilayers mimicking those of promastigotes, infected macrophage and mammalian cells showed that these peptides strongly bind to vesicles with intense lytic activity at low concentrations. Additionally, circular dichroism and light scattering experiments showed changes in the secondary structure of peptides and in vesicle size, depending on vesicles compositions. Altogether they suggest that DecP-11 antileishmanial activity is impaired by the aggregation and that aminophospholipids are probably involved. DecP-11 potent cytolytic and membranolytic activities with lack of selectivity toward promastigote model membranes warrant further structural studies to improve selectivity. Strong interactions of peptides with aminophospholipids, abundant in parasite membranes, potentially lead to aggregated forms impairing activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Delivery of siRNA using ternary complexes containing branched cationic peptides: the role of peptide sequence, branching and targeting.

    PubMed

    Kudsiova, Laila; Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Cui, Lili; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2016-03-01

    Ternary nanocomplexes, composed of bifunctional cationic peptides, lipids and siRNA, as delivery vehicles for siRNA have been investigated. The study is the first to determine the optimal sequence and architecture of the bifunctional cationic peptide used for siRNA packaging and delivery using lipopolyplexes. Specifically three series of cationic peptides of differing sequence, degrees of branching and cell-targeting sequences were co-formulated with siRNA and vesicles prepared from a 1 : 1 molar ratio of the cationic lipid DOTMA and the helper lipid, DOPE. The level of siRNA knockdown achieved in the human alveolar cell line, A549-luc cells, in both reduced serum and in serum supplemented media was evaluated, and the results correlated to the nanocomplex structure (established using a range of physico-chemical tools, namely small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurement); the conformational properties of each component (circular dichroism); the degree of protection of the siRNA in the lipopolyplex (using gel shift assays) and to the cellular uptake, localisation and toxicity of the nanocomplexes (confocal microscopy). Although the size, charge, structure and stability of the various lipopolyplexes were broadly similar, it was clear that lipopolyplexes formulated from branched peptides containing His-Lys sequences perform best as siRNA delivery agents in serum, with protection of the siRNA in serum balanced against efficient release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm of the cell.

  12. Spontaneous intermolecular amide bond formation between side chains for irreversible peptide targeting.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Howarth, Mark

    2010-04-07

    Peptides and synthetic peptide-like molecules are powerful tools for analysis and control of biological function. One major limitation of peptides is the instability of their interactions with biomolecules, because of the limited accessible surface area for noncovalent interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of peptides. Peptide tags are nonetheless fundamental for protein detection and purification, because their small size minimizes the perturbation to protein function. Here we have designed a 16 amino acid peptide that spontaneously forms an amide bond to a protein partner, via reaction between lysine and asparagine side chains. This depended upon splitting a pilin subunit from a human pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes, which usually undergoes intramolecular amide bond formation to impart mechanical and proteolytic stability to pili. Reaction of the protein partner was able to proceed to 98% conversion. The amide bond formation was independent of redox state and occurred at pH 5-8. The reaction was efficient in phosphate buffered saline and a wide range of biological buffers. Surprisingly, amide bond formation occurred at a similar rate at 4 and 37 degrees C. Both peptide and protein partners are composed of the regular 20 amino acids and reconstituted efficiently inside living E. coli. Labeling also showed high specificity on the surface of mammalian cells. Irreversible targeting of a peptide tag may have application in bioassembly, in cellular imaging, and to lock together proteins subject to high biological forces.

  13. Eukaryotic Peptide Deformylases. Nuclear-Encoded and Chloroplast-Targeted Enzymes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Williams, Mark A.; Houtz, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis (ecotype Columbia-0) genes, AtDEF1and AtDEF2, represent eukaryotic homologs of the essential prokaryotic gene encoding peptide deformylase. Both deduced proteins contain three conserved protein motifs found in the active site of all eubacterial peptide deformylases, and N-terminal extensions identifiable as chloroplast-targeting sequences. Radiolabeled full-length AtDEF1 was imported and processed by isolated pea (Pisum sativum L. Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts and AtDEF1 and 2 were immunologically detected in Arabidopsis leaf and chloroplast stromal protein extracts. The partial cDNAs encoding the processed forms of Arabidopsis peptide deformylase 1 and 2 (pAtDEF1 and 2, respectively) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using C-terminal hexahistidyl tags. Both recombinant Arabidopsis peptide deformylases had peptide deformylase activity with unique kinetic parameters that differed from those reported for the E. coli enzyme. Actinonin, a specific peptide deformylase inhibitor, was effective in vitro against Arabidopsis peptide deformylase 1 and 2 activity, respectively. Exposure of several plant species including Arabidopsis to actinonin resulted in chlorosis and severe reductions in plant growth and development. The results suggest an essential role for peptide deformylase in protein processing in all plant plastids. PMID:11553738

  14. Preferential HLA-DRB1*11-dependent presentation of CUB2-derived peptides by ADAMTS13-pulsed dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Sorvillo, Nicoletta; van Haren, Simon D; Kaijen, Paul H; ten Brinke, Anja; Fijnheer, Rob; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2013-04-25

    Autoantibodies directed against ADAMTS13 prohibit the processing of von Willebrand factor multimers, initiating a rare and life-threatening disorder called acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Recently, HLA-DRB1*11 has been identified as a risk factor for the development of acquired TTP. Here, we identified ADAMTS13-derived peptides presented on MHC class II alleles from 17 healthy donors. Dendritic cells from a panel of both HLA-DRB1*11-positive and -negative donors were pulsed with ADAMTS13, and the HLA-DR-presented peptide repertoire was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, at low antigen concentrations, HLA-DRB1*11- or DRB1*03-positive donors presented a limited number of CUB2-derived peptides. Pulsing of dendritic cells using higher concentrations of ADAMTS13 resulted in the presentation of larger numbers of ADAMTS13-derived peptides by both HLA-DRB1*11-positive and -negative donors. Although the presented peptides were derived from several ADAMTS13 domains, inspection of the peptide profiles revealed that CUB2 domain-derived peptides were presented with a higher efficiency when compared with other peptides. Remarkably, dendritic cells from DRB1*11 donors pulsed with higher concentrations of ADAMTS13-present derivatives of a single CUB2-derived peptide. We hypothesize that functional presentation of CUB2-derived peptides on HLA-DRB1*11 contributes to the onset of acquired TTP by stimulating low-affinity, self-reactive CD4+ T cells.

  15. Commercially available antibodies can be applied in quantitative multiplexed peptide immunoaffinity enrichment targeted mass spectrometry assays

    PubMed Central

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Kennedy, Jacob; Yan, Ping; Lin, Chenwei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides coupled to multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (immuno-MRM) enables highly specific, sensitive, and precise quantification of peptides and post-translational modifications. Major obstacles to developing a large number of immuno-MRM assays are the poor availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) validated for immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides and the cost and lead time of developing the antibodies de novo. Although many thousands of mAbs are commercially offered, few have been tested for application to immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides. In this study we tested the success rate of using commercially available mAbs for peptide immuno-MRM assays. We selected 105 commercial mAbs (76 targeting non-modified “pan” epitopes, 29 targeting phosphorylation) to proteins associated with the DNA damage response network. We found that 8 of the 76 pan (11%) and 5 of the 29 phospho-specific mAbs (17%) captured tryptic peptides (detected by LC-MS/MS) of their protein targets from human cell lysates. Seven of these mAbs were successfully used to configure and analytically characterize immuno-MRM assays. By applying selection criteria upfront, the results indicate that a screening success rate of up to 24% is possible, establishing the feasibility of screening a large number of catalog antibodies to provide readily-available assay reagents. PMID:27094115

  16. Peptide-decorated chitosan derivatives enhance fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Patrulea, V; Hirt-Burri, N; Jeannerat, A; Applegate, L A; Ostafe, V; Jordan, O; Borchard, G

    2016-05-20

    RGD peptide sequences are known to regulate cellular activities by interacting with α5β1, αvβ5 and αvβ3 integrin, which contributes to the wound healing process. In this study, RGDC peptide was immobilized onto chitosan derivative 1,6-diaminohexane-O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (DAH-CMTMC) to display RGDC-promoting adhesion for enhanced wound healing. The efficiency of N-methylation, O-carboxymethylation and spacer grafting was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed by (1)H NMR and FTIR, yielding 0.38 degree of substitution for N-methylation and >0.85 for O-carboxymethylation. The glass transition temperatures for chitosan derivatives were also studied. Peptide immobilization was achieved through sulfhydryl groups using sulfosuccinimidyl (4-iodoacetyl)amino-benzoate (sulfo-SIAB method). RGDC immobilized peptide onto DAH-CMTMC was found to be about 15.3 μg/mg of chitosan derivative by amino acid analysis (AAA). The significant increase of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) viability in vitro over 7 days suggests that RGDC-functionalized chitosan may lead to enhanced wound healing (viability >140%). Moreover, bio-adhesion and proliferation assays confirmed that coatings of RGDC-functionalized chitosan derivatives exhibit in vitro wound healing properties by enhancing fibroblast proliferation and adhesion. These results showed that RGDC peptide-functionalized chitosan provides an optimal environment for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation.

  17. Structural analysis of the foldecture derived from racemic peptide foldamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jintaek; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Jeong, Rokam; Driver, Russell W.; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2017-08-01

    The molecular packing structure of an elongated parallelogram plate shaped foldecture composed of a 1:1 racemic mixture of 11-helical peptide foldamers was resolved by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis. A comprehensive Rietveld refinement procedure compensated for powder texture and identified the principal face of the foldecture. Each foldamer makes head-to-tail intermolecular hydrogen bonds, creating extended chains of single enantiomers that form a network of hydrophobic close contacts with foldamers of both the opposite and the same chiralities. An isosurface for anisotropic microstrain was calculated and found to be smallest along the x-axis, which is parallel to the network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Comparison with the single crystal structure found molecular packing motifs to be almost identical-a result infrequently observed in enantiopure foldectures. This is the first powder X-ray diffraction structural analysis of a foldecture composed of multiple components.

  18. Protective Role of PEDF-Derived Synthetic Peptide Against Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Taira, J; Higashimoto, Y; Yamagishi, S

    2016-09-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a glycoprotein with complex neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties, all of which could potentially be exploited as a therapeutic option for vascular complications in diabetes. We have previously shown that PEDF-derived synthetic peptide, P5-3 (FIFVLRD) has a comparable ability with full PEDF protein to inhibit rat corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization. However, the effects of PEDF peptide on experimental diabetic nephropathy remain unknown. To address the issue, we modified P5-3 to stabilize and administered the modified peptide (d-Lys-d-Lys-d-Lys-Gln-d-Pro-P5-3-Cys-amide, 0.2 nmol/day) or vehicle to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-rats) intraperitoneally by an osmotic mini pump for 2 weeks. We further examined the effects of modified peptide on human proximal tubular cells. Renal PEDF expression was decreased in STZ-rats. Although the peptide administration did not affect blood glucose or blood pressure, it decreased urinary excretion levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, and reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression, and suppressed glomerular expansion in the diabetic kidneys. High glucose or advanced glycation end products stimulated oxidative stress generation and PAI-1 gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were significantly suppressed by 10 nM modified P5-3 peptide. Our present study suggests that PEDF-derived synthetic modified peptide could protect against experimental diabetic nephropathy and inhibit tubular cell damage under diabetes-like conditions through its anti-oxidative properties. Supplementation of modified P5-3 peptide may be a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes which may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten

  20. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes that may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten-free or

  1. LL-37-Derived Peptides Eradicate Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Thermally Wounded Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24841266

  2. LL-37-derived peptides eradicate multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from thermally wounded human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  3. Screening of soy protein-derived hypotriglyceridemic di-peptides in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Soy protein and soy peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their potentially beneficial biological properties, including antihypertensive, anticarcinogenic, and hypolipidemic effects. Although soy protein isolate contains several bioactive peptides that have distinct physiological activities in lipid metabolism, it is not clear which peptide sequences are responsible for the triglyceride (TG)-lowering effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of soy protein-derived peptides on lipid metabolism, especially TG metabolism, in HepG2 cells and obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats. Results In the first experiment, we found that soy crude peptide (SCP)-LD3, which was prepared by hydrolyze of soy protein isolate with endo-type protease, showed hypolipidemic effects in HepG2 cells and OLETF rats. In the second experiment, we found that hydrophilic fraction, separated from SCP-LD3 with hydrophobic synthetic absorbent, revealed lipid-lowering effects in HepG2 cells and OLETF rats. In the third experiment, we found that Fraction-C (Frc-C) peptides, fractionated from hydrophilic peptides by gel permeation chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography, significantly reduced TG synthesis and apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion in HepG2 cells. In the fourth experiment, we found that the fraction with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, isolated from Frc-C peptides by octadecylsilyl column chromatography, showed hypolipidemic effects in HepG2 cells. In the final experiment, we found that 3 di-peptides, Lys-Ala, Val-Lys, and Ser-Tyr, reduced TG synthesis, and Ser-Tyr additionally reduced apoB secretion in HepG2 cells. Conclusion Novel active peptides with TG-lowering effects from soy protein have been isolated. PMID:21600040

  4. Antiviral activity of peptide inhibitors derived from the protein E stem against Japanese encephalitis and Zika viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liman; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaobo; Sun, Jianhong; Wang, Peilin; Xin, Qilin; Zhang, Leike; Xiao, Gengfu; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-21

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are mosquito-borne viruses of the Flavivirus genus that cause viral encephalitis and congenital microcephaly, respectively, in humans, and thus present a risk to global public health. The envelope glycoprotein (E protein) of flaviviruses is a class II viral fusion protein that mediates host cell entry through a series of conformational changes, including association between the stem region and domain II leading to virion-target cell membrane fusion. In this study, peptides derived from the JEV E protein stem were investigated for their ability to block JEV and ZIKV infection. Peptides from stem helix 2 inhibit JEV infection with the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the nanomolar range. One of these peptides (P5) protected mice against JEV-induced lethality by decreasing viral load, while abrogating histopathological changes associated with JEV infection. We also found that P5 blocked ZIKV infection with IC50 at the micromolar level. Moreover, P5 was proved to reduce the histopathological damages in brain and testes resulting from ZIKV infection in type I and II interferon receptor-deficient (AG6) mice. These findings provide a basis for the development of peptide-based drugs against JEV and ZIKV.

  5. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  6. Drug resistance to chlorambucil in murine B-cell leukemic cells is overcome by its conjugation to a targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Gellerman, Gary; Baskin, Sophia; Galia, Luboshits; Gilad, Yosef; Firer, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Targeting drugs through small-molecule carriers with a high affinity to receptors on cancer cells can overcome the lack of target cell specificity of most anticancer drugs. These targeted carrier-drug conjugates are also capable of reversing drug resistance in cancer cells. Although many targeted drug delivery approaches are being tested, the linkage of several and different drugs to a single carrier molecule might further enhance their therapeutic efficacy, particularly if the drugs are engineered for variable time release. This report shows that murine B-cell leukemic cells previously resistant to a chemotherapeutic drug can be made sensitive to that drug as long as it is conjugated to a targeting peptide and, in particular, when the conjugate contains multiple copies of the drug. Using a 13mer peptide (VHFFKNIVTPRTP) derived from the myelin basic protein (p-MBP), dendrimer-based peptide conjugates containing one, two, or four molecules of chlorambucil were synthesized. Although murine hybridomas expressing antibodies to either p-MBP (MBP cells) or a nonrelevant antigen (BCL-1 cells) were both resistant to free chlorambucil, exposure of the cells to the p-MBP-chlorambucil conjugate completely reversed the drug resistance in MBP, but not BCL-1 cells or normal spleen cells. Moreover, at equivalent drug doses, there was significant enhancement in the cytotoxic activity of multidrug versus single-drug copy conjugates. On the basis of these results, the use of multifunctional dendrone linkers bearing several covalently bound cytotoxic agents allows the development of more effective targeted drug systems and enhances the efficacy of currently approved drugs for B-cell leukemia.

  7. Development of a receptor-targeted gene delivery system using CXCR4 ligand-conjugated cross-linking peptides.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna; Bogacheva, Maria; Shubina, Anastasia; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Success in gene therapy greatly depends on the efficiency of nucleic acid delivery. Important features of the carriers for gene delivery should include an enhanced transfection ability, targeting of specific receptors and low toxicity. In the present study, we characterized CXCR4-targeted cross-linking peptides modified with an N-terminal fragment of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α as carriers for gene delivery. We studied three variants of DNA/carrier complexes with different targeting ligand content. The physicochemical characteristics of the complexes, including their DNA-binding and protective ability, interaction with glycosaminoglycans and size, were determined. Transfection efficacy was studied in cell lines with different levels of CXCR4 expression (HeLa, A172, CHO, Е.А.hy926) and also in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of the ligand content on the efficacy of transfection was studied by means of chlorpromazine blockage of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, competition with CXCR4-antagonist AMD3100, and valproic acid treatment of hMSCs. CXCR4-targeted peptides were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and in vitro transfection capacities. Ligand-modified carriers were found to be 10- to 50-fold more effective than unmodified carriers in CXCR4-positive cells. By contrast, their transfection efficacy in CXCR4-negative cells was similar to unmodified carriers. Experiments with chlorpromazine demonstrated receptor-specific transfection in A172 cells. The transfection efficacy of CXCR4-targeted carriers in AMD3100-treated HeLa cells was reduced by two-fold compared to the untreated control. Valproic acid treatment resulted in a four- to 15-fold increase of transfection efficacy for ligand-modified carriers in hMSCs. CXCR4-targeted cross-linking peptides should be considered as useful tools for nonviral gene delivery into tumor and mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Synthesis, chiroptical properties, and configurational assignment of fulleroproline derivatives and peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, A.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Toniolo, C.; Marconi, G.; Villani, C.; Prato, M.

    1996-05-01

    1,3-Dipolar cycloaddition of azomethine ylides to C{sub 60} leads to fulleroproline derivatives, in which a proline ring is fused on a 6,6-ring junction of the fullerene spheroid. This unnatural amino acid can be manipulated under standard coupling conditions to afford fulleroproline-containing peptides. All optically active fulleroproline derivatives and peptides display a characteristic maximum at 428 nm in CD spectra, which is diagnostic for the assignment of the absolute configuration of the C{sup {alpha}} atom of the proline ring. Calculation of the CD spectra confirm the configurational assignment. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Enhanced Membrane Pore Formation through High-Affinity Targeted Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Arnusch, Christopher J.; Pieters, Roland J.; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-01-01

    Many cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) target the unique lipid composition of the prokaryotic cell membrane. However, the micromolar activities common for these peptides are considered weak in comparison to nisin, which follows a targeted, pore-forming mode of action. Here we show that AMPs can be modified with a high-affinity targeting module, which enables membrane permeabilization at low concentration. Magainin 2 and a truncated peptide analog were conjugated to vancomycin using click chemistry, and could be directed towards specific membrane embedded receptors both in model membrane systems and whole cells. Compared with untargeted vesicles, a gain in permeabilization efficacy of two orders of magnitude was reached with large unilamellar vesicles that included lipid II, the target of vancomycin. The truncated vancomycin-peptide conjugate showed an increased activity against vancomycin resistant Enterococci, whereas the full-length conjugate was more active against a targeted eukaryotic cell model: lipid II containing erythrocytes. This study highlights that AMPs can be made more selective and more potent against biological membranes that contain structures that can be targeted. PMID:22768121

  10. Variant antigenic peptide promotes cytotoxic T lymphocyte adhesion to target cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shotton, David M.; Attaran, Amir

    1998-01-01

    Timelapse video microscopy has been used to record the motility and dynamic interactions between an H-2Db-restricted murine cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone (F5) and Db-transfected L929 mouse fibroblasts (LDb) presenting normal or variant antigenic peptides from human influenza nucleoprotein. F5 cells will kill LDb target cells presenting specific antigen (peptide NP68: ASNENMDAM) after “browsing” their surfaces for between 8 min and many hours. Cell death is characterized by abrupt cellular rounding followed by zeiosis (vigorous “boiling” of the cytoplasm and blebbing of the plasma membrane) for 10–20 min, with subsequent cessation of all activity. Departure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from unkilled target cells is rare, whereas serial killing is sometimes observed. In the absence of antigenic peptide, cytotoxic T lymphocytes browse target cells for much shorter periods, and readily leave to encounter other targets, while never causing target cell death. Two variant antigenic peptides, differing in nonamer position 7 or 8, also act as antigens, albeit with lower efficiency. A third variant peptide NP34 (ASNENMETM), which differs from NP68 in both positions and yet still binds Db, does not stimulate F5 cytotoxicity. Nevertheless, timelapse video analysis shows that NP34 leads to a significant modification of cell behavior, by up-regulating F5–LDb adhesive interactions. These data extend recent studies showing that partial agonists may elicit a subset of the T cell responses associated with full antigen stimulation, by demonstrating that TCR interaction with variant peptide antigens can trigger target cell adhesion and surface exploration without activating the signaling pathway that results in cytotoxicity. PMID:9861010

  11. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Castelletto, V.; Ryumin, P.; Cramer, R.; Hamley, I. W.; Taylor, M.; Allsop, D.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.; Arnold, T.; Hermida-Merino, D.; Garcia, C. I.; Leal, M. C.; Castaño, E.

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16–20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1–42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:28272542

  12. Derivatives of the mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) inhibit fungal and bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Robijns, Stijn; Steenackers, Hans; Verstraeten, Natalie; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Dovgan, Barbara; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Michiels, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-09-01

    We identified a 26-amino-acid truncated form of the 34-amino-acid cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the islets of Langerhans of the murine pancreas. This peptide, P318, shares 67% identity with the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide. As LL-37 displays antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity, we tested antifungal and antibiofilm activity of P318 against the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. P318 shows biofilm-specific activity as it inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.15 μM without affecting planktonic survival at that concentration. Next, we tested the C. albicans biofilm-inhibitory activity of a series of truncated and alanine-substituted derivatives of P318. Based on the biofilm-inhibitory activity of these derivatives and the length of the peptides, we decided to synthesize the shortened alanine-substituted peptide at position 10 (AS10; KLKKIAQKIKNFFQKLVP). AS10 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.22 μM and acted synergistically with amphotericin B and caspofungin against mature biofilms. AS10 also inhibited biofilm formation of different bacteria as well as of fungi and bacteria in a mixed biofilm. In addition, AS10 does not affect the viability or functionality of different cell types involved in osseointegration of an implant, pointing to the potential of AS10 for further development as a lead peptide to coat implants. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Derivatives of the Mouse Cathelicidin-Related Antimicrobial Peptide (CRAMP) Inhibit Fungal and Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Robijns, Stijn; Steenackers, Hans; Verstraeten, Natalie; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Dovgan, Barbara; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Michiels, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We identified a 26-amino-acid truncated form of the 34-amino-acid cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the islets of Langerhans of the murine pancreas. This peptide, P318, shares 67% identity with the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide. As LL-37 displays antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity, we tested antifungal and antibiofilm activity of P318 against the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. P318 shows biofilm-specific activity as it inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.15 μM without affecting planktonic survival at that concentration. Next, we tested the C. albicans biofilm-inhibitory activity of a series of truncated and alanine-substituted derivatives of P318. Based on the biofilm-inhibitory activity of these derivatives and the length of the peptides, we decided to synthesize the shortened alanine-substituted peptide at position 10 (AS10; KLKKIAQKIKNFFQKLVP). AS10 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.22 μM and acted synergistically with amphotericin B and caspofungin against mature biofilms. AS10 also inhibited biofilm formation of different bacteria as well as of fungi and bacteria in a mixed biofilm. In addition, AS10 does not affect the viability or functionality of different cell types involved in osseointegration of an implant, pointing to the potential of AS10 for further development as a lead peptide to coat implants. PMID:24982087

  14. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Ryumin, P; Cramer, R; Hamley, I W; Taylor, M; Allsop, D; Reza, M; Ruokolainen, J; Arnold, T; Hermida-Merino, D; Garcia, C I; Leal, M C; Castaño, E

    2017-03-08

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16-20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1-42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity.

  15. Translational medicine in fish-derived peptides: from fish endocrinology to human physiology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of fish-derived peptide hormones to human endocrinology. These peptides include melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), urocortins (human urotensin-I), and urotensin-II. MCH, a hypothalamic peptide, is a potent stimulator on appetite. Urocortins, e.g. urocortin 1 and urocortin 3 (stresscopin), are endogenous ligands for the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, particularly CRF type 2 receptor, that mediates a vasodilator action, a positive inotropic action and a central appetite-inhibiting action. These actions mediated by CRF type 2 receptor may ameliorate the stress response. Human urotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, while it acts as a vasodilator on some arteries. Human urotensin-II is expressed in various types of cells and tissues, including cardiovascular tissues, as well as many types of tumor cells. Thus, these fish-derived peptides appear to play important roles in human physiology, such as appetite regulation, stress response and cardiovascular regulation, and also in diseases, for example, obesity, cardiovascular diseases and tumors. Development of antagonists/agonists against the receptors for these peptides may open new strategies for the treatment of various diseases, including obesity-related diseases, hypertension, heart failure and malignant tumors.

  16. Insights into the Mechanism of Peptide Cyclodehydrations Achieved Through the Chemoenzymatic Generation of Amide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies for generating peptides and proteins bearing amide carbonyl derivatives rely on solid-phase peptide synthesis for amide functionalization. Although such strategies have been successfully implemented, technical limitations restrict both the length and sequence of the synthetic fragments. Herein we report the repurposing of a thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) cyclodehydratase to site-specifically install amide backbone labels onto diverse peptide substrates, a method we refer to as azoline-mediated peptide backbone labeling (AMPL). This convenient chemoenzymatic strategy can generate both thioamides and amides with isotopically labeled oxygen atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate the first leader peptide-independent activity of a TOMM synthetase, circumventing the requirement that sequences of interest be fused to a leader peptide for modification. Through bioinformatics-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we also convert a strictly dehydrogenase-dependent TOMM azole synthetase into an azoline synthetase. This vastly expands the spectrum of substrates modifiable by AMPL by allowing any in vitro reconstituted TOMM synthetase to be employed. To demonstrate the utility of AMPL for mechanistic enzymology studies, an 18O-labeled substrate was generated to provide direct evidence that cyclodehydrations in TOMMs occur through the phosphorylation of the carbonyl oxygen preceding the cyclized residue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AMPL is a useful tool for establishing the location of azolines both on in vitro modified peptides and azoline-containing natural products. PMID:23721104

  17. Peptide derived from Pvfp-1 as bioadhesive on bio-inert surface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhen; Yu, Yabiao; Du, Lina; Ding, Xiyu; Xu, Hui; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-02-01

    Surface property is one important characteristic of materials, especially for ones that are bio-inert but designed for bio-medical application. In this study, we designed a series of peptides and compared their capacities as bioadhesive to improve the surface bioactivity of bio-inert material. The peptides were designed according to the sequence of Perna viridis foot protein 1 (Pvfp-1), one of the Mfp-1s (mussel foot protein 1) which play key roles in wet adhesion of mussel byssus. And the Teflon (PTFE) was chosen as a model of bio-inert material. With adsorption, adhesion and coating analysis, it was found that peptide C2 (M) (derived from the non-repeating region of Pvfp-1, contains modified DOPA) has superior coating and adhesion abilities especially on the bio-inert surface of PTFE. After coating with peptide C2 (M), the cell adhesion and spreading of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells on PTFE were significantly improved compared with those on non-coated surface, and the peptide-coating did not show any cell toxicity. Therefore, peptide C2 (M) is effective for improving the bioactivity of bio-inert PTFE, and could be potentially used as a bioadhesive on other bio-inert materials for biomedical application. Moreover, this study also provided new insights in designing other peptide-based bioadhesive materials.

  18. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sivakamasundari, Chandrasekaran; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of six 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes. The net charge of the peptides at neutral pH varies from -1 to +6. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that peptides with a high net positive charge tend to fold into a helical conformation in the presence of negatively charged lipid vesicles. In helical conformation, their average hydrophobic moment and hydrophobicity would render them surface-active. The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar face also plays a role in determining membrane activity. The distribution of amino acids in the polar face of the helix in the peptides that were investigated do not fall into the canonical classes described. Amphipathic helices, which are part of proteins, with a pattern of amino acid distribution different from those observed in class L, A and others, could help in providing newer insights into peptide-membrane interactions.

  19. Central cell-derived peptides regulate early embryo patterning in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana M; Marshall, Eleanor; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Mori, Masashi; Umetsu, Yoshitaka; Otterbach, Sophie L; Papareddy, Ranjith; Dickinson, Hugh G; Boutiller, Kim; VandenBosch, Kathryn A; Ohki, Shinya; Gutierrez-Marcos, José F

    2014-04-11

    Plant embryogenesis initiates with the establishment of an apical-basal axis; however, the molecular mechanisms accompanying this early event remain unclear. Here, we show that a small cysteine-rich peptide family is required for formation of the zygotic basal cell lineage and proembryo patterning in Arabidopsis. EMBRYO SURROUNDING FACTOR 1 (ESF1) peptides accumulate before fertilization in central cell gametes and thereafter in embryo-surrounding endosperm cells. Biochemical and structural analyses revealed cleavage of ESF1 propeptides to form biologically active mature peptides. Further, these peptides act in a non-cell-autonomous manner and synergistically with the receptor-like kinase SHORT SUSPENSOR to promote suspensor elongation through the YODA mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our findings demonstrate that the second female gamete and its sexually derived endosperm regulate early embryonic patterning in flowering plants.

  20. Structure and hydrogel formation studies on homologs of a lactoglobulin-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Guy, Marie-Michèle; Voyer, Normand

    2012-04-01

    In order to study the impact of the amino acid sequence on the morphology of peptide-based nanostructures and their hydrogel formation, we designed a series of analogs of a milk-derived octapeptide (OP), mainly using strategic amino acid substitutions. Electronic transmission microscopy (TEM) and circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry were used to analyze the nanostructures formed, and to characterize some structural features of the modified peptides. Further, the potential to form hydrogels was investigated for all of the analogous peptides. We learned that those able to undergo secondary structure transition to β-sheet conformation form strong gels. The results reported highlight some key structural properties that explain the self-assembly propensity of Peptide OP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure-Activity Relations of Myxinidin, an Antibacterial Peptide Derived from the Epidermal Mucus of Hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Marco; Leone, Marilisa; Mignogna, Eleonora; Kampanaraki, Katerina; Falanga, Annarita; Morelli, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The structure-activity relations of myxinidin, a peptide derived from epidermal mucus of hagfish, Myxine glutinosa L., were investigated. Analysis of key residues allowed us to design new peptides with increased efficiency. Antimicrobial activity of native and modified peptides demonstrated the key role of uncharged residues in the sequence; the loss of these residues reduces almost entirely myxinidin antimicrobial activity, while insertion of arginine at charged and uncharged position increases antimicrobial activity compared with that of native myxinidin. Particularly, we designed a peptide capable of achieving a high inhibitory effect on bacterial growth. Experiments were conducted using both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that myxinidin is able to form an amphipathic α-helical structure at the N terminus and a random coil region at the C terminus. PMID:24002100

  2. Structure-activity relations of myxinidin, an antibacterial peptide derived from the epidermal mucus of hagfish.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Leone, Marilisa; Mignogna, Eleonora; Kampanaraki, Katerina; Falanga, Annarita; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2013-11-01

    The structure-activity relations of myxinidin, a peptide derived from epidermal mucus of hagfish, Myxine glutinosa L., were investigated. Analysis of key residues allowed us to design new peptides with increased efficiency. Antimicrobial activity of native and modified peptides demonstrated the key role of uncharged residues in the sequence; the loss of these residues reduces almost entirely myxinidin antimicrobial activity, while insertion of arginine at charged and uncharged position increases antimicrobial activity compared with that of native myxinidin. Particularly, we designed a peptide capable of achieving a high inhibitory effect on bacterial growth. Experiments were conducted using both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies showed that myxinidin is able to form an amphipathic α-helical structure at the N terminus and a random coil region at the C terminus.

  3. Killer Bee Molecules: Antimicrobial Peptides as Effector Molecules to Target Sporogonic Stages of Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Victoria; Underhill, Ann; Baber, Ibrahima; Sylla, Lakamy; Baby, Mounirou; Larget-Thiery, Isabelle; Zettor, Agnès; Bourgouin, Catherine; Langel, Ülo; Faye, Ingrid; Otvos, Laszlo; Wade, John D.; Coulibaly, Mamadou B.; Traore, Sekou F.; Tripet, Frederic; Eggleston, Paul; Hurd, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes. Specifically targeting early sporogonic stages, we initially screened AMPs for toxicity against a mosquito cell line and P. berghei ookinetes. Promising candidate AMPs were fed to mosquitoes to monitor adverse fitness effects, and their efficacy in blocking rodent malaria infection in Anopheles stephensi was assessed. This was followed by tests to determine their activity against P. falciparum in An. gambiae, initially using laboratory cultures to infect mosquitoes, then culminating in preliminary assays in the field using gametocytes and mosquitoes collected from the same area in Mali, West Africa. From a range of 33 molecules, six AMPs able to block Plasmodium development were identified: Anoplin, Duramycin, Mastoparan X, Melittin, TP10 and Vida3. With the exception of Anoplin and Mastoparan X, these AMPs were also toxic to an An. gambiae cell line at a concentration of 25 µM. However, when tested in mosquito blood feeds, they did not reduce mosquito longevity or egg production at concentrations of 50 µM. Peptides effective against cultured ookinetes were less effective when tested in vivo and differences in efficacy against P. berghei and P. falciparum were seen. From the range of molecules tested, the majority of effective AMPs were derived from bee/wasp venoms. PMID:24278025

  4. A peptide antigen derived from EGFR T790M is immunogenic in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    OFUJI, KAZUYA; TADA, YOSHITAKA; YOSHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; SHIMOMURA, MANAMI; YOSHIMURA, MAYUKO; SAITO, KEIGO; NAKAMOTO, YASUNARI; NAKATSURA, TETSUYA

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), such as gefitinib and erlotinib, have demonstrated marked clinical activity against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, in most cases, patients develop acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy. The threonine to methionine change at codon 790 of EGFR (EGFR T790M) mutation is the most common acquired resistance mutation, and is present in ~50% cases of TKI resistance. New treatment strategies for NSCLC patients harboring the EGFR T790M mutation are required. We evaluated the immunogenicity of an antigen derived from EGFR with the T790M mutation. Using BIMAS we selected several EGFR T790M-derived peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. T790M-A peptide (789–797) (IMQLMPFGC)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A2+ healthy donors. An established T790M-A-specific CTL line showed reactivity against the NCSLC cell line, H1975-A2 (HLA-A2+, T790M+), but not H1975 (HLA-A2−, T790M+), and the corresponding wild-type peptide (ITQLMPFGC)-pulsed T2 cells using an interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immuno spot (ELISPOT) assay. This CTL line also demonstrated peptide-specific cytotoxicity against H1975-A2 cells. This finding suggests that the EGFR T790M mutation-derived antigen could be a new target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25532027

  5. ATP synthase: a molecular therapeutic drug target for antimicrobial and antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimicrobial/ antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F(1) sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented.

  6. ATP Synthase: A Molecular Therapeutic Drug Target for Antimicrobial and Antitumor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimi-crobial/antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F1 sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented. PMID:23432591

  7. Possible role of milk-derived bioactive peptides in the treatment and prevention of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Herrera, Manuel Olalla; Artacho, Reyes

    2012-04-01

    The growing prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as its impact on public health has garnered increased attention in recent years. As a result, metabolic syndrome is now considered one of the world's leading public health problems. Bioactive peptides deriving from milk proteins may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and its complications via several mechanisms, such as the satiety response, the regulation of insulinemia levels and blood pressure, the uptake of free radicals, and alteration of the lipid profile. These peptides can be incorporated into functional foods or administered via nutraceuticals to decrease the risk of obesity, atherogenesis, arterial hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Recent findings have generated considerable scientific and commercial interest in milk-derived bioactive peptides, leading to numerous publications on the effectiveness of these substances. This review summarizes the current knowledge on bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins and examines the potential value of these peptides in the treatment and prevention of metabolic syndrome and its complications.

  8. Protease specificity profiling by tandem mass spectrometry using proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Oliver; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Protease specificity profiling using proteome-derived, database-searchable peptide libraries is a novel approach to define the active site specificity of proteolytic enzymes we call PICS (Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites). Proteome-derived peptide libraries are generated by trypsin, GluC, or chymotrypsin digestion of biologically relevant proteomes, such as cytosolic lysates, to generate three separate libraries that each differ from the others in their C-terminal amino acid residues according to the protease specificity. Primary amines of all peptides are then chemically protected so that after incubation with a test protease, the neo-N-termini of the prime-side cleavage products with exposed α-amines can be specifically biotinylated, enriched, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding nonprime-side sequences are derived bioinformatically. Suited for all protease classes except carboxyproteases and those aminoproteases and dipeptidases requiring a free α-amine for cleavage, PICS simultaneously profiles the specificity of prime and nonprime positions and directly determines scissile peptide bonds of up to hundreds of cleavage site sequences in a single experiment. This wealth of sequence specificity information also allows for the investigation of subsite cooperativity. Herein we describe a simplified procedure to produce PICS peptide libraries, the methods to perform a PICS assay, and a new method of data analysis.

  9. Experimental myositis inducible with transfer of dendritic cells presenting a skeletal muscle C protein-derived CD8 epitope peptide.

    PubMed

    Okiyama, Naoko; Hasegawa, Hisanori; Oida, Takatoku; Hirata, Shinya; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Fujimoto, Manabu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    It is suggested that polymyositis, an autoimmune inflammatory myopathy, is mediated by autoaggressive CD8 T cells. Skeletal muscle C protein is a self-antigen that induces C protein-induced myositis, a murine model of polymyositis. To establish a new murine model of myositis inducible with a single CD8 T-cell epitope peptide that derives from the C protein, three internet-based prediction systems were employed to identify 24 candidate peptides of the immunogenic fragment of the C protein and bind theoretically to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules of C57BL/6 (B6) mice. RMA-S cell assay revealed that a HILIYSDV peptide, amino acid position 399-406 of the C protein, had the highest affinity to the H2-K(b) molecules. Transfer of mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with HILIYSDV induced myositis in naive B6 mice. This myositis was suppressed by anti-CD8-depleting antibodies but not by anti-CD4-depleting antibodies. Because this myositis model is mediated by CD8 T cells independently of CD4 T cells, it should be a useful tool to investigate pathology of polymyositis and develop therapies targeting CD8 T cells. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Potential Use of Food Protein-Derived Peptides in the Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Lopez, Lourdes; Gonzalez-Cordova, Aaron F; Hernandez-Mendoza, Adrian; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, major developments in the field of inflammatory pathophysiology have clearly shown that arthritis, diabetes, intestinal bowel diseases, and obesity, which affect many people around the world, are essentially inflammatory in nature. Different anti-inflammatory drugs have been used to treat these conditions. Some people are able to take these drugs without difficulty, yet others experience negative side effects. Hence, the search for new, natural anti-inflammatory alternatives has rapidly increased in recent years. Evidence has shown that food protein-derived peptides may be one alternative for treating inflammatory diseases. Peptides are encrypted in food proteins, can be released under hydrolysis conditions, and do not cause adverse effects. Despite limited information on the mechanism of action of peptides, in vitro and animal model studies have demonstrated their potential anti-inflammatory activity. Several in vitro studies have demonstrated that peptides can inhibit different pathways of inflammation processes such as that of the nuclear factor kappalight- chain of activated B cells (NF-κB). They can also induce the production of nitric oxide synthase (iNOs) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) as well as influence PepT1 and CaRS, the transporters of peptides to the gastrointestinal tract that are responsible for the absorption of dietary peptides in the intestine. However, contradictory evidence has been reported in clinical assays. Hence, in this review, we present the latest research on the anti-inflammatory activity of food protein-derived peptides and provide future perspectives on the use of peptides as potential natural sources of therapeutic treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A novel vascular targeting strategy for brain-derived endothelial cells using a TCR mimic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Raktima; Xu, Yan; Rahman, Md. Ashequr; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette B.; Weidanz, Jon A.; Bickel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Organ-specific vascular targeting, for example to the blood-brain barrier, requires the identification of unique molecular addresses on a subset of endothelial cells. The present study describes a crucial step towards tapping the exquisite specificity of the peptide/HLA class I system for this goal. We utilized a novel T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibody of high affinity and specificity, which is restricted by HLA-A2 and has been generated to recognize a peptide epitope derived from p68 RNA helicase (YLLPAIVHI). The parent protein is highly expressed by brain endothelial cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging showed that the antibody binds to HLA-A2 positive human brain derived endothelial cells, both immortalized hCMEC/D3 cells and primary cells. The TCR mimic antibody undergoes internalization into vesicles, where significant colocalization occurs with the early endosomal marker EEA-1, but barely with caveolin-1. To our knowledge internalization of neither MHC class I protein nor TCR mimics by brain endothelial cells has been previously observed. Knockdown of p68 protein expression by siRNA reduced the presentation of YLLPAIVHI-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes on the cell membrane by half as measured by flow cytometry 48h later. We also found that brain endothelial cells isolated from HLA-A2 transgenic mouse strains express the A2 transgene, and brain endothelial cells of one of these strains also present YLLPAIVHI-peptide/HLA-A2, making these mouse strains suitable models for studying TCR mimic antibodies in vivo. In conclusion, these data strongly support the notion that TCR mimic antibodies could be a new class of therapeutic targeting agents in a wide variety of diseases. PMID:20506235

  12. Salivary gland derived peptides as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents: review of preclinical pharmacology of C-terminal peptides of SMR1 protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The limitations of steroidal and non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have prompted investigation into other biologically based therapeutics, and identification of immune selective anti-inflammatory agents of salivary origin. The traditional view of salivary glands as accessory digestive structures is changing as their importance as sources of systemically active immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory factors is recognized. Salivary gland involvement in maintenance of whole body homeostasis is regulated by the nervous system and thus constitutes a "neuroendocrine axis". The potent anti-inflammatory activities, both in vivo and in vitro, of the tripeptide Phe-Glu-Gly (FEG) are reviewed. FEG is a carboxyl terminal peptide of the prohormone SMR1 identified in the rat submandibular salivary gland, The D-isomeric form (feG) mimics the activity of its L-isomer FEG. Macropharmacologically, feG attenuates the cardiovascular and inflammatory effects of endotoxemia and anaphylaxis, by inhibition of hypotension, leukocyte migration, vascular leak, and disruption of pulmonary function and intestinal motility. Mechanistically, feG affects activated inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, by regulating integrins and inhibiting intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. Pharmacodynamically, feG is active at low doses (100 μg/kg) and has a long (9-12 hour) biological half life. As a therapeutic agent, feG shows promise in diseases characterized by over exuberant inflammatory responses such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome and other acute inflammatory diseases. Arthritis, sepsis, acute pancreatitis, asthma, acute respiratory inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease, and equine laminitis are potential targets for this promising therapeutic peptide. The term "Immune Selective Anti-Inflammatory Derivatives" (ImSAIDs) is proposed for salivary-derived peptides to distinguish this class of agents from corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

  13. Synthesis and cellular compatibility of biomineralized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in tumor cells targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yin, Guangfu; Ma, Chuying; Huang, Zhongbing; Chen, Xianchun; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Yin, Hao

    2013-07-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) coated with WSG-peptide were prepared via a facile biomineralization technique at room temperature. The concentration of the peptides and the mixing time could substantially influence the morphology of as-prepared particles. The saturation magnetization of WSG-coated Fe3O4 particles were 35.92 emu/g, slightly higher than that of Fe3O4 without WSG peptides. Cell viability assay revealed that WSG-coated Fe3O4 particles had a good cellular compatibility. In addition, compared with Fe3O4 NPs, the mineralized Fe3O4 NPs coated with WSG peptides could more easily assemble into the cancer cell, indicating that the WSG-Fe3O4 NPs possess cancer targeting property. Thus, the WSG-coated Fe3O4 NPs could be used in cancer diagnosis and treatment fields. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemokine CCR3 ligands-binding peptides derived from a random phage-epitope library.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effectors cells implicated in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases in humans, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The human chemokine receptor C-C receptor 3 (hCCR3) provides a mechanism for the recruitment of eosinophils into tissue and thus has recently become an attractive biological target for therapeutic intervention. In order to develop peptides antagonists of hCCR3-hCCL11 (human eotaxin) interactions, a random bacteriophage hexapeptide library was used to map structural features of hCCR3 by determining the epitopes of neutralizing anti-hCCR3 mAb 7B11. This mAb t is selective for hCCR3 and exhibit potent antagonist activity in receptor binding and functional assays. After three rounds of biopanning, four mAb7B11-binding peptides were identified from a 6-mer linear peptide library. The phage bearing the peptides showed specific binding to immobilized mAb 7B11 with over 94% of phages bound being competitively inhibited by free synthetic peptides. In FACScan analysis all selected phage peptides were able to strongly inhibit the binding of mAb 7B11 to hCCR3-transfected preB-300-19 murine cells. Furthermore, synthetic peptides of the corresponding phage epitopes were effective in blocking the antibody-hCCR3 interactions and to inhibit the binding of hCCL11 to hCCR3 transfectants. Chemically synthesized peptides CKGERF, FERKGK, SSMKVK and RHVSSQ, effectively competed for (125)I-hCCL11 binding to hCCR3 with IC(50) ranging from 3.5 to 9.7μM. Calcium release and chemotaxis of hCCR3 transfectants or human eosinophils were inhibited by all peptides in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, they showed inhibitory effects on chemotaxis of human eosinophils induced by hCCL11, hCCL5, hCCL7, hCCL8, and hCCL24. Specificities of all selected peptides were assessed with hCXCR1, hCXCR2, hCXCR3, and hCCR5 receptors. Peptides CKGERF and FERKGK showed inhibitory effects on eosinophil chemotaxis in a murine model of mCCL11-induced

  15. Antimicrobial properties of two novel peptides derived from Theobroma cacao osmotin.

    PubMed

    Falcao, Loeni L; Silva-Werneck, Joseilde O; Ramos, Alessandra de R; Martins, Natalia F; Bresso, Emmanuel; Rodrigues, Magali A; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Marcellino, Lucilia H

    2016-05-01

    The osmotin proteins of several plants display antifungal activity, which can play an important role in plant defense against diseases. Thus, this protein can be useful as a source for biotechnological strategies aiming to combat fungal diseases. In this work, we analyzed the antifungal activity of a cacao osmotin-like protein (TcOsm1) and of two osmotin-derived synthetic peptides with antimicrobial features, differing by five amino acids residues at the N-terminus. Antimicrobial tests showed that TcOsm1 expressed in Escherichia coli inhibits the growth of Moniliophthora perniciosa mycelium and Pichia pastoris X-33 in vitro. The TcOsm1-derived peptides, named Osm-pepA (H-RRLDRGGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at R23-K49, and Osm-pepB (H-GGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at G28-K49, inhibited growth of yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C and Pichia pastoris X-33) and spore germination of the phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium f. sp. glycines and Colletotrichum gossypi. Osm-pepA was more efficient than Osm-pepB for S. cerevisiae (MIC=40μM and MIC=127μM, respectively), as well as for P. pastoris (MIC=20μM and MIC=127μM, respectively). Furthermore, the peptides presented a biphasic performance, promoting S. cerevisiae growth in doses around 5μM and inhibiting it at higher doses. The structural model for these peptides showed that the five amino acids residues, RRLDR at Osm-pepA N-terminus, significantly affect the tertiary structure, indicating that this structure is important for the peptide antimicrobial potency. This is the first report of development of antimicrobial peptides from T. cacao. Taken together, the results indicate that the cacao osmotin and its derived peptides, herein studied, are good candidates for developing biotechnological tools aiming to control phytopathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative Proteomics Targeting Classes of Motif-containing Peptides Using Immunoaffinity-based Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Niclas; James, Peter; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2012-01-01

    The development of high-performance technology platforms for generating detailed protein expression profiles, or protein atlases, is essential. Recently, we presented a novel platform that we termed global proteome survey, where we combined the best features of affinity proteomics and mass spectrometry, to probe any proteome in a species independent manner while still using a limited set of antibodies. We used so called context-independent-motif-specific antibodies, directed against short amino acid motifs. This enabled enrichment of motif-containing peptides from a digested proteome, which then were detected and identified by mass spectrometry. In this study, we have demonstrated the quantitative capability, reproducibility, sensitivity, and coverage of the global proteome survey technology by targeting stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture-labeled yeast cultures cultivated in glucose or ethanol. The data showed that a wide range of motif-containing peptides (proteins) could be detected, identified, and quantified in a highly reproducible manner. On average, each of six different motif-specific antibodies was found to target about 75 different motif-containing proteins. Furthermore, peptides originating from proteins spanning in abundance from over a million down to less than 50 copies per cell, could be targeted. It is worth noting that a significant set of peptides previously not reported in the PeptideAtlas database was among the profiled targets. The quantitative data corroborated well with the corresponding data generated after conventional strong cation exchange fractionation of the same samples. Finally, several differentially expressed proteins, with both known and unknown functions, many relevant for the central carbon metabolism, could be detected in the glucose- versus ethanol-cultivated yeast. Taken together, the study demonstrated the potential of our immunoaffinity-based mass spectrometry platform for reproducible quantitative

  17. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  18. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells and impairs mineralization in tooth models of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Benjamin; Bardet, Claire; Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide - a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization - derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  19. Challenging the catechism of therapeutics for chronic neuropathic pain: Targeting CaV2.2 interactions with CRMP2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Polina; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-12-17

    Chronic neuropathic pain management is a worldwide concern. Pharmaceutical companies globally have historically targeted ion channels as the therapeutic catechism with many blockbuster successes. Remarkably, no new pain therapeutic has been approved by European or American regulatory agencies over the last decade. This article will provide an overview of an alternative approach to ion channel drug discovery: targeting regulators of ion channels, specifically focusing on voltage-gated calcium channels. We will highlight the discovery of an anti-nociceptive peptide derived from a novel calcium channel interacting partner - the collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2). In vivo administration of this peptide reduces pain behavior in a number of models of neuropathic pain without affecting sympathetic-associated cardiovascular activity, memory retrieval, sensorimotor function, or depression. A CRMP2-derived peptide analgesic, with restricted access to the CNS, represents a completely novel approach to the treatment of severe pain with an improved safety profile. As peptides now represent one of the fastest growing classes of new drugs, it is expected that peptide targeting of protein interactions within the calcium channel complex may be a paradigm shift in ion channel drug discovery.

  20. Peptide-22 and Cyclic RGD Functionalized Liposomes for Glioma Targeting Drug Delivery Overcoming BBB and BBTB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuitian; Duan, Ziqing; Yuan, Yan; Li, Ruixiang; Pang, Liang; Liang, Jianming; Xu, Xinchun; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-02-22

    Chemotherapy outcomes for the treatment of glioma remain unsatisfied due to the inefficient drug transport across BBB/BBTB and poor drug accumulation in the tumor site. Nanocarriers functionalized with different targeting ligands are considered as one of the most promising alternatives. However, few studies were reported to compare the targeting efficiency of the ligands and develop nanoparticles to realize BBB/BBTB crossing and brain tumor targeting simultaneously. In this study, six peptide-based ligands (Angiopep-2, T7, Peptide-22, c(RGDfK), D-SP5 and Pep-1), widely used for brain delivery, were selected to decorate liposomes, respectively, so as to compare their targeting ability to BBB or BBTB. Based on the in vitro cellular uptake results on BCECs and HUVECs, Peptide-22 and c(RGDfK) were picked to construct a BBB/BBTB dual-crossing, glioma-targeting liposomal drug delivery system c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-DOX-LP. In vitro cellular uptake demonstrated that the synergetic effect of c(RGDfK) and Peptide-22 could significantly increase the internalization of liposomes on U87 cells. In vivo imaging further verified that c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-LP exhibited higher brain tumor distribution than single ligand modified liposomes. The median survival time of glioma-bearing mice treated with c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-DOX-LP (39.5 days) was significantly prolonged than those treated with free doxorubicin or other controls. In conclusion, the c(RGDfK) and Peptide-22 dual-modified liposome was constructed based on the targeting ability screening of various ligands. The system could effectively overcome BBB/BBTB barriers, target to tumor cells and inhibit the growth of glioma, which proved its potential for improving the efficacy of chemotherapeutics for glioma therapy.

  1. Germline TRAV5D-4 T-cell receptor sequence targets a primary insulin peptide of NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Maki; Castoe, Todd; Sosinowski, Tomasz; He, XiangLing; Johnson, Kelly; Haskins, Kathryn; Vignali, Dario A A; Gapin, Laurent; Pollock, David; Eisenbarth, George S

    2012-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that autoimmunity to insulin B chain peptide, amino acids 9-23 (insulin B:9-23), is central to development of autoimmune diabetes of the NOD mouse model. We hypothesized that enhanced susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes is the result of targeting of insulin by a T-cell receptor (TCR) sequence commonly encoded in the germline. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that a particular Vα gene TRAV5D-4 with multiple junction sequences is sufficient to induce anti-islet autoimmunity by studying retrogenic mouse lines expressing α-chains with different Vα TRAV genes. Retrogenic NOD strains expressing Vα TRAV5D-4 α-chains with many different complementarity determining region (CDR) 3 sequences, even those derived from TCRs recognizing islet-irrelevant molecules, developed anti-insulin autoimmunity. Induction of insulin autoantibodies by TRAV5D-4 α-chains was abrogated by the mutation of insulin peptide B:9-23 or that of two amino acid residues in CDR1 and 2 of the TRAV5D-4. TRAV13-1, the human ortholog of murine TRAV5D-4, was also capable of inducing in vivo anti-insulin autoimmunity when combined with different murine CDR3 sequences. Targeting primary autoantigenic peptides by simple germline-encoded TCR motifs may underlie enhanced susceptibility to the development of autoimmune diabetes.

  2. Peptide vaccination against multiple myeloma using peptides derived from anti-apoptotic proteins: a phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Abildgaard, Niels; Straten, Per Thor; Svane, Inge Marie; Andersen, Mads Hald; Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins play a crucial role in multiple myeloma (MM), contributing to lacking apoptosis which is a hallmark of the disease. This makes the Bcl-2 proteins interesting targets for therapeutic peptide vaccination. We report a phase I trial of therapeutic vaccination with peptides from the proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 in patients with relapsed MM. Vaccines were given concomitant with bortezomib. Out of 7 enrolled patients, 4 received the full course of 8 vaccinations. The remaining 3 patients received fewer vaccinations due to progression, clinical decision of lacking effect and development of hypercalcemia, respectively. There were no signs of toxicity other than what was to be expected from bortezomib. Immune responses to the peptides were seen in all 6 patients receiving more than 2 vaccinations. Three patients had increased immune responses after vaccination. Vaccination against Bcl-2 was well tolerated and was able to induce immune responses in patients with relapsed MM. PMID:28078275

  3. Next generation of antimicrobial peptides as molecular targeted medicines.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics have significantly improved our living environments. However, overuse of antibiotics has led to the emergence of multi-drug resistant microorganisms, and the subsequent constant demand for the exploration of novel antibiotics. To this end, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted much attention as a novel class of antibiotics. AMPs have strong antimicrobial activity against a wide-range of species, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. In addition, they are also effective against pathogenic organisms that are resistant to conventional drugs. Despite their great potential, the hemolytic activity and a highly broad spectrum of activity of AMPs dictate the need for amendments to develop safe pharmaceuticals. The human body contains commensal microflora as an integral part of complex mucosal surfaces that offers protection against pathogenic organisms. Administration of antibiotics with broad spectra of activity disrupts the indigenous microflora and increases the risks of diarrhea and other fatal infections. Therefore, it is difficult, but vital, to develop treatments capable of rapidly eliminating pathogenic organisms while maintaining the commensal microbiota. As such, novel pharmaceuticals, safe designer AMPs have been heavily researched. In this article, we review recent attempts to spatially and temporally regulate AMPs to enhance the quality-of-life of patients. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hishot Display—A New Combinatorial Display for Obtaining Target-Recognizing Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Shoutaro; Yamashita, Makiko; Kageyama, Taihei; Ohtsu, Takashi; Suzuki, Katsuo; Kato, Shintaro; Akitomi, Joe; Furuichi, Makio; Waga, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Display technologies are procedures used for isolating target-recognizing peptides without using immunized animals. In this study, we describe a new display method, named Hishot display, that uses Escherichia coli and an expression plasmid to isolate target-recognizing peptides. This display method is based on the formation, in bacteria, of complexes between a polyhistidine (His)-tagged peptide including random sequences and the peptide-encoding mRNA including an RNA aptamer against the His-tag. When this system was tested using a sequence encoding His-tagged green fluorescent protein that included an RNA aptamer against the His-tag, the collection of mRNA encoding the protein was dependent on the RNA aptamer. Using this display method and a synthetic library of surrogate single-chain variable fragments consisting of VpreB and Ig heavy-chain variable domains, it was possible to isolate clones that could specifically recognize a particular target (intelectin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α). These clones were obtained as soluble proteins produced by E. coli, and the purified peptide clones recognizing intelectin-1 could be used as detectors for sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The Hishot display will be a useful method to add to the repertoire of display technologies. PMID:24386149

  5. Hishot display--a new combinatorial display for obtaining target-recognizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoutaro; Yamashita, Makiko; Kageyama, Taihei; Ohtsu, Takashi; Suzuki, Katsuo; Kato, Shintaro; Akitomi, Joe; Furuichi, Makio; Waga, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Display technologies are procedures used for isolating target-recognizing peptides without using immunized animals. In this study, we describe a new display method, named Hishot display, that uses Escherichia coli and an expression plasmid to isolate target-recognizing peptides. This display method is based on the formation, in bacteria, of complexes between a polyhistidine (His)-tagged peptide including random sequences and the peptide-encoding mRNA including an RNA aptamer against the His-tag. When this system was tested using a sequence encoding His-tagged green fluorescent protein that included an RNA aptamer against the His-tag, the collection of mRNA encoding the protein was dependent on the RNA aptamer. Using this display method and a synthetic library of surrogate single-chain variable fragments consisting of VpreB and Ig heavy-chain variable domains, it was possible to isolate clones that could specifically recognize a particular target (intelectin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α). These clones were obtained as soluble proteins produced by E. coli, and the purified peptide clones recognizing intelectin-1 could be used as detectors for sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The Hishot display will be a useful method to add to the repertoire of display technologies.

  6. Peptide-drug conjugate linked via a disulfide bond for kidney targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qian; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong

    2012-06-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, and unfortunately, the therapeutic index of clinically available drugs is limited. Thus, there is a great need to exploit effective treatment strategies, and the carrier-drug approach is an attractive method to improve the kidney specificity of the therapeutic agents. The aim of this present study is to develop a peptide-drug conjugate for the kidney targeted delivery of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril (CAP), since G3-C12 peptide (ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR) could specifically accumulate in the kidney after intravenous injection. Therefore, FITC labeled G3-C12 peptide (G3-C12-FITC) and peptide-drug conjugate (G3-C12-CAP) with a disulfide bond which can be cleaved by reduced glutathione in the kidney were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The fluorescence imaging of G3-C12-FITC revealed that the labeled peptide specifically accumulated in the kidney soon after i.v. injection to mice, and the accumulation is due largely to the reabsorption of the peptide by the proximal renal tubule cells. Furthermore, in comparison with the corresponding nonconjugated form, a 2.7-fold increase in renal area under concentration-time curve produced by the conjugate was observed in mice. Interestingly, the CAP entirely released in the kidney even at 0.05 h postinjection through disulfide reduction. As a consequence, the in vivo renal ACE inhibition was significantly increased. In conclusion, these findings suggest the potential of G3-C12 peptide serving as a suitable candidate carrier for kidney-targeted drug delivery.

  7. Antiprion properties of prion protein-derived cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Kajsa; Wahlström, Anna; Lundberg, Pontus; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid; Bedecs, Katarina

    2008-07-01

    In prion diseases, the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) becomes misfolded into the pathogenic scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)) responsible for prion infectivity. We show here that peptides derived from the prion protein N terminus have potent antiprion effects. These peptides are composed of a hydrophobic sequence followed by a basic segment. They are known to have cell-penetrating ability like regular cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), short peptides that can penetrate cellular membranes. Healthy (GT1-1) and scrapie-infected (ScGT1-1) mouse neuronal hypothalamic cells were treated with various CPPs, including the prion protein-derived CPPs. Lysates were analyzed for altered protein levels of PrP(C) or PrP(Sc). Treatment with the prion protein-derived CPPs mouse mPrP(1-28) or bovine bPrP(1-30) significantly reduced PrP(Sc) levels in prion-infected cells but had no effect on PrP(C) levels in noninfected cells. Further, presence of prion protein-derived CPPs significantly prolonged the time before infection was manifested when infecting GT1-1 cells with scrapie. Treatment with other CPPs (penetratin, transportan-10, or poly-L-arginine) or prion protein-derived peptides lacking CPP function (mPrP(23-28,) mPrP(19-30,) or mPrP(23-50)) had no effect on PrP(Sc) levels. The results suggest a mechanism by which the signal sequence guides the prion protein-derived CPP into a cellular compartment, where the basic segment binds specifically to PrP(Sc) and disables formation of prions.

  8. Identification of peptide sequences that target to the brain using in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Wang, Yuchen; Liu, Qingfeng; Guo, Liangran; Jiang, Xinguo

    2012-06-01

    Phage display technology could provide a rapid means for the discovery of novel peptides. To find peptide ligands specific for the brain vascular receptors, we performed a modified phage display method. Phages were recovered from mice brain parenchyma after administrated with a random 7-mer peptide library intravenously. A longer circulation time was arranged according to the biodistributive brain/blood ratios of phage particles. Following sequential rounds of isolation, a number of phages were sequenced and a peptide sequence (CTSTSAPYC, denoted as PepC7) was identified. Clone 7-1, which encodes PepC7, exhibited translocation efficiency about 41-fold higher than the random library phage. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Clone 7-1 had a significant superiority on transport efficiency into the brain compared with native M13 phage. Clone 7-1 was inhibited from homing to the brain in a dose-dependent fashion when cyclic peptides of the same sequence were present in a competition assay. Interestingly, the linear peptide (ATSTSAPYA, Pep7) and a scrambled control peptide PepSC7 (CSPATSYTC) did not compete with the phage at the same tested concentration (0.2-200 pg). Labeled by Cy5.5, PepC7 exhibited significant brain-targeting capability in in vivo optical imaging analysis. The cyclic conformation of PepC7 formed by disulfide bond, and the correct structure itself play a critical role in maintaining the selectivity and affinity for the brain. In conclusion, PepC7 is a promising brain-target motif never been reported before and it could be applied to targeted drug delivery into the brain.

  9. Activatable iRGD-based peptide monolith: Targeting, internalization, and fluorescence activation for precise tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Jun; Lee, Sung-Jin; Park, Sung-Jun; Paik, Chang H; Lee, Sang-Myung; Kim, Sehoon; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2016-09-10

    A disulfide-bridged cyclic RGD peptide, named iRGD (internalizing RGD, c(CRGDK/RGPD/EC)), is known to facilitate tumor targeting as well as tissue penetration. After the RGD motif-induced targeting on αv integrins expressed near tumor tissue, iRGD encounters proteolytic cleavage to expose the CendR motif that promotes penetration into cancer cells via the interaction with neuropilin-1. Based on these proteolytic cleavage and internalization mechanism, we designed an iRGD-based monolithic imaging probe that integrates multiple functions (cancer-specific targeting, internalization and fluorescence activation) within a small peptide framework. To provide the capability of activatable fluorescence signaling, we conjugated a fluorescent dye to the N-terminal of iRGD, which was linked to the internalizing sequence (CendR motif), and a quencher to the opposite C-terminal. It turned out that fluorescence activation of the dye/quencher-conjugated monolithic peptide probe requires dual (reductive and proteolytic) cleavages on both disulfide and amide bond of iRGD peptide. Furthermore, the cleavage of the iRGD peptide leading to fluorescence recovery was indeed operative depending on the tumor-related angiogenic receptors (αvβ3 integrin and neuropilin-1) in vitro as well as in vivo. Compared to an 'always fluorescent' iRGD control probe without quencher conjugation, the dye/quencher-conjugated activatable monolithic peptide probe visualized tumor regions more precisely with lower background noise after intravenous injection, owing to the multifunctional responses specific to tumor microenvironment. All these results, along with minimal in vitro and in vivo toxicity profiles, suggest potential of the iRGD-based activatable monolithic peptide probe as a promising imaging agent for precise tumor diagnosis.

  10. Thermally Targeted Delivery of a c-Myc Inhibitory Peptide In Vivo Using Elastin-Like Polypeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), bactenecin (Bac), penetratin ( Pen ), or Tat, is conjugated to the ELP to enhance delivery of the polypeptide across the...CPPs are short peptides known to enhance the cellular uptake of large cargo. The three CPPs proposed for this study are the penetratin ( Pen ...we conjugated the c-Myc inhibitory peptide and the Pen peptide to ELP for thermally targeted delivery ( Pen -ELP-H1) (1). Uptake of Pen -ELP-H1 in MCF-7

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of food-derived pyroglutamyl peptides in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukako; Mizushige, Takafumi; Mori, Yukiha; Shimmura, Yuki; Fukutomi, Ruuta; Kanamoto, Ryuhei; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2015-06-01

    The N-terminal glutamine residue, exposed by enzymatic cleavage of precursor proteins, is known to be modified to a pyroglutamyl residue with a cyclic structure in not only endogenous but also food-derived peptides. We investigated the effects of wheat-derived pyroglutamyl peptides on emotional behaviors. Pyroglutamyl leucine (pyroGlu-Leu, pEL) and pyroglutamyl glutaminyl leucine (pyroGlu-Gln-Leu, pEQL) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the tail suspension and forced swim tests in mice. pEQL exhibited more potent antidepressant-like activity than pEL after i.p. and i.c.v. administration. pEQL exhibited antidepressant-like activity at a lower dose than Gln-Gln-Leu, suggesting that pyroglutamyl peptide had more potent activity. To examine whether pyroglutamyl peptides increased hippocampus neurogenesis, associated with the effects of antidepressants, we measured 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. pEL and pEQL increased BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Intriguingly, pEL did not increase hippocampal mRNA and protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is a factor associated with both neuropoietic and antidepressive effects. Thus, pyroglutamyl peptides may enhance hippocampal neurogenesis via a pathway independent of BDNF. We also confirmed that pEL and pEQL were produced in the subtilisin digest of major wheat proteins, glutenin and gliadin, after heat treatment. pEL and pEQL are the first peptides derived from wheat proteins to be shown to exhibit an antidepressant-like activity.

  12. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  13. MHC class I–associated peptides derive from selective regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Hillary; Granados, Diana Paola; Durette, Chantal; Bonneil, Eric; Courcelles, Mathieu; Rodenbrock, Anja; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Caroline; Thibault, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    MHC class I–associated peptides (MAPs) define the immune self for CD8+ T lymphocytes and are key targets of cancer immunosurveillance. Here, the goals of our work were to determine whether the entire set of protein-coding genes could generate MAPs and whether specific features influence the ability of discrete genes to generate MAPs. Using proteogenomics, we have identified 25,270 MAPs isolated from the B lymphocytes of 18 individuals who collectively expressed 27 high-frequency HLA-A,B allotypes. The entire MAP repertoire presented by these 27 allotypes covered only 10% of the exomic sequences expressed in B lymphocytes. Indeed, 41% of expressed protein-coding genes generated no MAPs, while 59% of genes generated up to 64 MAPs, often derived from adjacent regions and presented by different allotypes. We next identified several features of transcripts and proteins associated with efficient MAP production. From these data, we built a logistic regression model that predicts with good accuracy whether a gene generates MAPs. Our results show preferential selection of MAPs from a limited repertoire of proteins with distinctive features. The notion that the MHC class I immunopeptidome presents only a small fraction of the protein-coding genome for monitoring by the immune system has profound implications in autoimmunity and cancer immunology. PMID:27841757

  14. Enhanced Drug Delivery into Cell Cytosol via Glycoprotein H-Derived Peptide Conjugated Nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Teresa; Vecchione, Raffaele; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Guarnieri, Daniela; Calcagno, Vincenzo; Di Natale, Concetta; Attanasio, Chiara; De Gregorio, Maria; Di Cicco, Chiara; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Maurea, Nicola; Barbieri, Antonio; Arra, Claudio; Raiola, Luca; Iaffaioli, Rosario V; Netti, Paolo A

    2017-08-28

    The key role of nanocarriers in improving the pharmacological properties of commonly used drugs is recognized worldwide. It is also known that in the development of new effective nanocarriers the use of targeting moieties integrated on their surface is essential. Herein, we propose a nanocarrier based on an oil in water nanoemulsion coated with a membranotropic peptide derived from the glycoprotein H of Herpes simplex virus 1, known as gH625, in order to reduce endolysosomal accumulation and to enhance cytosolic localization. In addition, we show an enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin, a bioactive compound isolated from the Curcuma longa plant, when loaded into our engineered nanocarriers. This effect is a consequence of a higher uptake combined with a high curcumin preservation exerted by the active nanocapsules compared to control ones. When loaded into our nanocapsules, indeed, curcumin molecules are directly internalized into the cytosol rather than into lysosomes. Further, in order to extend the in vitro experimental setting with a more complex model and to explore the possibility to use our nanocarriers for further biological applications, we tested their performance in a 3D sprouting angiogenesis model. Finally, we show promising preliminary in vivo results by assessing the anti-inflammatory properties of the proposed nanocarrier.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of phenylalanine-derived trifluoromethyl ketones for peptide-based oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Featherston, Aaron L; Miller, Scott J

    2016-10-15

    We report the synthesis of phenylalanine-derived trifluoromethyl ketones for the in situ generation of dioxiranes for the purpose of oxidation catalysis. The key features of this synthesis include the use of a masked ketone strategy and a Negishi cross-coupling to access the parent amino acid. The derivatives can be readily incorporated into a peptide for use in oxidation chemistry and exhibit good stability and reactivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of Diketopiperizine Peptide Derivatives by Cross-Metathesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    derivatives using Grubbs’ second generation ruthenium catalyst 13 [(H2IMes)(PCy 3)( Cl )2Ru=CHPh] (1) to couple amino acids to the diketopiperazine...catalyst [(PCy3)2( Cl )2Ru=CHPh] where they employed allyl and homoallylamides. 14 Here we report the product yields and distributions of CM reactions of... Fmoc - kin 0 -ý " N R 2 Mes-N N-Mes = cyclohexyl, CP"’ I PhMes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl CI Ph PCY3 1 R - PG O R N 0 PG PG. 0 k~ N 0n PG R Heterodimer

  17. PeptideManager: a peptide selection tool for targeted proteomic studies involving mixed samples from different species

    PubMed Central

    Demeure, Kevin; Duriez, Elodie; Domon, Bruno; Niclou, Simone P.

    2014-01-01

    The search for clinically useful protein biomarkers using advanced mass spectrometry approaches represents a major focus in cancer research. However, the direct analysis of human samples may be challenging due to limited availability, the absence of appropriate control samples, or the large background variability observed in patient material. As an alternative approach, human tumors orthotopically implanted into a different species (xenografts) are clinically relevant models that have proven their utility in pre-clinical research. Patient derived xenografts for glioblastoma have been extensively characterized in our laboratory and have been shown to retain the characteristics of the parental tumor at the phenotypic and genetic level. Such models were also found to adequately mimic the behavior and treatment response of human tumors. The reproducibility of such xenograft models, the possibility to identify their host background and perform tumor-host interaction studies, are major advantages over the direct analysis of human samples. At the proteome level, the analysis of xenograft samples is challenged by the presence of proteins from two different species which, depending on tumor size, type or location, often appear at variable ratios. Any proteomics approach aimed at quantifying proteins within such samples must consider the identification of species specific peptides in order to avoid biases introduced by the host proteome. Here, we present an in-house methodology and tool developed to select peptides used as surrogates for protein candidates from a defined proteome (e.g., human) in a host proteome background (e.g., mouse, rat) suited for a mass spectrometry analysis. The tools presented here are applicable to any species specific proteome, provided a protein database is available. By linking the information from both proteomes, PeptideManager significantly facilitates and expedites the selection of peptides used as surrogates to analyze proteins of interest

  18. Effect of buffalo casein-derived novel bioactive peptides on osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Srinu; Shanmugam, Venkatesa Perumal; Tanedjeu, Kemgang Sonfack; Kapila, Suman; Kapila, Rajeev

    2016-11-21

    Epidemiological and intervention studies show that milk consumption in childhood and during adolescence is related to higher bone mineral density. Milk and milk products prevent the bone loss in pre- and postmenopausal women. Apart from calcium, there are other biologically active compounds in milk such as bioactive peptides which may play a role in promoting bone health. Casein is the major protein in milk which has also been reported to have numerous biological active peptides within it. The hypothesis of the present study was to identify the key peptides behind osteoanabolic nature of the milk protein, which further can be used to prepare functional foods to alleviate bone diseases like osteoporosis. Hence, this study was carried out to investigate osteogenic nature of four novel bioactive peptides [PEP1 (EDVPSER), PEP2 (NAVPITPTL), PEP3 (VLPVPQK) and PEP4 (HPHPHLSF)] derived from buffalo casein by in vitro osteoblast differentiation model. Calvaria cells were isolated from 3-day-old rat pups, cultured under in vitro conditions till confluence and further used for experiments. Calvarial osteoblast cells were cultured in the presence or absence of peptides including positive controls up to 21 days. Effect of peptides was checked at regular intervals by quantifying osteoblast differentiation marker genes (ALP, OCN and COL-1) expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin level in culture supernatants, mineral deposition by alizarin red staining and caspase-3 and 9 assays. The osteoblast differentiation marker genes (ALP, OCN and COL-1) expression was significantly [(p < 0.01) (p < 0.001)] up-regulated in the presence of these peptides. The peptides also significantly induced alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin level and mineral deposition in comparison with the control. It was also observed that all the four peptides did not show any cytotoxic effect during 21-day treatment period. All peptides enhanced osteoblast differentiation along with the

  19. Targeted Drug Delivery Systems Mediated by a Novel Peptide in Breast Cancer Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chien-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Yan, Shin-Long; Wang, Yi-Ping; Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Yeh, Chen-Yun; Lo, Albert; Wu, Han-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of drugs to tumors represents a significant advance in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, development of novel tumor-specific ligands or pharmaceutical nanocarriers is highly desirable. In this study, we utilized phage display to identify a new targeting peptide, SP90, which specifically binds to breast cancer cells, and recognizes tumor tissues from breast cancer patients. We used confocal and electron microscopy to reveal that conjugation of SP90 with liposomes enables efficient delivery of drugs into cancer cells through endocytosis. Furthermore, in vivo fluorescent imaging demonstrated that SP90-conjugated quantum dots possess tumor-targeting properties. In tumor xenograft and orthotopic models, SP90-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was found to improve the therapeutic index of the chemotherapeutic drug by selectively increasing its accumulation in tumors. We conclude that the targeting peptide SP90 has significant potential in improving the clinical benefits of chemotherapy in the treatment and the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:23776619

  20. Differences between lumen targeting domains of chloroplast transit peptides determine pathway specificity for thylakoid transport.

    PubMed

    Henry, R; Kapazoglou, A; McCaffery, M; Cline, K

    1994-04-08

    Nuclear encoded thylakoid lumen proteins are imported into the chloroplast storma and further directed across thylakoid membranes by lumen targeting domains. Recently, we showed that there are two protein-specific pathways for transport into the lumen. This was unexpected in that lumen targeting domains have similar properties, all containing bacterial signal peptide motifs. Nevertheless, sequence homology analysis suggests that pathway specificity is determined by elements in the lumen targeting domain. To test this, we constructed and analyzed chimeric proteins in which transit peptides from proteins transported by one pathway were fused to the mature domains of proteins directed by the other. We also investigated the transport characteristics of a previously unexamined protein whose pathway was predicted by sequence similarity analysis. Our results confirm that lumen targeting domains contain pathway sorting elements and further indicate that distinct energy and stroma requirements for transport are pathway characteristics, unrelated to the passenger protein. These findings suggest the operation of two mechanistically different translocators.

  1. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activities of antimicrobial peptides derived from human and bovine cathelicidins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Watson, Karen M; Buckheit, Robert W

    2008-09-01

    From among 15 human cathelicidin LL-37-derived peptides, FK-13 was identified as the smallest peptide active against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and GI-20 had the highest therapeutic index, which was twice that of LL-37. BMAP-18, which is derived from bovine cathelicidin BMAP-27, possessed a therapeutic index similar to that of GI-20. Peptide sequence order, helical structures, and aromatic residues are important in HIV inhibition.

  2. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Human and Bovine Cathelicidins ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Watson, Karen M.; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    From among 15 human cathelicidin LL-37-derived peptides, FK-13 was identified as the smallest peptide active against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and GI-20 had the highest therapeutic index, which was twice that of LL-37. BMAP-18, which is derived from bovine cathelicidin BMAP-27, possessed a therapeutic index similar to that of GI-20. Peptide sequence order, helical structures, and aromatic residues are important in HIV inhibition. PMID:18591279

  3. A Fly-Through Mission Strategy Targeting Peptide as a Signature of Chemical Evolution and Possible Life in Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Dziomba, Szymon; Takahagi, Wataru; Shibuya, Takazo; Takano, Yoshinori; Guerrouache, Mohamed; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Takai, Ken; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Yano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In situ detection of organic molecules in the extraterrestrial environment provides a key step towards better understanding the variety and the distribution of building blocks of life and it may ultimately lead to finding extraterrestrial life within the Solar System. Here we present combined results of two separate experiments that enable us to realize such in situ life signature detection from the deep habitats of the "Ocean World": a hydrothermal reactor experiment simulating complex organic synthesis and a simulated fly-through capture experiment of organic-bearing microparticles using silica aerogels, followed by subsequent analysis. Both experiments employ peptide as a plausible organics existing in Encleadus plume particles produced in its subsurface ocean. Recent laboratory hydrothermal experiments and a theoretical model on silica saturation indicated an on going hydrothermal reactions in subsurface Enceladus ocean. Given the porous chondritic origin of the core, it is likely that organic compounds originated by radiation chemistry such as amino acid precursors could have been provided, leached, and altered through widespread water-rock interactions. By using the same laboratory experimental setup from the latest water-rock interaction study, we performed amino acid polymerization experiments for 144 days and monitored the organic complexity changing over time. So far over 3,000 peaks up to the size of greater than 600 MW were observed through the analysis of capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS) with an indication of amino acid derivatives and short peptides. Generally abiotic polymerization of enantiomeric amino acids results in forming stereoisomeric peptides with identical molecular weight and formula as opposed to homochiral biopolymers. Assuming Enceladus plume particles may contain a mixture of stereoisomeric peptides, we were able to distinguish 16 of the 17 stereoisomeric tripeptides as a test sample using

  4. Identification of Programmed Death Ligand 1-derived Peptides Capable of Inducing Cancer-reactive Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes From HLA-A24+ Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-09-01

    Molecular therapy targeting tumor angiogenesis has been the standard treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, despite their significant antitumor effects, most of patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anticancer immunotherapy has been considered a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells. However, anticancer CTLs can be inhibited by several immune inhibitory mechanisms, including the interaction between programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1, on T cells and cancer cells, respectively. Alternatively, this also means that PD-L1 could be a promising target for anticancer immunotherapy. Therefore, we searched for PD-L1-derived peptides that are applicable for anticancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from PD-L1, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24(+) allele, both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides induced peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Such PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8 T cells showed cytotoxicity against HLA-A24(+) and PD-L1-expressing RCC cells. Although IFN-γ treatment increased PD-L1 expression on PD-L1(low) RCC cells, their sensitivity to cytotoxicity of PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells varied between patients. Altogether, these results indicate that both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides could be candidates for peptide-based anticancer vaccines for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  5. Multivalent Targeting Based Delivery of Therapeutic Peptide using AP1-ELP Carrier for Effective Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sarangthem, Vijaya; Kim, Yunjae; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Seo, Bo-Yeon; Cheon, Sun-Ha; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Byung-Heon; Park, Rang-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP)-based drug delivery has been utilized for various applications including cancer therapies for many years. Genetic incorporation of internalization ligands and cell-targeting peptides along with ELP polymer enhanced tumor accumulation and retention time as well as stability and activities of the drug conjugates. Herein, we described a unique delivery system comprised of genetically engineered ELP incorporated with multiple copies of IL-4 receptor targeting peptide (AP1) periodically and proapoptotic peptide (KLAKLAK)2 referred to as AP1-ELP-KLAK. It triggered thermal-responsive self-assembly into a nanoparticle-like structure at physiological body temperature and stabilized its helical conformation, which is critical for its membrane-disrupting activities. Increased IL-4 receptor specific cellular internalization was associated with the enhanced cytotoxic effect of (KLAKLAK)2 peptide. Additionally, multivalent presentation of targeting ligands by AP1-ELP-KLAK significantly enhanced intratumoral localization and prolonged the retention time compared to ELP-KLAK, non-targeted control. Systemic administration of AP1-ELP-KLAK significantly inhibited tumor growth by provoking cell apoptosis in various tumor xenograft models without any specific organ toxicity. Thus, our newly designed AP1-ELP-KLAK polymer nanoparticle is a promising candidate for effective cancer therapy and due to the simple preparative procedures of ELPs, this platform can be used as a good carrier for tumor-specific delivery of other therapeutics. PMID:27924160

  6. The HA-incorporated nanostructure of a peptide-drug amphiphile for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Huyeon; Jeena, M T; Palanikumar, L; Jeong, Yoojeong; Park, Sooham; Lee, Eunji; Ryu, Ja-Hyoung

    2016-04-25

    A simple peptide based prodrug of camptothecin (CPT) has been synthesised in which the CPT is conjugated to a tripeptide (KCK) via a disulfide linkage (KCK-CPT) and self-assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water depending on the concentration. The hyaluronic acid (HA) complex of KCK-CPT exhibited target specific toxicity with excellent antitumour efficiency.

  7. The fusogenic peptide HA2 impairs selectivity of CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Serna, N; Mattanovich, M; Cazzanelli, P; Sánchez-Chardi, A; Conchillo-Solé, O; Cortés, F; Daura, X; Unzueta, U; Mangues, R; Villaverde, A; Vázquez, E

    2017-03-21

    We demonstrate here that the genetic incorporation of the fusogenic peptide HA2 into a CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticle dramatically reduces the specificity of the interaction between nanoparticles and cell receptors, a factor to be considered when designing tumor-homing drug vehicles displaying endosomal-escape agents. The loss of specificity is concomitant with enhanced cell penetrability.

  8. Structure-Function Characterization and Optimization of a Plant-Derived Antibacterial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Mougli; Haenni, Marisa; Canarelli, Stéphane; Fisch, Florian; Chodanowski, Pierre; Servis, Catherine; Michielin, Olivier; Freitag, Ruth; Moreillon, Philippe; Mermod, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    Crushed seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree have been used traditionally as natural flocculants to clarify drinking water. We previously showed that one of the seed peptides mediates both the sedimentation of suspended particles such as bacterial cells and a direct bactericidal activity, raising the possibility that the two activities might be related. In this study, the conformational modeling of the peptide was coupled to a functional analysis of synthetic derivatives. This indicated that partly overlapping structural determinants mediate the sedimentation and antibacterial activities. Sedimentation requires a positively charged, glutamine-rich portion of the peptide that aggregates bacterial cells. The bactericidal activity was localized to a sequence prone to form a helix-loop-helix structural motif. Amino acid substitution showed that the bactericidal activity requires hydrophobic proline residues within the protruding loop. Vital dye staining indicated that treatment with peptides containing this motif results in bacterial membrane damage. Assembly of multiple copies of this structural motif into a branched peptide enhanced antibacterial activity, since low concentrations effectively kill bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyogenes without displaying a toxic effect on human red blood cells. This study thus identifies a synthetic peptide with potent antibacterial activity against specific human pathogens. It also suggests partly distinct molecular mechanisms for each activity. Sedimentation may result from coupled flocculation and coagulation effects, while the bactericidal activity would require bacterial membrane destabilization by a hydrophobic loop. PMID:16127062

  9. Proglucagon-Derived Peptides Do Not Significantly Affect Acute Exocrine Pancreas in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akalestou, Elina; Christakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Antonia M; Minnion, James S; Rutter, Guy A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2016-08-01

    Reports have suggested a link between treatment with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogs and an increased risk of pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin, a dual agonist of both GLP-1 and glucagon receptors, is currently being investigated as a potential antiobesity therapy, but little is known about its pancreatic safety. The aim of the study was to investigate the acute effect of oxyntomodulin and other proglucagon-derived peptides on the rat exocrine pancreas. Glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, glucagon, and exendin-4 were infused into anesthetized rats to measure plasma amylase concentration changes. In addition, the effect of each peptide on both amylase release and proliferation in rat pancreatic acinar (AR42J) and primary isolated ductal cells was determined. Plasma amylase did not increase postpeptide infusion, compared with vehicle and cholecystokinin; however, oxyntomodulin inhibited plasma amylase when coadministered with cholecystokinin. None of the peptides caused a significant increase in proliferation rate or amylase secretion from acinar and ductal cells. The investigated peptides do not have an acute effect on the exocrine pancreas with regard to proliferation and plasma amylase, when administered individually. Oxyntomodulin seems to be a potent inhibitor of amylase release, potentially making it a safer antiobesity agent regarding pancreatitis, compared with GLP-1 agonists.