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Sample records for peptide derivative targeting

  1. Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Kreitler, Dale F; Thomas, Nicole C; Belair, David G; Rettko, Nicholas J; Murphy, William L; Forest, Katrina T; Gellman, Samuel H

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain-mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  2. Targeting diverse protein–protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, James W.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Thomas, Nicole C.; Belair, David G.; Rettko, Nicholas J.; Murphy, William L.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2015-04-14

    Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of large and topologically complex protein surfaces. Here, we describe a strategy for designing oligomers containing both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") that mimic several peptides derived from the three-helix bundle "Z-domain" scaffold. We show that α/β-peptides derived from a Z-domain peptide targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can structurally and functionally mimic the binding surface of the parent peptide while exhibiting significantly decreased susceptibility to proteolysis. The tightest VEGF-binding α/β-peptide inhibits the VEGF₁₆₅-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this strategy by showing how principles underlying VEGF signaling inhibitors can be rapidly extended to produce Z-domain–mimetic α/β-peptides that bind to two other protein partners, IgG and tumor necrosis factor-α. Because well-established selection techniques can identify high-affinity Z-domain derivatives from large DNA-encoded libraries, our findings should enable the design of biostable α/β-peptides that bind tightly and specifically to diverse targets of biomedical interest. Such reagents would be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  3. Targeting of liposomes to HIV-1-infected cells by peptides derived from the CD4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Slepushkin, V A; Salem, I I; Andreev, S M; Dazin, P; Düzgüneş, N

    1996-10-23

    Liposomes can be targeted to HIV-infected cells by either reconstituting transmembrane CD4 in the membrane or covalently coupling soluble CD4 to modified lipids. We investigated whether synthetic peptides could be used as ligands for targeting liposomes. A synthetic peptide from the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR-2)-like domain of CD4 could bind specifically to HIV-infected cells and mediate the binding of peptide-coupled liposomes to these cells. A peptide from the CDR-3-like domain of CD4 inhibited HIV-induced syncytia formation, but failed to target liposomes to infected cells. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the requirement for a conformational change in the CD4 receptor for the CDR-3 region to interact with the HIV envelope protein. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using synthetic peptides to target liposomes containing antiviral drugs to HIV-infected cells.

  4. Mammary-Derived Growth Inhibitor Targeting Peptide-Modified PEG-PLA Nanoparticles for Enhanced Targeted Glioblastoma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xingye; Gao, Xiaoling; Kang, Ting; Jiang, Di; Yao, Jianhui; Jing, Yixian; Song, Qingxiang; Jiang, Xinguo; Liang, Jianying; Chen, Jun

    2015-08-19

    Targeting delivery of chemotherapeutics to neovasculature represents a promising means for tumor therapy since angiogenesis has been a featured hallmark of glioblastma. However, anti-angiogenic therapy would induce the occurrence of metastatic tumor and even neoplasm recurrence. Simultaneous targeting of tumor cells and neovasculature perfectly overcome such defects and has been proven to be an efficacious strategy for suppressing tumor growth. In the present study, a tumor homing peptide CooP selective binding to mammary-derived growth inhibitor that overexpressed in glioma cells and blood vessel endothelial cells was decorated on the surface of paclitaxel-loading PEG-PLA nanoparticles (NP-PTX) to obtain the dual targeting nanovector CooP-NP-PTX. In vitro antiproliferation study showed that HUVEC cells and U87MG cells were much more sensitive to CooP-NP-PTX than NP-PTX. In vivo imaging demonstrated that CooP-NP accumulated more selectively and penetrated deeper into the tumor site. In addition, the glioma-bearing mice treated with CooP-NP-PTX achieved the longest survival time compared to NP-PTX and Taxol. The findings observed above indicated that CooP peptide-functionalized anti-neoplastic agent-loaded nanoparticles might possess promising potential for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:26222392

  5. A bacteria deriving peptide modified dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGL) self-assembling nanoplatform for targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; He, Xi; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Wang, Chenyu; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Lou, Jinning; Jiang, Chen

    2014-10-01

    Achieving effective gene therapy for glioma depends on gene delivery systems. The gene delivery system should be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and further target glioma at its early stage. Active brain tumor targeted delivery can be achieved using the "Trojan horse" technology, which involves either endogenous ligands or extraneous substances that can recognize and bind to specific receptors in target sites. This method facilitates receptor-mediated endocytosis to cross the BBB and enter into glioma cells. Dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGLs), which are novel nonviral gene vectors, are conjugated to a peptide (sequence: EPRNEEK) derived from Streptococcus pneumonia, a pathogen causing meningitis. This process yields peptide-modified nanoparticles (NPs) after DNA loading. Cellular uptake and in vivo imaging results indicate that EPRNEEK peptide-modified NPs have a better brain tumor targeted effect compared with a pentapeptide derived from endogenous laminin after intravenous injection. The mechanism of this effect is further explored in the present study. Besides, EPRNEEK peptide-modified NPs also exhibited a prolonged median survival time. In conclusion, the EPRNEEK peptide-modified DGL NPs exhibit potential as a nonviral platform for efficient, noninvasive, and safe brain glioma dual-targeted gene delivery.

  6. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    PubMed

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  7. A leptin derived 30-amino-acid peptide modified pegylated poly-L-lysine dendrigraft for brain targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jianfeng; Shao, Kun; Huang, Rongqin; Ye, Liya; Lou, Jinning; Jiang, Chen

    2010-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier is the major obstacle that prevents diagnostic and therapeutic drugs being delivered to the central nervous systems in order to exert their effects. Specific ligand-receptor binding mediated endocytosis is one of the possible strategies to cross this barrier. A 30-amino-acid peptide (leptin30) derived from an endogenic hormone-leptin is exploited as brain-targeting ligand as it is reported to possess the same brain accumulation efficiency after intravenous injection. Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) is used as non-viral gene vector in this study. DGL-PEG-Leptin30 was complexed with plasmid DNA yielding nanoparticles (NPs). The cellular uptake characteristic and mechanism were explored in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) which express leptin receptors. Furthermore, brain parenchyma microglia cells such as BV-2 cells expressing leptin receptors could promote ligand-receptor mediated endocytosis leading to enhanced gene transfection ability of DGL-PEG-Leptin30/DNA NPs. The targeted NPs were proved to be transported across in vitro BBB model effectively and accumulate more in brains after i.v. resulting in a relatively high gene transfection efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Besides, the NPs showed low cytotoxicity after in vitro transfection. Thus, DGL-PEG-Leptin30 provides a safe and noninvasive approach for the delivery of gene across the blood-brain barrier.

  8. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment.

  9. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27695323

  10. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  11. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen–host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-tuberculosis vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, i.e. Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro. PMID:25041568

  12. Peptide targeted copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Michelle T; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography are viable candidates for molecular imaging of cancer. In a clinical setting, optimal image quality relies on selective tumor uptake of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer. The three components of the radiotracer construct--the chelate group, linker and targeting peptide--all influence the biodistribution of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Low or moderate Cu complex stability in vivo results in transmetallation of ⁶⁴Cu to endogenous proteins, giving rise to high background activity. The length and the nature of the linker group affect the affinity of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer for the target receptor. Variations in the peptide sequence can impact on the metabolic stability and therefore the bioavailability and tumor retention of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Lastly, the hydrophilicity of the construct can influence radiotracer metabolism and clearance pathways. Recent advances in the field of peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals involve GRPR-targeted and αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted constructs. These constructs are based on the bombesin peptide sequence and the RGD recognition motif respectively. These examples are reviewed as case studies in the optimisation of ⁶⁴Cu radiotracer design.

  13. Cell-specific targeting in the mouse inner ear using nanoparticles conjugated with a neurotrophin-derived peptide ligand: potential tool for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumen; Johnston, Alex H; Newman, Tracey A; Glueckert, Rudolf; Dudas, Jozsef; Bitsche, Mario; Corbacella, Elisa; Rieger, Gunde; Martini, Alessandro; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2010-05-10

    Cell specific targeting is an emerging field in nanomedicine. Homing of the multifunctional nanoparticles (MFNPs) is achieved by the conjugation of targeting moieties on the nanoparticle surface. The inner ear is an attractive target for new drug delivery strategies as it is hard to access and hearing loss is a significant worldwide problem. In this work we investigated the utility of a Nerve Growth Factor-derived peptide (hNgf_EE) functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) to target cells of the inner ear. These functionalized NPs were introduced to organotypic explant cultures of the mouse inner ear and to PC-12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. The NPs did not show any signs of toxicity. Specific targeting and higher binding affinity to spiral ganglion neurons, Schwann cells and nerve fibers of the explant cultures were achieved through ligand mediated multivalent binding to tyrosine kinase receptors and to p75 neurotrophin receptors. Unspecific uptake of NPs was investigated using NPs conjugated with scrambled hNgf_EE peptide. Our results indicate a selective cochlear cell targeting by MFNPs, which may be a potential tool for cell specific drug and gene delivery to the inner ear.

  14. Food-derived immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mata-Haro, Verónica; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2016-08-01

    Food proteins contain specific amino acid sequences within their structures that may positively impact bodily functions and have multiple immunomodulatory effects. The functional properties of these specific sequences, also referred to as bioactive peptides, are revealed only after the degradation of native proteins during digestion processes. Currently, milk proteins have been the most explored source of bioactive peptides, which presents an interesting opportunity for the dairy industry. However, plant- and animal-derived proteins have also been shown to be important sources of bioactive peptides. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence of the role of various food proteins as sources of immunomodulatory peptides and discusses the possible pathways involving these properties. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    PubMed

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P < 0.001). The sperm-zona pellucida interaction described in this paper is applied as a functional assay for molecular interactions of sperm binding and can be used to assess function for potential surface markers on gametes. It is shown here that a unique binding ligand (PPS2) can be synthesized from another complimentary ligand (PPS1) without the need for a known intermediate substrate. PPS1 and PPS2 may have properties that can be used to target processes involved in conception and assisted reproduction. A movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  16. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  17. Therapeutic targeting of naturally presented myeloperoxidase-derived HLA peptide ligands on myeloid leukemia cells by TCR-transgenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Klar, R; Schober, S; Rami, M; Mall, S; Merl, J; Hauck, S M; Ueffing, M; Admon, A; Slotta-Huspenina, J; Schwaiger, M; Stevanović, S; Oostendorp, R A J; Busch, D H; Peschel, C; Krackhardt, A M

    2014-12-01

    T cells have been proven to be therapeutically effective in patients with relapsed leukemias, although target antigens on leukemic cells as well as T-cell receptors (TCRs), potentially recognizing those antigens, are mostly unknown. We have applied an immunopeptidomic approach and isolated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands from primary leukemia cells. We identified a number of ligands derived from different genes that are restrictedly expressed in the hematopoietic system. We exemplarily selected myeloperoxidase (MPO) as a potential target and isolated a high-avidity TCR with specificity for a HLA-B*07:02-(HLA-B7)-restricted epitope of MPO in the single HLA-mismatched setting. T cells transgenic for this TCR demonstrated high peptide and antigen specificity as well as leukemia reactivity in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, no significant on- and off-target toxicity could be observed. In conclusion, we here demonstrate, exemplarily for MPO, that leukemia-derived HLA ligands can be selected for specific effector tool development to redirect T cells to be used for graft manipulation or adoptive T-cell therapies in diverse transplant settings. This approach can be extended to other HLA ligands and HLA molecules in order to provide better treatment options for this life-threatening disease.

  18. HLA-A*0201-restricted CEA-derived peptide CAP1 is not a suitable target for T-cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fauquembergue, Emilie; Toutirais, Olivier; Tougeron, David; Drouet, Aurélie; Le Gallo, Matthieu; Desille, Mireille; Cabillic, Florian; de La Pintière, Cécile Thomas; Iero, Manuela; Rivoltini, Licia; Baert-Desurmont, Stéphanie; Leprince, Jérôme; Vaudry, Hubert; Sesboué, Richard; Frébourg, Thierry; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Catros, Véronique

    2010-05-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy, as it is frequently overexpressed in human carcinomas. Moreover, an epitope derived from CEA, designated CAP1 (YLSGANLNL), has been proposed as naturally processed and presented by tumors in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 context. Our aim was to fully characterize and assess the clinical relevance of the HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response against CEA. Stable and potent artificial antigen presenting cells (AAPCs) were used to evaluate T-cell response against CEA. These cells efficiently activate CTLs against tumor-derived epitopes after transduction with the antigenic peptides or full-length proteins. We found that AAPCs genetically modified to express CAP1, the agonist peptide CAP1-6D, or the whole CEA protein were not able to activate CAP1-specific CTLs from HLA-A*0201+ healthy donors or patients with colorectal carcinoma, even after multiple stimulations. In addition, we showed that a CAP1-specific T-cell clone, obtained after multiple stimulations of T cells of a HLA-A*0201+ healthy donor in vitro with autologous antigen presenting cells, recognized CEA(-) HLA-A*0201+ tumors transduced with a minigene encoding CAP1 but failed to react against HLA-A*0201+ tumor cells expressing CEA. Finally, AAPCs expressing the whole CEA protein did not induce any specific CTL response against CEA+ HLA-A*0201+ tumor cells highlighting the potential difficulty of mounting an efficacious T-cell response against this autoantigen. Altogether, our data indicate that CAP1 is not efficiently processed and presented by CEA+ tumor cells, and therefore, is not an appropriate target for T-cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:20386466

  19. Targeting RNA with cysteine-constrained peptides

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Virginia A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Basso, Anne; Cavanagh, John; Melander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    A combined approach for targeting RNA with novel, biologically active ligands has been developed using a cyclic peptide library and in silico modeling. This approach has successfully identified novel cyclic peptide constructs that can target bTAR RNA. Subsequently, RNA/peptide interactions were effectively modeled using the HADDOCK docking program. PMID:18065222

  20. Inhibition of lethal inflammatory responses through the targeting of membrane-associated Toll-like receptor 4 signaling complexes with a Smad6-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Sook; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Su Myung; Kim, Sang-Doo; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Mamura, Mizuko; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported that Smad6, one of the inhibitory Smads of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling by disrupting the Pellino-1-mediated TLR4 signaling complex. Here, we developed Smaducin-6, a novel membrane-tethered palmitic acid-conjugated Smad6-derived peptide composed of amino acids 422-441 of Smad6. Smaducin-6 interacted with Pellino-1, located in the inner membrane, thereby disrupting the formation of IRAK1-, RIP1-, IKKε-mediated TLR4 signaling complexes. Systemic administration of Smaducin-6 showed a significant therapeutic effect on mouse TLR4-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis while enhancing neutrophil migration and bacterial clearance. Our findings provide clues to develop new peptide-based drugs to target Pellino-1 protein in TLR4 signaling pathway for the treatment of sepsis.

  1. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27197902

  2. Targeting B-cell neoplasia with T-cell receptors recognizing a CD20-derived peptide on patient-specific HLA.

    PubMed

    Mensali, Nadia; Ying, Fan; Sheng, Vincent Oei Yi; Yang, Weiwen; Walseng, Even; Kumari, Shraddha; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Kolstad, Arne; Uckert, Wolfgang; Malmberg, Karl Johan; Wälchli, Sébastien; Olweus, Johanna

    2016-05-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeted to CD19 are effective in treatment of B-lymphoid malignancies. However, CARs recognize all CD19 positive (pos) cells, and durable responses are linked to profound depletion of normal B cells. Here, we designed a strategy to specifically target patient B cells by utilizing the fact that T-cell receptors (TCRs), in contrast to CARs, are restricted by HLA. Two TCRs recognizing a peptide from CD20 (SLFLGILSV) in the context of foreign HLA-A*02:01 (CD20p/HLA-A2) were expressed as 2A-bicistronic constructs. T cells re-directed with the A23 and A94 TCR constructs efficiently recognized malignant HLA-A2(pos) B cells endogenously expressing CD20, including patient-derived follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. In contrast, a wide range of HLA-A2(pos)CD20(neg) cells representing different tissue origins, and HLA-A2(neg)CD20(pos) cells, were not recognized. Cytotoxic T cells re-directed with CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs or CD19 CARs responded with similar potencies to cells endogenously expressing comparable levels of CD20 and CD19. The CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs recognized CD20p bound to HLA-A2 with high functional avidity. The results show that T cells expressing CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs efficiently and specifically target B cells. When used in context of an HLA-haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation where the donor is HLA-A2(neg) and the patient HLA-A2(pos), these T cells would selectively kill patient-derived B cells and allow reconstitution of the B-cell compartment with HLA-A2(neg) donor cells. These results should pave the way for clinical testing of T cells genetically engineered to target malignant B cells without permanent depletion of normal B cells.

  3. Targeting B-cell neoplasia with T-cell receptors recognizing a CD20-derived peptide on patient-specific HLA.

    PubMed

    Mensali, Nadia; Ying, Fan; Sheng, Vincent Oei Yi; Yang, Weiwen; Walseng, Even; Kumari, Shraddha; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Kolstad, Arne; Uckert, Wolfgang; Malmberg, Karl Johan; Wälchli, Sébastien; Olweus, Johanna

    2016-05-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeted to CD19 are effective in treatment of B-lymphoid malignancies. However, CARs recognize all CD19 positive (pos) cells, and durable responses are linked to profound depletion of normal B cells. Here, we designed a strategy to specifically target patient B cells by utilizing the fact that T-cell receptors (TCRs), in contrast to CARs, are restricted by HLA. Two TCRs recognizing a peptide from CD20 (SLFLGILSV) in the context of foreign HLA-A*02:01 (CD20p/HLA-A2) were expressed as 2A-bicistronic constructs. T cells re-directed with the A23 and A94 TCR constructs efficiently recognized malignant HLA-A2(pos) B cells endogenously expressing CD20, including patient-derived follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. In contrast, a wide range of HLA-A2(pos)CD20(neg) cells representing different tissue origins, and HLA-A2(neg)CD20(pos) cells, were not recognized. Cytotoxic T cells re-directed with CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs or CD19 CARs responded with similar potencies to cells endogenously expressing comparable levels of CD20 and CD19. The CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs recognized CD20p bound to HLA-A2 with high functional avidity. The results show that T cells expressing CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs efficiently and specifically target B cells. When used in context of an HLA-haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation where the donor is HLA-A2(neg) and the patient HLA-A2(pos), these T cells would selectively kill patient-derived B cells and allow reconstitution of the B-cell compartment with HLA-A2(neg) donor cells. These results should pave the way for clinical testing of T cells genetically engineered to target malignant B cells without permanent depletion of normal B cells. PMID:27467957

  4. Computer-based prediction of mitochondria-targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Savojardo, Castrense; Fariselli, Piero; Tasco, Gianluca; Casadio, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods are invaluable when protein sequences, directly derived from genomic data, need functional and structural annotation. Subcellular localization is a feature necessary for understanding the protein role and the compartment where the mature protein is active and very difficult to characterize experimentally. Mitochondrial proteins encoded on the cytosolic ribosomes carry specific patterns in the precursor sequence from where it is possible to recognize a peptide targeting the protein to its final destination. Here we discuss to which extent it is feasible to develop computational methods for detecting mitochondrial targeting peptides in the precursor sequences and benchmark our and other methods on the human mitochondrial proteins endowed with experimentally characterized targeting peptides. Furthermore, we illustrate our newly implemented web server and its usage on the whole human proteome in order to infer mitochondrial targeting peptides, their cleavage sites, and whether the targeting peptide regions contain or not arginine-rich recurrent motifs. By this, we add some other 2,800 human proteins to the 124 ones already experimentally annotated with a mitochondrial targeting peptide. PMID:25631024

  5. Human Anti-Aβ IgGs Target Conformational Epitopes on Synthetic Dimer Assemblies and the AD Brain-Derived Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A.; Ehrlich, Hartmut J.; Schwarz, Hans P.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Solomon, Alan; O’Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ’s conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody’s nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody’s lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted. PMID:23209707

  6. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  7. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  10. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  11. The proteome targets of intracellular targeting antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pramod; Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been considered well-deserving candidates to fight the battle against microorganisms due to their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. Several studies have suggested that membrane disruption is the basic mechanism of AMPs that leads to killing or inhibiting microorganisms. Also, AMPs have been reported to interact with macromolecules inside the microbial cells such as nucleic acids (DNA/RNA), protein synthesis, essential enzymes, membrane septum formation and cell wall synthesis. Proteins are associated with many intracellular mechanisms of cells, thus protein targets may be specifically involved in mechanisms of action of AMPs. AMPs like pyrrhocoricin, drosocin, apidecin and Bac 7 are documented to have protein targets, DnaK and GroEL. Moreover, the intracellular targeting AMPs are reported to influence more than one protein targets inside the cell, suggesting for the multiple modes of actions. This complex mechanism of intracellular targeting AMPs makes them more difficult for the development of resistance. Herein, we have summarized the current status of AMPs in terms of their mode of actions, entry to cytoplasm and inhibition of macromolecules. To reveal the mechanism of action, we have focused on AMPs with intracellular protein targets. We have also included the use of high-throughput proteome microarray to determine the unidentified AMP protein targets in this review.

  12. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Asare, B K; Biswas, P K; Rajnarayanan, R V

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide "I-box" derived from ER residues 503-518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479-485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497-506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511-520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497-506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. PMID:27462021

  13. Targeting B16 tumors in vivo with peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan; Bekah, Devesh; Teodoro, Jose G.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and peptide conjugation on the biodistribution of ultrasmall (2.7 nm) gold nanoparticles in mice bearing B16 melanoma allografts. Nanoparticles were delivered intravenously, and biodistribution was measured at specific timepoints by organ digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All major organs were examined. Two peptides were tested: the cyclic RGD peptide (cRGD, which targets integrins); and a recently described peptide derived from the myxoma virus. We found the greatest specific tumor delivery using the myxoma peptide, with or without PEGylation. Un-PEGylated cRGD performed poorly, but PEGylated RGD showed a significant transient collection in the tumor. Liver and kidney were the primary targets of all constructs. None of the particles were able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Although it was able to deliver Au to B16 cells, the myxoma peptide did not show any cytotoxic activity against these cells, in contrast to previous reports. These results indicate that the effect of passive targeting by PEGylation and active targeting by peptides can be independent or combined, and that they should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis when designing new nanosystems for targeted therapies. Both myxoma peptide and cRGD should be considered for specific targeting to melanoma, but a thorough investigation of the cytotoxicity of the myxoma peptide to different cell lines remains to be performed.

  14. High-avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for a new PRAME-derived peptide can target leukemic and leukemic-precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Quintarelli, Concetta; Dotti, Gianpietro; Hasan, Sayyeda T; De Angelis, Biagio; Hoyos, Valentina; Errichiello, Santa; Mims, Martha; Luciano, Luigia; Shafer, Jessica; Leen, Ann M; Heslop, Helen E; Rooney, Cliona M; Pane, Fabrizio; Brenner, Malcolm K; Savoldo, Barbara

    2011-03-24

    The cancer testis antigen (CTA) preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is overexpressed by many hematologic malignancies, but is absent on normal tissues, including hematopoietic progenitor cells, and may therefore be an appropriate candidate for T cell-mediated immunotherapy. Because it is likely that an effective antitumor response will require high-avidity, PRAME-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we attempted to generate such CTLs using professional and artificial antigen-presenting cells loaded with a peptide library spanning the entire PRAME protein and consisting of 125 synthetic pentadecapeptides overlapping by 11 amino acids. We successfully generated polyclonal, PRAME-specific CTL lines and elicited high-avidity CTLs, with a high proportion of cells recognizing a previously uninvestigated HLA-A*02-restricted epitope, P435-9mer (NLTHVLYPV). These PRAME-CTLs could be generated both from normal donors and from subjects with PRAME(+) hematologic malignancies. The cytotoxic activity of our PRAME-specific CTLs was directed not only against leukemic blasts, but also against leukemic progenitor cells as assessed by colony-forming-inhibition assays, which have been implicated in leukemia relapse. These PRAME-directed CTLs did not affect normal hematopoietic progenitors, indicating that this approach may be of value for immunotherapy of PRAME(+) hematologic malignancies. PMID:21278353

  15. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. PMID:27451165

  16. Effective Leveraging of Targeted Search Spaces for Improving Peptide Identification in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Avinash K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2015-12-01

    In shotgun proteomics, peptides are typically identified using database searching, which involves scoring acquired tandem mass spectra against peptides derived from standard protein sequence databases such as Uniprot, Refseq, or Ensembl. In this strategy, the sensitivity of peptide identification is known to be affected by the size of the search space. Therefore, creating a targeted sequence database containing only peptides likely to be present in the analyzed sample can be a useful technique for improving the sensitivity of peptide identification. In this study, we describe how targeted peptide databases can be created based on the frequency of identification in the global proteome machine database (GPMDB), the largest publicly available repository of peptide and protein identification data. We demonstrate that targeted peptide databases can be easily integrated into existing proteome analysis workflows and describe a computational strategy for minimizing any loss of peptide identifications arising from potential search space incompleteness in the targeted search spaces. We demonstrate the performance of our workflow using several data sets of varying size and sample complexity.

  17. Effective Leveraging of Targeted Search Spaces for Improving Peptide Identification in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Avinash K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2015-12-01

    In shotgun proteomics, peptides are typically identified using database searching, which involves scoring acquired tandem mass spectra against peptides derived from standard protein sequence databases such as Uniprot, Refseq, or Ensembl. In this strategy, the sensitivity of peptide identification is known to be affected by the size of the search space. Therefore, creating a targeted sequence database containing only peptides likely to be present in the analyzed sample can be a useful technique for improving the sensitivity of peptide identification. In this study, we describe how targeted peptide databases can be created based on the frequency of identification in the global proteome machine database (GPMDB), the largest publicly available repository of peptide and protein identification data. We demonstrate that targeted peptide databases can be easily integrated into existing proteome analysis workflows and describe a computational strategy for minimizing any loss of peptide identifications arising from potential search space incompleteness in the targeted search spaces. We demonstrate the performance of our workflow using several data sets of varying size and sample complexity. PMID:26569054

  18. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  19. Artificial neural network study on organ-targeting peptides.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Kim, Junhyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Minkyoung; Rhee, Hokyoung; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Kang, Sang-Kee; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report a new approach to studying organ targeting of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. The positive control data sets consist of organ-targeting peptide sequences identified by the peroral phage-display technique for four organs, and the negative control data are prepared from random sequences. The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions is validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (the ROC score). VHSE descriptor produces statistically significant training models and the models with simple neural network architectures show slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. The training and test set statistics indicate that our models could discriminate between organ-targeting and random sequences. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of organ-targeting peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  20. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  1. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-05-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented.

  2. Shredding the signal: targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2014-12-01

    The biogenesis and functionality of mitochondria and chloroplasts depend on the constant turnover of their proteins. The majority of mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are imported as precursors via their N-terminal targeting peptides. After import, the targeting peptides are cleaved off and degraded. Recent work has elucidated a pathway involved in the degradation of targeting peptides in mitochondria and chloroplasts, with two proteolytic components: the presequence protease (PreP) and the organellar oligopeptidase (OOP). PreP and OOP are specialized in degrading peptides of different lengths, with the substrate restriction being dictated by the structure of their proteolytic cavities. The importance of the intraorganellar peptide degradation is highlighted by the fact that elimination of both oligopeptidases affects growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  3. Preproglucagon derived peptides GLP-1, GLP-2 and oxyntomodulin in the CNS: role of peripherally secreted and centrally produced peptides.

    PubMed

    Vrang, Niels; Larsen, Philip Just

    2010-11-01

    The scientific understanding of preproglucagon derived peptides has provided people with type 2 diabetes with two novel classes of glucose lowering agents, the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists. For the scientists, the novel GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-IV inhibitors have evolved as useful tools to understand the role of the preproglucagon derived peptides in normal physiology and disease. However, the overwhelming interest attracted by GLP-1 analogues as potent incretins has somewhat clouded the efforts to understand the importance of preproglucagon derived peptides in other physiological contexts. In particular, our neurobiological understanding of the preproglucagon expressing neuronal pathways in the central nervous system as well as the degree to which central GLP-1 receptors are targeted by peripherally administered GLP-1 receptor agonists is still fairly limited. The role of GLP-1 as an anorectic neurotransmitter is well recognized, but clarification of the neuronal targets and physiological basis of this response is further warranted, as is the mapping of GLP-1 sensitive neurons involved in a variety of neuroendocrine and behavioral responses. Further recent evidence points to GLP-1 as a central neuropeptide with neuroprotective capabilities potentially mitigating a wide array of neurodegenerative conditions. It is the aim of the present review to summarize our current understanding of preproglucagon derived peptides as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

  4. Targeted Killing of Streptococcus mutans by a Pheromone-Guided “Smart” Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Randal ; He, Jian; Yarbrough, Daniel K.; Qi, Fengxia; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wenyuan

    2006-01-01

    Within the repertoire of antibiotics available to a prescribing clinician, the majority affect a broad range of microorganisms, including the normal flora. The ecological disruption resulting from antibiotic treatment frequently results in secondary infections or other negative clinical consequences. To address this problem, our laboratory has recently developed a new class of pathogen-selective molecules, called specifically (or selectively) targeted antimicrobial peptides (STAMPs), based on the fusion of a species-specific targeting peptide domain with a wide-spectrum antimicrobial peptide domain. In the current study, we focused on achieving targeted killing of Streptococcus mutans, a cavity-causing bacterium that resides in a multispecies microbial community (dental plaque). In particular, we explored the possibility of utilizing a pheromone produced by S. mutans, namely, the competence stimulating peptide (CSP), as a STAMP targeting domain to mediate S. mutans-specific delivery of an antimicrobial peptide domain. We discovered that STAMPs constructed with peptides derived from CSP were potent against S. mutans grown in liquid or biofilm states but did not affect other oral streptococci tested. Further studies showed that an 8-amino-acid region within the CSP sequence is sufficient for targeted delivery of the antimicrobial peptide domain to S. mutans. The STAMPs presented here are capable of eliminating S. mutans from multispecies biofilms without affecting closely related noncariogenic oral streptococci, indicating the potential of these molecules to be developed into “probiotic” antibiotics which could selectively eliminate pathogens while preserving the protective benefits of a healthy normal flora. PMID:17060534

  5. Peptide inhibitors of flavivirus entry derived from the E protein stem.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron G; Yang, Priscilla L; Harrison, Stephen C

    2010-12-01

    Peptides derived from the "stem" of dengue virus (DV) type 2 (DV2) envelope (E) protein inhibit DV2 infectivity, targeting a late-stage fusion intermediate. We show here that stem peptides from all DV serotypes cross-inhibit DV1 to DV4 but that corresponding peptides derived from related flaviviruses do not. This failure to inhibit infection is not due to poor interaction with the E protein but rather to loss of association with the virion membrane. Residues 442 to 444 of the stem are determinants of inhibition; increasing hydrophobicity in this region increases inhibitory strength. These results support a two-step model of how stem-derived peptides inhibit viral entry. PMID:20881042

  6. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo. PMID:27197631

  7. Chromogranin A-derived peptides are involved in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Aslam, R; Atindehou, M; Lavaux, T; Haïkel, Y; Schneider, F; Metz-Boutigue, M-H

    2012-01-01

    New endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from chromogranin A (CgA) are secreted by nervous, endocrine and immune cells during stress. They display antimicrobial activities by lytic effects at micromolar range using a pore-forming mechanism against Gram-positive bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. These AMPs can also penetrate quickly into neutrophils (without lytic effects), where, similarly to "cell penetrating peptides", they interact with cytoplasmic calmodulin, and induce calcium influx via Store Operated Channels therefore triggering neutrophils activation. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritis are bacteria responsible for severe infections. We investigated here the effects of S. aureus and S. enteritis bacterial proteases on CgA-derived peptides and evaluated their antimicrobial activities. We showed that the Glu-C protease produced by S. aureus V8 induces the loss of the AMPs antibacterial activities and produces new antifungal peptides. In addition, four antimicrobial CGA-derived peptides (chromofungin, procatestatin, human/bovine catestatin) are degraded when treated with bacterial supernatants from S. aureus and S. enteritis, whereas, cateslytin, the short active form of catestatin, resists to this degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that several antimicrobial CgA-derived peptides are able to act synergistically with antibiotics against bacteria and fungi indicating their roles in innate defense.

  8. Inhibition of inflammation by a p38 MAP kinase targeted cell permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Meng, Xianmei; He, Junyun; Gu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    p38 MAPK has been the key therapeutic target for multiple inflammation diseases. However, the clinical applications of p38 inhibitors, most of which target on the ATP binding groove in the kinase, have been held back, largely because of their limited specificity and severe side-effects. An alternative strategy to generate highly selective p38 inhibitor is to block the specific interaction in the p38 signal pathway. Based on the hypothesis that specific binding peptides targeting on the docking groove would interfere the intrinsic interaction between p38 and its partners, we have designed a fusion peptide containing 12aa p38 docking sequence derived from MKK3b and 11aa HIV-TAT transmembrane sequence to form a cell permeable peptide. The peptide specifically binds to p38, and aborts its interaction with upstream kinase as well as downstream substrates, and thus to inhibit p38 phosphorylation and its signaling. Furthermore, the induction and secretion of TNFalpha and other inflammatory factors by LPS are blocked in peptide treated cells and mice. Finally the peptide has been shown to significantly inhibit ear oedema in mice. Therefore, the peptide holds great potential as an anti-inflammation agent for the treatment of inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:18991745

  9. The problem with peptide presumption and the downfall of target-decoy false discovery rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In proteomics, peptide-tandem mass spectrum match scores and target-decoy database derived false discovery rates (FDR) are confidence indicators describing the quality of individual and sets of tandem mass spectrum matches. A user can impose a standard by prescribing a limit to these values, equival...

  10. A New Staple: Peptide-Targeted Covalent Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leverson, Joel D

    2016-09-22

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Huhn et al. (2016) unveil a clever strategy for selectively and irreversibly inhibiting an anti-apoptotic protein, BFL-1. The authors describe stapled peptides bearing carefully placed electrophiles that target a unique cysteine residue in BFL-1 via covalent modification, thus representing an extension of the stapled peptide concept into the covalent inhibitor space. PMID:27662249

  11. Novel alpha-MSH peptide analogs for melanoma targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flook, Adam Michael

    Skin cancer is the one of the most diagnosed cancers in the United States with increasing incidence over the past two decades. There are three major forms of skin cancer but melanoma is the deadliest. It is estimated that 76,690 new diagnoses of melanoma and 9,480 deaths will occur in 2013. Melanoma accounts for approximately 1.6% of all cancer related deaths and is the 5 th leading diagnosed cancer in the United States. The mean survival rate of patients diagnosed with metastatic melanoma is six months, with five year survival rates of less than 5%. In this project, we describe the design and characterization of novel melanoma-targeting peptide analogs for use in diagnostic imaging of both primary and metastatic melanoma lesions. Novel alpha-MSH peptide conjugates were designed to target the melanocortin-1 receptor present and over-expressed on melanoma cells. These peptides were synthesized and their in-vitro melanocortin-1 receptor binding affinities were established in murine melanoma cells. Once binding affinities were determined, the peptides were radiolabeled with 99mTc utilizing a novel direct radiolabeling technique developed in our laboratory. The peptides were purified via reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and in-vivo melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing female C57BL/6 mice. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed with the promising 99m Tc-labeled peptide conjugates. All alpha-MSH peptide conjugates tested showed low nanomolar binding affinity for the melanocortin-1 receptor. All peptides were readily radiolabeld with 99mTc with greater than 95% radiochemical purity. All 99mTc-labeled peptides displayed high specific in-vivo melanoma tumor uptake while maintaining low normal organ accumulation, and were excreted through the urinary system in a timely fashion. In addition, all tested 99mTc-labeld alpha-MSH peptides demonstrated clear visualization of in

  12. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  13. Phage Peptide Libraries As a Source of Targeted Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Nemudraya, A. A.; Richter, V. A.; Kuligina, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the dominant trends in modern pharmacology is the creation of drugs that act directly on the lesion focus and have minimal toxicity on healthy tissues and organs. This problem is particularly acute in relation to oncologic diseases. Short tissue- and organ-specific peptides capable of delivering drugs to the affected organ or tissue are considered promising targeted agents that can be used in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases, including cancer. The review discusses in detail the technology of phage display as a method for obtaining specific targeted peptide agents and offers examples of their use in diagnostic and clinical practice. PMID:27099784

  14. Non-calcitonin secretory peptide derived from preprocalcitonin

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.S.; O'Neil, J.A.; Muszynski, M.; Aron, D.C.; Roos, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The terminal hexadecapeptide sequence of preprocalcitonin (termed carboxyl-adjacent peptide, CAP, for its position relative to calcitonin) has been synthesized to establish a radioimmunoassay for an investigation of cross-reacting peptides in extracts of normal and neoplastic calcitonin-producing tissues. Gel filtration chromatography of a rat thyroid extract revealed a major peak of immunoreactive peptide of approximately the same molecular weight as synthetic CAP. A minor peak of higher molecular weight immunoreactive material was also observed. The isoelectric point of both the thyroid peptide and synthetic material was about 5.2. Immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin were found in approximately equimolar amounts in normal thyroid and in anaplastic and well differentiated rat medullary thyroid carcinomas. Immunoreactive CAP was not detected in any tissue which did not contain calcitonin. Monolayer cultures of a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma contained and secreted equimolar amounts of immunoreactive CAP and calcitonin under basal (1 mM Ca/sup 2 +/) and stimulated (4 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and 1 ..mu..M glucagon) conditions. These data indicate that the thyroidal peptide is probably the hexadecapeptide CAP which is derived from the same translation product as calcitonin. The similarity between the processing of precursors to the amidated peptide melanocyte-stimulating hormone and the corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide and processing of calcitonin and CAP suggests that the sequence Gly-Lys-Lys-Arg is one amidation codon in mammalian systems.

  15. Milk derived bioactive peptides and their impact on human health - A review.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, D P; Mohapatra, S; Misra, S; Sahu, P S

    2016-09-01

    Milk-derived bioactive peptides have been identified as potential ingredients of health-promoting functional foods. These bioactive peptides are targeted at diet-related chronic diseases especially the non-communicable diseases viz., obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Peptides derived from the milk of cow, goat, sheep, buffalo and camel exert multifunctional properties, including anti-microbial, immune modulatory, anti-oxidant, inhibitory effect on enzymes, anti-thrombotic, and antagonistic activities against various toxic agents. Majority of those regulate immunological, gastrointestinal, hormonal and neurological responses, thereby playing a vital role in the prevention of cancer, osteoporosis, hypertension and other disorders as discussed in this review. For the commercial production of such novel bioactive peptides large scale technologies based on membrane separation and ion exchange chromatography methods have been developed. Separation and identification of those peptides and their pharmacodynamic parameters are necessary to transfer their potent functional properties into food applications. The present review summarizes the preliminary classes of bioactive milk-derived peptides along with their physiological functions, general characteristics and potential applications in health-care. PMID:27579006

  16. Autophagy as a target for therapeutic uses of multifunctional peptides.

    PubMed

    Muciño, Gabriel; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of complex diseases is promoting a change from one-target to multitarget drugs and peptides are ideal molecules to fulfill this polypharmacologic role. Here we review current status in the design of polypharmacological peptides aimed to treat complex diseases, focusing on tuberculosis. In this sense, combining multiple activities in single molecules is a two-sided sword, as both positive and negative side effects might arise. These polypharmacologic compounds may be directed to regulate autophagy, a catabolic process that enables cells to eliminate intracellular microbes (xenophagy), such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MBT). Here we review some strategies to control MBT infection and propose that a peptide combining both antimicrobial and pro-autophagic activities would have a greater potential to limit MBT infection. This endeavor may complement the knowledge gained in understanding the mechanism of action of antibiotics and may lead to the design of better polypharmacological peptides to treat complex diseases such as tuberculosis. PMID:26968336

  17. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-07-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein-protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a 'hot segment', a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  18. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  19. Inhibition of the ferric uptake regulator by peptides derived from anti-FUR peptide aptamers: coupled theoretical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Cissé, Cheickna; Mathieu, Sophie V; Abeih, Mohamed B Ould; Flanagan, Lindsey; Vitale, Sylvia; Catty, Patrice; Boturyn, Didier; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-12-19

    The FUR protein (ferric uptake regulator) is an iron-dependent global transcriptional regulator. Specific to bacteria, FUR is an attractive antibacterial target since virulence is correlated to iron bioavailability. Recently, four anti-FUR peptide aptamers, composed of 13 amino acid variable loops inserted into a thioredoxinA scaffold, were identified, which were able to interact with Escherichia coli FUR (EcFUR), inhibit its binding to DNA and to decrease the virulence of pathogenic E. coli in a fly infection model. The first characterization of anti-FUR linear peptides (pF1 6 to 13 amino acids) derived from the variable part of the F1 anti-FUR peptide aptamer is described herein. Theoretical and experimental approaches, in original combination, were used to study interactions of these peptides with FUR in order to understand their mechanism of inhibition. After modeling EcFUR by homology, docking with Autodock was combined with molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent to take into account the flexibility of the partners. All calculations were cross-checked either with other programs or with experimental data. As a result, reliable structures of EcFUR and its complex with pF1 are given and an inhibition pocket formed by the groove between the two FUR subunits is proposed. The location of the pocket was validated through experimental mutation of key EcFUR residues at the site of proposed peptide interaction. Cyclisation of pF1, mimicking the peptide constraint in F1, improved inhibition. The details of the interactions between peptide and protein were analyzed and a mechanism of inhibition of these anti-FUR molecules is proposed.

  20. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  1. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer. PMID:26062132

  2. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents.

    PubMed

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A

    2015-06-08

    Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP) with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  3. Identification of candidate antimicrobial peptides derived from abalone hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun; Coates, Christopher J; Zhu, Hongtao; Zhu, Ping; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2015-03-01

    Hemocyanins present in invertebrate hemolymph are multifunctional proteins, responsible for oxygen transport and contributing to innate immunity through phenoloxidase-like activity. In arthropods, hemocyanin has been identified as a source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides during infection. Conversely, no hemocyanin-derived antimicrobial peptides have been reported for molluscs. The present study describes a putative antimicrobial region, termed haliotisin, located within the linking sequence between the α-helical domain and β-sheet domain of abalone (Haliotis tuberculata) hemocyanin functional unit E. A series of synthetic peptides based on overlapping fragments of the haliotisin region were tested for their bactericidal potential. Incubating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the presence of certain haliotisin peptides, notably peptides 3-4-5 (DTFDYKKFGYRYDSLELEGRSISRIDELIQQRQEKDRTFAGFLLKGFGTSAS) led to reductions in microbial growth. Furthermore, transmission electron micrographs of haliotisin-treated bacteria revealed damages to the microbial cell wall. Data discussed here provides the first evidence to suggest that molluscan hemocyanin may act as a source of anti-infective peptides. PMID:25445903

  4. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  5. DMP1-derived Peptides Promote Remineralization of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Padovano, J.D.; Ravindran, S.; Snee, P.T.; Ramachandran, A.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  6. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate.

  7. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; Pilleri, Roberta; D'Amato, Filomena; Messana, Irene; Manconi, Barbara; Ebling, Francis J P; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC) or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis.

  8. Photoperiod Regulates vgf-Derived Peptide Processing in Siberian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; Pilleri, Roberta; D’Amato, Filomena; Messana, Irene; Manconi, Barbara; Ebling, Francis J. P.; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    VGF mRNA is induced in specific hypothalamic areas of the Siberian hamster upon exposure to short photoperiods, which is associated with a seasonal decrease in appetite and weight loss. Processing of VGF generates multiple bioactive peptides, so the objective of this study was to determine the profile of the VGF-derived peptides in the brain, pituitary and plasma from Siberian hamsters, and to establish whether differential processing might occur in the short day lean state versus long day fat. Antisera against short sequences at the C- or N- termini of proVGF, as well as against NERP-1, TPGH and TLQP peptides, were used for analyses of tissues, and both immunohistochemistry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) coupled with high-performance liquid (HPLC) or gel chromatography were carried out. VGF peptide immunoreactivity was found within cortex cholinergic perikarya, in multiple hypothalamic nuclei, including those containing vasopressin, and in pituitary gonadotrophs. ELISA revealed that exposure to short day photoperiod led to a down-regulation of VGF immunoreactivity in the cortex, and a less pronounced decrease in the hypothalamus and pituitary, while the plasma VGF levels were not affected by the photoperiod. HPLC and gel chromatography both confirmed the presence of multiple VGF-derived peptides in these tissues, while gel chromatography showed the presence of the VGF precursor in all tissues tested except for the cortex. These observations are consistent with the view that VGF-derived peptides have pleiotropic actions related to changing photoperiod, possibly by regulating cholinergic systems in the cortex, vasopressin hypothalamic pathways, and the reproductive axis. PMID:26555143

  9. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  10. Intrinsically disordered amphiphilic peptides as potential targets in drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Accardo, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Annamaria; Ronga, Luisa; Guillon, Jean; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Rossi, Filomena; Tesauro, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins/peptides play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological events and may assume a precise conformation upon binding to a specific target. Recently, we have described the conformational and functional properties of two linear ester peptides provided with the following sequences: Y-G-E-C-P-C-K-OAllyl (PepK) and Y-G-E-C-P-C-E-OAllyl (PepE). Both peptides are characterized by the presence of the "CPC" motif together with a few amino acids able to promote disorder. The CPC sequence is a binding motif for the CXCR4 receptor that represents a well-known target for cancer therapies. In this paper, we report on synthetic amphiphilic peptides that consist of lipophilic derivatives of PepE and PepK bearing two stearic alkyl chains and/or an ethoxylic spacer. These peptide amphiphiles form stable supramolecular aggregates; they present conformational features that are typical of intrinsically disordered molecules as shown by CD spectroscopy. Solution fluorescence and DLS studies have been performed to evaluate Critical Micellar Concentrations and the dimension of supramolecular aggregates. Moreover, preliminary in vitro cell-based assays have been conducted to investigate the molecular recognition processes involving the CXCR4 receptor. In the end, the results obtained have been compared with the previous data generated by the corresponding non-amphiphilic peptides (PepE and PepK).

  11. A chirality change in XPC- and Sfi1-derived peptides affects their affinity for centrin.

    PubMed

    Grecu, Dora; Irudayaraj, Victor Paul Raj; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Assairi, Liliane

    2016-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein centrin binds to a hydrophobic motif (W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8)) included in the sequence of several cellular targets: XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein), Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein1), and Sac3 [the central component of the transcription and mRNA export (TREX-2) complex]. However, centrin binding occurs in a reversed orientation (L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1)) for Sfi1 and Sac3 compared with XPC. Because D-peptides have been investigated for future therapeutic use, we analyzed their centrin-binding properties. Their affinity for centrin was measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The chirality change in the target-derived peptides affected their ability to bind centrin in a specific manner depending on the sequence orientation of the centrin-binding motif. In contrast to L-XPC-P10, D-XPC-P10 bound C-HsCen1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and to a lesser extent. D-XPC-P10 exhibited a reduced affinity for C-HsCen1 (Ka=0.064 × 10(6) M(-1)) by a factor of 2000 compared with L-XPC-P10 (Ka=132 × 10(6) M(-1)). D-peptides have a lower affinity than L-peptides for centrin, and the strength of this affinity depends on the sequence orientation of the target-derived peptides. The residual affinity observed for D-XPC suggests that the use of d-peptides represents a promising strategy for inhibiting centrin binding to its targets.

  12. Food Derived Bioactive Peptides and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Rivero-Gutiérrez, Belén; Mascaraque, Cristina; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of food-derived bioactive peptides have been shown to exert health-promoting actions and are therefore considered functional foods or nutraceuticals. Some of these actions are related to the maintenance, reinforcement or repairment of the intestinal barrier function (IBF) whose role is to selectively allow the absorption of water, nutrients and ions while preventing the influx of microorganisms from the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the IBF have been related to many disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease or metabolic syndrome. Components of IBF are the intestinal epithelium, the mucus layer, secretory immunoglobulin A and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Here we review the effects of food derived bioactive peptides on these IBF components. In vitro and in vivo effects, both in healthy and disease states, have been reviewed. Although limited, the available information indicates a potential for food-derived peptides to modify IBF and to contribute to disease treatment, but further research is needed to better isolate responsible peptides, and to help define their mode of action. PMID:25501338

  13. Progressive Structuring of a Branched Antimicrobial Peptide on the Path to the Inner Membrane Target*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Liu, Shouping; Li, Jianguo; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sarawathi, Padmanabhan; Tang, Charles; Ho, Duncun; Verma, Chandra; Beuerman, Roger W.; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, interest has grown in the antimicrobial properties of certain natural and non-natural peptides. The strategy of inserting a covalent branch point in a peptide can improve its antimicrobial properties while retaining host biocompatibility. However, little is known regarding possible structural transitions as the peptide moves on the access path to the presumed target, the inner membrane. Establishing the nature of the interactions with the complex bacterial outer and inner membranes is important for effective peptide design. Structure-activity relationships of an amphiphilic, branched antimicrobial peptide (B2088) are examined using environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and high resolution NMR in solution and in condensed states. The peptide is reconstituted in bacterial outer membrane lipopolysaccharide extract as well as in a variety of lipid media mimicking the inner membrane of Gram-negative pathogens. Progressive structure accretion is observed for the peptide in water, LPS, and lipid environments. Despite inducing rapid aggregation of bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharides, the peptide remains highly mobile in the aggregated lattice. At the inner membranes, the peptide undergoes further structural compaction mediated by interactions with negatively charged lipids, probably causing redistribution of membrane lipids, which in turn results in increased membrane permeability and bacterial lysis. These findings suggest that peptides possessing both enhanced mobility in the bacterial outer membrane and spatial structure facilitating its interactions with the membrane-water interface may provide excellent structural motifs to develop new antimicrobials that can overcome antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:22700968

  14. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Plastid-targeting peptides from the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew B; Archibald, John M; Field, Matthew A; Li, Catherine; Striepen, Boris; Keeling, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are marine amoeboflagellate protists that have acquired their plastid (chloroplast) through secondary endosymbiosis with a green alga. Like other algae, most of the proteins necessary for plastid function are encoded in the nuclear genome of the secondary host. These proteins are targeted to the organelle using a bipartite leader sequence consisting of a signal peptide (allowing entry in to the endomembrane system) and a chloroplast transit peptide (for transport across the chloroplast envelope membranes). We have examined the leader sequences from 45 full-length predicted plastid-targeted proteins from the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans with the goal of understanding important features of these sequences and possible conserved motifs. The chemical characteristics of these sequences were compared with a set of 10 B. natans endomembrane-targeted proteins and 38 cytosolic or nuclear proteins, which show that the signal peptides are similar to those of most other eukaryotes, while the transit peptides differ from those of other algae in some characteristics. Consistent with this, the leader sequence from one B. natans protein was tested for function in the apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, and shown to direct the secretion of the protein.

  16. Peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for selective targeting of pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Valetti, Sabrina; Maione, Federica; Mura, Simona; Stella, Barbara; Desmaële, Didier; Noiray, Magali; Vergnaud, Juliette; Vauthier, Christine; Cattel, Luigi; Giraudo, Enrico; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-10-28

    Chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is hampered by the tumor's physio-pathological complexity. Here we show a targeted nanomedicine using a new ligand, the CKAAKN peptide, which had been identified by phage display, as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Taking advantage of the squalenoylation platform, the CKAAKN peptide was conjugated to squalene (SQCKAAKN) and then co-nanoprecipitated with the squalenoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (SQdFdC) giving near monodisperse nanoparticles (NPs) for safe intravenous injection. By interacting with a novel target pathway, the Wnt-2, the CKAAKN functionalization enabled nanoparticles: (i) to specifically interact with both tumor cells and angiogenic vessels and (ii) to simultaneously promote pericyte coverage, thus leading to the normalization of the vasculature likely improving the tumor accessibility for therapy. All together, this approach represents a unique targeted nanoparticle design with remarkable selectivity towards pancreatic cancer and multiple mechanisms of action.

  17. NMR-derived model for a peptide-antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zilber, B.; Scherf, T.; Anglister, J. ); Levitt, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The TE34 monoclonal antibody against cholera toxin peptide 3 (CTP3; VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA) was sequenced and investigated by two-dimensional transferred NOE difference spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The V{sub H} sequence of TE34, which does not bind cholera toxin, shares remarkable homology to that of TE32 and TE33, which are both anti-CTP3 antibodies that bind the toxin. However, due to a shortened heavy chain CDR3, TE34 assumes a radically different combining site structure. The assignment of the combining site interactions to specific peptide residues was completed by use of AcIDSQRKA, a truncated peptide analogue in which lysine-13 was substituted by arginine, specific deuteration of individual polypeptide chains of the antibody, and a computer model for the Fv fragment of TE34. NMR-derived distance restraints were then applied to the calculated model of the Fv to generate a three-dimensional structure of the TE34/CTP3 complex. The combining site was found to be a very hydrophobic cavity composed of seven aromatic residues. Charged residues are found in the periphery of the combining site. The peptide residues HIDSQKKA form a {beta}-turn inside the combining site. The contact area between the peptide and the TE34 antibody is 388 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, about half of the contact area observed in protein-antibody complexes.

  18. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  19. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  20. Targeting pre-miRNA by Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Avitabile, Concetta; Saviano, Michele; D'Andrea, Luca; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Brognara, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    PNAs conjugated to carrier peptides have been employed for the targeting of miRNA precursor, with the aim to develop molecules able to interfere in the pre-miRNA processing. The capability of the molecules to bind pre-miRNA has been tested in vitro by fluorescence assayes on Thiazole Orange labeled molecules and in vivo, in K562 cells, evaluating the amount of miRNA produced after treatment of cells with two amounts of PNAs. PMID:22699795

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  2. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed.

  3. Exogenous loading of a tapasin-dependent peptide onto HLA-B*44:02 can be restored by acid treatment or fixation of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Stroobant, Vincent; Demotte, Nathalie; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Cresswell, Peter; Bonehill, Aude; Michaux, Alexandre; Ma, Wenbin; Mulder, Arend; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Vigneron, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Anti-tumor CTLs recognize peptides derived from cellular proteins and presented on MHC class I. One category of peptides recognized by these CTLs is derived from proteins encoded by “cancer-germline” genes, which are specifically expressed in tumors, and therefore represent optimal targets for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identify an antigenic peptide, which is derived from the MAGE-A1-encoded protein (160-169) and presented to CTLs by HLA-B*44:02. Although this peptide is encoded by MAGE-A1, processed endogenously and presented by tumor cells, the corresponding synthetic peptide is hardly able to sensitize target cells to CTL recognition when pulsed exogenously. Endogenous processing and presentation of this peptide is strictly dependent on the presence of tapasin, which is believed to help peptide loading by stabilizing a peptide-receptive form of HLA-B*44:02. Exogenous loading of the peptide can be dramatically improved by paraformaldehyde fixation of surface molecules or by peptide loading at acidic pH. Either strategy allows efficient exogenous loading of the peptide, presumably by generating or stabilizing a peptide-receptive, empty conformation of the HLA. Altogether, our results indicate a potential drawback of short peptide-based vaccination strategies and offer possible solutions regarding the use of problematic epitopes such as the one described here. PMID:22678898

  4. EDB Fibronectin Specific Peptide for Prostate Cancer Targeting.

    PubMed

    Han, Zheng; Zhou, Zhuxian; Shi, Xiaoyue; Wang, Junpeng; Wu, Xiaohui; Sun, Da; Chen, Yinghua; Zhu, Hui; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-05-20

    Extradomain-B fibronectin (EDB-FN), one of the oncofetal fibronectin (onfFN) isoforms, is a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein that mediates cell adhesion and migration. The expression of EDB-FN is associated with a number of cancer-related biological processes such as tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, we report the development of a small peptide specific to EDB-FN for targeting prostate cancer. A cyclic nonapeptide, CTVRTSADC (ZD2), was identified using peptide phage display. A ZD2-Cy5 conjugate was synthesized to accomplish molecular imaging of prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. ZD2-Cy5 demonstrated effective binding to up-regulated EDB-FN secreted by TGF-β-induced PC3 cancer cells following EMT. Following intravenous injections, the targeted fluorescent probe specifically bound to and delineated PC3-GFP prostate tumors in nude mice bearing the tumor xenografts. ZD2-Cy5 also showed stronger binding to human prostate tumor specimens with a higher Gleason score (GS9) compared to those with a lower score (GS 7), with no binding in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Thus, the ZD2 peptide is a promising strategy for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of prostate cancer.

  5. Data-independent-acquisition mass spectrometry for identification of targeted-peptide site-specific modifications.

    PubMed

    Porter, Caleb J; Bereman, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel strategy based on data-independent acquisition coupled to targeted data extraction for the detection and identification of site-specific modifications of targeted peptides in a completely unbiased manner. This method requires prior knowledge of the site of the modification along the peptide backbone from the protein of interest, but not the mass of the modification. The procedure, named multiplex adduct peptide profiling (MAPP), consists of three steps: 1) A fragment-ion tag is extracted from the data, consisting of the b-type and y-type ion series from the N and C-terminus, respectively, up to the amino-acid position that is believed to be modified; 2) MS1 features are matched to the fragment-ion tag in retention-time space, using the isolation window as a pre-filter to enable calculation of the mass of the modification; and 3) modified fragment ions are overlaid with the unmodified fragment ions to verify the mass calculated in step 2. We discuss the development, applications, and limitations of this new method for detection of unknown peptide modifications. We present an application of the method in profiling adducted peptides derived from abundant proteins in biological fluids with the ultimate objective of detecting biomarkers of exposure to reactive species.

  6. Tumor cell-targeting by phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Ulla B; Schreiber, Valerie; Schultz, Huguette; Mischler, Fabienne; Schughart, Klaus

    2002-07-01

    We isolated cancer cell-specific phages by subtracting and selecting complex peptide display phage libraries on cultured human cancer cells. The best candidate was selected by performing three rounds of subtraction before each of five selections on the human colorectal WiDr cell line. The phage showed more than 1000-fold higher binding efficiency for WiDr cells when compared to five other human cancer cell lines, including two of colorectal origin, and when compared to wild-type M13 phage. Fifty-fold higher binding efficiency was also seen for a human breast cancer cell line. We show that the WiDr cell binding of the selected phage was efficiently competed by the synthetic peptide HEWSYLAPYPWF, predicted from the phage sequence. This confirms that the specificity of the peptide is independent of the display by the phage coat proteins. The identified peptide may target biomarkers linked to colorectal cancer, and thus be useful for designing gene transfer vectors as well as diagnostic and prognostic tools for this disease. PMID:12082461

  7. Novel peptide-mediated interactions derived from high-resolution 3-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Stein, Amelie; Aloy, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    Many biological responses to intra- and extracellular stimuli are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions where a globular domain in one protein recognizes a linear peptide from another, creating a relatively small contact interface. These peptide stretches are often found in unstructured regions of proteins, and contain a consensus motif complementary to the interaction surface displayed by their binding partners. While most current methods for the de novo discovery of such motifs exploit their tendency to occur in disordered regions, our work here focuses on another observation: upon binding to their partner domain, motifs adopt a well-defined structure. Indeed, through the analysis of all peptide-mediated interactions of known high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) structure, we found that the structure of the peptide may be as characteristic as the consensus motif, and help identify target peptides even though they do not match the established patterns. Our analyses of the structural features of known motifs reveal that they tend to have a particular stretched and elongated structure, unlike most other peptides of the same length. Accordingly, we have implemented a strategy based on a Support Vector Machine that uses this features, along with other structure-encoded information about binding interfaces, to search the set of protein interactions of known 3D structure and to identify unnoticed peptide-mediated interactions among them. We have also derived consensus patterns for these interactions, whenever enough information was available, and compared our results with established linear motif patterns and their binding domains. Finally, to cross-validate our identification strategy, we scanned interactome networks from four model organisms with our newly derived patterns to see if any of them occurred more often than expected. Indeed, we found significant over-representations for 64 domain-motif interactions, 46 of which had not been

  8. Novel harmine derivatives for tumor targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fan; Wang, Zhaohui; Tian, Caiping; Qian, Zhiyu; Tang, Liping; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Harmine is a beta-carboline alkaloid found in medicinal plant PeganumHarmala, which has served as a folk anticancer medicine. However, clinical applications of harmine were limited by its low pharmacological effects and noticeable neurotoxicity. In this study, we modified harmine to increase the therapeutic efficacy and to decrease the systemic toxicity. Specifically, two tumor targeting harmine derivatives 2DG-Har-01 and MET-Har-02 were synthesized by modifying substituent in position-2, -7 and -9 of harmine ring with two different targeting group2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and Methionine (Met), respectively. Their therapeutic efficacy and toxicity were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results suggested that the two newharmine derivatives displayed much higher therapeutic effects than non-modified harmine. In particular, MET-Har-02 was more potent than 2DG-Har-01 with promising potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:25940702

  9. Peptide-based carbon nanotubes for mitochondrial targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battigelli, Alessia; Russier, Julie; Venturelli, Enrica; Fabbro, Chiara; Petronilli, Valeria; Bernardi, Paolo; da Ros, Tatiana; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, we report the design and synthesis of peptide-based-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to target mitochondria. Targeting these intracellular organelles might open the way to develop alternative systems to address diseases related to genetic mutations in mitochondrial (mt)-DNA, by delivering therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first step towards mitochondrial delivery of this type of nucleic acid was to target MWCNTs to mitochondria by covalent functionalization with a well-known endogenous mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). The subcellular localization of the conjugates, which were fluorescently labeled, in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and human HeLa cells was then studied using different microscopy techniques, such as wide-field epifluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The localization of the MTS-MWCNT conjugates into mitochondria was further confirmed by analyzing the isolated organelles using TEM.In the present study, we report the design and synthesis of peptide-based-multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to target mitochondria. Targeting these intracellular organelles might open the way to develop alternative systems to address diseases related to genetic mutations in mitochondrial (mt)-DNA, by delivering therapeutic oligonucleotides. The first step towards mitochondrial delivery of this type of nucleic acid was to target MWCNTs to mitochondria by covalent functionalization with a well-known endogenous mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). The subcellular localization of the conjugates, which were fluorescently labeled, in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and human HeLa cells was then studied using different microscopy techniques, such as wide-field epifluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The localization of the MTS-MWCNT conjugates into mitochondria was further confirmed by analyzing the

  10. Organellar oligopeptidase (OOP) provides a complementary pathway for targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Murcha, Monika W.; Branca, Rui M. M.; Radomiljac, Jordan D.; Regberg, Jakob; Svensson, Linda M.; Bakali, Amin; Langel, Ülo; Lehtiö, Janne; Whelan, James; Stenmark, Pål; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain distinct proteolytic systems for precursor protein processing catalyzed by the mitochondrial and stromal processing peptidases and for the degradation of targeting peptides catalyzed by presequence protease. Here, we have identified and characterized a component of the organellar proteolytic systems in Arabidopsis thaliana, the organellar oligopeptidase, OOP (At5g65620). OOP belongs to the M3A family of peptide-degrading metalloproteases. Using two independent in vivo methods, we show that the protease is dually localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Furthermore, we localized the OPP homolog At5g10540 to the cytosol. Analysis of peptide degradation by OOP revealed substrate size restriction from 8 to 23 aa residues. Short mitochondrial targeting peptides (presequence of the ribosomal protein L29 and presequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase 1) and N- and C-terminal fragments derived from the presequence of the ATPase beta subunit ranging in size from 11 to 20 aa could be degraded. MS analysis showed that OOP does not exhibit a strict cleavage pattern but shows a weak preference for hydrophobic residues (F/L) at the P1 position. The crystal structures of OOP, at 1.8–1.9 Å, exhibit an ellipsoidal shape consisting of two major domains enclosing the catalytic cavity of 3,000 Å3. The structural and biochemical data suggest that the protein undergoes conformational changes to allow peptide binding and proteolysis. Our results demonstrate the complementary role of OOP in targeting-peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts. PMID:24043784

  11. Targeting and mimicking collagens via triple helical peptide assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    As the major structural component of the extracellular matrix, collagen plays a crucial role in tissue development and regeneration. Since structural and metabolic abnormalities of collagen are associated with numerous debilitating diseases and pathologic conditions, the ability to target collagens of diseased tissues could lead to new diagnostics and therapeutics. Collagen is also a natural biomaterial widely used in drug delivery and tissue engineering, and construction of synthetic collagen-like materials is gaining interests in the biomaterials community. The unique triple helical structure of collagen has been explored for targeting collagen strands, and for engineering collagen-like functional assemblies and conjugates. This review focuses on the forefront of research activities in the use of the collagen mimetic peptide for both targeting and mimicking collagens via its triple helix mediated strand hybridization and higher order assembly. PMID:24210894

  12. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  13. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    PubMed

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  14. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.; Stöcklein, Walter F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  15. pHLIP peptide targets nanogold particles to tumors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Daniels, Jennifer; Danniels, Jennifer; Moshnikova, Anna; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Ahmed, Aftab; Engelman, Donald M; Reshetnyak, Yana K; Andreev, Oleg A

    2013-01-01

    Progress in nanomedicine depends on the development of nanomaterials and targeted delivery methods. In this work, we describe a method for the preferential targeting of gold nanoparticles to a tumor in a mouse model. The method is based on the use of the pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), which targets various imaging agents to acidic tumors. We compare tumor targeting by nonfunctionalized nanogold particles with nanogold-pHLIP conjugates, where nanogold is covalently attached to the N terminus of pHLIP. Our most important finding is that both intratumoral and i.v. administration demonstrated a significant enhancement of tumor uptake of gold nanoparticles conjugated with pHLIP. Statistically significant reduction of gold accumulation was observed in acidic tumors and kidney when pH-insensitive K-pHLIP was used as a vehicle, suggesting an important role of pH in the pHLIP-mediated targeting of gold nanoparticles. The pHLIP technology can substantially improve the delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors by providing specificity of targeting, enhancing local concentration in tumors, and distributing nanoparticles throughout the entire tumor mass where they remain for an extended period (several days), which is beneficial for radiation oncology and imaging. PMID:23267062

  16. pHLIP peptide targets nanogold particles to tumors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Daniels, Jennifer; Danniels, Jennifer; Moshnikova, Anna; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Ahmed, Aftab; Engelman, Donald M; Reshetnyak, Yana K; Andreev, Oleg A

    2013-01-01

    Progress in nanomedicine depends on the development of nanomaterials and targeted delivery methods. In this work, we describe a method for the preferential targeting of gold nanoparticles to a tumor in a mouse model. The method is based on the use of the pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), which targets various imaging agents to acidic tumors. We compare tumor targeting by nonfunctionalized nanogold particles with nanogold-pHLIP conjugates, where nanogold is covalently attached to the N terminus of pHLIP. Our most important finding is that both intratumoral and i.v. administration demonstrated a significant enhancement of tumor uptake of gold nanoparticles conjugated with pHLIP. Statistically significant reduction of gold accumulation was observed in acidic tumors and kidney when pH-insensitive K-pHLIP was used as a vehicle, suggesting an important role of pH in the pHLIP-mediated targeting of gold nanoparticles. The pHLIP technology can substantially improve the delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors by providing specificity of targeting, enhancing local concentration in tumors, and distributing nanoparticles throughout the entire tumor mass where they remain for an extended period (several days), which is beneficial for radiation oncology and imaging.

  17. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  18. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  19. PFR peptide, one of the antimicrobial peptides identified from the derivatives of lactoferrin, induces necrosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Shi, Yue; Zhou, Han-Wei; Chen, Qi; Wei, Bu-Yun; Wang, Xi; Yang, Tian-Xin; Chinn, Y. Eugene; Kang, Jian; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    LF11-322 (PFWRIRIRR-NH2) (PFR peptide), a nine amino acid-residue peptide fragment derived from human lactoferricin, possesses potent cytotoxicity against bacteria. We report here the discovery and characterization of its antitumor activity in leukemia cells. PFR peptide inhibited the proliferation of MEL and HL-60 leukemia cells by inducing cell death in the absence of the classical features of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, Annexin V staining, Caspase activation and increase of abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins. Instead, necrotic cell death as evidenced by increasing intracellular PI staining and LDH release, inducing membrane disruption and up-regulating intracellular calcium level, was observed following PFR peptide treatment. In addition to necrotic cell death, PFR peptide also induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, PFR peptide exhibited favorable antitumor activity and tolerability in vivo. These findings thus provide a new clue of antimicrobial peptides as a potential novel therapy for leukemia. PMID:26860588

  20. Convergent evolution-guided design of antimicrobial peptides derived from influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Aumelas, André; Gao, Bin

    2011-02-24

    Antimicrobial activity and solution structures of four 13-amino acid peptides derived from the fusion domain of viral hemagglutinin proteins are presented. The results show that carboxyl-terminal amidation is a key factor to switch a viral fusion domain-derived sequence into an antimicrobial peptide. Optimization of amphiphilic balance on the amidated analogue largely improves efficacy and enlarges antimicrobial spectra of these peptides. Our work indicates that viral fusion domains have potential to be engineered into potent antimicrobial peptides.

  1. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Timothy P; Schroeter, Elena R; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2015-06-01

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa. PMID:25972464

  2. Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in moa collagens

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Timothy P.; Schroeter, Elena R.; Schweitzer, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified biologically derived PTMs (i.e. methylation, di-methylation, alkylation, hydroxylation, fucosylation) on amino acids at locations consistent with extant proteins. In addition to these in vivo modifications, we detected novel modifications that are probably diagenetically derived. These include loss of hydroxylation/glutamic semialdehyde, carboxymethyllysine and peptide backbone cleavage, as well as previously noted deamidation. Moa collagen sequences and modifications provide a baseline by which to evaluate proteomic studies of other fossils, and a framework for defining the molecular relationship of moa to other closely related taxa. PMID:25972464

  3. RGD based peptide amphiphiles as drug carriers for cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraf, Poonam S.

    Specific interactions of ligands with receptors is one of the approaches for active targeting of anticancer drugs to cancer cells. Over expression of integrin receptors is a physiological manifestation in several cancers and is associated with cancer progression and metastasis, which makes it an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. The peptide sequence for this integrin recognition is the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Self-assembly offers a unique way of presenting ligands to target receptors for recognition and binding. This study focuses on development of integrin specific peptide amphiphile self-assemblies as carriers for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to αvbeta 3 integrin overexpressing cancers. Amphiphiles composed of conjugates of different analogs of RGD (linear, cyclic or glycosylated) and aliphatic fatty acid with or without 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid (ADA) as linker were synthesized and characterized. The amphiphiles exhibited Critical Micellar Concentration in the range of 7-30 μM. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed the formation of spherical micelles in the size range of 10-40 nm. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer studies revealed entrapment of hydrophobic dyes within a tight micellar core and provided information regarding the cargo exchange within micelles. The RGD micelles exhibited competitive binding with 55% displacement of a bound fluorescent probe by the cyclic RGD micelles. The internalization of fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC) loaded RGD micelles was significantly higher in A2058 melanoma cells compared to free FITC within 20 minutes of incubation at 37°C. The same micelles showed significantly lower internalization at 4°C and on pretreatment with 0.45M sucrose confirming endocytotic uptake of the RGD micellar carriers. The IC50 of paclitaxel in A2058 melanoma cells was lower when treated within RGD micelles as compared to treatment of free drug. On the other hand, IC50 values increased by 2 to 9 fold for micellar treatment

  4. Lipid-Targeting Peptide Probes for Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2327-2332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  6. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  7. Dual-targeting anti-angiogenic cyclic peptides as potential drug leads for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide analogues derived from bioactive hormones such as somatostatin or certain growth factors have great potential as angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer applications. In an attempt to combat emerging drug resistance many FDA-approved anti-angiogenesis therapies are co-administered with cytotoxic drugs as a combination therapy to target multiple signaling pathways of cancers. However, cancer therapies often encounter limiting factors such as high toxicities and side effects. Here, we combined two anti-angiogenic epitopes that act on different pathways of angiogenesis into a single non-toxic cyclic peptide framework, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II), and subsequently assessed the anti-angiogenic activity of the novel compound. We hypothesized that the combination of these two epitopes would elicit a synergistic effect by targeting different angiogenesis pathways and result in improved potency, compared to that of a single epitope. This novel approach has resulted in the development of a potent, non-toxic, stable and cyclic analogue with nanomolar potency inhibition in in vitro endothelial cell migration and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis assays. This is the first report to use the MCoTI-II framework to develop a 2-in-1 anti-angiogenic peptide, which has the potential to be used as a form of combination therapy for targeting a wide range of cancers. PMID:27734947

  8. Pyroacm Resin: An Acetamidomethyl Derived Resin for Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptides through Side Chain Anchoring of C-Terminal Cysteine Residues.

    PubMed

    Juvekar, Vinayak; Gong, Young Dae

    2016-02-19

    The design, synthesis and utilization of an efficient acetamidomethyl derived resin for the peptide synthesis is presented using established Fmoc and Boc protocols via side chain anchoring. Cleavage of the target peptide from the resin is performed using carboxymethylsulfenyl chloride under mild conditions which gave in situ thiol-sulfenyl protection of the cysteine residues. The utility of the resin is successfully demonstrated through applications to the syntheses of model peptides and natural products Riparin 1.1 and Riparin 1.2.

  9. Development of a peptide-based vaccine targeting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, Haydn Thomas; Sanda, Martin George; Dunn, Laura Kathleen; Arredouani, Mohamed Simo

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel vaccine targets is critical for the design and advancement of prostate cancer (PCa) immunotherapy. Ideal targets are proteins that are abundant in prostate tumors while absent in extra-prostatic tissues. The fusion of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 gene with the ETS transcription factor ERG occurs in approximately 50% of prostate cancer cases and results in aberrant ERG expression. Because expression of ERG is very low in peripheral tissue, we evaluated the suitability of this protein as an antigen target in PCa vaccines. ERG-derived HLA-A*0201-restricted immunogenic epitopes were identified through a 3-step strategy that included in silico, in vitro, and in vivo validation. Algorithms were used to predict potential HLA-A*0201-binding epitopes. High scoring epitopes were tested for binding to HLA-A*0201 using the T2-based stabilization assay in vitro. Five peptides were found to bind HLA-A*0201 and were subsequently tested for immunogenicity in humanized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. The in vivo screening identified three immunogenic peptides. One of these peptides, ERG295, overcame peripheral tolerance in HLA-A*0201 mice that expressed prostate restricted ERG. Also, this peptide induced an antigen specific response against ERG-expressing human prostate tumor cells. Finally, tetramer assay showed detectable and responsive ERG295-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in peripheral blood of HLA-A*0201+ prostate cancer patients. Detection of ERG-specific CTLs in both mice and the blood of prostate cancer patients indicates that ERG-specific tolerance can be overcome. Additionally, these data suggest that ERG is a suitable target antigen for PCa immunotherapy. PMID:24149465

  10. Histidine-iridium(III) coordination-based peptide luminogenic cyclization and cyclo-RGD peptides for cancer-cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochuan; Jia, Junli; Cao, Rui; Wang, Xiaobo; Fei, Hao

    2014-12-24

    In the field of peptide drug discovery, structural constraining and fluorescent labeling are two sought-after techniques important for both basic research and pharmaceutical development. In this work, we describe an easy-to-use approach for simultaneous peptide cyclization and luminescent labeling based on iridium(III)-histidine coordination (Ir-HH cyclization). Using a series of model peptides with histidine flanking each terminus, the binding activity and reaction kinetics of Ir-HH cyclization of different ring sizes were characterized. In the series, Ir-HAnH (n = 2, 3) with moderate ring sizes provides appropriate flexibility and proper distance between histidines for cyclic formation, which leads to the best binding affinity and structural stability in physiological conditions, as compared to other Ir-HH-cyclized peptides with smaller (n = 0, 1) or larger (n = 4, 5) ring sizes. Ir-HRGDH, an Ir-HH-cyclized peptide containing integrin targeting motif Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), showed better targeting affinity than its linear form and enhanced membrane permeability in comparison with fluorescein-labeled cyclic RGDyK peptide. Cell death inducing peptide KLA-linked Ir-HRGDH (Ir-HRGDH-KLA) showed dramatically enhanced cytotoxicity and high selectivity for cancer cells versus noncancer cells. These data demonstrate that the method conveniently combines structural constraining of peptides with luminescent imaging capabilities, which facilitates functional and intracellular characterization of potential peptide-based drug leads, thus introducing a new tool to meet emerging needs in medicinal research.

  11. A rapid in vitro screening for delivery of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors as potential drug candidates via epithelial peptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Martin; Meyer, Antje; Theis, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Daniel, Hannelore

    2004-08-01

    Targeting drugs or prodrugs to a specific enzyme by simultaneously targeting cell membrane carriers for efficient transport should provide the highest bioavailability along with specificity at the site of action. The peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, including the brush-border membranes of epithelial cells of the small intestine and kidney. The transporters accept a wide range of substrates and are therefore good targets for a transporter-mediated drug delivery. Here, we report a screening procedure for peptidomimetic drug candidates combining two independent expression systems: 1) a competition assay in transgenic Pichia pastoris yeast cells expressing either mammalian PEPT1 or PEPT2 for identifying substrate interaction with the transporter binding site; and 2) a Xenopus laevis-based oocyte expression of the peptide transporter for assessing electrogenic transport of drug candidates. Based on the known oral availability and in vivo efficacy of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPIV) inhibitor isoleucine-thiazolidide and its peptide-like structure, we first tested whether this compound is a substrate of epithelial peptide transporters. Additionally, a series of structurally related inhibitors were analyzed for transport. We identified various compounds that serve as substrates of the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1. In contrast, none of these DPIV inhibitors showed electrogenic transport by PEPT2, although a variety of the compounds displayed good affinities for competition in peptide uptake in PEPT2-expressing cells, suggesting that they may serve as efficient inhibitors. In conclusion, we have applied an in vitro screening system that predicts efficient intestinal absorption of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors via PEPT1 in vivo. PMID:15051798

  12. Different target surfaces for the analysis of peptides, peptide mixtures and peptide mass fingerprints by AP-MALDI ion trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Kassler, Alexander; Haubner, Roland; Allmaier, Günter

    2011-06-10

    The desorption/ionization behavior of individual peptides, an equimolare peptide mixture and a tryptic digest was investigated by AP-MALDI-IT-MS using four different target materials (gold-covered stainless steel (SS), titanium nitride-covered SS, hand-polished SS, and microdiamond-covered hardmetal) under identical conditions. Gold-covered as well as polished SS targets yielded comparable mass spectra for peptides and peptide mixture in the low pMol-range. The first target exhibited superior data down to the 10fMol-range. In contrast, titanium nitride-covered SS and microdiamond-covered hardmetal AP-MALDI-targets yielded poor sensitivity. These observations could be correlated with the surface roughness of the targets determined by 3D-confocal-white-light-microscopy. The roughest surfaces were found for titanium nitride-covered SS and microdiamond-covered hardmetal material showing both poor MS sensitivity. A less rough surface could be determined for the hand-polished SS target and the smoothest surface was found for the gold-covered target yielding the best sensitivity of all surfaces. These differences in the roughness having a strong impact on the ultimate sensitivity obtainable for peptide samples could be corroborated by electron microscopy. A peptide mixture covering a wide range of molecular weights and a tryptic protein digest (from 2-DE) exhibit the same behavior. This clearly indicates that the smooth gold-covered SS target is the surface of choice in AP-MALDI MS proteomics.

  13. Interactions of histatin 5 and histatin 5-derived peptides with liposome membranes: surface effects, translocation and permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Den Hertog, Alice L; Wong Fong Sang, Harro W; Kraayenhof, Ruud; Bolscher, Jan G M; Van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V

    2004-01-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, among which are histatin 5 and the derived peptides dhvar4 and dhvar5, enter their target cells and interact with internal organelles. There still are questions about the mechanisms by which antimicrobial peptides translocate across the membrane. We used a liposome model to study membrane binding, translocation and membrane-perturbing capacities of histatin 5, dhvar4 and dhvar5. Despite the differences in amphipathic characters of these peptides, they bound equally well to liposomes, whereas their membrane activities differed remarkably: dhvar4 translocated at the fastest rate, followed by dhvar5, whereas the histatin 5 translocation rate was much lower. The same pattern was seen for the extent of calcein release: highest with dhvar4, less with dhvar5 and almost none with histatin 5. The translocation and disruptive actions of dhvar5 did not seem to be coupled, because translocation occurred on a much longer timescale than calcein release, which ended within a few minutes. We conclude that peptide translocation can occur through peptide-phospholipid interactions, and that this is a possible mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides enter cells. However, the translocation rate was much lower in this model membrane system than that seen in yeast cells. Thus it is likely that, at least for some peptides, additional features promoting the translocation across biological membranes are involved as well. PMID:14733612

  14. A High Affinity hRpn2-Derived Peptide That Displaces Human Rpn13 from Proteasome in 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Sarah E.; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Walters, Kylie J.

    2015-01-01

    Rpn13 is a proteasome ubiquitin receptor that has emerged as a therapeutic target for human cancers. Its ubiquitin-binding activity is confined to an N-terminal Pru (pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin) domain that also docks it into the proteasome, while its C-terminal DEUBAD (DEUBiquitinase ADaptor) domain recruits deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 to the proteasome. Bis-benzylidine piperidone derivatives that were found to bind covalently to Rpn13 C88 caused the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins as well as ER stress-related apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, including bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma lines. We find that a 38-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminus of proteasome PC repeat protein hRpn2/PSMD1 binds to hRpn13 Pru domain with 12 nM affinity. By using NMR, we identify the hRpn13-interacting amino acids in this hRpn2 fragment, some of which are conserved among eukaryotes. Importantly, we find the hRpn2-derived peptide to immunoprecipitate endogenous Rpn13 from 293T cells, and to displace it from the proteasome. These findings indicate that this region of hRpn2 is the primary binding site for hRpn13 in the proteasome. Moreover, the hRpn2-derived peptide was no longer able to interact with endogenous hRpn13 when a strictly conserved phenylalanine (F948 in humans) was replaced with arginine or a stop codon, or when Y950 and I951 were substituted with aspartic acid. Finally, over-expression of the hRpn2-derived peptide leads to an increased presence of ubiquitinated proteins in 293T cells. We propose that this hRpn2-derived peptide could be used to develop peptide-based strategies that specifically target hRpn13 function in the proteasome. PMID:26466095

  15. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol.

  16. Melanoma Therapy via Peptide-Targeted a-Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Hylarides, Mark; Fisher, Darrell R.; Shelton, Tiffani; Moore, Herbert A.; Wester, Dennis W.; Fritzberg, Alan R.; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer. Current chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy regimens are ineffective agents against melanoma, as shown by a 10-year survival rate for patients with disseminated disease of approximately 5% (reference?). In this study, the unique combination of a melanoma targeting peptide and an in vivo generated a-particle emitting radioisotope was investigated for its melanoma therapy potential. Alpha-radiation is densely ionizing and energy is locally absorbed, resulting in high concentrations of destructive free radicals and irreparable DNA double strand breaks. This high linear-energy-transfer overcomes radiation resistant tumor cells and oxygen-enhancement effects. The melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was radiolabeled with 212Pb, the parent of 212Bi, which decays via alpha and beta decay. Biodistribution and therapy studies were performed in the B16/F1 melanoma bearing C57 mouse flank tumor model. 212Pb[DOTA]-R e(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited rapid tumor uptake and extended retention coupled with rapid whole body disappearance. Radiation dose delivered to the tumor was estimated to be 61 cGy/uCi 212Pb administered. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with 50, 100 and 200 uCi of 212Pb[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH extended mean survival of mice to 22, 28, and 49.8 days, respectively, compared to the 14.6 day mean survival of the placebo control group. Forty-five percent of the mice receiving 200 uCi survived the study disease-free.

  17. Multimerized HIV-gp41-derived peptides as fusion inhibitors and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2016-11-01

    To date, several antigens based on the amino-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (NHR) region of an HIV-1 envelope protein gp41 and fusion inhibitors based on the carboxy-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (CHR) region of gp41 have been reported. We have developed a synthetic antigen targeting the membrane-fusion mechanism of HIV-1. This uses a template designed with C3-symmetric linkers and mimics the trimeric form of the NHR-derived peptide N36. The antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 trimeric antigen binds preferentially to the N36 trimer and blocks HIV-1 infection effectively, compared with the antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 monomer. Using another template designed with different C3-symmetric linkers, we have also developed a synthetic peptide mimicking the trimeric form of the CHR-derived peptide C34, with ∼100 times the inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 fusion mechanism than that of the monomer C34 peptide. A dimeric derivative of C34 has potent inhibitory activity at almost the same levels as this C34 trimer mimic, suggesting that presence of a dimeric form of C34 is structurally critical for fusion inhibitors. As examples of rising mid-size drugs, this review describes an effective strategy for the design of HIV vaccines and fusion inhibitors based on a relationship with the native structure of proteins involved in HIV fusion mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 622-628, 2016.

  18. Rational Design of Cancer-Targeted Benzoselenadiazole by RGD Peptide Functionalization for Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liye; Li, Wenying; Huang, Yanyu; Zhou, Yangliang; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-09-01

    A cancer-targeted conjugate of the selenadiazole derivative BSeC (benzo[1,2,5] selenadiazole-5-carboxylic acid) with RGD peptide as targeting molecule and PEI (polyethylenimine) as a linker is rationally designed and synthesized in the present study. The results show that RGD-PEI-BSeC forms nanoparticles in aqueous solution with a core-shell nanostructure and high stability under physiological conditions. This rational design effectively enhances the selective cellular uptake and cellular retention of BSeC in human glioma cells, and increases its selectivity between cancer and normal cells. The nanoparticles enter the cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via clathrin-mediated and nystatin-dependent lipid raft-mediated pathways. Internalized nanoparticles trigger glioma cell apoptosis by activation of ROS-mediated p53 phosphorylation. Therefore, this study provides a strategy for the rational design of selenium-containing cancer-targeted theranostics.

  19. Flagellar display of bone protein-derived peptides for studying peptide-mediated biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Philip E.; Mao, Chuanbin

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellum is self-assembled primarily from thousands of a protein subunit called flagellin (FliC). A foreign peptide can be fully displayed on the surface of the flagellum through inserting it into every constituent protein subunit. To shed light into the role of bone proteins during nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HAP), representative domains from type I collagen, including a part of N-, C-terminal, N-, C-zone around hole zone and a 8 repetitive Gly-Pro-Pro (GPP8) sequence similar to central sequence of type I collagen, were separately displayed on the surface of the flagella. Moreover, eight negatively charged, contiguous glutamic acid residues (E8) and two other characteristic sequences, derived from a representative non-collagenous protein called bone sialoprotein (BSP), were also displayed on flagella. After being incubated in a HAP supersaturated precursor solution, flagella displaying E8 or GPP8 sequences were found to be coated with a layer of HAP nanocrystals. Very weak or no nucleation are observed on flagella displaying other peptides being tested. We also found that calcium ions can induce the assembly of the negatively charged E8 flagella into bundles mimicking collagen fibers, followed by the formation of HAP nanocrystals with the crystallographic c-axis preferentially aligned with long axes of flagella which is similar to that along the collagen fibrils in bone. This work demonstrates that due to the ease of peptide display on flagella and self-assembly of flagella, flagella can serve as a platform for studying biomineralization and as a building block to generate bone-like biomaterials. PMID:23148645

  20. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  1. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  2. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  3. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  5. Identification of an H2-Kb or H2-Db restricted and glypican-3-derived cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope peptide

    PubMed Central

    IWAMA, TATSUAKI; HORIE, KAZUTAKA; YOSHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; NOBUOKA, DAISUKE; SHIMOMURA, MANAMI; SAWADA, YU; NAKATSURA, TETSUYA

    2013-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is overexpressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but not expressed in normal tissues except for placenta and fetal liver and therefore is an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we identified an H2-Kb or H2-Db restricted and murine GPC3 (mGPC3)-derived cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope peptide in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, which can be used in the design of preclinical studies of various therapies with GPC3-target immunotherapy in vivo. First, 11 types of 9- to 10-mer peptides predicted to bind with H2-Kb or H2-Db were selected from the mGPC3 amino acid sequence based on the binding score as calculated by the BIMAS software. We evaluated the peptide-binding affinity and confirmed that all peptides were able to bind to H2-Kb or H2-Db by in vitro cellular binding assay. Subsequently, a mixed peptide vaccine and single peptide vaccine were given to B6 mice to evaluate immunogenic potential of the 11 selected peptides. Using the splenocytes from peptide-vaccinated mice, interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays showed that mGPC3-1127–136 (AMFKNNYPSL) peptide was the most efficient for inducing CTLs among the 11 peptides. Next, we demonstrated that the mGPC3-1 peptide-specific CTL line could recognize mGPC3-expressing cancer cells, suggesting that mGPC3-1 peptide was an endogenously presented peptide. In conclusion, we identified mGPC3-1 as an H2-Kb or H2-Db restricted, mGPC3-derived CTL epitope peptide. PMID:23354275

  6. Overview of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Marine Resources: The Sources, Characteristic, Purification, and Evaluation Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, RiBang; Wu, CuiLing; Liu, Dan; Yang, XingHao; Huang, JiaFeng; Zhang, Jiang; Liao, Binqiang; He, HaiLun; Li, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Marine organisms are rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive nitrogenous components. In recent years, numerous bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of marine protein resources, such as antioxidant peptides. Many studies have approved that marine antioxidant peptides have a positive effect on human health and the food industry. Antioxidant activity of peptides can be attributed to free radicals scavenging, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and metal ion chelating. Moreover, it has also been verified that peptide structure and its amino acid sequence can mainly affect its antioxidant properties. The aim of this review is to summarize kinds of antioxidant peptides from various marine resources. Additionally, the relationship between structure and antioxidant activities of peptides is discussed in this paper. Finally, current technologies used in the preparation, purification, and evaluation of marine-derived antioxidant peptides are also reviewed.

  7. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  8. Effects of histatin 5 and derived peptides on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ruissen, A L; Groenink, J; Helmerhorst, E J; Walgreen-Weterings, E; Van't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2001-01-01

    Three anti-microbial peptides were compared with respect to their killing activity against Candida albicans and their ability to disturb its cellular and internal membranes. Histatin 5 is an anti-fungal peptide occurring naturally in human saliva, while dhvar4 and dhvar5 are variants of its active domain, with increased anti-microbial activity. dhvar4 has increased amphipathicity compared with histatin 5, whereas dhvar5 has amphipathicity comparable with that of histatin 5. All three peptides caused depolarization of the cytoplasmic and/or mitochondrial membrane, indicating membranolytic activity. For the variant peptides both depolarization and killing occurred at a faster rate. With FITC-labelled peptides, no association with the cytoplasmic membrane was observed, contradicting the formation of permanent transmembrane multimeric peptide pores. Instead, the peptides were internalized and act on internal membranes, as demonstrated with mitochondrion- and vacuole-specific markers. In comparison with histatin 5, the variant peptides showed a more destructive effect on mitochondria. Entry of the peptides and subsequent killing were dependent on the metabolic state of the cells. Blocking of the mitochondrial activity led to complete protection against histatin 5 activity, whereas that of dhvar4 was hardly affected and that of dhvar5 was affected only intermediately. PMID:11368762

  9. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  10. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  11. Peptide receptor targeting in cancer: the somatostatin paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1-5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed.

  12. Peptide Receptor Targeting in Cancer: The Somatostatin Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Federica; Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Würth, Roberto; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptors involved in pathophysiological processes represent promising therapeutic targets. Neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is produced by specialized cells in a large number of human organs and tissues. SST primarily acts as inhibitor of endocrine and exocrine secretion via the activation of five G-protein-coupled receptors, named sst1–5, while in central nervous system, SST acts as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator, regulating locomotory and cognitive functions. Critical points of SST/SST receptor biology, such as signaling pathways of individual receptor subtypes, homo- and heterodimerization, trafficking, and cross-talk with growth factor receptors, have been extensively studied, although functions associated with several pathological conditions, including cancer, are still not completely unraveled. Importantly, SST exerts antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on cancer cells in vitro, and on experimental tumors in vivo. Moreover, SST agonists are clinically effective as antitumor agents for pituitary adenomas and gastro-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, SST receptors being expressed by tumor cells of various tumor histotypes, their pharmacological use is potentially extendible to other cancer types, although to date no significant results have been obtained. In this paper the most recent findings on the expression and functional roles of SST and SST receptors in tumor cells are discussed. PMID:23476673

  13. Behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents: Implications for schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lister, Josh; Fletcher, Paul J; Nobrega, José N; Remington, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Dohan proposed that an overload of dietary peptides, such as those derived from wheat gluten and milk casein, could be a factor relevant to the development or maintenance of schizophrenia (SZ) symptoms in at least a subset of vulnerable individuals. Rodent behavioral models may offer insight into the plausibility of Dohan's exorphin hypothesis by providing a means to directly study the effects of such peptides. Accordingly, a review of the literature on the behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents was undertaken. Studies using a variety of behavioral tests to examine the effects of several classes of food-derived opioid-like peptides were identified and reviewed. Peptides derived from casein (β-casomorphins; BCMs, n=19), spinach (rubiscolins; RCs, n=4), and soy (soymorphins; SMs, n=1) were behaviorally active in various paradigms assessing nociception, spontaneous behavior, and memory. Surprisingly, only a single study evaluating a gluten-derived peptide (gliadorphin-7; GD-7, n=1) was identified and included in this review. In conclusion, food-derived peptides can affect rodent behavior, but more studies of GDs using diverse behavioral batteries are warranted. Assuming they occur in sufficient quantities during protein digestion and can access central opioid receptors (which entails crossing both the gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers intact), these peptides may affect human behavior. Although BCMs and GDs may not be directly pathogenic in SZ, documented associations of casein and gluten sensitivity with SZ justify increased patient screening and dietary intervention where necessary. PMID:25661529

  14. Behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents: Implications for schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lister, Josh; Fletcher, Paul J; Nobrega, José N; Remington, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Dohan proposed that an overload of dietary peptides, such as those derived from wheat gluten and milk casein, could be a factor relevant to the development or maintenance of schizophrenia (SZ) symptoms in at least a subset of vulnerable individuals. Rodent behavioral models may offer insight into the plausibility of Dohan's exorphin hypothesis by providing a means to directly study the effects of such peptides. Accordingly, a review of the literature on the behavioral effects of food-derived opioid-like peptides in rodents was undertaken. Studies using a variety of behavioral tests to examine the effects of several classes of food-derived opioid-like peptides were identified and reviewed. Peptides derived from casein (β-casomorphins; BCMs, n=19), spinach (rubiscolins; RCs, n=4), and soy (soymorphins; SMs, n=1) were behaviorally active in various paradigms assessing nociception, spontaneous behavior, and memory. Surprisingly, only a single study evaluating a gluten-derived peptide (gliadorphin-7; GD-7, n=1) was identified and included in this review. In conclusion, food-derived peptides can affect rodent behavior, but more studies of GDs using diverse behavioral batteries are warranted. Assuming they occur in sufficient quantities during protein digestion and can access central opioid receptors (which entails crossing both the gastrointestinal and blood-brain barriers intact), these peptides may affect human behavior. Although BCMs and GDs may not be directly pathogenic in SZ, documented associations of casein and gluten sensitivity with SZ justify increased patient screening and dietary intervention where necessary.

  15. ProSAAS-derived peptides are colocalized with neuropeptide Y and function as neuropeptides in the regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    Wardman, Jonathan H; Berezniuk, Iryna; Di, Shi; Tasker, Jeffrey G; Fricker, Lloyd D

    2011-01-01

    ProSAAS is the precursor of a number of peptides that have been proposed to function as neuropeptides. Because proSAAS mRNA is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, we examined the cellular localization of several proSAAS-derived peptides in the mouse hypothalamus and found that they generally colocalized with neuropeptide Y (NPY), but not α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. However, unlike proNPY mRNA, which is upregulated by food deprivation in the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither proSAAS mRNA nor proSAAS-derived peptides were significantly altered by 1-2 days of food deprivation in wild-type mice. Furthermore, while proSAAS mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus were significantly lower in Cpe(fat/fat) mice as compared to wild-type littermates, proNPY mRNA levels in the mediobasal hypothalamus and in other subregions of the hypothalamus were not significantly different between wild-type and Cpe(fat/fat) mice. Intracerebroventricular injections of antibodies to two proSAAS-derived peptides (big LEN and PEN) significantly reduced food intake in fasted mice, while injections of antibodies to two other proSAAS-derived peptides (little LEN and little SAAS) did not. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of parvocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, a target of arcuate NPY projections, showed that big LEN produced a rapid and reversible inhibition of synaptic glutamate release that was spike independent and abolished by blocking postsynaptic G protein activity, suggesting the involvement of a postsynaptic G protein-coupled receptor and the release of a retrograde synaptic messenger. Taken together with previous studies, these findings support a role for proSAAS-derived peptides such as big LEN as neuropeptides regulating food intake.

  16. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection. PMID:27427753

  17. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of antihypertensive food-derived peptides and selected alanine analogues.

    PubMed

    McClean, Stephen; Beggs, Louise B; Welch, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated four food-derived peptides with known antihypertensive activities for antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms, and assessed structure-function relationships using alanine analogues. The peptides (EVSLNSGYY, barley; PGTAVFK, soybean; TTMPLW, α-casein; VHLPP, α-zein) and the six alanine substitution peptides of PGTAVFK were synthesised, characterised and evaluated for antimicrobial activity using the bacteria, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus and the yeast, Candida albicans. The peptides TTMPLW and PGTAVFK inhibited growth of all four microorganisms tested, with activities of a similar order of magnitude to ampicillin and ethanol controls. EVSLNSGYY inhibited the growth of the bacteria, but VHLPP showed no antimicrobial activity. The alanine analogue, PGAAVFK showed the highest overall antimicrobial activity and PGTAVFA showed no activity; overall, the activities of the analogues were consistent with their structures. Some peptides with antihypertensive activity also show antimicrobial activity, suggesting that food-derived peptides may exert beneficial effects via a number of mechanisms.

  19. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  20. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:25515753

  1. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  2. Enhanced and selective permeability of gold nanoparticles functionalized with cell penetrating peptide derived from maurocalcine animal toxin.

    PubMed

    Khamehchian, Sedigheh; Nikkhah, Maryam; Madani, Rasool; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2016-11-01

    Functionalization of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is suitable for many applications such as biomedical imaging, clinical diagnosis, and targeted delivery by conjugating cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Here, we investigated intracellular uptake of GNP conjugated to MCaUF1-9(Ala) , a CPP derived from maurocalcine (MCa) animal toxin, and compared it with TAT functionalized GNP. Peptide conjugated GNP was characterized using UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and transmission electron microscopy. Uptake of MCaUF1-9(Ala) and TAT functionalized GNPs was evaluated in three cell lines, HeLa, MDA-MB-231, and A431, using dark field imaging and atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to peptide sequences and type of cells different cell penetrating activity was observed. Peptide functionalized GNP had little effect on cell viability and respect to net charge difference between peptide, showed interesting selectivity against three cell types. Peptide conjugated to GNPs displayed higher uptake than bare GNPs in the all cell lines except HeLa cell with lowest internalization. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2693-2700, 2016.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Novel Synthetic Peptides Derived from Indolicidin and Ranalexin against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Hassan Mahmood; Le, Cheng Foh; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Isa, Diyana Mohd; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics in order to defeat multidrug-resistant bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, thirteen antimicrobial peptides were designed based on two natural peptides indolicidin and ranalexin. Our results revealed that four hybrid peptides RN7-IN10, RN7-IN9, RN7-IN8, and RN7-IN6 possess potent antibacterial activity against 30 pneumococcal clinical isolates (MIC 7.81-15.62µg/ml). These four hybrid peptides also showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity (7.81µg/ml) against S. aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and E. coli. Furthermore, the time killing assay results showed that the hybrid peptides were able to eliminate S. pneumoniae within less than one hour which is faster than the standard drugs erythromycin and ceftriaxone. The cytotoxic effects of peptides were tested against human erythrocytes, WRL-68 normal liver cell line, and NL-20 normal lung cell line. The results revealed that none of the thirteen peptides have cytotoxic or hemolytic effects at their MIC values. The in silico molecular docking study was carried out to investigate the binding properties of peptides with three pneumococcal virulent targets by Autodock Vina. RN7IN6 showed a strong affinity to target proteins; autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) based on rigid docking studies. Our results suggest that the hybrid peptides could be suitable candidates for antibacterial drug development. PMID:26046345

  4. Antioxidant activities of a peptide derived from chicken dark meat.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoko; Mizutani, Saki; Nomura, Sarika; Hara, Wakana; Matsui, Riko; Nagai, Kumiko; Murakami, Yuki; Washio, Nanami; Ikemoto, Narumi; Terashima, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Antioxidant activities against hypochlorite ions and peroxyl radicals of a chicken dark meat hydrolysate digested with pepsin were examined with the myoglobin method based on the structure change of myoglobin due to redox reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS). A peptide that showed strong antioxidant activity against the peroxyl radical was isolated from the hydrolysate using HPLC equipped with a hydrophobic-interacting column. The sequence of the first five amino acid residues of the peptide was determined as YASGR (Tyr-Ala-Ser-Gly-Arg), and this sequence matched with the amino acid residues 143-147 of chicken β-actin (GenBank: CAA25004.1). The synthetic peptide YASGR showed very high antioxidant activity against the peroxyl radical. Antioxidant activities of the free amino acids, confirmed that the tyrosine residue of this peptide was possibly responsible for antioxidant activity. PMID:27407214

  5. Optimization of a Novel Peptide Ligand Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Shoaib; Nissen, Felix; Marr, Annabell; Markert, Annette; Altmann, Annette; Mier, Walter; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Askoxylakis, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-regulated transmembrane protein over-expressed in various types of human cancer. Recently, a new peptide with affinity for human carbonic anhydrase IX (CaIX-P1) was identified using the phage display technology. Aim of the present study is to characterize the binding site in the sequence of CaIX-P1, in order to optimize the binding and metabolic properties and use it for targeting purposes. Methodology/Principal Findings Various fragments of CaIX-P1 were synthesized on solid support using Fmoc chemistry. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the amino acids crucial for target binding. Derivatives with increased binding affinity were radiolabeled and in vitro studies were carried out on the CA IX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52 and the CA IX negative human pancreatic carcinoma cell line BxPC3. Metabolic stability was investigated in cell culture medium and human serum. Organ distribution and planar scintigraphy studies were performed in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted SKRC 52 tumors. The results of our studies clearly identified amino acids that are important for target binding. Among various fragments and derivatives the ligand CaIX-P1-4-10 (NHVPLSPy) was found to possess increased binding potential in SKRC 52 cells, whereas no binding capacity for BxPC3 cells was observed. Binding of radiolabeled CaIX-P1-4-10 on CA IX positive cells could be inhibited by both the unlabeled and the native CaIX-P1 peptide but not by control peptides. Stability experiments indicated the degradation site in the sequence of CaIX-P1-4-10. Biodistribution studies showed a higher in vivo accumulation in the tumor than in most healthy tissues. Conclusions Our data reveal modifications in the sequence of the CA IX affine ligand CaIX-P1 that might be favorable for improvement of target affinity and metabolic stability, which are necessary prior to the use of the ligand in

  6. Bioactive peptides derived from natural proteins with respect to diversity of their receptors and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2015-10-01

    We have found various bioactive peptides derived from animal and plant proteins, which interact with receptors for endogenous bioactive peptides such as opioids, neurotensin, complements C3a and C5a, oxytocin, and formyl peptides etc. Among them, rubiscolin, a δ opioid peptide derived from plant RuBisCO, showed memory-consolidating, anxiolytic-like, and food intake-modulating effects. Soymorphin, a μ opioid peptide derived from β-conglycinin showed anxiolytic-like, anorexigenic, hypoglycemic, and hypotriglyceridemic effects. β-Lactotensin derived from β-lactoglobulin, the first natural ligand for the NTS2 receptor, showed memory-consolidating, anxiolytic-like, and hypocholesterolemic effects. Weak agonist peptides for the complements C3a and C5a receptors were released from many proteins and exerted various central effects. Peptides showing anxiolytic-like antihypertensive and anti-alopecia effects via different types of receptors such as OT, FPR and AT2 were also obtained. Based on these study, new functions and post-receptor mechanisms of receptor commom to endogenous and exogenous bioactive peptides have been clarified.

  7. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-derived peptides as epitopes for hepatoma immunotherapy: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Mizejewski, Gerald J

    2009-02-01

    The various immunological roles of human alpha-fetoprotein (HAFP), and its correlation with hepatomas, that is, hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), are not often addressed together in biomedical reports considering that HAFP is an established biomarker for hepatomas. Studies reporting measurement of HAFP serum levels in hepatoma patients in basic/clinical research settings has greatly increased over the years. Recent reports have now expanded our base knowledge in the mounting of an immune response against AFP, a self antigen, during hepatoma tumorigenesis. Advances in the detection and identification of AFP-derived peptide epitopes are opening new vistas of knowledge regarding the immunological role of AFP-peptides as T cell stimulating antigens in the course of hepatoma growth and progression. The present commentary addresses HAFP-derived peptides as immunologic responders in HCC and their use in the study and generation of AFP-peptide sensitized T cells directed against hepatoma cells. Attempts were further made to relate the AFP-derived peptide epitopes to T cell activities during the course of hepatoma immunotherapies and to profile the traits and properties of the peptides themselves. Hence, the present commentary was divided into two sections; (1) the characterization, properties, and traits of AFP peptide epitopes, and (2) the use of AFP-derived peptides in the therapeutic induction of T cells primed against hepatoma cells using both in vivo and in vitro models.

  8. Small Peptides Derived from Penetratin as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Somlai, Csaba; Andujar, Sebastián A; Garro, Adriana D; Lima, Beatriz; Tapia, Alejandro; Feresin, Gabriela; Perczel, Andras; Tóth, Gabor; Cascales, Javier López; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation and conformational study of several small-size peptides acting as antibacterial agents are reported. Among the compounds evaluated, the peptides Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Trp-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2 , Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Arg-NH2 , and Arg-Gln-Ile-Trp-Trp-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity. These were found to be very active antibacterial compounds, considering their small molecular size. In order to better understand the antibacterial activity obtained for these peptides, an exhaustive conformational analysis was performed, using both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations using two different media (water and trifluoroethanol/water) were employed. The results of these theoretical calculations were corroborated by experimental circular dichroism measurements. A brief discussion on the possible mechanism of action of these peptides at molecular level is also presented. Some of the peptides reported here constitute very interesting structures to be used as starting compounds for the design of new small-size peptides possessing antibacterial activity. PMID:26972341

  9. AVPdb: a database of experimentally validated antiviral peptides targeting medically important viruses.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Thakur, Nishant; Tandon, Himani; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral peptides (AVPs) have exhibited huge potential in inhibiting viruses by targeting various stages of their life cycle. Therefore, we have developed AVPdb, available online at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/avpdb, to provide a dedicated resource of experimentally verified AVPs targeting over 60 medically important viruses including Influenza, HCV, HSV, RSV, HBV, DENV, SARS, etc. However, we have separately provided HIV inhibiting peptides in 'HIPdb'. AVPdb contains detailed information of 2683 peptides, including 624 modified peptides experimentally tested for antiviral activity. In modified peptides a chemical moiety is attached for increasing their efficacy and stability. Detailed information include: peptide sequence, length, source, virus targeted, virus family, cell line used, efficacy (qualitative/quantitative), target step/protein, assay used in determining the efficacy and PubMed reference. The database also furnishes physicochemical properties and predicted structure for each peptide. We have provided user-friendly browsing and search facility along with other analysis tools to help the users. Entering of many synthetic peptide-based drugs in various stages of clinical trials reiterate the importance for the AVP resources. AVPdb is anticipated to cater to the needs of scientific community working for the development of antiviral therapeutics. PMID:24285301

  10. Identification of small peptides inhibiting the integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction through targeting the cellular co-factor.

    PubMed

    Cavalluzzo, Claudia; Christ, Frauke; Voet, Arnout; Sharma, Ajendra; Singh, Brajendra Kumar; Zhang, Kam Y J; Lescrinier, Eveline; De Maeyer, Marc; Debyser, Zeger; Van der Eycken, Erik

    2013-10-01

    The integration of the viral DNA into the host genome is one of the essential steps in the HIV replication cycle. This process is mediated by the viral enzyme integrase (IN) and lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a crucial cellular co-factor of integration that acts by tethering IN to the cellular chromatin. Recently, circular peptides were identified that bind to the C-terminal domain of IN and disrupt the interaction with LEDGF/p75. Starting from the circular peptides, we identified a short peptidic sequence able to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction at low μM concentration through its binding to the IN binding site of LEDGF/p75. This discovery can lead to the synthesis of peptidomimetics with high anti-HIV activity targeting the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75 and not the viral protein IN.

  11. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Checco, James W.; Lee, Erinna F.; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J.; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Eddinger, Geoffrey A.; Belair, David G.; Wilson, Julia L.; Eller, Chelcie H.; Raines, Ronald T.; Murphy, William L.; Smith, Brian J.; Gellman, Samuel H.; Fairlie, W. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of L-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues (“α/β-peptides”) manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous “α-peptides”. This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a “stapled” Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon crosslink to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain crosslinking to produce synergistic benefits. PMID:26317395

  12. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Martin J.; Tay, Stephanie; McMahon, Róisín M.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota) might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB - or peptides - complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors. PMID:26225423

  13. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep).

    PubMed

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H; Pineda, Julio M; Kacherovsky, Nataly A; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  14. Serum Stability and Affinity Optimization of an M2 Macrophage-Targeting Peptide (M2pep)

    PubMed Central

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Gustafson, Heather H.; Pineda, Julio M.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major stromal component of the tumor microenvironment in several cancers. TAMs are a potential target for adjuvant cancer therapies due to their established roles in promoting proliferation of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We previously discovered an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) which was successfully used to target and deliver a pro-apoptotic KLA peptide to M2-like TAMs in a CT-26 colon carcinoma model. However, the effectiveness of in vivo TAM-targeting using M2pep is limited by its poor serum stability and low binding affinity. In this study, we synthesized M2pep derivatives with the goals of increasing serum stability and binding affinity. Serum stability evaluation of M2pepBiotin confirmed its rapid degradation attributed to exolytic cleavage from the N-terminus and endolytic cleavages at the W10/W11 and S16/K17 sites. N-terminal acetylation of M2pepBiotin protected the peptide against the exolytic degradation while W10w and K(17,18,19)k substitutions were able to effectively protect endolytic degradation at their respective cleavage sites. However, no tested amino acid changes at the W10 position resulted in both protease resistance at that site and retention of binding activity. Therefore, cyclization of M2pep was investigated. Cyclized M2pep better resisted serum degradation without compromising binding activity to M2 macrophages. During the serum stability optimization process, we also discovered that K9R and W10Y substitutions significantly enhanced binding affinity of M2pep. In an in vitro binding study of different M2pep analogs pre-incubated in mouse serum, cyclic M2pep with K9R and W10Y modifications (cyclic M2pep(RY)) retained the highest binding activity to M2 macrophages over time due to its improved serum stability. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo accumulation of sulfo-Cy5-labeled M2pep and cyclic M2pep(RY) in both the CT-26 and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. Cyclic M2pep

  15. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  16. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Nielsen, Morten; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02:01 and HLA-DRB1*01:01 molecules were identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. Immunization of transgenic HLA-A*02:01/HLA-DRB1*01:01 mice with four of these double binding peptides gave rise to both HLA class I and class II restricted responses by CD8 and CD4 T cells, respectively, whereas four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise to both HLA class I and class I restricted responses, a quality which might be of potential interest for peptide-based vaccine development. PMID:26731261

  17. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to hepatitis C virus-derived peptides containing the HLA A2.1 binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, A; McHutchison, J G; Pasquinelli, C; Brown, M E; Brothers, M A; Grabscheid, B; Fowler, P; Houghton, M; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    The HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a major defense mechanism in viral infections. It has been suggested that the CTL response may contribute to viral clearance and liver cell injury during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To test this hypothesis requires an understanding of the characteristics of HCV-specific cytotoxic effector cells and identification of the target antigens to which they respond. To begin this process we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a group of HLA-A2 positive patients with chronic hepatitis C with a panel of 130 HCV-derived peptides containing the HLA-A2 binding motif. Effector cells were tested for their capacity to lyse HLA-A2-matched target cells that were either sensitized with peptide or infected with a vaccinia virus construct containing HCV sequences. Using this approach we have identified nine immunogenic peptides in HCV, three of which are derived from the putative core protein, three from the nonstructural (NS) 3 domain, two from NS4 and one from NS5. Selected responses were shown to be HLA-A2 restricted, mediated by CD8+ T cells and to recognize endogenously synthesized viral antigen. Unexpectedly, peptide-specific CTL responses could also be induced in sero-negative individuals, suggesting in vitro activation of naive CTL precursors. The precursor frequency of peptide-specific CTL was 10 to 100-fold higher in infected patients compared to uninfected controls, and the responses were greatly diminished by removal of CD45 RO+ (memory) T cells. Further quantitative studies are clearly required to establish whether a correlation exists between the HCV-specific CTL response and the clinical course of this disease. Definition of the molecular targets of the human CTL response to HCV creates this opportunity, and may also contribute to the development of a T cell-based HCV vaccine. PMID:7860734

  18. Novel EGFR-targeted strategy with hybrid peptide against oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Shinya; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Nakai, Yukie; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Muto, Manabu; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key molecule in the pathophysiology of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, EGFR-targeted agents such as anti-EGFR antibody or tyrosine kinase inhibitors for OSCC have not demonstrated any clinical benefits. Recently, a novel chemotherapeutic agent, EGFR(2R)-lytic hybrid peptide, a composite of EGFR-binding peptide and lytic peptide fragments, has been shown to exhibit a potent anti-tumour effect against cancers that express high EGFR levels. In this study, we investigated the validity of employing EGFR(2R)-lytic hybrid peptide against OSCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the toxicity of this peptide was assessed in mice. We found high EGFR expression levels on the cell surface of OSCC cells, and the EGFR-binding peptide fragment showed high affinity for OSCC cells. A potent cytotoxic effect was induced within 30 minutes by the exposure of OSCC cells to EGFR(2R)-lytic hybrid peptide. Furthermore, EGFR(2R)-lytic hybrid peptide markedly suppressed the tumour growth of OSCC cells in a xenograft model. Moreover, it did not cause any identifiable adverse effects in mice. Taken together, EGFR(2R)-lytic hybrid peptide was shown to be a valid therapeutic agent against OSCC, providing a crucial rationale regarding novel EGFR-targeted therapies against OSCC. PMID:26956916

  19. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P < 0.05) increased emulsifying properties of 7S, 11S, and APP peptides independent of fatty acid chain length. Acylation decreased water binding capacity although oil binding capacity of acylated tofu whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW < 3 kDa), 7S- and 11S-peptides were improved compared to native peptides. 7S peptides acylated with long chain fatty acids had shown significant higher surface hydrophobicity as in contrast with acylated UFTW < 3 kDa and APP peptides. Fluorescence spectra studies revealed structural conformation of acylated soy peptides as compared to native peptides. This study shows that chemical modification with fatty acids can further affect functional properties of soy proteins.

  20. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L. M.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  1. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K⁺ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  2. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K+ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  3. A polyalanine peptide derived from polar fish with anti-infectious activities.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marlon H; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Nolasco, Diego O; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Felício, Mário R; Gonçalves, Sónia; Matos, Carolina O; Liao, Luciano M; Santos, Nuno C; Hancock, Robert E W; Franco, Octávio L; Migliolo, Ludovico

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing concern about antibiotic-resistant microbial infections, increasing support has been given to new drug discovery programs. A promising alternative to counter bacterial infections includes the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have emerged as model molecules for rational design strategies. Here we focused on the study of Pa-MAP 1.9, a rationally designed AMP derived from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP 1.9 was active against Gram-negative planktonic bacteria and biofilms, without being cytotoxic to mammalian cells. By using AFM, leakage assays, CD spectroscopy and in silico tools, we found that Pa-MAP 1.9 may be acting both on intracellular targets and on the bacterial surface, also being more efficient at interacting with anionic LUVs mimicking Gram-negative bacterial surface, where this peptide adopts α-helical conformations, than cholesterol-enriched LUVs mimicking mammalian cells. Thus, as bacteria present varied physiological features that favor antibiotic-resistance, Pa-MAP 1.9 could be a promising candidate in the development of tools against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26916401

  4. Biophysical analysis of the interaction of granulysin-derived peptides with enterobacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Howe, Jörg; Andrä, Jörg; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; da Silva, Ana Paula Galvão; Krensky, Alan M; Clayberger, Carol; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    To combat infections by Gram-negative bacteria, it is not only necessary to kill the bacteria but also to neutralize pathogenicity factors such as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The development of antimicrobial peptides based on mammalian endotoxin-binding proteins is a promising tool in the fight against bacterial infections, and septic shock syndrome. Here, synthetic peptides derived from granulysin (Gra-pep) were investigated in microbiological and biophysical assays to understand their interaction with LPS. We analyzed the influence of the binding of Gra-pep on (1) the acyl chain melting of the hydrophobic moiety of LPS, lipid A, by Fourier-transform spectroscopy, (2) the aggregate structure of LPS by small-angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, and 3) the enthalpy change by isothermal titration calorimetry. In addition, the influence of Gra-pep on the incorporation of LPS and LPS-LBP (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) complexes into negatively charged liposomes was monitored. Our findings demonstrate a characteristic change in the aggregate structure of LPS into multilamellar stacks in the presence of Gra-pep, but little or no change of acyl chain fluidity. Neutralization of LPS by Gra-pep is not due to a scavenging effect in solution, but rather proceeds after incorporation into target membranes, suggesting a requisite membrane-bound step.

  5. A polyalanine peptide derived from polar fish with anti-infectious activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Marlon H.; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Nolasco, Diego O.; de La Fuente-Núñez, César; Felício, Mário R.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Matos, Carolina O.; Liao, Luciano M.; Santos, Nuno C.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Franco, Octávio L.; Migliolo, Ludovico

    2016-02-01

    Due to the growing concern about antibiotic-resistant microbial infections, increasing support has been given to new drug discovery programs. A promising alternative to counter bacterial infections includes the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have emerged as model molecules for rational design strategies. Here we focused on the study of Pa-MAP 1.9, a rationally designed AMP derived from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP 1.9 was active against Gram-negative planktonic bacteria and biofilms, without being cytotoxic to mammalian cells. By using AFM, leakage assays, CD spectroscopy and in silico tools, we found that Pa-MAP 1.9 may be acting both on intracellular targets and on the bacterial surface, also being more efficient at interacting with anionic LUVs mimicking Gram-negative bacterial surface, where this peptide adopts α-helical conformations, than cholesterol-enriched LUVs mimicking mammalian cells. Thus, as bacteria present varied physiological features that favor antibiotic-resistance, Pa-MAP 1.9 could be a promising candidate in the development of tools against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria.

  6. A polyalanine peptide derived from polar fish with anti-infectious activities

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marlon H.; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Nolasco, Diego O.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Felício, Mário R.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Matos, Carolina O.; Liao, Luciano M.; Santos, Nuno C.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Franco, Octávio L.; Migliolo, Ludovico

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing concern about antibiotic-resistant microbial infections, increasing support has been given to new drug discovery programs. A promising alternative to counter bacterial infections includes the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have emerged as model molecules for rational design strategies. Here we focused on the study of Pa-MAP 1.9, a rationally designed AMP derived from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus. Pa-MAP 1.9 was active against Gram-negative planktonic bacteria and biofilms, without being cytotoxic to mammalian cells. By using AFM, leakage assays, CD spectroscopy and in silico tools, we found that Pa-MAP 1.9 may be acting both on intracellular targets and on the bacterial surface, also being more efficient at interacting with anionic LUVs mimicking Gram-negative bacterial surface, where this peptide adopts α-helical conformations, than cholesterol-enriched LUVs mimicking mammalian cells. Thus, as bacteria present varied physiological features that favor antibiotic-resistance, Pa-MAP 1.9 could be a promising candidate in the development of tools against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26916401

  7. Degradable polyethylenimine derivate coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 as a new gene-delivery vector

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kehai; Wang, Xiaoyu; Fan, Wei; Zhu, Qing; Yang, Jingya; Gao, Jing; Gao, Shen

    2012-01-01

    Background To solve the efficiency versus cytotoxicity and tumor-targeting problems of polyethylenimine (PEI) used as a nonviral gene delivery vector, a degradable PEI derivate coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 was developed. Methods First, we synthesized a degradable PEI derivate by crosslinking low-molecular-weight PEI with pluronic P123, then used tumor-targeting peptide arginine-glycine-aspartate-cysteine (RGDC), in conjunction with the cell-penetrating peptide Tat (49–57), to yield a bifunctional peptide RGDC-Tat (49–57) named R13, which can improve cell selection and increase cellular uptake, and, lastly, adopted R13 to modify the PEI derivates so as to prepare a new polymeric gene vector (P123-PEI-R13). The new gene vector was characterized in terms of its chemical structure and biophysical parameters. We also investigated the specificity, cytotoxicity, and gene transfection efficiency of this vector in αvβ3-positive human cervical carcinoma Hela cells and murine melanoma B16 cells in vitro. Results The vector showed controlled degradation, strong targeting specificity to αvβ3 receptor, and noncytotoxicity in Hela cells and B16 cells at higher doses, in contrast to PEI 25 KDa. The particle size of P123-PEI-R13/DNA complexes was around 100–250 nm, with proper zeta potential. The nanoparticles can protect plasmid DNA from being digested by DNase I at a concentration of 6 U DNase I/μg DNA. The nanoparticles were resistant to dissociation induced by 50% fetal bovine serum and 600 μg/mL sodium heparin. P123-PEI-R13 also revealed higher transfection efficiency in two cell lines as compared with PEI 25 KDa. Conclusion P123-PEI-R13 is a potential candidate as a safe and efficient gene-delivery carrier for gene therapy. PMID:22412301

  8. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and derived peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C.; Krueger, R.C.; Schwartz, N.B. )

    1990-01-30

    In order to define the domain structure of proteoglycans as well as identify primary amino acid sequences specific for attachment of the various carbohydrate substituents, reliable techniques for deglycosylating proteoglycans are required. In this study, deglycosylation of cartilage chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) with minimal core protein cleavage was accomplished by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and keratanase, followed by treatment with anhydrous HF in pyridine. Nearly complete deglycosylation of secreted proteoglycan was verified within 45 min of HF treatment by loss of incorporated ({sup 3}H)glucosamine label from the proteoglycan as a function of time of treatment, as well as by direct analysis of carbohydrate content and xylosyltransferase acceptor activity of unlabeled core protein preparations. The deglycosylated CSPG preparations were homogeneous and of high molecular weight. Comparison of the intact deglycosylated core protein preparations with newly synthesized unprocessed precursors suggested that extensive proteolytic cleavage of the core protein did not occur during normal intracellular processing. Furthermore, peptide patterns generated after clostripain digestion of core protein precursor and of deglycosylated secreted proteoglycan were comparable. With the use of the clostripain digestion procedure, peptides were produced from unlabeled proteoglycan, and two predominant peptides from the most highly glycosylated regions were isolated, characterized, and deglycosylated. These peptides were found to follow similar kinetics of deglycosylation and to acquire xylose activity comparable to the intact core protein.

  9. Novel tumor-targeting, self-assembling peptide nanofiber as a carrier for effective curcumin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian; Xu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yumin; Chu, Liping; Liu, Qingfen; Song, Naling; Yang, Cuihong

    2014-01-01

    The poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin restrict its clinical application for cancer treatment. In this study, a novel tumor-targeting nanofiber carrier was developed to improve the solubility and tumor-targeting ability of curcumin using a self-assembled Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide. The morphologies of the peptide nanofiber and the curcumin-encapsulated nanofiber were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The tumor-targeting activity of the curcumin-encapsulated Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide nanofiber (f-RGD-Cur) was studied in vitro and in vivo, using Nap-GFFYG-RGE peptide nanofiber (f-RGE-Cur) as the control. Curcumin was encapsulated into the peptide nanofiber, which had a diameter of approximately 10–20 nm. Curcumin showed sustained-release behavior from the nanofibers in vitro. f-RGD-Cur showed much higher cellular uptake in αvβ3 integrin-positive HepG2 liver carcinoma cells than did non-targeted f-RGE-Cur, thereby leading to significantly higher cytotoxicity. Ex vivo studies further demonstrated that curcumin could accumulate markedly in mouse tumors after administration of f-RGD-Cur via the tail vein. These results indicate that Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide self-assembled nanofibers are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system for targeted treatment of cancer. PMID:24399876

  10. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (∼52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  11. Novel antimicrobial peptides derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other lentivirus transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Tencza, S B; Douglass, J P; Creighton, D J; Montelaro, R C; Mietzner, T A

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a conserved set of peptides derived from lentiviral envelope transmembrane proteins that are similar to the natural antimicrobial peptides cecropins and magainins in overall structure but bear no sequence homology to them or other members of their class. We describe here an evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of these virally derived peptides, designated lentivirus lytic peptides (LLPs). The results of this study demonstrate that they are potent and selective antibacterial peptides: the prototype sequence, LLP1, is bactericidal to both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms at micromolar concentrations in 10 mM phosphate buffer. Furthermore, LLP1 kills bacteria quite rapidly, causing a 1,000-fold reduction in viable organisms within 50 s. Peptides corresponding to sequences from three lentivirus envelope proteins were synthesized and characterized. Several of these peptides are selective, killing bacteria at concentrations 50- to 100-fold lower than those required to lyse erythrocytes. Development of antimicrobial agents based on these peptides may lead to improved therapeutics for the management of a variety of infectious diseases. PMID:9371339

  12. Fiber formation of a synthetic spider peptide derived from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji; Kontani, Ko-Ichi; Taniguchi, Rina; Saiki, Masatoshi; Yokoi, Sayoko; Yukuhiro, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Dragline silk is a high-performance biopolymer with exceptional mechanical properties. Artificial spider dragline silk is currently prepared by a recombinant technique or chemical synthesis. However, the recombinant process is costly and large-sized synthetic peptides are needed for fiber formation. In addition, the silk fibers that are produced are much weaker than a fiber derived from a native spider. In this study, a small peptide was chemically synthesized and examined for its ability to participate in fiber formation. A short synthetic peptide derived from Nephila clavata was prepared by a solid-phase peptide method, based on a prediction using the hydrophobic parameter of each individual amino acid residue. After purification of the spider peptide, fiber formation was examined under several conditions. Fiber formation proceeded in the acidic pH range, and larger fibers were produced when organic solvents such as trifluoroethanol and acetonitrile were used at an acidic pH. Circular dichroism measurements of the spider peptide indicate that the peptide has a beta-sheet structure and that the formation of a beta-sheet structure is required for the spider peptide to undergo fiber formation. PMID:20564008

  13. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rosemeire A; Giordano, Ricardo J; Gutierrez, Paulo S; Rocha, Viviane Z; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S P; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C; Marques, Fabio L N; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V; Lugão, Ademar B; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05), when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC) was synthesized and labeled with (111)InCl₃ in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases. PMID:27563889

  14. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rosemeire A.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Rocha, Viviane Z.; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S. P.; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C.; Marques, Fabio L. N.; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05), when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC) was synthesized and labeled with 111InCl3 in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases. PMID:27563889

  15. A novel peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; Yan, Danhong; He, Xueling; Zhang, Li; Wei, Yan; Huang, Zhongbing

    2013-12-01

    Discovery of peptide ligands that can target human ovarian cancer and deliver chemotherapeutics offers new opportunity for cancer therapy. The advent of phage-displayed peptide library facilitated the screening of such peptides. In vivo screening that set in a microanatomic and functional context was applied in our study, and a novel peptide WSGPGVWGASVK targeting ovarian cancer was isolated. The phage clone PC3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK can gain effective access to accumulate in the tumor sites after intravenous injection while reducing its accumulation in normal organs. Positive immunostaining of PC3-1 was located in both sites of tumor cells and tumor blood vessels, which resulted in a diffuse binding pattern through the tumor. In vitro study results confirmed the capability of peptide WSGPGVWGASVK binding to and being internalized by both tumor cells and angiogenic endothelial cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the peptide bound to SKOV3 cells with Kd value of 5.43 ± 0.4 μM. Taken together, it suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK is a lead candidate for delivering therapeutics to penetrate into tumors. PMID:24105738

  16. Transcytosis-Targeting Peptide: A Conductor of Liposomal Nanoparticles through the Endothelial Cell Barrier.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hidetaka; Fujiwara, Takahiro; Santiwarangkool, Sarochin; Hossen, Nazir; Kajimoto, Kazuaki; El-Sayed, Ayman; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal in the area of drug-delivery systems is the development of a nanoparticle that can penetrate the endothelial cell monolayer for the targeting of tissue parenchyma. In the present study, we identify a transcytosis-targeting peptide (TTP) that permits polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-modified liposomes (PEG-LPs) to penetrate through monolayers of brain-derived endothelial cells. These endothelial cells were layered on a gelatin nanofiber sheet, a nanofiber meshwork that allows the evaluation of transcellular transport of nanosized particles (ca. 100 nm). Systematic modification of the sequences results in the identification of the consensus sequence of TTP as L(R/K)QZZZL, where Z denotes hydrophilic amino acids (R/K/S and partially D). The TTP-modified liposomes are bound on the heparin sulfate proteoglycan, and are then taken up via lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. Subsequent intracellular imaging of the particles reveals a unique intracellular sorting of TTP-modified PEG liposomes (TTP-PEG-LPs); namely the TTP-LPs are not localized with the lysosomes, whereas this co-localization is dominant in the unmodified PEG liposomes (PEG-LPs). The in vivo endothelial penetration of liposomes in adipose tissue is conferred by the dual modification of the particles with TTP and tissue-targeting ligands. This technology promises innovations in intravenously available delivery system to tissue parenchyma.

  17. Precision-guided antimicrobial peptide as a targeted modulator of human microbial ecology

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lihong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Yang, Youngik; Eckert, Randal; Kaplan, Christopher W.; Kyme, Pierre; Sheikh, Omid; Varnum, Brian; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    One major challenge to studying human microbiome and its associated diseases is the lack of effective tools to achieve targeted modulation of individual species and study its ecological function within multispecies communities. Here, we show that C16G2, a specifically targeted antimicrobial peptide, was able to selectively kill cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans with high efficacy within a human saliva-derived in vitro oral multispecies community. Importantly, a significant shift in the overall microbial structure of the C16G2-treated community was revealed after a 24-h recovery period: several bacterial species with metabolic dependency or physical interactions with S. mutans suffered drastic reduction in their abundance, whereas S. mutans’ natural competitors, including health-associated Streptococci, became dominant. This study demonstrates the use of targeted antimicrobials to modulate the microbiome structure allowing insights into the key community role of specific bacterial species and also indicates the therapeutic potential of C16G2 to achieve a healthy oral microbiome. PMID:26034276

  18. Targeted vault nanoparticles engineered with an endosomolytic peptide deliver biomolecules to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Han, Muri; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Nemerow, Glen R; Rome, Leonard H

    2011-08-23

    Vault nanoparticles were engineered to enhance their escape from the endosomal compartment by fusing a membrane lytic peptide derived from adenovirus protein VI (pVI) to the N-terminus of the major vault protein to form pVI-vaults. We demonstrate that these pVI-vaults disrupt the endosomal membrane using three different experimental protocols including (1) enhancement of DNA transfection, (2) co-delivery of a cytosolic ribotoxin, and (3) direct visualization by fluorescence. Furthermore, direct targeting of vaults to specific cell surface epidermal growth factor receptors led to enhanced cellular uptake and efficient delivery of vaults to the cytoplasm. This process was monitored with fluorescent vaults, and morphological changes in the endosomal compartment were observed. By combining targeting and endosomal escape into a single recombinant vault, high levels of transfection efficiency were achieved using low numbers of vault particles. These results demonstrate that engineered vaults are effective, efficient, and nontoxic nanoparticles for targeted delivery of biomaterials to the cell cytoplasm.

  19. Bioavailability of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides: a glycaemic management perspective.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Drummond, Elaine; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-06-01

    Milk protein-derived peptides have been reported to have potential benefits for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, what the active components are and whether intact peptides exert this bioactivity has received little investigation in human subjects. Furthermore, potentially useful bioactive peptides can be limited by low bioavailability. Various peptides have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream after milk-protein ingestion, providing valuable insights into their potential bioavailability. However, these studies are currently limited and the structure and sequence of milk peptides exerting bioactivity for glycaemic management has received little investigation in human subjects. The present article reviews the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides in human studies to date, and examines the evidence on milk proteins and glycaemic management, including potential mechanisms of action. Areas in need of advancement are identified. Only by establishing the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides, the active components and the mechanistic pathways involved can the benefits of milk proteins for the prevention or management of type 2 diabetes be fully realised in future.

  20. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Derived from Human Lactoferrin with Conformation-dependent Uptake Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Duchardt, Falk; Ruttekolk, Ivo R.; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Bürck, Jochen; Hufnagel, Hansjörg; Fischer, Rainer; van den Heuvel, Maaike; Löwik, Dennis W. P. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Ulrich, Anne; de Waard, Michel; Brock, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The molecular events that contribute to the cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are still a matter of intense research. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of a 22-amino acid CPP derived from the human milk protein, lactoferrin. The peptide exhibits a conformation-dependent uptake efficiency that is correlated with efficient binding to heparan sulfate and lipid-induced conformational changes. The peptide contains a disulfide bridge formed by terminal cysteine residues. At concentrations exceeding 10 μm, this peptide undergoes the same rapid entry into the cytoplasm that was described previously for the arginine-rich CPPs nona-arginine and Tat. Cytoplasmic entry strictly depends on the presence of the disulfide bridge. To better understand this conformation dependence, NMR spectroscopy was performed for the free peptide, and CD measurements were performed for free and lipid-bound peptide. In solution, the peptides showed only slight differences in secondary structure, with a predominantly disordered structure both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bridge. In contrast, in complex with large unilamellar vesicles, the conformation of the oxidized and reduced forms of the peptide clearly differed. Moreover, surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the oxidized form binds to heparan sulfate with a considerably higher affinity than the reduced form. Consistently, membrane binding and cellular uptake of the peptide were reduced when heparan sulfate chains were removed. PMID:19858187

  1. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition.

  2. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition. PMID:26435515

  3. Spontaneous human squamous cell carcinomas are killed by a human cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone recognizing a wild-type p53-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Röpke, M; Hald, J; Guldberg, P; Zeuthen, J; Nørgaard, L; Fugger, L; Svejgaard, A; Van der Burg, S; Nijman, H W; Melief, C J; Claesson, M H

    1996-12-10

    A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone generated in vitro from the peripheral blood of a healthy HLA-A2-positive individual against a synthetic p53 protein-derived wild-type peptide (L9V) was shown to kill squamous carcinoma cell lines derived from two head and neck carcinomas, which expressed mutant p53 genes, in a L9V/HLA-A2 specific and restricted fashion. Thus, the normal tolerance against endogenously processed p53 protein-derived self-epitopes can be broken by peptide-specific in vitro priming. p53 protein-derived wild-type peptides might thus represent tumor associated target molecules for immunotherapeutical approaches. PMID:8962118

  4. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    PubMed

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases.

  5. An overview of antifungal peptides derived from insect.

    PubMed

    Faruck, Mohammad Omer; Yusof, Faridah; Chowdhury, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Fungi are not classified as plants or animals. They resemble plants in many ways but do not produce chlorophyll or make their own food photosynthetically like plants. Fungi are useful for the production of beer, bread, medicine, etc. More complex than viruses or bacteria; fungi can be destructive human pathogens responsible for various diseases in humans. Most people have a strong natural immunity against fungal infection. However, fungi can cause diseases when this immunity breaks down. In the last few years, fungal infection has increased strikingly and has been accompanied by a rise in the number of deaths of cancer patients, transplant recipients, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients owing to fungal infections. The growth rate of fungi is very slow and quite difficult to identify. A series of molecules with antifungal activity against different strains of fungi have been found in insects, which can be of great importance to tackle human diseases. Insects secrete such compounds, which can be peptides, as a part of their immune defense reactions. Active antifungal peptides developed by insects to rapidly eliminate infectious pathogens are considered a component of the defense munitions. This review focuses on naturally occurring antifungal peptides from insects and their challenges to be used as armaments against human diseases. PMID:26093218

  6. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

  7. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  8. Alginate-peptide amphiphile core-shell microparticles as a targeted drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoven, Job; Zha, R. Helen; Tantakitti, Faifan; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Newcomb, Christina J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe in this work the synthesis of microparticles with a doxorubicin drug conjugated alginate core and a shell of peptide amphiphile nanofibres functionalized for targeting the folate receptor. The spherical geometry of the particle core allows high drug loading per surface area, whereas the nanoscale fibrous shell formed by self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles offers a high surface to volume ratio that is ideal for targeting. The synthesised microparticles have a 60-fold higher cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared to non-targeting particles. PMID:25642326

  9. The development of peptide ligands that target helix 69 rRNA of bacterial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Dremann, Danielle N; Chow, Christine S

    2016-09-15

    Antibiotic resistance prevents successful treatment of common bacterial infections, making it clear that new target locations and drugs are required to resolve this ongoing challenge. The bacterial ribosome is a common target for antibacterials due to its essential contribution to cell viability. The focus of this work is a region of the ribosome called helix 69 (H69), which was recently identified as a secondary target site for aminoglycoside antibiotics. H69 has key roles in essential ribosomal processes such as subunit association, ribosome recycling, and tRNA selection. Conserved across phylogeny, bacterial H69 also contains two pseudouridines and one 3-methylpseudouridine. Phage display revealed a heptameric peptide sequence that targeted H69. Using solid-phase synthesis, peptide variants with higher affinity and improved selectivity to modified H69 were generated. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine relative apparent dissociation constants of the RNA-peptide complexes. PMID:27492196

  10. Quantitative analysis of peptides and proteins in biomedicine by targeted mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Michael A; Carr, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming widely used in academia and in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries for sensitive and quantitative detection of proteins, peptides and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the increasing importance of targeted MS technologies in clinical proteomics and the potential key roles these techniques will have in bridging biomedical discovery and clinical implementation. PMID:23269374

  11. Intracellular observation of nanocarriers modified with a mitochondrial targeting signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Eriko; Yamada, Yuma; Yasuzaki, Yukari; Hyodo, Mamoru; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-11-01

    This study focused on the intracellular observation of nanocarriers modified with a mitochondrial targeting signal peptide (MTS). The nanocarriers showed an efficient cellular uptake, and the MTS had a positive effect on their mitochondrial targeting. This is the first report of an intracellular observation of nanocarriers modified with MTS.

  12. Interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-derived peptides with TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Long, K S; Crothers, D M

    1995-07-11

    Basic peptides from the carboxy terminus of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein bind to the stem-loop region of TAR RNA, spanning a trinucleotide bulge, with high affinity and moderate specificity. Previous studies have demonstrated that TAR RNA contains a specific arginine binding pocket. A series of 24 amino acid Tat-derived peptides with one or two arginines has been evaluated as possible structural models of the wild-type peptide in its interaction with TAR RNA, using gel electrophoretic methods and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Dissociation rate measurements indicate that these peptides form complexes with TAR RNA that are significantly less stable kinetically than the wild-type complex. Through a combination of dissociation and association rate measurements, we estimate that wild-type Tat peptide and TAR RNA interact with a Kd of about 16 pM. Together with competition experiments, these results confirm that band shift gel titration methods significantly underestimate absolute peptide-RNA binding affinities in the subnanomolar range. Through competition experiments with bulge mutants of TAR RNA, we demonstrate that peptides that form longer lived complexes with wild-type TAR RNA also show greater discrimination over TAR RNA bulge mutants. Difference CD spectra show that the Tat-derived peptides do not induce the same changes in TAR RNA as the wild-type peptide. The difference CD spectrum of argininamide bound to TAR RNA is most similar to that of the wild-type peptide-TAR RNA complex, implying that the differences in CD spectra upon complex formation are mostly due to changes in TAR RNA conformation.

  13. The antimicrobial peptides derived from chromogranin/secretogranin family, new actors of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Zhang, Dan; Chich, Jean-François; Gasnier, Claire; Schneider, Francis; Haïkel, Youssef; Aunis, Dominique; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène

    2010-11-30

    Chromogranins/secretogranins are members of the granin family present in secretory vesicles of nervous, endocrine and immune cells. In chromaffin cells, activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors induces the release, with catecholamines, of bioactive peptides resulting from a natural processing. During the past decade, our laboratory has characterized new antimicrobial chromogranin-derived peptides in the secretions of stimulated bovine chromaffin cells. They act at the micromolar range against bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and are non-toxic for the mammalian cells. They are recovered in several biological fluids involved in defence mechanisms (human serum, neutrophil secretions and saliva). These new antimicrobial peptides demonstrate the major role of the adrenal medulla in innate immunity. In this review we focus on the antimicrobial peptides derived from human and bovine chromogranin A (CGA), chromogranin B (CGB) and secretogranin II (SGII) emphasizing their direct action against pathogens and their effects on immune cells.

  14. Bioactive peptides derived from human milk proteins--mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins with very diverse functions, which are beneficial for the rapidly growing neonate. The large variety of bioactivities is accomplished by the combination of bioactive proteins per se and gastrointestinal release of bioactive peptides derived from them. The bioactivities exerted by these peptides include enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulation, opioid, antihypertensive and antimicrobial activities. Notably, several of the activities are not attributed to the parental proteins, but exclusively to released bioactive peptides. This article reviews studies on bioactive peptides derived from major human milk proteins, such as caseins, α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin, during gastrointestinal digestion. Studies of bovine milk counterparts are also cited as a comparison.

  15. Molecular Design, Structural Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Derivatives of Peptide CGA-N46.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Zhi-Fang; Sun, Ya-Nan; Chen, Shi-Hua; Yi, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Ru; Yang, Shuo-Ye; Yu, Guang-Hai; Huang, Liang; Li, Chao-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Chromogranin A (CGA)-N46, a derived peptide of human chromogranin A, has antifungal activity. To further research the active domain of CGA-N46, a series of derivatives were designed by successively deleting amino acid from both terminus of CGA-N46, and the amino acid sequence of each derivative was analyzed by bioinformatic software. Based on the predicted physicochemical properties of the peptides, including half-life time in mammalian reticulocytes (in vitro), yeast (in vivo) and E. coli (in vivo), instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), the secondary structure, net charge, the distribution of hydrophobic residues and hydrophilic residues, the final derivatives CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The results of bioinformatic analysis showed that CGA-N46 and its derivatives were α-helix, neutral or weak positive charge, hydrophilic, and CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were more stable than the other derivatives. The results of circular dichroism confirmed that CGA-N46 and its derived peptides displayed α-helical structure in an aqueous solution and 30 mM sodium dodecylsulfate, but α-helical contents decreased in hydrophobic lipid vesicles. CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 had higher antifungal activities than their mother peptide CGA-N46. Among of the derived peptides, CGA-N12 showed the least hemolytic activity. In conclusion, we have successfully identified the active domain of CGA-N46 with strong antifungal activity and weak hemolytic activity, which provides the possibility to develop a new class of antibiotics.

  16. Development and Testing of a 212Pb/212Bi Peptide for Targeting Metastatic Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop a new radiolabeled peptide for imaging and treating metastatic melanoma. The immunoconjugate consists of a receptor-specific peptide that targets melanoma cells. The beta-emitter lead-212 (half-life = 10.4 hours) is linked by coordination chemistry to the peptide. After injection, the peptide targets melanoma receptors on the surfaces of melanoma cells. Lead-212 decays to the alpha-emitter bismuth-212 (half-life = 60 minutes). Alpha-particles that hit melanoma cell nuclei are likely to kill the melanoma cell. For cancer cell imaging, the lead-212 is replaced by lead-203 (half-life = 52 hours). Lead-203 emits 279 keV photons (80.1% abundance) that can be imaged and measured for biodistribution analysis, cancer imaging, and quantitative dosimetry.

  17. A General Synthetic Approach for Designing Epitope Targeted Macrocyclic Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Das, Samir; Nag, Arundhati; Liang, JingXin; Bunck, David N; Umeda, Aiko; Farrow, Blake; Coppock, Matthew B; Sarkes, Deborah A; Finch, Amethist S; Agnew, Heather D; Pitram, Suresh; Lai, Bert; Yu, Mary Beth; Museth, A Katrine; Deyle, Kaycie M; Lepe, Bianca; Rodriguez-Rivera, Frances P; McCarthy, Amy; Alvarez-Villalonga, Belen; Chen, Ann; Heath, John; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N; Heath, James R

    2015-11-01

    We describe a general synthetic strategy for developing high-affinity peptide binders against specific epitopes of challenging protein biomarkers. The epitope of interest is synthesized as a polypeptide, with a detection biotin tag and a strategically placed azide (or alkyne) presenting amino acid. This synthetic epitope (SynEp) is incubated with a library of complementary alkyne or azide presenting peptides. Library elements that bind the SynEp in the correct orientation undergo the Huisgen cycloaddition, and are covalently linked to the SynEp. Hit peptides are tested against the full-length protein to identify the best binder. We describe development of epitope-targeted linear or macrocycle peptide ligands against 12 different diagnostic or therapeutic analytes. The general epitope targeting capability for these low molecular weight synthetic ligands enables a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications, similar to those of monoclonal antibodies.

  18. Smac-Derived Aza-Peptide As an Aminopeptidase-Resistant XIAP BIR3 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Mohamed A; Tikhonova, Irina G; Martin, Lorraine; Walker, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The peptidic nature of anti-IAPs N-terminus Smac-derived peptides precludes their utilization as potential therapeutic anticancer agents. Recent advances in the development of novel Smacderived peptidomimetics and non-peptidic molecules with improved anti-IAPs activity and resistance to proteolytic cleavage have been reported and led to a number of candidates that are currently in clinical trials including LCL-161, SM-406/AT-406, GDC-0512/GDC-0917, and birinapant. As an attempt to improve the proteolytic stability of Smac peptides, we developed the Aza-peptide AzaAla- Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (2). Unlike unmodified peptide Ala-Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (1), analogue (2) exhibited resistance towards proteolytic cleavage by two aminopeptidases; LAP and DPP-IV, while retaining its IAP inhibitory activity. This was due to the altered planar geometry of the P1 residue side chain. Our findings showed that using aza-isosteres of bioactive peptide sequences imbue the residue with imperviousness to proteolysis; underscoring a potential approach for developing a new generation of Smac-derived Aza-peptidomimetics. PMID:26282728

  19. Smac-Derived Aza-Peptide As an Aminopeptidase-Resistant XIAP BIR3 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Elsawy, Mohamed A; Tikhonova, Irina G; Martin, Lorraine; Walker, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The peptidic nature of anti-IAPs N-terminus Smac-derived peptides precludes their utilization as potential therapeutic anticancer agents. Recent advances in the development of novel Smacderived peptidomimetics and non-peptidic molecules with improved anti-IAPs activity and resistance to proteolytic cleavage have been reported and led to a number of candidates that are currently in clinical trials including LCL-161, SM-406/AT-406, GDC-0512/GDC-0917, and birinapant. As an attempt to improve the proteolytic stability of Smac peptides, we developed the Aza-peptide AzaAla- Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (2). Unlike unmodified peptide Ala-Val-Pro-Phe-Tyr-NH2 (1), analogue (2) exhibited resistance towards proteolytic cleavage by two aminopeptidases; LAP and DPP-IV, while retaining its IAP inhibitory activity. This was due to the altered planar geometry of the P1 residue side chain. Our findings showed that using aza-isosteres of bioactive peptide sequences imbue the residue with imperviousness to proteolysis; underscoring a potential approach for developing a new generation of Smac-derived Aza-peptidomimetics.

  20. Activity Prediction and Molecular Mechanism of Bovine Blood Derived Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Nie, Shaoping; Liu, Boqun; Yu, Yiding; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Development of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) inhibitory peptides from food protein is under extensive research as alternative for the prevention of hypertension. However, it is difficult to identify peptides released from food sources. To accelerate the progress of peptide identification, a three layer back propagation neural network model was established to predict the ACE-inhibitory activity of pentapeptides derived from bovine hemoglobin by simulated enzyme digestion. The pentapeptide WTQRF has the best predicted value with experimental IC50 23.93 μM. The potential molecular mechanism of the WTQRF / ACE interaction was investigated by flexible docking. PMID:25768442

  1. Activity prediction and molecular mechanism of bovine blood derived angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Nie, Shaoping; Liu, Boqun; Yu, Yiding; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Development of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) inhibitory peptides from food protein is under extensive research as alternative for the prevention of hypertension. However, it is difficult to identify peptides released from food sources. To accelerate the progress of peptide identification, a three layer back propagation neural network model was established to predict the ACE-inhibitory activity of pentapeptides derived from bovine hemoglobin by simulated enzyme digestion. The pentapeptide WTQRF has the best predicted value with experimental IC50 23.93 μM. The potential molecular mechanism of the WTQRF / ACE interaction was investigated by flexible docking. PMID:25768442

  2. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  3. A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Elmlund, Louise; Söderberg, Pernilla; Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. PMID:25587414

  4. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Lujuan; Fu, Qingquan; Zhou, Guang-hong; Zhang, Wan-gang

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides. PMID:27657142

  5. A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Lujuan; Fu, Qingquan; Zhou, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Wan-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides. PMID:27657142

  6. Delivery of siRNA using ternary complexes containing branched cationic peptides: the role of peptide sequence, branching and targeting.

    PubMed

    Kudsiova, Laila; Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Cui, Lili; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2016-03-01

    Ternary nanocomplexes, composed of bifunctional cationic peptides, lipids and siRNA, as delivery vehicles for siRNA have been investigated. The study is the first to determine the optimal sequence and architecture of the bifunctional cationic peptide used for siRNA packaging and delivery using lipopolyplexes. Specifically three series of cationic peptides of differing sequence, degrees of branching and cell-targeting sequences were co-formulated with siRNA and vesicles prepared from a 1 : 1 molar ratio of the cationic lipid DOTMA and the helper lipid, DOPE. The level of siRNA knockdown achieved in the human alveolar cell line, A549-luc cells, in both reduced serum and in serum supplemented media was evaluated, and the results correlated to the nanocomplex structure (established using a range of physico-chemical tools, namely small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurement); the conformational properties of each component (circular dichroism); the degree of protection of the siRNA in the lipopolyplex (using gel shift assays) and to the cellular uptake, localisation and toxicity of the nanocomplexes (confocal microscopy). Although the size, charge, structure and stability of the various lipopolyplexes were broadly similar, it was clear that lipopolyplexes formulated from branched peptides containing His-Lys sequences perform best as siRNA delivery agents in serum, with protection of the siRNA in serum balanced against efficient release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm of the cell.

  7. Commercially available antibodies can be applied in quantitative multiplexed peptide immunoaffinity enrichment targeted mass spectrometry assays

    PubMed Central

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Zhao, Lei; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Kennedy, Jacob; Yan, Ping; Lin, Chenwei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides coupled to multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (immuno-MRM) enables highly specific, sensitive, and precise quantification of peptides and post-translational modifications. Major obstacles to developing a large number of immuno-MRM assays are the poor availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) validated for immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides and the cost and lead time of developing the antibodies de novo. Although many thousands of mAbs are commercially offered, few have been tested for application to immunoaffinity enrichment of peptides. In this study we tested the success rate of using commercially available mAbs for peptide immuno-MRM assays. We selected 105 commercial mAbs (76 targeting non-modified “pan” epitopes, 29 targeting phosphorylation) to proteins associated with the DNA damage response network. We found that 8 of the 76 pan (11%) and 5 of the 29 phospho-specific mAbs (17%) captured tryptic peptides (detected by LC-MS/MS) of their protein targets from human cell lysates. Seven of these mAbs were successfully used to configure and analytically characterize immuno-MRM assays. By applying selection criteria upfront, the results indicate that a screening success rate of up to 24% is possible, establishing the feasibility of screening a large number of catalog antibodies to provide readily-available assay reagents. PMID:27094115

  8. The effects of shortening lactoferrin derived peptides against tumour cells, bacteria and normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Strøm, Morten B; Mekonnen, Seble M; Svendsen, John S; Rekdal, Oystein

    2004-01-01

    A number of shortened derivatives of the lactoferrin model peptide L12, PAWRKAFRWAKRMLKKAA, were designed in order to elucidate the structural basis for antitumour activity of lactoferrin derivatives. Three tumour cell lines were included in the study and toxicity determined by measuring lysis of human red blood cells and fibroblasts. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between antitumour activity and net positive charge, in which a net charge close to +7 was essential for a high antitumour activity. In order to increase the antitumour activity of the shortest peptide with a net charge less than +7, the hydrophobicity had to be increased by adding a bulky Trp residue. None of the peptides were haemolytic, but toxicity against fibroblasts was observed. However, modifications of the peptides had a higher effect on reducing fibroblast toxicity than antitumour activity and thereby resulted in peptides displaying an almost 7-fold selectivity for tumour cells compared with fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coil and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was also included in order to compare the structural requirements for antitumour activity with those required for a high antimicrobial activity. The results showed that most of the peptides were highly active against both bacterial strains. Less modification by shortening the peptide sequences was tolerated for maintaining a high antitumour activity and selectivity compared with antimicrobial activity. The order of the amino acid residues and thereby the conformation of the peptides was highly essential for antitumour activity, whereas the antimicrobial activity was hardly influenced by changes in this parameter. Thus, in addition to a certain net positive charge and hydrophobicity, the ability to adopt an amphipathic conformation was a more critical structural parameter for antitumour activity than for antimicrobial activity, and implied that a

  9. Inhibition of Arenavirus Infection by a Glycoprotein-Derived Peptide with a Novel Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jennifer S.; Melnik, Lilia I.; Badani, Hussain; Wimley, William C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The family Arenaviridae includes a number of viruses of public health importance, such as the category A hemorrhagic fever viruses Lassa virus, Junin virus, Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, and Sabia virus. Current chemotherapy for arenavirus infection is limited to the nucleoside analogue ribavirin, which is characterized by considerable toxicity and treatment failure. Using Pichinde virus as a model arenavirus, we attempted to design glycoprotein-derived fusion inhibitors similar to the FDA-approved anti-HIV peptide enfuvirtide. We have identified a GP2-derived peptide, AVP-p, with antiviral activity and no acute cytotoxicity. The 50% inhibitory dose (IC50) for the peptide is 7 μM, with complete inhibition of viral plaque formation at approximately 20 μM, and its antiviral activity is largely sequence dependent. AVP-p demonstrates activity against viruses with the Old and New World arenavirus viral glycoprotein complex but not against enveloped viruses of other families. Unexpectedly, fusion assays reveal that the peptide induces virus-liposome fusion at neutral pH and that the process is strictly glycoprotein mediated. As observed in cryo-electron micrographs, AVP-p treatment causes morphological changes consistent with fusion protein activation in virions, including the disappearance of prefusion glycoprotein spikes and increased particle diameters, and fluorescence microscopy shows reduced binding by peptide-treated virus. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest that glycoproteins are destabilized by peptide-induced alterations in viral membrane order. We conclude that untimely deployment of fusion machinery by the peptide could render virions less able to engage in on-pathway receptor binding or endosomal fusion. AVP-p may represent a potent, highly specific, novel therapeutic strategy for arenavirus infection. IMPORTANCE Because the only drug available to combat infection by Lassa virus, a highly pathogenic arenavirus, is toxic

  10. Protective Role of PEDF-Derived Synthetic Peptide Against Experimental Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Taira, J; Higashimoto, Y; Yamagishi, S

    2016-09-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a glycoprotein with complex neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties, all of which could potentially be exploited as a therapeutic option for vascular complications in diabetes. We have previously shown that PEDF-derived synthetic peptide, P5-3 (FIFVLRD) has a comparable ability with full PEDF protein to inhibit rat corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization. However, the effects of PEDF peptide on experimental diabetic nephropathy remain unknown. To address the issue, we modified P5-3 to stabilize and administered the modified peptide (d-Lys-d-Lys-d-Lys-Gln-d-Pro-P5-3-Cys-amide, 0.2 nmol/day) or vehicle to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-rats) intraperitoneally by an osmotic mini pump for 2 weeks. We further examined the effects of modified peptide on human proximal tubular cells. Renal PEDF expression was decreased in STZ-rats. Although the peptide administration did not affect blood glucose or blood pressure, it decreased urinary excretion levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, and reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression, and suppressed glomerular expansion in the diabetic kidneys. High glucose or advanced glycation end products stimulated oxidative stress generation and PAI-1 gene expression in tubular cells, all of which were significantly suppressed by 10 nM modified P5-3 peptide. Our present study suggests that PEDF-derived synthetic modified peptide could protect against experimental diabetic nephropathy and inhibit tubular cell damage under diabetes-like conditions through its anti-oxidative properties. Supplementation of modified P5-3 peptide may be a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27214310

  11. Peptide-decorated chitosan derivatives enhance fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Patrulea, V; Hirt-Burri, N; Jeannerat, A; Applegate, L A; Ostafe, V; Jordan, O; Borchard, G

    2016-05-20

    RGD peptide sequences are known to regulate cellular activities by interacting with α5β1, αvβ5 and αvβ3 integrin, which contributes to the wound healing process. In this study, RGDC peptide was immobilized onto chitosan derivative 1,6-diaminohexane-O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (DAH-CMTMC) to display RGDC-promoting adhesion for enhanced wound healing. The efficiency of N-methylation, O-carboxymethylation and spacer grafting was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed by (1)H NMR and FTIR, yielding 0.38 degree of substitution for N-methylation and >0.85 for O-carboxymethylation. The glass transition temperatures for chitosan derivatives were also studied. Peptide immobilization was achieved through sulfhydryl groups using sulfosuccinimidyl (4-iodoacetyl)amino-benzoate (sulfo-SIAB method). RGDC immobilized peptide onto DAH-CMTMC was found to be about 15.3 μg/mg of chitosan derivative by amino acid analysis (AAA). The significant increase of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) viability in vitro over 7 days suggests that RGDC-functionalized chitosan may lead to enhanced wound healing (viability >140%). Moreover, bio-adhesion and proliferation assays confirmed that coatings of RGDC-functionalized chitosan derivatives exhibit in vitro wound healing properties by enhancing fibroblast proliferation and adhesion. These results showed that RGDC peptide-functionalized chitosan provides an optimal environment for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation. PMID:26917381

  12. Peptide-decorated chitosan derivatives enhance fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Patrulea, V; Hirt-Burri, N; Jeannerat, A; Applegate, L A; Ostafe, V; Jordan, O; Borchard, G

    2016-05-20

    RGD peptide sequences are known to regulate cellular activities by interacting with α5β1, αvβ5 and αvβ3 integrin, which contributes to the wound healing process. In this study, RGDC peptide was immobilized onto chitosan derivative 1,6-diaminohexane-O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (DAH-CMTMC) to display RGDC-promoting adhesion for enhanced wound healing. The efficiency of N-methylation, O-carboxymethylation and spacer grafting was quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed by (1)H NMR and FTIR, yielding 0.38 degree of substitution for N-methylation and >0.85 for O-carboxymethylation. The glass transition temperatures for chitosan derivatives were also studied. Peptide immobilization was achieved through sulfhydryl groups using sulfosuccinimidyl (4-iodoacetyl)amino-benzoate (sulfo-SIAB method). RGDC immobilized peptide onto DAH-CMTMC was found to be about 15.3 μg/mg of chitosan derivative by amino acid analysis (AAA). The significant increase of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) viability in vitro over 7 days suggests that RGDC-functionalized chitosan may lead to enhanced wound healing (viability >140%). Moreover, bio-adhesion and proliferation assays confirmed that coatings of RGDC-functionalized chitosan derivatives exhibit in vitro wound healing properties by enhancing fibroblast proliferation and adhesion. These results showed that RGDC peptide-functionalized chitosan provides an optimal environment for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation.

  13. Connexin targeting peptides as inhibitors of voltage- and intracellular Ca2+-triggered Cx43 hemichannel opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; De Bock, Marijke; Decrock, Elke; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-12-01

    Connexins form gap junctions that function as intercellular channels and hemichannels that form a conduit between the cytoplasm and extracellular fluid when open. Peptide inhibitors of connexin channels, especially those identical to defined connexin sequences, are interesting experimental, and possibly also therapeutic tools because they may have better selectivity than general inhibitors like carbenoxolone. Over the past ten years, several peptides have been demonstrated to block hemichannels, including Gap26, Gap27, peptide5, L2 and Gap19; some of these specifically block hemichannels but not gap junctions. Most of these peptides have only recently been investigated towards their actions at the single hemichannel level, bringing up interesting information on how they interact with the connexin protein and how they affect hemichannel gating. Hemichannels can be opened by electrical, mechanical and chemical stimuli. We here review the effect of the prototypic peptides Gap26/27 and L2/Gap19 with specific focus on their inhibition of Cx43 hemichannel opening triggered by positive membrane potentials and changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Both Gap26/27 and L2/Gap19 peptide families block Cx43 hemichannel opening triggered by voltage as well as intracellular Ca2+ stimulation. Interestingly, these peptides as well as intracellular Ca2+ elevation modulate the voltage activation threshold for hemichannel opening, pointing to a common target. Moreover, L2 and Gap19 peptides are part of a sequence on the cytoplasmic loop that acts as a Ca2+/calmodulin interaction site. We here review the interesting network of interactions between Cx43 targeting peptides, voltage gating and intracellular Ca2+ as major modulators of hemichannel function. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'.

  14. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  15. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  16. LL-37-derived peptides eradicate multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from thermally wounded human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  17. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes that may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten-free or

  18. Anti-inflammatory Effect of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Targeting the Nrf2/Keap1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is increasingly recognized as a central regulator of multiple signaling pathways in inflammation and cancer, and the ability to use chemical biological tools to investigate its biological effects is very attractive. A peptide comprising a TAT-conjugated Nrf2 sequence is shown to activate Nrf2 and its downstream target gene heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a dose-dependent manner in intact human THP-1 monocytes. Levels of Nrf2 protein peak after 3 h, whereas HO-1 mRNA and protein peak after 6 and 12 h, respectively. The peptide is also shown to inhibit the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF. The TAT-14mer constitutes a useful chemical biology tool with potential therapeutic applications. PMID:22582137

  19. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  20. Variant antigenic peptide promotes cytotoxic T lymphocyte adhesion to target cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shotton, David M.; Attaran, Amir

    1998-01-01

    Timelapse video microscopy has been used to record the motility and dynamic interactions between an H-2Db-restricted murine cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone (F5) and Db-transfected L929 mouse fibroblasts (LDb) presenting normal or variant antigenic peptides from human influenza nucleoprotein. F5 cells will kill LDb target cells presenting specific antigen (peptide NP68: ASNENMDAM) after “browsing” their surfaces for between 8 min and many hours. Cell death is characterized by abrupt cellular rounding followed by zeiosis (vigorous “boiling” of the cytoplasm and blebbing of the plasma membrane) for 10–20 min, with subsequent cessation of all activity. Departure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from unkilled target cells is rare, whereas serial killing is sometimes observed. In the absence of antigenic peptide, cytotoxic T lymphocytes browse target cells for much shorter periods, and readily leave to encounter other targets, while never causing target cell death. Two variant antigenic peptides, differing in nonamer position 7 or 8, also act as antigens, albeit with lower efficiency. A third variant peptide NP34 (ASNENMETM), which differs from NP68 in both positions and yet still binds Db, does not stimulate F5 cytotoxicity. Nevertheless, timelapse video analysis shows that NP34 leads to a significant modification of cell behavior, by up-regulating F5–LDb adhesive interactions. These data extend recent studies showing that partial agonists may elicit a subset of the T cell responses associated with full antigen stimulation, by demonstrating that TCR interaction with variant peptide antigens can trigger target cell adhesion and surface exploration without activating the signaling pathway that results in cytotoxicity. PMID:9861010

  1. A fossil antibacterial peptide gives clues to structural diversity of cathelicidin-derived host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins, a group of vertebrate- specific immune effector molecules, developed into a multigene family through gene duplication in the Cetartiodactyla lineage, in which structural changes of the antimicrobial domains (AMDs) among paralogs during evolution are clearly associated with functional diversification of cathelicidins. However, the evolutionary mechanism for such structural diversity remains largely unsolved. Although at the genomic level, the 3'-exon alone encoding the variable AMD repertoire would favor a role of exon shuffling, the observation that two structurally unrelated subfamilies of AMDs (protegrins and prophenins) display high similarity in some nucleotide regions of the 3'-exons of their genes provides evidence for postduplication sequence remodeling. This opinion is further strengthened by finding a proline-arginine-rich antibacterial peptide of 38 residues (named PR-38) encoded by an open reading frame located in the 3' untranslated region of protegrins, which is in frame with prophenins. The latter appears to have undergone internal motif repeats in the region corresponding to PR-38. PR-38 exhibits similar amino acid sequence and carboxyl-terminal amidation feature to PR-39s, a subfamily of cathelicidin peptides conserved across Cetartiodactyla. Functional assays of the chemically synthesized PR-38 confirmed its antibacterial activity with a similar action mode to PR-39 against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at micromolar concentrations, supporting an ancient functional link among cathelicidin members belonging to different subfamilies. Resurrecting the fossil peptide highlights the evolutionary position of PR-39 in generating structurally variable subfamilies of porcine cathelicidins through postduplication sequence remodeling. PMID:18796560

  2. Derivatives of the mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) inhibit fungal and bacterial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Robijns, Stijn; Steenackers, Hans; Verstraeten, Natalie; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Dovgan, Barbara; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Michiels, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-09-01

    We identified a 26-amino-acid truncated form of the 34-amino-acid cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the islets of Langerhans of the murine pancreas. This peptide, P318, shares 67% identity with the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide. As LL-37 displays antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity, we tested antifungal and antibiofilm activity of P318 against the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. P318 shows biofilm-specific activity as it inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.15 μM without affecting planktonic survival at that concentration. Next, we tested the C. albicans biofilm-inhibitory activity of a series of truncated and alanine-substituted derivatives of P318. Based on the biofilm-inhibitory activity of these derivatives and the length of the peptides, we decided to synthesize the shortened alanine-substituted peptide at position 10 (AS10; KLKKIAQKIKNFFQKLVP). AS10 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.22 μM and acted synergistically with amphotericin B and caspofungin against mature biofilms. AS10 also inhibited biofilm formation of different bacteria as well as of fungi and bacteria in a mixed biofilm. In addition, AS10 does not affect the viability or functionality of different cell types involved in osseointegration of an implant, pointing to the potential of AS10 for further development as a lead peptide to coat implants. PMID:24982087

  3. Antibacterial activity of casein-derived peptides isolated from rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) milk.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Maria; Thomas, Ursula; Pellegrini, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    Acid-precipitated rabbit 'whole casein' was digested by trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and clostripain to screen for possible peptides with antibacterial properties. The peptide fragments were separated by reversed-phase chromatography. The collected fractions were pooled and their antibacterial properties tested against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus lentus. Three antibacterial peptide fragments derived from tryptic digestion of rabbit casein were isolated and identified. Their sequences were found as follows: HVEQLLR (residues 50-56 of beta-casein), ILPFIQSLFPFAER (residues 64-77 of beta-casein), and FHLGHLK (residues 19-25 of alpha(s1)-casein). The three peptides were synthesized and found to exert antibacterial effect against gram positive bacteria only. Proteolytic digestion of rabbit casein by chymotrypsin, pepsin and clostripain yielded several peptide fragments with antibacterial activity. Since antibiotic peptides can be released from casein during the digestion of milk proteins, our results suggest a possible antibacterial function of rabbit caseins. It is conceivable that antibacterial peptides can be generated by endopeptidases of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract possibly providing protection for new-born rabbits against aggression of micro-organisms.

  4. Interaction study between wheat-derived peptides and procyanidin B3 by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ricardo; Perez-Gregorio, Maria Rosa; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Tannins have the ability to complex and precipitate proteins, being particularly reactive towards the proline-rich ones. The main structural feature of the wheat peptides responsible for the onset of Celiac Disease (CD) is their high content in proline residues. The aim of this work was to characterize the binding between a common food tannin (procyanidin B3) and different wheat-derived peptidic fractions. For this, seven peptide mixtures were obtained after in vitro digestion of a wheat gliadins crude extract and further characterized by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Several soluble B3-peptide complexes were identified by ESI-MS. The peptides involved in complex formation varied in terms of their size and diversity in CD epitopes. Although binding selectivity of procyanidin B3 towards peptides containing CD epitopes was not found, the major complexes contained or could contain immunoreactive peptides. This study highlights the potential beneficial effects of food polyphenols as a nutritional approach in the modulation of CD. PMID:26471686

  5. Insights into the Mechanism of Peptide Cyclodehydrations Achieved Through the Chemoenzymatic Generation of Amide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies for generating peptides and proteins bearing amide carbonyl derivatives rely on solid-phase peptide synthesis for amide functionalization. Although such strategies have been successfully implemented, technical limitations restrict both the length and sequence of the synthetic fragments. Herein we report the repurposing of a thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) cyclodehydratase to site-specifically install amide backbone labels onto diverse peptide substrates, a method we refer to as azoline-mediated peptide backbone labeling (AMPL). This convenient chemoenzymatic strategy can generate both thioamides and amides with isotopically labeled oxygen atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate the first leader peptide-independent activity of a TOMM synthetase, circumventing the requirement that sequences of interest be fused to a leader peptide for modification. Through bioinformatics-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we also convert a strictly dehydrogenase-dependent TOMM azole synthetase into an azoline synthetase. This vastly expands the spectrum of substrates modifiable by AMPL by allowing any in vitro reconstituted TOMM synthetase to be employed. To demonstrate the utility of AMPL for mechanistic enzymology studies, an 18O-labeled substrate was generated to provide direct evidence that cyclodehydrations in TOMMs occur through the phosphorylation of the carbonyl oxygen preceding the cyclized residue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AMPL is a useful tool for establishing the location of azolines both on in vitro modified peptides and azoline-containing natural products. PMID:23721104

  6. Killer Bee Molecules: Antimicrobial Peptides as Effector Molecules to Target Sporogonic Stages of Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Victoria; Underhill, Ann; Baber, Ibrahima; Sylla, Lakamy; Baby, Mounirou; Larget-Thiery, Isabelle; Zettor, Agnès; Bourgouin, Catherine; Langel, Ülo; Faye, Ingrid; Otvos, Laszlo; Wade, John D.; Coulibaly, Mamadou B.; Traore, Sekou F.; Tripet, Frederic; Eggleston, Paul; Hurd, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes. Specifically targeting early sporogonic stages, we initially screened AMPs for toxicity against a mosquito cell line and P. berghei ookinetes. Promising candidate AMPs were fed to mosquitoes to monitor adverse fitness effects, and their efficacy in blocking rodent malaria infection in Anopheles stephensi was assessed. This was followed by tests to determine their activity against P. falciparum in An. gambiae, initially using laboratory cultures to infect mosquitoes, then culminating in preliminary assays in the field using gametocytes and mosquitoes collected from the same area in Mali, West Africa. From a range of 33 molecules, six AMPs able to block Plasmodium development were identified: Anoplin, Duramycin, Mastoparan X, Melittin, TP10 and Vida3. With the exception of Anoplin and Mastoparan X, these AMPs were also toxic to an An. gambiae cell line at a concentration of 25 µM. However, when tested in mosquito blood feeds, they did not reduce mosquito longevity or egg production at concentrations of 50 µM. Peptides effective against cultured ookinetes were less effective when tested in vivo and differences in efficacy against P. berghei and P. falciparum were seen. From the range of molecules tested, the majority of effective AMPs were derived from bee/wasp venoms. PMID:24278025

  7. ATP Synthase: A Molecular Therapeutic Drug Target for Antimicrobial and Antitumor Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Okafor, Florence; Azim, Sofiya; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of ATP synthase as a molecular drug target for natural and synthetic antimi-crobial/antitumor peptides. We start with an introduction of the universal nature of the ATP synthase enzyme and its role as a biological nanomotor. Significant structural features required for catalytic activity and motor functions of ATP synthase are described. Relevant details regarding the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it a potential drug target with respect to antimicrobial peptides and other inhibitors such as dietary polyphenols, is also reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have about twelve discrete inhibitor binding sites including peptides and other inhibitors located at the interface of α/β subunits on the F1 sector of the enzyme. Molecular interaction of peptides at the β DEELSEED site on ATP synthase is discussed with specific examples. An inhibitory effect of other natural/synthetic inhibitors on ATP is highlighted to explore the therapeutic roles played by peptides and other inhibitors. Lastly, the effect of peptides on the inhibition of the Escherichia coli model system through their action on ATP synthase is presented. PMID:23432591

  8. A peptide antigen derived from EGFR T790M is immunogenic in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    OFUJI, KAZUYA; TADA, YOSHITAKA; YOSHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; SHIMOMURA, MANAMI; YOSHIMURA, MAYUKO; SAITO, KEIGO; NAKAMOTO, YASUNARI; NAKATSURA, TETSUYA

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), such as gefitinib and erlotinib, have demonstrated marked clinical activity against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, in most cases, patients develop acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy. The threonine to methionine change at codon 790 of EGFR (EGFR T790M) mutation is the most common acquired resistance mutation, and is present in ~50% cases of TKI resistance. New treatment strategies for NSCLC patients harboring the EGFR T790M mutation are required. We evaluated the immunogenicity of an antigen derived from EGFR with the T790M mutation. Using BIMAS we selected several EGFR T790M-derived peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02:01. T790M-A peptide (789–797) (IMQLMPFGC)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HLA-A2+ healthy donors. An established T790M-A-specific CTL line showed reactivity against the NCSLC cell line, H1975-A2 (HLA-A2+, T790M+), but not H1975 (HLA-A2−, T790M+), and the corresponding wild-type peptide (ITQLMPFGC)-pulsed T2 cells using an interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immuno spot (ELISPOT) assay. This CTL line also demonstrated peptide-specific cytotoxicity against H1975-A2 cells. This finding suggests that the EGFR T790M mutation-derived antigen could be a new target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25532027

  9. Role of αA-crystallin-derived αA66-80 peptide in guinea pig lens crystallin aggregation and insolubilization.

    PubMed

    Raju, Murugesan; Mooney, Brian P; Thakkar, Kavi M; Giblin, Frank J; Schey, Kevin L; Sharma, K Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Earlier we reported that low molecular weight (LMW) peptides accumulate in aging human lens tissue and that among the LMW peptides, the chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80, derived from α-crystallin protein, is one of the predominant peptides. We showed that in vitro αA66-80 induces protein aggregation. The current study was undertaken to determine whether LMW peptides are also present in guinea pig lens tissue subjected to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in vivo. The nuclear opacity induced by HBO in guinea pig lens is the closest animal model for studying age-related cataract formation in humans. A LMW peptide profile by mass spectrometry showed the presence of an increased amount of LMW peptides in HBO-treated guinea pig lenses compared to age-matched controls. Interestingly, the mass spectrometric data also showed that the chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80 accumulates in HBO-treated guinea pig lens. Following incubation of synthetic chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80 with α-crystallin from guinea pig lens extracts, we observed a decreased ability of α-crystallin to inhibit the amorphous aggregation of the target protein alcohol dehydrogenase and the formation of large light scattering aggregates, similar to those we have observed with human α-crystallin and αA66-80 peptide. Further, time-lapse recordings showed that a preformed complex of α-crystallin and αA66-80 attracted additional crystallin molecules to form even larger aggregates. These results demonstrate that LMW peptide-mediated cataract development in aged human lens and in HBO-induced lens opacity in the guinea pig may have common molecular pathways.

  10. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders. PMID:26361729

  11. Antimicrobial properties of two novel peptides derived from Theobroma cacao osmotin.

    PubMed

    Falcao, Loeni L; Silva-Werneck, Joseilde O; Ramos, Alessandra de R; Martins, Natalia F; Bresso, Emmanuel; Rodrigues, Magali A; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Marcellino, Lucilia H

    2016-05-01

    The osmotin proteins of several plants display antifungal activity, which can play an important role in plant defense against diseases. Thus, this protein can be useful as a source for biotechnological strategies aiming to combat fungal diseases. In this work, we analyzed the antifungal activity of a cacao osmotin-like protein (TcOsm1) and of two osmotin-derived synthetic peptides with antimicrobial features, differing by five amino acids residues at the N-terminus. Antimicrobial tests showed that TcOsm1 expressed in Escherichia coli inhibits the growth of Moniliophthora perniciosa mycelium and Pichia pastoris X-33 in vitro. The TcOsm1-derived peptides, named Osm-pepA (H-RRLDRGGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at R23-K49, and Osm-pepB (H-GGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at G28-K49, inhibited growth of yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C and Pichia pastoris X-33) and spore germination of the phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium f. sp. glycines and Colletotrichum gossypi. Osm-pepA was more efficient than Osm-pepB for S. cerevisiae (MIC=40μM and MIC=127μM, respectively), as well as for P. pastoris (MIC=20μM and MIC=127μM, respectively). Furthermore, the peptides presented a biphasic performance, promoting S. cerevisiae growth in doses around 5μM and inhibiting it at higher doses. The structural model for these peptides showed that the five amino acids residues, RRLDR at Osm-pepA N-terminus, significantly affect the tertiary structure, indicating that this structure is important for the peptide antimicrobial potency. This is the first report of development of antimicrobial peptides from T. cacao. Taken together, the results indicate that the cacao osmotin and its derived peptides, herein studied, are good candidates for developing biotechnological tools aiming to control phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:26996966

  12. Activatable iRGD-based peptide monolith: Targeting, internalization, and fluorescence activation for precise tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Jun; Lee, Sung-Jin; Park, Sung-Jun; Paik, Chang H; Lee, Sang-Myung; Kim, Sehoon; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2016-09-10

    A disulfide-bridged cyclic RGD peptide, named iRGD (internalizing RGD, c(CRGDK/RGPD/EC)), is known to facilitate tumor targeting as well as tissue penetration. After the RGD motif-induced targeting on αv integrins expressed near tumor tissue, iRGD encounters proteolytic cleavage to expose the CendR motif that promotes penetration into cancer cells via the interaction with neuropilin-1. Based on these proteolytic cleavage and internalization mechanism, we designed an iRGD-based monolithic imaging probe that integrates multiple functions (cancer-specific targeting, internalization and fluorescence activation) within a small peptide framework. To provide the capability of activatable fluorescence signaling, we conjugated a fluorescent dye to the N-terminal of iRGD, which was linked to the internalizing sequence (CendR motif), and a quencher to the opposite C-terminal. It turned out that fluorescence activation of the dye/quencher-conjugated monolithic peptide probe requires dual (reductive and proteolytic) cleavages on both disulfide and amide bond of iRGD peptide. Furthermore, the cleavage of the iRGD peptide leading to fluorescence recovery was indeed operative depending on the tumor-related angiogenic receptors (αvβ3 integrin and neuropilin-1) in vitro as well as in vivo. Compared to an 'always fluorescent' iRGD control probe without quencher conjugation, the dye/quencher-conjugated activatable monolithic peptide probe visualized tumor regions more precisely with lower background noise after intravenous injection, owing to the multifunctional responses specific to tumor microenvironment. All these results, along with minimal in vitro and in vivo toxicity profiles, suggest potential of the iRGD-based activatable monolithic peptide probe as a promising imaging agent for precise tumor diagnosis. PMID:27349354

  13. Activatable iRGD-based peptide monolith: Targeting, internalization, and fluorescence activation for precise tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Jun; Lee, Sung-Jin; Park, Sung-Jun; Paik, Chang H; Lee, Sang-Myung; Kim, Sehoon; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2016-09-10

    A disulfide-bridged cyclic RGD peptide, named iRGD (internalizing RGD, c(CRGDK/RGPD/EC)), is known to facilitate tumor targeting as well as tissue penetration. After the RGD motif-induced targeting on αv integrins expressed near tumor tissue, iRGD encounters proteolytic cleavage to expose the CendR motif that promotes penetration into cancer cells via the interaction with neuropilin-1. Based on these proteolytic cleavage and internalization mechanism, we designed an iRGD-based monolithic imaging probe that integrates multiple functions (cancer-specific targeting, internalization and fluorescence activation) within a small peptide framework. To provide the capability of activatable fluorescence signaling, we conjugated a fluorescent dye to the N-terminal of iRGD, which was linked to the internalizing sequence (CendR motif), and a quencher to the opposite C-terminal. It turned out that fluorescence activation of the dye/quencher-conjugated monolithic peptide probe requires dual (reductive and proteolytic) cleavages on both disulfide and amide bond of iRGD peptide. Furthermore, the cleavage of the iRGD peptide leading to fluorescence recovery was indeed operative depending on the tumor-related angiogenic receptors (αvβ3 integrin and neuropilin-1) in vitro as well as in vivo. Compared to an 'always fluorescent' iRGD control probe without quencher conjugation, the dye/quencher-conjugated activatable monolithic peptide probe visualized tumor regions more precisely with lower background noise after intravenous injection, owing to the multifunctional responses specific to tumor microenvironment. All these results, along with minimal in vitro and in vivo toxicity profiles, suggest potential of the iRGD-based activatable monolithic peptide probe as a promising imaging agent for precise tumor diagnosis.

  14. Broad-spectrum anti-biofilm peptide that targets a cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Reffuveille, Fany; Haney, Evan F; Straus, Suzana K; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria form multicellular communities known as biofilms that cause two thirds of all infections and demonstrate a 10 to 1000 fold increase in adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics. Currently, there are no approved drugs that specifically target bacterial biofilms. Here we identified a potent anti-biofilm peptide 1018 that worked by blocking (p)ppGpp, an important signal in biofilm development. At concentrations that did not affect planktonic growth, peptide treatment completely prevented biofilm formation and led to the eradication of mature biofilms in representative strains of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Low levels of the peptide led to biofilm dispersal, while higher doses triggered biofilm cell death. We hypothesized that the peptide acted to inhibit a common stress response in target species, and that the stringent response, mediating (p)ppGpp synthesis through the enzymes RelA and SpoT, was targeted. Consistent with this, increasing (p)ppGpp synthesis by addition of serine hydroxamate or over-expression of relA led to reduced susceptibility to the peptide. Furthermore, relA and spoT mutations blocking production of (p)ppGpp replicated the effects of the peptide, leading to a reduction of biofilm formation in the four tested target species. Also, eliminating (p)ppGpp expression after two days of biofilm growth by removal of arabinose from a strain expressing relA behind an arabinose-inducible promoter, reciprocated the effect of peptide added at the same time, leading to loss of biofilm. NMR and chromatography studies showed that the peptide acted on cells to cause degradation of (p)ppGpp within 30 minutes, and in vitro directly interacted with ppGpp. We thus propose that 1018 targets (p)ppGpp and marks it for degradation in

  15. Pharmacological characteristics of endokinin C/D-derived peptides in nociceptive and inflammatory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Naono-Nakayama, Rumi; Sunakawa, Natsuki; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Matsushima, Osamu; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2011-12-01

    Endokinins designated from the human TAC4 gene consist of endokinin A, endokinin B, endokinin C (EKC) and endokinin D (EKD). EKC/D is a peptide using the common carboxyl-terminal in EKC and EKD and consists of 12 amino acids, and exerts antagonistic effects on the induction of scratching behavior by substance P (SP). Some of SP-preferring receptor antagonists have several d-tryptophan (d-Trp); however, the pharmacological effect of EKC/D-derived peptides with d-Trp remains to be solved. Therefore, to clarify the pharmacological characteristics of EKC/D-derived peptides, effects of pretreatment with these peptides on SP-induced scratching and thermal hyperalgesia, formalin-induced flinching and carrageenan-induced inflammation were evaluated. Intrathecal administration of [d-Trp(8)]-EKC/D and [d-Trp(10)]-EKC/D showed a markedly long inhibitory effect, at least 14 h, whereas the antagonistic effects of [d-Trp(8,10)]-EKC/D and EKC/D without d-Trp disappeared after 1h. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of [d-Trp(10)]-EKC/D-derived peptides was dependent on the number of amino acids from the amino-terminus, and the more numerous the amino acids, the more marked the antagonistic effect. Thus, these results indicate that the effective duration of EKC/D-derived peptides is dependent on the number of d-Trp in the carboxyl-terminal region and the amino-terminal region regulates the antagonistic effect of EKC/D.

  16. Antidepressant-like effect of food-derived pyroglutamyl peptides in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukako; Mizushige, Takafumi; Mori, Yukiha; Shimmura, Yuki; Fukutomi, Ruuta; Kanamoto, Ryuhei; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2015-06-01

    The N-terminal glutamine residue, exposed by enzymatic cleavage of precursor proteins, is known to be modified to a pyroglutamyl residue with a cyclic structure in not only endogenous but also food-derived peptides. We investigated the effects of wheat-derived pyroglutamyl peptides on emotional behaviors. Pyroglutamyl leucine (pyroGlu-Leu, pEL) and pyroglutamyl glutaminyl leucine (pyroGlu-Gln-Leu, pEQL) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the tail suspension and forced swim tests in mice. pEQL exhibited more potent antidepressant-like activity than pEL after i.p. and i.c.v. administration. pEQL exhibited antidepressant-like activity at a lower dose than Gln-Gln-Leu, suggesting that pyroglutamyl peptide had more potent activity. To examine whether pyroglutamyl peptides increased hippocampus neurogenesis, associated with the effects of antidepressants, we measured 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. pEL and pEQL increased BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Intriguingly, pEL did not increase hippocampal mRNA and protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is a factor associated with both neuropoietic and antidepressive effects. Thus, pyroglutamyl peptides may enhance hippocampal neurogenesis via a pathway independent of BDNF. We also confirmed that pEL and pEQL were produced in the subtilisin digest of major wheat proteins, glutenin and gliadin, after heat treatment. pEL and pEQL are the first peptides derived from wheat proteins to be shown to exhibit an antidepressant-like activity. PMID:25957094

  17. A Fly-Through Mission Strategy Targeting Peptide as a Signature of Chemical Evolution and Possible Life in Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Dziomba, Szymon; Takahagi, Wataru; Shibuya, Takazo; Takano, Yoshinori; Guerrouache, Mohamed; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Takai, Ken; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Yano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In situ detection of organic molecules in the extraterrestrial environment provides a key step towards better understanding the variety and the distribution of building blocks of life and it may ultimately lead to finding extraterrestrial life within the Solar System. Here we present combined results of two separate experiments that enable us to realize such in situ life signature detection from the deep habitats of the "Ocean World": a hydrothermal reactor experiment simulating complex organic synthesis and a simulated fly-through capture experiment of organic-bearing microparticles using silica aerogels, followed by subsequent analysis. Both experiments employ peptide as a plausible organics existing in Encleadus plume particles produced in its subsurface ocean. Recent laboratory hydrothermal experiments and a theoretical model on silica saturation indicated an on going hydrothermal reactions in subsurface Enceladus ocean. Given the porous chondritic origin of the core, it is likely that organic compounds originated by radiation chemistry such as amino acid precursors could have been provided, leached, and altered through widespread water-rock interactions. By using the same laboratory experimental setup from the latest water-rock interaction study, we performed amino acid polymerization experiments for 144 days and monitored the organic complexity changing over time. So far over 3,000 peaks up to the size of greater than 600 MW were observed through the analysis of capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS) with an indication of amino acid derivatives and short peptides. Generally abiotic polymerization of enantiomeric amino acids results in forming stereoisomeric peptides with identical molecular weight and formula as opposed to homochiral biopolymers. Assuming Enceladus plume particles may contain a mixture of stereoisomeric peptides, we were able to distinguish 16 of the 17 stereoisomeric tripeptides as a test sample using

  18. Enzymatic activatable self-assembled peptide nanowire for targeted therapy and fluorescence imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Wu, Zhan; Zhang, Chong-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-03-01

    We developed novel activatable probe using self-assembled peptide nanowires with low affinity and toxicity to tumor cells in the absence of matrix metalloproteinase that showed activated high affinity and toxicity and provided a highly selective and efficient platform for targeted therapy and tumor imaging. PMID:26854263

  19. Recombinant expression and downstream processing of the disulfide-rich tumor-targeting peptide chlorotoxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Min; Luo, Xiao; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2013-10-01

    Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a scorpion-derived disulfide-rich peptide that targets malignant tumors by binding the cell surface matrix metalloproteinase-2 and annexin A2. Various CTXs labeled with functional moieties have shown great potential for tumor diagnosis and treatment. In the present study, we established an efficient approach for preparing mature CTX that may be used for experimental and therapeutic purposes. The designed CTX precursors carried either a 6xHis-tag or a 6xHis-tag and a glutathione transferase (GST)-tag and were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Following S-sulfonation, the precursors were purified using immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography. Subsequent to the removal of the tag by enterokinase cleavage and in vitro oxidative refolding, mature CTX was obtained with a considerable yield. The yield of mature CTX whose precursors carried a 6xHis-tag and a GST-tag (2 mg per liter of culture) was ∼10-fold that of the mature CTX whose precursors carried a 6xHis-tag (150-200 μg per liter of culture). The folded CTX inhibited the migration of glioma cells in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting it was biologically active.

  20. Efficient four-drug cocktail therapy targeting amyloid-β peptide for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Asai, Masashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Tomita, Taisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Ishiura, Shoichi; Saido, Takaomi C; Maruyama, Kei

    2010-12-01

    Cocktail treatment is an effective multidrug medication therapy for some diseases, such as cancer and AIDS, because of the additive or synergistic effect of each medicine and relief from adverse effects. Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is now recognized as central to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from the sequential proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Secretase inhibitors are one of most attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in AD. However, because β- and γ-secretases cleave not only APP but also other substrate proteins, strong inhibition of these secretases leads to severe adverse effects. Some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) can modify the production of Aβ. Here, we report that a cocktail treatment with four drugs (NSAID, statin, and β- and γ-secretase inhibitors) had additive effects on the reduction of Aβ levels in cultured cells without competing with each other. Moreover, the four-drug cocktail treatment caused no changes in processing of the γ-secretase substrate Notch. This is suggests that this cocktail treatment could be a new therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:20890992

  1. Quantification of hydroxyl radical-derived oxidation products in peptides containing glycine, alanine, valine, and proline.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Philip E; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-01-15

    Proteins are a major target for oxidation due to their abundance and high reactivity. Despite extensive investigation over many years, only limited quantitative data exist on the contributions of different pathways to the oxidation of peptides and proteins. This study was designed to obtain quantitative data on the nature and yields of oxidation products (alcohols, carbonyls, hydroperoxides, fragment species) formed by a prototypic oxidant system (HO(•)/O(2)) on small peptides of limited, but known, amino acid composition. Peptides composed of Gly, Ala, Val, and Pro were examined with particular emphasis on the peptide Val-Gly-Val-Ala-Pro-Gly, a repeat motif in elastin with chemotactic activity and metalloproteinase regulation properties. The data obtained indicate that hydroperoxide formation occurs nonrandomly (Pro > Val > Ala > Gly) with this inversely related to carbonyl yields (both peptide-bound and released). Multiple alcohols are generated at both side-chain and backbone sites. Backbone fragmentation has been characterized at multiple positions, with sites adjacent to Pro residues being of major importance. Summation of the product concentrations provides clear evidence for the occurrence of chain reactions in peptides exposed to HO(•)/O(2), with the overall product yields exceeding that of the initial HO(•) generated.

  2. Global Phenotype Screening and Transcript Analysis Outlines the Inhibitory Mode(s) of Action of Two Amphibian-Derived, α-Helical, Cationic Peptides on Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Morton, C. Oliver; Hayes, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Rash, Bharat M.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Coote, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dermaseptin S3(1-16) [DsS3(1-16)] and magainin 2 (Mag 2) are two unrelated, amphibian-derived cationic peptides that adopt an α-helical structure within microbial membranes and have been proposed to kill target organisms via membrane disruption. Using a combination of global deletion mutant library phenotypic screening, expression profiling, and physical techniques, we have carried out a comprehensive in vitro analysis of the inhibitory action of these two peptides on the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene ontology profiling (of biological processes) was used to identify both common and unique effects of each peptide. Resistance to both peptides was conferred by genes involved in telomere maintenance, chromosome organization, and double-strand break repair, implicating a common inhibitory action of DNA damage. Crucially, each peptide also required unique genes for maintaining resistance; for example, DsS3(1-16) required genes involved in protein targeting to the vacuole, and Mag 2 required genes involved in DNA-dependent DNA replication and DNA repair. Thus, DsS3(1-16) and Mag 2 have both common and unique antifungal actions that are not simply due to membrane disruption. Physical techniques revealed that both peptides interacted with DNA in vitro but in subtly different ways, and this observation was supported by the functional genomics experiments that provided evidence that both peptides also interfered with DNA integrity differently in vivo. This implies that both peptides are able to pass through the cytoplasmic membrane of yeast cells and damage DNA, an inhibitory action that has not been previously attributed to either of these peptides. PMID:17846143

  3. Antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-negative pathogens, produced and delivered by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Volzing, Katherine; Borrero, Juan; Sadowsky, Michael J; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-11-15

    We present results of tests with recombinant Lactococcus lactis that produce and secrete heterologous antimicrobial peptides with activity against Gram-negative pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella . In an initial screening, the activities of numerous candidate antimicrobial peptides, made by solid state synthesis, were assessed against several indicator pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella strains. Peptides A3APO and Alyteserin were selected as top performers based on high antimicrobial activity against the pathogens tested and on significantly lower antimicrobial activity against L. lactis . Expression cassettes containing the signal peptide of the protein Usp45 fused to the codon-optimized sequence of mature A3APO and Alyteserin were cloned under the control of a nisin-inducible promoter PnisA and transformed into L. lactis IL1403. The resulting recombinant strains were induced to express and secrete both peptides. A3APO- and Alyteserin-containing supernatants from these recombinant L. lactis inhibited the growth of pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella by up to 20-fold, while maintaining the host's viability. This system may serve as a model for the production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides by lactic acid bacteria to target Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria populations.

  4. Human antimicrobial peptide histatin 5 is a cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondrial ATP synthesis in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Luque-Ortega, Juan Román; van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Saugar, José M; Rivas, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Histatin 5 (Hst5) is a human salivary antimicrobial peptide that targets fungal mitochondria. In the human parasitic protozoa Leishmania, the mitochondrial ATP production is essential, as it lacks the bioenergetic switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation described in some yeasts. On these premises, Hst5 activity was assayed on both stages of its life cycle, promastigotes and amastigotes (LC(50)=7.3 and 14.4 microM, respectively). In a further step, its lethal mechanism was studied. The main conclusions drawn were as follows: 1) Hst5 causes limited and temporary damage to the plasma membrane of the parasites, as assessed by electron microscopy, depolarization, and entrance of the vital dye SYTOX Green; 2) Hst5 translocates into the cytoplasm of Leishmania in an achiral receptor-independent manner with accumulation into the mitochondrion, as shown by confocal microscopy; and 3) Hst5 produces a bioenergetic collapse of the parasite, caused essentially by the decrease of mitochondrial ATP synthesis through inhibition of F(1)F(0)-ATPase, with subsequent fast ATP exhaustion. By using the Hst5 enantiomer, it was found that the key steps of its lethal mechanism involved no chiral recognition. Hst5 thus constitutes the first leishmanicidal peptide with a defined nonstereospecific intracellular target. The prospects of its development, by its own or as a carrier molecule for other leishmanicidal molecules, into a novel anti-Leishmania drug with a preferential subcellular accumulation are discussed. PMID:18230684

  5. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pranjol, Md Zahidul Islam; Hajitou, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration. PMID:25606974

  6. Development of recombinant collagen-peptide-based vehicles for delivery of adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Plantinga, Josée A; van Speuwel-Goossens, Carolina A F M; van Dongen, Elisabeth M W M; Kluijtmans, Sebastiaan G J M; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising approach for repair, remodeling and even regenerate tissue of otherwise irreparable damage, such as after myocardial infarction (aMI). A severe limitation of cardiac stem cell therapy is the generally poor retention of administered cells in the target tissue. In tissue repair the main mode of action of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSC) is the production of various growth factors, cytokines, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic factors that together augment repair, remodeling, and regeneration. In this experiment, we used recombinant collagen peptide (RCP) with additional integrin-binding motives and different crosslinkers. Formulated as 50-100 μm microspheres with bound ADSC, we hypothesized that this would improve ADSC retention and function. Crosslinking was performed with chemical crosslinkers (EDC and HMDIC) at high and low concentrations or by thermal treatment (DHT). ADSC adhesion, proliferation, apoptosis/necrosis, and gene expressions in two-dimensional and three-dimensional were analyzed. In addition, the effect of ADSC conditioned medium (ADSC-CM) on proapoptotic/sprouting HUVEC was examined. Our results show that all materials support cell adhesion in short time point, however, EDC-High crosslinker induced ADSC apoptosis/necrosis. Gene expression results revealed lower expression of proinflammatory genes in chemical crosslinked materials, despite EDC-High the proinflammatory genes expressions were similar or higher than TCPS. In addition, cultured ADSC on DHT crosslinked RCP showed a proinflammatory phenotype compared to TCPS. Sprouting assay results confirmed the protective effect of ADSC-CM derived from TCPS and HMDIC-High crosslinked RCP proapoptotic HUVEC. We conclude that ADSC adhere to the materials and maintain their therapeutic profile.

  7. The expanding roles of the ghrelin-gene derived peptide obestatin in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Walpole, Carina; Amorim, Laura; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian; Chopin, Lisa

    2011-06-20

    Obestatin is a 23 amino acid, ghrelin gene-derived peptide hormone produced in the stomach and a range of other tissues throughout the body. While it was initially reported that obestatin opposed the actions of ghrelin with regards to appetite and food intake, it is now clear that obestatin is not an endogenous ghrelin antagonist, but it is a multi-functional peptide hormone in its own right. In this review we will discuss the controversies associated with the discovery of obestatin and explore emerging central and peripheral roles of obestatin, which includes adipogenesis, pancreatic homeostasis and cancer.

  8. Interaction of fluorescently labeled triethyleneglycol and peptide derivatives with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Alouini, Mohamed-Anis; Moustoifa, El-Farouck; Rubio-Albenque, Sandra; Berthelot, Thomas; Fery-Forgues, Suzanne; Déléris, Gérard

    2014-02-24

    A triethyleneglycol (TEG) chain, a linear peptide, and a cyclic peptide labeled with 7-methoxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (MC) and 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DAC) were used to thoroughly study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in inclusion complexes. (1) H NMR evidence was given for the formation of a 1:1 inclusion complex between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and the fluorophore moieties of model compounds. The binding constant was 20 times higher for DAC than for MC derivatives. Molecular modeling provided additional information. The UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence properties were studied and the energy transfer process was quantified. Fluorescence quenching was particularly strong for the peptide derivatives. The presence of β-CDs reduced the FRET efficiency slightly. Dye-labeled peptide derivatives can thus be used to form inclusion complexes with β-CDs and retain most of their FRET properties. This paves the way for their subsequent use in analytical devices that are designed to measure the activity of matrix metalloproteinases.

  9. Remodeling of Hepatic Metabolism and Hyperaminoacidemia in Mice Deficient in Proglucagon-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chika; Seino, Yusuke; Miyahira, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Fukami, Ayako; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Sato, Jun; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Oiso, Yutaka; Murata, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon is believed to be one of the most important peptides for upregulating blood glucose levels. However, homozygous glucagon–green fluorescent protein (gfp) knock-in mice (Gcggfp/gfp: GCGKO) are normoglycemic despite the absence of proglucagon-derived peptides, including glucagon. To characterize metabolism in the GCGKO mice, we analyzed gene expression and metabolome in the liver. The expression of genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for gluconeogenesis was only marginally altered. On the other hand, genes encoding enzymes involved in conversion of amino acids to metabolites available for the tricarboxylic acid cycle and/or gluconeogenesis showed lower expression in the GCGKO liver. The expression of genes involved in the metabolism of fatty acids and nicotinamide was also altered. Concentrations of the metabolites in the GCGKO liver were altered in manners concordant with alteration in the gene expression patterns, and the plasma concentrations of amino acids were elevated in the GCGKO mice. The insulin concentration in serum and phosphorylation of Akt protein kinase in liver were reduced in GCGKO mice. These results indicated that proglucagon-derived peptides should play important roles in regulating various metabolic pathways, especially that of amino acids. Serum insulin concentration is lowered to compensate the impacts of absent proglucagon-derived peptide on glucose metabolism. On the other hand, impacts on other metabolic pathways are only partially compensated by reduced insulin action. PMID:22187375

  10. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these ’Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM’ (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins. PMID:27264994

  11. Screening and identification of a specific peptide for targeting hypoxic hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Xia, Xiangwen; Wang, Yong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Guofeng; Liang, Huiming; Feng, Gansheng; Zheng, Chuansheng

    2016-08-01

    The biological behaviors of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial embolization therapy, which exist in a hypoxic or even anaerobic tumor microenvironment, differ from the tumor cells under normoxic conditions. This study aimed to use a phage display peptide library for in vivo and in vitro screening to obtain a peptide which could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells, allowing further targeted diagnosis and treatment for liver cancer. In this study, hypoxic hepatoma cells HepG2 (targeted cells), and normal liver cells HL-7702 (control cells), were utilized to perform three rounds of in vitro screening using a phage-displayed 7-mer peptide library. In addition, hypoxic HepG2 were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to establish a hepatocarcinoma model, followed by performing three rounds of in vivo screening on the phages identified from the in vitro screening. The products from the screening were further identified using ELISA and immunofluorescence staining on cells and tissues. The results indicated that the P11 positive clone had the highest binding effect with hypoxic hepatoma cells. The sequence of the exogenous insert fragment of P11 positive clone was obtained by sequencing: GSTSFSK. The binding assay indicated that GSTSFSK could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells and hepatocarcinoma tissues. This 7-mer peptide has the potential to be developed as an useful molecular to the targeting diagnosis and treatment of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:27381416

  12. Conformational Ensembles Explored Dynamically from Disordered Peptides Targeting Chemokine Receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  13. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  14. Peptide Targeting of an Antibiotic Prodrug toward Phagosome-Entrapped Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mark P; Shi, Julie; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-12-11

    Mycobacterial infections are difficult to treat due to the bacterium's slow growth, ability to reside in intracellular compartments within macrophages, and resistance mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of conventional antibiotics. Developing antibiotics that overcome these challenges is therefore critical to providing a pipeline of effective antimicrobial agents. Here, we describe the synthesis and testing of a unique peptide-drug conjugate that exhibits high levels of antimicrobial activity against M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis as well as clearance of intracellular mycobacteria from cultured macrophages. Using an engineered peptide sequence, we deliver a potent DHFR inhibitor and target the intracellular phagosomes where mycobacteria reside and also incorporate a β-lactamase-cleavable cephalosporin linker to enhance the targeting of quiescent intracellular β-lactam-resistant mycobacteria. By using this type of prodrug approach to target intracellular mycobacterial infections, the emergence of antibacterial resistance mechanisms could be minimized. PMID:27623056

  15. Antibody-independent identification of bovine milk-derived peptides in breast-milk.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Passariello, Annalisa; Dallas, David C; Robinson, Randall C; Barile, Daniela; Canani, Roberto Berni

    2016-08-10

    Exclusively breast-fed infants can exhibit clear signs of IgE or non IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy. However, the definite characterization of dietary cow's milk proteins (CMP) that survive the maternal digestive tract to be absorbed into the bloodstream and secreted into breast milk remains missing. Herein, we aimed at assessing possible CMP-derived peptides in breast milk. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-high resolution mass spectrometry (MS), we compared the peptide fraction of breast milk from 12 donors, among which 6 drank a cup of milk daily and 6 were on a strict dairy-free diet. We identified two bovine β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg, 2 out 6 samples) and one αs1-casein (1 out 6 samples) fragments in breast milk from mothers receiving a cup of bovine milk daily. These CMP-derived fragments, namely β-Lg (f42-54), (f42-57) and αs1-casein (f180-197), were absent in milk from mothers on dairy-free diet. In contrast, neither intact nor hydrolyzed β-Lg was detected by western blot and competitive ELISA in any breast milk sample. Eight additional bovine milk-derived peptides identified by software-assisted MS were most likely false positive. The results of this study demonstrate that CMP-derived peptides rather than intact CMP may sensitize or elicit allergic responses in the neonate through mother's milk. Immunologically active peptides from the maternal diet could be involved in priming the newborn's immune system, driving a tolerogenic response. PMID:27396729

  16. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activities in vitro and/or in vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activities in vitro. The bioactive IgG-derived Fc N10K peptide (NQVSLTCLVK) spontaneously self-assembles, a feature previously recognized as relevant for the therapeutic activity of another antibody-derived peptide. We evaluated the contribution of each residue to the peptide self-assembling capability by circular-dichroism spectroscopy. The interaction of the N10K peptide and its derivatives with Candida albicans cells was studied by confocal, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The apoptosis and autophagy induction profiles in yeast cells treated with the peptides were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the therapeutic efficacy against candidal infection was studied in a Galleria mellonella model. Overall, the results indicate a critical role for some residues in the self-assembly process and a correlation of that capability with the candidacidal activities of the peptides in vitro and their therapeutic effects in vivo. PMID:26856836

  17. Peptide-directed HPMA copolymer-doxorubicin conjugates as targeted therapeutics for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kopansky, Eva; Shamay, Yosi; David, Ayelet

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic oligopeptides have emerged as a promising class of targeting ligands, providing a variety of choices for the construction of conjugates for desired ligand functionality. To explore the potential of short peptides as ligands for targeted delivery of macromolecular therapeutics for colorectal cancer (CRC), fluorescently labelled HPMA copolymers--bearing either G3-C12 or GE11 for targeting galectin-3 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), respectively--were synthesised and the mechanisms of their internalisation and subcellular fate in CRC cells were studied. The targetability of the G3-C12 bearing copolymers towards galectin-3 was further compared to that of galactose-containing copolymers. The resulting G3-C12-bearing conjugate actively and selectively targets CRC tumour cells over-expressing galectin-3 and exhibits superior targetability to galectin-3 when compared to the galactose-bearing copolymer. GE11 copolymer conjugate binds specifically and efficiently to EGFR over-expressing cells, thus mediating internalisation to a significantly higher extent relative the copolymer conjugated to a scrambled sequence peptide. We further incorporated doxorubicin (DOX) into GE11 bearing copolymer via an acid-labile hydrazone bond. The GE11-DOX copolymer conjugate demonstrated higher cytotoxicity toward EGFR over-expressing cells relative to the control non-targeted DOX conjugate. Altogether, our results show a proof of principle for the selective delivery of DOX to the target CRC cells. PMID:22074249

  18. Peptide-directed HPMA copolymer-doxorubicin conjugates as targeted therapeutics for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kopansky, Eva; Shamay, Yosi; David, Ayelet

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic oligopeptides have emerged as a promising class of targeting ligands, providing a variety of choices for the construction of conjugates for desired ligand functionality. To explore the potential of short peptides as ligands for targeted delivery of macromolecular therapeutics for colorectal cancer (CRC), fluorescently labelled HPMA copolymers--bearing either G3-C12 or GE11 for targeting galectin-3 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), respectively--were synthesised and the mechanisms of their internalisation and subcellular fate in CRC cells were studied. The targetability of the G3-C12 bearing copolymers towards galectin-3 was further compared to that of galactose-containing copolymers. The resulting G3-C12-bearing conjugate actively and selectively targets CRC tumour cells over-expressing galectin-3 and exhibits superior targetability to galectin-3 when compared to the galactose-bearing copolymer. GE11 copolymer conjugate binds specifically and efficiently to EGFR over-expressing cells, thus mediating internalisation to a significantly higher extent relative the copolymer conjugated to a scrambled sequence peptide. We further incorporated doxorubicin (DOX) into GE11 bearing copolymer via an acid-labile hydrazone bond. The GE11-DOX copolymer conjugate demonstrated higher cytotoxicity toward EGFR over-expressing cells relative to the control non-targeted DOX conjugate. Altogether, our results show a proof of principle for the selective delivery of DOX to the target CRC cells.

  19. TAT-mediated intracellular delivery of NPM-derived peptide induces apoptosis in leukemic cells and suppresses leukemogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Du, Wei; Koretsky, Tara; Bagby, Grover C; Pang, Qishen

    2008-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is frequently overexpressed in leukemias and other tumors. NPM has been reported to suppress oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis and may represent a therapeutic target for cancer. We fused a NPM-derived peptide to the HIV-TAT (TAT-NPMDeltaC) and found that the fusion peptide inhibited proliferation and induced apoptotic death of primary fibroblasts and preleukemic stem cells. TAT-NPMDeltaC down-regulated several NF-kappaB-controlled survival and inflammatory proteins and suppressed NF-kappaB-driven reporter gene activities. Using an inflammation-associated leukemia model, we demonstrate that TAT-NPMDeltaC induced proliferative suppression and apoptosis of preleukemic stem cells and significantly delayed leukemic development in mice. Mechanistically, TAT-NPMDeltaC associated with wild-type NPM proteins and formed complexes with endogenous NPM and p65 at promoters of several antiapoptotic and inflammatory genes and abrogated their transactivation by NF-kappaB in leu-kemic cells. Thus, TAT-delivered NPM peptide may provide a novel therapy for inflammation-associated tumors that require NF-kappaB signaling for survival.

  20. In vivo detection of human TRPV6-rich tumors with anti-cancer peptides derived from soricidin.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Chris V; DeBay, Drew; Ewart, H Stephen; Gallant, Pamela; Gormley, Sean; Ilenchuk, T Toney; Iqbal, Umar; Lutes, Tyler; Martina, Marzia; Mealing, Geoffrey; Merkley, Nadine; Sperker, Sandra; Moreno, Maria J; Rice, Christopher; Syvitski, Raymond T; Stewart, John M

    2013-01-01

    Soricidin is a 54-amino acid peptide found in the paralytic venom of the northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) and has been found to inhibit the transient receptor potential of vallinoid type 6 (TRPV6) calcium channels. We report that two shorter peptides, SOR-C13 and SOR-C27, derived from the C-terminus of soricidin, are high-affinity antagonists of human TRPV6 channels that are up-regulated in a number of cancers. Herein, we report molecular imaging methods that demonstrate the in vivo diagnostic potential of SOR-C13 and SOR-C27 to target tumor sites in mice bearing ovarian or prostate tumors. Our results suggest that these novel peptides may provide an avenue to deliver diagnostic and therapeutic reagents directly to TRPV6-rich tumors and, as such, have potential applications for a range of carcinomas including ovarian, breast, thyroid, prostate and colon, as well as certain leukemia's and lymphomas. PMID:23554944

  1. VY6, a β-lactoglobulin-derived peptide, altered metabolic lipid pathways in the zebra fish liver.

    PubMed

    Mohammed-Geba, K; Arrutia, F; Do-Huu, H; Borrell, Y J; Galal-Khallaf, A; Ardura, A; Riera, Francisco A; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Today enormous research efforts are being focused on alleviating the massive, adverse effects of obesity. Short peptides are key targets for research as they can be generated from natural proteins, like milk. Here we conducted trypsinogen digestion of beta-lactoglobulin (β-lg), the major mammalian milk protein, to release the hexamer VY6. It was assayed in vivo for its activities on lipid metabolism using zebra fish as a vertebrate model. Zebra fish juveniles were injected with two different doses of the peptide: 100 and 800 μg per g fish and left for 5 days before sacrificing. Lipid measurements showed significant reduction in liver triglycerides and free cholesterol, as well as increased liver HDL cholesterol. Dose-dependent increases of the mRNA levels of the genes coding for the enzymes acyl coenzyme A oxidase 1 (acox1) and lipoprotein lipase (lpl) were also found. The complete results suggest significant anti-obesity activity of the β-lg-derived VY6 peptide. Its use as a nutraceutical has been discussed. PMID:26983953

  2. In Vivo Detection of Human TRPV6-Rich Tumors with Anti-Cancer Peptides Derived from Soricidin

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Chris V.; DeBay, Drew; Ewart, H. Stephen; Gallant, Pamela; Gormley, Sean; Ilenchuk, T. Toney; Iqbal, Umar; Lutes, Tyler; Martina, Marzia; Mealing, Geoffrey; Merkley, Nadine; Sperker, Sandra; Moreno, Maria J.; Rice, Christopher; Syvitski, Raymond T.; Stewart, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Soricidin is a 54-amino acid peptide found in the paralytic venom of the northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) and has been found to inhibit the transient receptor potential of vallinoid type 6 (TRPV6) calcium channels. We report that two shorter peptides, SOR-C13 and SOR-C27, derived from the C-terminus of soricidin, are high-affinity antagonists of human TRPV6 channels that are up-regulated in a number of cancers. Herein, we report molecular imaging methods that demonstrate the in vivo diagnostic potential of SOR-C13 and SOR-C27 to target tumor sites in mice bearing ovarian or prostate tumors. Our results suggest that these novel peptides may provide an avenue to deliver diagnostic and therapeutic reagents directly to TRPV6-rich tumors and, as such, have potential applications for a range of carcinomas including ovarian, breast, thyroid, prostate and colon, as well as certain leukemia's and lymphomas. PMID:23554944

  3. Insights into the uptake mechanism of NrTP, a cell-penetrating peptide preferentially targeting the nucleolus of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David

    2012-06-01

    Nucleolar targeting peptides are 14-15 residue-long sequences designed by structural minimization of a snake toxin (J Med Chem 2008;50:7041). Peptides such as NrTP1 (YKQCHKKGGKK GSG) and analogues are capable of penetrating human cervix epithelial carcinoma cells and homing into their nucleoli. We now show that NrTP1 similarly penetrates and localizes in the nucleolus of tumour cells derived from human pancreatic (BxPC-3) and human ductal mammary gland (BT-474) carcinomas. Live cell confocal microscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry analysis of cells arrested to defined phases of their cycle, confirms that NrTP1 uptake and nucleolar homing are independent of cell cycle phase. Peptide uptake is significantly reduced at low temperature. Also, drugs inhibiting chlatrin-mediated endocytosis severely decrease uptake, pointing to a clathrin-dependent route as the primary NrTP1 internalization mechanism. These results highlight nucleolar targeting peptides not only as a novel and efficient class of cell-penetrating peptides but also for their exceptional ability to target preferentially an essential and dynamic subnuclear structure such as the nucleolus. PMID:22405142

  4. Role of VGF-derived peptides in the control of food intake, body weight and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, Preeti H; Ebling, Francis J P

    2008-01-01

    VGF is a 68-kDa polypeptide synthesized in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. It is cleaved into a number of smaller peptides which are stored in dense core vesicles and are likely to be secreted products. The VGF gene is expressed abundantly in the brain, and in peripheral endocrine tissues including the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands and the pancreas but also in the gastrointestinal tract in both the myenteric plexus and in endocrine cells. Several lines of evidence including observation of changes in hypothalamic VGF expression in catabolic states, a hypermetabolic phenotype in transgenic mice lacking VGF signalling, and demonstration of bioactivity of various peptide fragments have led to the view that VGF and/or its derived peptides are involved in the regulation of both energy balance and reproduction. PMID:18408361

  5. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria . E-mail: garciaze@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-04-06

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in {alpha} helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  6. Peptide IDR-1018: modulating the immune system and targeting bacterial biofilms to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Sarah C; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-05-01

    Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides, produced by all complex organisms, typically contain an abundance of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues. A small synthetic peptide termed innate defense regulator (IDR-)1018 was derived by substantial modification of the bovine neutrophil host defense peptide bactenecin. Here, we review its intriguing properties that include anti-infective, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, and anti-biofilm activities. It was initially developed as an immune modulator with an ability to selectively enhance chemokine production and polarize cellular differentiation while suppressing/balancing the pro-inflammatory response. In this regard, it has demonstrated in vivo activity in murine models including enhancement of wound healing and an ability to protect against Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, herpes virus, and inflammatory disorders, including cerebral malaria and neuronal damage in a pre-term birth model. More recently, IDR-1018 was shown, in a broad-spectrum fashion, to selectively target bacterial biofilms, which are adaptively resistant to many antibiotics and represent the most common growth state of bacteria in human infections. Furthermore, IDR-1018 demonstrated synergy with conventional antibiotics to both prevent biofilm formation and treat pre-existing biofilms. These data are consistent with a strong potential as an adjunctive therapy against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  7. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  8. Cementomimetics-constructing a cementum-like biomineralized microlayer via amelogenin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Gungormus, Mustafa; Oren, Ersin E; Horst, Jeremy A; Fong, Hanson; Hnilova, Marketa; Somerman, Martha J; Snead, Malcolm L; Samudrala, Ram; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2012-06-01

    Cementum is the outer-, mineralized-tissue covering the tooth root and an essential part of the system of periodontal tissue that anchors the tooth to the bone. Periodontal disease results from the destructive behavior of the host elicited by an infectious biofilm adhering to the tooth root and left untreated, may lead to tooth loss. We describe a novel protocol for identifying peptide sequences from native proteins with the potential to repair damaged dental tissues by controlling hydroxyapatite biomineralization. Using amelogenin as a case study and a bioinformatics scoring matrix, we identified regions within amelogenin that are shared with a set of hydroxyapatite-binding peptides (HABPs) previously selected by phage display. One 22-amino acid long peptide regions referred to as amelogenin-derived peptide 5 (ADP5) was shown to facilitate cell-free formation of a cementum-like hydroxyapatite mineral layer on demineralized human root dentin that, in turn, supported attachment of periodontal ligament cells in vitro. Our findings have several implications in peptide-assisted mineral formation that mimic biomineralization. By further elaborating the mechanism for protein control over the biomineral formed, we afford new insights into the evolution of protein-mineral interactions. By exploiting small peptide domains of native proteins, our understanding of structure-function relationships of biomineralizing proteins can be extended and these peptides can be utilized to engineer mineral formation. Finally, the cementomimetic layer formed by ADP5 has the potential clinical application to repair diseased root surfaces so as to promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues and thereby reduce the morbidity associated with tooth loss.

  9. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Phycobiliproteins of Dulse Palmaria palmata

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Tomoe; Miyabe, Yoshikatsu; Yasui, Hajime; Kinoshita, Yasunori; Kishimura, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the inhibitory activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in protein hydrolysates from dulse, Palmaria palmata. The proteins extracted from dulse were mainly composed of phycoerythrin (PE) followed by phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC). The dulse proteins showed slight ACE inhibitory activity, whereas the inhibitory activity was extremely enhanced by thermolysin hydrolysis. The ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysates was hardly affected by additional pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin treatments. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides (YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, IKGHY, LKNPG, LDY, LRY, FEQDWAS) were isolated from the hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was demonstrated that the synthetic peptide LRY (IC50: 0.044 μmol) has remarkably high ACE inhibitory activity. Then, we investigated the structural properties of dulse phycobiliproteins to discuss the origin of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides. Each dulse phycobiliprotein possesses α-subunit (Mw: 17,477–17,638) and β-subunit (Mw: 17,455–18,407). The sequences of YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, LKNPG and LDY were detected in the primary structure of PE α-subunit, and the LDY also exists in the APC α- and β-subunits. In addition, the LRY sequence was found in the β-subunits of PE, PC and APC. From these results, it was suggested that the dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were derived from phycobiliproteins, especially PE. To make sure the deduction, we carried out additional experiment by using recombinant PE. We expressed the recombinant α- and β-subunits of PE (rPEα and rPEβ, respectively), and then prepared their peptides by thermolysin hydrolysis. As a result, these peptides showed high ACE inhibitory activities (rPEα: 94.4%; rPEβ: 87.0%). Therefore, we concluded that the original proteins of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were phycobiliproteins. PMID:26861357

  10. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Phycobiliproteins of Dulse Palmaria palmata.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tomoe; Miyabe, Yoshikatsu; Yasui, Hajime; Kinoshita, Yasunori; Kishimura, Hideki

    2016-02-04

    We examined the inhibitory activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in protein hydrolysates from dulse, Palmaria palmata. The proteins extracted from dulse were mainly composed of phycoerythrin (PE) followed by phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC). The dulse proteins showed slight ACE inhibitory activity, whereas the inhibitory activity was extremely enhanced by thermolysin hydrolysis. The ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysates was hardly affected by additional pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin treatments. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides (YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, IKGHY, LKNPG, LDY, LRY, FEQDWAS) were isolated from the hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was demonstrated that the synthetic peptide LRY (IC50: 0.044 μmol) has remarkably high ACE inhibitory activity. Then, we investigated the structural properties of dulse phycobiliproteins to discuss the origin of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides. Each dulse phycobiliprotein possesses α-subunit (Mw: 17,477-17,638) and β-subunit (Mw: 17,455-18,407). The sequences of YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, LKNPG and LDY were detected in the primary structure of PE α-subunit, and the LDY also exists in the APC α- and β-subunits. In addition, the LRY sequence was found in the β-subunits of PE, PC and APC. From these results, it was suggested that the dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were derived from phycobiliproteins, especially PE. To make sure the deduction, we carried out additional experiment by using recombinant PE. We expressed the recombinant α- and β-subunits of PE (rPEα and rPEβ, respectively), and then prepared their peptides by thermolysin hydrolysis. As a result, these peptides showed high ACE inhibitory activities (rPEα: 94.4%; rPEβ: 87.0%). Therefore, we concluded that the original proteins of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were phycobiliproteins.

  11. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Phycobiliproteins of Dulse Palmaria palmata.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Tomoe; Miyabe, Yoshikatsu; Yasui, Hajime; Kinoshita, Yasunori; Kishimura, Hideki

    2016-02-01

    We examined the inhibitory activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in protein hydrolysates from dulse, Palmaria palmata. The proteins extracted from dulse were mainly composed of phycoerythrin (PE) followed by phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC). The dulse proteins showed slight ACE inhibitory activity, whereas the inhibitory activity was extremely enhanced by thermolysin hydrolysis. The ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysates was hardly affected by additional pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin treatments. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides (YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, IKGHY, LKNPG, LDY, LRY, FEQDWAS) were isolated from the hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was demonstrated that the synthetic peptide LRY (IC50: 0.044 μmol) has remarkably high ACE inhibitory activity. Then, we investigated the structural properties of dulse phycobiliproteins to discuss the origin of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides. Each dulse phycobiliprotein possesses α-subunit (Mw: 17,477-17,638) and β-subunit (Mw: 17,455-18,407). The sequences of YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, LKNPG and LDY were detected in the primary structure of PE α-subunit, and the LDY also exists in the APC α- and β-subunits. In addition, the LRY sequence was found in the β-subunits of PE, PC and APC. From these results, it was suggested that the dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were derived from phycobiliproteins, especially PE. To make sure the deduction, we carried out additional experiment by using recombinant PE. We expressed the recombinant α- and β-subunits of PE (rPEα and rPEβ, respectively), and then prepared their peptides by thermolysin hydrolysis. As a result, these peptides showed high ACE inhibitory activities (rPEα: 94.4%; rPEβ: 87.0%). Therefore, we concluded that the original proteins of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were phycobiliproteins. PMID:26861357

  12. Intracellular screening of a peptide library to derive a potent peptide inhibitor of α-synuclein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheruvara, Harish; Allen-Baume, Victoria L; Kad, Neil M; Mason, Jody M

    2015-03-20

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) into toxic fibrils is a pathogenic hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Studies have focused largely on residues 71-82, yet most early-onset mutations are located between residues 46 and 53. A semirationally designed 209,952-member library based entirely on this region was constructed, containing all wild-type residues and changes associated with early-onset PD. Intracellular cell survival screening and growth competition isolated a 10-residue peptide antagonist that potently inhibits α-syn aggregation and associated toxicity at a 1:1 stoichiometry. This was verified using continuous growth measurements and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity studies. Atomic force microscopy and circular dichroism on the same samples showed a random-coil structure and no oligomers. A new region of α-syn for inhibitor targeting has been highlighted, together with the approach of using a semirational design and intracellular screening. The peptides can then be used as candidates for modification in drugs capable of slowing or even preventing the onset of PD.

  13. Intracellular Screening of a Peptide Library to Derive a Potent Peptide Inhibitor of α-Synuclein Aggregation*

    PubMed Central

    Cheruvara, Harish; Allen-Baume, Victoria L.; Kad, Neil M.; Mason, Jody M.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) into toxic fibrils is a pathogenic hallmark of Parkinson disease (PD). Studies have focused largely on residues 71–82, yet most early-onset mutations are located between residues 46 and 53. A semirationally designed 209,952-member library based entirely on this region was constructed, containing all wild-type residues and changes associated with early-onset PD. Intracellular cell survival screening and growth competition isolated a 10-residue peptide antagonist that potently inhibits α-syn aggregation and associated toxicity at a 1:1 stoichiometry. This was verified using continuous growth measurements and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity studies. Atomic force microscopy and circular dichroism on the same samples showed a random-coil structure and no oligomers. A new region of α-syn for inhibitor targeting has been highlighted, together with the approach of using a semirational design and intracellular screening. The peptides can then be used as candidates for modification in drugs capable of slowing or even preventing the onset of PD. PMID:25616660

  14. Prokaryotic expression and antimicrobial mechanism of XPF-St7-derived α-helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tonghui; Huang, Yibing; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    XPF-St7 (GLLSNVAGLLKQFAKGGVNAVLNPK) is an antimicrobial peptide isolated from Silurana tropicalis. We developed an α-helical segment of XPF-St7 termed as XPF2. Using the XPF2 as a framework, we increased the positive net charge of XPF2 by amino acid substitutions, and thus obtained two novel antimicrobial peptides XPF4 and XPF6. These were each fused with an ubiquitin tag and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. This ubiquitin fusion system may present a viable alternative for industrial production of antimicrobial peptides. XPF4 and XPF6 showed much better overall antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria than XPF2. The therapeutic index of XPF4 and XPF6 was 5.6-fold and 6.7-fold of XPF2, respectively. Bacterial cell membrane permeabilization and genomic DNA interaction assays were utilized to explore the mechanism of action of XPF serial peptides. The results revealed that the target of these antimicrobial peptides was the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

  15. Anticancer activity of a synthetic peptide derived from harmoniasin, an antibacterial peptide from the ladybug Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Kwon, Young-Nam; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dong-Chul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2013-08-01

    Harmoniasin is a defensin-like antimicrobial peptide identified from the ladybug Harmonia axyridis. Among the synthetic homodimer peptide analogues derived from harmoniasin, HaA4 has been found to have antibacterial activity without hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated whether HaA4 has anticancer activity against human leukemia cell lines such as U937 and Jurkat cells. HaA4 manifested cytotoxicity and decreased the cell viability of U937 and Jurkat cells in MTS assay and LDH release assay. We found that HaA4 induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death of the leukemia cells using flow cytometric analysis, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and nucleosomal fragmentation of genomic DNA. Activation of caspase-7 and -9 and fragmentation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase was detected in the HaA4-treated leukemia cells, suggesting induction of a caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway by HaA4. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was further confirmed by reversal of the HaA4-induced viability reduction by treatment of Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor. In conclusion, HaA4 caused necrosis and caspase-dependent apoptosis in both U937 and Jurkat leukemia cells, which suggests potential utility of HaA4 as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:23732481

  16. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. PMID:24549831

  17. The VGF-derived peptide TLQP-21 contributes to inflammatory and nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Cristina D.; Speltz, Rebecca H.; Riedl, Maureen S.; Kitto, Kelley F.; Dykstra, Jaclyn A.; Braun, Patrick D.; Sadahiro, Masato; Salton, Stephen R.; Vulchanova, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    VGF (non-acronymic) is a granin-like protein that is packaged and proteolytically processed within the regulated secretory pathway. VGF and peptides derived from its processing have been implicated in neuroplasticity associated with learning, memory, depression, and chronic pain. In sensory neurons, VGF is rapidly increased following peripheral nerve injury and inflammation. Several bioactive peptides generated from the C-terminus of VGF have pro-nociceptive spinal effects. The goal of the present study was to examine the spinal effects of the peptide TLQP-21 and determine whether it participates in spinal mechanisms of persistent pain. Application of exogenous TLQP-21 induced dose-dependent thermal hyperalgesia in the warm water immersion tail withdrawal test. This hyperalgesia was inhibited by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. We used immunoneutralization of TLQP-21 to determine the function of the endogenous peptide in mechanisms underlying persistent pain. In mice injected intradermally with complete Freund’s adjuvant, intrathecal treatment with anti-TLQP21 IgG immediately prior to or 5 h after induction of inflammation dose-dependently inhibited tactile hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal anti-TL21 administration also attenuated the development and maintenance of tactile hypersensitivity in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain. These results provide evidence that endogenous TLQP-21 peptide contributes to the mechanisms of spinal neuroplasticity after inflammation and nerve injury. PMID:24657450

  18. Tumor homing cell penetrating peptide decorated nanoparticles used for enhancing tumor targeting delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; Jiang, Xinguo; He, Qin

    2015-01-15

    Specific targeting ability and good tissue penetration are two critical requirements for tumor targeted delivery systems. Systematical selected peptides from a library may meet these two requirements. RLW was such a cell penetrating peptide that could specifically target to non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549). In this study, RLW was linked onto nanoparticles (RNPs) and then the RNPs were used for lung cancer targeting delivery. A traditional cell penetrating peptide, R8 (RRRRRRRR), was used as control. In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that modification with RLW specifically enhanced the uptake by A549 cells rather than human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while modification with R8 increased the uptake by both cells. Furthermore, the modification with RLW specifically elevated the penetration into A549 tumor spheroids rather than glioma cell (U87, used as in vivo control) spheroids. And the in vivo imaging further demonstrated RNPs could target to A549 xenografts rather than U87 xenografts. Importantly, the distribution of RNPs in normal organs was approximately the same as that of unmodified nanoparticles. However, R8 modified nanoparticles elevated the distribution in almost all the tissues. These results demonstrated that RLW was superior in A549 tumor targeted delivery. After loaded with docetaxel, an anti-microtube agent, different formulations could effectively induce the A549 cell apoptosis, and inhibit the growth of A549 spheroids in vitro. While in vivo, RNPs displayed the best antitumor effect. The tumor volume was significantly lower than other groups, which was only 33.3% as that of saline group. In conclusion, in vitro RLW could specifically target to A549 cells and enhance the cytotoxicity of docetaxel. In vivo, RLW could significantly enhance the A549 xenografts targeting delivery and led to improved antitumor effect.

  19. Identification of a peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEDAN; HU, YUE; LI, WENJU; WANG, FAN; LU, XIAOSHENG; HAN, XUEYING; LV, JIEQIANG; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in terms of gynecological malignancies, and is difficult to diagnose due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To identify ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, the present study used a Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library to screen for ligands that selectively target HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells. Following 5 rounds of biopanning, the phage clone P2 was selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and DNA sequencing, and its characteristics were additionally validated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed the positive phage were enriched 92-fold following 5 rounds of biopanning, and the DNA sequence AAC CCG ATG ATT CGC CGC CAG (amino acid sequence, NPMIRRQ) was repeated most frequently (phage clones, P2, P3, P15, P30 and P54). Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays revealed that the phage clone P2 was able to bind to ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and not those of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the peptide NPMIRRQ may be a potential agent for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27313733

  20. Prioritizing therapeutic targets using patient-derived xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, K A; Hadley, A M; Haluska, P; Scott, C L

    2015-04-01

    Effective systemic treatment of cancer relies on the delivery of agents with optimal therapeutic potential. The molecular age of medicine has provided genomic tools that can identify a large number of potential therapeutic targets in individual patients, heralding the promise of personalized treatment. However, determining which potential targets actually drive tumor growth and should be prioritized for therapy is challenging. Indeed, reliable molecular matches of target and therapeutic agent have been stringently validated in the clinic for only a small number of targets. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are tumor models developed in immunocompromised mice using tumor procured directly from the patient. As patient surrogates, PDX models represent a powerful tool for addressing individualized therapy. Challenges include humanizing the immune system of PDX models and ensuring high quality molecular annotation, in order to maximize insights for the clinic. Importantly, PDX can be sampled repeatedly and in parallel, to reveal clonal evolution, which may predict mechanisms of drug resistance and inform therapeutic strategy design.

  1. Medicinal Chemistry of ATP Synthase: A Potential Drug Target of Dietary Polyphenols and Amphibian Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the inhibitory effects of dietary polyphenols and amphibian antimicrobial/antitumor peptides on ATP synthase. In the beginning general structural features highlighting catalytic and motor functions of ATP synthase will be described. Some details on the presence of ATP synthase on the surface of several animal cell types, where it is associated with multiple cellular processes making it an interesting drug target with respect to dietary polyphenols and amphibian antimicrobial peptides will also be reviewed. ATP synthase is known to have distinct polyphenol and peptide binding sites at the interface of α/β subunits. Molecular interaction of polyphenols and peptides with ATP synthase at their respective binding sites will be discussed. Binding and inhibition of other proteins or enzymes will also be covered so as to understand the therapeutic roles of both types of molecules. Lastly, the effects of polyphenols and peptides on the inhibition of Escherichia coli cell growth through their action on ATP synthase will also be presented. PMID:20586714

  2. Intracellular selection of peptide inhibitors that target disulphide-bridged Aβ42 oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Acerra, Nicola; Kad, Neil M; Cheruvara, Harish; Mason, Jody M

    2014-01-01

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregates into a number of soluble and insoluble forms, with soluble oligomers thought to be the primary factor implicated in Alzheimer's disease pathology. As a result, a wide range of potential aggregation inhibitors have been developed. However, in addition to problems with solubility and protease susceptibility, many have inadvertently raised the concentration of these soluble neurotoxic species. Sandberg et al. previously reported a β-hairpin stabilized variant of Aβ42 that results from an intramolecular disulphide bridge (A21C/A31C; Aβ42cc), which generates highly toxic oligomeric species incapable of converting into mature fibrils. Using an intracellular protein-fragment complementation (PCA) approach, we have screened peptide libraries using E. coli that harbor an oxidizing environment to permit cytoplasmic disulphide bond formation. Peptides designed to target either the first or second β-strand have been demonstrated to bind to Aβ42cc, lower amyloid cytotoxicity, and confer bacterial cell survival. Peptides have consequently been tested using wild-type Aβ42 via ThT binding assays, circular dichroism, MTT cytotoxicity assays, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Results demonstrate that amyloid-PCA selected peptides function by both removing amyloid oligomers as well as inhibiting their formation. These data further support the use of semirational design combined with intracellular PCA methodology to develop Aβ antagonists as candidates for modification into drugs capable of slowing or even preventing the onset of AD. PMID:24947815

  3. Peptide-Metal Organic Framework Swimmers that Direct the Motion toward Chemical Targets.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L; Shi, Menglu; Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-10

    Highly efficient and robust chemical motors are expected for the application in microbots that can selectively swim toward targets and accomplish their tasks in sensing, labeling, and delivering. However, one of major issues for such development is that current artificial swimmers have difficulty controlling their directional motion toward targets like bacterial chemotaxis. To program synthetic motors with sensing capability for the target-directed motion, we need to develop swimmers whose motions are sensitive to chemical gradients in environments. Here we create a new intelligent biochemical swimmer by integrating metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and peptides that can sense toxic heavy metals in solution and swim toward the targets. With the aid of Pb-binding enzymes, the peptide-MOF motor can directionally swim toward PbSe quantum dots (QD) by sensing pH gradient and eventually complete the motion as the swimmer reaches the highest gradient point at the target position in solution. This type of technology could be evolved to miniaturize chemical robotic systems that sense target chemicals and swim toward target locations. PMID:26010172

  4. Breast cancer growth inhibition by delivery of the MDGI-derived peptide P108.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Kurtz, A

    2000-05-11

    Mammary derived growth inhibitor (MDGI) is a member of the family of cytoplasmic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), which bind hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids, retinoids, eicosanoids and prostaglandines. MDGI and an 11 amino acid MDGI-derived conserved C-terminal peptide (P108) inhibits growth of normal mammary epithelial cells in tissue and organ culture, but fails to inhibit proliferation of many breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Here, the effects of peptide P108 on tumor growth of MCF-7, MDA-MB468 and MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cell lines in nude mice were tested. To deliver P108 into tumors, a novel peptide production system was applied for expression and secretion of small bioactive peptides in mammalian cells. Functional differentiation was observed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells upon P108 expression. In addition, EGF-dependent colony formation in soft agar by MDA-MB468 cells was inhibited by secreted P108. Tumor growth in athymic nude mice was suppressed in all three cell lines tested. Furthermore, P108 expressed by MCF-7/P108 cells caused paracrine tumor growth inhibition of MDA-MB231 cells. These results indicate that breast cancer inhibition by P108 is independent of binding to hydrophobic ligands and is perhaps mediated by interference with EGF-dependent signaling pathways.

  5. Peptides derived from CXCL8 based on in silico analysis inhibit CXCL8 interactions with its receptor CXCR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Chun-Chun; Chung, Yi; Lin, Lee-Fong; Hsu, Hao-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Chemokine CXCL8 is crucial for regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via activating its cognate receptor CXCR1. In this study, molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were combined to predict the initial binding event of CXCL8 to CXCR1 for peptide drug design. The simulations reveal that in the initial binding, the N-loop of CXCL8 interacts with the N-terminus of CXCR1, which is dominated by electrostatic interactions. The derived peptides from the binding region of CXCL8 are synthesized for further confirmation. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that the CXCL8 derived peptide with 14 residues is able to bind to the receptor CXCR1 derived peptide with equilibrium KD of 252 μM while the peptide encompassing a CXCL8 K15A mutation hardly binds to CXCR1 derived peptide (KD = 1553 μM). The cell experiments show that the designed peptide inhibits CXCL8-induced and LPS-activated monocytes adhesion and transmigration. However, when the peptides were mutated on two lysine residues (K15 and K20), the inhibition effects were greatly reduced indicating these two amino acids are key residues for the initial binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. This study demonstrates that in silico prediction based functional peptide design can be effective for developing anti-inflammation drugs.

  6. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles

    PubMed Central

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F.; Owens, Scott R.; Joshi, Bishnu P.; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35 days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity. PMID:25483425

  7. Mitochondria-Targeted Peptide Reverses Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cognitive Deficits in Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Mingqiang; Hao, Shuangying; Jia, Ming; Ji, Muhuo; Qiu, Lili; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and long-term cognitive impairments. Its pathophysiology remains to be determined and an effective pharmacologic treatment is lacking. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 on mitochondrial function and cognitive deficits in SAE mice. C57BL/6 male mice were randomly divided into sham, sham + SS-31, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and CLP + SS-31 groups. Peptide SS-31 (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administrated immediately after operation and afterwards once daily for six consecutive days. Surviving mice were subjected to behavioral tests and the hippocampus was collected for biochemical analysis 7 days after operation. The results showed that CLP resulted in high mortality rate and cognitive deficits, representative characteristics of SAE. A physiological mechanistic investigation revealed that mitochondrial function of hippocampus was severely impaired, coupled with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, triggering neuronal apoptosis and inflammation. Notably, administration of peptide SS-31 protected the integrity of mitochondria, reversed the mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibited the apoptosis resulting from the release of cytochrome c, diminished the response of inflammation, and ultimately reversed the behavior deficits in the SAE mice. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that daily treatment with mitochondria-targeted peptide SS-31 reduces mortality rate and ameliorates cognitive deficits, which is possibly through a mechanism of reversing mitochondrial dysfunction and partial inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and inflammation in the hippocampus of the SAE mice.

  8. Probing the Backbone Function of Tumor Targeting Peptides by an Amide-to-Triazole Substitution Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Ibai E; Vomstein, Sandra; Fischer, Christiane A; Mascarin, Alba; Mindt, Thomas L

    2015-09-24

    Novel backbone-modified radiolabeled analogs based on the tumor targeting peptide bombesin were synthesized and fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. We have recently introduced the use of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles as metabolically stable trans-amide bond surrogates in radiolabeled peptides in order to improve their tumor targeting. As an extension of our approach, we now report several backbone-modified analogs of the studied bombesin peptide bearing multiple triazole substitutions. We investigated the effect of the modifications on several biological parameters including the internalization of the radiopeptidomimetics into tumor cells, their affinity toward the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr), metabolic stability in blood plasma, and biodistribution in mice bearing GRPr-expressing xenografts. The backbone-modified radiotracers exhibited a significantly increased resistance to proteolytic degradation. In addition, some of the radiopeptidomimetics retained a nanomolar affinity toward GRPr, resulting in an up to 2-fold increased tumor uptake in vivo in comparison to a (all amide bond) reference compound. PMID:26309061

  9. Rational derivation of CETP self-binding helical peptides by π-π stacking and halogen bonding: Therapeutic implication for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Meijuan; Zhu, Lixia

    2016-10-01

    The human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to other lipoproteins and has been established as an attractive target for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. Here, an amphipathic α-helix peptide, namely SBH-peptide ((465)EHLLVDFLQSLS(476)), was derived from the C-terminal tail of CETP. The peptide exhibits self-binding capability towards the CETP. Crystal structure analysis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and ab initio electron correlation characterizations of CETP-SBH-peptide complex system revealed that the Phe471 residue plays a key role in SBH-peptide binding, which can form a π-π stacking with the Phe197 residue of CETP. In addition, substitution of the hydrogen atom H4 of Phe471 with halogen atoms, in particular the bromine atom Br4, can constitute a geometrically satisfactory halogen bonding with the oxygen atom O of CETP Ile193 residue. Fluorescence polarization assays substantiated that (i) mutation of the aromatic Phe471 to small Ala residue would impair the SBH-peptide affinity with Kd change from 10.5 to 26.4μM, indicating that the π-π stacking should exist in Phe471⋯Phe197 adduct, and (ii) substitution with Br4 can considerably improve SBH-peptide affinity by ∼3-fold, but the SBH-peptide binding does not change essentially upon substitution with Br3 (a negative control that is theoretically unable to form the halogen bonding), indicating that the rationally designed halogen bonding should form between the Phe471(Br4) residue of SBH-peptide and the Ile193 residue of CETP protein.

  10. Rational derivation of CETP self-binding helical peptides by π-π stacking and halogen bonding: Therapeutic implication for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Lu, Meijuan; Zhu, Lixia

    2016-10-01

    The human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to other lipoproteins and has been established as an attractive target for reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. Here, an amphipathic α-helix peptide, namely SBH-peptide ((465)EHLLVDFLQSLS(476)), was derived from the C-terminal tail of CETP. The peptide exhibits self-binding capability towards the CETP. Crystal structure analysis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and ab initio electron correlation characterizations of CETP-SBH-peptide complex system revealed that the Phe471 residue plays a key role in SBH-peptide binding, which can form a π-π stacking with the Phe197 residue of CETP. In addition, substitution of the hydrogen atom H4 of Phe471 with halogen atoms, in particular the bromine atom Br4, can constitute a geometrically satisfactory halogen bonding with the oxygen atom O of CETP Ile193 residue. Fluorescence polarization assays substantiated that (i) mutation of the aromatic Phe471 to small Ala residue would impair the SBH-peptide affinity with Kd change from 10.5 to 26.4μM, indicating that the π-π stacking should exist in Phe471⋯Phe197 adduct, and (ii) substitution with Br4 can considerably improve SBH-peptide affinity by ∼3-fold, but the SBH-peptide binding does not change essentially upon substitution with Br3 (a negative control that is theoretically unable to form the halogen bonding), indicating that the rationally designed halogen bonding should form between the Phe471(Br4) residue of SBH-peptide and the Ile193 residue of CETP protein. PMID:27611728

  11. Chlorotoxin, a scorpion-derived peptide, specifically binds to gliomas and tumors of neuroectodermal origin.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Susan A; O'Neal, Jeffrey; Sontheimer, Harald

    2002-08-01

    Highly migratory neuroectodermal cells share a common embryonic origin with cells of the central nervous system (CNS). They include enteric, parasympathetic, sympathoadrenal, and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells, melanocytes, endocrine cells, and cells forming connective tissue of the face and neck. Because of their common embryologic origin, these cells and the tumors that derive from them can share genetic and antigenic phenotypes with gliomas, tumors derived from CNS glia. We recently discovered that chlorotoxin (ClTx), a 4-kD peptide purified from Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpion, is a highly specific marker for glioma cells in biopsy tissues (Soroceanu et al. Cancer Res 58:4871-4879, 1998) that can target tumors in animal models. We report on the specificity of ClTx as a marker for tumors of neuroectodermal origin that include peripheral neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) and gliomas. Specifically, we histochemically stained frozen and paraffin tissue sections of human biopsy tissues from 262 patients with a synthetically manufactured and biologically active ClTx bearing an N-terminal biotin. The vast majority (74 of 79) of primary human brain tumors investigated showed abundant binding of ClTx with greater than 90% ClTx-positive cells in each section. By comparison, 32 biopsies of uninvolved brain used for comparison were largely ClTx-negative, with only a few isolated reactive astrocytes showing some ClTx binding. However, as with gliomas, the vast majority of PNETs examined showed specific ClTx binding (31 of 34). These include medulloblastomas (4 of 4), neuroblastomas (6 of 7), ganglioneuromas (4 of 4), melanomas (7 of 7), adrenal pheochromocytomas (5 of 6), primitive PNET (1), small cell lung carcinoma (2 of 3), and Ewing's sarcoma (2 of 2). Under identical staining conditions, normal tissues from brain, skin, kidney, and lung were consistently negative for ClTx. These results suggest that chlorotoxin is a reliable and specific

  12. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-14

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets.

  13. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cromm, Philipp M.; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets. PMID:27075966

  14. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets. PMID:27075966

  15. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  16. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  17. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, Aman P; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  18. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  19. Targeted Delivery of Peptide-Tagged DNA Lipoplexes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ariatti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The application of homing peptides to direct DNA and RNA lipoplexes to target cells is a rapidly evolving area of study, which may find application in corrective gene therapy for the treatment of neoplasms and other disorders of a genetic origin. Here, a step-wise account of the assembly and characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma cell-specific DNA lipoplexes and their cytotoxicity assessment in and delivery to the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 is given. PMID:27436315

  20. Peptide deformylase of eukaryotic protists: a target for new antiparasitic agents?

    PubMed

    Meinnel, T

    2000-04-01

    Peptide deformylase is found only in Eubacteria, making it a logical target for discovering new antibacterial agents. Although this protein is absent from animal or fungal cells, evidence supports its existence in eukaryotic protists, including the causative agents of malaria, sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and leishmaniosis. Here, Thierry Meinnel discusses the idea that deformylase inhibitors could be used as very broad-spectrum antibiotics against bacterial infections, as well as parasitic diseases.

  1. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  2. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  3. Considerations for the process development of insect-derived antimicrobial peptide production.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hagen; Salzig, Denise; Czermak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could evolve into new therapeutic lead molecules against multi-resistant bacteria. As insects are a rich source of AMP, the identification and characterization of insect-derived AMPs is particularly emphasized. One challenge of bringing these molecules into market, e.g., as a drug, is to develop a cost-efficient large-scale production process. Due to the fact that a direct AMP isolation from insects is not economical and that chemical synthesis is recommended for peptide sizes below 40 amino acids, a viable option is heterologous AMP production. Therefore, previous knowledge concerning the expression of larger proteins can be adapted, but due to the AMP nature (e.g., small size, bactericide) additional challenges have to be faced during up and downstream processing. Nonetheless the bottleneck for large-scale AMP production is the same as for proteins; mainly the downstream process. This review introduces opportunities for insect-derived AMP production, like the choice of the expression system (based on previously derived data), depending on the AMP nature, as well as new purification strategies like elastin-like peptide/intein based purification strategies. All of these aspects are discussed with regard to large-scale processes and costs.

  4. New Peptide-Conjugated Chlorin-Type Photosensitizer Targeting Neuropilin-1 for Anti-Vascular Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kamarulzaman, Ezatul Ezleen; Mohd Gazzali, Amirah; Acherar, Samir; Frochot, Céline; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel; Boura, Cédric; Chaimbault, Patrick; Sibille, Estelle; Wahab, Habibah A.; Vanderesse, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that requires three components, namely light, dioxygen and a photosensitizing agent. After light excitation, the photosensitizer (PS) in its excited state transfers its energy to oxygen, which leads to photooxidation reactions. In order to improve the selectivity of the treatment, research has focused on the design of PS covalently attached to a tumor-targeting moiety. In this paper, we describe the synthesis and the physico-chemical and photophysical properties of six new peptide-conjugated photosensitizers designed for targeting the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) receptor. We chose a TPC (5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15, 20-triphenyl chlorine as photosensitizer, coupled via three different spacers (aminohexanoic acid, 1-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid, and 1-amino-9-aza-3,6,12,15-tetraoxa-10-on-heptadecanoic acid) to two different peptides (DKPPR and TKPRR). The affinity towards the NRP-1 receptor of the conjugated chlorins was evaluated along with in vitro and in vivo stability levels. The tissue concentration of the TPC-conjugates in animal model shows good distribution, especially for the DKPPR conjugates. The novel peptide–PS conjugates proposed in this study were proven to have potential to be further developed as future NRP-1 targeting photodynamic therapy agent. PMID:26473840

  5. Clinical Efficacy of a Specifically Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide Mouth Rinse: Targeted Elimination of Streptococcus mutans and Prevention of Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, R.; Santarpia, P.; Lavender, S.; Gittins, E.; Liu, Z.; Anderson, M.H.; He, J.; Shi, W.; Eckert, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of dental caries, has a measurable impact on domestic and global health care costs. Though persistent in the oral cavity despite conventional oral hygiene, S. mutans can be excluded from intact oral biofilms through competitive exclusion by other microorganisms. This suggests that therapies capable of selectively eliminating S. mutans while limiting the damage to the normal oral flora might be effective long-term interventions to fight cariogenesis. To meet this challenge, we designed C16G2, a novel synthetic specifically targeted antimicrobial peptide with specificity for S. mutans. C16G2 consists of a S. mutans-selective ‘targeting region’ comprised of a fragment from S. mutans competence stimulation peptide (CSP) conjoined to a ‘killing region’ consisting of a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide (G2). In vitro studies have indicated that C16G2 has robust efficacy and selectivity for S. mutans, and not other oral bacteria, and affects targeted bacteria within seconds of contact. Methods In the present study, we evaluated C16G2 for clinical utility in vitro, followed by a pilot efficacy study to examine the impact of a 0.04% (w/v) C16G2 rinse in an intra-oral remineralization/demineralization model. Results and Conclusions C16G2 rinse usage was associated with reductions in plaque and salivary S. mutans, lactic acid production, and enamel demineralization. The impact on total plaque bacteria was minimal. These results suggest that C16G2 is effective against S. mutans in vivo and should be evaluated further in the clinic. PMID:21860239

  6. Small Retinoprotective Peptides Reveal a Receptor-binding Region on Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kenealey, Jason; Subramanian, Preeti; Comitato, Antonella; Bullock, Jeanee; Keehan, Laura; Polato, Federica; Hoover, David; Marigo, Valeria; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) require interactions between an as of a yet undefined region with a distinct ectodomain on the PEDF receptor (PEDF-R). Here we characterized the area in PEDF that interacts with PEDF-R to promote photoreceptor survival. Molecular docking studies suggested that the ligand binding site of PEDF-R interacts with the neurotrophic region of PEDF (44-mer, positions 78–121). Binding assays demonstrated that PEDF-R bound the 44-mer peptide. Moreover, peptide P1 from the PEDF-R ectodomain had affinity for the 44-mer and a shorter fragment within it, 17-mer (positions 98–114). Single residue substitutions to alanine along the 17-mer sequence were designed and tested for binding and biological activity. Altered 17-mer[R99A] did not bind to the P1 peptide, whereas 17-mer[H105A] had higher affinity than the unmodified 17-mer. Peptides 17-mer, 17-mer[H105A], and 44-mer exhibited cytoprotective effects in cultured retina R28 cells. Intravitreal injections of these peptides and PEDF in the rd1 mouse model of retinal degeneration decreased the numbers of dying photoreceptors, 17-mer[H105A] being most effective. The blocking peptide P1 hindered their protective effects both in retina cells and in vivo. Thus, in addition to demonstrating that the region composed of positions 98–114 of PEDF contains critical residues for PEDF-R interaction that mediates survival effects, the findings reveal distinct small PEDF fragments with neurotrophic effects on photoreceptors. PMID:26304116

  7. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  8. ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan functionalized nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drug.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Choi, Won Il; Lee, Jae Young; Tae, Giyoong

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we developed a dual ligand functionalized pluronic-based nanocarrier (NC) for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan and zonula occludins toxin (ZOT)-derived, tight junction opening peptide were conjugated to NC to increase the permeability of loaded insulin across the small intestine through the paracellular pathway. Surface functionalized NC, either by chitosan or peptide, could modulate the tight junction (TJ) integrity in contrast to no effect of unmodified NC, as evidenced by the change in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and immunostaining of Claudin-4, a tight junction marker, in Caco-2 cell monolayer. On the other hand, dual ligand (chitosan and peptide) functionalized NC significantly further increased the permeation of insulin across Caco-2 cell monolayer. More importantly, insulin loaded, dual ligand functionalized NC could increase the plasma insulin level and efficiently regulate the glycemic response for a prolonged period of time (∼1 day) upon oral administration to diabetic rats, whereas delivery of insulin by single ligand functionalized NCs, either by chitosan or peptide, as well as by unmodified NC and free insulin, could not induce the effective regulation of the blood glucose level. The use of fluorescence dye labeled insulin (FITC-insulin) and Cy5.5 labeled NC revealed that both insulin and dual ligand functionalized NC were adequately penetrated across the whole intestine villi in contrast to limited adsorption of insulin and NC mainly onto the epithelial surface of the intestine for single ligand functionalized NCs. These results suggest that dual conjugation of ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan is a promising approach to functionalize the surface of nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drugs. PMID:27380442

  9. ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan functionalized nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drug.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Choi, Won Il; Lee, Jae Young; Tae, Giyoong

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we developed a dual ligand functionalized pluronic-based nanocarrier (NC) for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan and zonula occludins toxin (ZOT)-derived, tight junction opening peptide were conjugated to NC to increase the permeability of loaded insulin across the small intestine through the paracellular pathway. Surface functionalized NC, either by chitosan or peptide, could modulate the tight junction (TJ) integrity in contrast to no effect of unmodified NC, as evidenced by the change in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and immunostaining of Claudin-4, a tight junction marker, in Caco-2 cell monolayer. On the other hand, dual ligand (chitosan and peptide) functionalized NC significantly further increased the permeation of insulin across Caco-2 cell monolayer. More importantly, insulin loaded, dual ligand functionalized NC could increase the plasma insulin level and efficiently regulate the glycemic response for a prolonged period of time (∼1 day) upon oral administration to diabetic rats, whereas delivery of insulin by single ligand functionalized NCs, either by chitosan or peptide, as well as by unmodified NC and free insulin, could not induce the effective regulation of the blood glucose level. The use of fluorescence dye labeled insulin (FITC-insulin) and Cy5.5 labeled NC revealed that both insulin and dual ligand functionalized NC were adequately penetrated across the whole intestine villi in contrast to limited adsorption of insulin and NC mainly onto the epithelial surface of the intestine for single ligand functionalized NCs. These results suggest that dual conjugation of ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan is a promising approach to functionalize the surface of nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drugs.

  10. Synergetic Targeted Delivery of Sleeping-Beauty Transposon System to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using LPD Nanoparticles Modified with a Phage-Displayed Targeting Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Wang, Dong-Dong; Lin, Yiyang; Wang, Jianglin; Petrenko, Valery; Mao, Chuanbin

    2013-03-01

    An important criterion for effective gene therapy is sufficient chromosomal integration activity. The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a plasmid system allowing efficient insertion of transgenes into the host genome. However, such efficient insertion occurs only after the system is delivered to nuclei. Since transposons do not have the transducing abilities of viral vectors, efficient delivery of this system first into cells and then into cell nuclei is still a challenge. Here, a phage display technique using a major coat displayed phage library is employed to identify a peptide (VTAMEPGQ) that can home to rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). A nanoparticle, called liposome protamine/DNA lipoplex (LPD), is electrostatically assembled from cationic liposomes and an anionic complex of protamine, DNA and targeting peptides. Various peptides are enveloped inside the LPD to improve its targeting capability for rMSCs and nuclei. The rMSC-targeting peptide and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide can execute the synergetic effect to promote transfection action of LPD. The homing peptide directs the LPD to target the MSCs, whereas the NLS peptide directs transposon to accumulate into nuclei once LPD is internalized inside the cells, leading to increased gene expression. This suggests that rMSC-targeting peptide and NLS peptide within LPD can target to rMSCs and then guide transposon into nuclei. After entering the nuclei, SB transposon increase the insertion rates into cellular chromosomes. The targeting LPD does not show obvious cell toxicity and influence on the differentiation potential of rMSCs. Therefore, the integration of SB transposon and LPD system is a promising nonviral gene delivery vector in stem cell therapy. PMID:23885226

  11. Solution structure of a bacterial microcompartment targeting peptide and its application in the construction of an ethanol bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Newnham, Sarah; Lee, Matthew J.; Brown, Ian R.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Rowe, Michelle L.; Mulvihill, Daniel P.; Prentice, Michael B; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    The targeting of proteins to bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) is mediated by a short peptide sequence of 18 amino acids. Herein, we report the solution structure of the N-terminal targeting peptide (P18) of PduP, the aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with the 1,2-propanediol utilization metabolosome. The solution structure reveals the peptide to have a well defined-helical conformation along its whole length. Saturation transfer difference and transferred NOE NMR has highlighted the observed interaction surface on the peptide with its main interacting protein, PduK, a component of the outer shell of the microcompartment. By tagging both a pyruvate decarboxylase and an alcohol dehydrogenase with targeting peptides it has been possible to direct these enzymes to empty BMCs in vivo and to generate an ethanol bioreactor. Purification of the re-designed BMCs reveals that not only do they contain the ethanogenic enzymes but that they are able to transform pyruvate into ethanol efficiently. PMID:24933391

  12. Construction and Application of Elastin Like Polypeptide Containing IL-4 Receptor Targeting Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sarangthem, Vijaya; Cho, Eun A.; Bae, Sang Mun; Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Kim, Sun-Ji; Kim, Soyoun; Jeon, Won Bae; Lee, Byung-Heon; Park, Rang-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Various human solid tumors highly express IL-4 receptors which amplify the expression of some of anti-apoptotic proteins, preventing drug-induced cancer cell death. Thus, IL-4 receptor targeted drug delivery can possibly increase the therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatment. Macromolecular carriers with multivalent targeting moieties offered great advantages in cancer therapy as they not only increase the plasma half-life of the drug but also allow delivery of therapeutic drugs to the cancer cells with higher specificity, minimizing the deleterious effects of the drug on normal cells. In this study we designed a library of elastin like polypeptide (ELP) polymers containing tumor targeting AP1 peptide using recursive directional ligation method. AP1 was previously discovered as an atherosclerotic plaque and breast tumor tissue homing peptide using phage display screening method, and it can selectively bind to the interleukin 4 receptor (IL-4R). The fluorescently labeled [AP1-V12]6, an ELP polymer containing six AP1 enhanced tumor-specific targeting ability and uptake efficiency in H226 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cell lines in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that multivalent presentation of the targeting ligand in the ELP polymer increased the binding affinity towards IL-4 receptor compared to free peptide. The binding of [AP1-V12]6 to cancer cells was remarkably reduced when IL-4 receptors were blocked by antibody against IL-4 receptor further confirmed its binding. Importantly, the Cy5.5-labeled [AP1-V12]6 demonstrated excellent homing and longer retention in tumor tissues in MDA-MB-231 xenograft mouse model. Immunohistological studies of tumor tissues further validated the targeting efficiency of [AP1-V12]6 to tumor tissue. These results indicate that designed [AP1-V12]6 can serve as a novel carrier for selective delivery of therapeutic drugs to tumors. PMID:24339977

  13. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  14. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  15. Applications of Convertible Isonitriles in the Ligation and Macrocyclization of Multicomponent Reaction-Derived Peptides and Depsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Wessjohann, Ludger A; Morejón, Micjel C; Ojeda, Gerardo M; Rhoden, Cristiano R B; Rivera, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    Peptide ligation and macrocyclization are among the most relevant approaches in the field of peptide chemistry. Whereas a variety of strategies relying on coupling reagents and native chemical ligation are available, there is a continuous need for efficient peptide ligation and cyclization methods. Herein we report on the utilization of convertible isonitriles as effective synthetic tools for the ligation and macrocyclization of peptides arising from isocyanide-based multicomponent reactions. The strategy relies on the use of convertible isonitriles-derived from Fukuyama amines-and peptide carboxylic acids in Ugi and Passerini reactions to afford N-alkylated peptides and depsipeptides, respectively, followed by conversion of the C-terminal amide onto either N-peptidoacyl indoles or pyrroles. Such activated peptides proved efficient in the ligation to peptidic, lipidic and fluorescently labeled amines and in macrocyclization protocols. As a result, a wide set of N-substituted peptides (with methyl, glycosyl and amino acids as N-substituents), cyclic N-methylated peptides and a depsipeptide were produced in good yields using conditions that involve either classical heating or microwave irradiation. This report improves the repertoire of peptide covalent modification methods by exploiting the synthetic potential of multicomponent reactions and convertible isonitriles. PMID:27390908

  16. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  17. Screening of integrin-binding peptides in a laminin peptide library derived from the mouse laminin β chain short arm regions.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumihiko; Takagi, Masaharu; Nakamura, Minako; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2014-05-15

    Laminins, major components of basement membrane, consist of three different subunits, α, β, and γ chains, and so far, five α, three β, and three γ chains have been identified. We have constructed synthetic peptide libraries derived from the laminin sequences and identified various cell-adhesive peptides. Ten active peptides from the laminin α chain sequences (α1-α5) were found to promote integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Previously, we found fourteen cell-adhesive peptides from the β1 chain sequence but their receptors have not been analyzed. Here, we expanded the synthetic peptide library to add peptides from the short arm regions of the laminin β2 and β3 chains and screened for integrin-binding peptides. Twenty-seven peptides promoted human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment in a peptide-coated plate assay. The morphological appearance of HDFs on the peptide-coated plates differed depending on the peptides. B34 (REKYYYAVYDMV, mouse laminin β1 chain, 255-266), B67 (IPYSMEYEILIRY, mouse laminin β1 chain, 604-616), B2-105 (APNFWNFTSGRG, mouse laminin β2 chain, 1081-1092), and B3-19 (GHLTGGKVQLNL, mouse laminin β3 chain, 182-193) promoted HDF spreading and HDF attachment was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that the peptides interact with integrins. Immunostaining analyses revealed that B67 induced well-organized actin stress fibers and focal contacts containing vinculin, however, B34, B2-105, and B3-19 did not exhibit stress fiber formation or focal contacts. The inhibition assay using anti-integrin antibodies indicated that B67 interacts with α3, α6, and β1 integrins, and B34 and B3-19 interact with β1 integrin. Based on adhesion analysis of peptides modified with an alanine scan and on switching analysis with the homologous inactive sequence B2-64 (LPRAMDYDLLLRW, mouse laminin β2 chain, 618-630), the Glu(8) residue in the B67 peptide was critical for HDF adhesion. These findings are useful for identifying an integrin binding motif. The B67 peptide

  18. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  19. A PCNA-Derived Cell Permeable Peptide Selectively Inhibits Neuroblastoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Long; Smith, Shanna; Li, Caroline; Hickey, Robert J.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Fields, Gregg B.; Lang, Walter H.; Sandoval, John A.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), through its interaction with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and DNA repair, plays a central role in maintaining genome stability. We previously reported a novel cancer associated PCNA isoform (dubbed caPCNA), which was significantly expressed in a broad range of cancer cells and tumor tissues, but not in non-malignant cells. We found that the caPCNA-specific antigenic site lies between L126 and Y133, a region within the interconnector domain of PCNA that is known to be a major binding site for many of PCNA's interacting proteins. We hypothesized that therapeutic agents targeting protein-protein interactions mediated through this region may confer differential toxicity to normal and malignant cells. To test this hypothesis, we designed a cell permeable peptide containing the PCNA L126-Y133 sequence. Here, we report that this peptide selectively kills human neuroblastoma cells, especially those with MYCN gene amplification, with much less toxicity to non-malignant human cells. Mechanistically, the peptide is able to block PCNA interactions in cancer cells. It interferes with DNA synthesis and homologous recombination-mediated double-stranded DNA break repair, resulting in S-phase arrest, accumulation of DNA damage, and enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin. These results demonstrate conceptually the utility of this peptide for treating neuroblastomas, particularly, the unfavorable MYCN-amplified tumors. PMID:24728180

  20. Buforins: histone H2A-derived antimicrobial peptides from toad stomach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ju Hyun; Sung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang

    2009-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) constitute an important component of the innate immune system in a variety of organisms. Buforin I is a 39-amino acid AMP that was first isolated from the stomach tissue of the Asian toad Bufo bufo gargarizans. Buforin II is a 21-amino acid peptide that is derived from buforin I and displays an even more potent antimicrobial activity than its parent AMP. Both peptides share complete sequence identity with the N-terminal region of histone H2A that interacts directly with nucleic acids. Buforin I is generated from histone H2A by pepsin-directed proteolysis in the cytoplasm of gastric gland cells. After secretion into the gastric lumen, buforin I remains adhered to the mucous biofilm that lines the stomach, thus providing a protective antimicrobial coat. Buforins, which house a helix-hinge-helix domain, kill a microorganism by entering the cell without membrane permeabilization and thus binding to nucleic acids. The proline hinge is crucial for the cell penetrating activity of buforins. Buforins also are known to possess anti-endotoxin and anticancer activities, thus making these peptides attractive reagents for pharmaceutical applications. This review describes the role of buforins in innate host defense; future research paradigms; and use of these agents as human therapeutics.

  1. Penetration of Milk-Derived Antimicrobial Peptides into Phospholipid Monolayers as Model Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Ewa; Więcław-Czapla, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Three antimicrobial peptides derived from bovine milk proteins were examined with regard to penetration into insoluble monolayers formed with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DPPG). Effects on surface pressure (Π) and electric surface potential (ΔV) were measured, Π with a platinum Wilhelmy plate and ΔV with a vibrating plate. The penetration measurements were performed under stationary diffusion conditions and upon the compression of the monolayers. The two type measurements showed greatly different effects of the peptide-lipid interactions. Results of the stationary penetration show that the peptide interactions with DPPC monolayer are weak, repulsive, and nonspecific while the interactions with DPPG monolayer are significant, attractive, and specific. These results are in accord with the fact that antimicrobial peptides disrupt bacteria membranes (negative) while no significant effect on the host membranes (neutral) is observed. No such discrimination was revealed from the compression isotherms. The latter indicate that squeezing the penetrant out of the monolayer upon compression does not allow for establishing the penetration equilibrium, so the monolayer remains supersaturated with the penetrant and shows an under-equilibrium orientation within the entire compression range, practically. PMID:24455264

  2. The Multiplicity of Post-Translational Modifications in Pro-Opiomelanocortin-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Akikazu; Jones, Leslie Sargent; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    The precursor protein, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) undergoes extensive post-translational processing in a tissue-specific manner to yield various biologically active peptides involved in diverse cellular functions. The recently developed method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for direct tissue analysis has proved to be a powerful tool for investigating the distribution of peptides and proteins. In particular, topological mass spectrometry analysis using MALDI-MS can selectively provide a mass profile of the hormones included in cell secretory granules. An advantage of this technology is that it is possible to analyze a frozen thin slice section, avoiding an extraction procedure. Subsequently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has a profound impact on addressing the modified residues in the hormone molecules. Based on these strategies with mass spectrometry, several interesting molecular forms of POMC-derived peptides have been found in the fish pituitary, such as novel sites of acetylation in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), hydroxylation of a proline residue in β-MSH, and the phosphorylated form of corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide. PMID:24348461

  3. Chicken cathelicidin-2-derived peptides with enhanced immunomodulatory and antibacterial activities against biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Molhoek, E Margo; van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Dijk-Knijnenburg, Helma; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H; Boele, Linda C L; Kaman-van Zanten, Wendy E; Haagsman, Henk P; Bikker, Floris J

    2010-09-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are considered to be excellent candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Recently, it was demonstrated that the peptide C1-15, an N-terminal segment of chicken HDP cathelicidin-2, exhibits potent antibacterial activity while lacking cytotoxicity towards eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we report that C1-15 is active against bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis that may potentially be used by bioterrorists. Substitution of single and multiple phenylalanine (Phe) residues to tryptophan (Trp) in C1-15 resulted in variants with improved antibacterial activity against B. anthracis and Y. pestis as well as decreased salt sensitivity. In addition, these peptides exhibited enhanced neutralisation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities of these C1-15-derived peptides are exerted at concentrations far below the concentrations that are toxic to human PBMCs. Taken together, we show that Phe-->Trp substitutions in C1-15 variants enhances the antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities against pathogenic bacteria, including those that may potentially be used as biological warfare agents.

  4. Penetration of milk-derived antimicrobial peptides into phospholipid monolayers as model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Barzyk, Wanda; Rogalska, Ewa; Więcław-Czapla, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Three antimicrobial peptides derived from bovine milk proteins were examined with regard to penetration into insoluble monolayers formed with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DPPG). Effects on surface pressure (Π) and electric surface potential (ΔV) were measured, Π with a platinum Wilhelmy plate and ΔV with a vibrating plate. The penetration measurements were performed under stationary diffusion conditions and upon the compression of the monolayers. The two type measurements showed greatly different effects of the peptide-lipid interactions. Results of the stationary penetration show that the peptide interactions with DPPC monolayer are weak, repulsive, and nonspecific while the interactions with DPPG monolayer are significant, attractive, and specific. These results are in accord with the fact that antimicrobial peptides disrupt bacteria membranes (negative) while no significant effect on the host membranes (neutral) is observed. No such discrimination was revealed from the compression isotherms. The latter indicate that squeezing the penetrant out of the monolayer upon compression does not allow for establishing the penetration equilibrium, so the monolayer remains supersaturated with the penetrant and shows an under-equilibrium orientation within the entire compression range, practically. PMID:24455264

  5. Peptide-Like Molecules (PLMs): A Journey from Peptide Bond Isosteres to Gramicidin S Mimetics and Mitochondrial Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wipf, Peter; Xiao, Jingbo; Stephenson, Corey R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are natural ligands and substrates for receptors and enzymes and exhibit broad physiological effects. However, their use as therapeutic agents often suffers from poor bioavailability and insufficient membrane permeability. The success of peptide mimicry hinges on the ability of bioisosteres, in particular peptide bond replacements, to adopt suitable secondary structures relevant to peptide strands and position functional groups in equivalent space. This perspective highlights past and ongoing studies in our group that involve new methods development as well as specific synthetic library preparations and applications in chemical biology, with the goal to enhance the use of alkene and cyclopropane peptide bond isosteres. PMID:20725595

  6. Structure and Activity of Human Mitochondrial Peptide Deformylase, a Novel Cancer Target

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar-Alvarez, Sindy; Goldgur, Yehuda; Yang, Guangli; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Li, Yueming; Scheinberg, David A.

    2009-07-21

    Peptide deformylase proteins (PDFs) participate in the N-terminal methionine excision pathway of newly synthesized peptides. We show that the human PDF (HsPDF) can deformylate its putative substrates derived from mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins. The first structural model of a mammalian PDF (1.7 A), HsPDF, shows a dimer with conserved topology of the catalytic residues and fold as non-mammalian PDFs. The HsPDF C-terminus topology and the presence of a helical loop (H2 and H3), however, shape a characteristic active site entrance. The structure of HsPDF bound to the peptidomimetic inhibitor actinonin (1.7 A) identified the substrate-binding site. A defined S1' pocket, but no S2' or S3' substrate-binding pockets, exists. A conservation of PDF-actinonin interaction across PDFs was observed. Despite the lack of true S2' and S3' binding pockets, confirmed through peptide binding modeling, enzyme kinetics suggest a combined contribution from P2'and P3' positions of a formylated peptide substrate to turnover.

  7. Tissue-Factor Targeted Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers as an Injectable Therapy To Control Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Courtney E; Dombrowski, Amanda W; Rubert Pérez, Charles M; Bahnson, Edward S M; Tsihlis, Nick D; Jiang, Wulin; Jiang, Qun; Vercammen, Janet M; Prakash, Vivek S; Pritts, Timothy A; Stupp, Samuel I; Kibbe, Melina R

    2016-01-26

    Noncompressible torso hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality in civilian and battlefield trauma. We sought to develop an i.v.-injectable, tissue factor (TF)-targeted nanotherapy to stop hemorrhage. Tissue factor was chosen as a target because it is only exposed to the intravascular space upon vessel disruption. Peptide amphiphile (PA) monomers that self-assemble into nanofibers were chosen as the delivery vehicle. Three TF-binding sequences were identified (EGR, RLM, and RTL), covalently incorporated into the PA backbone, and shown to self-assemble into nanofibers by cryo-transmission electron microscopy. Both the RLM and RTL peptides bound recombinant TF in vitro. All three TF-targeted nanofibers bound to the site of punch biopsy-induced liver hemorrhage in vivo, but only RTL nanofibers reduced blood loss versus sham (53% reduction, p < 0.05). Increasing the targeting ligand density of RTL nanofibers yielded qualitatively better binding to the site of injury and greater reductions in blood loss in vivo (p < 0.05). In fact, 100% RTL nanofiber reduced overall blood loss by 60% versus sham (p < 0.05). Evaluation of the biocompatibility of the RTL nanofiber revealed that it did not induce RBC hemolysis, did not induce neutrophil or macrophage inflammation at the site of liver injury, and 70% remained intact in plasma after 30 min. In summary, these studies demonstrate successful binding of peptides to TF in vitro and successful homing of a TF-targeted PA nanofiber to the site of hemorrhage with an associated decrease in blood loss in vivo. Thus, this therapeutic may potentially treat noncompressible hemorrhage. PMID:26700464

  8. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jung Young

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  9. Fidelity of targeting to chloroplasts is not affected by removal of the phosphorylation site from the transit peptide.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Mould, Ruth M; Smith, Alison G

    2004-02-01

    Phosphorylation of the transit peptide of several chloroplast-targeted proteins enables the binding of 14-3-3 proteins. The complex that forms, together with Hsp70, has been demonstrated to be an intermediate in the chloroplast protein import pathway in vitro[May, T. & Soll, J. (2000) Plant Cell 12, 53-63]. In this paper we report that mutagenesis (in order to remove the phosphorylation site) of the transit peptide of the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not affect its ability to target green fluorescent protein to chloroplasts in vivo. We also found no mistargeting to other organelles such as mitochondria. Similar alterations to the transit peptides of histidyl- or cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, which are dual-targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria, had no effect on their ability to target green fluorescent protein in vivo. Thus, phosphorylation of the transit peptide is not responsible for the specificity of chloroplast import.

  10. Physiological roles of preproghrelin-derived peptides in GH secretion and feeding.

    PubMed

    Zizzari, Philippe; Hassouna, Rim; Grouselle, Dominique; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2011-11-01

    Among the factors playing a crucial role in the regulation of energy metabolism, gastro-intestinal peptides are essential signals to maintain energy homeostasis as they relay to the central nervous system the informations about the nutritional status of the body. Among these factors, preproghrelin is a unique prohormone as it encodes ghrelin, a powerful GH secretagogue and the only orexigenic signal from the gastrointestinal tract and obestatin, a proposed functional ghrelin antagonist. These preproghrelin-derived peptides may contribute to balance energy intake, metabolism and body composition by regulating the activity of the GH/IGF-1 axis and appetite. Whereas the contribution of ghrelin has been well characterized, the role of the more recently identified obestatin, in this regulatory process is still controversial. In this chapter, we describe the contribution of these different preproghrelin-derived peptides and their receptors in the regulation of GH secretion and feeding. Data obtained from pharmacological approaches, mutant models and evaluation of the hormones in animal and human models are discussed.

  11. New NSAID Targets and Derivatives for Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Grizzle, William E.; Abadi, Ashraf; Keeton, Adam; Zhu, Bing; Xi, Yaguang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies provide strong evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can prevent numerous types of cancers, especially colorectal cancer. Unfortunately, the depletion of physiologically important prostaglandins due to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition results in potentially fatal toxicities that preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. While studies have shown an involvement of COX-2 in colorectal tumorigenesis, other studies suggest that a COX-independent target may be at least partially responsible for the antineoplastic activity of NSAIDs. For example, certain NSAID derivatives have been identified that do not inhibit COX-2 but have demonstrated efficacy to suppress carcinogenesis with potential for reduced toxicity. A number of alternative targets have also been reported to account for the tumor cell growth inhibitory activity of NSAIDs, including the inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterases (cGMP PDEs), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the suppression of the apoptosis inhibitor protein, survivin, and others. Here, we review several promising mechanisms that are being targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22893202

  12. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  13. Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Targeted by Spice-Derived Nutraceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, car-damonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  14. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  15. The Homeodomain Derived Peptide Penetratin Induces Curvature of Fluid Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lamazière, Antonin; Wolf, Claude; Lambert, Olivier; Chassaing, Gérard; Trugnan, Germain; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein membrane transduction domains that are able to cross the plasma membrane are present in several transcription factors, such as the homeodomain proteins and the viral proteins such as Tat of HIV-1. Their discovery resulted in both new concepts on the cell communication during development, and the conception of cell penetrating peptide vectors for internalisation of active molecules into cells. A promising cell penetrating peptide is Penetratin, which crosses the cell membranes by a receptor and metabolic energy-independent mechanism. Recent works have claimed that Penetratin and similar peptides are internalized by endocytosis, but other endocytosis-independent mechanisms have been proposed. Endosomes or plasma membranes crossing mechanisms are not well understood. Previously, we have shown that basic peptides induce membrane invaginations suggesting a new mechanism for uptake, “physical endocytosis”. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we investigate the role of membrane lipid phases on Penetratin induced membrane deformations (liquid ordered such as in “raft” microdomains versus disordered fluid “non-raft” domains) in membrane models. Experimental data show that zwitterionic lipid headgroups take part in the interaction with Penetratin suggesting that the external leaflet lipids of cells plasma membrane are competent for peptide interaction in the absence of net negative charges. NMR and X-ray diffraction data show that the membrane perturbations (tubulation and vesiculation) are associated with an increase in membrane negative curvature. These effects on curvature were observed in the liquid disordered but not in the liquid ordered (raft-like) membrane domains. Conclusions/Significance The better understanding of the internalisation mechanisms of protein transduction domains will help both the understanding of the mechanisms of cell communication and the development of potential therapeutic molecular vectors. Here we showed that

  16. Effect of osteonectin-derived peptide on the viscoelasticity of hydrogel/apatite nanocomposite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogel/apatite nanocomposites are the ideal biomaterial to mimic the physio-chemical and biologic properties of the bone and to fabricate scaffolds for bone regeneration. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of an osteonectin derived glutamic acid sequence on the viscoelastic properties of poly(lactide-ethylene oxide-fumarate) (PLEOF)/apatite composite, as a model degradable material in bone regeneration. Osteonectin is an extracellular acidic glycoprotein of the bone matrix, which is believed to be involved in linking the collagen network to hydroxyapatite (HA), the mineral phase of the bone. We synthesized a 6-glutamic acid sequence in solid phase with affinity to HA crystals via ionic interactions. One end of the synthesized peptide was functionalized with an acrylate group to covalently attach the peptide (Ac-Glu6) to the aqueous-based biodegradable and in situ crosslinkable PLEOF hydrogel matrix. To determine the effect of energetic interactions between the fillers and hydrogel matrix, HA nanoparticles were also treated with an acrylate functionalized 6-glycine amino acid peptide (Ac-Gly6) that interacts with the fillers only by van der Waals and polar interactions (without ionic interactions). Crosslinked PLEOF/apatite scaffolds were prepared using PLEOF as the degradable macromer, HA nanofillers treated with Ac-Glu6 peptide linker, and a neutral redox initiation system. The viscoelastic properties were studied by dynamic time sweep, strain sweep, and small amplitude oscillatory rheometry. Composites without surface treatment, treated with Ac-Gly6, and treated with Ac-Glu6 at different volume fractions and various particle sizes were examined. The results showed that the 6-mer glutamic acid sequence significantly affects the shear modulus of the scaffold because of ionic interactions between the peptide and HA crystals.

  17. Effect of osteonectin-derived peptide on the viscoelasticity of hydrogel/apatite nanocomposite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogel/apatite nanocomposites are the ideal biomaterial to mimic the physio-chemical and biologic properties of the bone and to fabricate scaffolds for bone regeneration. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of an osteonectin derived glutamic acid sequence on the viscoelastic properties of poly(lactide-ethylene oxide-fumarate) (PLEOF)/apatite composite, as a model degradable material in bone regeneration. Osteonectin is an extracellular acidic glycoprotein of the bone matrix, which is believed to be involved in linking the collagen network to hydroxyapatite (HA), the mineral phase of the bone. We synthesized a 6-glutamic acid sequence in solid phase with affinity to HA crystals via ionic interactions. One end of the synthesized peptide was functionalized with an acrylate group to covalently attach the peptide (Ac-Glu6) to the aqueous-based biodegradable and in situ crosslinkable PLEOF hydrogel matrix. To determine the effect of energetic interactions between the fillers and hydrogel matrix, HA nanoparticles were also treated with an acrylate functionalized 6-glycine amino acid peptide (Ac-Gly6) that interacts with the fillers only by van der Waals and polar interactions (without ionic interactions). Crosslinked PLEOF/apatite scaffolds were prepared using PLEOF as the degradable macromer, HA nanofillers treated with Ac-Glu6 peptide linker, and a neutral redox initiation system. The viscoelastic properties were studied by dynamic time sweep, strain sweep, and small amplitude oscillatory rheometry. Composites without surface treatment, treated with Ac-Gly6, and treated with Ac-Glu6 at different volume fractions and various particle sizes were examined. The results showed that the 6-mer glutamic acid sequence significantly affects the shear modulus of the scaffold because of ionic interactions between the peptide and HA crystals. PMID:17183515

  18. Octreotide-Mediated Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery via a Cleavable Doxorubicin-Peptide Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Freidel, Christoph; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Stalla, Günter; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-12-01

    Although recent methods for targeted drug delivery have addressed many of the existing problems of cancer therapy associated with undesirable side effects, significant challenges remain that have to be met before they find significant clinical relevance. One such area is the delicate chemical bond that is applied to connect a cytotoxic drug with targeting moieties like antibodies or peptides. Here we describe a novel platform that can be utilized for the preparation of drug-carrier conjugates in a site-specific manner, which provides excellent versatility and enables triggered release inside cancer cells. Its key feature is a cleavable doxorubicin-octreotide bioconjugate that targets overexpressed somatostatin receptors on tumor cells, where the coupling between the two components was achieved through the first cleavable disulfide-intercalating linker. The tumor targeting ability and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in AtT-20 cells by both octreotide and the doxorubicin hybrid were determined via a specific radioimmunoassay. Both substances reduced the hormone secretion to a similar extent, which demonstrated that the tumor homing peptide is able to interact with the relevant cell surface receptors after the attachment of the drug. Effective drug release was quickly accomplished in the presence of the physiological reducing agent glutathione. We also demonstrate the relevance of this scaffold in biological context in cytotoxicity assays with pituitary, pancreatic, and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26524088

  19. Targeting dendritic cells in lymph node with an antigen peptide-based nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuan; Jin, Honglin; Qiao, Sha; Dai, Yanfeng; Huang, Chuan; Lu, Lisen; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    The design of peptide-based subunit vaccine formulations for the direct delivery of tumor antigen peptides (Aps) to dendritic cells (DCs) localized within draining lymph nodes (DLNs) is challenging. Mature DCs (mDCs) are abundantly distributed within DLNs but have dramatically reduced endocytic uptake and antigen-processing abilities, so their role as potential vaccine targets has been largely overlooked. Here we report an ultra-small biocompatible nanovaccine (α-Ap-FNP) functionalized by avidly targeting delivery of Ap via the scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1) pathway to mDCs. The self-assembly, small size (∼30 nm), SR-B1-targeting and optical properties of α-Ap-FNP resulted in its efficient Ap loading, substantial LN accumulation, targeting of mDCs and enhanced Ap presentation, and fluorescence trafficking, respectively. We also demonstrate that the α-Ap-FNP can be either used alone or encapsulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide as a prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine. Thus, the excellent properties of α-Ap-FNP provide it potential for clinical applications as a potent nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-28

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples. PMID:27087258

  1. Target validation of the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) gene in Cryptosporidium using Phylomer(®) peptides.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, R; Yang, R; Woh, C K; Weldt, T; Milech, N; Estcourt, A; Armstrong, T; Hopkins, R; Watt, P; Reid, S; Armson, A; Ryan, U M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastroenteric disease characterised mainly by diarrheal illnesses in humans and mammals is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium. Treatment options for cryptosporidiosis are limited, with the current therapeutic nitazoxanide, only partly efficacious in immunocompetent individuals. The parasite lacks de novo purine synthesis, and is exclusively dependant on purine salvage from its host. Inhibition of the inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a purine salvage enzyme that is essential for DNA synthesis, thereby offers a potential drug target against this parasite. In the present study, a yeast-two-hybrid system was used to identify Phylomer peptides within a library constructed from the genomes of 25 phylogenetically diverse bacteria that targeted the IMPDH of Cryptosporidium parvum (IMPcp) and Cryptosporidium hominis (IMPch). We identified 38 unique interacting Phylomers, of which, 12 were synthesised and screened against C. parvum in vitro. Two Phylomers exhibited significant growth inhibition (81.2-83.8% inhibition; P < 0.05), one of which consistently exhibited positive interactions with IMPcp and IMPch during primary and recapitulation yeast two-hybrid screening and did not interact with either of the human IMPDH proteins. The present study highlightsthe potential of Phylomer peptides as target validation tools for Cryptosporidium and other organisms and diseases because of their ability to bind with high affinity to target proteins and disrupt function. PMID:25447124

  2. Non-Peptide Macrocyclic Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Derived from Tricyclic Ketolide Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A.; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) function is a validated therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Of the several structurally distinct small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) reported, macrocyclic depsipeptides possess the most complex cap-groups and have demonstrated excellent HDAC inhibition potency and isoform selectivity. Unfortunately, the development of macrocyclic depsipeptides has been hampered in part due to development problems characteristic of large peptides and the complex reaction schemes required for their synthesis. Herein we report that tricyclic ketolide TE-802 is an excellent mimetic for the peptide backbone of macrocyclic HDACi. Compounds derived from this template are particularly selective against HDAC 1 and 2 with nanomolar inhibitory activity. Interrogation of the association between a subset of these compounds and key HDAC isoforms, using AutoDock, enables a molecular description of the interaction between the HDAC enzyme's outer rim and the inhibitors’ macrocyclic cap group that are responsible for compound affinity and presumably isoform selectivity. PMID:20669972

  3. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J.; Chester, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCARlow/EGFRhigh cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of

  4. Assessment of meat authenticity using bioinformatics, targeted peptide biomarkers and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Orduna, Alberto; Husby, Erik; Yang, Charles T; Ghosh, Dipankar; Beaudry, Francis

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a significant increase of food fraud has been observed, ranging from false label claims to the use of additives and fillers to increase profitability. Recently in 2013 horse and pig DNAs were detected in beef products sold from several retailers. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become the workhorse in protein research, and the detection of marker proteins could serve for both animal species and tissue authentication. Meat species authenticity is performed in this paper using a well-defined proteogenomic annotation, carefully chosen surrogate tryptic peptides and analysis using a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap MS. Selected mammalian meat samples were homogenised and proteins were extracted and digested with trypsin. The samples were analysed using a high-resolution MS. Chromatography was achieved using a 30-min linear gradient along with a BioBasic C8 100 × 1 mm column at a flow rate of 75 µl min(-1). The MS was operated in full-scan high resolution and accurate mass. MS/MS spectra were collected for selected proteotypic peptides. Muscular proteins were methodically analysed in silico in order to generate tryptic peptide mass lists and theoretical MS/MS spectra. Following a comprehensive bottom-up proteomic analysis, we detected and identified a proteotypic myoglobin tryptic peptide (120-134) for each species with observed m/z below 1.3 ppm compared with theoretical values. Moreover, proteotypic peptides from myosin-1, myosin-2 and β-haemoglobin were also identified. This targeted method allowed comprehensive meat speciation down to 1% (w/w) of undesired product.

  5. Assessment of meat authenticity using bioinformatics, targeted peptide biomarkers and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Orduna, Alberto; Husby, Erik; Yang, Charles T; Ghosh, Dipankar; Beaudry, Francis

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a significant increase of food fraud has been observed, ranging from false label claims to the use of additives and fillers to increase profitability. Recently in 2013 horse and pig DNAs were detected in beef products sold from several retailers. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become the workhorse in protein research, and the detection of marker proteins could serve for both animal species and tissue authentication. Meat species authenticity is performed in this paper using a well-defined proteogenomic annotation, carefully chosen surrogate tryptic peptides and analysis using a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap MS. Selected mammalian meat samples were homogenised and proteins were extracted and digested with trypsin. The samples were analysed using a high-resolution MS. Chromatography was achieved using a 30-min linear gradient along with a BioBasic C8 100 × 1 mm column at a flow rate of 75 µl min(-1). The MS was operated in full-scan high resolution and accurate mass. MS/MS spectra were collected for selected proteotypic peptides. Muscular proteins were methodically analysed in silico in order to generate tryptic peptide mass lists and theoretical MS/MS spectra. Following a comprehensive bottom-up proteomic analysis, we detected and identified a proteotypic myoglobin tryptic peptide (120-134) for each species with observed m/z below 1.3 ppm compared with theoretical values. Moreover, proteotypic peptides from myosin-1, myosin-2 and β-haemoglobin were also identified. This targeted method allowed comprehensive meat speciation down to 1% (w/w) of undesired product. PMID:26241836

  6. Vaccine for human contraception targeting sperm Izumo protein and YLP12 dodecamer peptide

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop a better method of contraception which is non-steroidal and reversible to control world population explosion and unintended pregnancies. Contraceptive vaccines (CV), especially targeting sperm-specific proteins, can provide an ideal contraceptive modality. Sperm-specific proteins can induce an immune response in women as well as men, thus can be used for CV development in both sexes. In this article, we will review two sperm-specific proteins, namely Izumo protein and YLP12 dodecamer peptide. Gene-knockout studies indicate that Izumo protein is essential for sperm–egg membrane fusion. Vaccination with Izumo protein or its cDNA causes a significant reduction in fertility of female mice. The antibodies to human Izumo inhibit human sperm penetration assay. Recently, our laboratory found that a significant percentage of infertile women have antibodies to Izumo protein. The second sperm-specific protein is YLP12, a peptide mimetic sequence present on human sperm involved in recognition and binding to the human oocyte zona pellucida. Vaccination with YLP12 or its cDNA causes long-term, reversible contraception, without side effects, in female mice. Infertile, but not fertile, men and women have antibodies to YLP12 peptide. Our laboratory has isolated, cloned, and sequenced cDNA encoding human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody from infertile men which reacts with YLP12 peptide. The human YLP12 scFv antibody may provide a novel passive immunocontraceptive, the first of its kind. In conclusion, sperm-specific Izumo protein and YLP12 peptide can provide exciting candidates for antisperm CV development. PMID:24723387

  7. Modulation of hydrogel nanoparticle intracellular trafficking by multivalent surface engineering with tumor targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Karamchand, Leshern; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Shouyan; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ray, Aniruddha; Jiddou, Ruba; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin A; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-11-01

    Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers.

  8. Tumor targeting and imaging with dual-peptide conjugated multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rangger, Christine; Helbok, Anna; Sosabowski, Jane; Kremser, Christian; Koehler, Gottfried; Prassl, Ruth; Andreae, Fritz; Virgolini, Irene J; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Background The significant progress in nanotechnology provides a wide spectrum of nanosized material for various applications, including tumor targeting and molecular imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles for targeting approaches and detection of tumors using different imaging modalities. The concept of dual-targeting was tested in vitro and in vivo using liposomes derivatized with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide binding to αvβ3 integrin receptors and a substance P peptide binding to neurokinin-1 receptors. Methods For liposome preparation, lipids, polyethylene glycol building blocks, DTPA-derivatized lipids for radiolabeling, lipid-based RGD and substance P building blocks and imaging labels were combined in defined molar ratios. Liposomes were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements, and in vitro binding properties were tested using fluorescence microscopy. Standardized protocols for radiolabeling were developed to perform biodistribution and micro-single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) studies in nude mice bearing glioblastoma and/or melanoma tumor xenografts. Additionally, an initial magnetic resonance imaging study was performed. Results Liposomes were radiolabeled with high radiochemical yields. Fluorescence microscopy showed specific cellular interactions with RGD-liposomes and substance P-liposomes. Biodistribution and micro-SPECT/CT imaging of 111In-labeled liposomal nanoparticles revealed low tumor uptake, but in a preliminary magnetic resonance imaging study with a single-targeted RGD-liposome, uptake in the tumor xenografts could be visualized. Conclusion The present study shows the potential of liposomes as multifunctional targeted vehicles for imaging of tumors combining radioactive, fluorescent, and magnetic resonance signaling. Specific in vitro tumor targeting by fluorescence microscopy and radioactivity was

  9. A peptide-linked recombinant glucocerebrosidase for targeted neuronal delivery: Design, production, and assessment.

    PubMed

    Gramlich, Paul A; Westbroek, Wendy; Feldman, Ricardo A; Awad, Ola; Mello, Nicholas; Remington, Mary P; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Wujuan; Sidransky, Ellen; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Fishman, Paul S

    2016-03-10

    Although recombinant glucocerebrosidase (GCase) is the standard therapy for the inherited lysosomal storage disease Gaucher's disease (GD), enzyme replacement is not effective when the central nervous system is affected. We created a series of recombinant genes/proteins where GCase was linked to different membrane binding peptides including the Tat peptide, the rabies glycoprotein derived peptide (RDP), the binding domain from tetanus toxin (TTC), and a tetanus like peptide (Tet1). The majority of these proteins were well-expressed in a mammalian producer cell line (HEK 293F). Purified recombinant Tat-GCase and RDP-GCase showed similar GCase protein delivery to a neuronal cell line that genetically lacks the functional enzyme, and greater delivery than control GCase, Cerezyme (Genzyme). This initial result was unexpected based on observations of superior protein delivery to neurons with RDP as a vector. A recombinant protein where a fragment of the flexible hinge region from IgA (IgAh) was introduced between RDP and GCase showed substantially enhanced GCase neuronal delivery (2.5 times over Tat-GCase), suggesting that the original construct resulted in interference with the capacity of RDP to bind neuronal membranes. Extended treatment of these knockout neuronal cells with either Tat-GCase or RDP-IgAh-GCase resulted in an >90% reduction in the lipid substrate glucosylsphingosine, approaching normal levels. Further in vivo studies of RDP-IgAh-GCase as well as Tat-GCase are warranted to assess their potential as treatments for neuronopathic forms of GD. These peptide vectors are especially attractive as they have the potential to carry a protein across the blood-brain barrier, avoiding invasive direct brain delivery. PMID:26795355

  10. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  11. Synthesis and in vitro inhibition properties of oligonucleotide conjugates carrying amphipathic proline-rich peptide derivatives of the sweet arrow peptide (SAP).

    PubMed

    Grijalvo, Santiago; Eritja, Ramon

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a series of derivatives of the amphipathic proline-rich sweet arrow peptide (SAP) were covalently linked to antisense oligonucleotides designed to inhibit Renilla luciferase gene. Oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates carrying lysine (Lys) and ornithine (Orn) residues were prepared using the stepwise approach by assembling first the peptide sequence followed by the assembly of the DNA molecule. The resulting Lys, Orn-conjugates were transformed to the corresponding arginine and homoarginine oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates by reaction with O-methylisourea. The introduction of the SAP at 3'-termini of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide did not affect the ability to inhibit gene expression when transfected with lipofectamine. However, these conjugates were not able to enter cells without transfecting agent. Further studies using SAP as a transfection agent showed promising results for the conjugates carrying the Orn-SAP. All conjugates showed high duplex stabilities.

  12. Combretastatin A-4 and Derivatives: Potential Fungicides Targeting Fungal Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-lin; Yan, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Jiu-jiu; Pang, Wan; Kai, Zhen-peng; Wu, Fan-hong

    2016-02-01

    Combretastatin A-4, first isolated from the African willow tree Combretum caffrum, is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor in medicine. It was first postulated as a potential fungicide targeting fungal tubulin for plant disease control in this study. Combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives were synthesized and tested against Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae. Several compounds have EC50 values similar to or better than that of isoprothiolane, which is widely used for rice disease control. Structure-activity relationship study indicated the the cis configuration and hydroxyl group in combretastatin A-4 are crucial to the antifungal effect. Molecular modeling indicated the binding sites of combretastatin A-4 and carbendazim on fungal tubulin are totally different. The bioactivity of combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives against carbendazim-resistant strains was demonstrated in this study. The results provide a new approach for fungicide discovery and fungicide resistance management.

  13. Combretastatin A-4 and Derivatives: Potential Fungicides Targeting Fungal Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-lin; Yan, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Jiu-jiu; Pang, Wan; Kai, Zhen-peng; Wu, Fan-hong

    2016-02-01

    Combretastatin A-4, first isolated from the African willow tree Combretum caffrum, is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor in medicine. It was first postulated as a potential fungicide targeting fungal tubulin for plant disease control in this study. Combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives were synthesized and tested against Rhizoctonia solani and Pyricularia oryzae. Several compounds have EC50 values similar to or better than that of isoprothiolane, which is widely used for rice disease control. Structure-activity relationship study indicated the the cis configuration and hydroxyl group in combretastatin A-4 are crucial to the antifungal effect. Molecular modeling indicated the binding sites of combretastatin A-4 and carbendazim on fungal tubulin are totally different. The bioactivity of combretastatin A-4 and its derivatives against carbendazim-resistant strains was demonstrated in this study. The results provide a new approach for fungicide discovery and fungicide resistance management. PMID:26711170

  14. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  15. A liposomal drug platform overrides peptide ligand targeting to a cancer biomarker, irrespective of ligand affinity or density.

    PubMed

    Gray, Bethany Powell; McGuire, Michael J; Brown, Kathlynn C

    2013-01-01

    One method for improving cancer treatment is the use of nanoparticle drugs functionalized with targeting ligands that recognize receptors expressed selectively by tumor cells. In theory such targeting ligands should specifically deliver the nanoparticle drug to the tumor, increasing drug concentration in the tumor and delivering the drug to its site of action within the tumor tissue. However, the leaky vasculature of tumors combined with a poor lymphatic system allows the passive accumulation, and subsequent retention, of nanosized materials in tumors. Furthermore, a large nanoparticle size may impede tumor penetration. As such, the role of active targeting in nanoparticle delivery is controversial, and it is difficult to predict how a targeted nanoparticle drug will behave in vivo. Here we report in vivo studies for αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide targeted liposomal doxorubicin, which increased liposomal delivery and toxicity to lung cancer cells in vitro. We systematically varied ligand affinity, ligand density, ligand stability, liposome dosage, and tumor models to assess the role of active targeting of liposomes to αvβ6. In direct contrast to the in vitro results, we demonstrate no difference in in vivo targeting or efficacy for H2009.1 tetrameric peptide liposomal doxorubicin, compared to control peptide and no peptide liposomes. Examining liposome accumulation and distribution within the tumor demonstrates that the liposome, and not the H2009.1 peptide, drives tumor accumulation, and that both targeted H2009.1 and untargeted liposomes remain in perivascular regions, with little tumor penetration. Thus H2009.1 targeted liposomes fail to improve drug efficacy because the liposome drug platform prevents the H2009.1 peptide from both actively targeting the tumor and binding to tumor cells throughout the tumor tissue. Therefore, using a high affinity and high specificity ligand targeting an over-expressed tumor biomarker does not guarantee enhanced efficacy of a

  16. Modulation of hydrogel nanoparticle intracellular trafficking by multivalent surface engineering with tumor targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamchand, Leshern; Kim, Gwangseong; Wang, Shouyan; Hah, Hoe Jin; Ray, Aniruddha; Jiddou, Ruba; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers.Surface engineering of a hydrogel nanoparticle (NP) with the tumor-targeting ligand, F3 peptide, enhances both the NP's binding affinity for, and internalization by, nucleolin overexpressing tumor cells. Remarkably, the F3-functionalized NPs consistently exhibited significantly lower trafficking to the degradative lysosomes than the non-functionalized NPs, in the tumor cells, after internalization. This is attributed to the non-functionalized NPs, but not the F3-functionalized NPs, being co-internalized with Lysosome-associated Membrane Protein-1 (LAMP1) from the surface of the tumor cells. Furthermore, it is shown that the intracellular trafficking of the F3-functionalized NPs differs significantly from that of the molecular F3 peptides (untethered to NPs). This has important implications for designing effective, chemically-responsive, controlled-release and multifunctional nanodrugs for multi-drug-resistant cancers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Effect of Potassium depletion on F3 peptide subcellular localization, MTT

  17. [The Qualitative Analysis of the Amide Derivative of HLDF-6 Peptide and Its Metabolites with the Use of Tritium- and Deuterium-Labeled Derivatives].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, A; Dadayan, A K; Kost, N V; Voevodina, M E; Sokolov, O Y; Kozik, V S; Shram, S I; Azev, V N; Bocharov, E V; Bogachouk, A P; Lipkin, V M; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elaborate the pharmacokinetics methods of the amide derivative of peptide HLDF-6 (TGENHR-NH2) and its range of nootropic and neuroprotective activity is wide. The hexapeptide 41TGENHR46 is a fragment of the HDLF differentiation factor. It forms the basis for the development of preventive and therapeutic preparations for treating cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative conditions. Pharmacokinetic and molecular mechanisms of the action of the HLDF-6 peptide were studied using tritium- and deuterium-labeled derivatives of this peptide, produced with the use of the high-temperature solid-state catalytic isotope exchange reaction (HSCIE). This reaction was employed to produce the tritium-labeled peptide [3H]TGENHR-NH2 with a molar radioactivity of 230 Ci/mmol and the deuterium-labeled peptide [2H]TGENHR-NH2 with an average deuterium incorporation equal to 10.5 atoms. It was shown by the NMR spectroscopy that the isotope label distribution over the labeled peptide's molecule was uniform, which allowed qualitative analysis ofboth the peptide itself and its fragments in the organism's tissues to be conducted. The newly developed pharmacokinetics method makes it possible to avoid almost completely losses of the peptides under study due to biodegradation during the analysis of tissues. These labeled peptides were used in mice, rats and rabbits to study the pharmacokinetics of the peptide and to calculate the values of its principal pharmacokinetic parameters. Characteristics of its pharmacokinetic profile in the blood were obtained, the hypothesis of pharmacokinetics linearity tested, its metabolism analyzed and its bioavailability value, 34%, calculated. It has been shown that the studied TGENHR-NH2 peptide shows high resistance to hydrolysis in the blood plasma, with dipeptidyl aminopeptidases making the largest contribution to its hydrolysis. PMID:27125017

  18. [The Qualitative Analysis of the Amide Derivative of HLDF-6 Peptide and Its Metabolites with the Use of Tritium- and Deuterium-Labeled Derivatives].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, A; Dadayan, A K; Kost, N V; Voevodina, M E; Sokolov, O Y; Kozik, V S; Shram, S I; Azev, V N; Bocharov, E V; Bogachouk, A P; Lipkin, V M; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elaborate the pharmacokinetics methods of the amide derivative of peptide HLDF-6 (TGENHR-NH2) and its range of nootropic and neuroprotective activity is wide. The hexapeptide 41TGENHR46 is a fragment of the HDLF differentiation factor. It forms the basis for the development of preventive and therapeutic preparations for treating cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative conditions. Pharmacokinetic and molecular mechanisms of the action of the HLDF-6 peptide were studied using tritium- and deuterium-labeled derivatives of this peptide, produced with the use of the high-temperature solid-state catalytic isotope exchange reaction (HSCIE). This reaction was employed to produce the tritium-labeled peptide [3H]TGENHR-NH2 with a molar radioactivity of 230 Ci/mmol and the deuterium-labeled peptide [2H]TGENHR-NH2 with an average deuterium incorporation equal to 10.5 atoms. It was shown by the NMR spectroscopy that the isotope label distribution over the labeled peptide's molecule was uniform, which allowed qualitative analysis ofboth the peptide itself and its fragments in the organism's tissues to be conducted. The newly developed pharmacokinetics method makes it possible to avoid almost completely losses of the peptides under study due to biodegradation during the analysis of tissues. These labeled peptides were used in mice, rats and rabbits to study the pharmacokinetics of the peptide and to calculate the values of its principal pharmacokinetic parameters. Characteristics of its pharmacokinetic profile in the blood were obtained, the hypothesis of pharmacokinetics linearity tested, its metabolism analyzed and its bioavailability value, 34%, calculated. It has been shown that the studied TGENHR-NH2 peptide shows high resistance to hydrolysis in the blood plasma, with dipeptidyl aminopeptidases making the largest contribution to its hydrolysis.

  19. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  20. Presentation of peptides from Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an epitope targeted anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    McComb, Ryan C; Ho, Chi-Lee; Bradley, Kenneth A; Grill, Laurence K; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-11-27

    The current anthrax vaccine requires improvements for rapidly invoking longer-lasting neutralizing antibody responses with fewer doses from a well-defined formulation. Designing antigens that target neutralizing antibody epitopes of anthrax protective antigen, a component of anthrax toxin, may offer a solution for achieving a vaccine that can induce strong and long lasting antibody responses with fewer boosters. Here we report implementation of a strategy for developing epitope focused virus nanoparticle vaccines against anthrax by using immunogenic virus particles to present peptides derived from anthrax toxin previously identified in (1) neutralizing antibody epitope mapping studies, (2) toxin crystal structure analyses to identify functional regions, and (3) toxin mutational analyses. We successfully expressed two of three peptide epitopes from anthrax toxin that, in previous reports, bound antibodies that were partially neutralizing against toxin activity, discovered cross-reactivity between vaccine constructs and toxin specific antibodies raised in goats against native toxin and showed that antibodies induced by our vaccine constructs also cross-react with native toxin. While protection against intoxication in cellular and animal studies were not as effective as in previous studies, partial toxin neutralization was observed in animals, demonstrating the feasibility of using plant-virus nanoparticles as a platform for epitope defined anthrax vaccines.

  1. PACE4-based molecular targeting of prostate cancer using an engineered ⁶⁴Cu-radiolabeled peptide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Ait-Mohand, Samia; D'Anjou, François; Day, Robert; Guérin, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The potential of PACE4 as a pharmacological target in prostate cancer has been demonstrated as this proprotein convertase is strongly overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissues and its inhibition, using molecular or pharmacological approaches, results in reduced cell proliferation and tumor progression in mouse tumor xenograft models. We developed a PACE4 high-affinity peptide inhibitor, namely, the multi-leucine (ML), and sought to determine whether this peptide could be exploited for the targeting of prostate cancer for diagnostic or molecular imaging purposes. We conjugated a bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7- triacetic acid (NOTA) to the ML peptide for copper-64 ((64)Cu) labeling and positron emission tomography (PET)- based prostate cancer detection. Enzyme kinetic assays against recombinant PACE4 showed that the NOTA-modified ML peptide displays identical inhibitory properties compared to the unmodified peptide. In vivo biodistribution of the (64)Cu/NOTA-ML peptide evaluated in athymic nude mice bearing xenografts of two human prostate carcinoma cell lines showed a rapid and high uptake in PACE4-expressing LNCaP tumor at an early time point and in PACE4-rich organs. Co-injection of unlabeled peptide confirmed that tumor uptake was target-specific. PACE4-negative tumors displayed no tracer uptake 15 minutes after injection, while the kidneys, demonstrated high uptake due to rapid renal clearance of the peptide. The present study supports the feasibility of using a (64)Cu/NOTA-ML peptide for PACE4-targeted prostate cancer detection and PACE4 status determination by PET imaging but also provides evidence that ML inhibitor-based drugs would readily reach tumor sites under in vivo conditions for pharmacological intervention or targeted radiation therapy.

  2. Inhibition of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication by an E1-Derived p80/UAF1-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G.

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  3. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  4. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target.

  5. Ghrelin-Derived Peptides: A Link between Appetite/Reward, GH Axis, and Psychiatric Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Labarthe, Alexandra; Fiquet, Oriane; Hassouna, Rim; Zizzari, Philippe; Lanfumey, Laurence; Ramoz, Nicolas; Grouselle, Dominique; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic and hormonal alterations, including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome as well as modifications in several biological rhythms including appetite, stress, sleep–wake cycles, and secretion of their corresponding endocrine regulators. Among the gastrointestinal hormones that regulate appetite and adapt the metabolism in response to nutritional, hedonic, and emotional dysfunctions, at the interface between endocrine, metabolic, and psychiatric disorders, ghrelin plays a unique role as the only one increasing appetite. The secretion of ghrelin is altered in several psychiatric disorders (anorexia, schizophrenia) as well as in metabolic disorders (obesity) and in animal models in response to emotional triggers (psychological stress …) but the relationship between these modifications and the physiopathology of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Recently, a large literature showed that this key metabolic/endocrine regulator is involved in stress and reward-oriented behaviors and regulates anxiety and mood. In addition, preproghrelin is a complex prohormone but the roles of the other ghrelin-derived peptides, thought to act as functional ghrelin antagonists, are largely unknown. Altered ghrelin secretion and/or signaling in psychiatric diseases are thought to participate in altered appetite, hedonic response and reward. Whether this can contribute to the mechanism responsible for the development of the disease or can help to minimize some symptoms associated with these psychiatric disorders is discussed in the present review. We will thus describe (1) the biological actions of ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides on food and drugs reward, anxiety and depression, and the physiological consequences of ghrelin invalidation on these parameters, (2) how ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides are regulated in animal models of psychiatric diseases and in human psychiatric disorders in relation with the GH axis

  6. Ghrelin-Derived Peptides: A Link between Appetite/Reward, GH Axis, and Psychiatric Disorders?

    PubMed

    Labarthe, Alexandra; Fiquet, Oriane; Hassouna, Rim; Zizzari, Philippe; Lanfumey, Laurence; Ramoz, Nicolas; Grouselle, Dominique; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with metabolic and hormonal alterations, including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome as well as modifications in several biological rhythms including appetite, stress, sleep-wake cycles, and secretion of their corresponding endocrine regulators. Among the gastrointestinal hormones that regulate appetite and adapt the metabolism in response to nutritional, hedonic, and emotional dysfunctions, at the interface between endocrine, metabolic, and psychiatric disorders, ghrelin plays a unique role as the only one increasing appetite. The secretion of ghrelin is altered in several psychiatric disorders (anorexia, schizophrenia) as well as in metabolic disorders (obesity) and in animal models in response to emotional triggers (psychological stress …) but the relationship between these modifications and the physiopathology of psychiatric disorders remains unclear. Recently, a large literature showed that this key metabolic/endocrine regulator is involved in stress and reward-oriented behaviors and regulates anxiety and mood. In addition, preproghrelin is a complex prohormone but the roles of the other ghrelin-derived peptides, thought to act as functional ghrelin antagonists, are largely unknown. Altered ghrelin secretion and/or signaling in psychiatric diseases are thought to participate in altered appetite, hedonic response and reward. Whether this can contribute to the mechanism responsible for the development of the disease or can help to minimize some symptoms associated with these psychiatric disorders is discussed in the present review. We will thus describe (1) the biological actions of ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides on food and drugs reward, anxiety and depression, and the physiological consequences of ghrelin invalidation on these parameters, (2) how ghrelin and ghrelin-derived peptides are regulated in animal models of psychiatric diseases and in human psychiatric disorders in relation with the GH axis.

  7. Inhibition of filament formation of human Rad51 protein by a small peptide derived from the BRC-motif of the BRCA2 protein.

    PubMed

    Nomme, Julian; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Martinez, Susan F; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Fleury, Fabrice; Weigel, Pierre; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2008-05-01

    Human Rad51 is a key element of recombinational DNA repair and is related to the resistance of cancer cells to chemo- and radiotherapies. The protein is thus a potential target of anti-cancer treatment. The crystallographic analysis shows that the BRC-motif of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor is in contact with the subunit-subunit interface of Rad51 and could thus prevent filament formation of Rad51. However, biochemical analysis indicates that a BRC-motif peptide of 69 amino acids preferentially binds to the N-terminal part of Rad51. We show experimentally that a short peptide of 28 amino acids derived from the BRC4 motif binds to the subunit-subunit interface and dissociates its filament, both in the presence and absence of DNA, certainly by binding to dissociated monomers. The inhibition is efficient and specific for Rad51: the peptide does not even interact with Rad51 homologs or prevent their interaction with DNA. Neither the N-terminal nor the C-terminal half of the peptide interacts with human Rad51, indicating that both parts are involved in the interaction, as expected from the crystal structure. These results suggest the possibility of developing inhibitors of human Rad51 based on this peptide.

  8. Targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor with mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Krystal R.; Ongarora, Benson G.; LeBlanc, Logan E.; Zhou, Zehua; Jois, Seetharama D.; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four mesoporphyrin IX-peptide conjugates designed to target EGFR, over-expressed in colorectal and other cancers, are reported. Two peptides with known affinity for EGFR, LARLLT (1) and GYHWYGYTPQNVI (2), were conjugated to mesoporphyrin IX (MPIX, 3) via one or both the propionic side chains, directly (4, 5) or with a triethylene glycol spacer (7, 8). The conjugates were characterized using NMR, MS, CD, SPR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. Energy minimization and molecular dynamics suggest different conformations for the conjugates. SPR studies show that conjugate 4, bearing two LARLLT with no PEG spacers, has the greatest affinity for binding to EGFR, followed by conjugate 7 with two PEG and two LARLLT sequences. Molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that both conjugates 4 and 7 can bind to monomer and dimer EGFR in open and closed conformations. The cytotoxicity and cellular targeting ability of the conjugates were investigated in human HEp2 cells over-expressing EGFR. All conjugates showed low dark- and photo-toxicities. The cellular uptake was highest for conjugates 4 and 8 and lowest for 7 bearing two LARLLT linked via PEG groups, likely due to decreased hydrophobicity. Among the conjugates investigated 4 is the most efficient EGFR-targeting agent, and therefore the most promising for the detection of cancers that over-express EGFR. PMID:27738394

  9. Targeting cancer cells via tumor-homing peptide CREKA functional PEG nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Okur, Aysu Ceren; Erkoc, Pelin; Kizilel, Seda

    2016-11-01

    Targeting cell microenvironment via nano-particle based therapies holds great promise for the treatment of various diseases. One of the main challenges in targeted delivery of nanoparticles for cancer therapy is the reduced localization of delivery vehicles to the tumor site. The therapeutic efficacy of drugs can be improved by recruiting delivery vehicles towards specific region of tumorigenesis in the body. Here, we demonstrate an effective approach in creating PEG particles via water-in-water emulsion technique with a tumor-homing peptide CREKA functionalization. The CREKA conjugated hydrogel nanoparticles were found to be more effective at inducing Doxorubicin (DOX)-mediated apoptosis compared to that of particles conjugated with laminin peptide IKVAV. Fluorescence intensity analysis on confocal micrographs suggested significantly higher cellular uptake of CREKA conjugated PEG particles than internalization of nanoparticles in other groups. We observed that fibrin binding ability of PEG particles could be increased up to 94% through CREKA conjugation. Our results suggest the possibility of cancer cell targeting via CREKA-functional PEG nanoparticles. PMID:27513587

  10. Impact of different cell penetrating peptides on the efficacy of antisense therapeutics for targeting intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Mohammad, Haroon; Thangamani, Shankar; Hussein, Asmaa A. A.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to address infections caused by intracellular pathogens. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) present a novel method to target intracellular pathogens due to their unique mechanism of action and their ability to be conjugated to cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to overcome challenging delivery barriers. In this study, we targeted the RNA polymerase α subunit (rpoA) using a PNA that was covalently conjugated to five different CPPs. Changing the conjugated CPP resulted in a pronounced improvement in the antibacterial activity observed against Listeria monocytogenes in vitro, in cell culture, and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) infection model. Additionally, a time-kill assay revealed three conjugated CPPs rapidly kill Listeria within 20 minutes without disrupting the bacterial cell membrane. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of other critical virulence genes (Listeriolysin O, and two phospholipases plcA and plcB) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PNA-inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis was selective and did not adversely affect mitochondrial protein synthesis. This study provides a foundation for improving and developing PNAs conjugated to CPPs to better target intracellular pathogens. PMID:26860980

  11. Impact of different cell penetrating peptides on the efficacy of antisense therapeutics for targeting intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Mohammad, Haroon; Thangamani, Shankar; Hussein, Asmaa A A; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-02-10

    There is a pressing need for novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to address infections caused by intracellular pathogens. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) present a novel method to target intracellular pathogens due to their unique mechanism of action and their ability to be conjugated to cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to overcome challenging delivery barriers. In this study, we targeted the RNA polymerase α subunit (rpoA) using a PNA that was covalently conjugated to five different CPPs. Changing the conjugated CPP resulted in a pronounced improvement in the antibacterial activity observed against Listeria monocytogenes in vitro, in cell culture, and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) infection model. Additionally, a time-kill assay revealed three conjugated CPPs rapidly kill Listeria within 20 minutes without disrupting the bacterial cell membrane. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of other critical virulence genes (Listeriolysin O, and two phospholipases plcA and plcB) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PNA-inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis was selective and did not adversely affect mitochondrial protein synthesis. This study provides a foundation for improving and developing PNAs conjugated to CPPs to better target intracellular pathogens.

  12. Tumor-homing peptides as tools for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta

    PubMed Central

    King, Anna; Ndifon, Cornelia; Lui, Sylvia; Widdows, Kate; Kotamraju, Venkata R.; Agemy, Lilach; Teesalu, Tambet; Glazier, Jocelyn D.; Cellesi, Francesco; Tirelli, Nicola; Aplin, John D.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Harris, Lynda K.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of therapeutics to treat pregnancy complications is severely lacking mainly because of the risk of causing harm to the fetus. As enhancement of placental growth and function can alleviate maternal symptoms and improve fetal growth in animal models, we have developed a method for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta. We show that the tumor-homing peptide sequences CGKRK and iRGD bind selectively to the placental surface of humans and mice and do not interfere with normal development. Peptide-coated nanoparticles intravenously injected into pregnant mice accumulated within the mouse placenta, whereas control nanoparticles exhibited reduced binding and/or fetal transfer. We used targeted liposomes to efficiently deliver cargoes of carboxyfluorescein and insulin-like growth factor 2 to the mouse placenta; the latter significantly increased mean placental weight when administered to healthy animals and significantly improved fetal weight distribution in a well-characterized model of fetal growth restriction. These data provide proof of principle for targeted delivery of drugs to the placenta and provide a novel platform for the development of placenta-specific therapeutics. PMID:27386551

  13. Tumor-homing peptides as tools for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta.

    PubMed

    King, Anna; Ndifon, Cornelia; Lui, Sylvia; Widdows, Kate; Kotamraju, Venkata R; Agemy, Lilach; Teesalu, Tambet; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Cellesi, Francesco; Tirelli, Nicola; Aplin, John D; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Harris, Lynda K

    2016-05-01

    The availability of therapeutics to treat pregnancy complications is severely lacking mainly because of the risk of causing harm to the fetus. As enhancement of placental growth and function can alleviate maternal symptoms and improve fetal growth in animal models, we have developed a method for targeted delivery of payloads to the placenta. We show that the tumor-homing peptide sequences CGKRK and iRGD bind selectively to the placental surface of humans and mice and do not interfere with normal development. Peptide-coated nanoparticles intravenously injected into pregnant mice accumulated within the mouse placenta, whereas control nanoparticles exhibited reduced binding and/or fetal transfer. We used targeted liposomes to efficiently deliver cargoes of carboxyfluorescein and insulin-like growth factor 2 to the mouse placenta; the latter significantly increased mean placental weight when administered to healthy animals and significantly improved fetal weight distribution in a well-characterized model of fetal growth restriction. These data provide proof of principle for targeted delivery of drugs to the placenta and provide a novel platform for the development of placenta-specific therapeutics. PMID:27386551

  14. Epitope-based peptide vaccine design and target site depiction against Ebola viruses: an immunoinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Hossain, M U; Rakib-Uz-Zaman, S M; Morshed, M N

    2015-07-01

    Ebola viruses (EBOVs) have been identified as an emerging threat in recent year as it causes severe haemorrhagic fever in human. Epitope-based vaccine design for EBOVs remains a top priority because a mere progress has been made in this regard. Another reason is the lack of antiviral drug and licensed vaccine although there is a severe outbreak in Central Africa. In this study, we aimed to design an epitope-based vaccine that can trigger a significant immune response as well as to prognosticate inhibitor that can bind with potential drug target sites using various immunoinformatics and docking simulation tools. The capacity to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity by T cell and B cell was checked for the selected protein. The peptide region spanning 9 amino acids from 42 to 50 and the sequence TLASIGTAF were found as the most potential B and T cell epitopes, respectively. This peptide could interact with 12 HLAs and showed high population coverage up to 80.99%. Using molecular docking, the epitope was further appraised for binding against HLA molecules to verify the binding cleft interaction. In addition with this, the allergenicity of the epitopes was also evaluated. In the post-therapeutic strategy, docking study of predicted 3D structure identified suitable therapeutic inhibitor against targeted protein. However, this computational epitope-based peptide vaccine designing and target site prediction against EBOVs open up a new horizon which may be the prospective way in Ebola viruses research; the results require validation by in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  15. Benzimidazole, coumrindione and flavone derivatives as alternate UV laser desorption ionization (LDI) matrices for peptides analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is a soft ionization mass spectrometric technique, allowing the analysis of bio-molecules and other macromolecules. The matrix molecules require certain characteristic features to serve in the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. Therefore, only a limited number of compounds have been identified as ultraviolet- laser desorption/ionization (UV-LDI) matrices. However, many of these routine matrices generate background signals that useful information is often lost in them. We have reported flavones, coumarindione and benzimidazole derivatives as alternate UV-LDI matrices. Results Thirty one compounds have been successfully employed by us as matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) peptides (up to 2000 Da). Two peptides, bradykinin and renin substrate tetra-decapeptide were analyzed by using the newly developed matrices. The MS measurements were made after mixing the matrix solution with analyte by using dried droplet sample preparation procedures. The synthesized matrix materials showed better S/N ratios and minimal background signals for low mass range. Furthermore, pico molar concentrations of [Glu1]-fibrinopeptide B human could be easily analyzed with these matrices. Finally, BSA-digest was analyzed and identified through database search against Swiss-Prot by using Mascot. Conclusions These results validate the good performance of the synthesized UV-laser desorption/ionization (LDI) matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight peptides. PMID:23621998

  16. Identification of Equine Lactadherin-derived Peptides That Inhibit Rotavirus Infection via Integrin Receptor Competition*

    PubMed Central

    Civra, Andrea; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Donalisio, Manuela; Napolitano, Lorenzo; Takada, Yoshikazu; Coulson, Barbara S.; Conti, Amedeo; Lembo, David

    2015-01-01

    Human rotavirus is the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and children under the age of 5 years in both developed and developing countries. Human lactadherin, a milk fat globule membrane glycoprotein, inhibits human rotavirus infection in vitro, whereas bovine lactadherin is not active. Moreover, it protects breastfed infants against symptomatic rotavirus infections. To explore the potential antiviral activity of lactadherin sourced by equines, we undertook a proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane proteins from donkey milk and elucidated its amino acid sequence. Alignment of the human, bovine, and donkey lactadherin sequences revealed the presence of an Asp-Gly-Glu (DGE) α2β1 integrin-binding motif in the N-terminal domain of donkey sequence only. Because integrin α2β1 plays a critical role during early steps of rotavirus host cell adhesion, we tested a minilibrary of donkey lactadherin-derived peptides containing DGE sequence for anti-rotavirus activity. A 20-amino acid peptide containing both DGE and RGD motifs (named pDGE-RGD) showed the greatest activity, and its mechanism of antiviral action was characterized; pDGE-RGD binds to integrin α2β1 by means of the DGE motif and inhibits rotavirus attachment to the cell surface. These findings suggest the potential anti-rotavirus activity of equine lactadherin and support the feasibility of developing an anti-rotavirus peptide that acts by hindering virus-receptor binding. PMID:25814665

  17. Identification of Protease Specificity by Combining Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Niemer, Melanie; Maksimchuk, Ken; Mayer, Bettina; Fuchs, Julian; Huesgen, Pitter F; McCafferty, Dewey G; Turk, Boris; Fritz, Guenther; Mayer, Jens; Haecker, Georg; Mach, Lukas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present protease specificity profiling based on quantitative proteomics in combination with proteome-derived peptide libraries. Peptide libraries are generated by endoproteolytic digestion of proteomes without chemical modification of primary amines before exposure to a protease under investigation. After incubation with a test protease, treated and control libraries are differentially isotope-labeled using cost-effective reductive dimethylation. Upon analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, cleavage products of the test protease appear as semi-specific peptides that are enriched for the corresponding isotope label. We validate our workflow with two proteases with well-characterized specificity profiles: trypsin and caspase-3. We provide the first specificity profile of a protease encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus and for chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF). For CPAF, we also highlight the structural basis of negative subsite cooperativity between subsites S1 and S2'. For A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4, -5, and -15, we show a canonical preference profile, including glutamate in P1 and glycine in P3'. In total, we report nearly 4000 cleavage sites for seven proteases. Our protocol is fast, avoids enrichment or synthesis steps, and enables probing for lysine selectivity as well as subsite cooperativity. Due to its simplicity, we anticipate usability by most proteomic laboratories. PMID:27122596

  18. Identification of Protease Specificity by Combining Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Niemer, Melanie; Maksimchuk, Ken; Mayer, Bettina; Fuchs, Julian; Huesgen, Pitter F; McCafferty, Dewey G; Turk, Boris; Fritz, Guenther; Mayer, Jens; Haecker, Georg; Mach, Lukas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present protease specificity profiling based on quantitative proteomics in combination with proteome-derived peptide libraries. Peptide libraries are generated by endoproteolytic digestion of proteomes without chemical modification of primary amines before exposure to a protease under investigation. After incubation with a test protease, treated and control libraries are differentially isotope-labeled using cost-effective reductive dimethylation. Upon analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, cleavage products of the test protease appear as semi-specific peptides that are enriched for the corresponding isotope label. We validate our workflow with two proteases with well-characterized specificity profiles: trypsin and caspase-3. We provide the first specificity profile of a protease encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus and for chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF). For CPAF, we also highlight the structural basis of negative subsite cooperativity between subsites S1 and S2'. For A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4, -5, and -15, we show a canonical preference profile, including glutamate in P1 and glycine in P3'. In total, we report nearly 4000 cleavage sites for seven proteases. Our protocol is fast, avoids enrichment or synthesis steps, and enables probing for lysine selectivity as well as subsite cooperativity. Due to its simplicity, we anticipate usability by most proteomic laboratories.

  19. Cell adhesion and invasion inhibitory effect of an ovarian cancer targeting peptide selected via phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ximing; Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; You, Fei; Wei, Yan

    2014-01-17

    Organ-specific metastasis is of great importance since most of the cancer deaths are caused by spread of the primary cancer to distant sites. Therefore, targeted anti-metastases therapies are needed to prevent cancer cells from metastasizing to different organs. The phage clone pc3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK selected by phage display had been identified which have high binding efficiency and remarkable cell specificity to SK-OV-3 cells. In the present work, the effects of selected cell-binding phage and cognate peptide on the cell adhesion and invasion of targeted cells were investigated. Results showed that the adhesive ability of SK-OV-3 to extracellular matrix was inhibited by pc3-1 and peptide WSGPGVWGASVK, and pc3-1 blocked SK-OV-3 cells attachment more effective than the cognate peptide. The peptide WSGPGVWGASVK suppressed the cell number of SK-OV-3 that attached to HUVECs monolayer up to 24% and could block the spreading of the attaching cells. Forthermore, the cognate peptide could inhibit the invasion of SK-OV-3 significantly. The number of invaded SK-OV-3 cells and invaded SK-OV-3-activated HUVECs pretreated with peptide WSGPGVWGASVK was decreased by 24.3% and 36.6%, respectively. All these results suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK might possess anti-metastasis against SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:24342617

  20. Enhancement of endotoxin neutralization by coupling of a C12-alkyl chain to a lactoferricin-derived peptide

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Antibacterial peptide acylation, which mimics the structure of the natural lipopeptide polymyxin B, increases antimicrobial and endotoxin-neutralizing activities. The interaction of the lactoferricin-derived peptide LF11 and its N-terminally acylated analogue, lauryl-LF11, with different chemotypes of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS Re, Ra and smooth S form) was investigated by biophysical means and was related to the peptides' biological activities. Both peptides exhibit high antibacterial activity against the three strains of Salmonella enterica differing in the LPS chemotype. Lauryl-LF11 has one order of magnitude higher activity against Re-type, but activity against Ra- and S-type bacteria is comparable with that of LF11. The alkyl derivative peptide lauryl-LF11 shows a much stronger inhibition of the LPS-induced cytokine induction in human mononuclear cells than LF11. Although peptide–LPS interaction is essentially of electrostatic nature, the lauryl-modified peptide displays a strong hydrophobic component. Such a feature might then explain the fact that saturation of the peptide binding takes place at a much lower peptide/LPS ratio for LF11 than for lauryl-LF11, and that an overcompensation of the negative LPS backbone charges is observed for lauryl-LF11. The influence of LF11 on the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase-transition of LPS is negligible for LPS Re, but clearly fluidizing for LPS Ra. In contrast, lauryl-LF11 causes a cholesterol-like effect in the two chemotypes, fluidizing in the gel and rigidifying of the hydrocarbon chains in the liquid-crystalline phase. Both peptides convert the mixed unilamellar/non-lamellar aggregate structure of lipid A, the ‘endotoxic principle’ of LPS, into a multilamellar one. These data contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of the peptide-mediated neutralization of endotoxin and effect of lipid modification of peptides. PMID:15344905

  1. Peptides derived from central turn motifs within integrin αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails inhibit integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinlei; Liu, Yongqing; Haas, Thomas A

    2014-12-01

    We previously found that peptides derived from the full length of integrin αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails inhibited their parent integrin activation, respectively. Here we showed that the cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the conserved central turn motif within αIIb and αV cytoplasmic tails, myr-KRNRPPLEED (αIIb peptide) and myr-KRVRPPQEEQ (αV peptide), similarly inhibited both αIIb and αV integrin activation. Pre-treatment with αIIb or αV peptides inhibited Mn(2+)-activated αIIbβ3 binding to soluble fibrinogen as well as the binding of αIIbβ3-expressing Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to immobilized fibrinogen. Our turn peptides also inhibited adhesion of two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-435 and MCF7) to αV ligand vitronectin. These results suggest that αIIb and αV peptides share a same mechanism in regulating integrin function. Using αIIb peptide as a model, we found that replacement of RPP with AAA significantly attenuated the inhibitory activity of αIIb peptide. Furthermore, we found that αIIb peptide specifically bound to β-tubulin in cells. Our work suggests that the central motif of α tails is an anchoring point for cytoskeletons during integrin activation and integrin-mediated cell adhesion, and its function depends on the turn structure at RPP. However, post-treatment of peptides derived from the full-length tail or from the turn motif did not reverse αIIb and αV integrin activation.

  2. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tanvi J.; Toombs, Jason E.; Minna, John D.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents. PMID:27120792

  3. A novel cell-penetrating peptide derived from WT1 enhances p53 activity, induces cell senescence and displays antimelanoma activity in xeno- and syngeneic systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Massaoka, Mariana H.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Girola, Natalia; Faria, Camyla F.; Azevedo, Ricardo A.; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    The Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) transcription factor has been associated in malignant melanoma with cell survival and metastasis, thus emerging as a candidate for targeted therapy. A lysine–arginine rich peptide, WT1-pTj, derived from the ZF domain of WT1 was evaluated as an antitumor agent against A2058 human melanoma cells and B16F10-Nex2 syngeneic murine melanoma. Peptide WT1-pTj quickly penetrated human melanoma cells and induced senescence, recognized by increased SA-β-galactosidase activity, enhanced transcriptional activity of p53, and induction of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. Moreover, the peptide bound to p53 and competed with WT1 protein for binding to p53. WT1-pTj treatment led to sustained cell growth suppression, abrogation of clonogenicity and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Notably, in vivo studies showed that WT1-pTj inhibited both the metastases and subcutaneous growth of murine melanoma in syngeneic mice, and prolonged the survival of nude mice challenged with human melanoma cells. The 27-amino acid cell-penetrating WT1-derived peptide, depends on C3 and H16 for effective antimelanoma activity, inhibits proliferation of WT1-expressing human tumor cell lines, and may have an effective role in the treatment of WT1-expressing malignancies. PMID:24490140

  4. Intervention With an Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Protects Against Neuroglial and Vascular Degeneration During Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    McVicar, Carmel M.; Hamilton, Ross; Colhoun, Liza M.; Gardiner, Tom A.; Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony; Stitt, Alan W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Erythropoietin (EPO) may be protective for early stage diabetic retinopathy, although there are concerns that it could exacerbate retinal angiogenesis and thrombosis. A peptide based on the EPO helix-B domain (helix B-surface peptide [pHBSP]) is nonerythrogenic but retains tissue-protective properties, and this study evaluates its therapeutic potential in diabetic retinopathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After 6 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, rats (n = 12) and age-matched nondiabetic controls (n = 12) were evenly split into pHBSP and scrambled peptide groups and injected daily (10 μg/kg per day) for 1 month. The retina was investigated for glial dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuronal DNA damage. The vasculature was dual stained with isolectin and collagen IV. Retinal cytokine expression was quantified using real-time RT-PCR. In parallel, oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) was used to evaluate the effects of pHBSP on retinal ischemia and neovascularization (1–30 μg/kg pHBSP or control peptide). RESULTS pHBSP or scrambled peptide treatment did not alter hematocrit. In the diabetic retina, Müller glial expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased when compared with nondiabetic controls, but pHBSP significantly reduced this stress-related response (P < 0.001). CD11b+ microglia and proinflammatory cytokines were elevated in diabetic retina responses, and some of these responses were attenuated by pHBSP (P < 0.01–0.001). pHBSP significantly reduced diabetes-linked DNA damage as determined by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling positivity and also prevented acellular capillary formation (P < 0.05). In OIR, pHBSP had no effect on preretinal neovascularization at any dose. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with an EPO-derived peptide after diabetes is fully established can significantly protect against neuroglial and vascular degenerative pathology without altering hematocrit or exacerbating

  5. Antiviral Cyclic D,L-α-Peptides: Targeting a General Biochemical Pathway in Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Wiethoff, Christopher M.; Cui, Chunli; Wilcoxen, Keith M.; Amorin, Manuel; Ghadiri, M. Reza; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2007-01-01

    Diverse virus families have evolved to exploit the acidification of endosomal compartments to gain entry into cells. We describe a supramolecular approach for selectively targeting and inhibiting viral infections through this central biochemical pathway. Using adenovirus as a model non-enveloped virus, we have determined that an eight-residue cyclic D,L-α-peptide, selected from a directed combinatorial library, can specifically prevent the development of low pH in endocytic vesicles, arrest the escape of virions from the endosome, and abrogate adenovirus infection without an apparent adverse effect on cell viability. The likely generality of this approach against other pH-dependent viral infections is supported by the inhibition of type-A influenza virus escape from endosomes in the presence of the same peptide. Our studies suggest that self-assembling cyclic D,L-α-peptides hold considerable potential as a new rational supramolecular approach toward the design and discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:15993611

  6. Reaction of phosphorylated and O-glycosylated peptides by chemically targeted identification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Rusnak, Felicia; Zhou, Jie; Hathaway, Gary M

    2004-12-01

    Conditions for carrying out chemically targeted identification of peptides containing phosphorylated or glycosylated serine residues have been investigated. Ba(OH)2 was used at ambient temperature to catalyze the beta-elimination reaction at 25 degrees C. Nucleophilic addition of 2-aminoethanethiol was performed in both parallel and tandem experiments. The method was demonstrated by the reaction of beta-casein tryptic digest phosphopeptides and an O-glycosylated peptide. Contrary to an earlier report by others, the glycopeptide was found to react with essentially the same kinetics as phosphopeptides. Conversion of four phosphoserines in residues 15, 17, 18, and 19 from bovine beta-casein N-terminal tryptic phosphopeptides were followed by monitoring the time course of the addition reaction. The chemistry proceeded rapidly at room temperature with a half-reaction time of 15 min. No side-reaction products were observed; however, care was taken to minimize all counter ions that either precipitate barium or neutralize the base. Digestion of the converted peptides with lysine endopeptidase identified all five phosphoserines in the beta-casein tryptic digest. Alternatively, preincubation with base followed by nucleophilic addition of the thiol was found to work satisfactorily. The use of the water-soluble hydrochloride of 2-aminoethanethiol allowed beta-elimination, nucleophilic addition, and desalting to be carried out on a micro C18 reverse phase pipette tip. PMID:15585826

  7. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor as a molecular target for psychiatric and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Roesler, R; Henriques, J A P; Schwartsmann, G

    2006-04-01

    The mammalian bombesin (BB)-like peptide gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) stimulates cell proliferation, displays a range of neuroendocrine activities, and acts as a growth factor in the pathogenesis of several types of human cancer. Several lines of evidence have indicated that GRP and its receptor (GRPR) might also be involved in the neurochemical alterations associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. GRP and GRPR are distributed throughout the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Altered levels of BB-like peptides have been found in the CNS of patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Dysfunctions in GRPR-induced cellular calcium signaling have been reported in fibroblasts from patients with Alzheimer's disease. A translocation in the GRPR gene has been associated with autism. Pharmacological and genetic studies in rodents have shown that GRPRs in brain areas such as the dorsal hippocampus and amygdala are importantly involved in regulating synaptic plasticity and aspects of behavior that might be altered in disorders such as anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, autism and dementia. Behaviors modulated by the GRPR in rodents include grooming, food intake, stereotypy, social behavior, and emotionally-motivated learning and memory. Together, these findings support the view that the GRPR should be considered a therapeutic target for a subset of CNS diseases.

  8. Characterization of on-target generated tryptic peptides from Giberella zeae conidia spore proteins by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongjuan; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally characterization of microbial proteins is performed by a complex sequence of steps with the final step to be either Edman sequencing or mass spectrometry, which generally takes several weeks or months to be complete. In this work, we proposed a strategy for the characterization of tryptic peptides derived from Giberella zeae (anamorph: Fusarium graminearum) proteins in parallel to intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) in which no complicated and time-consuming steps were needed. Experimentally, after a simple washing treatment of the spores, the aliquots of the intact G. zeae macro conidia spores solution, were deposited two times onto one MALDI (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometry (MS) target (two spots). One spot was used for ICMS and the second spot was subject to a brief on-target digestion with bead-immobilized or non-immobilized trypsin. Subsequently, one spot was analyzed immediately by MALDI MS in the linear mode (ICMS) whereas the second spot containing the digested material was investigated by MALDI MS in the reflectron mode ("peptide mass fingerprint") followed by protonated peptide selection for MS/MS (post source decay (PSD) fragment ion) analysis. Based on the formed fragment ions of selected tryptic peptides a complete or partial amino acid sequence was generated by manual de novo sequencing. These sequence data were used for homology search for protein identification. Finally four different peptides of varying abundances have been identified successfully allowing the verification that our desorbed/ionized surface compounds were indeed derived from proteins. The presence of three different proteins could be found unambiguously. Interestingly, one of these proteins is belonging to the ribosomal superfamily which indicates that not only surface-associated proteins were digested. This strategy minimized the amount of time and labor required for obtaining deeper information on spore preparations within the

  9. Argininosuccinate Synthetase Is a Functional Target for a Snake Venom Anti-hypertensive Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Juliano R.; Lameu, Claudiana; Oliveira, Eduardo F.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Melo, Robson L.; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Fox, Jay W.; Lebrun, Ivo; Serrano, Solange M. T.; Camargo, Antonio C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bj-BPP-10c is a bioactive proline-rich decapeptide, part of the C-type natriuretic peptide precursor, expressed in the brain and in the venom gland of Bothrops jararaca. We recently showed that Bj-BPP-10c displays a strong, sustained anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), without causing any effect in normotensive rats, by a pharmacological effect independent of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesized that another mechanism should be involved in the peptide activity. Here we used affinity chromatography to search for kidney cytosolic proteins with affinity for Bj-BPP-10c and demonstrate that argininosuccinate synthetase (AsS) is the major protein binding to the peptide. More importantly, this interaction activates the catalytic activity of AsS in a dose-de pend ent manner. AsS is recognized as an important player of the citrulline-NO cycle that represents a potential limiting step in NO synthesis. Accordingly, the functional interaction of Bj-BPP-10c and AsS was evidenced by the following effects promoted by the peptide: (i) increase of NO metabolite production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell culture and of arginine in human embryonic kidney cells and (ii) increase of arginine plasma concentration in SHR. Moreover, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid, a specific AsS inhibitor, significantly reduced the anti-hypertensive activity of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR. Taken together, these results suggest that AsS plays a role in the anti-hypertensive action of Bj-BPP-10c. Therefore, we propose the activation of AsS as a new mechanism for the anti-hypertensive effect of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR and AsS as a novel target for the therapy of hypertension-related diseases. PMID:19491403

  10. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds. PMID:27092515

  11. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-16

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  12. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D.; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds. PMID:27092515

  13. Breast and ovarian cancer-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize the same HER2/neu-derived peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, G E; Goedegebuure, P S; Smith, R; Linehan, D C; Yoshino, I; Eberlein, T J

    1995-01-01

    The identification of antigenic peptides presented on the tumor cell surface by HLA class I molecules and recognized by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes may lead to a peptide vaccine capable of inducing protective cellular immunity. We demonstrate that both HLA-A2-restricted breast and ovarian tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize shared antigenic peptides. At least one of these peptides is derived from the oncogene product of HER2/neu, which is overexpressed in 30-40% of all breast and ovarian cancers. T cells sensitized against this nine-amino acid sequence demonstrate significant recognition of HLA-A2+, HER2/neu+ tumors. Since 50% of the tumor-cell population is HLA-A2+ and many different tumors express HER2/neu, this peptide may be widely recognized and have many clinical applications. PMID:7831305

  14. Antihypertensive effect of cattle bone collagen-derived peptides in ovariectomized stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, K; Ikeda, K; Ishikado, A; Kawai, Y; Yamori, Y

    2000-01-01

    1. The effect of food collagen, cattle bone collagen-derived (CBC) peptides, on ovariectomy induced increases in blood pressure was examined in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). 2. Long-term administration of CBC peptides to ovariectomized SHRSP suppressed the hypertension compared with ovariectomized SHRSP fed standard chow. 3. The CBC peptides showed an inhibitory activity (IC50 = 40 microg/mL) for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CBC peptides with gastrointestinal proteases did not change this inhibitory activity of CBC for ACE. 4. These results indicate that CBC peptides may prevent increases in blood pressure in ovariectomized SHRSP by a possible mechanism of an inhibitory action against ACE.

  15. Fighting microbial infections: A lesson from amphibian skin-derived esculentin-1 peptides.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Luca, Vincenzo; McDermott, Alison M

    2015-09-01

    Due to the growing emergence of resistance to commercially available antibiotics/antimycotics in virtually all clinical microbial pathogens, the discovery of alternative anti-infective agents, is greatly needed. Gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hold promise as novel therapeutics. In particular, amphibian skin is one of the richest storehouses of AMPs, especially that of the genus Rana, with esculentins-1 being among the longest (46 amino acids) AMPs found in nature to date. Here, we report on the recently discovered in vitro and in vivo activities and mechanism of action of two derivatives of the N-terminal part of esculentin-1a and -1b peptides, primarily against two relevant opportunistic microorganisms causing a large number of life-threatening infections worldwide; i.e. the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the yeast Candida albicans. Because of distinct advantages compared to several mammalian AMPs, the two selected frog skin AMP-derivatives represent attractive candidates for the development of new antimicrobial compounds with expanded properties, for both human and veterinary medicine.

  16. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Segal, Michal; Soifer, Ilya; Petzold, Heike; Howard, Jonathon; Elbaum, Michael; Reiner, Orly

    2012-03-15

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  17. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Michal; Soifer, Ilya; Petzold, Heike; Howard, Jonathon; Elbaum, Michael; Reiner, Orly

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport. PMID:23213412

  18. Arginine-derived advanced glycation end products generated in peptide-glucose mixtures during boiling.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Andrej; Schmidt, Rico; Spiller, Sandro; Greifenhagen, Uta; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-23

    Glycation refers to the reaction of amino groups, for example in proteins, with reducing sugars. Intermediately formed Amadori products can be degraded by oxidation (Maillard reactions) leading to a heterogeneous class of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), especially during exposure to heat. AGEs are considered to be toxic in vivo due to their pronounced local and systemic inflammatory effects. At high temperatures, these reactions have been mostly investigated at the amino acid level. Here, we studied the formation of arginine-related AGEs in peptides under conditions simulating household cooking at physiological d-glucose concentrations. High quantities of AGE-modified peptides were produced within 15 min, especially glyoxal-derived products. The intermediately formed dihydroxy-imidazolidine yielded glyoxal- (Glarg) and methylglyoxal-derived hydro-imidazolinones (MG-H), with Glarg being further degraded to carboxymethyl-l-arginine (CMA). Carboxyethyl-l-arginine was not detected. The formation rates and yields were strongly increased in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of Fe(II)-ions and ascorbate. A nearby histidine residue increased the content of AGEs, whereas glutamic acid significantly reduced the CMA levels.

  19. Synthesis of New Peptide Derivatives of Galanthamine Designed for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Vezenkov, Lyubomir T; Ilieva, Lilia; Danalev, Dancho L; Bakalova, Anastasia; Vassilev, D Nikolay; Danchev, Nikolai; Nikolova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    New derivatives of galanthamine containing peptide fragments with β-secretase inhibitor activity were synthesized. In position 6 of the galanthamine new shortened analogues of β-secretase inhibitor OM 99-2 (Boc-Val-Asn-Leu-Ala-OH and Boc-Val-Asn-Leu-Ala-Val-OH) were included. The new derivatives of the galanthamine in position 11 including Boc and norgalanthamine in P3 or P4 positions, Val in P2' position and benzylamin in P3'-position were also synthesized. All new peptides were investigated on mice for acute toxicity. The test compounds were administered to mice via intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. They have low toxicity (LD50>1000 mg/kg) after i.p. The compound 11-N-demethyl-11-N-N-[Boc-Asp(Asp-Leu-Ala-Val-NH-Bzl)]-Galanthamine was investigated by two way active avoidance method. The compound has good influence on the conditioned reflexes, which improved the processes of learning and memory. Inhibition activity of newly synthesized compounds was monitored against BuChE and IC50 values are determined. All compounds show activity in micromolar concentration. Compounds 5 and 6 have around 10 times higher activity than galanthamine. Compounds 4 and 9 also show good activity. All newly synthesized compounds show low acute toxicity. PMID:26129719

  20. Discovery and development of a synthetic peptide derived from lactoferrin for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Carlo P J M; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Welling, Mick M

    2011-09-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial drugs especially for combating the rise of infections caused by multi-resistant pathogens such as MRSA and VRSA. The problem of antibiotic resistant micro-organisms is expected to increase disproportionally and controlling of infections is becoming difficult because of the rapid spread of those micro-organisms. Primary therapy with classical antibiotics is becoming more ineffective. Combinational therapy of antibiotics with antimicrobial peptides (AMP's) has been suggested as an alternative approach to improve treatment outcome. Their unique mechanism of action and safety profile makes AMP's appealing candidates for simultaneous or sequential use in different cases of infections. In this review, for antimicrobial treatment the application of synthetic antimicrobial peptide hLF(1-11), derived from the first 11 amino acids of human lactoferrin is evaluated in both pre-clinical and clinical settings. Present information indicates that this derivate from lactoferrin is well tolerated in pre-clinical tests and clinical trials and thus hLF(1-11) is an interesting candidate for further exploration in various clinical indications of obscure infections, including meningitis. Another approach of using AMP's is their use in prevention of infections e.g. as coating for dental or bone implants or in biosensing applications or useful as infection specific radiopharmaceutical.

  1. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  2. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  3. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  4. Selective Covalent Targeting of Anti-Apoptotic BFL-1 by Cysteine-Reactive Stapled Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Annissa J; Guerra, Rachel M; Harvey, Edward P; Bird, Gregory H; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-09-22

    Anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins block cell death by trapping the critical α-helical BH3 domains of pro-apoptotic members in a surface groove. Cancer cells hijack this survival mechanism by overexpressing a spectrum of anti-apoptotic members, mounting formidable apoptotic blockades that resist chemotherapeutic treatment. Drugging the BH3-binding pockets of anti-apoptotic proteins has become a highest-priority goal, fueled by the clinical success of ABT-199, a selective BCL-2 inhibitor, in reactivating apoptosis in BCL-2-dependent cancers. BFL-1 is a BCL-2 homolog implicated in melanoma, lymphoma, and other cancers, and remains undrugged. A natural juxtaposition of two unique cysteines at the binding interface of the NOXA BH3 helix and BFL-1 pocket informed the development of stapled BH3 peptides bearing acrylamide warheads to irreversibly inhibit BFL-1 by covalent targeting. Given the frequent proximity of native cysteines to regulatory binding surfaces, covalent stapled peptide inhibitors provide a new therapeutic strategy for targeting pathologic protein interactions. PMID:27617850

  5. Targeting a c-Myc inhibitory polypeptide to specific intracellular compartments using cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Gene L; Davis, Aisha N; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-04-01

    The therapeutic index of current anti-cancer chemotherapeutics can be improved by two major mechanisms: 1) developing drugs which are specifically toxic to the cancer cells and 2) developing methods to deliver drugs to the tumor site. In an attempt to combine these approaches, we developed a thermally responsive polypeptide inhibitor of c-Myc. This polypeptide is based on the thermally responsive Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). When injected systemically, ELP-fused drugs will aggregate and accumulate at the tumor site where local hyperthermia is applied. ELP was fused to a peptide which blocks c-Myc/Max dimerization (H1), thereby inhibiting transcription activation by c-Myc (ELP-H1). In this study, the cellular uptake, intracellular distribution, and potency of the Pen, Tat and Bac cell penetrating peptides fused to ELP-H1 were evaluated. While Pen-ELP-H1 and Tat-ELP-H1 were localized in the cytoplasm, Bac-ELP-H1 localized to the nucleus in a subset of the cells and was the most potent inhibitor of MCF-7 cell proliferation. This data demonstrates that ELP can be targeted to the desired cellular compartment simply by choice of the CPP used, resulting in a more potent nuclear targeted c-Myc inhibitory polypeptide which may be beneficial in cancer therapy.

  6. Antimicrobial peptide-modified liposomes for bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kewei; Gitter, Burkhard; Rüger, Ronny; Wieland, Gerhard D; Chen, Ming; Liu, Xiangli; Albrecht, Volker; Fahr, Alfred

    2011-10-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are two promising strategies to combat the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To take advantage of these two strategies, we integrated a novel antimicrobial peptide (WLBU2) and a potent generation II photosensitizer (temoporfin) into liposomes by preparing WLBU2-modified liposomes, aiming at bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin for PACT. WLBU2 was successfully coupled to temoporfin-loaded liposomes using a functional phospholipid. The delivery of temoporfin to bacteria was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, thus demonstrating that more temoporfin was delivered to bacteria by WLBU2-modified liposomes than by unmodified liposomes. Consequently, the WLBU2-modified liposomes eradicated all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and induced a 3.3 log(10) reduction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the in vitro photodynamic inactivation test. These findings demonstrate that the use of AMP-modified liposomes is promising for bacteria-targeted delivery of photosensitizers and for improving the PACT efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in the local infections.

  7. Modulation of CD59 expression by restrictive silencer factor-derived peptides in cancer immunotherapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Donev, Rossen M; Gray, Lisa C; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Hughes, Timothy R; van den Berg, Carmen W; Morgan, B Paul

    2008-07-15

    Tumor cells escape clearance by complement by abundantly expressing CD59 and other membrane complement regulators. Existing strategies for blocking/knocking down these regulators can contribute to tumor immunoclearance in vitro; however, there are numerous difficulties restricting their use in vivo. Here, we report a new strategy for suppression of CD59 expression in neuroblastoma using peptides that target regulators of CD59 expression. We identified the neural-restrictive silencer factor (REST) as a target for modulation of CD59 expression in neuroblastoma. We next designed plasmids that encoded peptides comprising different DNA-binding domains of REST and transfected them into neuroblastoma cell lines. These peptides suppressed CD59 expression, sensitizing neuroblastoma to complement-mediated killing triggered by anti-GD2 therapeutic monoclonal antibody. These CD59-modulating peptides might be effective therapeutic adjuvants to therapeutic monoclonal antibodies used for treatment of neuroblastoma and other cancer types sharing the same mechanism for regulation of CD59 expression.

  8. Peptide targeted tripod macrocyclic Gd(III) chelates for cancer molecular MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Wu, Xueming; Kresak, Adam; Griswold, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-10-01

    Rational design and develop of targeted contrast agents binding to cancer-related proteins will achieve more accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CREKA is a tumor-homing pentapeptide (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala) specifically homes to fibrin-fibronectin complexes abundantly expressed in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we developed and evaluated a CREKA peptide targeted multiplexed Gd-MR probe (CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3) for MR imaging of breast tumors. CREKA and azide bearing Gd(III) was attached to a maleimide-functional trialkyne scaffold via thiol-maleimide and azide-alkyne click chemistry, respectively. CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 has a well-defined structure with a molecular weight of 2914 Da. The T1 relaxivity of CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)3 is 8.06 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (24.18 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule) at room temperature and 3 T. Fluorescence imaging showed high binding specificity of CREKA to a 4T1 breast tumor model in mice while it was not found for the scrambled CREKA (CERAK). The CREKA peptide-targeted contrast agent resulted in greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding CERAK agent and the commercialized contrast agent ProHance(®) in tumor at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg in female athymic mice bearing 4T1 breast carcinoma xenograft. This small molecular contrast agent was easily excreted from body after imaging indicated low toxicity. The targeted MRI contrast agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  9. Peptide Targeted Tripod Macrocyclic Gd(III) Chelates for Cancer Molecular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Wu, Xueming; Kresak, Adam; Griswold, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Rational design and develop of targeted contrast agents binding to cancer-related proteins will achieve more accurate cancer diagnosis and prognosis by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CREKA is a tumor-homing pentapeptide (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala) specifically homes to fibrin-fibronectin complexes abundantly expressed in tumor microenvironment. In this study, we developed and evaluated a CREKA peptide targeted multiplexed Gd-MR probe (CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA)) for MR imaging of breast tumors. CREKA and azide bearing Gd(III) was attached to a maleimide-functional trialkyne scaffold via thiol-maleimide and azide-alkyne click chemistry, respectively. CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA) has a well-defined structure with a molecular weight of 2914 Da. The T1 relaxivity of CREKA-Tris-Gd(DOTA) is 8.06 mM-1s-1 per Gd (24.18 mM-1s-1 per molecule) at room temperature and 3 T. Fluorescence imaging showed high binding specificity of CREKA to a 4T1 breast tumor model in mice while it was not found for the scrambled CREKA (CERAK). The CREKA peptide-targeted contrast agent resulted in greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding CERAK agent and the commercialized contrast agent Prohance™ in tumor at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg in female athymic mice bearing 4T1 breast carcinoma xenograft. This small molecular contrast agent was easily excreted from body after imaging indicated low toxicity. The targeted MRI contrast agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI. PMID:23863450

  10. Cateslytin, a Chromogranin A Derived Peptide Is Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Resistant to Degradation by Its Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Rizwan; Marban, Céline; Corazzol, Christian; Jehl, François; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Prévost, Gilles; Haïkel, Youssef; Taddei, Corinne; Schneider, Francis; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity involving antimicrobial peptides represents an integrated and highly effective system of molecular and cellular mechanisms that protects host against infections. One of the most frequent hospital-acquired pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, capable of producing proteolytic enzymes, which can degrade the host defence agents and tissue components. Numerous antimicrobial peptides derived from chromogranins, are secreted by nervous, endocrine and immune cells during stress conditions. These kill microorganisms by their lytic effect at micromolar range, using a pore-forming mechanism against Gram-positive bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. In this study, we tested antimicrobial activity of chromogranin A-derived peptides (catestatin and cateslytin) against S. aureus and analysed S. aureus-mediated proteolysis of these peptides using HPLC, sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Interestingly, this study is the first to demonstrate that cateslytin, the active domain of catestatin, is active against S. aureus and is interestingly resistant to degradation by S. aureus proteases. PMID:23894389

  11. Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from olive flounder lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI).

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-10-17

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Peptides Derived from Olive Flounder Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein/Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein (LBP/BPI)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase. PMID:25329706

  13. Cytolytic and antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides derived from amoebapore, the pore-forming peptide of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, M; Andrä, J; Müller-Eberhard, H J

    1994-01-01

    The pore-forming peptide amoebapore is considered part of the cytolytic armament of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebapore is composed of 77 amino acid residues arranged in four alpha-helical domains. For structure-function analysis, synthetic peptides were constructed corresponding to these four domains: H1 (residues 1-22), H2 (25-39), H3 (40-64), and H4 (67-77). The peptides H1 and H3, representing two highly amphipathic alpha-helical regions of amoebapore, possessed pore-forming activity. Peptide H3 displayed cytolytic and antibacterial functions similar to those of natural amoebapore. The most potent antibacterial activity and the broadest activity spectrum were expressed by H1-Mel, a hybrid molecule composed of the N-terminal alpha-helix of amoebapore and the C-terminal hexapeptide of melittin from the venom of Apis mellifera. Images PMID:8146160

  14. Peptide based DNA nanocarriers incorporating a cell-penetrating peptide derived from neurturin protein and poly-L-lysine dendrons.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Nurlina; Christie, Michelle P; Moyle, Peter M; Toth, Istvan

    2015-05-15

    Multicomponent gene delivery systems incorporating cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) from the human neurturin protein (NRTN-30, NRTN(132-161); NRTN-17, NRTN(145-161)) and a poly-l-lysine (PLL) dendron, were synthesized and characterized for plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. Acetylated NRTN peptides (Ac-CPP) and peptides conjugated to a PLL dendron (DEN-CPP) efficiently condensed and stabilized pDNA. Complexes between pDNA and DEN-CPP formed smaller and more stable nanoparticles. Flow cytometry experiments showed that pDNA-DEN-CPPs were taken up more efficiently into HeLa cells. There was also no significant difference between NRTN-30 and NRTN-17 for pDNA uptake, indicating that the truncated peptide alone is sufficient as a CPP for pDNA delivery.

  15. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand–receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:25762070

  16. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-03-24

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand-receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:25762070

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Synthetic Peptides Derived from Lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212

    PubMed Central

    León-Calvijo, María A.; Leal-Castro, Aura L.; Almanzar-Reina, Giovanni A.; Rosas-Pérez, Jaiver E.; García-Castañeda, Javier E.; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J.

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i) the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii) reduction or (iii) elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv) synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR) and I.4 ((RRWQWR)4K2Ahx2C2) exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4–33 μM) and E. faecalis (MIC 10–33 μM) when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF) and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA) and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE). It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield. PMID:25815317

  18. Formation pathways and opioid activity data for 3-hydroxypyridinium compounds derived from glucuronic acid and opioid peptides by Maillard processes.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Stefica; Roscić, Maja; Lemieux, Carole; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Schiller, Peter W

    2007-07-01

    The kinetics of formation and identity of the reaction products of the glucuronic acid with three representative opioid peptides were investigated in vitro. Peptides were conjugated with glucuronic acid either in solution or under dry-heating conditions. From the incubations performed in solution N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranos-1-yluronic acid)-peptide derivatives (Amadori compounds) were isolated, whereas from the dry-heated reactions products containing the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety at the N-terminal of the peptide chain were obtained. Experiments performed under mild dry-heating conditions (40 degrees C) in model systems based on Leu-enkephalin and glucuronic acid, and in environment of either 40% or 75% relative humidity, revealed that the higher level of humidity promoted a process that enhanced 3-hydroxypyridinium compound generation. The mechanism of 3-hydroxypyridinium formation is discussed. In comparison with their respective parent peptides, the N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranosyl-uronic acid) derivatives of the opioid peptides showed three- to 11-fold lower mu- and delta-receptor-binding affinities and agonist potencies in the functional assays, likely as a consequence of the steric bulk introduced at the N-terminal amino group. The further decrease in opioid activity observed with the 3-hydroxypyridinium-containing peptides may be due to the lower pK(a) of the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety and to delocalization of the positive charge in the pyridinium ring system. PMID:17630992

  19. Immunohistochemical mapping of pro-opiomelanocortin- and pro-dynorphin-derived peptides in the alpaca (Lama pacos) diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Manso, B; Sánchez, M L; Medina, L E; Aguilar, L A; Díaz-Cabiale, Z; Narváez, J A; Coveñas, R

    2014-09-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibres containing non-opioid peptides (adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) and opioid peptides (beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-neo-endorphin, leucine-enkephalin) in the alpaca diencephalon. No immunoreactive cell bodies containing ACTH were found. Perikarya containing the other four peptides were observed exclusively in the hypothalamus and their distribution was restricted. Perikarya containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin showed a more widespread distribution than those containing leucine-enkephalin or beta-endorphin (1-27). Cell bodies containing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were observed in the arcuate nucleus, anterior and lateral hypothalamic areas and in the ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei, whereas perikarya containing alpha-neo-endorphin (a pro-dynorphin-derived peptide) were found in the arcuate nucleus, dorsal and lateral hypothalamic areas, and in the paraventricular, ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei. Immunoreactive cell bodies containing leucine-enkephalin were found in the lateral hypothalamic area and in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Immunoreactive fibres expressing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were more numerous than those expressing pro-dynorphin-derived peptides. A close anatomical relationship was observed: in all the diencephalic nuclei in which beta-endorphin (1-27)-immunoreactive fibres were found, fibres containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were also observed. Fibres containing beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were widely distributed throughout the diencephalon, but fibres containing ACTH or leucine-enkephalin showed a moderate distribution. The distribution of the five peptides studied here is also compared with that reported previously in

  20. Structural Study of Cell Attachment Peptide Derived from Laminin by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hironao; Mori, Sakiko; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Takasu, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with cell attachment activity are beneficial component of biomaterials for tissue engineering. Conformational structure is one of the important factors for the biological activities. The EF1 peptide (DYATLQLQEGRLHFMFDLG) derived from laminin promotes cell spreading and cell attachment activity mediated by α2β1 integrin. Although the sequence of the EF2 peptide (DFATVQLRNGFPYFSYDLG) is homologous sequence to that of EF1, EF2 does not promote cell attachment activity. To determine whether there are structural differences between EF1 and EF2, we performed replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations and conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that EF1 and EF2 had β-sheet structure as a secondary structure around the global minimum. However, EF2 had variety of structures around the global minimum compared with EF1 and has easily escaped from the bottom of free energy. The structural fluctuation of the EF1 is smaller than that of the EF2. The structural variation of EF2 is related to these differences in the structural fluctuation and the number of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). From the analysis of H-bonds in the β-sheet, the number of H-bonds in EF1 is larger than that in EF2 in the time scale of the conventional MD simulation, suggesting that the formation of H-bonds is related to the differences in the structural fluctuation between EF1 and EF2. From the analysis of other non-covalent interactions in the amino acid sequences of EF1 and EF2, EF1 has three pairs of residues with hydrophobic interaction, and EF2 has two pairs. These results indicate that several non-covalent interactions are important for structural stabilization. Consequently, the structure of EF1 is stabilized by H-bonds and pairs of hydrophobic amino acids in the terminals. Hence, we propose that non-covalent interactions around N-terminal and C-terminal of the peptides are crucial for maintaining the β-sheet structure of the peptides. PMID:26889829

  1. Structural Study of Cell Attachment Peptide Derived from Laminin by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hironao; Mori, Sakiko; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Takasu, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with cell attachment activity are beneficial component of biomaterials for tissue engineering. Conformational structure is one of the important factors for the biological activities. The EF1 peptide (DYATLQLQEGRLHFMFDLG) derived from laminin promotes cell spreading and cell attachment activity mediated by α2β1 integrin. Although the sequence of the EF2 peptide (DFATVQLRNGFPYFSYDLG) is homologous sequence to that of EF1, EF2 does not promote cell attachment activity. To determine whether there are structural differences between EF1 and EF2, we performed replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations and conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that EF1 and EF2 had β-sheet structure as a secondary structure around the global minimum. However, EF2 had variety of structures around the global minimum compared with EF1 and has easily escaped from the bottom of free energy. The structural fluctuation of the EF1 is smaller than that of the EF2. The structural variation of EF2 is related to these differences in the structural fluctuation and the number of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). From the analysis of H-bonds in the β-sheet, the number of H-bonds in EF1 is larger than that in EF2 in the time scale of the conventional MD simulation, suggesting that the formation of H-bonds is related to the differences in the structural fluctuation between EF1 and EF2. From the analysis of other non-covalent interactions in the amino acid sequences of EF1 and EF2, EF1 has three pairs of residues with hydrophobic interaction, and EF2 has two pairs. These results indicate that several non-covalent interactions are important for structural stabilization. Consequently, the structure of EF1 is stabilized by H-bonds and pairs of hydrophobic amino acids in the terminals. Hence, we propose that non-covalent interactions around N-terminal and C-terminal of the peptides are crucial for maintaining the β-sheet structure of the peptides.

  2. Discovery of novel peptides targeting pro-atherogenic endothelium in disturbed flow regions -Targeted siRNA delivery to pro-atherogenic endothelium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; Shim, Hyunbo; Kim, Kwanchang; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed blood flow. Targeting these pro-atherogenic regions is a potential anti-atherogenic therapeutic approach, but it has been extremely challenging. Here, using in vivo phage display approach and the partial carotid ligation model of flow-induced atherosclerosis in mouse, we identified novel peptides that specifically bind to endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to disturbed flow condition in pro-atherogenic regions. Two peptides, CLIRRTSIC and CPRRSHPIC, selectively bound to arterial ECs exposed to disturbed flow not only in the partially ligated carotids but also in the lesser curvature and branching point of the aortic arch in mice as well as human pulmonary artery branches. Peptides were conjugated to branched polyethylenimine-polyethylene glycol polymer to generate polyplexes carrying siRNA targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (siICAM-1). In mouse model, CLIRRTSIC polyplexes carrying si-ICAM-1 specifically bound to endothelium in disturbed flow regions, reducing endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that non-muscle myosin heavy chain II A (NMHC IIA) is a protein targeted by CLIRRTSIC peptide. Further studies showed that shear stress regulates NMHC IIA expression and localization in ECs. The CLIRRTSIC is a novel peptide that could be used for targeted delivery of therapeutics such as siRNAs to pro-atherogenic endothelium. PMID:27173134

  3. b3a2 BCR-ABL fusion peptides as targets for cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Norbury, L C; Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2000-06-01

    Peptide sequences spanning the BCR-ABL protein junction potentially constitute novel leukaemia-specific antigens. 9-mer b3a2 fusion peptides have been reported to bind with high affinity to HLA-A3, -A11 and -B8. We have studied the effect of b3a2 BCR-ABL junctional peptides on the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response against normal and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were prepared from HLA-A3- or -B8-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by incubation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin (IL)-2 for 7 d. These APCs were pulsed with the respective b3a2 junctional peptide in the presence of beta2-microglobulin and were then used to challenge autologous PBMCs at 7-d intervals in the presence of IL-2, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-12. On subsequent exposure to target cells (either further pulsed normal APCs or unpulsed CML cells), specific HLA-restricted CTL responses were observed against all HLA-A3/-B8 matched normal target cells tested, but not to targets that were HLA mismatched. Cytotoxicity was also induced against HLA-A3/-B8 unpulsed CML cells, but not against unmatched CML cells. These data indicate (i) that endogenous BCR-ABL junctional peptides may be presented by CML cells and (ii) that exogenous peptides are potential stimulators of autologous antileukaemic CTLs.

  4. Comparison between the interactions of adenovirus-derived peptides with plasmid DNA and their role in gene delivery mediated by liposome-peptide-DNA virus-like nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Monika; Tecle, Miriam; Shah, Imran; Matthews, David A; Miller, Andrew D

    2003-07-21

    Previously we have described the development and applications of an important new platform system for gene delivery known as liposome-mu-DNA (LMD), prepared from cationic liposomes (L), plasmid DNA (D) and the mu(M) peptide derived from the adenovirus core. In an attempt to improve upon mu, an alternative peptide (pepV) derived from the adenovirus peptide/protein-DNA core complex was identified, synthesised and studied alongside mu using a number of biophysical techniques including gel retardation, ethidium bromide exclusion, CD binding titration, DNA melting, and plasmid protection assays. PepV binds to pDNA less efficiently than mu but is able to charge neutralise and condense pDNA into negatively charged pepVD particles comparable in dimension to MD particles. The results of CD studies and plasmid protection assays suggest that peptide-DNA interactions are likely to cause pDNA condensation by a combination of charge neutralisation, base pair tilting, double helix destabilisation and the induction of pDNA superfolding. Data suggest the pepVD particles may be formulated with cationic liposomes to give defined LpepVD particles that appear to transfect HeLa cells with marginally more efficiency than LMD particles suggesting that pepV may have some effect on the pDNA transcription process. Although pepV harbours a nuclear-nucleolar localisation sequence (NLS), transfection data show that this capacity is not being appropriately harnessed by the current LpepVD formulation. Further improvements may be required in terms of optimising LpepVD formulations--for instance, to ensure the integrity of the peptide-DNA complexes following cell entry--in order to fully exploit the full NLS capacity of the peptide, thereby facilitating the transfection of slowly dividing or quiescent cells.

  5. Optimization of hydrolysis conditions, isolation, and identification of neuroprotective peptides derived from seahorse Hippocampus trimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Ryu, Bomi; Himaya, Swa; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-08-01

    Hippocampus trimaculatus is one of the most heavily traded seahorse species for traditional medicine purposes in many countries. In the present study, we showed neuroprotective effects of peptide derived from H. trimaculatus against amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) toxicity which are central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's diseases (AD). Firstly, H. trimaculatus was separately hydrolyzed by four different enzymes and tested for their protective effect on Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity in differentiated PC12 cells. Pronase E hydrolysate exerted highest protection with cell viability value of 88.33 ± 3.33 %. Furthermore, we used response surface methodology to optimize pronase E hydrolysis conditions and found that temperature at 36.69 °C with the hydrolysis time 20.01 h, enzyme to substrate (E/S) ratio of 2.02 % and pH 7.34 were the most optimum conditions. Following several purification steps, H. trimaculatus-derived neuroprotective peptides (HTP-1) sequence was identified as Gly-Thr-Glu-Asp-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys (906.4 Da). HTP-1 protected PC12 cells from Aβ42-induced neuronal death with the cell viability value of 85.52 ± 2.22 % and up-regulated pro-survival gene (Bcl-2) expressions. These results suggest that HTP-1 has the potential to be used in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD. Identification, characterization, and synthesis of bioactive components derived from H. trimaculatus have the potential to replace or at least complement the use of seahorse as traditional medicine, which further may become an approach to minimize seahorse exploitation in traditional medicine.

  6. Photosensitizer and peptide-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer for targeted in vivo photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Narsireddy, Amreddy; Vijayashree, Kurra; Adimoolam, Mahesh G; Manorama, Sunkara V; Rao, Nalam M

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in photodynamic therapy (PDT) include development of efficient near infrared-sensitive photosensitizers (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphine [PS]) and targeted delivery of PS to the tumor tissue. In this study, a dual functional dendrimer was synthesized for targeted PDT. For targeting, a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (G4) was conjugated with a PS and a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group. A peptide specific to human epidermal growth factor 2 was expressed in Escherichia coli with a His-tag and was specifically bound to the NTA group on the dendrimer. Reaction conditions were optimized to result in dendrimers with PS and the NTA at a fractional occupancy of 50% and 15%, respectively. The dendrimers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using PS fluorescence, cell uptake of these particles was confirmed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PS-dendrimers are more efficient than free PS in PDT-mediated cell death assays in HER2 positive cells, SK-OV-3. Similar effects were absent in HER2 negative cell line, MCF-7. Compared to free PS, the PS-dendrimers have shown significant tumor suppression in a xenograft animal tumor model. Conjugation of a PS with dendrimers and with a targeting agent has enhanced photodynamic therapeutic effects of the PS. PMID:26604753

  7. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma.

  8. Photosensitizer and peptide-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer for targeted in vivo photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Narsireddy, Amreddy; Vijayashree, Kurra; Adimoolam, Mahesh G; Manorama, Sunkara V; Rao, Nalam M

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in photodynamic therapy (PDT) include development of efficient near infrared-sensitive photosensitizers (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphine [PS]) and targeted delivery of PS to the tumor tissue. In this study, a dual functional dendrimer was synthesized for targeted PDT. For targeting, a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (G4) was conjugated with a PS and a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group. A peptide specific to human epidermal growth factor 2 was expressed in Escherichia coli with a His-tag and was specifically bound to the NTA group on the dendrimer. Reaction conditions were optimized to result in dendrimers with PS and the NTA at a fractional occupancy of 50% and 15%, respectively. The dendrimers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using PS fluorescence, cell uptake of these particles was confirmed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PS-dendrimers are more efficient than free PS in PDT-mediated cell death assays in HER2 positive cells, SK-OV-3. Similar effects were absent in HER2 negative cell line, MCF-7. Compared to free PS, the PS-dendrimers have shown significant tumor suppression in a xenograft animal tumor model. Conjugation of a PS with dendrimers and with a targeting agent has enhanced photodynamic therapeutic effects of the PS. PMID:26604753

  9. Application of Collagen-Model Triple-Helical Peptide-Amphiphiles for CD44-Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Lauer, Janelle L.; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer treatment by chemotherapy is typically accompanied by deleterious side effects, attributed to the toxic action of chemotherapeutics on proliferating cells from nontumor tissues. The cell surface proteoglycan CD44 has been recognized as a cancer stem cell marker. The present study has examined CD44 targeting as a way to selectively deliver therapeutic agents encapsulated inside colloidal delivery systems. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan binds to a triple-helical sequence derived from type IV collagen, α1(IV)1263–1277. We have assembled a peptide-amphiphile (PA) in which α1(IV)1263–1277 was sandwiched between 4 repeats of Gly-Pro-4-hydroxyproline and conjugated to palmitic acid. The PA was incorporated into liposomes composed of DSPG, DSPC, cholesterol, and DSPE-PEG-2000 (1 : 4 : 5 : 0.5). Doxorubicin-(DOX-)loaded liposomes with and without 10% α1(IV)1263–1277 PA were found to exhibit similar stability profiles. Incubation of DOX-loaded targeted liposomes with metastatic melanoma M14#5 and M15#11 cells and BJ fibroblasts resulted in IC50 values of 9.8, 9.3, and >100 μM, respectively. Nontargeted liposomes were considerably less efficacious for M14#5 cells. In the CD44+ B16F10 mouse melanoma model, CD44-targeted liposomes reduced the tumor size to 60% of that of the untreated control, whereas nontargeted liposomes were ineffective. These results suggest that PA targeted liposomes may represent a new class of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems. PMID:23213537

  10. A novel role for an RCAN3-derived peptide as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Høyer, Sergio; Solé-Sánchez, Sònia; Aguado, Fernando; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Hernández, José Luis; Iglesias, Mar; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Casanovas, Oriol; Messeguer, Ramon; Pérez-Riba, Mercè

    2015-07-01

    The members of the human regulators of calcineurin (RCAN) protein family are endogenous regulators of the calcineurin (CN)-cytosolic nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc) pathway activation. This function is explained by the presence of a highly conserved calcipressin inhibitor of calcineurin (CIC) motif in RCAN proteins, which has been shown to compete with NFATc for the binding to CN and therefore are able to inhibit NFATc dephosphorylation and activation by CN. Very recently, emerging roles for NFATc proteins in transformation, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis have been described in different cancer cell types. In this work, we report that the overexpression of RCAN3 dramatically inhibits tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in an orthotopic human breast cancer model. We suggest that RCAN3 exerts these effects in a CN-dependent manner, as mutation of the CIC motif in RCAN3 abolishes the tumor suppressor effect. Moreover, the expression of the EGFP-R3(178-210) peptide, spanning the CIC motif of RCAN3, is able to reproduce all the antitumor effects of RCAN3 full-length protein. Finally, we show that RCAN3 and the EGFP-R3(178-210) peptide inhibit the CN-NFATc signaling pathway and the induction of the NFATc-dependent gene cyclooxygenase-2. Our work suggests that the EGFP-R3(178-210) peptide possess potent tumor suppressor properties and therefore constitutes a novel lead for the development of potent and specific antitumoral agents. Moreover, we propose the targeting of the CN-NFATc pathway in the tumor cells constitutes an effective way to hamper tumor progression by impairing the paracrine network among tumor, endothelial and polymorphonucleated cells.

  11. Antiproliferative effect and characterization of a novel antifungal peptide derived from human Chromogranin A

    PubMed Central

    LI, RUI-FANG; LU, YA-LI; LU, YAN-BO; ZHANG, HUI-RU; HUANG, LIANG; YIN, YANLI; ZHANG, LIN; LIU, SHUAI; LU, ZHIFANG; SUN, YANAN

    2015-01-01

    CGA-N46 is a novel antifungal peptide derived from the N-terminus of human Chromogranin A, corresponding to the 31st to 76th amino acids. Further research on its activities and characteristics may be helpful for the application of CGA-N46 in medical or other situations. In the present study, the antifungal spectrum and physicochemical characteristics of CGA-N46 were investigated using an antifungal assay, its antiproliferative effects on cancer and normal cells were assessed using MTT assay and its combinatorial effect with other antibiotics was analyzed using checkerboard analysis. The results showed that CGA-N46 exhibited antifungal activity against the tested Candidas (C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis and C. albicans) at a concentration of <0.8 mM, but had no effect on the growth of filamentous fungi or other types of fungi (Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes), even at a concentration of 3.2 mM. CGA-N46 had an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells and a reversible effect on the growth of normal primary chicken embryo fibroblast cells, but no hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes at the minimum inhibitory concentration of CGA-N46 against yeasts. The antifungal activity of CGA-N46 was stable at a temperature <40°C or within a broad pH range (pH 5.0–7.0). Its antifungal activity was enhanced when the peptide was used in combination with fluconazole and terbinafine. The present results indicate that CGA-N46 is a safe, physicochemically stable, antifungal peptide with anticancer cell activity that exhibits an additive effect with conventional antibiotics. PMID:26668630

  12. Targeting of follicle stimulating hormone peptide-conjugated dendrimers to ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Dimple A.; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Bugno, Jason; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Hong, Seungpyo; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side effects. To address these issues, we have designed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers to selectively target the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), which is overexpressed by tumorigenic ovarian cancer cells but not by immature primordial follicles and other non-tumorigenic cells. Fluorescein-labeled generation 5 (G5) PAMAM dendrimers were conjugated with the binding peptide domain of FSH (FSH33) that has a high affinity to FSHR. The targeted dendrimers exhibited high receptor selectivity to FSHR-expressing OVCAR-3 cells, resulting in significant uptake and downregulation of an anti-apoptotic protein survivin, while showing minimal interactions with SKOV-3 cells that do not express FSHR. The selectivity of the FSH33-targeted dendrimers was further validated in 3D organ cultures of normal mouse ovaries. Immunostaining of the conjugates revealed their selective binding and uptake by ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells that express FSHR, while sparing the immature primordial follicles. In addition, an in vivo study monitoring tissue accumulation following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the conjugates showed significantly higher accumulation of FSH33-targeted dendrimers in the ovary and oviduct compared to the non-targeted conjugates. These proof-of-concept findings highlight the potential of these FSH33-targeted dendrimers to serve as a delivery platform for anti-ovarian cancer drugs, while reducing their systemic side effects by preventing nonspecific uptake by the primordial follicles.Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Current treatment modalities include a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, which often lead to loss of fertility in premenopausal women and a myriad of systemic side

  13. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  14. Role of Proopiomelanocortin-Derived Peptides and Their Receptors in the Osteoarticular System: From Basic to Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Grässel, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides such as melanocortins and β-endorphin (β-ED) exert their pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR) and opioid receptors (OR). There is now compelling evidence for the existence of a functional POMC system within the osteoarticular system. Accordingly, distinct cell types of the synovial tissue and bone have been identified to generate POMC-derived peptides like β-ED, ACTH, or α-MSH. MCR subtypes, especially MC1R, MC2R (the ACTH receptor), MC3R, and MC4R, but also the μ-OR and δ-OR, have been detected in various cells of the synovium, cartilage, and bone. The respective ligands of these POMC-derived peptide receptors mediate an increasing number of newly recognized biological effects in the osteoarticular system. These include bone mineralization and longitudinal growth, cell proliferation and differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis, osteoprotection, and immunomodulation. Importantly, bone formation is also regulated by the central melanocortin system via a complex hormonal interplay with other organs and tissues involved in energy metabolism. Among the POMC-derived peptides examined in cell culture systems from osteoarticular tissue and in animal models of experimentally induced arthritis, α-MSH, ACTH, and MC3R-specific agonists appear to have the most promising antiinflammatory actions. The effects of these melanocortin peptides may be exploited in future for the treatment of patients with inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. PMID:22736674

  15. Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Senff, Sebastian; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Herzig, Volker; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F

    2012-09-15

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels play a central role in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells in both humans and insects. Many venomous animals have therefore evolved toxins that modulate the activity of Na(V) channels in order to subdue their prey and deter predators. Spider venoms in particular are rich in Na(V) channel modulators, with one-third of all known ion channel toxins from spider venoms acting on Na(V) channels. Here we review the landscape of spider-venom peptides that have so far been described to target vertebrate or invertebrate Na(V) channels. These peptides fall into 12 distinct families based on their primary structure and cysteine scaffold. Some of these peptides have become useful pharmacological tools, while others have potential as therapeutic leads because they target specific Na(V) channel subtypes that are considered to be important analgesic targets. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides and so far only 0.01% of this diversity been characterised. Thus, it is likely that future research will reveal additional structural classes of spider-venom peptides that target Na(V) channels.

  16. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa Fn; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  17. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Martins, Ivone M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line– 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 –CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2—EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  18. Selection of Novel Peptides Homing the 4T1 CELL Line: Exploring Alternative Targets for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera L; Ferreira, Debora; Nobrega, Franklin L; Martins, Ivone M; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2016-01-01

    The use of bacteriophages to select novel ligands has been widely explored for cancer therapy. Their application is most warranted in cancer subtypes lacking knowledge on how to target the cancer cells in question, such as the triple negative breast cancer, eventually leading to the development of alternative nanomedicines for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, the following study aimed to select and characterize novel peptides for a triple negative breast cancer murine mammary carcinoma cell line- 4T1. Using phage display, 7 and 12 amino acid random peptide libraries were screened against the 4T1 cell line. A total of four rounds, plus a counter-selection round using the 3T3 murine fibroblast cell line, was performed. The enriched selective peptides were characterized and their binding capacity towards 4T1 tissue samples was confirmed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. The selected peptides (4T1pep1 -CPTASNTSC and 4T1pep2-EVQSSKFPAHVS) were enriched over few rounds of selection and exhibited specific binding to the 4T1 cell line. Interestingly, affinity to the human MDA-MB-231 cell line was also observed for both peptides, promoting the translational application of these novel ligands between species. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis suggested that both peptides target human Mucin-16. This protein has been implicated in different types of cancer, as it is involved in many important cellular functions. This study strongly supports the need of finding alternative targeting systems for TNBC and the peptides herein selected exhibit promising future application as novel homing peptides for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27548261

  19. Angiopep-2 and activatable cell penetrating peptide dual modified nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting and penetrating.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ling; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2014-10-20

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor was influenced by at least two factors: specific targeting and highly efficient penetrating of the nanoparticles. In this study, two targeting ligands, angiopep-2 and activatable cell penetrating peptide (ACP), were functionalized onto nanoparticles for tumor targeting delivery. In this system, angiopep-2 is a ligand of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) which was highly expressed on tumor cells, and the ACP was constructed by the conjugation of RRRRRRRR (R8) with EEEEEEEE through a matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) sensitive linker, enabling the ACP with tumor microenvironment-responsive cell penetrating property. 4h incubation of ACP with MMP-2 leads to over 80% cleavage of ACP, demonstrating ACP indeed possessed MMP-2 responsive property. The constructed dual targeting nanoparticles (AnACNPs) were approximately 110 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.231. In vitro, ACP modification and angiopep-2 modification could both enhance the U-87 MG cell uptake because of the high expression of MMP-2 and LRP-1 on C6 cells. AnACNPs showed higher uptake level than the single ligand modified nanoparticles. The uptake of all particles was time- and concentration-dependent and endosomes were involved. In vivo, AnACNPs showed best tumor targeting efficiency. The distribution of AnACNPs in tumor was higher than all the other particles. After microvessel staining with anti-CD31 antibody, the fluorescent distribution demonstrated AnACNPs could distribute in the whole tumor with the highest intensity. In conclusion, a novel drug delivery system was developed for enhanced tumor dual targeting and elevated cell internalization.

  20. Conserved Peptide Fragmentation as a Benchmarking Tool for Mass Spectrometers and a Discriminating Feature for Targeted Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Umut H.; Gillet, Ludovic C.; Maiolica, Alessio; Navarro, Pedro; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the similarity of spectra is an important task in various areas of spectroscopy, for example, to identify a compound by comparing sample spectra to those of reference standards. In mass spectrometry based discovery proteomics, spectral comparisons are used to infer the amino acid sequence of peptides. In targeted proteomics by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) or SWATH MS, predetermined sets of fragment ion signals integrated over chromatographic time are used to identify target peptides in complex samples. In both cases, confidence in peptide identification is directly related to the quality of spectral matches. In this study, we used sets of simulated spectra of well-controlled dissimilarity to benchmark different spectral comparison measures and to develop a robust scoring scheme that quantifies the similarity of fragment ion spectra. We applied the normalized spectral contrast angle score to quantify the similarity of spectra to objectively assess fragment ion variability of tandem mass spectrometric datasets, to evaluate portability of peptide fragment ion spectra for targeted mass spectrometry across different types of mass spectrometers and to discriminate target assays from decoys in targeted proteomics. Altogether, this study validates the use of the normalized spectral contrast angle as a sensitive spectral similarity measure for targeted proteomics, and more generally provides a methodology to assess the performance of spectral comparisons and to support the rational selection of the most appropriate similarity measure. The algorithms used in this study are made publicly available as an open source toolset with a graphical user interface. PMID:24623587

  1. RGD and interleukin-13 peptide functionalized nanoparticles for enhanced glioblastoma cells and neovasculature dual targeting delivery and elevated tumor penetration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Xiong, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Shijie; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-03-01

    As the most common malignant brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was characterized by angiogenesis and tumor cells proliferation. Dual targeting to neovasculature and GBM cells could deliver cargoes to these two kinds of cells, leading to a combination treatment. In this study, polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized with RGD and interleukin-13 peptide (IRNPs) to construct a neovasculature and tumor cell dual targeting delivery system in which RGD could target αvβ3 on neovasculature and interleukin-13 peptide could target IL13Rα2 on GBM cells. In vitro, interleukin-13 peptide and RGD could enhance the uptake by corresponding cells (C6 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells). Due to the expression of both receptors on C6 cells, RGD also could enhance the uptake by C6 cells. Through receptor labeling, it clearly showed that αvβ3 could mediate the internalization of RGD modified nanoparticles and IL13Rα2 could mediate the internalization of interleukin-13 peptide modified nanoparticles. The ligand functionalization also resulted in a modification on endocytosis pathways, which changed the main endocytosis pathways from macropinocytosis for unmodified nanoparticles to clathrin-mediated endocytosis for IRNPs. IRNPs also displayed the strongest penetration ability according to tumor spheroid analysis. In vivo, IRNPs could effectively deliver cargoes to GBM with higher intensity than monomodified nanoparticles. After CD31-staining, it demonstrated IRNPs could target both neovasculature and GBM cells. In conclusion, IRNPs showed promising ability in dual targeting both neovasculature and GBM cells.

  2. Structure activity relationship modelling of milk protein-derived peptides with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative structure activity type models were developed in an attempt to predict the key features of peptide sequences having dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity. The models were then employed to help predict the potential of peptides, which are currently reported in the literature to be present in the intestinal tract of humans following milk/dairy product ingestion, to act as inhibitors of DPP-IV. Two models (z- and v-scale) for short (2-5 amino acid residues) bovine milk peptides, behaving as competitive inhibitors of DPP-IV, were developed. The z- and the v-scale models (p<0.05, R(2) of 0.829 and 0.815, respectively) were then applied to 56 milk protein-derived peptides previously reported in the literature to be found in the intestinal tract of humans which possessed a structural feature of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides (P at the N2 position). Ten of these peptides were synthetized and tested for their in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory properties. There was no agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the competitive peptide inhibitors. However, the ranking for DPP-IV inhibitory potency of the competitive peptide inhibitors was conserved. Furthermore, potent in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was observed with two peptides, LPVPQ (IC50=43.8±8.8μM) and IPM (IC50=69.5±8.7μM). Peptides present within the gastrointestinal tract of human may have promise for the development of natural DPP-IV inhibitors for the management of serum glucose.

  3. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  4. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS. PMID:24389234

  5. The in Vitro Immune-Modulating Properties of a Sweat Gland-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Dermcidin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Echo; Qiang, Xiaoling; Li, Jianhua; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barriers of the skin serve as the first layer of defense by limiting the access of many pathogens to the blood circulation. In addition, human skin also contains sweat glands that can secrete a wide array of antimicrobial peptides to restrain the growth of various microbes. In the case of microbial infection, macrophages and monocytes constitute the first line of defense by producing a wide array of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This process is triggered either by pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (such as bacterial endotoxin) or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (such as HMGB1). In light of our findings that a sweat gland-derived antimicrobial peptide, dermcidin, affected both pathogen-associated molecular pattern and damage-associated molecular pattern-induced cytokines/chemokines by macrophages/monocytes, we propose that dermcidin may play an important role in the regulation of the innate immune responses to infection and injury. Future investigations are warranted to further test this understudied hypothesis in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  6. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied.

  7. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS.

  8. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied. PMID:26310860

  9. Transport of IRW, an ovotransferrin-derived antihypertensive peptide, in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bejjani, Satyanarayana; Wu, Jianping

    2013-02-20

    IRW is an egg ovotransferrin-