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Sample records for peptide directs penicillin

  1. Fragments of pro-peptide activate mature penicillin amidase of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Kasche, Volker; Galunsky, Boris; Ignatova, Zoya

    2003-12-01

    Penicillin amidase from Alcaligenes faecalis is a recently identified N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase, which possesses the highest specificity constant (kcat/Km) for the hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin compared with penicillin amidases from other sources. Similar to the Escherichia coli penicillin amidase, the A. faecalis penicillin amidase is maturated in vivo from an inactive precursor into the catalytically active enzyme, containing one tightly bound Ca2+ ion, via a complex post-translational autocatalytic processing with a multi-step excision of a small internal pro-peptide. The function of the pro-region is so far unknown. In vitro addition of chemically synthesized fragments of the pro-peptide to purified mature A. faecalis penicillin amidase increased its specific activity up to 2.3-fold. Mutations were used to block various steps in the proteolytic processing of the pro-peptide to obtain stable mutants with covalently attached fragments of the pro-region to their A-chains. These extensions of the A-chain raised the activity up to 2.3-fold and increased the specificity constants for benzylpenicillin hydrolysis mainly by an increase of the turnover number (kcat).

  2. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  3. Directed Evolution of Streptomyces clavuligerus Deacetoxycephalosporin C Synthase for Enhancement of Penicillin G Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chia-Li; Yang, Yunn-Bor; Deng, Chan-Hui; Liu, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Jyh-Shing; Lin, Yu-Ching; Liaw, Shwu-Huey; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    The deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase from Streptomyces clavuligerus was directly modified for enhancement of penicillin G expansion into phenylacetyl-7-aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid, an important intermediate in the industrial manufacture of cephalosporin antibiotics. Nine new mutants, mutants M73T, T91A, A106T, C155Y, Y184H, M188V, M188I, H244Q, and L277Q with 1.4- to 5.7-fold increases in the kcat/Km ratio, were obtained by screening 6,364 clones after error-prone PCR-based random mutagenesis. Subsequently, DNA shuffling was carried out to screen possible combinations of substitutions, including previous point mutations. One quaternary mutant, the C155Y/Y184H/V275I/C281Y mutant, which had a kcat/Km ratio that was 41-fold higher was found after 10,572 clones were assayed. The distinct mutants obtained using different mutagenesis methods demonstrated the complementarity of the techniques. Interestingly, most of the mutated residues that result in enhanced activities are located within or near the unique small barrel subdomain, suggesting that manipulation of this subdomain may be a constructive strategy for improvement of penicillin expansion. Several mutations had very distinct effects on expansion of penicillins N and G, perhaps due to different penicillin-interacting modes within the enzyme. Thus, the present study provided not only promising enzymes for cephalosporin biosynthesis but also a large number of mutants, which provided new insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein that should lead to further rational engineering. PMID:16332884

  4. Structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid allergen in penicillin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Mao, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Jiawei; Peng, Yan; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2014-08-15

    Trace penicilloic acid allergen frequently leads to various fatal immune responses to many patients, but it is still a challenge to directly discriminate and detect its residue in penicillin by a chemosensing way. Here, we report that silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) exhibit a structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement capability for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid in penicillin. It has been demonstrated that penicilloic acid can very easily link Au@Ag NPs together by its two carboxyl groups, locating itself spontaneously at the interparticle of Au@Ag NPs to form strong Raman hot-spot. At the critical concentration inducing the nanoparticle aggregation, Raman-enhanced effect of penicilloic acid is ~60,000 folds higher than that of penicillin. In particular, the selective Raman enhancement to the two carboxyl groups makes the peak of carboxyl group at C6 of penicilloic acid appear as a new Raman signal due to the opening of β-lactam ring of penicillin. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensor reaches a sensitive limit lower than the prescribed 1.0‰ penicilloic acid residue in penicillin. The novel strategy to examine allergen is more rapid, convenient and inexpensive than the conventional separation-based assay methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hitler's penicillin.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Milton

    2004-01-01

    During the Second World War, the Germans and their Axis partners could only produce relatively small amounts of penicillin, certainly never enough to meet their military needs; as a result, they had to rely upon the far less effective sulfonamides. One physician who put penicillin to effective use was Hitler's doctor, Theodore Morell. Morell treated the Führer with penicillin on a number of occasions, most notably following the failed assassination attempt in July 1944. Some of this penicillin appears to have been captured from, or inadvertently supplied by, the Allies, raising the intriguing possibility that Allied penicillin saved Hitler's life.

  6. The multifunctional peptide synthetase performing the first step of penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is a 421,073 dalton protein similar to Bacillus brevis peptide antibiotic synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Earl, A J; Turner, G

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Penicillium chrysogenum Oli13 acvA gene encoding delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, which performs the first step in penicillin biosynthesis, has been determined. The acvA gene contains an open reading frame of 11,238 bp encoding a protein of 3746 amino acids with a predicted mol. wt of 421,073 dalton. Three domains within the protein of approximately 570 amino acids have between 38% and 43% identity with each other and share similarity with two antibiotic peptide synthetases from Bacillus brevis as well as two other enzymes capable of performing ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reactions. The acvA gene is located close to the pcbC gene encoding isopenicillin N synthetase, the enzyme for the second step of beta-lactam biosynthesis, and is transcribed in the opposite orientation to it. The intergenic region of 1107 bp from which the acvA and pcbC genes are divergently transcribed has also been sequenced. PMID:2118102

  7. Peptide partitioning properties from direct insertion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmschneider, Martin; Smith, Jeremy C; Ulmschneider, Jakob

    2010-06-01

    Partitioning properties of polypeptides are at the heart of biological membrane phenomena and their precise quantification is vital for ab-initio structure prediction and the accurate simulation of membrane protein folding and function. Recently the cellular translocon machinery has been employed to determine membrane insertion propensities and transfer energetics for a series of polyleucine segments embedded in a carrier sequence. We show here that the insertion propensity, pathway, and transfer energetics into synthetic POPC bilayers can be fully described by direct atomistic peptide partitioning simulations. The insertion probability as a function of peptide length follows two-state Boltzmann statistics, in agreement with the experiments. The simulations expose a systematic offset between translocon-mediated and direct insertion free energies. Compared to the experiment the insertion threshold is shifted toward shorter peptides by 2 leucine residues. The simulations reveal many hitherto unknown atomic-resolution details about the partitioning process and promise to provide a powerful tool for urgently needed calibration of lipid parameters to match experimentally observed peptide transfer energies.

  8. Penicillin anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, M R; Smith, M S

    1986-05-01

    A case of oral penicillin anaphylaxis is described, and the terminology, occurrence, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of anaphylaxis are reviewed. Emergency physicians should be aware of oral penicillin anaphylaxis in order to prevent its occurrence by prescribing the antibiotic judiciously and knowledgeably and to offer optimal medical therapy once this life-threatening reaction has begun.

  9. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP.

  10. Penicillin Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions cannot be detected by skin tests. Graded challenge If the diagnosis of a penicillin allergy is ... he or she may recommend a graded drug challenge. With this procedure, you receive four to five ...

  11. Future directions for peptide therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Allan A; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The notable expansion of peptide therapeutics development in the late 1990s and the 2000s led to an unprecedented number of marketing approvals in 2012 and has provided a robust pipeline that should deliver numerous approvals during the remainder of the 2010s. To document the current status of the pipeline, we collected data for peptide therapeutics in clinical studies and regulatory review, as well as those recently approved. In this Foundation review, we provide an overview of the pipeline, including therapeutic area and molecular targets, with a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists. Areas for potential expansion, for example constrained peptides and peptide-drug conjugates, are profiled.

  12. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  13. Chemical Reactions Directed Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B.; Das, Apurba K.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly. PMID:25984603

  14. Rapid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a spherical cell morphotype facilitates tolerance to carbapenems and penicillins but increases susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Leigh G; Turnbull, Lynne; Osvath, Sarah R; Birch, Debra; Charles, Ian G; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerates high concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Despite inhibiting the growth of the organism, these cell wall-targeting drugs exhibit remarkably little bactericidal activity. However, the mechanisms underlying β-lactam tolerance are currently unclear. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa undergoes a rapid en masse transition from normal rod-shaped cells to viable cell wall-defective spherical cells when treated with β-lactams from the widely used carbapenem and penicillin classes. When the antibiotic is removed, the entire population of spherical cells quickly converts back to the normal bacillary form. Our results demonstrate that these rapid population-wide cell morphotype transitions function as a strategy to survive antibiotic exposure. Taking advantage of these findings, we have developed a novel approach to efficiently kill P. aeruginosa by using carbapenem treatment to induce en masse transition to the spherical cell morphotype and then exploiting the relative fragility and sensitivity of these cells to killing by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are relatively inactive against P. aeruginosa bacillary cells. This approach could broaden the repertoire of antimicrobial compounds used to treat P. aeruginosa and serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic agents to combat bacterial infections.

  15. Rapid Conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to a Spherical Cell Morphotype Facilitates Tolerance to Carbapenems and Penicillins but Increases Susceptibility to Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Leigh G.; Turnbull, Lynne; Osvath, Sarah R.; Birch, Debra; Charles, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa tolerates high concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Despite inhibiting the growth of the organism, these cell wall-targeting drugs exhibit remarkably little bactericidal activity. However, the mechanisms underlying β-lactam tolerance are currently unclear. Here, we show that P. aeruginosa undergoes a rapid en masse transition from normal rod-shaped cells to viable cell wall-defective spherical cells when treated with β-lactams from the widely used carbapenem and penicillin classes. When the antibiotic is removed, the entire population of spherical cells quickly converts back to the normal bacillary form. Our results demonstrate that these rapid population-wide cell morphotype transitions function as a strategy to survive antibiotic exposure. Taking advantage of these findings, we have developed a novel approach to efficiently kill P. aeruginosa by using carbapenem treatment to induce en masse transition to the spherical cell morphotype and then exploiting the relative fragility and sensitivity of these cells to killing by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that are relatively inactive against P. aeruginosa bacillary cells. This approach could broaden the repertoire of antimicrobial compounds used to treat P. aeruginosa and serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic agents to combat bacterial infections. PMID:24419348

  16. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  17. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  18. Template-Directed Ligation of Peptides to Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruick, Richard K.; Dawson, Philip E.; Kent, Stephen BH; Usman, Nassim; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic oligonucleotides and peptides have enjoyed a wide range of applications in both biology and chemistry. As a consequence, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have received considerable attention, most notably in the development of antisense constructs with improved pharmacological properties. In addition, oligonucleotide-peptide conjugates have been used as molecular tags, in the assembly of supramolecular arrays and in the construction of encoded combinatorial libraries. To make these chimeric molecules more accessible for a broad range of investigations, we sought to develop a facile method for joining fully deprotected oligonucleotides and peptides through a stable amide bond linkage. Furthermore, we wished to make this ligation reaction addressable, enabling one to direct the ligation of specific oligonucleotide and peptide components.To confer specificity and accelerate the rate of the reaction, the ligation process was designed to be dependent on the presence of a complementary oligonucleotide template.

  19. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  20. The newer penicillins.

    PubMed

    SIMON, H J

    1962-09-01

    The newer penicillins give high promise of overcoming some of the few disadvantages of penicillin-G. THEY FALL INTO THREE GROUPS: The alpha-phenoxy-penicillins; the penicillinase resistant penicillins; and the penicillins with enhanced activity against gram-negative bacteria. The newer alpha-phenoxy-penicillins offer little over alpha-phenoxy methyl penicillin (penicillin-V). As the length of the side chain is increased, absorption and attainable serum concentration is also increased, but these are questionable benefits and probably not significant for therapeusis. The penicillinase-resistant penicillins have once more brought almost all severe staphylococcal infections within therapeutic range. One of them, methicillin, must be administered parenterally. It is the agent of choice for the treatment of severe, penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections, and this is its only clinical indication. Another, oxacillin, which may be administered orally, is partially resistant to gastric acid degradation, but must be given on an empty stomach. It is most useful as prolonged therapy following methicillin, in the treatment of mixed hemolytic streptococcal-penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections, and as primary therapy for moderately severe penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections. The third group is still mostly in the experimental stage, but some strains of Proteus, E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella are highly vulnerable to their action. Toxic and allergic reactions to the newer penicillins, and crossed allergic reactions with penicillin-G, present unsolved problems.

  1. THE NEWER PENICILLINS

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Harold J.

    1962-01-01

    The newer penicillins give high promise of overcoming some of the few disadvantages of penicillin-G. They fall into three groups: The alpha-phenoxy-penicillins; the penicillinase resistant penicillins; and the penicillins with enhanced activity against gram-negative bacteria. The newer alpha-phenoxy-penicillins offer little over alpha-phenoxy methyl penicillin (penicillin-V). As the length of the side chain is increased, absorption and attainable serum concentration is also increased, but these are questionable benefits and probably not significant for therapeusis. The penicillinase-resistant penicillins have once more brought almost all severe staphylococcal infections within therapeutic range. One of them, methicillin, must be administered parenterally. It is the agent of choice for the treatment of severe, penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections, and this is its only clinical indication. Another, oxacillin, which may be administered orally, is partially resistant to gastric acid degradation, but must be given on an empty stomach. It is most useful as prolonged therapy following methicillin, in the treatment of mixed hemolytic streptococcal-penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections, and as primary therapy for moderately severe penicillin-G resistant staphylococcal infections. The third group is still mostly in the experimental stage, but some strains of Proteus, E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella are highly vulnerable to their action. Toxic and allergic reactions to the newer penicillins, and crossed allergic reactions with penicillin-G, present unsolved problems. PMID:13913108

  2. Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine injection ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  3. The direct peptide reactivity assay: selectivity of chemical respiratory allergens.

    PubMed

    Lalko, Jon F; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank; Foertsch, Leslie M; Api, Anne Marie; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that some chemicals are capable of causing allergic diseases of the skin and respiratory tract. Commonly, though not exclusively, chemical allergens are associated with the selective development of skin or respiratory sensitization. The reason for this divergence is unclear, although it is hypothesized that the nature of interactions between the chemical hapten and proteins is influential. The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) has been developed as a screen for the identification of skin-sensitizing chemicals, and here we describe the use of this method to explore whether differences exist between skin and respiratory allergens with respect to their peptide-binding properties. Known skin and respiratory sensitizers were reacted with synthetic peptides containing either lysine (Lys) or cysteine (Cys) for 24 h. The samples were analyzed by HPLC/UV, and the loss of peptide from the reaction mixture was expressed as the percent depletion compared with the control. The potential for preferential reactivity was evaluated by comparing the ratio of Lys to Cys depletion (Lys:Cys ratio). The results demonstrate that the majority of respiratory allergens are reactive in the DPRA, and that in contrast to most skin-sensitizing chemicals, preferentially react with the Lys peptide. These data suggest that skin and respiratory chemical allergens can result in different protein conjugates, which may in turn influence the quality of induced immune responses. Overall, these investigations reveal that the DPRA has considerable potential to be incorporated into tiered testing approaches for the identification and characterization of chemical respiratory allergens.

  4. Development of a direct ELISA based on carboxy-terminal of penicillin-binding protein BlaR for the detection of β-lactam antibiotics in foods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Cheng, Guyue; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Hao, Haihong; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-11-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, are commonly used in veterinary medicine. Illegal use and abuse of β-lactams could cause allergy and selected bacterial resistance. BlaR-CTD, the carboxy-terminal of penicillin-recognizing protein BlaR from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580, was utilized in this study to develop a receptor-based ELISA for detection and determination of β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken. This assay was based on directly competitive inhibition of binding of horseradish peroxidase-labeled ampicillin to the immobilized BlaR-CTD by β-lactams. The assay was developed as screening test with the option as semiquantitative assay, when the identity of a single type of residual β-lactam was known. The IC50 values of 15 β-lactam antibiotics, including benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, cefapirin, cefoperazone, cefalotin, cefazolin, cefquinome, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefalexin, ceftiofur and its metabolite desfuroylceftiofur were evaluated and ranged from 0.18 to 170.81 μg L(-1). Simple sample extraction method was carried out with only phosphate-buffered saline, and the recoveries of selected β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken were in the range of 53.27 to 128.29 %, most ranging from 60 to 120 %. The inter-assay variability was below 30 %. Limits of detection in milk, beef, and chicken muscles with cefquinome matrix calibration were 2.10, 30.68, and 31.13 μg kg(-1), respectively. This study firstly established a rapid, simple, and accurate method for simultaneous detection of 15 β-lactams in edible tissues, among which 11 β-lactams controlled by European Union could be detected below maximum residue limits.

  5. Membrane-bound dd-carboxypeptidases from Bacillus megaterium KM. General properties, substrate specificity and sensitivity to penicillins, cephalosporins and peptide inhibitors of the activity at pH5

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mauriño, Teresa; Nieto, Manuel; Perkins, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    1. The membrane from Bacillus megaterium KM contained a dd-carboxypeptidase with optimum activity under the following conditions: pH5.2, bivalent cation, 3mm; ionic strength, 40mm; temperature, 35°C. It was inactivated by treatment with p-chloromercuribenzoate but was fairly insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol. 2. The enzyme was inhibited by penicillins and cephalosporins. The inhibition of this enzyme was partially reversed on dialysis but 0.2m-2-mercaptoethanol could neither prevent nor reverse the inhibition. 3. The enzyme was extremely sensitive to changes in the configuration and size of the side chain of the C-terminal dipeptide of the substrate. An aliphatic side chain of a well-defined length and polarity was required in the residue that precedes the C-terminal dipeptide. 4. The enzyme was inhibited by a wide range of analogues of the peptidic portion of the natural substrate. PMID:4218954

  6. Affinities of penicillins and cephalosporins for the penicillin-binding proteins of Escherichia coli K-12 and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, N A; Orr, D; Ross, G W; Boulton, M G

    1979-01-01

    The affinities of a range of penicillins and cephalosporins for ther penicillin-binding proteins of Escherichia coli K-12 have been studied, and the results were compared with the antibacterial activity of the compounds against E. coli K-12 and an isogenic permeability mutant. Different penicillins and cephalosporins exhibited different affinities for the "essential" penicillin-binding proteins of E. coli K-12, in a manner which directly correlated with their observed effects upon bacterial morphology. Furthermore, the affinities of the compounds for their "primary" lethal penicillin-binding protein targets showed close agreement with their antibacterial activities against the permeability mutant. Images PMID:393164

  7. Penicillin G (Potassium, Sodium) Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  8. Penicillin V Potassium Oral

    MedlinePlus

    Penicillin V potassium is an antibiotic used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia, scarlet fever, and ear, ... Penicillin V potassium comes as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ...

  9. Overview of penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher; Mahmood, Mubashar M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2012-08-01

    Allergy to penicillin is the most commonly reported antibiotic allergy. However, most patients who report a positive history of a prior reaction to penicillin are not found to be allergic to penicillin upon skin testing. Often, this history is vague or based on a parent's recollection of an event that occurred in the distant past. Avoidance of penicillin based on self-reported allergic history alone often leads to the use of an alternate antibiotic with greater cost or side effect profile. Patients with a negative skin test to both major and minor determinants may generally be given penicillin, with a statistical risk of developing an allergic reaction similar to that observed in the general population. A more cautious approach in these cases where the degree of suspicion is low, an allergic etiology is unproven, or there is a negative skin test, is to do a graded challenge. If the skin test is positive, an alternate antibiotic should be used. If, however, an alternate antibiotic is not available, then desensitization may be performed, but there are limitations to desensitization as well, and tolerance is not permanent. Avoidance of cephalosporins may be recommended in cases of penicillin allergy, but newer generation cephalosporins have demonstrate less cross-reactivity to penicillin than earlier generation ones. Desensitization protocols for cephalosporins are available but not standardized. The mechanisms of antibiotic sensitization are not clearly understood.

  10. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  11. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  12. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  13. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  14. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  15. pH-directed self-assembling helical peptide conformation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The beta-sheet and alpha-helix peptide conformation are two of the most fundamentally ordered secondary structures found in proteins and peptides. They also give rise to self-assembling motifs that form macromolecular channels and nanostructures. Through design these conformations can yield enhance...

  16. Peptide-chaperone-directed transdermal protein delivery requires energy.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Changli; Chen, Chuanjun; Ding, Weiping; Wen, Longping

    2014-11-03

    The biologically inspired transdermal enhanced peptide TD1 has been discovered to specifically facilitate transdermal delivery of biological macromolecules. However, the biological behavior of TD1 has not been fully defined. In this study, we find that energy is required for the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery through rat and human skins. Our results show that the permeation activity of TD1-hEGF, a fusion protein composed of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and the TD1 sequence connected with a glycine-serine linker (GGGGS), can be inhibited by the energy inhibitor, rotenone or oligomycin. In addition, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the essential energetic molecule in organic systems, can effectively facilitate the TD1 directed permeation of the protein-based drug into the skin in a dose-dependent fashion. Our results here demonstrate a novel energy-dependent permeation process during the TD1-mediated transdermal protein delivery that could be valuable for the future development of promising new transdermal drugs.

  17. Direct involvement of the CreA transcription factor in penicillin biosynthesis and expression of the pcbAB gene in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-García, Cristina; Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Rico, Ramón O; García-Estrada, Carlos; Cajiao, Angela; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan Francisco

    2014-08-01

    The transcription factor CreA is the main regulator responsible for carbon repression in filamentous fungi. CreA is a wide domain regulator that binds to regulatory elements in the promoters of target genes to repress their transcription. Penicillin biosynthesis and the expression of penicillin biosynthetic genes are subject to carbon repression. However, evidence of the participation of CreA in this regulation is still lacking, and previous studies on the promoter of the pcbC gene of Aspergillus nidulans indicated the lack of involvement of CreA in its regulation. Here we present clear evidence of the participation of CreA in carbon repression of penicillin biosynthesis and expression of the pcbAB gene, encoding the first enzyme of the pathway, in Penicillium chrysogenum. Mutations in cis of some of the putative CreA binding sites present in the pcbAB gene promoter fused to a reporter gene caused an important increase in the measured enzyme activity in glucose-containing medium, whereas activity in the medium with lactose was not affected. An RNAi strategy was used to attenuate the expression of the creA gene. Transformants expressing a small interfering RNA for creA showed higher penicillin production, and this increase was more evident when glucose was used as carbon source. These results confirm that CreA plays an important role in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum and opens the possibility of its utilization to improve the industrial production of this antibiotic.

  18. Orthogonal Cysteine-Penicillamine Disulfide Pairing for Directing the Oxidative Folding of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwu; Zhai, Linxiang; Zhao, Yibing; Wu, Chuanliu

    2015-12-09

    Precise disulfide pairing in synthetic peptides usually is achieved using orthogonal protecting group strategies or relies on primary sequence manipulation. Orthogonal disulfide pairing technology should be promising for directing the rational folding of multicyclic peptides from the fully reduced peptides. Here, we report a discovery on the orthogonality between heterodisulfide pairing of cysteine (Cys) and penicillamine (Pen) and formation of Cys-Cys/Pen-Pen homodisulfides. The orthogonal Cys-Pen disulfide pairing can be exploited for highly selective production of certain (multi)cyclic structures (or even a sole structure without isomers) through direct oxidation in air or thiol-disulfide exchanges in redox media. This strategy makes rational folding of multicyclic peptides without protecting groups, sequence manipulation, and complex synthetic reactions a reality, thus providing invaluable assets to peptide communities, and should greatly benefit the development of multicyclic peptide therapeutics and ligands.

  19. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wildtype Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approachmore » generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.« less

  20. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wildtype Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approachmore » generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.« less

  1. Directed Evolution of FLS2 towards Novel Flagellin Peptide Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Helft, Laura; Thompson, Mikayla

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wild-type Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. These studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets. PMID:27270917

  2. Enkephalin-related peptides: direct action on the octopus heart.

    PubMed

    Voigt, K H; Kiehling, C; Frösch, D; Schiebe, M; Martin, R

    1981-11-18

    Immunocytochemical evidence for the occurrence of "vertebrate" peptides in the neuropil of the vena cava [12, 13] and the structural similarity between enkephalin precursor peptides and the molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide [16], lead us to study the action of enkephalin-related peptides on the octopus heart. Systemic hearts of Octopus vulgaris were perfused with sea wate and test substances and a crude extract of vena cave were added for 1 min; frequency and pressure were monitored continuously. The heptapeptide Leu5-enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and the Met5-analogue, both in the amidized form, displayed dose-response relationship with a sensitivity of about 10 nmol. The C-terminal tetrapeptide amides, Phe-Leu/Met-Arg-Phe-NH2, were active at the same doses. Opiate receptors do not seem to be involved in this action on the octopus heart, as naloxone treatment had no effect. Whereas the N-terminal portion of the heptapeptide is known to be crucial for activity as an opioid, the C-terminal NH2 group is essential for cardioexcitatory activity.

  3. Directed evolution of FLS2 towards novel flagellin peptide recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Helft, Laura; Bent, Andrew F.

    2016-06-06

    Microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are molecules, or domains within molecules, that are conserved across microbial taxa and can be recognized by a plant or animal immune system. Although MAMP receptors have evolved to recognize conserved epitopes, the MAMPs in some microbial species or strains have diverged sufficiently to render them unrecognizable by some host immune systems. In this study, we carried out in vitro evolution of the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2) to isolate derivatives that recognize one or more flagellin peptides from bacteria for which the wildtype Arabidopsis FLS2 confers little or no response. A targeted approach generated amino acid variation at FLS2 residues in a region previously implicated in flagellin recognition. The primary screen tested for elevated response to the canonical flagellin peptide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flg22. From this pool, we then identified five alleles of FLS2 that confer modest (quantitatively partial) recognition of an Erwinia amylovora flagellin peptide. Use of this Erwinia-based flagellin peptide to stimulate Arabidopsis plants expressing the resulting FLS2 alleles did not lead to a detectable reduction of virulent P. syringae pv. tomato growth. However, combination of two identified mutations into a single allele further increased FLS2-mediated responses to the E. amylovora flagellin peptide. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate the potential to raise the sensitivity of MAMP receptors toward particular targets.

  4. Stabilization of Penicillin G Acylase from Escherichia coli: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Protein Surface To Increase Multipoint Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Grazú, Valeria; Hermoso, Juan; González, Ramón; García, José Luis; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Three mutations on the penicillin acylase surface (increasing the number of Lys in a defined area) were performed. They did not alter the enzyme's stability and kinetic properties; however, after immobilization on glyoxyl-agarose, the mutant enzyme showed improved stability under all tested conditions (e.g., pH 2.5 at 4°C, pH 5 at 60°C, pH 7 at 55°C, or 60% dimethylformamide), with stabilization factors ranging from 4 to 11 compared with the native enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose. PMID:14766616

  5. Proteome Analysis of the Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Barreiro, Carlos; García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by “blue silver” colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin

  6. Elucidation of peptide-directed palladium surface structure for biologically tunable nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M; Briggs, Beverly D; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-05-26

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then elucidated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences.

  7. Elucidation of Peptide-Directed Palladium Surface Structure for Biologically Tunable Nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M.; Briggs, Beverly D.; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then eluddated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences

  8. Penicillin skin testing: potential implications for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Unger, Nathan R; Gauthier, Timothy P; Cheung, Linda W

    2013-08-01

    As the progression of multidrug-resistant organisms and lack of novel antibiotics move us closer toward a potential postantibiotic era, it is paramount to preserve the longevity of current therapeutic agents. Moreover, novel interventions for antimicrobial stewardship programs are integral to combating antimicrobial resistance worldwide. One unique method that may decrease the use of second-line antibiotics (e.g., fluoroquinolones, vancomycin) while facilitating access to a preferred β-lactam regimen in numerous health care settings is a penicillin skin test. Provided that up to 10% of patients have a reported penicillin allergy, of whom ~10% have true IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, significant potential exists to utilize a penicillin skin test to safely identify those who may receive penicillin or a β-lactam antibiotic. In this article, we provide information on the background, associated costs, currently available literature, pharmacists' role, antimicrobial stewardship implications, potential barriers, and misconceptions, as well as future directions associated with the penicillin skin test.

  9. Site-specific radical directed dissociation of peptides at phosphorylated residues.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Jolene K; Julian, Ryan R

    2008-09-17

    Site-specific fragmentation of peptides at phosphorylated serine or threonine residues is demonstrated. This radical directed cleavage is accomplished by a two-step procedure. First the phosphate is replaced with naphthalenethiol using well established Michael Addition chemistry. Second, the modified peptide is electrosprayed and subjected to irradiation at 266 nm. Absorption at naphthalene causes homolytic cleavage of the connecting carbon-sulfur bond yielding a radical in the beta-position. Subsequent rearrangement cleaves the peptide backbone yielding a d-type fragment. This chemistry is generally applicable as demonstrated by experiments with several different peptides. Assignment of phosphorylation sites is greatly facilitated by this approach, particularly for peptides containing multiple serine or threonine residues.

  10. Mode of Action of Penicillins In Vivo and In Vitro in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo

    1976-01-01

    A new system in which the in vivo and in vitro formation of cross-links in the peptidoglycan of Bacillus megaterium can be compared directly has been developed. The method for the determination of the in vivo cross-linking consists of lysozyme digestion of acetylated [14C]diaminopimelic acid-labeled cells and Bio-Gel P-6 gel filtration of the digest. The elution profile indicates the cell wall synthesized in vivo consists of highly cross-linked fractions (44%), bisdisaccharide peptide(s) (38%), and disaccharide peptide(s) (18%). The in vitro system showed a high synthetic activity of cross-linked peptidoglycan. The synthesis was inhibited completely by 83.3 μg of ristocetin or vancomycin per ml or 10−4 M p-chloromercuribenzoate and inhibited only partially by penicillins. The polymerization was stimulated by high concentrations of sucrose, glycerol, amino acids, or dimethyl sulfoxide. The formation of cross-links was inhibited 50% at 0.3 μg of dicloxacillin per ml and 90% at 0.5 μg or more. It was also stimulated by high concentrations of sucrose, glycerol, or dimethyl sulfoxide. Effective concentrations of dicloxacillin on the growth, viability, and morphology of B. megaterium were determined. Sharp inhibition of cross-linking occurred in vivo and in vitro at these effective concentrations, whereas the incorporation of [14C]-diaminopimelate into bacterial cells was not affected at all. Cell-bound dicloxacillin reduced severely the degree of cross-linking in the cell wall synthesized after transfer to a dicloxacillin-free medium. Cell wall synthesized in the presence of dicloxacillin showed a higher rate of turnover than did the normal cell wall. Moreover, disaccharide peptide(s) was degraded faster than was bisdisaccharide peptide(s) in dicloxacillin-treated cells. From these observations, the primary target of penicillin action in B. megaterium is discussed in relation to the inhibition of cross-linking, penicillin-binding components, and cell lysis. PMID

  11. 21 CFR 558.460 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin. 558.460 Section 558.460 Food and Drugs... Animal Feeds § 558.460 Penicillin. (a) Specifications. As penicillin procaine G or feed grade penicillin.... (1) It is used as follows: Penicillin in grams per ton Combination in grams per ton Indications for...

  12. 21 CFR 558.460 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin. 558.460 Section 558.460 Food and Drugs... Animal Feeds § 558.460 Penicillin. (a) Specifications. As penicillin procaine G or feed grade penicillin.... (1) It is used as follows: Penicillin in grams per ton Combination in grams per ton Indications for...

  13. 21 CFR 558.460 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin. 558.460 Section 558.460 Food and Drugs... Animal Feeds § 558.460 Penicillin. (a) Specifications. As penicillin procaine G or feed grade penicillin.... (1) It is used as follows: Penicillin in grams per ton Combination in grams per ton Indications for...

  14. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176... Penicillin contamination. If a reasonable possibility exists that a non-penicillin drug product has been exposed to cross-contamination with penicillin, the non-penicillin drug product shall be tested for the...

  15. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176... Penicillin contamination. If a reasonable possibility exists that a non-penicillin drug product has been exposed to cross-contamination with penicillin, the non-penicillin drug product shall be tested for the...

  16. 21 CFR 558.460 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin. 558.460 Section 558.460 Food and Drugs... Animal Feeds § 558.460 Penicillin. (a) Specifications. As penicillin procaine G or feed grade penicillin.... (1) It is used as follows: Penicillin in grams per ton Combination in grams per ton Indications for...

  17. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176... Penicillin contamination. If a reasonable possibility exists that a non-penicillin drug product has been exposed to cross-contamination with penicillin, the non-penicillin drug product shall be tested for the...

  18. 21 CFR 558.460 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin. 558.460 Section 558.460 Food and Drugs... Animal Feeds § 558.460 Penicillin. (a) Specifications. As penicillin procaine G or feed grade penicillin.... (1) It is used as follows: Penicillin in grams per ton Combination in grams per ton Indications...

  19. Development of multifunctional collagen scaffolds directed by collagen mimetic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Lan (Allen)

    Collagen is widely used for soft tissue replacement and tissue engineering scaffold. Functionalized collagen may offer new and improved applications for collagen-based biomaterials. But passively adsorbed molecules readily diffuse out from collagen matrix, and conventional chemical reactions on collagen are difficult to control and may compromise the biochemical feature of natural collagen. Hence, the aim of this dissertation is to develop a new physical collagen modification method through the non-covalent immobilization of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) and CMP derivatives on collagen scaffolds, thereby evading the drawbacks of passive and chemical modifications. Most of the research on CMPs over the past three decades has focused on synthesizing CMPs and understanding the effects of amino acid sequence on the peptide structural stability. Although few attempts have been made to develop biomaterials based on pure CMP, CMP has never used in complex with natural collagen. We demonstrate that CMPs with varying chain lengths have strong propensity to associate with natural 2-D and 3-D collagen substrates. We also show that CMPs can recognize and bind to reconstituted type I collagen fibers as well as collagens of ex vivo human liver tissue. The practical use of CMPs conjugated with linear and multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)s allows to control cell organization in 2-D collagen substrates. Our cell adhesion studies suggest that under certain conditions (e.g. high incubation temperature, small CMP size), the bound CMP derivatives can be released from the collagen matrix, which may provide new opportunities for manipulating cell behavior especially by dynamically controlling the amount of signaling molecules in the collagen matrix. Polyanionic charged CMP was synthesized to modulate tubulogenesis of endothelial cells by attracting VEGF with 3-D collagen gel and a new PEG hydrogel using bifunctional CMP conjugates was synthesized as physico-chemical crosslinkers for

  20. Directing peptide crystallization through curvature control of nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gobeaux, Frédéric; Tarabout, Christophe; Fay, Nicolas; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maïté

    2014-07-01

    In the absence of efficient crystallization methods, the molecular structures of fibrous assemblies have so far remained rather elusive. In this paper, we present a rational method to crystallize the lanreotide octapeptide by modification of a residue involved in a close contact. Indeed, we show that it is possible to modify the curvature of the lanreotide nanotubes and hence their diameter. This fine tuning leads to crystallization because the radius of curvature of the initially bidimensional peptide wall can be increased up to a point where the wall is essentially flat and a crystal is allowed to grow along a third dimension. By comparing X-ray diffraction data and Fourier transform Raman spectra, we show that the nanotubes and the crystals share similar cell parameters and molecular conformations, proving that there is indeed a structural continuum between these two morphologies. These results illustrate a novel approach to crystallization and represent the first step towards the acquisition of an Å-resolution structure of the lanreotide nanotubes β-sheet assembly.

  1. Peptide conjugates for directing the morphology and assembly of 1D nanoparticle superstructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Song, Chengyi; Fry, H Christopher; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2014-01-20

    Designed peptide conjugates molecules are used to direct the synthesis and assembly of gold nanoparticles into complex 1D nanoparticle superstructures with various morphologies. Four peptide conjugates, each based on the gold-binding peptide (AYSSGAPPMPPF; PEPAu ), are prepared: C12H23O-AYSSGAPPMPP (1), C12H23O-AYSSGAPPMPPF (2), C12H23O-AYSSGAPPMPPFF (3), and C12H23O-AYSSGAPPMPPFFF (4). The affect that C-terminal hydrophobic F residues have on both the soft-assembly of the peptide conjugates and the resulting assembly of gold nanoparticle superstructures is examined. It is shown that the addition of two C-terminal F residues (3) leads to thick, branched 1D gold nanoparticle superstructures, whereas the addition of three C-terminal F residues (4) leads to bundling of thin 1D nanoparticle superstructures.

  2. Direct arginine modification in native peptides and application to chemical probe development.

    PubMed

    Grundler, Verena; Gademann, Karl

    2014-12-11

    An efficient method for the direct labeling of the Arg guanidinium group in native peptides is reported. This straightforward procedure allows modifying the arginine moiety in peptides with various reporter groups, such as fluorophores, biotin, etc., under mild conditions in an operationally simple procedure. The scope of this method tolerates various functionalized amino acids such as His, Ser, Trp, Tyr, Glu, etc., while the only limitations uncovered so far are restricted to cysteine and free amine residues. The utility of this late-stage diversification method was demonstrated in direct labeling of leuprolide, a clinically used drug, for distribution monitoring in Daphnia, and in labeling of microcystin, a cyanobacterial toxin.

  3. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-09-13

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions.

  4. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions. PMID:27619816

  5. Efficient and directed peptide bond formation in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-01-28

    Amide linkages are among the most important chemical bonds in living systems, constituting the connections between amino acids in peptides and proteins. We demonstrate the controlled formation of amide bonds between amino acids or peptides in the gas phase using ion/ion reactions in a mass spectrometer. Individual amino acids or peptides can be prepared as reagents by (i) incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to silence otherwise reactive functional groups, such as the N terminus; (ii) converting the carboxyl groups to the active ester of N-hydroxysuccinimide; and (iii) incorporating a charge site. Protonation renders basic sites (nucleophiles) unreactive toward the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents, resulting in sites with the greatest gas phase basicities being, in large part, unreactive. The N-terminal amines of most naturally occurring amino acids have lower gas phase basicities than the side chains of the basic amino acids (i.e., those of histidine, lysine, or arginine). Therefore, reagents may be directed to the N terminus of an existing "anchor" peptide to form an amide bond by protonating the anchor peptide's basic residues, while leaving the N-terminal amine unprotonated and therefore reactive. Reaction efficiencies of greater than 30% have been observed. We propose this method as a step toward the controlled synthesis of peptides in the gas phase.

  6. Direct mass spectrometric peptide profiling and sequencing of nervous tissues to identify peptides involved in male copulatory behavior in Lymnaea stagnalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreisewerd, Klaus; Kingston, Robert; Geraerts, Wijnand P. M.; Li, Ka Wan

    1997-12-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was performed directly on a small piece of single penis nerve of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, and reveals the presence of complex peptide profiles, including many hitherto undescribed peptides. Two of the peptides have molecular weights corresponding exactly to the previously described Lymnaea small cardioactive peptides (SCP) A and B. We confirmed their identities by structural characterization of the two peptides directly from a single penis nerve by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization high-energy collision tandem MS analysis. MALDI-MS of nervous tissues also demonstrates that a cluster of central neurons, which send their axons to the penis nerve, contain the two peptides. As the penis nerve is the nerve that innervates the penis complex, we propose that the peptides are involved in the modulation of male copulatory processes. A bioassay indeed showed that the peptides increase the contraction frequency of the vas deference in a dose-dependent manner. The results demonstrate the potential of direct MALDI-MS analysis of nervous tissue to complement or substitute conventional biochemical techniques for the identification and localization of neuropeptides.

  7. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    The chemical structure of penicillin was determined between 1942 and 1945 under conditions of secrecy established by the U.S. and U.K. governments. The evidence was not published in the open literature but as a monograph. This complex volume does not present a structure proof that can be readily comprehended by a student. In this article, a basic structural proof for the penicillin molecule is provided, emphasizing the chemical work. The stereochemistry of penicillin is also described, and various rearrangements are considered on the basis of the accepted β-lactam structure.

  8. 21 CFR 556.510 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin. 556.510 Section 556.510 Food and Drugs... Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.510 Penicillin. Tolerances are established for residues of penicillin and the salts of penicillin in food as follows: (a) 0.05 part per million (negligible residue) in...

  9. The use of penicillins in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A

    1984-11-01

    The main use of the penicillins in orthopedic surgery is in the treatment of infections due to Hemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Group D streptococci (enterococci). Penicillins have antimicrobial activity and have a characteristic pharmacodynamic action, including side effects. The tissue penetration characteristics of the penicillins into synovial fluid and human bone are significant. Semisynthetic penicillins, antistaphylococcal penicillins, and the antipseudomonal penicillins are used for treatment of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Oral penicillin therapy can be useful in treatment of osteomyelitis.

  10. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  11. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  12. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system.

  13. Materials specificity and directed assembly of a gold-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Duman, Memed; Oren, Ersin Emre; Gungormus, Mustafa; Xiong, Xiaorong; Kacar, Turgay; Parviz, Babak A; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2006-11-01

    Adsorption studies of a genetically engineered gold-binding peptide, GBP1, were carried out using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to quantify its molecular affinity to noble metals. The peptide showed higher adsorption onto and lower desorption from a gold surface compared to a platinum substrate. The material specificity, that is, the preferential adsorption, of GBP1 was also demonstrated using gold and platinum micropatterned on a silicon wafer containing native oxide. The biotinylated three-repeat units of GBP1 were preferentially adsorbed onto gold regions delineated using streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots (SAQDs). These experiments not only demonstrate that an inorganic-binding peptide could preferentially adsorb onto a metal (Au) rather than an oxide (SiO2) but also onto one noble metal (Au) over another (Pt). This result shows the utility of an engineered peptide as a molecular erector in the directed immobilization of a nanoscale hybrid entity (SAQDs) over selected regions (Au) on a fairly complex substrate (Au and Pt micropatterned regions on silica). The selective and controlled adsorption of inorganic-binding peptides may have significant implications in nano- and nanobiotechnology, where they could be genetically tailored for specific use in the development of self-assembled molecular systems.

  14. Programmable peptide-directed two dimensional arrays of various nanoparticles on graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bong Gill; Yang, Min Ho; Park, Tae Jung; Huh, Yun Suk; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Won Hi; Park, Hoseok

    2011-08-01

    In this research, we report an innovative, chemical strategy for the in situ synthesis and direct two-dimensional (2D) arraying of various nanoparticles (NPs) on graphenes using both programmed-peptides as directing agents and graphenes as pre-formed 2D templates. The peptides were designed for manipulating the enthalpic (coupled interactions) constraint of the global system. Along with the functionalization of graphene for the stable dispersion, peptides directed the growth and array of NPs in a controllable manner. In particular, the sequences of peptides were encoded by the combination of glutamic acid (E), glycine (G), and phenylalanine (F) amino acids as follows: (E-G-F)3-G, with E for the interaction with NPs and F and G for the interaction with graphenes. For the entropic (restricted geometry) constraint, graphene was used as a 2D scaffold to tune the size, density, and position of NPs, while maintaining the intrinsic properties for electrochemical applications. The excellent quality of the resultant hybrids was demonstrated by their high electrocatalytic activity in the electrooxidation of methanol. This synergistic combination of peptides and graphenes allowed for a uniform 2D array and spontaneous organization of various NPs (i.e., Pt, Au, Pd, and Ru), which would greatly expand the utility and versatility of this approach for the synthesis and array of the advanced nanomaterials.In this research, we report an innovative, chemical strategy for the in situ synthesis and direct two-dimensional (2D) arraying of various nanoparticles (NPs) on graphenes using both programmed-peptides as directing agents and graphenes as pre-formed 2D templates. The peptides were designed for manipulating the enthalpic (coupled interactions) constraint of the global system. Along with the functionalization of graphene for the stable dispersion, peptides directed the growth and array of NPs in a controllable manner. In particular, the sequences of peptides were encoded by the

  15. Penicillin-induced hemolytic anemia and acute hepatic failure following treatment of tetanus in a horse.

    PubMed

    Step, D L; Blue, J T; Dill, S G

    1991-01-01

    Acute, severe hemolytic anemia occurred in a horse being treated for tetanus with intravenous penicillin and tetanus antitoxin. During treatment, the horse developed a positive direct antiglobulin test and a high titer (maximum 1:1024) of IgG anti-penicillin antibody. The horse recovered from the tetanus and penicillin induced hemolytic anemia, but later developed acute hepatic failure, probably resulting from the administration of equine origin tetanus antitoxin.

  16. Pickles, pectin, and penicillin.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2004-01-01

    My professional life has been devoted to the study of microbial products and their biosynthesis, regulation, and overproduction. These have included primary metabolites (glutamic acid, tryptophan, inosinic acid, guanylic acid, vitamin B(12), riboflavin, pantothenic acid, ethanol, and lactic acid) and secondary metabolites (penicillin, cephalosporins, streptomycin, fosfomycin, gramicidin S, rapamycin, indolmycin, microcin B17, fumagillin, mycotoxins, Monascus pigments, and tetramethylpyrazine). Other areas included microbial nutrition, strain improvement, bioconversions of statins and beta-lactams, sporulation and germination, plasmid stability, gel microdroplets, and the production of double-stranded RNA, the polymer xanthan, and enzymes (polygalacturonase, protease, cellulase). Most of the studies were carried out with me by devoted and hardworking industrial scientists for 15 years at Merck & Co. and by similarly characterized students, postdoctorals, and visiting scientists during my 32 years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I owe much of my success to my mentors from academia and industry. My recent research activities with undergraduate students at the Charles A. Dana Research Institute for Scientists Emeriti (R.I.S.E.) at Drew University have been very rewarding and are allowing me to continue my career.

  17. Specific on-plate enrichment of phosphorylated peptides for direct MALDI-TOF MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Roussel, Christophe; Wan, Jingjing; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2007-12-01

    An on-plate specific enrichment method is presented for the direct analysis of peptides phosphorylation. An array of sintered TiO 2 nanoparticle spots was prepared on a stainless steel plate to provide porous substrate with a very large specific surface and durable functions. These spots were used to selectively capture phosphorylated peptides from peptide mixtures, and the immobilized phosphopeptides could then be analyzed directly by MALDI MS after washing away the nonphosphorylated peptides. beta-Casein and protein mixtures were employed as model samples to investigate the selection efficiency. In this strategy, the steps of phosphopeptide capture, purification, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis are all successfully accomplished on a single target plate, which greatly reduces sample loss and simplifies analytical procedures. The low detection limit, small sample size, and rapid selective entrapment show that this on-plate strategy is promising for online enrichment of phosphopeptides, which is essential for the analysis of minute amount of samples in high-throughput proteome research.

  18. Why did the Fleming strain fail in penicillin industry?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sáiz, Marta; Díez, Bruno; Barredo, José Luis

    2005-05-01

    Penicillin, discovered 75 years ago by Sir Alexander Fleming in Penicillium notatum, laid the foundations of modern antibiotic chemotherapy. Early work was carried out on the original Fleming strain, but it was later replaced by overproducing strains of Penicillium chrysogenum, which became the industrial penicillin producers. We show how a C(1357)-->T (A394V) change in the gene encoding PahA in P. chrysogenum may help to explain the drawback of P. notatum. PahA is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the catabolism of phenylacetic acid (PA; a precursor of penicillin G). We expressed the pahA gene from P. notatum in P. chrysogenum obtaining transformants able to metabolize PA (P. chrysogenum does not), and observing penicillin production levels about fivefold lower than that of the parental strain. Our data thus show that a loss of function in P. chrysogenum PahA is directly related to penicillin overproduction, and support the historic choice of P. chrysogenum as the industrial producer of penicillin.

  19. Direct palladium-mediated on-resin disulfide formation from Allocam protected peptides.

    PubMed

    Kondasinghe, Thilini D; Saraha, Hasina Y; Odeesho, Samantha B; Stockdill, Jennifer L

    2017-04-05

    The synthesis of disulfide-containing polypeptides represents a long-standing challenge in peptide chemistry, and broadly applicable methods for the construction of disulfides are in constant demand. Few strategies exist for on-resin formation of disulfides directly from their protected counterparts. We present herein a novel strategy for the on-resin construction of disulfides directly from Allocam-protected cysteines. Our palladium-mediated approach is mild and uses readily available reagents, requiring no special equipment. No reduced peptide intermediates or S-allylated products are observed, and no residual palladium can be detected in the final products. The utility of this method is demonstrated through the synthesis of the C-carboxy analog of oxytocin.

  20. Direct Cytosolic Delivery of Polar Cargo to Cells by Spontaneous Membrane-translocating Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Kauffman, W. Berkeley; Fuselier, Taylor; Naveen, Somanna K.; Voss, Thomas G.; Hristova, Kalina; Wimley, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Direct cellular entry of potentially useful polar compounds into cells is prevented by the hydrophobic barrier of the membrane. Toward circumventing this barrier, we used high throughput screening to identify a family of peptides that carry membrane-impermeant cargos across synthetic membranes. Here we characterize the plasma membrane translocation of these peptides with polar cargos under a variety of conditions. The spontaneous membrane-translocating peptides (SMTPs) delivered the zwitterionic, membrane-impermeant dye tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) into cells even when the conditions were not permissive for endocytosis. They also delivered the larger, anionic membrane-impermeant dye Alexa Fluor 546 but did not deliver a quantum dot nanoparticle. Under all conditions, the SMTP-cargo filled the cytoplasm with a diffuse, non-punctate fluorescence that was partially excluded from the nucleus. d-Amino acid peptides behaved identically in vitro, ruling out proteolysis as an important factor in the diffuse cellular distribution. Thus, cytosolic delivery of SMTP-cargo conjugates is dominated by direct membrane translocation. This is in sharp contrast to Arg9-TAMRA, a representative highly cationic, cell-penetrating peptide, which entered cells only when endocytosis was permitted. Arg9-TAMRA triggered large scale endocytosis and did not appreciably escape the endosomal compartments in the 1-h timescales we studied. When injected into mice, SMTP-TAMRA conjugates were found in many tissues even after 2 h. Unconjugated TAMRA was rapidly cleared and did not become systemically distributed. SMTPs are a platform that could improve delivery of many polar compounds to cells, in the laboratory or in the clinic, including those that would otherwise be rejected as drugs because they are membrane-impermeant. PMID:23983125

  1. The inhibition of proinsulin-processing endopeptidase activities by active-site-directed peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, C J; Zumbrunn, A; Bailyes, E M; Shaw, E; Hutton, J C

    1989-01-01

    Inhibitor studies were performed on the two endopeptidase activities involved in proinsulin conversion in isolated insulin secretory granules [Davidson, Rhodes & Hutton (1988) Nature (London) 333, 93-96]. The active-site-directed peptides L-alanyl-L-arginyl-L-arginylmethyldimethylsulphonium and L-alanyl-L-lysyl-L-arginylmethyldimethylsulphonium inhibited these activities in accordance with the observed cleavage pattern, suggesting that the primary amino acid sequence of the dibasic site was an important determinant of the endopeptidase substrate specificities. PMID:2649090

  2. Changing the peptide specificity of a human T cell receptor by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Wang, Yuhang; Baylon, Javier L.; Singh, Nishant K.; Baker, Brian M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a T cell receptor (TCR) to a peptide/major histocompatibility complex is the key interaction involved in antigen specificity of T cells. The recognition involves up to six complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the TCR. Efforts to examine the structural basis of these interactions and to exploit them in adoptive T cell therapies has required the isolation of specific T cell clones and their clonotypic TCRs. Here we describe a strategy using in vitro, directed evolution of a single TCR to change its peptide specificity, thereby avoiding the need to isolate T cell clones. The human TCR A6, which recognizes the viral peptide Tax/HLA-A2, was converted to TCR variants that recognized the cancer peptide MART1/HLA-A2. Mutational studies and molecular dynamics simulations identified CDR residues that were predicted to be important in the specificity switch. Thus, in vitro engineering strategies alone can be used to discover TCRs with desired specificities. PMID:25376839

  3. A direct comparison of helix propensity in proteins and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    1997-01-01

    α-Helical secondary structure occurs widely in globular proteins and its formation is a key step in their folding. As a consequence, understanding the energetics of helix formation is crucial to understanding protein folding and stability. We have measured the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids for an α-helix in an intact protein, ribonuclease T1, and for a 17-residue peptide with a sequence identical to that of the α-helix in the protein. The helix propensities are in excellent agreement. This shows that when compared in the same sequence context, the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids are identical in helical peptides and intact proteins, and that conclusions based on studies of the helix-to-coil transitions of peptides may, in favorable cases, be directly applicable to proteins. Our helix propensities based on ribonuclease T1 are in good agreement with those from similar studies of barnase and T4 lysozyme. In contrast, our helix propensities differ substantially from those derived from studies of alanine-stabilized or salt bridge-stabilized model α-helical peptides. PMID:9096306

  4. Direct quantitation of peptide mixtures without standards using clusters formed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leib, Ryan D; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2009-05-15

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, ion abundances depend on a number of different factors, including analyte surface activity, competition between analytes for charge, analyte concentration, as well as instrumental factors, including mass-dependent ion transmission and detection. Here, a novel method for obtaining quantitative information about solution-phase concentrations of peptide mixtures is described and demonstrated for five different peptide mixtures with relative concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 50%. In this method, the abundances of large clusters containing anywhere from 0 to 13 impurity molecules are measured and directly related to the relative solution-phase concentration of the peptides. For clusters containing approximately 15 or more peptides, the composition of the clusters approaches the statistical value indicating that these clusters are formed nonspecifically and that any differences in ion detection or ionization efficiency are negligible at these large cluster sizes. This method is accurate to within approximately 20% or better, even when the relative ion intensities of the protonated monomers can differ by over an order of magnitude compared to their solution-phase concentrations. Although less accurate than other quantitation methods that employ internal standards, this method does have the key advantages of speed, simplicity, and the ability to quantitate components in solution even when the identities of the components are unknown.

  5. The International Reference Preparation of Penicillin K

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J. H.; Lightbown, J. W.

    1954-01-01

    The International Reference Preparation of Penicillin K was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization at its fifth session, held in Geneva in 1951. Since the preparation is likely to be used for research only, no unit has been defined. The composition of the preparation, in terms of its activity against a strain of Bacillus subtilis, is penicillin K 89.9%, penicillin dihydro F 9.6%, and penicillin F 0.5%. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:13199652

  6. Selection of peptides with semiconductor binding specificity for directed nanocrystal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Sandra R.; English, D. S.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Barbara, Paul F.; Belcher, Angela M.

    2000-06-01

    In biological systems, organic molecules exert a remarkable level of control over the nucleation and mineral phase of inorganic materials such as calcium carbonate and silica, and over the assembly of crystallites and other nanoscale building blocks into complex structures required for biological function. This ability to direct the assembly of nanoscale components into controlled and sophisticated structures has motivated intense efforts to develop assembly methods that mimic or exploit the recognition capabilities and interactions found in biological systems. Of particular value would be methods that could be applied to materials with interesting electronic or optical properties, but natural evolution has not selected for interactions between biomolecules and such materials. However, peptides with limited selectivity for binding to metal surfaces and metal oxide surfaces have been successfully selected. Here we extend this approach and show that combinatorial phage-display libraries can be used to evolve peptides that bind to a range of semiconductor surfaces with high specificity, depending on the crystallographic orientation and composition of the structurally similar materials we have used. As electronic devices contain structurally related materials in close proximity, such peptides may find use for the controlled placement and assembly of a variety of practically important materials, thus broadening the scope for `bottom-up' fabrication approaches.

  7. Symmetry-Directed Self-Organization in Peptide Nanoassemblies through Aromatic π-π Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Sajitha; Hazam, Prakash Kishore; Ramakrishnan, Vibin

    2017-01-19

    Almost all biological systems are assemblies of one or more biomolecules from nano- to macrodimensions. Unlike inorganic molecules, peptide systems attune with the conceptual framework of aggregation models when forming nanoassemblies. Three significant recent theoretical models have indicated that nucleation, end-to-end association, and geometry of growth are determined primarily by the size and electrostatics of the individual basic building blocks. In this study, we tested six model systems, differentially modulating the prominence of three design variables, namely, aromatic π-π interactions, local electrostatics, and overall symmetry of the basic building unit. Our results indicate that the crucial design elements in a peptide-based nanoassembly are (a) a stable extended π-π interaction network, (b) size, and (c) overall symmetry of the basic building blocks. The six model systems represent all of the design variables in the best manner possible, considering the complexity of a biomolecule. The results provide important directives in deciding the morphology and crystallinity of peptide nanoassemblies.

  8. Simulated Batch Production of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, A.; Walker, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a program in applied biology in which the simulation of the production of penicillin in a batch fermentor is used as a teaching technique to give students experience before handling a genuine industrial fermentation process. Details are given for the calculation of minimum production cost. (JR)

  9. Simulated Batch Production of Penicillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, A.; Walker, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a program in applied biology in which the simulation of the production of penicillin in a batch fermentor is used as a teaching technique to give students experience before handling a genuine industrial fermentation process. Details are given for the calculation of minimum production cost. (JR)

  10. Chromatography of Penicillins, Penicilloates, and Penicilloylamides on Dextran Gels

    PubMed Central

    Hyslop, Newton E.; Milligan, Richard J.

    1974-01-01

    The factors influencing the chromatographic behavior on dextran gels of penicillins and their derivatives were investigated by comparing elution profiles and partition coefficients (KD and KAV) of penicillins differing in side-chain structure and among penicillin derivatives of identical side-chain but different nuclear structure. Under the conditions of pH and ionic strength employed (pH 7.4, 0.145 M NaCl, 0.05 M PO4), side-chain adsorptive effects best explained the anomalous behavior of benzylpenicillin and of oxacillin and its chlorine-substituted analogues. Polar side-chain substituents, such as the amino group of ampicillin and the carboxyl group of carbenicillin, and cleavage of the β-lactam ring, exemplified by penicilloates and penicilloylamines, both appeared to interfere with side-chain-directed adsorption. The differential adsorption of penicillins and their derivatives to dextran gels is not only of theoretical interest relative to the mechanism of chromatography but of practical application to analytical and preparative procedures in penicillin chemistry. PMID:15825415

  11. Peptide-Metal Organic Framework Swimmers that Direct the Motion toward Chemical Targets.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L; Shi, Menglu; Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-10

    Highly efficient and robust chemical motors are expected for the application in microbots that can selectively swim toward targets and accomplish their tasks in sensing, labeling, and delivering. However, one of major issues for such development is that current artificial swimmers have difficulty controlling their directional motion toward targets like bacterial chemotaxis. To program synthetic motors with sensing capability for the target-directed motion, we need to develop swimmers whose motions are sensitive to chemical gradients in environments. Here we create a new intelligent biochemical swimmer by integrating metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and peptides that can sense toxic heavy metals in solution and swim toward the targets. With the aid of Pb-binding enzymes, the peptide-MOF motor can directionally swim toward PbSe quantum dots (QD) by sensing pH gradient and eventually complete the motion as the swimmer reaches the highest gradient point at the target position in solution. This type of technology could be evolved to miniaturize chemical robotic systems that sense target chemicals and swim toward target locations.

  12. Improving penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum by glyoxalase overproduction.

    PubMed

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2013-07-01

    Genetic engineering of fungal cell factories mainly focuses on manipulating enzymes of the product pathway or primary metabolism. However, despite the use of strong promoters or strains containing the genes of interest in multiple copies, the desired strongly enhanced enzyme levels are often not obtained. Here we present a novel strategy to improve penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum by reducing reactive and toxic metabolic by-products, 2-oxoaldehydes. This was achieved by overexpressing the genes encoding glyoxalase I and II, which resulted in a 10% increase in penicillin titers relative to the control strain. The protein levels of two key enzymes of penicillin biosynthesis, isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase, were increased in the glyoxalase transformants, whereas their transcript levels remained unaltered. These results suggest that directed intracellular reduction of 2-oxoaldehydes prolongs the functional lifetime of these enzymes.

  13. Penicillins and other acylamino compounds synthesized by the cell-bound penicillin acylase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M.

    1969-01-01

    1. The penicillin acylase of Eschericha coli N.C.I.B. 8743 is a reversible enzyme. Reaction rates for the two directions have been determined. 2. Measurements of the rates of enzymic synthesis of penicillins from 6-aminopenicillanic acid and various carboxylic acids revealed that p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid was the best substrate, followed by phenylacetic, 2-thienylacetic, substituted phenylacetic, 3-hexenoic and n-hexanoic acids. 3. The rate of synthesis of penicillin improved when amides or N-acylglycines were used; α-aminobenzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were only synthesized when using these more energy-rich compounds. 4. Phenyl-acetylglycine was the best substrate for the synthesis of benzylpenicillin compared with other derivatives of phenylacetic acid. 5. The enzyme was specific for acyl-l-amino acids, benzylpenicillin being synthesized from phenylacetyl-l-α-aminophenylacetic acid but not from phenylacetyl-d-α-aminophenylacetic acid. 6. α-Phenoxyethylpenicillin was synthesized from 6-aminopenicillanic acid and α-phenoxypropionylthioglycollic acid non-enzymically, but the rate was faster in the presence of the enzyme. 7. The E. coli acylase catalysed the acylation of hydroxylamine by acids or amides to give hydroxamic acids, the phenylacetyl group being the most suitable acyl group. The enzyme also catalysed other acyl-group transfers. PMID:4982418

  14. Penicillin allergy: A practical guide for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Radojicic, Cristine

    2015-05-01

    Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported drug allergy in the United States. However, after undergoing a complete evaluation by a board-certified allergist, including skin testing, 90% of patients labeled as 'penicillin-allergic' are able to tolerate penicillin. Clinical presentation is key in classifying reactions as either mediated by or not mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE), and in determining which patients may benefit from penicillin skin testing, graded-dose challenge, or desensitization. Cross-reactivity between penicillin and other beta-lactams is less common than previously thought.

  15. The facts about penicillin allergy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are the major problem in the use of penicillins. True penicillin allergy is rare with the estimated frequency of anaphylaxis at 1-5 per 10 000 cases of penicillin therapy. Hypersensitivity is however, its most important adverse reaction resulting in nausea, vomiting, pruritus, urticaria, wheezing, laryngeal oedema and ultimately, cardiovascular collapse. Identification of patients who erroneously carry ß-lactam allergy leads to improved utilization of antibiotics and slows the spread of multiple drug-resistant bacteria. Cross-reactivity between penicillin and second and third generation cephalosporin is low and may be lower than the cross-reactivity between penicillin and unrelated antibiotics.

  16. A density functional theory study on peptide bond cleavage at aspartic residues: direct vs cyclic intermediate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sang-aroon, Wichien; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2013-12-01

    In this work, peptide bond cleavages at carboxy- and amino-sides of the aspartic residue in a peptide model via direct (concerted and step-wise) and cyclic intermediate hydrolysis reaction pathways were explored computationally. The energetics, thermodynamic properties, rate constants, and equilibrium constants of all hydrolysis reactions, as well as their energy profiles were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The result indicated that peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue occurred most preferentially via the cyclic intermediate hydrolysis pathway. In all reaction pathways, cleavage of the peptide bond at the amino-side occurred less preferentially than at the carboxy-side. The overall reaction rate constants of peptide bond cleavage of the Asp residue at the carboxy-side for the assisted system were, in increasing order: concerted < step-wise < cyclic intermediate.

  17. Site-Directed Glycosylation of Peptide/Protein with Homogeneous O-Linked Eukaryotic N-Glycans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Jiang, Kuan; Zhu, Hailiang; Ma, Cheng; Yu, Zaikuan; Li, Lei; Guan, Wanyi; Liu, Yunpeng; Zhu, He; Chen, Yanyi; Li, Shanshan; Li, Jing; Cheng, Jiansong; Zhang, Lianwen; Wang, Peng George

    2016-09-21

    Here we report a facile and efficient method for site-directed glycosylation of peptide/protein. The method contains two sequential steps: generation of a GlcNAc-O-peptide/protein, and subsequent ligation of a eukaryotic N-glycan to the GlcNAc moiety. A pharmaceutical peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and a model protein, bovine α-Crystallin, were successfully glycosylated using such an approach. It was shown that the GLP-1 with O-linked N-glycan maintained an unchanged secondary structure after glycosylation, suggesting the potential application of this approach for peptide/protein drug production. In summary, the coupled approach provides a general strategy to produce homogeneous glycopeptide/glycoprotein bearing eukaryotic N-glycans.

  18. Penicillin allergy: a practical approach to management.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, G L; Davis, K; Kohler, P F

    1986-01-01

    Although penicillin is nontoxic, it is highly immunogenic and is the most common drug that causes allergic reactions. A previous reaction to penicillin has been shown to be unreliable in predicting sensitivity in 75% to 90% of patients. To more accurately test for penicillin allergy, diagnostic skin test reagents have been developed; these include the major determinant (benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine) and the minor determinant mixture (penicillin G potassium, benzylpenicilloate sodium and benzylpenicilloyl-N-propylamine). Penicillin skin testing has been shown to be safe and useful in predicting immediate IgE-mediated reactions (overall predictive value 99%). Reactions that occur when patients are challenged with penicillin are mild or accelerated urticarial reactions. We outline a practical and rational therapeutic approach based on the current understanding of penicillin allergy. PMID:3518897

  19. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation.

  20. Direct electrochemical and AFM detection of amyloid-β peptide aggregation on basal plane HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Paula; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2014-06-01

    Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation.Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details: procedures for Aβ42 aggregation and electrode modification, DPV/AFM measurements and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02413c

  1. Presentation of BMP-2 Mimicking Peptides in 3D Hydrogels Directs Cell Fate Commitment in Osteoblasts and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Christopher M.; Mehta, Manav; Duda, Georg N.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Many strategies for controlling the fate of transplanted stem cells rely on the concurrent delivery of soluble growth factors that have the potential to produce undesirable secondary effects in surrounding tissue. Such off target effects could be eliminated by locally presenting growth factor peptide mimics from biomaterial scaffolds to control stem cell fate. Peptide mimics of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) were synthesized by solid phase Fmoc-peptide synthesis and covalently bound to alginate hydrogels via either carbodiimide or sulfhydryl-based coupling strategies. Successful peptide conjugation was confirmed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and quantified by fluorescently labeling the peptides. Peptides derived from the knuckle epitope of BMP-2, presented from both 2D surfaces and 3D alginate hydrogels, were shown to increase alkaline phosphatase activity in clonally derived murine osteoblasts. Furthermore, when presented in 3D hydrogels, these peptides were shown to initiate Smad signaling, upregulate osteopontin production, and increase mineral deposition with clonally derived murine mesenchymal stem cells. These data suggest that these peptide-conjugated hydrogels may be effective alternatives to local BMP-2 release in directly and spatially eliciting osteogenesis from transplanted or host osteoprogenitors in the future. PMID:24400664

  2. Directed Evolution of an LBP/CD14 Inhibitory Peptide and Its Anti-Endotoxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Guan-song; Ji, Fu-yun; Mei, Chun-xia; Liu, Juan; Wu, Guo-ming

    2014-01-01

    Background LPS-binding protein (LBP) and its ligand CD14 are located upstream of the signaling pathway for LPS-induced inflammation. Blocking LBP and CD14 binding might prevent LPS-induced inflammation. In previous studies, we obtained a peptide analog (MP12) for the LBP/CD14 binding site and showed that this peptide analog had anti-endotoxin activity. In this study, we used in vitro directed evolution for this peptide analog to improve its in vivo and in vitro anti-endotoxin activity. Methods We used error-prone PCR (ep-PCR) and induced mutations in the C-terminus of LBP and attached the PCR products to T7 phages to establish a mutant phage display library. The positive clones that competed with LBP for CD14 binding was obtained by screening. We used both in vivo and in vitro experiments to compare the anti-endotoxin activities of a polypeptide designated P1 contained in a positive clone and MP12. Results 11 positive clones were obtained from among target phages. Sequencing showed that 9 positive clones had a threonine (T) to methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. Compared to polypeptide MP12, polypeptide P1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α expression and NF-κB activity in U937 cells (P<0.05). Compared to MP12, P1 significantly improved arterial oxygen pressure, an oxygenation index, and lung pathology scores in LPS-induced ARDS rats (P<0.05). Conclusion By in vitro directed evolution of peptide analogs for the LBP/CD14 binding site, we established a new polypeptide (P1) with a threonine (T)-to-methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. This polypeptide had high anti-endotoxin activity in vitro and in vivo, which suggested that amino acid 287 in the C-terminus of LBP may play an important role in LBP binding with CD14. PMID:25025695

  3. Fluorous Phase-Directed Peptide Assembly Affords Nano-Peptisomes Capable of Ultrasound-Triggered Cellular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Medina, Scott H; Michie, Megan S; Miller, Stephen E; Schnermann, Martin J; Schneider, Joel P

    2017-09-11

    Here, we report the design, synthesis and efficacy of a new class of ultrasound (US)-sensitive self-assembled peptide-based nanoparticle. Peptisomes are prepared via templated assembly of a de novo designed peptide at the interface of fluorinated nanodroplets. Utilizing peptide assembly allows for facile particle synthesis, direct incorporation of bioactive sequences displayed from the particle corona, and the ability to easily encapsulate biologics during particle preparation using a mild solvent exchange procedure. Further, nano-peptisome size can be precisely controlled by simply modulating the starting peptide and fluorinated solvent concentrations during synthesis. Biomolecular cargo encapsulated within the particle core can be directly delivered to the cytoplasm of cells upon US-mediated rupture of the carrier. Thus, nano-peptisomes represent a novel class of US-activated carriers that can shuttle cell-impermeable biomacromolecules into cells with spatial and temporal precision. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. An Engineered Yeast Efficiently Secreting Penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Douma, Rutger D.; Seifar, Reza M.; van Gulik, Walter M.; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this β-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) β-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  5. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    PubMed

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A K W; Douma, Rutger D; Seifar, Reza M; van Gulik, Walter M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2009-12-15

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's.

  6. PbSe nanocrystal growth as nanocubes and nanorods on peptide nanotubes via different directed-assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Menglu; Su, Wei; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    Pb-binding TAR-1 peptides (Ile-Ser-Leu-Leu-His-Ser-Thr) were covalently conjugated on a bolaamphiphile peptide nanotube substrate and the precursors of PbSe were incubated at room temperature. This resulted in the growth of highly crystalline PbSe nanocubes on this biomimetic cylindrical substrate. The growth mechanism to generate nanocubes occurs via the directed self-assembly of nanoparticles and then nanoparticle fusion. The peptide conformation and the cylindrical peptide nanotube substrate play important roles in the mesoscopic crystallization of PbSe nanocubes. Changing the buffer for the peptide immobilization process from 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid to phosphate induces a transformation in the nanocrystal shape from nanocube to nanorods. The conformational change of the TAR-1 peptide on the nanotubes due to the change in the buffer seems to be responsible for aggregating intermediate nanoparticles in different directions for the directed fusion and mesoscopic crystallization of PbSe into the different shapes.

  7. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  8. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  9. Synergy of Penicillin-Netilmicin Combinations Against Enterococci Including Strains Highly Resistant to Streptomycin or Kanamycin

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Christine C.

    1977-01-01

    The in vitro activity of combinations of penicillin and netilimicin was determined against 20 clinical isolates of enterococci and compared with that obtained in simultaneous tests with penicillin/sisomicin, penicillin/streptomycin, and penicillin/kanamycin. Synergy between the two drugs in each combination was determined by the use of quantitative kill curves and was defined as a killing by the combination at least 100-fold greater than that produced by the most effective drug alone. Penicillin/netilmicin and penicillin/sisomicin combinations were found to be synergistic against the majority of isolates tested, including strains resistant to penicillin/streptomycin or penicillin/kanamycin combinations. This synergy with penicillin could be demonstrated at a concentration of ≤7 μg/ml for either netilmicin or sisomicin. Studies on the kinetics of killing produced by these combinations showed the rate and extent of killing to be directly dependent upon the organism's relative susceptibility to the aminoglycoside alone and the aminoglycoside concentration in the combination. Results also indicated that the interaction between penicillin and netilmicin was true synergy; i.e., rapid and complete killing was produced by combinations containing each drug at concentrations insufficient to produce any killing alone, and the killing observed could not be produced by either drug alone at a concentration equivalent to the total drug concentration in the combination. The potential clinical application of this synergistic interaction should be investigated further, especially in view of recent reports showing netilmicin to be considerably less toxic than gentamicin in experimental animals. PMID:242509

  10. Heteroresistance to penicillin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Morand, Brigitte; Mühlemann, Kathrin

    2007-08-28

    Heteroresistance to beta-lactam antibiotics has been mainly described for staphylococci, for which it complicates diagnostic procedures and therapeutic success. This study investigated whether heteroresistance to penicillin exists in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Population analysis profile (PAP) showed the presence of subpopulations with higher penicillin resistance in four of nine clinical pneumococcal strains obtained from a local surveillance program (representing the multiresistant clones ST179, ST276, and ST344) and in seven of 16 reference strains (representing the international clones Spain(23F)-1, Spain(9V)-3, Spain(14)-5, Hungary(19A)-6, South Africa(19A)-13, Taiwan(23F)-15, and Finland(6B)-12). Heteroresistant strains had penicillin minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (for the majority of cells) in the intermediate- to high-level range (0.19-2.0 mug/ml). PAP curves suggested the presence of subpopulations also for the highly penicillin-resistant strains Taiwan(19F)-14, Poland(23F)-16, CSR(19A)-11, and CSR(14)-10. PAP of bacterial subpopulations with higher penicillin resistance showed a shift toward higher penicillin-resistance levels, which reverted upon multiple passages on antibiotic-free media. Convergence to a homotypic resistance phenotype did not occur. Comparison of two strains of clone ST179 showed a correlation between the heteroresistant phenotype and a higher-penicillin MIC and a greater number of altered penicillin-binding proteins (PBP1a, -2b, and -2x), respectively. Therefore, heteroresistance to penicillin occurs in international multiresistant clones of S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci may use heteroresistance to penicillin as a tool during their evolution to high penicillin resistance, because it gives the bacteria an opportunity to explore growth in the presence of antibiotics before acquisition of resistance genes.

  11. Spacer-free BODIPY fluorogens in antimicrobial peptides for direct imaging of fungal infection in human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendive-Tapia, Lorena; Zhao, Can; Akram, Ahsan R.; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lee, Martin; Serrels, Alan; Kielland, Nicola; Read, Nick D; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Vendrell, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent antimicrobial peptides are promising structures for in situ, real-time imaging of fungal infection. Here we report a fluorogenic probe to image Aspergillus fumigatus directly in human pulmonary tissue. We have developed a fluorogenic Trp-BODIPY amino acid with a spacer-free C-C linkage between Trp and a BODIPY fluorogen, which shows remarkable fluorescence enhancement in hydrophobic microenvironments. The incorporation of our fluorogenic amino acid in short antimicrobial peptides does not impair their selectivity for fungal cells, and enables rapid and direct fungal imaging without any washing steps. We have optimized the stability of our probes in human samples to perform multi-photon imaging of A. fumigatus in ex vivo human tissue. The incorporation of our unique BODIPY fluorogen in biologically relevant peptides will accelerate the development of novel imaging probes with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26956772

  12. Multiple Length Peptide-Pheromone Variants Produced by Streptococcus pyogenes Directly Bind Rgg Proteins to Confer Transcriptional Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication. PMID:24958729

  13. Multiple length peptide-pheromone variants produced by Streptococcus pyogenes directly bind Rgg proteins to confer transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Nanavati, Dhaval; Federle, Michael J

    2014-08-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a human-restricted pathogen, accounts for substantial mortality related to infections worldwide. Recent studies indicate that streptococci produce and respond to several secreted peptide signaling molecules (pheromones), including those known as short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs), to regulate gene expression by a quorum-sensing mechanism. Upon transport into the bacterial cell, pheromones bind to and modulate activity of receptor proteins belonging to the Rgg family of transcription factors. Previously, we reported biofilm regulation by the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing circuit in S. pyogenes. The aim of this study was to identify the composition of mature pheromones from cell-free culture supernatants that facilitate biofilm formation. Bioluminescent reporters were employed to detect active pheromones in culture supernatants fractionated by reverse-phase chromatography, and mass spectrometry was used to characterize their properties. Surprisingly, multiple SHPs that varied by length were detected. Synthetic peptides of each variant were tested individually using bioluminescence reporters and biofilm growth assays, and although activities differed widely among the group, peptides comprising the C-terminal eight amino acids of the full-length native peptide were most active. Direct Rgg/SHP interactions were determined using a fluorescence polarization assay that utilized FITC-labeled peptide ligands. Peptide receptor affinities were seen to be as low as 500 nm and their binding affinities directly correlated with observed bioactivity. Revelation of naturally produced pheromones along with determination of their affinity for cognate receptors are important steps forward in designing compounds whose purpose is positioned for future therapeutics aimed at treating infections through the interference of bacterial communication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. 21 CFR 556.510 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.510 Penicillin. Tolerances are established for residues of penicillin...

  15. 21 CFR 556.510 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.510 Penicillin. Tolerances are established for residues of penicillin...

  16. 21 CFR 556.510 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.510 Penicillin. Tolerances are established for residues of penicillin...

  17. 21 CFR 556.510 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.510 Penicillin. Tolerances are established for residues of penicillin...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin. ...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin. ...

  20. What if Fleming had not discovered penicillin?

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Wainwright, Milton; Alahmadi, Tahani Awad; Salleeh, Hashim Bin; Faden, Asmaa A.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    What would have happened had Alexander Fleming not discovered penicillin in 1928? Perhaps the obvious answer is that, someone else would have discovered penicillin during 1930s and the Oxford group, would still have purified it sometime in the early 1940s. Here, however, in this counterfactual account of the penicillin story, it is argued that without Fleming, penicillin might still be undiscovered and the antibiotic age would never have dawned. As a result, many of the recent developments in medicine, such as organ transplantation, might have been delayed or, at best, made more hazardous. Penicillin might have come onto the scene a few years later but, had Fleming overlooked the discovery, it seems certain that penicillin would not have saved countless Allied lives, during and after D-Day. Instead of having enjoyed fifty and more years of the antibiotic age, it is argued here, that we would have had to rely upon highly developed sulphonamides, so-called “supasulfas”, and other chemically-derived antibacterial drugs. Indeed, it might be the case that, even well into this new millennium, the antibiotic age has yet to dawn, and medicine is still waiting for someone to chance upon penicillin. Here we discuss what might have happened had Fleming not discovered penicillin and come to the conclusion that the medical armoury available today would have been far different and might have relied solely upon highly developed varieties of sulphonamides or similar, synthetic, non-antibiotic antibacterial agents. PMID:25183937

  1. Formation of 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, Penicillins, and Penicillin Acylase by Various Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M.

    1966-01-01

    Several penicillin-producing fungi were examined for ability to produce 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) and penicillin acylase. 6-APA was found in corn steep liquor fermentations of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus ochraceous, and three strains of Penicillium sp. 6-APA was not detected in fermentations of Epidermophyton floccosum although penicillins were produced. 6-APA formed a large part of the total antibiotic production of T. mentagrophytes. The types of penicillins produced by various fungi were identified by paper chromatography, and it was found that all cultures produced benzylpenicillin. T. mentagrophytes and A. ochraceous showed increased yields of benzylpenicillin and the formation of phenoxymethylpenicillin in response to the addition to the fermentation medium of phenylacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid, respectively. Washed mycelia of the three Penicillium spp. and two high penicillin-yielding strains of P. chrysogenum possessed penicillin acylase activity against phenoxymethylpenicillin. A. ochraceous, T. mentagrophytes, E. floccosum, and Cephalosporium sp. also had penicillin acylase activity against phenoxymethylpenicillin. Only two of the above fungi, T. mentagrophytes and E. floccosum, showed significant penicillin acylase activity against benzylpenicillin; in both cases it was very low. The acylase activity of A. ochraceous was considerably increased by culturing in the presence of phenoxyacetic acid. It is concluded that 6-APA frequently but not invariably accompanies the formation of penicillin, and that penicillin acylase activity against phenoxymethylpenicillin is present in all penicillin-producing fungi. PMID:5950252

  2. Characterization of an autoinducer of penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Martín, Jorge; García-Estrada, Carlos; Rumbero, Angel; Recio, Eliseo; Albillos, Silvia M; Ullán, Ricardo V; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2011-08-15

    Filamentous fungi produce an impressive variety of secondary metabolites; many of them have important biological activities. The biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites is frequently induced by plant-derived external elicitors and appears to also be regulated by internal inducers, which may work in a way similar to that of bacterial autoinducers. The biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum is an excellent model for studying the molecular mechanisms of control of gene expression due to a good knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular genetics of β-lactam antibiotics and to the availability of its genome sequence and proteome. In this work, we first developed a plate bioassay that allows direct testing of inducers of penicillin biosynthesis using single colonies of P. chrysogenum. Using this bioassay, we have found an inducer substance in the conditioned culture broths of P. chrysogenum and Acremonium chrysogenum. No inducing effect was exerted by γ-butyrolactones, jasmonic acid, or the penicillin precursor δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine. The conditioned broth induced penicillin biosynthesis and transcription of the pcbAB, pcbC, and penDE genes when added at inoculation time, but its effect was smaller if added at 12 h and it had no effect when added at 24 h, as shown by Northern analysis and lacZ reporter studies. The inducer molecule was purified and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as 1,3-diaminopropane. Addition of pure 1,3-diaminopropane stimulated the production of penicillin by about 100% compared to results for the control cultures. Genes for the biosynthesis of 1,3-diaminopropane have been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome.

  3. Penicillin-resistant Variants of Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Gunnison, Janet B.; Fraher, Margaret A.; Pelcher, Elisabeth A.; Jawetz, Ernest

    1968-01-01

    All of the 74 strains of pneumococci isolated from human infections from 1963 to 1964 proved to be uniformly and highly susceptible to penicillin. Of these strains, 15 were identified by capsule-swelling reactions and were submitted to serial transfer in the presence of increasing concentrations of penicillin. Highly penicillin-resistant mutants were selected from 14 of the 15 strains, whereas one strain was moderately resistant. Of these mutants, 11 could still react with specific antiserum, and all of the mutants could be identified by fermentation reactions and optochin inhibition. The in vitro development of penicillin resistance in these mutants did not result in a change in cell-wall composition sufficient to diminish bile solubility. The possibility of encountering rising penicillin resistance among pneumococci, as well as the possibility that such mutants may react atypically, should be kept in mind. PMID:4384590

  4. Overexpression of Penicillin V Acylase from Streptomyces lavendulae and Elucidation of Its Catalytic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Hormigo, Daniel; Torres-Gúzman, Raquel; Arroyo, Miguel; Castillón, María Pilar; García, José Luis; Acebal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The pva gene from Streptomyces lavendulae ATCC 13664, encoding a novel penicillin V acylase (SlPVA), has been isolated and characterized. The gene encodes an inactive precursor protein containing a secretion signal peptide that is activated by two internal autoproteolytic cleavages that release a 25-amino-acid linker peptide and two large domains of 18.79 kDa (α-subunit) and 60.09 kDa (β-subunit). Based on sequence alignments and the three-dimensional model of SlPVA, the enzyme contains a hydrophobic pocket involved in catalytic activity, including Serβ1, Hisβ23, Valβ70, and Asnβ272, which were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The heterologous expression of pva in S. lividans led to the production of an extracellularly homogeneous heterodimeric enzyme at a 5-fold higher concentration (959 IU/liter) than in the original host and in a considerably shorter time. According to the catalytic properties of SlPVA, the enzyme must be classified as a new member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily, which belongs to a novel subfamily of acylases that recognize substrates with long hydrophobic acyl chains and have biotechnological applications in semisynthetic antifungal production. PMID:25501472

  5. Overexpression of penicillin V acylase from Streptomyces lavendulae and elucidation of its catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Hormigo, Daniel; Torres-Gúzman, Raquel; Arroyo, Miguel; Castillón, María Pilar; García, Luis José; Acebal, Carmen; de la Mata, Isabel

    2015-02-01

    The pva gene from Streptomyces lavendulae ATCC 13664, encoding a novel penicillin V acylase (SlPVA), has been isolated and characterized. The gene encodes an inactive precursor protein containing a secretion signal peptide that is activated by two internal autoproteolytic cleavages that release a 25-amino-acid linker peptide and two large domains of 18.79 kDa (alpha-subunit) and 60.09 kDA (beta-subunit). Based on sequence alignments and the three-dimensional model of SlPVA, the enzyme contains a hydrophobicpocket involved in catalytic activity, including Serbeta1, Hisbeta23, Valbeta70, and Asnbeta272, which were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis studies. The heterologous expression of pva in S. lividans led to the production of an extracellularly homogeneous heterodimeric enzyme at a 5-fold higher concentration (959 IU/liter) than in the original host and in a considerably shorter time. According to the catalytic properties of SlPVA, the enzyme must be classified as a new member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily, which belongs to a novel subfamily of acylases that recognize substrates with long hydrophobic acyl chains and have biotechnological applications in semisynthetic antifungal production.

  6. MALDI-imaging enables direct observation of kinetic and thermodynamic products of mixed peptide fiber assembly.

    PubMed

    Medini, Karima; West, Brandi; Williams, David E; Brimble, Margaret A; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2017-02-04

    Controlling the self-assembly of multicomponent systems provides a key to designing new materials and understanding the molecular complexity of biology. Here, we demonstrate the first use of MALDI-imaging to characterize a multicomponent self-assembling peptide fiber. Observations of mixed peptide systems over time demonstrate how simple sequence variation can change the balance between kinetic and thermodynamic products.

  7. Plant elicitor peptides are conserved signals regulating direct and indirect anti-herbivore defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect-induced defenses occur in nearly all plants and are regulated by conserved signaling pathways. As the first described plant peptide signal, systemin regulates anti-herbivore defenses in the Solanaceae, but in other plant families peptides with analogous activity have remained elusive. In th...

  8. Plant elicitor peptides are conserved signals regulating direct and indirect anti-herbivore defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect-induced defenses occur in nearly all plants and are regulated by conserved signaling pathways. As the first described plant peptide signal, systemin regulates anti-herbivore defenses in the Solanaceae, but in other plant families peptides with analogous activity have remained elusive. In the ...

  9. Chimeric peptide beacons: a direct polypeptide analog of DNA molecular beacons†

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kenneth J.; Cash, Kevin J.; Lubin, Arica A.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new biosensor architecture, which is comprised of a polypeptide–peptide nucleic acid tri-block copolymer and which we have termed chimeric peptide beacons (CPB), that generates an optical output via a mechanism analogous to that employed in DNA-based molecular beacons. PMID:18361352

  10. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  11. Directed peptide amphiphile assembly using aqueous liquid crystal templates in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    van der Asdonk, Pim; Keshavarz, Masoumeh; Christianen, Peter C M; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-21

    An alignment technique based on the combination of magnetic fields and a liquid crystal (LC) template uses the advantages of both approaches: the magnetic fields offer non-contact methods that apply to all sample sizes and shapes, whilst the LC templates offer high susceptibilities. The combination introduces a route to control the spatial organization of materials with low intrinsic susceptibilities. We demonstrate that we can unidirectionally align one such material, peptide amphiphiles in water, on a centimeter scale at a tenfold lower magnetic field by using a lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal as a template. We can transform the aligned supramolecular assemblies into optically active π-conjugated polymers after photopolymerization. Lastly, by reducing the magnetic field strength needed for addressing these assemblies, we are able to create more complex structures by initiating self-assembly of our supramolecular materials under competing alignment forces between the magnetically induced alignment of the assemblies (with a positive diamagnetic anisotropy) and the elastic force dominated alignment of the template (with a negative diamagnetic anisotropy), which is directed orthogonally. Although the approach is still in its infancy and many critical parameters need optimization, we believe that it is a very promising technique to create tailor-made complex structures of (aqueous) functional soft matter.

  12. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  13. Capability of Neutrophils to Form NETs Is Not Directly Influenced by a CMA-Targeting Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Maueröder, Christian; Schall, Nicolas; Meyer, Frédéric; Mahajan, Aparna; Garnier, Benjamin; Hahn, Jonas; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Muller, Sylviane

    2017-01-01

    During inflammatory reaction, neutrophils exhibit numerous cellular and immunological functions, notably the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and autophagy. NETs are composed of decondensed chromatin fibers coated with various antimicrobial molecules derived from neutrophil granules. NETs participate in antimicrobial defense and can also display detrimental roles and notably trigger some of the immune features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Autophagy is a complex and finely regulated mechanism involved in the cell survival/death balance that may be connected to NET formation. To shed some light on the connection between autophagy and NET formation, we designed a number of experiments in human neutrophils and both in normal and lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice to determine whether the synthetic peptide P140, which is capable of selectively modulating chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in lymphocytes, could alter NET formation. P140/Lupuzor™ is currently being evaluated in phase III clinical trials involving SLE patients. Overall our in vitro and in vivo studies established that P140 does not influence NET formation, cytokine/chemokine production, or CMA in neutrophils. Thus, the beneficial effect of P140/Lupuzor™ in SLE is apparently not directly related to modulation of neutrophil function. PMID:28191006

  14. Capability of Neutrophils to Form NETs Is Not Directly Influenced by a CMA-Targeting Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maueröder, Christian; Schall, Nicolas; Meyer, Frédéric; Mahajan, Aparna; Garnier, Benjamin; Hahn, Jonas; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Hoffmann, Markus H; Muller, Sylviane

    2017-01-01

    During inflammatory reaction, neutrophils exhibit numerous cellular and immunological functions, notably the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and autophagy. NETs are composed of decondensed chromatin fibers coated with various antimicrobial molecules derived from neutrophil granules. NETs participate in antimicrobial defense and can also display detrimental roles and notably trigger some of the immune features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Autophagy is a complex and finely regulated mechanism involved in the cell survival/death balance that may be connected to NET formation. To shed some light on the connection between autophagy and NET formation, we designed a number of experiments in human neutrophils and both in normal and lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice to determine whether the synthetic peptide P140, which is capable of selectively modulating chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in lymphocytes, could alter NET formation. P140/Lupuzor™ is currently being evaluated in phase III clinical trials involving SLE patients. Overall our in vitro and in vivo studies established that P140 does not influence NET formation, cytokine/chemokine production, or CMA in neutrophils. Thus, the beneficial effect of P140/Lupuzor™ in SLE is apparently not directly related to modulation of neutrophil function.

  15. Alkali-treated penicillin G solution is a better option than penicillin G as an alternative source of minor determinants for penicillin skin test.

    PubMed

    Wangrattanasopon, Pongsak; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong

    2012-01-01

    Both benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine (PPL) and minor determinant mixture (MDM) are the recommended standard reagents for penicillin skin testing. However, penicillin G is commonly suggested as an alternative source of minor determinants. This study evaluated the accuracy of penicillin G and alkali-treated penicillin G compared with the standardized MDM for skin testing. Sixty-eight patients with histories of allergies to penicillin or semisynthetic penicillins were skin tested with commercial Kit penicillin allergenic determinants (DAP) (PPL and DAP-MDM; Diater Laboratorios, Madrid, Spain). The in-house MDM (IH-MDM), prepared by alkali-treated aged penicillin, and fresh penicillin G sodium (PGs) were tested alongside DAP-MDM. Positive penicillin skin test results were identified in 22 patients (32.4%) using commercial reagents (PPL+ DAP-MDM) and 19 of them reacted to DAP-MDM alone or together with PPL. The accuracy of IH-MDM and PGs compared with DAP-MDM was 89.7 and 76.5%, respectively. Our study shows that alkali-treated penicillin G is a better option than penicillin G as an alternative source of MDM for skin testing in case the commercialized MDM is not available. Minor determinants play a significant role for penicillin allergy in Thailand and should be included in the penicillin skin test panel to verify suspected cases of penicillin allergy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00789217).

  16. Antibodies Directed against a Peptide Epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-Derived Protein Are Present in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tinazzi, Elisa; Moretta, Francesca; D’Angelo, Salvatore; Olivieri, Ignazio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis of unknown origin. Its autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Several reports have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae as a triggering or perpetuating factor in AS; however, its role in the disease pathogenesis remains debated. Moreover, despite extensive investigations, a biomarker for AS has not yet been identified. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with pooled IgGs obtained from 40 patients with AS. A peptide (AS peptide) selected from the library was recognized by serum IgGs from 170 of 200 (85%) patients with AS but not by serum specimens from 100 healthy controls. Interestingly, the AS peptide shows a sequence similarity with several molecules expressed at the fibrocartilaginous sites that are primarily involved in the AS inflammatory process. Moreover, the peptide is highly homologous to a Klebsiella pneumoniae dipeptidase (DPP) protein. The antibody affinity purified against the AS peptide recognizes the autoantigens and the DPP protein. Furthermore, serum IgG antibodies against the Klebsiella DPP121-145 peptide epitope were detected in 190 of 200 patients with AS (95%), 3 of 200 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1.5%) and only 1 of 100 (1%) patients with psoriatic arthritis. Such reactivity was not detected in healthy control donors. Our results show that antibodies directed against an epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived protein are present in nearly all patients with AS. In the absence of serological biomarkers for AS, such antibodies may represent a useful tool in the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:28135336

  17. Antibodies Directed against a Peptide Epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-Derived Protein Are Present in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Puccetti, Antonio; Dolcino, Marzia; Tinazzi, Elisa; Moretta, Francesca; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Olivieri, Ignazio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis of unknown origin. Its autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Several reports have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae as a triggering or perpetuating factor in AS; however, its role in the disease pathogenesis remains debated. Moreover, despite extensive investigations, a biomarker for AS has not yet been identified. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with pooled IgGs obtained from 40 patients with AS. A peptide (AS peptide) selected from the library was recognized by serum IgGs from 170 of 200 (85%) patients with AS but not by serum specimens from 100 healthy controls. Interestingly, the AS peptide shows a sequence similarity with several molecules expressed at the fibrocartilaginous sites that are primarily involved in the AS inflammatory process. Moreover, the peptide is highly homologous to a Klebsiella pneumoniae dipeptidase (DPP) protein. The antibody affinity purified against the AS peptide recognizes the autoantigens and the DPP protein. Furthermore, serum IgG antibodies against the Klebsiella DPP121-145 peptide epitope were detected in 190 of 200 patients with AS (95%), 3 of 200 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1.5%) and only 1 of 100 (1%) patients with psoriatic arthritis. Such reactivity was not detected in healthy control donors. Our results show that antibodies directed against an epitope of a Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived protein are present in nearly all patients with AS. In the absence of serological biomarkers for AS, such antibodies may represent a useful tool in the diagnosis of the disease.

  18. Direct demonstration of guanine nucleotide sensitive receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Agui, T.; Matsumoto, K. )

    1990-05-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were identified on the membranes from the rat anterior pituitary gland with ({sup 125}I)VIP. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values were estimated from the competitive inhibition data. The Kd and Bmax values were 1.05 +/- 0.75 nM and 103 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The order of molar potency of related peptides to inhibit ({sup 125}I)VIP binding was VIP greater than peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) greater than secretin greater than glucagon. Glucagon was not effective to inhibit the binding. ({sup 125}I)VIP binding was effectively inhibited by the addition of guanine nucleotides. The order of molar potency to inhibit the binding was Gpp(NH)p greater than GTP greater than GDP greater than GMP greater than ATP. These results directly suggest the coupling of VIP receptors with guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the anterior pituitary gland.

  19. Discovery of pan-VEGF inhibitory peptides directed to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the VEGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Redondo, Alexandre R.; Magalhães, Leila S.; Cambui, Caio C.; Giordano, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key molecules in numerous cellular processes, the inhibitors of which play an important role in the clinic. Among them are the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members and their receptors (VEGFR), which are essential in the formation of new blood vessels by angiogenesis. Anti-VEGF therapy has already shown promising results in oncology and ophthalmology, but one of the challenges in the field is the design of specific small-molecule inhibitors for these receptors. We show the identification and characterization of small 6-mer peptides that target the extracellular ligand-binding domain of all three VEGF receptors. These peptides specifically prevent the binding of VEGF family members to all three receptors and downstream signaling but do not affect other angiogenic RTKs and their ligands. One of the selected peptides was also very effective at preventing pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of retinopathy, normalizing the vasculature to levels similar to those of a normal developing retina. Collectively, our results suggest that these peptides are pan-VEGF inhibitors directed at a common binding pocket shared by all three VEGFRs. These peptides and the druggable binding site they target might be important for the development of novel and selective small-molecule, extracellular ligand-binding inhibitors of RTKs (eTKIs) for angiogenic-dependent diseases. PMID:27819042

  20. Accessing Three-Dimensional Crystals with Incorporated Guests through Metal-Directed Coiled-Coil Peptide Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Sheedlo, Michael J; Das, Chittaranjan; Chmielewski, Jean

    2016-08-31

    Obtaining three-dimensional (3D) protein and peptide crystals on demand requires a precisely orchestrated hierarchical assembly of biopolymer building blocks. In this work, we disclose a metal-ion-mediated strategy to assemble trimeric coiled-coil peptides in a head-to-tail fashion into linear strands with interstrand interactions. This design led to hexagonal 3D peptide crystal formation within 30 min in the presence of divalent metal ions. The crystal morphology could be controlled by varying the metal ion/peptide ratio, resulting in hexagonal discs to rods. Diffraction studies elucidated the head-to-tail arrangement of the coiled-coil linear strands and their hexagonal, antiparallel packing within the crystal. Unsatisfied ligands at the hexagonal ends of the crystals were harnessed as a powerful means to direct His-tagged fluorophores to distinct locations within the crystals. Overall, the designed hierarchical assembly provides a facile means to obtain 3D peptide crystals and incorporate His-tag-based cargoes and may have potential use in drug delivery and sensor design.

  1. Direct synthesis of Rev peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles and their application in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Thi Thanh; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lin, Chiao-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Tai, Yian; Yung, Benjamin Y M

    2011-07-20

    We have developed a simple approach for generating peptide-conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from the Rev peptide and gold aqueous solution. The peptide functions as both a reducing agent and a capping molecule. AuNPs of various sizes (20-300 nm) and shapes (spheres, triangular plates, and polygons) can be obtained upon modulating the ratio of gold ions to the Rev peptide. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-vis spectroscopy were utilized to characterize these nanoparticles. Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate chemical interactions between the Rev peptide and AuNPs. Lactate dehydrogenase and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays revealed that the Rev peptide-AuNP nanocomposites exhibited exceptionally high cytotoxic effects toward mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell lines, relative to the effects of equal doses of the free Rev peptide. Our study suggests a new way of utilizing biomolecule-conjugated AuNPs as potentially effective anticancer drugs.

  2. Penicillin allergy-getting the label right.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Penicillin(i) allergy is a potentially serious adverse reaction that impacts on antibacterial treatment options. Although it is commonly reported and recorded in medical records, only a minority of patients with a label of penicillin allergy actually have the condition confirmed. The term 'allergy' may be incorrectly applied to adverse reactions that do not have an immunological basis and inappropriate labelling of penicillin allergy can lead to the unnecessary avoidance of penicillins and other beta-lactam antibacterials. Here, we discuss key features that help to distinguish patients at low or high risk of having a true penicillin allergy, summarise what is known about the risk of allergic reactions to other beta-lactam antibacterials in patients with penicillin allergy and discuss the steps to consider when assessing a label of penicillin allergy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Direct demonstration of unique mode of natural peptide binding to the type 2 cholecystokinin receptor using photoaffinity labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J

    2013-08-01

    Direct analysis of mode of peptide docking using intrinsic photoaffinity labeling has provided detailed insights for the molecular basis of cholecystokinin (CCK) interaction with the type 1 CCK receptor. In the current work, this technique has been applied to the closely related type 2 CCK receptor that also binds the natural full agonist peptide, CCK, with high affinity. A series of photolabile CCK analog probes with sites of covalent attachment extending from position 26 through 32 were characterized, with the highest affinity analogs that possessed full biological activity utilized in photoaffinity labeling. The position 29 probe, incorporating a photolabile benzoyl-phenylalanine in that position, was shown to bind with high affinity and to be a full agonist, with potency not different from that of natural CCK, and to covalently label the type 2 CCK receptor in a saturable, specific and efficient manner. Using proteolytic peptide mapping, mutagenesis, and radiochemical Edman degradation sequencing, this probe was shown to establish a covalent bond with type 2 CCK receptor residue Phe¹²⁰ in the first extracellular loop. This was in contrast to its covalent attachment to Glu³⁴⁵ in the third extracellular loop of the type 1 CCK receptor, directly documenting differences in mode of docking this peptide to these receptors.

  4. Rational, computer-enabled peptide drug design: principles, methods, applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J; Swanson, Jon; Bayden, Alexander S; Jarosinski, Mark; Audie, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Peptides provide promising templates for developing drugs to occupy a middle space between small molecules and antibodies and for targeting 'undruggable' intracellular protein-protein interactions. Importantly, rational or in cerebro design, especially when coupled with validated in silico tools, can be used to efficiently explore chemical space and identify islands of 'drug-like' peptides to satisfy diverse drug discovery program objectives. Here, we consider the underlying principles of and recent advances in rational, computer-enabled peptide drug design. In particular, we consider the impact of basic physicochemical properties, potency and ADME/Tox opportunities and challenges, and recently developed computational tools for enabling rational peptide drug design. Key principles and practices are spotlighted by recent case studies. We close with a hypothetical future case study.

  5. Molecular cloning and analysis of the gene encoding the thermostable penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Verhaert, R M; Riemens, A M; van der Laan, J M; van Duin, J; Quax, W J

    1997-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis penicillin G acylase is more stable than the Escherichia coli enzyme. The activity of the A. faecalis enzyme was not affected by incubation at 50 degrees C for 20 min, whereas more than 50% of the E. coli enzyme was irreversibly inactivated by the same treatment. To study the molecular basis of this higher stability, the A. faecalis enzyme was isolated and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The gene encodes a polypeptide that is characteristic of periplasmic penicillin G acylase (signal peptide-alpha subunit-spacer-beta subunit). Purification, N-terminal amino acid analysis, and molecular mass determination of the penicillin G acylase showed that the alpha and beta subunits have molecular masses of 23.0 and 62.7 kDa, respectively. The length of the spacer is 37 amino acids. Amino acid sequence alignment demonstrated significant homology with the penicillin G acylase from E. coli A unique feature of the A. faecalis enzyme is the presence of two cysteines that form a disulfide bridge. The stability of the A. faecalis penicillin G acylase, but not that of the E. coli enzyme, which has no cysteines, was decreased by a reductant. Thus, the improved thermostability is attributed to the presence of the disulfide bridge. PMID:9292993

  6. Protected aminooxyprolines for expedited library synthesis: application to Tsg101-directed proline-oxime containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa; Stephen, Andrew G; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2008-02-01

    The stereoselective synthesis of aminooxy-containing proline analogues bearing Fmoc/Boc or Fmoc/Mtt protection that renders them suitable for incorporation into peptides using Fmoc protocols is reported. Acid-catalyzed unmasking at the completion of peptide synthesis yields free aminooxy-functionalities for oxime formation through reaction with libraries of aldehydes. This allows post solid-phase diversification strategies that may facilitate structure-activity relationship studies.

  7. Potent Inducers of Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides for Host Directed Therapy of Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, H.; Nylén, F.; Sarker, P.; Miraglia, E.; Bergman, P.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Raqib, R.; Agerberth, B.; Strömberg, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new concept for treatment of infections is induction of our own antimicrobial peptides and the presented novel class of inducer, aroylated phenylenediamines (APDs), gives up to 20 to 30-fold induction of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, in vitro. In addition, oral administration of an APD in a rabbit model of Shigellosis resulted in recovery from the infection in a few days implying that APD’s are promising candidates for treatment of infections.

  8. Potent Inducers of Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides for Host Directed Therapy of Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ottosson, H.; Nylén, F.; Sarker, P.; Miraglia, E.; Bergman, P.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Raqib, R.; Agerberth, B.; Strömberg, R.

    2016-01-01

    A new concept for treatment of infections is induction of our own antimicrobial peptides and the presented novel class of inducer, aroylated phenylenediamines (APDs), gives up to 20 to 30-fold induction of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, in vitro. In addition, oral administration of an APD in a rabbit model of Shigellosis resulted in recovery from the infection in a few days implying that APD’s are promising candidates for treatment of infections. PMID:27827460

  9. Nanoprobe Directed Tumor Imaging Using pH Activated Peptides as Contrast Agent Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    an 8-carboxyfluoroscein ligand to the surface of tumor cells in C57blk-J6 mice bearing subcutaneously transplanted Lewis lung cell-derived tumors...of principle for their diagnostic utility of this technology was obtained by injection of a 99mTc labeled peptide followed by gamma scintigraphy . This...changes in pH within the body. BODY Our research began with in vitro studies to characterize the peptides in Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC1) under

  10. Multiple changes of penicillin-binding proteins in penicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hakenbeck, R; Tarpay, M; Tomasz, A

    1980-01-01

    Penicillin-binding properties and characteristics of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) were investigated in several clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae differing in their susceptibilities to penicillin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC], 0.03 to 0.5 microgram/ml) and compared with the penicillin-susceptible strain R36A (MIC, 0.07 microgram/ml). Several changes accompanied the development of resistance: the relative affinity to penicillin of whole cells, isolated membranes, and two major PBPs after in vivo or in vitro labeling decreased (with increasing resistance). Furthermore, one additional PBP (2') appeared in four of five relatively resistant strains with an MIC of 0.25 microgram/ml and higher. PBP 3 maintained the same high affinity toward penicillin in all strains under all labeling conditions. Images PMID:7425601

  11. 21 CFR 520.1696d - Penicillin V potassium tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium tablets. 520.1696d Section... Penicillin V potassium tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains penicillin V potassium equivalent to... susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations. Administer orally 1 to 2 hours prior to feeding for...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1696d - Penicillin V potassium tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium tablets. 520.1696d Section... Penicillin V potassium tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains penicillin V potassium equivalent to... susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations. Administer orally 1 to 2 hours prior to feeding for...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1696d - Penicillin V potassium tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium tablets. 520.1696d Section... Penicillin V potassium tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains penicillin V potassium equivalent to... susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations. Administer orally 1 to 2 hours prior to feeding for...

  14. No Evidence That RFamide-Related Peptide 3 Directly Modulates LH Secretion in the Ewe.

    PubMed

    Decourt, C; Anger, K; Robert, V; Lomet, D; Bartzen-Sprauer, J; Caraty, A; Dufourny, L; Anderson, G; Beltramo, M

    2016-04-01

    The neuropeptide RFamide-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3) has been implicated in the control of gonadotropin secretion in both birds and mammals. However, in mammals, depending on species, sex and photoperiod, inhibitory, excitatory, or no effect of RFRP-3 on the plasma concentration of LH has been reported. In the ewe, treatment with RFRP-3 either reduced LH concentration or had no effect, and treatment with an RFRP-3 receptor antagonist (ie, RF9) resulted in increased concentration of plasma LH. To clarify these conflicting results in the present study, a set of experiments was performed in ewes. Multiple iv injections of RFRP-3 (6 × 50 μg) in ovariectomized ewes had no effect on plasma LH pulsatility. In intact ewes a bolus injection (500 μg) or an injection (250, 500, or 1000 μg) followed by a 4-hour perfusion (250, 500, or 1000 μg · h(-1)) of RFRP-3 had no effect on the LH pulse induced by kisspeptin (6.5 μg). In ovariectomized, estrogen-replaced ewes, the LH surge induced by estradiol benzoate was not modified by a 24-hour perfusion of RFRP-3 (500 μg h(-1)). Finally, although treatment with RF9 induced a robust release of LH, treatment with a more selective RFRP-3 receptor antagonist, GJ14, resulted in no evident increase of LH. In contrast to the inhibitory effect previously suggested, our data are more consistent with the concept that RFRP-3 has no direct effect on LH secretion in ewes and that RF9 effect on LH release is likely not RFRP-3 receptor mediated. Hence, RFRP-3 probably has a minor role on the control of LH secretion in the ewe.

  15. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  16. Safely diagnosing clinically significant penicillin allergy using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine, penicillin, and oral amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric; Ngor, Eunis W

    2013-01-01

    Penicillin skin testing is rarely used to undiagnose penicillin "allergy" in the United States, partially because of concern that commercially available materials are inadequate. We determined whether skin testing with only commercially available penicilloyl-poly-lysine and penicillin followed by an oral amoxicillin challenge, if skin test-negative, can safely identify clinically significant penicillin allergy. Five hundred sequential persons with positive history of penicillin "allergy" were evaluated by skin testing with penicilloyl-poly-lysine and penicillin between June 8, 2010, and March 29, 2012. All persons with negative skin tests were given an oral amoxicillin challenge and observed for 1 hour. Persons undergoing penicillin allergy testing were representative of all health plan members with penicillin allergy. Only 4 persons (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.32%-2.03%) had a positive skin test result. Only 4 persons (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.32%-2.03%) had an acute objective oral amoxicillin challenge reaction. Fifteen persons (3.0%; 95% CI, 1.83%-4.98%) had subjective oral challenge reactions, either acute transient itching or dizziness. All were women and 11 (73.3%) had multiple drug intolerance syndrome. None had severe reactions or objective signs. These were not considered to be positive challenge reactions. Sixty-eight subjects (13.6%) who were negative on testing were exposed to 88 courses of penicillins during 90 days of follow-up. New reactions were reported after 4 courses (4.5%), 3 (75%) occurring in subjects with multiple drug intolerance syndrome. Penicillin skin testing, using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine and penicillin, followed by oral amoxicillin challenge, if negative, can safely identify clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy in patients who use health care in the United States at this time. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    PubMed

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application.

  18. Proteome analysis of the penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum: characterization of protein changes during the industrial strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Barreiro, Carlos; García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-06-01

    Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by "blue silver" colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin

  19. Is Your Child's 'Penicillin Allergy' Real?

    MedlinePlus

    ... During my pediatric residency and fellowship, we constantly saw families reporting a penicillin allergy and were questioning the validity" of the claim, Vyles said. Two of his three young children have also been ...

  20. Influence of non-H-2 genes on the in vivo response to penicillin-treated autologous platelets.

    PubMed

    Claas, F H; Blankert, J J; Rooduyn-Moerel, L; Van Rood, J J

    1984-01-01

    Mice of different inbred strains were injected intravenously on day 0 and day 6 with autologous platelets incubated in a penicillin solution. After the second injection mice of most strains died immediately with anaphylactic symptoms. Both passive transfer experiments and indirect immunofluorescence studies suggest that a serum factor (probably IgM) is involved in this phenomenon. Only mice with a C3H background were unable to respond to autologous penicillin-treated platelets, although C3H platelets did induce a lethal response in B10.A mice. Experiments in which B10.A mice were primed with autologous penicillin-treated platelets and rechallenged with allogeneic penicillin-treated platelets, showed that the response is directed against a polymorphic non-H-2 antigen in combination with penicillin.

  1. Cytosolic NADPH metabolism in penicillin-G producing and non-producing chemostat cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Kleijn, Roelco J; Liu, Feng; van Winden, Wouter A; van Gulik, Walter M; Ras, Cor; Heijnen, Joseph J

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the relation between NADPH supply and penicillin synthesis, by comparing the flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP; the main source of cytosolic NADPH) in penicillin-G producing and non-producing chemostat cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. The fluxes through the oxidative part of the PPP were determined using the recently introduced gluconate-tracer method. Significantly higher oxidative PPP fluxes were observed in penicillin-G producing chemostat cultures, indicating that penicillin production puts a major burden on the supply of cytosolic NADPH. To our knowledge this is the first time direct experimental proof is presented for the causal relationship between penicillin production and NADPH supply. Additional insight in the metabolism of P. chrysogenum was obtained by comparing the PPP fluxes from the gluconate-tracer experiment to oxidative PPP fluxes derived via metabolic flux analysis, using different assumptions for the stoichiometry of NADPH consumption and production.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of the penicillins in man.

    PubMed

    Barza, M; Weinstein, L

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review and summarise those aspects of the pharmacokinetic behaviour of the penicillins that may be of particular interest to the clinician. While these antibiotics differ markedly in their acid stability and oral absorption, misleading inferences may be drawn from simple inspection of the maximal serum concentrations produced by a given dose administered orally. A more accurate picture emerges when serum protein binding and intrinsic activity of the drugs are taken into account. All of the penicillins are readily and actively secreted by the renal tubles and most are eliminated, almost completely unchanged, in the urine. The majority are excreted in small quantities in the bile, but this is a major route for elimination of nafcillin from the body. Distribution of the penicillins in 'non-specialised' sites is excellent. In contrast, penetration of the central nevous system and eye are poor, and of the prostate, minimal. Inflammation reduces the barries to penetration of these areas. However, quantitative data related to this phenomenon in man are few. Probenecid actively competes with the 'export' pump of the meninges and renal tubular cells. This results in an increase in concentrations of the penicillins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The effect of this agent on active secretion of these antibiotics from the eye and biliary tract is minimal. While elimination of the penicillins from the body takes place largely via renal excretion, penicillin V and oxacillin are extensively degraded as well. In contrast to the situation with respect to 'natural' and 'broad-spectrum' penicillins, the serum half-life of the isoxazolyl congeners and nafcillin is only minimally prolonged in the presence of renal failure. These agents are only weakly haemodialyzable, while the other penicillins are rapidly removed from the circulation by this procedure.

  3. Direct selection of targeted adenovirus vectors by random peptide display on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Yoshida, K; Nishimoto, T; Hatanaka, K; Ohnami, S; Asaka, M; Douglas, J T; Curiel, D T; Yoshida, T; Aoki, K

    2007-10-01

    Targeting of gene transfer at the level of cell entry is one of the most attractive challenges in vector development. However, attempts to redirect adenovirus vectors to alternative receptors by engineering the capsid-coding region have shown limited success because proper targeting ligand-receptor systems on the cells of interest are generally unknown. Systematic approaches to generate adenovirus vectors targeting any given cell type need to be developed to achieve this goal. Here, we constructed an adenovirus library that was generated by a Cre-lox-mediated in vitro recombination between an adenoviral fiber-modified plasmid library and genomic DNA to display random peptides on a fiber knob. As proof of concept, we screened the adenovirus display library on a glioma cell line and observed selection of several particular peptide sequences. The targeted vector carrying the most frequently isolated peptide significantly enhanced gene transduction in the glioma cell line but not in many other cell lines. Because the insertion of a pre-selected peptide into a fiber knob often fails to generate an adenovirus vector, the selection of targeting peptides is highly useful in the context of the adenoviral capsid. This vector-screening system can facilitate the development of a targeted adenovirus vector for a variety of applications in medicine.

  4. Peptide-directed binding of quantum dots to integrins in human fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peng; Chen, Hongfeng; Cho, Michael R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    There is currently a major international effort aimed at integrating semiconductor nanostructures with biological structures. This paper reports the use of peptide sequences with certain motifs like artinine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) to functionalize zinc sulfide (ZnS)-capped cadmiun selenide (CdSe) quantum dots, so that the quantum dot-peptide complexes selectively bind to integrins on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells membrane. In this way, an interface between semiconductor nanocrystals and subcellular components was achieved, and the distribution pattern of RGD and LDV receptors on HT1080 cell membranes is revealed. These findings point the way to using a wide class of peptide-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots for the study of cellular processes involving integrins.

  5. Effect of nifedipine on hippocampal neuron number in penicillin-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ismail; Akdogan, Ilgaz; Kaya, Ertugrul; Yonguc, Goksin Nilufer

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures lead to neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Experimental epilepsy can be induced by direct application of various chemicals to cerebral cortex. Nifedipine is an L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blocker. In spite of several studies that show the seizure-suppressing effects of nifedipine, it has been shown that nifedipine does not suppress but conversely increases epileptic seizures. Similarly, contradictory effects of nifedipine have been reported, such as neuroprotection, failed neuroprotection and neurotoxicity. We therefore aimed to investigate the effect of nifedipine on hippocampal neuronal loss in penicillin induced epileptic rats in this study. The effect of nifedipine on total hippocampal neuron number was estimated by using the optical fractionator method (an unbiased stereological method) in penicillin-G induced epileptic rats. The total number of hippocampal neurons in the control group was 183687 ± 3184. In the penicillin-induced group, the total neuron number significantly decreased to 146318 ± 3042 compared to the control group. In the nifedipine group, the neuron number significantly decreased to 128873 ± 1157 compared to both control and penicillin-induced groups. Nifedipine increased neuronal loss and did not suppress epileptic seizures in penicillin-induced epileptic rats. Nifedipine could not protect against hippocampal neuronal loss in penicillin-induced epileptic rats.

  6. Directing the phase behavior of polyelectrolyte complexes using chiral patterned peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacalin, Naomi M.; Leon, Lorraine; Tirrell, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) have a broad range of promising applications as soft materials due to their self-assembly and diversity of structure and chemical composition. Peptide polymer PECs are highly biocompatible and biodegradable, making them particularly useful for encapsulation of food additives and flavors, micellar drug delivery, medical and underwater adhesives, fetal membrane patches, and scaffolds for cell growth in tissue engineering. While parameters affecting PEC formation and stability in regards to charge effects are well researched, little is known about the effects of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure in these materials. Peptide chirality provides a unique opportunity to manipulate PEC phase to modulate the amount of solid-like (precipitate) or liquid-like (coacervate) character by influencing hydrogen bonding interactions among peptide chains. In previous work, we showed that chiral peptides form solid complexes, while complexes with even one racemic peptide were fluid. This raised the interesting question of how long a homochiral sequence must be to result in solid phase formation. In this work, we designed chiral patterned peptides of polyglutamic acid and polylysine ranging from 50 to 90% L-chiral residues with increasing numbers of sequential L-chiral residues before a chirality change. These polymers were mixed together to form PECs. We observed that 8 or more sequential L-chiral residues are necessary to achieve both the appearance of a precipitate phase and sustained β-sheets in the complex, as determined by optical imaging and FTIR Spectroscopy. Less homochiral content results in formation of a coacervate phase. Thus, we show that chiral sequence can be used to control the phase transition of PECs. Understanding how to manipulate PEC phase using chiral sequence as presented here may enable tuning of the material properties to achieve the desired mechanical strength for coatings and polymer

  7. Penicillin skin testing is a safe and effective tool for evaluating penicillin allergy in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephanie J; Park, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Penicillin skin testing has been validated in the evaluation of adult patients with penicillin allergy. However, the commercially available benzylpenicilloyl polylysine (Pre-Pen) is not indicated in the pediatric population. Moreover, the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the pediatric population has not been well studied. We describe the safety and validity of penicillin skin testing in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Children (<18 years) with a history of penicillin allergy were evaluated with penicillin skin tests and were reviewed for basic demographics, penicillin skin test results, adverse drug reaction to penicillin after penicillin skin test, and adverse reaction to penicillin skin test. By using the χ(2) test, we compared the differences in the proportion of children and adults with a positive penicillin skin test. P value (<.05) was considered statistically significant. The institutional review board approved the study, and all the subjects signed written informed consents. A total of 778 children underwent penicillin skin testing; 703 of 778 patients had a negative penicillin skin test (90.4%), 66 had a positive test (8.5%), and 9 had an equivocal test (1.1%). Children were more likely to have a positive penicillin skin test (P < .0001) compared with adults (64 of 1759 [3.6%]); 369 of 703 patients with negative penicillin skin test (52%) were challenged with penicillin, and 14 of 369 patients (3.8%) had an adverse drug reaction. No adverse reactions to penicillin skin testing were observed. Penicillin skin testing was safe and effective in the evaluation of children with a history of penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular Uptake of Gold Nanoparticles Directly Cross-linked with Carrier Peptides by Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Deendayal; Maran, Avudaippan; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Bolander, Mark E; Sarkar, Gobinda

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been extensively used for a variety of biomedical applications and there is a growing need for highly specific and efficient delivery of the nanoparticles into target cells and subcellular location. We attempted to accomplish this goal by modifying gold particles with peptide motif’s that are known to deliver a ‘cargo’ into chosen cellular location specifically, we intended to deliver nanogold particles into cells through chemical cross-linking with different peptides known to carry protein into cells. Our results suggest that specific sequence of such ‘carrier peptides’ can efficiently deliver gold nanoparticles into cells when chemically cross-linked with the metal particles. PMID:18807262

  9. Penicillin-binding proteins in Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Because some Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are β-lactam-producing bacteria, they have to have some self-resistant mechanism. The β-lactam biosynthetic gene clusters include genes for β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), suggesting that these are involved in self-resistance. However, direct evidence for the involvement of β-lactamases does not exist at the present time. Instead, phylogenetic analysis revealed that PBPs in Streptomyces are distinct in that Streptomyces species have much more PBPs than other Actinobacteria, and that two to three pairs of similar PBPs are present in most Streptomyces species examined. Some of these PBPs bind benzylpenicillin with very low affinity and are highly similar in their amino-acid sequences. Furthermore, other low-affinity PBPs such as SCLAV_4179 in Streptomyces clavuligerus, a β-lactam-producing Actinobacterium, may strengthen further the self-resistance against β-lactams. This review discusses the role of PBPs in resistance to benzylpenicillin in Streptomyces belonging to Actinobacteria.

  10. Structural Characterization of Phospholipids and Peptides Directly from Tissue Sections by MALDI Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, Whitney. B.; Kliman, Michal; McLean, John A.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) provides rapid two-dimensional separations based on analyte apparent surface area or collision cross section (CCS, Å2) and mass-to-charge, respectively. Recently, traveling-wave (t-wave) IM-MS was developed which uses electrodynamic rather than electrostatic fields commonly used in drift cell IM-MS instruments. The underlying theory for obtaining CCS data is well developed for drift cell IM-MS, while strategies for obtaining CCS values from t-wave IM-MS data remains an active area of research. In this report, methods were developed and validated to obtain CCS values of phospholipids and peptides directly from thin tissue sections by MALDI t-wave IM-MS using CCS calibrants measured by MALDI drift cell IM-MS. Importantly, the average percent difference between t-wave and drift cell CCS measurements is minimized by calibrating with the same biomolecular class. Calibrating t-wave phospholipid CCS values with drift cell peptide CCS measurements results in an average percent difference of ca. 7% between the same lipids measured using t-wave and drift cell IM-MS, while this improves to <0.5% when drift cell phospholipid CCS values are used for calibrating t-wave data. A suite of CCS values are reported for lipids and peptides that were determined directly from tissue, i.e. without the need for tissue extraction and further purification steps. PMID:20146447

  11. Water-soluble phosphines for direct labeling of peptides with technetium and rhenium: insights from electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Greenland, William E P; Blower, Philip J

    2005-01-01

    Direct labeling of salmon calcitonin (sCT) is possible in one step using water-soluble phosphines (sulfonated triphenylphosphines) as the reducing agent both for disulfide and for pertechnetate. Phosphines were the most efficient reducing agent for disulfide bonds among those examined. The phosphines both reduced the pertechnetate to Tc(III), and contributed to the technetium coordination sphere in the labeled product. In contrast, the phosphines did not reduce rhenium below oxidation state V, nor did they participate in the rhenium coordination sphere in the labeled peptide. Instead, the expected oxorhenium(V) moiety was incorporated. Both Tc and Re labeling processes gave rise to dimers with two peptides linked by the metal center, as well as simple monomeric species. Positive mode electrospray mass spectrometry not only revealed the presence of phosphine bound to technetium and oxygen bound to rhenium in the metallopeptides but also revealed the oxidation states of the metals. Electrospray mass spectrometry is proving to be an exceptionally valuable technique for characterizing radiopharmaceuticals. Although the one-step direct labeling method described gives mixed products and poor receptor affinity when applied to the small peptide sCT, it might be readily adapted to monoclonal antibodies.

  12. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Showalter, Allison R; Woehl, Taylor J; Hughes, Zak E; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S Piril; Coughlin, E Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R; Bunker, Bruce A

    2016-09-27

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when two different metallic species are mixed at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods was then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange with solute tempering molecular dynamics simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  13. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Showalter, Allison R.; Woehl, Taylor J.; ...

    2016-09-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when mixing two different metallic species at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesizedmore » with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods were then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence-dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange solute tempering molecular dynamic simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Finally, taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be

  14. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Showalter, Allison R.; Woehl, Taylor J.; Hughes, Zak E.; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S. Piril; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-09-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when mixing two different metallic species at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods were then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence-dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange solute tempering molecular dynamic simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Finally, taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  15. Studies of the chemical basis of the origin of protein synthesis Initiation and direction of peptide growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented in this paper show that the ease of nonenzymatic activation of carboxylic acids by ATP at pH 5 varies directly with the pKa of the carboxyl group, and is consistent with the idea that it is the protonated form of the carboxyl group which participates in the activation reaction. Consequently, since most N-blocked amino acids have higher pKas than do their unblocked forms, they are activated more readily, and it has been demonstrated that this principle applies to peptides as well, which are activated more rapidly than single amino acids. It is proposed that this fact may be partly responsible for the origin of two important features still observed in contemporary protein synthesis: (1) initiation in prokaryotes is accomplished with an N-blocked amino acid, and (2) elongation in all living systems occurs at the carboxyl end of the growing peptide.

  16. Studies of the chemical basis of the origin of protein synthesis Initiation and direction of peptide growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The data presented in this paper show that the ease of nonenzymatic activation of carboxylic acids by ATP at pH 5 varies directly with the pKa of the carboxyl group, and is consistent with the idea that it is the protonated form of the carboxyl group which participates in the activation reaction. Consequently, since most N-blocked amino acids have higher pKas than do their unblocked forms, they are activated more readily, and it has been demonstrated that this principle applies to peptides as well, which are activated more rapidly than single amino acids. It is proposed that this fact may be partly responsible for the origin of two important features still observed in contemporary protein synthesis: (1) initiation in prokaryotes is accomplished with an N-blocked amino acid, and (2) elongation in all living systems occurs at the carboxyl end of the growing peptide.

  17. Enhanced production of penicillin V acylase from Streptomyces lavendulae.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Ramón, F; de la Mata, I; Acebal, C; Castillón, M P

    1999-12-01

    A 28 degrees C, Streptomyces lavendulae produced high levels of penicillin V acylase (178 IU/l of culture) when grown on skim milk as the sole nutrient source for 275 h. The enzyme showed catabolite repression by glucose and was produced in the stationary phase of growth. Penicillin V was a good inducer of penicillin V acylase formation, while phenoxyacetic acid, the side-chain moiety of penicillin V, did not alter enzyme production significantly. The enzyme was stable between pH 6 and 11 and at temperatures from 20 degrees C to 55 degrees C. This extracellular enzyme was able to hydrolyse natural penicillins and unable to hydrolyse penicillin G.

  18. Functional characterization of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster of Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marco A; Westerlaken, Ilja; Leeflang, Chris; Kerkman, Richard; Bovenberg, Roel A L

    2007-09-01

    Industrial strain improvement via classical mutagenesis is a black box approach. In an attempt to learn from and understand the mutations introduced, we cloned and characterized the amplified region of industrial penicillin production strains. Upon amplification of this region Penicillium chrysogenum is capable of producing an increased amount of antibiotics, as was previously reported [Barredo, J.L., Diez, B., Alvarez, E., Martín, J.F., 1989a. Large amplification of a 35-kb DNA fragment carrying two penicillin biosynthetic genes in high yielding strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. Curr. Genet. 16, 453-459; Newbert, R.W., Barton, B., Greaves, P., Harper, J., Turner, G., 1997. Analysis of a commercially improved Penicillium chrysogenum strain series, involvement of recombinogenic regions in amplification and deletion of the penicillin gene cluster. J. Ind. Microbiol. 19, 18-27]. Bioinformatic analysis of the central 56.9kb, present as six direct repeats in the strains analyzed in this study, predicted 15 Open Reading Frames (ORFs). Besides the three penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC and penDE) only one ORF has an orthologue of known function in the database: the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ERG25. Surprisingly, many genes known to encode direct or indirect steps beta-lactam biosynthesis like phenyl acetic acid CoA ligase and transporters are not present. Detailed analyses reveal a detectable transcript for most of the predicted ORFs under the conditions tested. We have studied the role of these in relation to penicillin production and amplification of the biosynthetic gene cluster. In contrast to what was expected, the genes encoding the three penicillin biosynthetic enzymes alone are sufficient to restore full beta-lactam synthesis in a mutant lacking the complete region. Therefore, the role of the other 12 ORFs in this region seems irrelevant for penicillin biosynthesis.

  19. Virus Directed Assembly of Peptide Receptor Surfaces for Diverse Sensing Platforms and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-29

    antibodies (anti-HA and anti-His) and milk solution, which contains a host of proteins and salts that can contribute to non-specific binding...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sensing, Receptor Peptides, Bio-scaffold, Virus, Nanotechnology, Protein ...coated sensor chips resulted in negative Δλo when exposed to the non-complementary antibodies, demonstrating its selectivity. The exposure to milk

  20. Diatom Mimics: Directing the Formation of Biosilica Nanoparticles by Controlled Folding of Lysine-Leucine Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Zane, Ariel; Jaeger, Vance; Roehrich, Adrienne M.; Lutz, Helmut; Pfaendtner, Jim; Drobny, Gary P.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Silaffins, long chain polyamines, and other biomolecules found in diatoms are involved in the assembly of a large number of silica nanostructures under mild, ambient conditions. Nanofabrication researchers have sought to mimic the diatom's biosilica production capabilities by engineering proteins to resemble aspects of naturally occurring biomolecules. Such mimics can produce monodisperse biosilica nanospheres, but in vitro production of the variety of intricate biosilica nanostructures that compose the diatom frustule is not yet possible. In this study we demonstrate how LK peptides, composed solely of lysine (K) and leucine (L) amino acids arranged with varying hydrophobic periodicities, initiate the formation of different biosilica nanostructures in vitro. When L and K residues are arranged with a periodicity of 3.5 the α-helical form of the LK peptide produces monodisperse biosilica nanospheres. However, when the LK periodicity is changed to 3.0, corresponding to a 310 helix, the morphology of the nanoparticles changes to elongated rod-like structures. β-strand LK peptides with a periodicity of 2.0 induce wire-like silica morphologies. This study illustrates how the morphology of biosilica can be changed simply by varying the periodicity of polar and nonpolar amino acids. PMID:25285787

  1. Direct Observation of Early-Time Hydrogelation in β-Hairpin Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Tuna; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2008-03-01

    Triggered hydrogelation of MAX 1 peptide (NH2-(VK)4-V^DPPT-(KV)4-CONH2) proceeds through peptide intramolecular folding into β-hairpins and immediate self-assembly into branched clusters of well defined (uniform, 3 nm cross section), semi-flexible, β-sheet-rich nanofibrils. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy indicates that dangling fibrils extend from one growing cluster to another and lead to early, intercluster communication in solution. At the apparent percolation threshold, the dynamic shear modulus measured by oscillatory rheology (G'(φ),G"(φ)φ^n) and the field-intensity autocorrelation function measured by dynamic light scattering (g1(τ)τ^-β') show power-law behavior with comparable critical dynamic exponents (n 0.47 and β' 0.45). Finite interpenetration of percolating cluster with smaller clusters, along with permanent intercluster entanglements, increase the network rigidity. The self-assembly of MAX 1 peptide was compared and contrasted with the assembly of other biopolymeric networks in literature.

  2. Detecting peptidic drugs, drug candidates and analogs in sports doping: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    With the growing availability of mature systems and strategies in biotechnology and the continuously expanding knowledge of cellular processes and involved biomolecules, human sports drug testing has become a considerably complex field in the arena of analytical chemistry. Proving the exogenous origin of peptidic drugs and respective analogs at lowest concentration levels in biological specimens (commonly blood, serum and urine) of rather limited volume is required to pursue an action against cheating athletes. Therefore, approaches employing chromatographic-mass spectrometric, electrophoretic, immunological and combined test methods have been required and developed. These allow detecting the misuse of peptidic compounds of lower (such as growth hormone-releasing peptides, ARA-290, TB-500, AOD-9604, CJC-1295, desmopressin, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormones, synacthen, etc.), intermediate (e.g., insulins, IGF-1 and analogs, 'full-length' mechano growth factor, growth hormone, chorionic gonadotropin, erythropoietin, etc.) and higher (e.g., stamulumab) molecular mass with desired specificity and sensitivity. A gap between the technically possible detection and the day-to-day analytical practice, however, still needs to be closed.

  3. Benzathine penicillin G after thirty years.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Many new antibiotics and countless formulations of old ones have been introduced during the past three decades. None has supplanted BPG. It remains the only drug that can provide antibiotic blood levels for several weeks following a single intramuscular injection. This property makes BPG the ideal preparation for treponematoses and group A streptococcal infections in patients who are not allergic to penicillin and for whom single-session therapy is desirable or necessary. Sensitivity reactions from BPG are less frequent and less severe than those from aqueous or procaine penicillin G. In certain situations, such as the prevention of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, the fear of a reaction in a patient with a negative past history of penicillin allergy is no justification for withholding BPG when it is clearly the drug of choice.

  4. Synergy between penicillin and gentamicin against enterococci.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, T G; Hastings, J G

    1990-04-01

    The role of active uptake in aminoglycoside activity against penicillin-treated enterococci was studied by viable counts and ATP determinations. Penicillin and gentamicin gave synergistic bactericidal and post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) which were partially reduced by sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, and totally blocked in the presence of both sodium azide and EDTA, which chelates divalent cations. EDTA and gentamicin showed marked synergy in both 'killing curve' and PAE experiments. This synergy was completely inhibited by sodium azide. The data indicate that the activity of gentamicin against enterococci that have been damaged by penicillin or EDTA is energy-dependent. This is consistent with present theories of gentamicin uptake via transportation drive by a protonmotive force.

  5. Breast abscess caused by penicillin resistant Pneumococci

    PubMed Central

    Appalaraju, Boppe; Mathews, Anila A.; Bhaskaran, Appolo C.; Arunachalam, Pavai

    2011-01-01

    Breast abscess is mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. A 26-year-old immunocompetent lady was admitted with breast abscess. Incision and drainage (I/D) was done and Pneumococci were isolated from the drained pus. The patient was earlier treated with Augmentin which was later changed to linezolid after testing for antibiotic susceptibility. This strain showed a high level of resistance to penicillin. It had been noticed that there was a slow increase in the number of penicillin resistant Pneumococci isolated in our hospitals. The increase in penicillin-resistant Pneumococci correlates with the intensive use of beta-lactam antibiotics. Hence, antibiotics should be used judiciously, avoiding their use particularly in mild self-limiting upper respiratory infections. Attention therefore, should focus on monitoring resistance in Pneumococci to prevent mortality and morbidity associated with this organism, which continues to take a heavy toll on children and the elderly. PMID:21897917

  6. d-Amino Acid Probes for Penicillin Binding Protein-based Bacterial Surface Labeling*

    PubMed Central

    Fura, Jonathan M.; Kearns, Daniel; Pires, Marcos M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential and highly conserved mesh structure that surrounds bacterial cells. It plays a critical role in retaining a defined cell shape, and, in the case of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, it lies at the interface between bacterial cells and the host organism. Intriguingly, bacteria can metabolically incorporate unnatural d-amino acids into the peptidoglycan stem peptide directly from the surrounding medium, a process mediated by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). Metabolic peptidoglycan remodeling via unnatural d-amino acids has provided unique insights into peptidoglycan biosynthesis of live bacteria and has also served as the basis of a synthetic immunology strategy with potential therapeutic implications. A striking feature of this process is the vast promiscuity displayed by PBPs in tolerating entirely unnatural side chains. However, the chemical space and physical features of this side chain promiscuity have not been determined systematically. In this report, we designed and synthesized a library of variants displaying diverse side chains to comprehensively establish the tolerability of unnatural d-amino acids by PBPs in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In addition, nine Bacillus subtilis PBP-null mutants were evaluated with the goal of identifying a potential primary PBP responsible for unnatural d-amino acid incorporation and gaining insights into the temporal control of PBP activity. We empirically established the scope of physical parameters that govern the metabolic incorporation of unnatural d-amino acids into bacterial peptidoglycan. PMID:26499795

  7. Directly coupled high-performance liquid chromatography-accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of chemically modified protein and peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Avi T; Stewart, Benjamin J; Ognibene, Ted J; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Bench, Graham

    2013-04-02

    Quantitation of low-abundance protein modifications involves significant analytical challenges, especially in biologically important applications, such as studying the role of post-translational modifications in biology and measurement of the effects of reactive drug metabolites. (14)C labeling combined with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides exquisite sensitivity for such experiments. Here, we demonstrate real-time (14)C quantitation of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separations by liquid sample accelerator mass spectrometry (LS-AMS). By enabling direct HPLC-AMS coupling, LS-AMS overcomes several major limitations of conventional HPLC-AMS, where individual HPLC fractions must be collected and converted to graphite before measurement. To demonstrate LS-AMS and compare the new technology to traditional solid sample AMS (SS-AMS), reduced and native bovine serum albumin (BSA) was modified by (14)C-iodoacetamide, with and without glutathione present, producing adducts on the order of 1 modification in every 10(6) to 10(8) proteins. (14)C incorporated into modified BSA was measured by solid carbon AMS and LS-AMS. BSA peptides were generated by tryptic digestion. Analysis of HPLC-separated peptides was performed in parallel by LS-AMS, fraction collection combined with SS-AMS, and (for peptide identification) electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). LS-AMS enabled (14)C quantitation from ng sample sizes and was 100 times more sensitive to (14)C incorporated in HPLC-separated peptides than SS-AMS, resulting in a lower limit of quantitation of 50 zmol (14)C/peak. Additionally, LS-AMS turnaround times were minutes instead of days, and HPLC trace analyses required 1/6th the AMS instrument time required for analysis of graphite fractions by SS-AMS.

  8. Receptor-directed inhibition of chemotactic factor-induced neutrophil hyperactivity by pyrazolon derivatives. Definition of a chemotactic peptide antagonist.

    PubMed

    Dahinden, C; Fehr, J

    1980-11-01

    The two pyrazolon derivatives, phenylbutazone and sulfinpyrazone, selectively inhibit chemotactic peptide-induced effects on neutrophils. As they antagonize the induction of acute neutropenia in vivo and of cellular hyperadhesiveness, lysosomal enzyme release, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, and superoxide production in vitro, these effects occur with a specificity not shared with other prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition by these drugs resembles the competitive type of antagonism and occurs at concentrations attainable in vivo under clinical conditions. The locomotory machinery, the direction-finding mechanisms, and the basic metabolic machinery of the cell are unaffected. These drugs interfere with specific binding of the formylpeptide to its receptor on neutrophils.

  9. Receptor-directed inhibition of chemotactic factor-induced neutrophil hyperactivity by pyrazolon derivatives. Definition of a chemotactic peptide antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Dahinden, C; Fehr, J

    1980-01-01

    The two pyrazolon derivatives, phenylbutazone and sulfinpyrazone, selectively inhibit chemotactic peptide-induced effects on neutrophils. As they antagonize the induction of acute neutropenia in vivo and of cellular hyperadhesiveness, lysosomal enzyme release, hexose monophosphate shunt activity, and superoxide production in vitro, these effects occur with a specificity not shared with other prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition by these drugs resembles the competitive type of antagonism and occurs at concentrations attainable in vivo under clinical conditions. The locomotory machinery, the direction-finding mechanisms, and the basic metabolic machinery of the cell are unaffected. These drugs interfere with specific binding of the formylpeptide to its receptor on neutrophils. PMID:7430350

  10. One-week oral challenge with penicillin in diagnosis of penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Hjortlund, Janni; Mortz, Charlotte Gotthard; Skov, Per Stahl; Eller, Esben; Poulsen, Johan Milling; Borch, Jakob Eli; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Many patients experience reactions during penicillin treatment. The diagnosis may be difficult and is mainly based on short-term tests. The European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA) guidelines proposed for diagnosing penicillin allergy do not include long-term challenge. In this study a total of 405 patients were evaluated. The ENDA guidelines were extended, to include a 7-day oral treatment (p.o.7) with penicillin for all patients who were negative in the ENDA programme. Among the 405 patients; 85 had an immediate reaction to penicillin, and a further 13 reacted during p.o.7. Among the 307 patients with a negative outcome, 88 had a case history of reaction to other β-lactam antibiotics and were subsequently tested with the culprit drug. Thirteen patients had a positive outcome: 3 on single-dose challenge and 10 during p.o.7. The extended penicillin diagnostic work-up was positive in 111 patients, 30.0% showed immediate reactions and 5.7% reacted during p.o.7. Approximately 20% of all patients with positive outcome during penicillin challenge are detected by adding p.o.7 with penicillin to the original ENDA guidelines.

  11. Relative penicillin G resistance in Neisseria meningitidis and reduced affinity of penicillin-binding protein 3.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelman, P M; Campos, J; Chaffin, D O; Serfass, D A; Smith, A L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1988-01-01

    We examined clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis relatively resistant to penicillin G (mean MIC, 0.3 micrograms/ml; range, 0.1 to 0.7 micrograms/ml), which were isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid for resistance mechanisms, by using susceptible isolates (mean MIC, less than or equal to 0.06 micrograms/ml) for comparison. The resistant strains did not produce detectable beta-lactamase activity, otherwise modify penicillin G, or bind less total penicillin. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 of the six resistant isolates tested uniformly bound less penicillin G in comparison to the same PBP of four susceptible isolates. Reflecting the reduced binding affinity of PBP 3 of the two resistant strains tested, the amount of 3H-labeled penicillin G required for half-maximal binding was increased in comparison with that of PBP 3 of the two susceptible isolates. We conclude that the mechanism of resistance in these meningococci relatively resistant to penicillin G was decreased affinity of PBP 3. Images PMID:3134848

  12. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  13. Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Check Again

    MedlinePlus

    ... researchers, 90 percent of people who have a penicillin allergy listed in their medical records didn't actually ... an allergy test. Doctors can test for a penicillin allergy in a two-step process. First, they do ...

  14. Synthetic Proteins and Peptides for the Direct Interrogation of α-Synuclein Posttranslational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Matthew R.; Abeywardana, Tharindumala; Marotta, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein is the aggregation-prone protein associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related neurodegenerative diseases. Complicating both its biological functions and toxic aggregation are a variety of posttranslational modifications. These modifications have the potential to either positively or negatively affect α-synuclein aggregation, raising the possibility that the enzymes that add or remove these modifications could be therapeutic targets in PD. Synthetic protein chemistry is uniquely positioned to generate site-specifically and homogeneously modified proteins for biochemical study. Here, we review the application of synthetic peptides and proteins towards understanding the effects of α-synuclein posttranslational modifications. PMID:26120904

  15. Casein phosphopeptides and CaCl2 increase penicillin production and cause an increment in microbody/peroxisome proteins in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; Kosalková, Katarina; García-Estrada, Carlos; Barreiro, Carlos; Ibáñez, Ana; Morales, Alejandro; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2017-03-06

    Transport of penicillin intermediates and penicillin secretion are still poorly characterized in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens). Calcium (Ca(2+)) plays an important role in the metabolism of filamentous fungi, and casein phosphopeptides (CPP) are involved in Ca(2+) internalization. In this study we observe that the effect of CaCl2 and CPP is additive and promotes an increase in penicillin production of up to 10-12 fold. Combination of CaCl2 and CPP greatly promotes expression of the three penicillin biosynthetic genes. Comparative proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, identified 39 proteins differentially represented in P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 after CPP/CaCl2 addition. The most interesting group of overrepresented proteins were a peroxisomal catalase, three proteins of the methylcitrate cycle, two aminotransferases and cystationine β-synthase, which are directly or indirectly related to the formation of penicillin amino acid precursors. Importantly, two of the enzymes of the penicillin pathway (isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase) are clearly induced after CPP/CaCl2 addition. Most of these overrepresented proteins are either authentic peroxisomal proteins or microbody-associated proteins. This evidence suggests that addition of CPP/CaCl2 promotes the formation of penicillin precursors and the penicillin biosynthetic enzymes in peroxisomes and vesicles, which may be involved in transport and secretion of penicillin.

  16. Direct Vasoactive Effects of the Chromogranin A (CHGA) Peptide Catestatin in Humans In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Maple M.; Salem, Rany M.; Mehtani, Parag; Thomas, Brenda; Lu, Christine F.; Perez, Brandon; Rao, Fangwen; Stridsberg, Mats; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mahata, Sushil K.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Catestatin is a bioactive peptide of chromogranin A (CHGA) that is co-released with catecholamines from secretory vesicles. Catestatin may function as a vasodilator and is diminished in hypertension. To evaluate this potential vasodilator in vivo without systemic counterregulation, we infused catestatin to target concentrations of ~ 50, ~ 500, ~5000 nM into dorsal hand veins of 18 normotensive men and women, after pharmacologic venoconstriction with phenylephrine. Pancreastatin, another CHGA peptide, was infused as a negative control. After preconstriction to ~ 69%, increasing concentrations of catestatin resulted in dose-dependent vasodilation (P = 0.019), in female subjects (to ~ 44%) predominantly. The EC50 (~ 30 nM) for vasodilation induced by catestatin was the same order of magnitude to circulating endogenous catestatin (4.4 nM). No vasodilation occurred during the control infusion with pancreastatin. Plasma CHGA, catestatin, and CHGA-to-catestatin processing were then determined in 622 healthy subjects without hypertension. Female subjects had higher plasma catestatin levels than males (P = 0.001), yet lower CHGA precursor concentrations (P = 0.006), reflecting increased processing of CHGA-to-catestatin (P < 0.001). Our results demonstrate that catestatin dilates human blood vessels in vivo, especially in females. Catestatin may contribute to sex differences in endogenous vascular tone, thereby influencing the complex predisposition to hypertension. PMID:20662728

  17. Chloroplast Hsp93 Directly Binds to Transit Peptides at an Early Stage of the Preprotein Import Process1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Kai; Chan, Po-Ting; Chen, Lih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Three stromal chaperone ATPases, cpHsc70, Hsp90C, and Hsp93, are present in the chloroplast translocon, but none has been shown to directly bind preproteins in vivo during import, so it remains unclear whether any function as a preprotein-translocating motor and whether they have different functions during the import process. Here, using protein crosslinking followed by ionic detergent solubilization, we show that Hsp93 directly binds to the transit peptides of various preproteins undergoing active import into chloroplasts. Hsp93 also binds to the mature region of a preprotein. A time course study of import, followed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments, confirmed that Hsp93 is present in the same complexes as preproteins at an early stage when preproteins are being processed to the mature size. In contrast, cpHsc70 is present in the same complexes as preproteins at both the early stage and a later stage after the transit peptide has been removed, suggesting that cpHsc70, but not Hsp93, is important in translocating processed mature proteins across the envelope. PMID:26676256

  18. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals.

    PubMed

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Bhandari, Prasana; Shukla, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  19. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A penicillin G procaine residue depletion study was conducted in heavy sows to estimate the pre-slaughter withdrawal periods necessary to clear penicillin from kidney and muscle. Heavy sows (n = 126) were treated with penicillin G procaine at a 5x dose (33,000 IU/kg) for 3 consecutive days by intra...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1696d - Penicillin V tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin V tablets. 520.1696d Section 520.1696d... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696d Penicillin V tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains penicillin V potassium equivalent to 125 milligrams (200,000...

  1. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The US-FDA CVM has not established a tolerance for penicillin residues in swine tissues, but across much of Europe and Asia a tolerance of 50 ppb penicillin G is in effect. In the US, heavy sows are often treated with extra-label doses of penicillin G, however appropriate pre-slaughter withdrawal p...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1696d - Penicillin V tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin V tablets. 520.1696d Section 520.1696d... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696d Penicillin V tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains penicillin V potassium equivalent to 125 milligrams (200,000...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1696b - Penicillin G powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G powder. 520.1696b Section 520.1696b... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696b Penicillin G powder. (a) Specifications. Each gram of powder contains penicillin G potassium equivalent to 1.54 million units...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1696b - Penicillin G powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin G powder. 520.1696b Section 520.1696b... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696b Penicillin G powder. (a) Specifications. Each gram of powder contains penicillin G potassium equivalent to 1.54 million units...

  5. Peptide-directed self-assembly of functionalized polymeric nanoparticles part I: design and self-assembly of peptide-copolymer conjugates into nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaochu; Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Thompson, Martin; Heiden, Patricia A

    2014-06-01

    A robust self-assembly of nanoparticles into fibers and 3D scaffolds is designed and fabricated by functionalizing a RAFT-polymerized amphiphilic triblock copolymer with designer ionic complementary peptides so that the assembled core-shell polymeric nanoparticles are directed by peptide assembly into continuous "nanoparticle fibers," ultimately leading to 3D fiber scaffolds. The assembled nanostructure is confirmed by FESEM and optical microscopy. The assembly is not hindered when a protein (insulin) is incorporated within the nanoparticles as an active ingredient. MTS cytotoxicity tests on SW-620 cell lines show that the peptides, copolymers, and peptide-copolymer conjugates are biocompatible. The methodology of self-assembled nanoparticle fibers and 3D scaffolds is intended to combine the advantages of a flexible hydrogel scaffold with the versatility of controlled release nanoparticles to offer unprecedented ability to incorporate desired drug(s) within a self-assembled scaffold system with individual control over the release of each drug.

  6. Systemic toxic reactions to procaine penicillin G.

    PubMed

    Downham, T F; Cawley, R A; Salley, S O; Dal Santo, G

    1978-01-01

    Systemic toxic were encountered in eight of 10,469 patients during or immediately following the intramuscular injection of 4,800,000 units of procaine penicillin G for the treatment of gonorrhea. Fear of imminent death, visual and auditory disturbances, violent combativeness, confusion, disorientation, and restlessness, disturbance in taste, cardiovascular changes, and grand mal seizures are the principal manifestations; these usually subside in two to 10 minutes spontaneously or after treatment. Symptoms and signs closely parallel systemic toxic reactions to local anesthetics. Pharmacokinetic analysis in dogs using 14C-procaine and 14C-procaine penicillin G showed rapid distribution of labeled drugs from plasma to cerebrospinal fluid for the intravenous as compared to the intramuscular route of administration. The animal studies were consistent with the hypothesis that the inadvertent intravenous administration of procaine penicillin G is responsible for the systemic toxic reactions. Plasma procainesterase (pseudocholinesterase) activity was assayed with an ultraviolet spectroscopic method. Substrates were procaine and procaine penicillin G. The plasma procainesterase activity of patients who had experienced systemic toxic reactions was significantly decreased as compared to that of controls, an observation not previously reported.

  7. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Laboratory Controls § 211.176...

  8. Inactivation of Penicillins by Thiol Broth

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick R.; Niles, Ann C.

    1982-01-01

    Thiol broth with sodium polyanetholesulfonate inactivated penicillin G, carbenicillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, and gentamicin, but had no effect on cephalothin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Only Thiol broth was capable of this inactivation, which was not influenced by the presence of blood. PMID:7153352

  9. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Testing (HFD-470), Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint...

  10. Factors Associated with Loss of Penicillin G Concentrations in Serum After Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin G Injection: A Meta-analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Naval Health Research Center Factors Associated With Loss of Penicillin G Concentrations in Serum After Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin G... Serum After Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin G Injection: A Meta-analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Concentrations in  Serum  After Intramuscular Benzathine  Penicillin  G Injection:  A Meta-analysis Michael P. Broderick, PhD,* Christian J. Hansen, BS,* and Dennis

  11. Penicillin to prevent recurrent leg cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kim S; Crook, Angela M; Nunn, Andrew J; Foster, Katharine A; Mason, James M; Chalmers, Joanne R; Nasr, Ibrahim S; Brindle, Richard J; English, John; Meredith, Sarah K; Reynolds, Nicholas J; de Berker, David; Mortimer, Peter S; Williams, Hywel C

    2013-05-02

    Cellulitis of the leg is a common bacterial infection of the skin and underlying tissue. We compared prophylactic low-dose penicillin with placebo for the prevention of recurrent cellulitis. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving patients with two or more episodes of cellulitis of the leg who were recruited in 28 hospitals in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Randomization was performed according to a computer-generated code, and study medications (penicillin [250 mg twice a day] or placebo for 12 months) were dispensed by a central pharmacy. The primary outcome was the time to a first recurrence. Participants were followed for up to 3 years. Because the risk of recurrence was not constant over the 3-year period, the primary hypothesis was tested during prophylaxis only. A total of 274 patients were recruited. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The median time to a first recurrence of cellulitis was 626 days in the penicillin group and 532 days in the placebo group. During the prophylaxis phase, 30 of 136 participants in the penicillin group (22%) had a recurrence, as compared with 51 of 138 participants in the placebo group (37%) (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.86; P=0.01), yielding a number needed to treat to prevent one recurrent cellulitis episode of 5 (95% CI, 4 to 9). During the no-intervention follow-up period, there was no difference between groups in the rate of a first recurrence (27% in both groups). Overall, participants in the penicillin group had fewer repeat episodes than those in the placebo group (119 vs. 164, P=0.02 for trend). There was no significant between-group difference in the number of participants with adverse events (37 in the penicillin group and 48 in the placebo group, P=0.50). In patients with recurrent cellulitis of the leg, penicillin was effective in preventing subsequent attacks during prophylaxis, but the protective effect diminished progressively once

  12. Risk of redocumenting penicillin allergy in a cohort of patients with negative penicillin skin tests.

    PubMed

    Rimawi, Ramzy H; Shah, Kaushal B; Cook, Paul P

    2013-11-01

    Even though electronic documentation of allergies is critical to patient safety, inaccuracies in documentation can potentiate serious problems. Prior studies have not evaluated factors associated with redocumenting penicillin allergy in the medical record despite a proven tolerance with a penicillin skin test (PST). Assess the prevalence of reinstating inaccurate allergy information and associated factors thereof. We conducted a retrospective observational study from August 1, 2012 to July 31, 2013 of patients who previously had a negative PST. We reviewed records from the hospital, long-term care facilities (LTCF), and primary doctors' offices. Vidant Health, a system of 10 hospitals in North Carolina. Patients with proven penicillin tolerance rehospitalized within a year period from the PST. We gauged hospital reappearances, penicillin allergy redocumentation, residence, antimicrobial use, and presence of dementia or altered mentation. Of the 150 patients with negative PST, 55 (37%) revisited a Vidant system hospital within a 1-year period, of whom 21 were LTCF residents. Twenty (36%) of the 55 patients had penicillin allergy redocumented without apparent reason. Factors associated with penicillin allergy redocumentation included age >65 years (P = 0.011), LTCF residence (P = 0.0001), acutely altered mentation (P < 0.0001), and dementia (P < 0.0001). Penicillin allergy was still listed in all 21 (100%) of the LTCF records. At our hospital system, penicillin allergies are often redocumented into the medical record despite proven tolerance. The benefits of PST may be limited by inadequately removing the allergy from different electronic/paper hospital, LTCF, primary physician, and community pharmacy records. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  13. Information transfer from peptide nucleic acids to RNA by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are uncharged analogs of DNA and RNA in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is substituted by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. A PNA C10 oligomer has been shown to act as template for efficient formation of oligoguanylates from activated guanosine ribonucleotides. In a previous paper we used heterosequences of DNA as templates in sequence-dependent polymerization of PNA dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from PNA to RNA. We describe the reactions of activated mononucleotides on heterosequences of PNA. Adenylic, cytidylic and guanylic acids were incorporated into the products opposite their complement on PNA, although less efficiently than on DNA templates.

  14. Information transfer from peptide nucleic acids to RNA by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are uncharged analogs of DNA and RNA in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is substituted by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. A PNA C10 oligomer has been shown to act as template for efficient formation of oligoguanylates from activated guanosine ribonucleotides. In a previous paper we used heterosequences of DNA as templates in sequence-dependent polymerization of PNA dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from PNA to RNA. We describe the reactions of activated mononucleotides on heterosequences of PNA. Adenylic, cytidylic and guanylic acids were incorporated into the products opposite their complement on PNA, although less efficiently than on DNA templates.

  15. A Novel Method for Direct site-specific Radiolabeling of Peptides Using [18F]FDG

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Mohammad; Cheng, Zhen; Zhang, Rong; De, Abhijit; Levi, Jelena; Hoerner, Joshua K.; Yaghoubi, Shahriar S.; Syud, Faisal A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the well-accepted and easily available 2-[18F]Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer as a prosthetic group for synthesis of 18F-labeled peptides. We herein report the synthesis of [18F]FDG-RGD (18F labeled linear RGD) and [18F]FDG-cyclo(RGDDYK) (18F labeled cyclic RGD) as examples of the use of [18F]FDG. We have successfully prepared [18F]FDG-RGD and [18F]FDG-cyclo(RGDDYK) in 27.5% and 41% radiochemical yields (decay corrected) respectively. The receptor binding affinity study of FDG-cyclo(RGDDYK) for integrin αvβ3 , using αvβ3 positive U87MG cells confirmed a competitive displacement with 125I-echistatin as a radioligand. The IC50 value for FDG-cyclo(RGDDYK) was determined to be 0.67 ± 0.19µM. High contrast small animal PET images with relatively moderate tumor uptake were observed for [18F]FDG-RGD and [18F]FDG-cyclo(RGDDYK) as PET probes in xenografts models expressing αvβ3 integrin. In conclusion, we have successfully used [18F]FDG as a prosthetic group to prepare 18F]FDG-RGD and [18F]FDG-cyclic[RGDDYK] based on a simple one step radiosynthesis. The one step radiosynthesis methodology consists of chemoselective oxime formation between an aminooxy functionalized peptide and [18F]FDG. The results have implications for radiolabeling of other macromolecules and would lead to a very simple strategy for routine pre-clinical and clinical use. PMID:19226160

  16. 75 FR 54017 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G Procaine Suspension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... CFR Parts 510 and 522 [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G Procaine Suspension; Penicillin G Procaine Aqueous Suspension AGENCY: Food and... drug applications (NADAs) from G. C. Hanford Manufacturing Co. to Norbrook Laboratories, Ltd. DATES...

  17. Hydrolysis of penicillins and related compounds by the cell-bound penicillin acylase of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M.

    1969-01-01

    1. A method is given for the preparation of penicillin acylase by using Escherichia coli N.C.I.B. 8743 and a strain selected for higher yield. The enzyme is associated with the bacterial cells and removes the side chains of penicillins to give 6-amino-penicillanic acid and a carboxylic acid. 2. The rates of penicillin deacylation indicated that p-hydroxybenzylpenicillin was the best substrate, followed in diminishing order by benzyl-, dl-α-hydroxybenzyl-, 2-furylmethyl-, 2-thienylmethyl-, d-α-aminobenzyl-, n-propoxymethyl- and isobutoxymethyl-penicillin. Phenylpenicillin and dl-α-carboxybenzylpenicillin were not substrates and phenoxymethyl-penicillin was very poor. 3. Amides and esters of the above penicillins were also substrates for the deacylation reaction, as were cephalosporins with a thienylmethyl side chain. 4. For the deacylation of 2-furylmethylpenicillin at 21° the optimum pH was 8·2. The optimum temperature was 60° at pH7. 5. By using selection A of N.C.I.B. 8743 and determining reaction velocities by assaying yields of 6-amino-penicillanic acid in a 10min. reaction at 50° and pH8·2, the Km for benzylpenicillin was found to be about 30mm and the Km for 2-furylmethylpenicillin, about 10mm. The Vmax. values were 0·6 and 0·24μmole/min./mg. of bacterial cells respectively. PMID:4982417

  18. [Evaluation of penicillin-binding protein genotypes in penicillin susceptible and resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Delialioğlu, Nuran; Aydın, Fatma Esin; Kuyucu, Necdet; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2012-04-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the natural targets of beta-lactam antibiotics and mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x genes, which encode PBPs, are responsible for resistance to beta-lactams in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, we intended to determine how often the common mutation patterns occurred within the pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x PBP gene regions and evaluate the PBP genotype mutations which were associated with penicillin resistance in several penicillin-susceptible and - resistant S.pneumoniae isolates in Mersin, Turkey. A total of 62 S.pneumoniae strains isolated from different clinical specimens (32 nasopharyngeal swab, 16 sputum, 3 blood, 3 wound, 2 cerebrospinal fluids and one of each urine, abscess, bronchoalveolar lavage, conjunctival swab, tracheal aspirate, middle ear effusion) were included in the study. Penicillin susceptibilities of the isolates were searched by disc diffusion and E-test methods, and 23 of them were identified as susceptible, 31 were intermediate susceptible, and eight were resistant to penicillin. A rapid DNA extraction procedure was performed for the isolation of nucleic acids from the strains. Distribution of PBP gene mutations in pbp1a, pbp2b, and pbp2x gene regions related to penicillin resistance was determined by using a wild-type specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based technique. PBP gene alterations of those isolates were also evaluated in relation to penicillin susceptibility and resistance patterns. Twenty two (95.7%) of 23 penicillin-susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes (pbp1a, pbp2x, and pbp 2b), while 1 (4.3%) of these harbored mutations in all of the three PBP genes. The penicillin-intermediate susceptible S.pneumoniae isolates exhibited various combinations of mutations. One (3.2%) of 31 penicillin-intermediate susceptible isolates exhibited no mutation in the three PBP genes, while 22 (71%) of them yielded mutations in all of the three PBP

  19. Lipid II-independent trans editing of mischarged tRNAs by the penicillin resistance factor MurM.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2013-09-06

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a causative agent of nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and septicemia. Penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae depends in part upon MurM, an aminoacyl-tRNA ligase that attaches L-serine or L-alanine to the stem peptide lysine of Lipid II in cell wall peptidoglycan. To investigate the exact substrates the translation machinery provides MurM, quality control by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) was investigated. AlaRS mischarged serine and glycine to tRNA(Ala), as observed in other bacteria, and also transferred alanine, serine, and glycine to tRNA(Phe). S. pneumoniae tRNA(Phe) has an unusual U4:C69 mismatch in its acceptor stem that prevents editing by phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS), leading to the accumulation of misaminoacylated tRNAs that could serve as substrates for translation or for MurM. Although the peptidoglycan layer of S. pneumoniae tolerates a combination of both branched and linear muropeptides, deletion of MurM results in a reversion to penicillin sensitivity in strains that were previously resistant. However, because MurM is not required for cell viability, the reason for its functional conservation across all strains of S. pneumoniae has remained elusive. We now show that MurM can directly function in translation quality control by acting as a broad specificity lipid-independent trans editing factor that deacylates tRNA. This activity of MurM does not require the presence of its second substrate, Lipid II, and can functionally substitute for the activity of widely conserved editing domain homologues of AlaRS, termed AlaXPs proteins, which are themselves absent from S. pneumoniae.

  20. Peptide fingerprinting of snake venoms by direct infusion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: potential use in venom identification and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Souza, Gustavo H M F; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Ifa, Demian R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Hyslop, Stephen

    2008-05-01

    Fingerprinting by mass spectrometry has been increasingly used to study venom variations and for taxonomic analyses based on venom components. Most of these studies have concentrated on components heavier than 3 kDa, but Bothrops snake venoms contain many biologically active peptides, principally C-type natriuretic peptides and bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). In this work, we have examined the peptide profile of Bothrops venoms (B. alternatus, B. erythromelas, B. insularis, B. jararaca, B. jararacussu, B. leucurus and B. moojeni) using direct infusion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS) subjecting the data further to principal components analysis (PCA) to assess whether the peptide distributions are reliable in distinguishing the venoms. ESI-MS of a low molar mass fraction obtained by ultrafiltration of each venom (5 kDa nominal cutoff filters) revealed that the venoms have a variety of peptides in common but that each venom also contains taxonomic marker peptides not shared with other venoms. One BPP peptide, QGGWPRPGPEIPP, was found to be common to the seven Bothrops species examined. This peptide may represent a specific marker for this genus since it was not found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus. PCA on the ESI-MS data reveals a close relationship between B. jararaca, B. jararacussu and B. moojeni venoms, with B. leucurus and B. erythromelas being more distant from these three; B. alternatus and B. insularis were also located distant from these five species, as was C. d. terrificus. These results agree partially with established phylogenetic relationships among these species and suggest that ESI-MS peptide fingerprinting of snake venoms coupled with PCA is a useful tool for identifying venoms and for taxonomic analyses.

  1. Identification and characterization of peptide fragments for the direct and site-specific immobilization of functional proteins onto the surface of silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Ootsuka, Takeru; Asada, Masashi; Yoshizuka, Saori; Chiyama, Masateru; Sakane, Masayasu; Fida, Hasan M D; Sawada, Kazuaki; Okumura, Koichi; Kishimoto, Michimasa

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we successfully identified peptide fragments that have a strong affinity toward the surface of a silicon nitride (SiN) substrate. An E. coli soluble protein, which was preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of a SiN substrate was isolated by 2D electrophoresis, and it was identified as "elongation factor Tu (ELN)" via the peptide MS fingerprinting method. A recombinant ELN that was originally cloned and produced, also maintained its adsorptive ability to a SiN substrate, by comparison with BSA that was used as a control protein. The peptide fragments derived from the recombinant ELN were prepared via 3 types of proteases with different recognition properties (trypsin, chymotrypsin and V8 protease). The peptide mixture was applied to the surface of a SiN substrate, and then, the SiN-binding peptide candidates were isolated and identified. The amino acid sequences of the peptide candidates were genetically fused with the C-terminal region of glutathione S-transferase as a model protein, and the adsorption properties of mutant-type GSTs on the surface of a SiN substrate were directly monitored using a reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) sensor system. Consequently, among the 8 candidates identified, the genetic fusion of TP14, V821 and CT22 peptides resulted in a significant enhancement of GST adsorption to the surface of the SiN substrate, while the adsorption of a wild-type GST was hardly detectable by RIfS sensor. These peptide fragments were located at the C-terminal region in the aminoacid sequence of recombinant ELN. Interestingly, the sequence with the shortest and strongest SiN-binding peptide, TP14 (GYRPQFYFR), was also found in that of V821 (GGRHTPFFKGYRPQFYFRTTDVTGTIE). The TP14 peptide might be the smallest unit of SiN-binding peptide, and a clarification of the amino acid contribution in TP14 peptide will be the next subject. Three-fold higher enzymatic activities were detected from the SiN substrate immobilized with GST-TP14

  2. Recent progress on the discovery of non-peptidic direct renin inhibitors for the clinical management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2013-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has long been established as a key pathway in the regulation of blood pressure and body fluid volume. The aspartic protease renin is responsible for the initial and rate-limiting step of the RAAS; hence inhibition of renin would favor an upstream blockade or modulation of the RAAS. Direct renin inhibitors (DRIs) are therefore considered attractive agents for the treatment of hypertension. However, the identification of orally bioavailable, efficacious and safe low molecular weight DRIs has proven very challenging. To date, aliskiren is the only DRI that has reached FDA approval as a hypertension therapy option. The present review summarizes the recent scientific accounts describing the design of new non-peptidic DRIs published between 2009 and 2012. The author also presents a number of chemical structures in addition to preclinical ADMET obtained from public scientific literatures and patent filings. Furthermore, the author discusses the results of early clinical trials of new candidate DRIs. The vast medicinal chemistry efforts on structure-based design of non-peptidic DRIs, over the past 10 years, have presented new chemical spaces for tight binding to renin as well as gaining a proper balance between the physicochemical properties, potency, efficacy and safety. However, the criteria for candidate selection has become increasingly demanding; and new antihypertensives are expected to demonstrate a clear difference in their clinical profile beyond lowering blood pressure compared with established drug treatment paradigms.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer through peptide-based self-assembled monolayers chemisorbed on gold electrodes: directing the flow-in and flow-out of electrons through peptide helices.

    PubMed

    Venanzi, Mariano; Gatto, Emanuela; Caruso, Mario; Porchetta, Alessandro; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio

    2014-08-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) experiments have been carried out on peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAM) chemisorbed on a gold substrate. The oligopeptide building block was exclusively formed by C(α)-tetrasubstituted α-aminoisobutyric residues to attain a helical conformation despite the shortness of the peptide chain. Furthermore, it was functionalized at the C-terminus by a pyrene choromophore to enhance the UV photon capture cross-section of the compound and by a lipoic group at the N-terminus for linking to gold substrates. Electron transfer across the peptide SAM has been studied by photocurrent generation experiments in an electrochemical cell employing a gold substrate modified by chemisorption of a peptide SAM as a working electrode and by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in solution and on a gold-coated glass. The results show that the electronic flow through the peptide bridge is strongly asymmetric; i.e., PET from the C-terminus to gold is highly favored with respect to PET in the opposite direction. This effect arises from the polarity of the Au-S linkage (Au(δ+)-S(δ-), junction effect) and from the electrostatic field generated by the peptide helix.

  4. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  5. Information transfer from DNA to peptide nucleic acids by template-directed syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. G.; Christensen, L.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are analogs of nucleic acids in which the ribose-phosphate backbone is replaced by a backbone held together by amide bonds. PNAs are interesting as models of alternative genetic systems because they form potentially informational base paired helical structures. Oligocytidylates have been shown to act as templates for formation of longer oligomers of G from PNA G2 dimers. In this paper we show that information can be transferred from DNA to PNA. DNA C4T2C4 is an efficient template for synthesis of PNA G4A2G4 using G2 and A2 units as substrates. The corresponding synthesis of PNA G4C2G4 on DNA C4G2C4 is less efficient. Incorporation of PNA T2 into PNA products on DNA C4A2C4 is the least efficient of the three reactions. These results, obtained using PNA dimers as substrates, parallel those obtained using monomeric activated nucleotides.

  6. Cephalosporin and penicillin cross-reactivity in patients allergic to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-D; Gao, N; Qiao, H-L

    2011-03-01

    Bata-lactam antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics which usually cause serious IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Of all bata-lactam antibiotics, penicillins have so far been the best-studied, but the studies of cephalosporins and their cross-reactivity with penicillins are rare. We sought to evaluate the IgE response in vitro and estimate cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins in patients allergic to penicillins. We studied 87 control subjects and 420 subjects allergic to penicillins. Radioallergosorbent test (RAST) was performed to detect eight types of specific-penicillin IgE and eleven types of specific-cephalosporin IgE. The cross-reactivity and different molecules recognition by IgE were studied with a radioallergosorbent inhibition test. Of 420 patients allergic to penicillins, 95 patients (22.62%) showed specific-cephalosporin IgE positive, 73 patients (17.38%) showed IgEs positive to both penicillins and cephalosporins. In specific-penicillin IgE positive group, the positive rate of specific-cephalosporin IgE was significantly higher than in specific-penicillin IgE negative group (27.14% vs. 14.57%, p < 0.01). In urticaria group, the positive rate of specific-cephalosporin IgE was significantly higher than in other symptoms group (30.65% vs. 8.11%, p < 0.05). The analysis of drugs which have the same or similar side-chains showed that benzylpenicillanyl-IgE (BPA-IgE), ampicillanyl-IgE (APA-IgE), amoxicillanyl-IgE (AXA-IgE) were respectively related to cephalothanyl-IgE (CLA-IgE), cephalexanyl-IgE (CEXA-IgE), cephalexanyl-IgE (CEXA-IgE)in sera of penicillin-allergic patients we studied, and compared with patients who had negative amoxicillin-IgE, the positive rates of specific-ampicillin IgE and specific-cephalexin IgE were significantly higher in patients who had positive amoxicillin-IgE (14.43% vs. 3.72%, 14.00% vs. 2.96%, p < 0.01). Radioallergosorbent test and radioallergosorbent inhibition test confirmed that both nuclear

  7. Association between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Susanna; Localio, Russell; Apter, Andrea J

    2016-04-01

    Penicillin allergy is the most commonly reported drug allergy and often presents with cutaneous symptoms. Other common diagnoses, such as chronic urticaria, may be falsely attributed to penicillin allergy. Because chronic urticaria is fairly common in the general population, evaluation of its prevalence in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was of interest. Similarly, the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria is not well known and also becomes interesting in light of the high prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in the general population. To determine the prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and the prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy. This was a retrospective medical record review of 11,143 patients completed using the electronic health record of the University of Pennsylvania Allergy and Immunology clinic. The prevalence of self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria was found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the general population. The prevalence of chronic urticaria in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy was also found to be approximately 3 times greater than in the population. This link between chronic urticaria and self-reported penicillin allergy highlights the need for clinicians to inquire about self-reported penicillin allergy in patients with chronic urticaria and to consider penicillin skin testing. Furthermore, patients who report penicillin allergy might actually have chronic urticaria, indicating the importance of inquiring about chronic urticaria symptoms in patients with self-reported penicillin allergy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A breakthrough in enzyme technology to fight penicillin resistance-industrial application of penicillin amidase.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic penicillin hydrolysis by penicillin amidase (also penicillin acylase, PA) represents a Landmark: the first industrially and economically highly important process using an immobilized biocatalyst. Resistance of infective bacteria to antibiotics had become a major topic of research and industrial activities. Solutions to this problem, the antibiotics resistance of infective microorganisms, required the search for new antibiotics, but also the development of derivatives, notably penicillin derivatives, that overcame resistance. An obvious route was to hydrolyse penicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), as a first step, for the introduction via chemical synthesis of various different side chains. Hydrolysis via chemical reaction sequences was tedious requiring large amounts of toxic chemicals, and they were cost intensive. Enzymatic hydrolysis using penicillin amidase represented a much more elegant route. The basis for such a solution was the development of techniques for enzyme immobilization, a highly difficult task with respect to industrial application. Two pioneer groups started to develop solutions to this problem in the late 1960s and 1970s: that of Günter Schmidt-Kastner at Bayer AG (Germany) and that of Malcolm Lilly of Imperial College London. Here, one example of this development, that at Bayer, will be presented in more detail since it illustrates well the achievement of a solution to the problems of industrial application of enzymatic processes, notably development of an immobilization method for penicillin amidase suitable for scale up to application in industrial reactors under economic conditions. A range of bottlenecks and technical problems of large-scale application had to be overcome. Data giving an inside view of this pioneer achievement in the early phase of the new field of biocatalysis are presented. The development finally resulted in a highly innovative and commercially important enzymatic process to produce 6-APA that

  9. Direct interrogation of viral peptides presented by the class I HLA of HIV-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Yaciuk, Jane C; Skaley, Matthew; Bardet, Wilfried; Schafer, Fredda; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Cate, Steven; Stewart, Christopher J; McMurtrey, Curtis; Jackson, Kenneth W; Buchli, Rico; Olvera, Alex; Cedeño, Samandhy; Plana, Montserrat; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; West, John T; Hildebrand, William H

    2014-11-01

    Identification of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes has traditionally relied upon testing of overlapping peptide libraries for their reactivity with T cells in vitro. Here, we pursued deep ligand sequencing (DLS) as an alternative method of directly identifying those ligands that are epitopes presented to CTLs by the class I human leukocyte antigens (HLA) of infected cells. Soluble class I HLA-A*11:01 (sHLA) was gathered from HIV-1 NL4-3-infected human CD4(+) SUP-T1 cells. HLA-A*11:01 harvested from infected cells was immunoaffinity purified and acid boiled to release heavy and light chains from peptide ligands that were then recovered by size-exclusion filtration. The ligands were first fractionated by high-pH high-pressure liquid chromatography and then subjected to separation by nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) at low pH. Approximately 10 million ions were selected for sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). HLA-A*11:01 ligand sequences were determined with PEAKS software and confirmed by comparison to spectra generated from synthetic peptides. DLS identified 42 viral ligands presented by HLA-A*11:01, and 37 of these were previously undetected. These data demonstrate that (i) HIV-1 Gag and Nef are extensively sampled, (ii) ligand length variants are prevalent, particularly within Gag and Nef hot spots where ligand sequences overlap, (iii) noncanonical ligands are T cell reactive, and (iv) HIV-1 ligands are derived from de novo synthesis rather than endocytic sampling. Next-generation immunotherapies must factor these nascent HIV-1 ligand length variants and the finding that CTL-reactive epitopes may be absent during infection of CD4(+) T cells into strategies designed to enhance T cell immunity. HIV-1 epitopes catalogued by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have yielded limited success in vaccine trials. Because the HLA of infected cells have not previously been assessed for HIV-1 ligands, the objective here

  10. A Structural Study of Norovirus 3C Protease Specificity: Binding of a Designed Active Site-Directed Peptide Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are the major cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.7 Å resolution. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, which is based on the most rapidly cleaved recognition sequence in the 200 kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenyl ethyl ester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups in a noroviral 3C protease and thus provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics. PMID:21128685

  11. Treatment of venereal disease in the penicillin-allergic patient: administration of penicillin following testing with major and minor determinants.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, P A; Phair, J P

    1985-01-01

    We describe the administration of penicillin for venereal disease in three penicillin-allergic patients for whom alternative antibiotics were not considered suitable. Each patient was skin test negative to the major penicillin determinant benzylpenicilloyl-polylysine and a minor determinant mixture of potassium penicillin, benzylpenicilloate and benzylpenicilloyl-n-propylamine provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Therapeutic doses of penicillin were administered without anaphylaxis, but one patient developed serum sickness on day five following benzylpenicillin. The skin testing results were determined within 30 minutes such that penicillin or its derivatives could be administered safely and rapidly to seriously ill patients, i.e. disseminated gonococcemia. When treating neurosyphilis or disseminated gonococcal infection for which non-penicillin therapy is unacceptable, use of the current skin test reagents provides a level of safety in avoiding anaphylaxis not previously attainable.

  12. Metabolism of Penicillins to Penicilloic Acids and 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid in Man and Its Significance in Assessing Penicillin Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M.; Kenig, M. D.; Hewitt, Valerie A.

    1973-01-01

    Penicillins can be metabolized to penicilloic acids in man, the extent being dependent on the penicillin structure. In the phenoxy penicillin series, phenoxymethyl penicillin was found to be particularly unstable, but the higher homologues were more stable. In the isoxazolyl series, oxacillin was unstable, and progressive insertion of halogen in the phenyl ring increased stability. Ampicillin and amoxycillin showed some instability, ampicillin possibly being the more stable. After intramuscular administration, carbenicillin was very stable in the body, ampicillin was fairly stable, and benzyl penicillin was unstable. It is important to take into account the penicilloic acid content of urine when estimating total absorption of a penicillin. Increased stability in the body as well as slower renal clearance can lead to high concentrations in the serum. Penicilloic acids seemed to be more slowly cleared from the body than penicillins. The liver is probably the site of inactivation. PMID:4364176

  13. Direct measurement of matrix metalloproteinase activity in 3D cellular microenvironments using a fluorogenic peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Leight, Jennifer L; Alge, Daniel L; Maier, Andrew J; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-10-01

    Incorporation of degradable moieties into synthetic hydrogels has greatly increased the utility of these three-dimensional matrices for in vitro cell culture as well as tissue engineering applications. A common method for introducing degradability is the inclusion of oligopeptides sensitive to cleavage by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enabling cell-mediated remodeling and migration within the material. While this strategy has been effective, characterization and measurement of cell-mediated degradation in these materials has remained challenging. There are 20+ MMP family members whose activity is regulated in space and time by a number of biochemical and biophysical cues. Thus, the typical approach of characterizing cleavage of degradable moieties in solution with recombinant enzymes does not easily translate to three-dimensional cell-mediated matrix remodeling. To address this challenge, we report here the synthesis of a cell-laden hydrogel matrix functionalized with a fluorogenic peptide substrate to provide real-time, quantitative monitoring of global MMP activity. Using this system, stimulation of MMP activity was observed with growth factor treatment in mammary epithelial cells and compared to classical zymography results. Further, the effect of biophysical cues on MMP activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was also investigated where more rigid hydrogels were observed to increase MMP activity. The regulation of MMP activity by these biochemical and biophysical cues highlights the need for in situ, real-time measurement of hydrogel degradation, and use of these functionalized hydrogels will aid in future rational design of degradable synthetic hydrogels for in vitro cell studies and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct determination of the peptide content in microspheres by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Hee; DeLuca, Patrick P; Lee, Kang Choon

    2004-05-01

    A quantitative determination of peptides incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was accomplished in a single step without pretreatment for extracting the peptide from the microsphere. The conventional extraction methods often underestimate the actual amount of peptide because of incomplete extraction from the microspheres or loss during the procedures. In this study, the microspheres dissolved in acetonitrile containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid were mixed with matrix solution containing the internal standard, and the peptide content was directly determined by MALDI-TOF MS. The drug content values determined by MALDI-TOF MS in both the leuprolide- and salmon calcitonin-incorporated microspheres were closer to the theoretical contents than those determined by the conventional extraction method. This method using MALDI-TOF MS could be a good alternative to time-consuming and less-accurate conventional methods.

  15. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  16. Impact of a clinical guideline for prescribing antibiotics to inpatients reporting penicillin or cephalosporin allergy.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Varughese, Christy A; Hurwitz, Shelley; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-10-01

    Self-reported penicillin allergy infrequently reflects an inability to tolerate penicillins. Inpatients reporting penicillin allergy receive alternative antibiotics that might be broader spectrum, more toxic, or less effective. To develop and assess a clinical guideline for the general inpatient provider that directs taking a history and prescribing antibiotics for patients with penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. A guideline was implemented to assist providers with assessing allergy history and prescribing antibiotics for patients with reported penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. The guideline used a standard 2-step graded challenge or test dose. A quasi-experimental study was performed to assess safety, feasibility, and impact on antibiotic use by comparing treatment 21 months before guideline implementation with 12 months after guideline implementation. Significantly more test doses to β-lactam antibiotics were performed monthly after vs before guideline implementation (median 14.5, interquartile range 13-16.25, vs 2, interquartile range 1-3.25, P < .001). Seven adverse drug reactions occurred during guideline-driven test doses, with no significant difference in rate (3.9% vs 6.1%, P = .44) or severity (P > .5) between periods. Guideline-driven test doses decreased alternative antimicrobial therapy after the test dose, including vancomycin (68.3% vs 37.2%, P < .001), aztreonam (11.5% vs 0.5%, P < .001), aminoglycosides (6.0% vs 1.1%, P = .004), and fluoro quinolones (15.3% vs 3.3%, P < .001). The implementation of an inpatient antibiotic prescribing guideline for patients with penicillin or cephalosporin allergy was associated with an almost 7-fold increase in the number of test doses to β-lactams without increased adverse drug reactions. Patients assessed with guideline-driven test doses were observed to have significantly decreased alternative antibiotic exposure. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by

  17. Dynamic gene expression regulation model for growth and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Verheijen, Peter J T; de Laat, Wim T A M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2010-07-01

    As is often the case for microbial product formation, the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum has been observed to be a function of the growth rate of the organism. The relation between the biomass specific rate of penicillin formation (q(p)) and growth rate (mu) has been measured under steady state conditions in carbon limited chemostats resulting in a steady state q(p)(mu) relation. Direct application of such a relation to predict the rate of product formation during dynamic conditions, as they occur, for example, in fed-batch experiments, leads to errors in the prediction, because q(p) is not an instantaneous function of the growth rate but rather lags behind because of adaptational and regulatory processes. In this paper a dynamic gene regulation model is presented, in which the specific rate of penicillin production is assumed to be a linear function of the amount of a rate-limiting enzyme in the penicillin production pathway. Enzyme activity assays were performed and strongly indicated that isopenicillin-N synthase (IPNS) was the main rate-limiting enzyme for penicillin-G biosynthesis in our strain. The developed gene regulation model predicts the expression of this rate limiting enzyme based on glucose repression, fast decay of the mRNA encoding for the enzyme as well as the decay of the enzyme itself. The gene regulation model was combined with a stoichiometric model and appeared to accurately describe the biomass and penicillin concentrations for both chemostat steady-state as well as the dynamics during chemostat start-up and fed-batch cultivation.

  18. Acute and chronic desensitization of penicillin-allergic patients using oral penicillin.

    PubMed

    Stark, B J; Earl, H S; Gross, G N; Lumry, W R; Goodman, E L; Sullivan, T J

    1987-03-01

    The efficacy, safety and mechanisms of penicillin desensitization were studied in 24 adults and two children with serious infections that required therapy with a beta-lactam drug. Indications for desensitization included debilitating as well as life-endangering infections. Increasing oral doses of phenoxymethyl penicillin were administered at 15-minute intervals to a cumulative dose of 1.3 million units. Parenteral therapy with the beta-lactam drug of choice was instituted at that point. Immunologic complications of desensitization or therapy, ranging from pruritus to serum sickness, occurred in 12 patients. The appearance of gradually worsening wheezing led to abandonment of the procedure in one subject with cystic fibrosis and severe pulmonary disease. The remaining 25 patients were successfully desensitized and received full-dose parenteral therapy. Chronic desensitization was maintained in seven individuals with twice daily oral penicillins for 3 weeks to more than 2 years. No allergic complications of chronic desensitization or recurrent full-dose parenteral therapy were detected. Skin test reactions to one or all penicillin determinants became negative in 11 of 15 patients retested after acute desensitization. Two desensitized patients became skin test negative, remained skin test negative after cessation of desensitization, and tolerated subsequent beta-lactam therapy without allergic reactions or resensitization. The results of this study provide new evidence that acute and chronic penicillin desensitization is useful and an acceptably safe approach and suggest that antigen-specific mast cell desensitization contributes to the protection against anaphylaxis.

  19. [Determination of penicillin intermediate and three penicillins in milk by high performance capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunqiu; Tan, Huarong; Gao, Liping; Shen, Huqin; Qi, Kezong

    2011-11-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of penicillin intermediate and penicillins in milk, including 6-amino-penicillanic acid (6-APA), penicillin G (PEN), ampicillin (AMP) and amoxicillin (AMO). The main parameters including the ion concentration and pH value of running buffer, separation voltage and column temperature were optimized systematically by orthogonal test. The four penicillins (PENs) were baseline separated within 4.5 min with the running buffer of 40 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate-20 mmol/L borax solution (pH 7.8), separation voltage of 28 kV and column temperature of 30 degrees C. The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 1.56 - 100 mg/L, and the correlation coefficients (r2) were between 0.9979 and 0.9998. The average recoveries at three spiked levels were in the range of 84.91% - 96.72% with acceptable relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.11% - 9.11%. The method is simple, fast, accurate and suitable for the determination of penicillins in real samples.

  20. Microtubular interactions of presenilin direct kinesis of Abeta peptide and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Tezapsidis, Nikolaos; Merz, Patricia A; Merz, George; Hong, Heni

    2003-07-01

    In our previous study we demonstrated that presenilin 1 (PS1) interacts with cytoplasmic linker protein 170/Restin (CLIP-170/Restin). Herein we show that disruption of the interaction of these proteins within neuronal cell-lines (SY5Y and N2a) can be accomplished by the transfection of vectors that drive the expression of peptide fragments corresponding to their binding domains (BDPs). Interestingly, the disruption of the PS1/CLIP-170 complex is associated with both decreased secretion of endogenous Abeta and decreased uptake of exogenous Abeta from the medium. BDP-expressing cells were also more resistant to surges of Abeta secretion induced by thapsigargin and ionomycin (that elevate intracellular calcium concentrations) and mutations in PS1 linked to familial Alzheimer's disease. Uptake of Abeta by SY5Y cells was amplified when preincubated with ApoE and was mediated through lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). BDP-expressing cells or cells treated with PS1 anti-sense oligonucleotides were less capable of taking up Abeta from the medium compared with controls, indicating that the PS1/CLIP-170 interaction is involved and that PS1 cannot be substituted. In this study, we also mapped the minimum binding domains (mBDPs) of PS1 and CLIP-70 to regions corresponding to the N-terminal end of the large cytoplasmic loop of PS1 and the metal binding motif-containing C-terminal end of CLIP-170. Further, our data obtained from experiments involving in vitro taxol-polymerization of tubulin and confocal immunofluorescence suggest that PS1, via CLIP-170, may serve as an anchor to the microtubules for specific subcellular fractions containing amyloidogenic fragments. Interestingly, Notch is absent from this population of microtubule binding subcellular fractions and its cleavage was unaffected in cells transfected with the PS1-based BDP. This raises the possibility that the interaction of PS1 with CLIP-170 could provide the conceptual basis for anti

  1. Penicillin and beta-lactam allergy: epidemiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Penicillin is the most common beta-lactam antibiotic allergy and the most common drug class allergy, reported in about 8% of individuals using health care in the USA. Only about 1% of individuals using health care in the USA have a cephalosporin allergy noted in their medical record, and other specific non-penicillin, non-cephalosporin beta-lactam allergies are even rarer. Most reported penicillin allergy is not associated with clinically significant IgE-mediated reactions after penicillin rechallenge. Un-verified penicillin allergy is a significant and growing public health problem. Clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy can be safely confirmed or refuted using skin testing with penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G and, if skin test is negative, an oral amoxicillin challenge. Acute tolerance of an oral therapeutic dose of a penicillin class antibiotic is the current gold standard test for a lack of clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy. Cephalosporins and other non-penicillin beta-lactams are widely, safely, and appropriately used in individuals, even with confirmed penicillin allergy. There is little, if any, clinically significant immunologic cross-reactivity between penicillins and other beta-lactams. Routine cephalosporin skin testing should be restricted to research settings. It is rarely needed clinically to safely manage patients and has unclear predictive value at this time. The use of alternative cephalosporins, with different side chains, is acceptable in the setting of a specific cephalosporin allergy. Carbapenems and monobactams are also safely used in individuals with confirmed penicillin allergy. A certain predictable, but low, rate of adverse reactions will occur with all beta-lactam antibiotic use both pre- and post-beta-lactam allergy evaluations.

  2. Elective penicillin skin testing in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Jost, Barbara Capes; Wedner, H James; Bloomberg, Gordon R

    2006-12-01

    Adverse reactions associated with penicillin-type antibiotics are common in pediatric practice, leading to the subsequent unnecessary use of alternative antibiotics. IgE-mediated penicillin allergy represents only a fraction of these adverse reactions. To examine (1) the trend of penicillin skin test reactivity during a recent 10-year interval, (2) the relative distribution of specific reagents related to a positive skin test result, and (3) skin test reactivity as a function of reaction history. Penicillin testing using 3 reagents--benzylpenicilloyl polylysine, penicillin G, and sodium penicilloate (penicillin A)--was conducted in a prospective study of 359 consecutive patients referred to an outpatient pediatric allergy clinic between January 1, 1993, and May 31, 2003. We also retrospectively reviewed penicillin skin test results for 562 children previously tested between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1992. Between 1993 and 2003, the prevalence of penicillin skin test sensitivity markedly declined. Of all the positive skin test results between 1979 and 2002, either penicillin G or sodium penicilloate or both identified 34%, with sodium penicilloate alone responsible for 8.5%. The rate of positive skin test reactions was not significantly different between patients with vs without a history of suggestive IgE-mediated reactions. A marked decline in penicillin skin test sensitivity in the pediatric age group is identified. The minor determinant reagents penicillin G and sodium penicilloate are both necessary for determining potential penicillin allergy. Relating history alone to potential penicillin sensitivity is unreliable in predicting the presence or absence of a positive skin test result.

  3. Computing the various pathways of penicillin synthesis and their molar yields.

    PubMed

    Prauße, Maria T E; Schäuble, Sascha; Guthke, Reinhard; Schuster, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 years after its discovery, penicillin is still a widely used and commercially highly important antibiotic. Here, we analyse the metabolic network of penicillin synthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum based on the concept of elementary flux modes. In particular, we consider the synthesis of the invariant molecular core of the various subtypes of penicillin and the two major ways of incorporating sulfur: transsulfuration and direct sulfhydrylation. 66 elementary modes producing this invariant core are obtained. These show four different yields with respect to glucose, notably ½, 2/5, 1/3, and 2/7, with the highest yield of ½ occurring only when direct sulfhydrylation is used and α-aminoadipate is completely recycled. In the case of no recycling of this intermediate, we find the maximum yield to be 2/7. We compare these values with earlier literature values. Our analysis provides a systematic overview of the redundancy in penicillin synthesis and a detailed insight into the corresponding routes. Moreover, we derive suggestions for potential knockouts that could increase the average yield. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bacterial resistance to penicillin G by decreased affinity of penicillin-binding proteins: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Temime, L; Boëlle, P Y; Courvalin, P; Guillemot, D

    2003-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis have very similar mechanisms of resistance to penicillin G. Although penicillin resistance is now common in S. pneumoniae, it is still rare in N. meningitidis. Using a mathematical model, we studied determinants of this difference and attempted to anticipate trends in meningococcal resistance to penicillin G. The model predicted that pneumococcal resistance in a population similar to that of France might emerge after 20 years of widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics; this period may vary from 10 to 30 years. The distribution of resistance levels became bimodal with time, a pattern that has been observed worldwide. The model suggests that simple differences in the natural history of colonization, interhuman contact, and exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics explain major differences in the epidemiology of resistance of S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis.

  5. Direct inhibition of NF-κB activation by peptide targeting the NOA ubiquitin binding domain of NEMO.

    PubMed

    Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Fontan, Elisabeth; Fsihi, Hafida; Coic, Yves-Marie; Baleux, Françoise; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2011-11-01

    Aberrant and constitutive NF-κB activation are frequently reported in numerous tumor types, making its inhibition an attractive target for the treatment of certain cancers. NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is the crucial component of the canonical NF-κB pathway that mediates IκB kinase (IKK) complex activation. IKK activation resides in the ability of the C-terminal domain of NEMO to properly dimerize and interact with linear and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Here, we have identified a new NEMO peptide inhibitor, termed UBI (ubiquitin binding inhibitor) that derives from the NOA/NUB/UBAN ubiquitin binding site located in the CC2-LZ domain of NEMO. UBI specifically inhibits the NF-κB pathway at the IKK level in different cell types stimulated by a variety of NF-κB signals. Circular dichroïsm and fluorescence studies showed that UBI exhibits an increased α-helix character and direct, good-affinity binding to the NOA-LZ region of NEMO. We also showed that UBI targets NEMO in cells but its mode of inhibition is completely different from the previously reported LZ peptide (herein denoted NOA-LZ). UBI does not promote dissociation of NEMO subunits in cells but impairs the interaction between the NOA UBD of NEMO and polyubiquitin chains. Importantly, we showed that UBI efficiently competes with the in vitro binding of K63-linked chains, but not with linear chains. The identification of this new NEMO inhibitor emphasizes the important contribution of K63-linked chains for IKK activation in NF-κB signaling and would provide a new tool for studying the complex role of NF-κB in inflammation and cancer.

  6. Peptide-enhanced mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts and direct reprogramming towards cardiomyocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kunwoo; Yu, Pengzhi; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Tang, Richard; Murthy, Niren

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of myocardial infarction is a major challenge in medicine due to the inability of heart tissue to regenerate. Direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes via the delivery of transcription factor mRNAs has the potential to regenerate cardiac tissue and to treat heart failure. Even though mRNA delivery to cardiac fibroblasts has the therapeutic potential, mRNA transfection in cardiac fibroblasts has been challenging. Herein, we develop an efficient mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via a polyarginine-fused heart-targeting peptide and lipofectamine complex, termed C-Lipo and demonstrate the partial direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts towards cardiomyocyte cells. C-Lipo enabled the mRNA-induced direct cardiac reprogramming due to its efficient transfection with low toxicity, which allowed for multiple transfections of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) mRNAs for a period of 2 weeks. The induced cardiomyocyte-like cells had α-MHC promoter-driven GFP expression and striated cardiac muscle structure from α-actinin immunohistochemistry. GMT mRNA transfection of cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via C-Lipo significantly increased expression of the cardiomyocyte marker genes, Actc1, Actn2, Gja1, Hand2, and Tnnt2, after 2 weeks of transfection. Moreover, this study provides the first direct evidence that the stoichiometry of the GMT reprogramming factors influence the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes. Our results demonstrate that mRNA delivery is a potential approach for cardiomyocyte generation. PMID:25834424

  7. Peptide-enhanced mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts and direct reprogramming towards cardiomyocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kunwoo; Yu, Pengzhi; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Tang, Richard; Murthy, Niren

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of myocardial infarction is a major challenge in medicine due to the inability of heart tissue to regenerate. Direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes via the delivery of transcription factor mRNAs has the potential to regenerate cardiac tissue and to treat heart failure. Even though mRNA delivery to cardiac fibroblasts has the therapeutic potential, mRNA transfection in cardiac fibroblasts has been challenging. Herein, we develop an efficient mRNA transfection in cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via a polyarginine-fused heart-targeting peptide and lipofectamine complex, termed C-Lipo and demonstrate the partial direct reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts towards cardiomyocyte cells. C-Lipo enabled the mRNA-induced direct cardiac reprogramming due to its efficient transfection with low toxicity, which allowed for multiple transfections of Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) mRNAs for a period of 2 weeks. The induced cardiomyocyte-like cells had α-MHC promoter-driven GFP expression and striated cardiac muscle structure from α-actinin immunohistochemistry. GMT mRNA transfection of cultured mouse cardiac fibroblasts via C-Lipo significantly increased expression of the cardiomyocyte marker genes, Actc1, Actn2, Gja1, Hand2, and Tnnt2, after 2 weeks of transfection. Moreover, this study provides the first direct evidence that the stoichiometry of the GMT reprogramming factors influence the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes. Our results demonstrate that mRNA delivery is a potential approach for cardiomyocyte generation.

  8. Action and interaction of penicillin and gentamicin on enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, F; Greenwood, D

    1979-01-01

    The action and interaction of benzylpenicillin and gentamicin on Streptococcus faecalis was studied using mainly turbidimetric methods. The minimum antibacterial concentration (MAC) of each antibiotic lay considerably below the conventionally determined minimum inhibitory concentration, and levels of the two agents exceeding the MAC were necessary in order to obtain a synergic interaction. Evidence was obtained that gentamicin interfered with bacterial lysis induced by penicillin, and this suggests that the aminoglycoside is responsible for the bactericidal activity of the combination, the role of the penicillin being solely to facilitate access of the aminoglycoside to its target site. Our findings do not, however, fully support the generally held view that the increased permeability of enterococci to aminoglycosides is due to penicillin-induced cell wall damage. 'Persisters'--cells surviving prolonged exposure to the optimum lethal concentration of penicillin--were not killed by subsequent exposure to gentamicin if the penicillin was removed but were killed if the penicillin remained present. PMID:117025

  9. The opioid peptide dynorphin directly blocks NMDA receptor channels in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Gu, Y; Huang, L Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The actions of dynorphin on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were examined in acutely dissociated trigeminal neurons in rat. Whole-cell and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch clamp technique. 2. Dynorphins reduced NMDA-activated currents (INMDA). The IC50 was 0.25 microM for dynorphin (1-32), 1.65 microM for dynorphin (1-17) and 1.8 microM for dynorphin (1-13). 3. The blocking action of dynorphin is voltage independent. 4. The inhibitory action of dynorphin cannot be blocked by high concentration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, nor by the specific kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). 5. Single-channel analyses indicate that dynorphin reduces the fraction of time the channel is open without altering the channel conductance. 6. We propose that dynorphin acts directly on NMDA receptors. PMID:7537820

  10. Potential Cross-Reactivity Between Penicillin Derivatives and Cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Putland, Stacey J; Soulsby, Natalie R; Ward, Sue M; Alderman, Christopher P

    2015-12-01

    Allergic reactions to both penicillins and cephalosporins are relatively common. Patients who have had a previous allergic reaction to a penicillin derivative may also be prone to a further reaction if treated with cephalosporins. This case illustrates several important points about potential cross-reactivity between penicillin derivatives and cephalosporins, as well as the benefits of an extended-hours pharmacy service in a longterm care facility.

  11. Sensitivity of Amoxicillin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori to Other Penicillins

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Maria P.; Graham, David Y.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Realdi, Giuseppe; Osato, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivities to penicillins and to a penicillin and β-lactamase inhibitor combination agent were determined for Helicobacter pylori strains that were sensitive, moderately resistant, or highly resistant to amoxicillin. All strains were resistant to nafcillin and oxacillin. Moderately resistant strains showed an intermediate zone of inhibition to ticarcillin, mezlocillin, piperacillin, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. High-level resistance was associated with the smallest zone size for all penicillins tested. PMID:10390249

  12. Tackling inpatient penicillin allergies: Assessing tools for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Wickner, Paige G; Hurwitz, Shelley; Pricco, Nicholas; Nee, Alexandra E; Laskowski, Karl; Shenoy, Erica S; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2017-07-01

    Reported penicillin allergy rarely reflects penicillin intolerance. Failure to address inpatient penicillin allergies results in more broad-spectrum antibiotic use, treatment failures, and adverse drug events. We aimed to determine the optimal approach to penicillin allergies among medical inpatients. We evaluated internal medicine inpatients reporting penicillin allergy in 3 periods: (1) standard of care (SOC), (2) penicillin skin testing (ST), and (3) computerized guideline application with decision support (APP). The primary outcome was use of a penicillin or cephalosporin, comparing interventions to SOC using multivariable logistic regression. There were 625 patients: SOC, 148; ST, 278; and APP, 199. Of 278 ST patients, 179 (64%) were skin test eligible; 43 (24%) received testing and none were allergic. In the APP period, there were 292 unique Web site views; 112 users (38%) completed clinical decision support. Although ST period patients did not have increased odds of penicillin or cephalosporin use overall (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.3; 95% CI, 0.8-2.0), we observed significant increased odds of penicillin or cephalosporin use overall in the APP period (aOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9) and in a per-protocol analysis of the skin tested subset (aOR, 5.7; 95% CI, 2.6-12.5). Both APP and ST-when completed-increased the use of penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics among inpatients reporting penicillin allergy. While the skin tested subset showed an almost 6-fold impact, the computerized guideline significantly increased penicillin or cephalosporin use overall nearly 2-fold and was readily implemented. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane position of a basic aromatic peptide that sequesters phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate determined by site-directed spin labeling and high-resolution NMR.

    PubMed

    Ellena, Jeffrey F; Moulthrop, Jason; Wu, Jing; Rauch, Michelle; Jaysinghne, Sajith; Castle, J David; Cafiso, David S

    2004-11-01

    The membrane interactions and position of a positively charged and highly aromatic peptide derived from a secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) are examined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and several biochemical methods. This peptide (SCAMP-E) is shown to bind to membranes containing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PI(4,5)P2, and sequester PI(4,5)P2 within the plane of the membrane. Site-directed spin labeling of the SCAMP-E peptide indicates that the position and structure of membrane bound SCAMP-E are not altered by the presence of PI(4,5)P2, and that the peptide backbone is positioned within the lipid interface below the level of the lipid phosphates. A second approach using high-resolution NMR was used to generate a model for SCAMP-E bound to bicelles. This approach combined oxygen enhancements of nuclear relaxation with a computational method to dock the SCAMP-E peptide at the lipid interface. The model for SCAMP generated by NMR is consistent with the results of site-directed spin labeling and places the peptide backbone in the bilayer interfacial region and the aromatic side chains within the lipid hydrocarbon region. The charged side chains of SCAMP-E lie well within the interface with two arginine residues lying deeper than a plane defined by the position of the lipid phosphates. These data suggest that SCAMP-E interacts with PI(4,5)P2 through an electrostatic mechanism that does not involve specific lipid-peptide contacts. This interaction may be facilitated by the position of the positively charged side chains on SCAMP-E within a low-dielectric region of the bilayer interface.

  14. Heterologous production of Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Krzeslak, Joanna; Braun, Peter; Voulhoux, Rome; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2009-07-15

    Penicillin G acylase (PGA) is a widely studied bacterial enzyme of great industrial importance. Since its overproduction in the original organisms is mostly limited to the intracellular bacterial spaces which may lead to aggregation and cell toxicity, we have set out to explore the host organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa that possesses the Xcp machinery for secretion of folded proteins to the extracellular medium. We have made fusion proteins, consisting of Pseudomonas Sec- or Tat-specific signal peptides, the elastase propeptide and the mature penicillin G acylase. With all constructs we obtained production of PGA in P. aeruginosa, but we observed that processing of the PGA was temperature dependent and that the active enzyme could only be found after growth at 25 degrees C or lower temperatures. Remarkably, the mature protein, expressed from a TatProPGA hybrid, was not only found in the extracellular medium and the periplasm, but also in the cytoplasm as assessed by comparison to the reporter beta-lactamase protein. The unusual cytoplasmic localization of the mature protein strongly suggests that processing of PGA can also occur in the cytoplasm of P. aeruginosa. The extracellular localization of the TatProPGA hybrid was found not to be dependent on the tatABC-genes. The elastase signal sequence/propeptide combination appeared to be an inadequate carrier for transporting penicillin G acylase across the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa.

  15. Back to the Future: Penicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Matthew P; René, Pierre; Cheng, Alexandre P; Lee, Todd C

    2016-12-01

    Widespread penicillin usage rapidly resulted in the emergence of penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. However, new data suggest that penicillin susceptibility may be in a period of renaissance. The objective of our study was to quantify penicillin resistance in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We retrospectively reviewed all adult MSSA bacteremia from April 2010 to April 2015 at the McGill University Health Centre (Montreal, QC, Canada). Susceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was determined in accordance with the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. There were 324 unique episodes of MSSA bacteremia. Ninety (28%) isolates were susceptible to penicillin, 229 (71%) to erythromycin, 239 (74%) to clindamycin, and 317 (98%) to TMP-SMX. Isolates that were penicillin resistant were more likely to also be resistant to other antibiotics, but a statistically significant association was apparent only for erythromycin resistance (76/234, 32.2% vs 19/90, 21.1%, P = .04). The median age of patients was 67.5 years (interquartile range 52-78) and overall in-hospital 30-day mortality was 16.3% (53 deaths). After adjustment for patient age, there was no association between penicillin resistance and either intensive care unit admission or death. More than one-quarter of patients with MSSA bacteremia potentially could be treated with parenteral penicillin, which may offer pharmacokinetic advantages over other beta-lactam drugs and potentially improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient sequence-directed psoralen targeting using pseudocomplementary Peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Fan, Xue-Jun; Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A pair of decameric pseudocomplementary PNAs which bind to their mixed purine-pyrimidine sequence target in duplex DNA by double duplex invasion has been synthesized with a derivative of 8-methoxypsoralen conjugated to one of the PNAs. It is shown that this pair of psoralen-conjugated pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers, which target a site in the pBluescriptKS+ vector, upon irradiation with long-wavelength UV light (UVA) with high efficiency and specificity form photoadducts to an adjacent 5'-TA site, and more than 50% of these adducts are DNA interstrand cross-links. Transcription elongation by T7 or T3 RNA polymerase is specifically arrested at the psoralen cross-linking site, yielding more than 90% arrested product. These results emphasize the potential of pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers for highly specific gene targeting, in particular, with respect to sequence-directed psoralen photomodification of double-stranded DNA. Thus, such psoralen-PNA conjugates could be very useful in a range of biology and drug discovery applications.

  17. Peptide-Directed Assembly of Single-Helical Gold Nanoparticle Superstructures Exhibiting Intense Chiroptical Activity.

    PubMed

    Merg, Andrea D; Boatz, Jennifer C; Mandal, Abhishek; Zhao, Gongpu; Mokashi-Punekar, Soumitra; Liu, Chong; Wang, Xianting; Zhang, Peijun; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2016-10-11

    Chiral nanoparticle assemblies are an interesting class of materials whose chiroptical properties make them attractive for a variety of applications. Here, C18-(PEPAu(M-ox))2 (PEPAu(M-ox) = AYSSGAPPM(ox)PPF) is shown to direct the assembly of single-helical gold nanoparticle superstructures that exhibit exceptionally strong chiroptical activity at the plasmon frequency with absolute g-factor values up to 0.04. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryogenic electron tomography (cryo-ET) results indicate that the single helices have a periodic pitch of approximately 100 nm and consist of oblong gold nanoparticles. The morphology and assembled structure of C18-(PEPAu(M-ox))2 are studied using TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy. TEM and AFM reveal that C18-(PEPAu(M-ox))2 assembles into linear amyloid-like 1D helical ribbons having structural parameters that correlate to those of the single-helical gold nanoparticle superstructures. FTIR, CD, XRD, and ssNMR indicate the presence of cross-β and polyproline II secondary structures. A molecular assembly model is presented that takes into account all experimental observations and that supports the single-helical nanoparticle assembly architecture. This model provides the basis for the design of future nanoparticle assemblies having programmable structures and properties.

  18. 21 CFR 522.1696a - Penicillin G benzathine and penicillin G procaine suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Repeat dosage in 48 hours. (ii) Conditions of use. Treatment of bacterial infections susceptible to penicillin G. (iii) Limitations. In beef cattle, treatment should be limited to two.... (ii) Conditions of use. (A) Treatment of bacterial pneumonia (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces pyogenes...

  19. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Noaparast, Morteza; Mirsharifi, Rasoul; Elyasinia, Fezzeh; Parsaei, Reza; Kondori, Hessam; Farifteh, Sara

    2014-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department with right lower limb pain, edema, and livedoid discoloration that occurred immediately after intramuscular injection of benzathine penicillin. The patient was diagnosed with Nicolau syndrome, a rare complication of intramuscular injection presumed to be related to the inadvertent intravascular injection. It was first reported following intramuscular injection of bismuth salt, but it can occur as a complication of various other drugs. Fasciotomy was carried out due to the resultant compartment syndrome and medical therapy with heparin, corticosteroid, and pentoxifyllin was initiated. PMID:25429182

  20. Design of penicillin fermentation process simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Zhonghu; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Wenqi

    2011-10-01

    Real-time monitoring for batch process attracts increasing attention. It can ensure safety and provide products with consistent quality. The design of simulation system of batch process fault diagnosis is of great significance. In this paper, penicillin fermentation, a typical non-linear, dynamic, multi-stage batch production process, is taken as the research object. A visual human-machine interactive simulation software system based on Windows operation system is developed. The simulation system can provide an effective platform for the research of batch process fault diagnosis.

  1. Discovery of a Direct Ras Inhibitor by Screening a Combinatorial Library of Cell-Permeable Bicyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have great potential as therapeutic agents and research tools. However, their applications against intracellular targets have been limited, because cyclic peptides are generally impermeable to the cell membrane. It was previously shown that fusion of cyclic peptides with a cyclic cell-penetrating peptide resulted in cell-permeable bicyclic peptides that are proteolytically stable and biologically active in cellular assays. In this work, we tested the generality of the bicyclic approach by synthesizing a combinatorial library of 5.7 × 106 bicyclic peptides featuring a degenerate sequence in the first ring and an invariant cell-penetrating peptide in the second ring. Screening of the library against oncoprotein K-Ras G12V followed by hit optimization produced a moderately potent and cell-permeable K-Ras inhibitor, which physically blocks the Ras-effector interactions in vitro, inhibits the signaling events downstream of Ras in cancer cells, and induces apoptosis of the cancer cells. Our approach should be generally applicable to developing cell-permeable bicyclic peptide inhibitors against other intracellular proteins. PMID:26645887

  2. Affinity of ceftobiprole for penicillin-binding protein 2b in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with various susceptibilities to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Davies, Todd A; He, Wenping; Bush, Karen; Flamm, Robert K

    2010-10-01

    Wild-type penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2b from penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae had high affinity for ceftobiprole and penicillin (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC(50)s] of ≤0.15 μg/ml) but not ceftriaxone (IC(50) of >8 μg/ml). In clinical isolates, ceftobiprole and PBP 2b affinities were reduced 15- to 30-fold with a Thr-446-Ala substitution and further still with an additional Ala-619-Gly PBP 2b substitution. Ceftobiprole remained active (MICs of ≤1 μg/ml) against all strains tested and behaved more like penicillin than ceftriaxone with respect to PBP 2b binding.

  3. Penicillin allergy: anti-penicillin IgE antibodies and immediate hypersensitivity skin reactions employing major and minor determinants of penicillin.

    PubMed

    Chandra, R K; Joglekar, S A; Tomas, E

    1980-11-01

    300 children considered to have had adverse reactions to penicillin were examined. Informed consent was obtained from the parents. Skin tests were conducted by the scratch/prick and intradermal techniques, using benzylpenicilloyl polylysine conjugate and a mixture of minor determinants of penicillin. Specific anti-penicillin IgE antibodies were estimated by the radioallergosorbent test. There was a good correlation between the two methods. The overall frequency of positive tests was 19%. 11 children showed cutaneous reactivity only to the minor determinants mixture. Positive results were found more often in those with accelerated adverse reactions, particularly anaphylaxis, serum sickness, angio-oedema, or urticaria. The validity of penicillin-negative results was confirmed by drug challenge in 56 subjects, only 2 of whom showed a slight skin rash. Of 5 patients with positive tests, inadvertent administration of penicillin produced accelerated urticaria in all. 14 of 42 children with positive tests had lost hypersensitivity to penicillin one year later. In a separate group of 50 children with a history of adverse response to ampicillin, the overall frequency of positive tests was 12%; 38% showed evidence of recent E-B virus infection. It was concluded that penicillin allergy is often overdiagnosed. The diagnosis can be reliably confirmed by skin tests using major and minor determinants of benzylpenicillin and by the radioallergosorbent test; such hypersensitivity is not permanent.

  4. Combined in vivo and in vitro approach for the characterization of penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity: tolerance tests with safe penicillins instead of challenge with culprit drugs.

    PubMed

    Sachs, B; Al Masaoudi, T; Merk, H F; Erdmann, S

    2004-10-01

    Amino-penicillins are a major cause of delayed-type reactions to penicillins. The aim of this study was to establish a diagnostic approach for the characterization of the individual penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity in order to detect side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins. Patients can then be advised to undergo a tolerance test with safe penicillins instead of provocation with culprit penicillins for confirmation of penicillin allergy. We investigated penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity in nine patients with delayed-type reactions to amino-penicillins by a combined in vivo (patch, prick and intracutaneous tests with delayed readings) and in vitro (lymphocyte transformation test, LTT) approach. A combination of LTT and skin tests improved the sensitivity for the characterization of penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity and allowed the detection of three different patterns of lymphocyte reactivity. Four patients showed a side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins in vivo and in vitro and were advised to undergo tolerance tests with safe penicillins. Two patients agreed and were exposed to parenteral benzyl-penicillin and oral phenoxymethyl-penicillin which they tolerated without complications. These data suggest that a combined in vivo and in vitro approach is helpful for the detection of side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins. Patients with such sensitization are very likely to tolerate safe penicillins, thereby expanding their therapeutic options when antibiotic treatment is required.

  5. Direct discovery and validation of a peptide/MHC epitope expressed in primary human breast cancer cells using a TCRm monoclonal antibody with profound antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bhavna; Hawkins, Oriana E; Neethling, Francisca A; Caseltine, Shannon L; Largo, Sherly R; Hildebrand, William H; Weidanz, Jon A

    2010-04-01

    The identification and validation of new cancer-specific T cell epitopes continues to be a major area of research interest. Nevertheless, challenges remain to develop strategies that can easily discover and validate epitopes expressed in primary cancer cells. Regarded as targets for T cells, peptides presented in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs are of special importance as they lend themselves to the detection of epitopes expressed in primary tumor cells. Here, we use an approach that has been successfully utilized in two different infectious disease applications (WNV and influenza). A direct peptide-epitope discovery strategy involving mass spectrometric analysis led to the identification of peptide YLLPAIVHI in the context of MHC A*02 allele (YLL/A2) from human breast carcinoma cell lines. We then generated and characterized an anti-YLL/A2 mAb designated as RL6A TCRm. Subsequently, the TCRm mAb was used to directly validate YLL/A2 epitope expression in human breast cancer tissue, but not in normal control breast tissue. Moreover, mice implanted with human breast cancer cells grew tumors, yet when treated with RL6A TCRm showed a marked reduction in tumor size. These data demonstrate for the first time a coordinated direct discovery and validation strategy that identified a peptide/MHC complex on primary tumor cells for antibody targeting and provide a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Investigation on natural diets of larval marine animals using peptide nucleic acid-directed polymerase chain reaction clamping.

    PubMed

    Chow, Seinen; Suzuki, Sayaka; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Lavery, Shane; Jeffs, Andrew; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-04-01

    The stomach contents of the larvae of marine animals are usually very small in quantity and amorphous, especially in invertebrates, making morphological methods of identification very difficult. Nucleotide sequence analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a likely approach, but the large quantity of larval (host) DNA present may mask subtle signals from the prey genome. We have adopted peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-directed PCR clamping to selectively inhibit amplification of host DNA for this purpose. The Japanese spiny lobster (Panulirus japonicus) and eel (Anguilla japonica) were used as model host and prey organisms, respectively. A lobster-specific PNA oligomer (20 bases) was designed to anneal to the sequence at the junction of the 18 S rDNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the lobster. PCR using eukaryote universal primers for amplifying the ITS1 region used in conjunction with the lobster-specific PNA on a mixed DNA template of lobster and eel demonstrated successful inhibition of lobster ITS1 amplification while allowing efficient amplification of eel ITS1. This method was then applied to wild-caught lobster larvae of P. japonicus and P. longipes bispinosus collected around Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. ITS1 sequences of a wide variety of animals (Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Crustacea, Teleostei, Mollusca, and Chaetognatha) were detected.

  7. Fusion activity of African henipavirus F proteins with a naturally occurring start codon directly upstream of the signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Weis, Michael; Behner, Laura; Binger, Tabea; Drexler, Jan Felix; Drosten, Christian; Maisner, Andrea

    2015-04-02

    Compared to the fusion proteins of pathogenic Nipah and Hendra viruses, the F protein of prototype African henipavirus GH-M74a displays a drastically reduced surface expression and fusion activity. A probable reason for limited F expression is the unusually long sequence located between the gene start and the signal peptide (SP) not present in other henipaviruses. Such a long pre-SP extension can prevent efficient ER translocation or protein maturation and processing. As its truncation can therefore enhance surface expression, the recent identification of a second in-frame start codon directly upstream of the SP in another African henipavirus F gene (GH-UP28) raised the question if such a naturally occurring minor sequence variation can lead to the synthesis of a pre-SP truncated translation product, thereby increasing the production of mature F proteins. To test this, we analyzed surface expression and biological activity of F genes carrying the second SP-proximal start codon of GH-UP28. Though we observed minor differences in the expression levels, introduction of the additional start codon did not result in an increased fusion activity, even if combined with further mutations in the pre-SP region. Thus, limited bioactivity of African henipavirus F protein is maintained even after sequence changes that alter the gene start allowing the production of F proteins without an unusually long pre-SP.

  8. Amyloid β peptide directly impairs pineal gland melatonin synthesis and melatonin receptor signaling through the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Cecon, Erika; Chen, Min; Marçola, Marina; Fernandes, Pedro A C; Jockers, Ralf; Markus, Regina P

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is the hormone produced by the pineal gland known to regulate physiologic rhythms and to display immunomodulatory and neuroprotective properties. It has been reported that Alzheimer disease patients show impaired melatonin production and altered expression of the 2 G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (MTRs), MT₁ and MT₂, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we evaluated whether this dysfunction of the melatonergic system is directly caused by amyloid β peptides (Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)). Aβ treatment of rat pineal glands elicited an inflammatory response within the gland, evidenced by the up-regulation of 52 inflammatory genes, and decreased the production of melatonin up to 75% compared to vehicle-treated glands. Blocking NF-κB activity prevented this effect. Exposure of HEK293 cells stably expressing recombinant MT₁ or MT₂ receptors to Aβ lead to a 40% reduction in [(125)I]iodomelatonin binding to MT₁. ERK1/2 activation triggered by MTRs, but not by the β₂-adrenergic receptor, was markedly impaired by Aβ in HEK293 transfected cells, as well as in primary rat endothelial cells expressing endogenous MTRs. Our data reveal the melatonergic system as a new target of Aβ, opening new perspectives to Alzheimer disease diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  9. T-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Derived V3 Loop Peptides Directly Bind to CXCR-4 and Inhibit T-Tropic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakaida, Hitoshi; Hori, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Akihito; Sato, Akihiko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshie, Osamu; Hattori, Toshio; Uchiyama, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Certain types of chemokine receptors have been identified as coreceptors for HIV-1 infection. The process of viral entry is initiated by the interaction between an envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1, CD4, and one of the relevant coreceptors. To understand the precise mechanism of the Env-mediated fusion and entry of HIV-1, we examined whether the V3 region of gp120 of T-cell line tropic (T-tropic) virus directly interacts with the coreceptor, CXCR-4, by using five synthetic V3 peptides: two cyclized V3 peptides (V3-BH10 and V3-ELI) which correspond to the V3 regions of the T-tropic HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 ELI strains, respectively, a linear V3 peptide (CTR36) corresponding to that of HIV-1 IIIB strain; and cyclized V3 peptides corresponding to that of the macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 ADA strain (V3-ADA) or the dualtropic HIV-1 89.6 strain (V3-89.6). FACScan analysis with a CXCR-4+ human B-cell line, JY, showed that V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6 but not CTR36 or V3-ADA blocked the binding of IVR7, an anti-CXCR-4 monoclonal antibody (MAb), to CXCR-4 with different magnitudes in a dose-dependent manner, while none of the V3 peptides influenced binding of an anti-CD19 MAb at all. Next, the effects of the V3 peptides on SDF-1β-induced transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ were investigated. Three V3 peptides (V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6) prevented Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, the three peptides inhibited infection by T-tropic HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by an MTT assay and a reverse transcriptase assay, while the other peptides had no effects. These results present direct evidence that the V3 loop of gp120 of T-tropic HIV-1 can interact with its coreceptor CXCR-4 independently of the V1/V2 regions of gp120 or cellular CD4. PMID:9811711

  10. Both the transglycosylase and transpeptidase functions in plastid penicillin-binding protein are essential for plastid division in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Yoshiko; TAKECHI, Katsuaki; TAKIO, Susumu; TAKANO, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are active in the final step of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. They possess a transglycosylase (TG) domain to polymerize the glycan chains and a transpeptidase (TP) domain to catalyze peptide cross-linking. We reported that knockout of the Pbp gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens (ΔPpPbp) results in a macrochloroplast phenotype by affecting plastid division. Here, expression of PpPBP-GFP in ΔPpPbp restored the wild-type phenotype and GFP fluorescence was observed mainly in the periphery of each chloroplast. Stable transformants expressing Anabaena PBP with the plastid-targeting sequence, or PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TP domain exhibited partial recovery, while chloroplast number was recovered to that of wild-type plants in the transformant expressing PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TG domain. Transient expression experiments with site-directed mutagenized PpPBP showed that mutations in the conserved amino acids in both domains interfered with phenotype recovery. These results suggest that both TG and TP functions are essential for function of PpPBP in moss chloroplast division. PMID:27941308

  11. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  12. Biochemistry and Comparative Genomics of SxxK Superfamily Acyltransferases Offer a Clue to the Mycobacterial Paradox: Presence of Penicillin-Susceptible Target Proteins versus Lack of Efficiency of Penicillin as Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Colette; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie

    2002-01-01

    The bacterial acyltransferases of the SxxK superfamily vary enormously in sequence and function, with conservation of particular amino acid groups and all-α and α/β folds. They occur as independent entities (free-standing polypeptides) and as modules linked to other polypeptides (protein fusions). They can be classified into three groups. The group I SxxK d,d-acyltransferases are ubiquitous in the bacterial world. They invariably bear the motifs SxxK, SxN(D), and KT(S)G. Anchored in the plasma membrane with the bulk of the polypeptide chain exposed on the outer face of it, they are implicated in the synthesis of wall peptidoglycans of the most frequently encountered (4→3) type. They are inactivated by penicillin and other β-lactam antibiotics acting as suicide carbonyl donors in the form of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). They are components of a morphogenetic apparatus which, as a whole, controls multiple parameters such as shape and size and allows the bacterial cells to enlarge and duplicate their particular pattern. Class A PBP fusions comprise a glycosyltransferase module fused to an SxxK acyltransferase of class A. Class B PBP fusions comprise a linker, i.e., protein recognition, module fused to an SxxK acyltransferase of class B. They ensure the remodeling of the (4→3) peptidoglycans in a cell cycle-dependent manner. The free-standing PBPs hydrolyze d,d peptide bonds. The group II SxxK acyltransferases frequently have a partially modified bar code, but the SxxK motif is invariant. They react with penicillin in various ways and illustrate the great plasticity of the catalytic centers. The secreted free-standing PBPs, the serine β-lactamases, and the penicillin sensors of several penicillin sensory transducers help the d,d-acyltransferases of group I escape penicillin action. The group III SxxK acyltransferases are indistinguishable from the PBP fusion proteins of group I in motifs and membrane topology, but they resist penicillin. They are

  13. Penicillin inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Hussein, Waleed M; Ul Islam, Nazar; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2012-04-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have a multitude of biological functions and are found in fungi, bacteria, plants and animals. In mammals, PAP activity is linked with bone resorption and over-expression can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis. PAP is therefore an attractive target for the development of drugs to treat this disease. A series of penicillin conjugates, in which 6-aminopenicillanic acid was acylated with aromatic acid chlorides, has been prepared and assayed against pig PAP. The binding mode of most of these conjugates is purely competitive, and some members of this class have potencies comparable to the best PAP inhibitors yet reported. The structurally related penicillin G was shown to be neither an inhibitor nor a substrate for pig PAP. Molecular modelling has been used to examine the binding modes of these compounds in the active site of the enzyme and to rationalise their activities. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  15. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696c Penicillin V powder. (a...) Sponsor. See No. 050604 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) (d) Conditions of use. Dogs and cats—(1... susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations. Administer orally 1 to 2 hours prior to feeding for...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696c Penicillin V powder. (a...) Sponsor. See No. 050604 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) (d) Conditions of use. Dogs and cats—(1... susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations. Administer orally 1 to 2 hours prior to feeding for...

  17. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2011, the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) switched from using the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test (FAST) for screening animal tissues for penicillin to using the Charm-Kidney Inhibition Swab test (KIS). The switch provided a quicker test and lower detection limits for penicillin when used o...

  18. Cell envelope of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: penicillin enhancement of peptidoglycan hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, W S; Hebeler, B H; Morse, S A

    1977-01-01

    The addition of 10 microgram of penicillin G per ml to log-phase cultures of Neisseria gonorrhoeae JW-31 (minimum inhibitory concentration for penicillin G, less than 0.007 microgram/ml) resulted in cellular lysis after a lag of 30 min. Penicillin markedly decreased the rate of peptidoglycan synthesis and enhanced the rate of hydrolysis of existing peptidoglycan. Hydrolysis was initiated immediately after addition of penicillin; cellular lysis did not occur until a considerable percentage of the peptidoglycan had been degraded. Cellular lysis was not due to penicillin per se but resulted from inhibition of cell wall synthesis. When cells were grown in media buffered with N-2-hydroxyethyl piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6, penicillin did not cause lysis; however, at this pH, peptidoglycan hydrolysis occurred and cells lost viability at the same rate as in the control (pH 7.2). We suggest that the stability of gonococci grown at pH 6 is related to increased stability of the outer membrane. The penicillin-enhanced rate of peptidoglycan hydrolysis decreased approximately 50% at pH 6.0. Penicillin-enhanced lysis, peptidoglycan hydrolysis, and loss of viability were also markedly reduced in cells grown at 28 degrees C. PMID:22492

  19. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  1. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  2. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS INTRAMAMMARY DOSAGE FORMS § 526.1696 Penicillin...

  3. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  5. Penicillin: the medicine with the greatest impact on therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kardos, Nelson; Demain, Arnold L

    2011-11-01

    The principal point of this paper is that the discovery of penicillin and the development of the supporting technologies in microbiology and chemical engineering leading to its commercial scale production represent it as the medicine with the greatest impact on therapeutic outcomes. Our nomination of penicillin for the top therapeutic molecule rests on two lines of evidence concerning the impact of this event: (1) the magnitude of the therapeutic outcomes resulting from the clinical application of penicillin and the subsequent widespread use of antibiotics and (2) the technologies developed for production of penicillin, including both microbial strain selection and improvement plus chemical engineering methods responsible for successful submerged fermentation production. These became the basis for production of all subsequent antibiotics in use today. These same technologies became the model for the development and production of new types of bioproducts (i.e., anticancer agents, monoclonal antibodies, and industrial enzymes). The clinical impact of penicillin was large and immediate. By ushering in the widespread clinical use of antibiotics, penicillin was responsible for enabling the control of many infectious diseases that had previously burdened mankind, with subsequent impact on global population demographics. Moreover, the large cumulative public effect of the many new antibiotics and new bioproducts that were developed and commercialized on the basis of the science and technology after penicillin demonstrates that penicillin had the greatest therapeutic impact event of all times. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  6. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  7. Improved fiber-optic chemical sensor for penicillin

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, B.G.; Walt, D.R.

    1995-12-15

    An optical penicillin biosensor is described, based on the enzyme penicillinase. The sensor is fabricated by selective photodeposition of analyte-sensitive polymer matrices on optical imaging fibers. The penicillin-sensitive matrices are fabricated by immobilizing the enzyme as micrometer-sized particles in a polymer hydrogel with a covalently bound pH indicator. An array of penicillin-sensitive and pH-sensitive matrices are fabricated on the same fiber. This array allows for the simultaneous, independent measurement of pH and penicillin. Independent measurement of the two analytes allows penicillin to be quantitated in the presence of a concurrent pH change. An analysis was conducted of enzyme kinetic parameters in order to model the penicillin response of the sensor at all pH values. This analysis accounts for the varying activity of the immobilized penicillinase at different pH values. The sensor detects penicillin in the range 0.25-10.0 mM in the pH range 6.2-7.5. The sensor was used to quantify penicillin concentration produced during a Penicillium chrysogenum fermentation. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  9. Long term treatment of chronic Lyme arthritis with benzathine penicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Cimmino, M A; Accardo, S

    1992-01-01

    The cases are reported of two patients with chronic Lyme arthritis resistant to the recommended antibiotic regimens who were cured by long term treatment with benzathine penicillin. It is suggested that the sustained therapeutic levels of penicillin were effective either by the inhibition of germ replication or by lysis of the spirochaetes when they were leaving their sanctuaries. PMID:1417107

  10. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  11. Characterization of an Autoinducer of Penicillin Biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum▿†

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Jorge; García-Estrada, Carlos; Rumbero, Ángel; Recio, Eliseo; Albillos, Silvia M.; Ullán, Ricardo V.; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce an impressive variety of secondary metabolites; many of them have important biological activities. The biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites is frequently induced by plant-derived external elicitors and appears to also be regulated by internal inducers, which may work in a way similar to that of bacterial autoinducers. The biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum is an excellent model for studying the molecular mechanisms of control of gene expression due to a good knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular genetics of β-lactam antibiotics and to the availability of its genome sequence and proteome. In this work, we first developed a plate bioassay that allows direct testing of inducers of penicillin biosynthesis using single colonies of P. chrysogenum. Using this bioassay, we have found an inducer substance in the conditioned culture broths of P. chrysogenum and Acremonium chrysogenum. No inducing effect was exerted by γ-butyrolactones, jasmonic acid, or the penicillin precursor δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine. The conditioned broth induced penicillin biosynthesis and transcription of the pcbAB, pcbC, and penDE genes when added at inoculation time, but its effect was smaller if added at 12 h and it had no effect when added at 24 h, as shown by Northern analysis and lacZ reporter studies. The inducer molecule was purified and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as 1,3-diaminopropane. Addition of pure 1,3-diaminopropane stimulated the production of penicillin by about 100% compared to results for the control cultures. Genes for the biosynthesis of 1,3-diaminopropane have been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome. PMID:21724894

  12. Does this child really have a penicillin allergy?

    PubMed

    Murphy, K; Scanlan, B; Coghlan, D

    2015-04-01

    Penicillins, the most prescribed paediatric medications worldwide, are also the most commonly reported cause of medication allergy, although this is rarely confirmed. An oral penicillin challenge is considered the gold standard in assessing children with suspected allergy but is seldom performed due to lack of appropriately trained staff and insufficient facilities. We introduced a standardised nurse-led protocol to evaluate children with suspected penicillin allergy fulfilling low risk criteria. In total, 40 children participated, including 22 girls and 18 boys, of which 38 met study criteria. There were 36 (95%) negative challenges completed, allowing these children to be safely prescribed oral penicillin in the future. There were 2 (5%) positive challenges developing similar signs to their initial reaction. This standardised protocol appears to be safe for use and efficient in the evaluation of low risk children with suspected penicillin allergy.

  13. Penicillin's Discovery and Antibiotic Resistance: Lessons for the Future?

    PubMed

    Lobanovska, Mariya; Pilla, Giulia

    2017-03-01

    Undoubtedly, the discovery of penicillin is one of the greatest milestones in modern medicine. 2016 marks the 75th anniversary of the first systemic administration of penicillin in humans, and is therefore an occasion to reflect upon the extraordinary impact that penicillin has had on the lives of millions of people since. This perspective presents a historical account of the discovery of the wonder drug, describes the biological nature of penicillin, and considers lessons that can be learned from the golden era of antibiotic research, which took place between the 1940s and 1960s. Looking back at the history of penicillin might help us to relive this journey to find new treatments and antimicrobial agents. This is particularly relevant today as the emergence of multiple drug resistant bacteria poses a global threat, and joint efforts are needed to combat the rise and spread of resistance.

  14. Penicillin production by wild isolates of Penicillium chrysogenum in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sajjad-Ur-Rahman; Rasool, Muhammad Hidayat; Rafi, Muhammad

    2012-04-01

    The present study was aimed at exploring the native wild isolates of Penicillium chrysogenum series in terms of their penicillin production potential. Apart from the standard medium, the efforts were made to utilize suitable agro-industrial wastes for the maximum yield of penicillin. Two series of P. chrysogenum were isolated from local sources and named as P. chrysogenum series UAF R1 and P. chrysogenum series UAF R2. The native series were found to possess better penicillin production potential than the already reported series of P. chrysogenum. However, P. chrysogenum series UAF R1 was found to be the best candidate for high yield of penicillin starting at 100 hour as compared to P. chrysogenum series UAF R2 which produced the highest yield of penicillin at 150 hours for a shorter period of time. Addition of Corn Steep Liquor (CSL) to the fermentation medium resulted in the production of 1.20g/L penicillin by P. chrysogenum series UAF R1 and P. chrysogenum series UAF R2. The fermentation medium in which Sugar Cane Bagasse (SCB) was replaced with CSL resulted in the highest yield of penicillin (1.92g/L) by both native series of P. chrysogenum. The penicillin production was increased by 62.5% in medium with SCB as compared to that with CSL. The penicillin yield of medium containing lactose and phenyl acetate was higher than that of control medium. Overall results revealed that P. chrysogenum series UAF R1 and P. chrysogenum series UAF R2 may be recommended for better yield of natural penicillin and this efficiency may be further enhanced by utilizing SCB as substrate in the growth medium.

  15. Are two penicillins better than one? A systematic review of oral flucloxacillin and penicillin V versus oral flucloxacillin alone for the emergency department treatment of cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Quirke, Michael; O'Sullivan, Ronan; McCabe, Aileen; Ahmed, Jameel; Wakai, Abel

    2014-06-01

    Flucloxacillin either alone or combined with penicillin V is still the first-line antibiotic drug of choice for the treatment of cellulitis in emergency departments (EDs) in Ireland. The rationale for this antibiotic regimen is their anti-staphylococcal and anti-streptococcal activity. To determine the clinical efficacy, tolerability and safety of oral flucloxacillin alone (monotherapy) compared with a combination of flucloxacillin with penicillin V (dual therapy) in the ED-directed outpatient treatment of cellulitis. We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE (1950 to August 2011), EMBASE (1980 to August 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue), OpenGrey, Current Controlled Trials metaRegister of Clinical Trials (August 2011) and reference lists and websites of potential trials. We performed cross-referencing from the reference lists of major articles on the subject. We imposed no language restriction. Despite a comprehensive literature search to identify relevant studies, no randomized-controlled trials that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were found. Despite its common use, there are no published randomized-controlled trials comparing flucloxacillin monotherapy with a combination of flucloxacillin and penicillin V in the ED management of cellulitis. We discuss existing European and North American prescribing rationale and current guidelines.

  16. Nematode Peptides with Host-Directed Anti-inflammatory Activity Rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi)-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators. PMID:27672387

  17. [Influence of penicillin minimum inhibitory concentration in the synergy between penicillin and gentamicin in viridans-group streptococci].

    PubMed

    Vigliarolo, L; Ramírez, M S; Centrón, D; Lopardo, H

    2007-01-01

    Penicillin resistance rates higher than 60% have been recorded in viridans group streptococci by some authors during the 90's and recently such resistance was associated with higher levels of mortality in bacteremia. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentration of penicillin for which synergy with aminoglycosides is not yet possible is still unknown. In order to try to dilucidate this puzzle, a study on the susceptibility to penicillin of 28 strains of viridans group streptococci isolated from significant samples in the Hospital de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan" was carried out. Seven mitis group isolates presenting different susceptibility patterns were selected for performing time-killing curves with penicillin, gentamicin, and penicillin plus gentamicin, using higher and lower penicillin concentrations than their minimal inhibitory concentrations. Synergy was not observed when the penicillin concentration was lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration, at least in these strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin > or = 16 microg/ml. When using penicillin in higher concentrations than the minimum inhibitory concentration, synergy was found in five of the seven strains. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes were found in the two other streptococci.

  18. Meningitis Due to Mixed Infection with Penicillin-Resistant and Penicillin-Susceptible Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Fernando; Campelo, Carolina; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquin R.

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the major cause of bacterial meningitis. We report a case of meningitis due to a mixed infection with two distinct strains of S. pneumoniae: one penicillin-resistant strain of serotype 9V and one penicillin-susceptible strain of serotype 7. The two strains exhibited different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. PMID:12517910

  19. Structural Effect of the Asp345a Insertion in Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 from Penicillin-Resistant Strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is insertion of an aspartate after position 345. The insertion resides on a loop near the active site and is immediately adjacent to an existing aspartate (Asp346) that forms a functionally important hydrogen bond with Ser363 of the SxN conserved motif. Insertion of other amino acids, including Glu and Asn, can also lower the rate of acylation by penicillin, but these insertions abolish transpeptidase function. Although the kinetic consequences of the Asp insertion are well-established, how it impacts the structure of PBP2 is unknown. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a truncated construct of PBP2 containing all five mutations present in PBP2 from the penicillin-resistant strain 6140, including the Asp insertion. Commensurate with the strict specificity for the Asp insertion over similar amino acids, the insertion does not cause disordering of the structure, but rather induces localized flexibility in the β2c−β2d loop. The crystal structure resolves the ambiguity of whether the insertion is Asp345a or Asp346a (due to the adjacent Asp) because the hydrogen bond between Asp346 and Ser362 is preserved and the insertion is therefore Asp346a. The side chain of Asp346a projects directly toward the β-lactam-binding site near Asn364 of the SxN motif. The Asp insertion may lower the rate of acylation by sterically impeding binding of the antibiotic or by hindering breakage of the β-lactam ring during acylation because of the negative charge of its side chain. PMID:25403720

  20. Human biliverdin reductase-based peptides activate and inhibit glucose uptake through direct interaction with the kinase domain of insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Poulin, Amelia; Farah, Elie; Maines, Mahin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin binding changes conformation of the insulin receptor kinase (IRK) domain and initiates glucose uptake through the insulin, IGF-1, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and MAPK pathways; human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is an IRK substrate and pathway effector. This is the first report on hBVR peptide-mediated IRK activation and conformational change. 290KYCCSRK, which increased IRK Vmax without changing Km, stimulated glucose uptake and potentiated insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in 4 cell lines. KYCCSRK in native hBVR was necessary for the hBVR and IRK cross-activation. Peptide treatment also activated PI3K downstream effectors, Akt and ERK, phosphorylation, and Elk transcriptional activity. In cells transfected with CMV-regulated EGFP-VP-peptide plasmid, C292→A mutant did not stimulate glucose uptake; K296→A decreased uptake and kinase activity. KEDQYMKMTV, corresponding to hBVR's SH2-binding domain, was a potent inhibitor of glucose uptake and IRK. The mechanism of action of peptides was examined using cells expressing IRK (aa 988–1263) activated by coexpressed KYCCSRK. Three active cys-mutants of IRK, with fluorophore coupled to cysteines, C1056, C1138, or C1234, were examined for changes in fluorescence emission spectra in the presence of peptides. KYCCSRK and KEDQYMKMTV bound to different sites in IRK. The findings identify novel agents for activating or inhibiting insulin signaling and offer a new approach for treatment of type 2 diabetes and hypoglycemia.—Gibbs, P. E. M., Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Poulin, A., Farah, E., Maines, M. D. Human biliverdin reductase-based peptides activate and inhibit glucose uptake through direct interaction with the kinase domain of insulin receptor. PMID:24568842

  1. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  2. Clarithromycin versus penicillin in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, J H

    1991-02-01

    The safety and efficacy of oral clarithromycin 250 mg every 12 h treatment and of oral penicillin VK (the potassium salt of phenoxymethylpenicillin) 250 mg every 6 h were compared in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes in an eight centre in-vivo study. A total of 243 patients were enrolled in the study and 125 patients were evaluated for efficacy; evaluable patients included 67 patients in the clarithromycin treatment group and 58 patients in the penicillin VK group. Both antibiotic regimens were effective in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis. The clinical cure rate during the initial post-treatment period (between two and ten days post-treatment) for the penicillin VK treated group was 98% (57/58) and for the clarithromycin treated group was 96% (64/67). The bacteriological cure rate during the initial post-treatment period for the penicillin VK treated group was 97% (56/58) and for the clarithromycin treated group was 100% (67/67). A total of 17 patients reported adverse events; seven patients were in the clarithromycin treatment group and ten patients in the penicillin VK treatment group. One patient in the penicillin VK group was withdrawn because of the severity of the adverse advent (balanitis). No clinically significant differences were reported between the two treatment groups for haematology, blood chemistry, or urinalysis evaluations. Oral clarithromycin 250 mg 12-hourly treatment was as safe and effective as penicillin VK 250 mg 6-hourly in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis.

  3. Biochemical properties of penicillin amidohydrolase from Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, D H; Ryu, D D

    1979-01-01

    Some biochemical properties of whole-cell penicillin amidohydrolase from Micrococcus luteus have been studied. This whole-cell enzyme showed its maximal activity at 36 degrees C at pH 7.5. It was found that the activation energy of this enzyme was 8.03 kcal (ca. 33.6 kJ) per mol, and this amidohydrolase showed first-order decay at 36 degrees C. The penicillin amidohydrolase was deactivated rapidly at temperatures above 50 degrees C during storage or preincubation for 24 h. The Michaelis constant, Km, for penicillin G was determined as 2.26 mM, and the substrate inhibition constant, Kis, was 155 mM. The whole-cell penicillin amidohydrolase from M. luteus was capable of hydrolyzing penicillin G, penicillin V, ampicillin, and cephalexin, but not cephalosporin C and cloxacillin. This whole-cell enzyme also had synthetic activity for semisynthetic penicillins or cephalosporins from D-(--)-alpha-phenylglycine methyl ester and 6-alpha-aminopenicillanic acid or 7-amino-3-deacetoxycephalosporanic acid. PMID:39505

  4. Penicillin-binding site on the Escherichia coli cell envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, L.; Lee, Y.; Schwarz, U.; Lorian, V.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 35/S-labeled penicillin to distinct penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cell envelope obtained from the sonication of Escherichia coli was studied at different pHs ranging from 4 to 11. Experiments distinguishing the effect of pH on penicillin binding by PBP 5/6 from its effect on beta-lactamase activity indicated that although substantial binding occurred at the lowest pH, the amount of binding increased with pH, reaching a maximum at pH 10. Based on earlier studies, it is proposed that the binding at high pH involves the formation of a covalent bond between the C-7 of penicillin and free epsilon amino groups of the PBPs. At pHs ranging from 4 to 8, position 1 of penicillin, occupied by sulfur, is considered to be the site that establishes a covalent bond with the sulfhydryl groups of PBP 5. The use of specific blockers of free epsilon amino groups or sulfhydryl groups indicated that wherever the presence of each had little or no effect on the binding of penicillin by PBP 5, the presence of both completely prevented binding. The specific blocker of the hydroxyl group of serine did not affect the binding of penicillin.

  5. Effect of media composition on the penicillin production.

    PubMed

    El-Marsafy, M; Abdel-Akher, M; El-Saied, H

    1977-01-01

    The conventional penicillin fermentation medium is composed of corn steep liquor, glucose, lactose, minerals, oil, and precursor. The penicillin activity was not affected, due to the addition of carbonate 0-1% or whale oil 0.5% instead of 1%. Also the omission of cupric, magnesium, manganese, zinc sulphates, and acetic acid did not affect the penicillin activity, while the omission of ammonium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate decreased the penicillin activity in the medium. The penicillin activity of a medium containing 2% calcium superphosphate was higher than that of the control medium, containing 0.4% potassium dihydrogen phosphate and 1% calcium carbonate. Instead of adding the precursor twice, after 0 and 48 hrs, the addition of phenylacetamide in the amount of 0.2%, at the start, did not affect the activity, while addition of phenylacetic acid (0.2%), at the start, decreased the penicillin activity. The omission of the precursors in the medium decreased the penicillin activity measured microbiologically, however, 6-aminopenicillanic acid content was relatively higher as compared with that of the control medium, containing precursor. These results were confirmed, using iodometric assay and paper chromatographic analysis.

  6. T cell receptor cross-reactivity directed by antigen-dependent tuning of peptide-MHC molecular flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, O.Y.; Piepenbrink, K.H.; Gloor, B.E.; Scott, D.R.; Sommese, R.F.; Cole, D.K.; Sewell, A.K.; Baker, B.M.

    2010-09-07

    T cell-mediated immunity requires T cell receptor (TCR) cross-reactivity, the mechanisms behind which remain incompletely elucidated. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes both the Tax (LLFGYPVYV) and Tel1p (MLWGYLQYV) peptides presented by the human class I MHC molecule HLA-A2. Here we found that although the two ligands are ideal structural mimics, they form substantially different interfaces with A6, with conformational differences in the peptide, the TCR, and unexpectedly, the MHC molecule. The differences between the Tax and Tel1p ternary complexes could not be predicted from the free peptide-MHC structures and are inconsistent with a traditional induced-fit mechanism. Instead, the differences were attributable to peptide and MHC molecular motion present in Tel1p-HLA-A2 but absent in Tax-HLA-A2. Differential tuning of the dynamic properties of HLA-A2 by the Tax and Tel1p peptides thus facilitates cross-recognition and impacts how structural diversity can be presented to and accommodated by receptors of the immune system.

  7. Detection of Viral Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies Directed Against EBV or VCP: In Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients of Indian Origin

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Sudha S; Shetty, Rashmi R; Mistry, Kejal J; Chogle, Arun R

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Study was undertaken to analyze the frequency of anti-viral citrullinated peptide (anti-VCP) antibodies in sera from patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). Materials and Methods: Viral citrullinated peptide (VCP) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) peptide were commercially prepared and antibodies to these were determined in 25 patients of ERA, 40 disease control patients constituting 25 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 7 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 2 scleroderma, 1 spondyloarthritis (SpA), 1 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), 1 osteoarthritis (OA), 1 psoriatic arthritis (PsA), 1 undifferentiated arthritis (UA), and 1 gout and 25 healthy controls (HCs) were taken for comparison. In-house ELISA was established for both the antibodies while cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody was detected by commercial ELISA kit. Results: Significant increase in VCP antibody by ERA and disease controls than healthy normal was observed. VCP IgM antibody was significantly increased in RA patients than HC. The presence of VCP antibody signifies a good marker for ERA. We observed significant difference in the VCP IgG and IgM antibody when compared to EBNA-1. In-house ELISA established for EBNA-1 and VCP antibodies showed low sensitivity but 96% specificity. Conclusions: We observed that sera from early RA patients reacted to the deiminated protein encoded by Epstain Barr Virus (EBV). Thus a possible role of virus in inducing an anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) response reveals viral etiology in this disease. PMID:21346905

  8. Structural Evidence for Direct Interactions Between the BRCT Domains of Human BRCA1 and a Phospho-Peptide from Human ACC1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,Y.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    The tandem BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains are phospho-serine/threonine recognition modules essential for the function of BRCA1. Recent studies suggest that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), an enzyme with crucial roles in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and lipogenesis and essential for cancer cell survival, may be a novel binding partner for BRCA1, through interactions with its BRCT domains. We report here the crystal structure at 3.2 Angstroms resolution of human BRCA1 BRCT domains in complex with a phospho-peptide from human ACC1 (p-ACC1 peptide, with the sequence 1258-DSPPQ-pS-PTFPEAGH-1271), which provides molecular evidence for direct interactions between BRCA1 and ACC1. The p-ACC1 peptide is bound in an extended conformation, located in a groove between the tandem BRCT domains. There are recognizable and significant structural differences to the binding modes of two other phospho-peptides to these domains, from BACH1 and CtIP, even though they share a conserved pSer-Pro-(Thr/Val)-Phe motif. Our studies establish a framework for understanding the regulation of lipid biosynthesis by BRCA1 through its inhibition of ACC1 activity, which could be a novel tumor suppressor function of BRCA1.

  9. Secretion by overexpression and purification of the water-soluble Streptomyces K15 DD-transpeptidase/penicillin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Palomeque-Messia, P; Quittre, V; Leyh-Bouille, M; Nguyen-Distèche, M; Gershater, C J; Dacey, I K; Dusart, J; Van Beeumen, J; Ghuysen, J M

    1992-01-01

    Though synthesized with a cleavable signal peptide and devoid of membrane anchors, the 262-amino-acid-residue Streptomyces K15 DD-transpeptidase/penicillin-binding protein is membrane-bound. Overexpression in Streptomyces lividans resulted in the export of an appreciable amount of the synthesized protein (4 mg/litre of culture supernatant). The water-soluble enzyme was purified close to protein homogeneity with a yield of 75%. It requires the presence of 0.5 M-NaCl to remain soluble. It is indistinguishable from the detergent-extract wild-type enzyme with respect to molecular mass, thermostability, transpeptidase activity and penicillin-binding capacity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:1445284

  10. [Quantitative determination of penicillins by iodometry using potassium hydrogen peroxymonosulfate].

    PubMed

    Blazhevskiĭ, N E; Karpova, S P; Kabachyĭ, V I

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and stoichiometry of S-oxidation of semisynthetic penicillins (amoxicillin trihydrate, ampicillin trihydrate, sodium salt of oxacillin and ticarcillin disodium salt) by potassium hydrogen peroxymonosulfate in aqueous solutions at pH 3-6 was studied by iodometric titration: 1 mol of KNSO5 per 1 mol of penicillin, the quantitative interaction is achieved in 1 min (time of observation). A unified method was developed and the possibility of quantification of penicillins by the iodometric method using potassium hydrogen peroxymonosulfate as an analytical reagent was shown.

  11. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A.; Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, G. Guy; Suresh, C. G.

    2005-01-01

    The production, crystallization and characterization of three inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase from B. sphaericus in their respective precursor and processed forms are reported. The space groups are different for the native enzyme and the mutants. The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants will provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme.

  12. 21 CFR 522.1696c - Penicillin G procaine in oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine in oil. 522.1696c Section... § 522.1696c Penicillin G procaine in oil. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent to 300,000 units of penicillin G. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  13. 21 CFR 522.1696c - Penicillin G procaine in oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine in oil. 522.1696c Section... § 522.1696c Penicillin G procaine in oil. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent to 300,000 units of penicillin G. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1696c - Penicillin G procaine in oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine in oil. 522.1696c Section... § 522.1696c Penicillin G procaine in oil. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent to 300,000 units of penicillin G. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1696c - Penicillin G procaine in oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine in oil. 522.1696c Section... § 522.1696c Penicillin G procaine in oil. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent to 300,000 units of penicillin G. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053501 in § 510.600(c) of this...

  16. Direct Visualization of Peptide/MHC Complexes at the Surface and in the Intracellular Compartments of Cells Infected In Vivo by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Cazareth, Julie; Hoebeke, Johan; Lippuner, Christoph; Davalos-Misslitz, Ana; Aebischer, Toni; Muller, Sylviane; Glaichenhaus, Nicolas; Mougneau, Evelyne

    2010-01-01

    Protozoa and bacteria infect various types of phagocytic cells including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells and eosinophils. However, it is not clear which of these cells process and present microbial antigens in vivo and in which cellular compartments parasite peptides are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules. To address these issues, we have infected susceptible BALB/c (H-2d) mice with a recombinant Leishmania major parasite expressing a fluorescent tracer. To directly visualize the antigen presenting cells that present parasite-derived peptides to CD4+ T cells, we have generated a monoclonal antibody that reacts to an antigenic peptide derived from the parasite LACK antigen bound to I-Ad Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecule. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of in vivo infected cells showed that intracellular I-Ad/LACK complexes were present in the membrane of amastigote-containing phagosomes in dendritic cells, eosinophils and macrophages/monocytes. In both dendritic cells and macrophages, these complexes were also present in smaller vesicles that did not contain amastigote. The presence of I-Ad/LACK complexes at the surface of dendritic cells, but neither on the plasma membrane of macrophages nor eosinophils was independently confirmed by flow cytometry and by incubating sorted phagocytes with highly sensitive LACK-specific hybridomas. Altogether, our results suggest that peptides derived from Leishmania proteins are loaded onto Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules in the phagosomes of infected phagocytes. Although these complexes are transported to the cell surface in dendritic cells, therefore allowing the stimulation of parasite-specific CD4+ T cells, this does not occur in other phagocytic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which Major Histocompatibility Complex class II molecules bound to peptides derived from a parasite protein have been visualized within and at the surface of

  17. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  18. Direct observation of internalization and ROS generation of amyloid β-peptide in neuronal cells at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Wei, Yibin; Liu, Zhiwei; An, Wenting; Guo, Maolin

    2012-11-05

    Seeing in many colors: Confocal images acquired using fluorescently labeled amyloid β-peptide revealed its efficient internalization by endocytosis into endosomes/lysosomes of human neuronal cells with a small portion reaching mitochondria, inducing marked cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  19. An alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptide selectively modulates macrophage responses to lipopolysaccharide and directly alters macrophage gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Rosenberger, C M; Gold, M R; Finlay, B B; Hancock, R E

    2000-09-15

    Certain cationic antimicrobial peptides block the binding of LPS to LPS-binding protein and reduce the ability of LPS to induce the production of inflammatory mediators by macrophages. To gain a more complete understanding of how LPS activates macrophages and how cationic peptides influence this process, we have used gene array technology to profile gene expression patterns in macrophages treated with LPS in the presence or the absence of the insect-derived cationic antimicrobial peptide CEMA (cecropin-melittin hybrid). We found that CEMA selectively blocked LPS-induced gene expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The ability of LPS to induce the expression of >40 genes was strongly inhibited by CEMA, while LPS-induced expression of another 16 genes was relatively unaffected. In addition, CEMA itself induced the expression of a distinct set of 35 genes, including genes involved in cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, CEMA, a synthetic alpha-helical peptide, selectively modulates the transcriptional response of macrophages to LPS and can alter gene expression in macrophages.

  20. MRM validation of targeted nonglycosylated peptides from N-glycoprotein biomarkers using direct trypsin digestion of undepleted human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; Cheon, Mi Hee; Park, Gun Wook; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Moon, Myeong Hee; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2014-02-26

    A rapid, simple, and reproducible MRM-based validation method for serological glycoprotein biomarkers in clinical use was developed by targeting the nonglycosylated tryptic peptides adjacent to N-glycosylation sites. Since changes in protein glycosylation are known to be associated with a variety of diseases, glycoproteins have been major targets in biomarker discovery. We previously found that nonglycosylated tryptic peptides adjacent to N-glycosylation sites differed in concentration between normal and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasma due to differences in steric hindrance of the glycan moiety in N-glycoproteins to tryptic digestion (Lee et al., 2011). To increase the feasibility and applicability of clinical validation of biomarker candidates (nonglycosylated tryptic peptides), we developed a method to effectively monitor nonglycosylated tryptic peptides from a large number of plasma samples and to reduce the total analysis time with maximizing the effect of steric hindrance by the glycans during digestion of glycoproteins. The AUC values of targeted nonglycosylated tryptic peptides were excellent (0.955 for GQYCYELDEK, 0.880 for FEDGVLDPDYPR and 0.907 for TEDTIFLR), indicating that these could be effective biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma. This method provides the necessary throughput required to validate glycoprotein biomarkers, as well as quantitative accuracy for human plasma analysis, and should be amenable to clinical use. Difficulties in verifying and validating putative protein biomarkers are often caused by complex sample preparation procedures required to determine their concentrations in a large number of plasma samples. To solve the difficulties, we developed MRM-based protein biomarker assays that greatly reduce complex, time-consuming, and less reproducible sample pretreatment steps in plasma for clinical implementation. First, we used undepleted human plasma samples without any enrichment procedures. Using nanoLC/MS/MS, we targeted

  1. Osmotic Pressure, Bacterial Cell Walls, and Penicillin: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.

    1984-01-01

    An easily constructed apparatus that models the effect of penicillin on the structure of bacterial cells is described. Background information and procedures for using the apparatus during a classroom demonstration are included. (JN)

  2. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciTech Connect

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.; Palma, G.; Veronese, F.M.

    1987-06-01

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that of the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.

  3. Osmotic Pressure, Bacterial Cell Walls, and Penicillin: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.

    1984-01-01

    An easily constructed apparatus that models the effect of penicillin on the structure of bacterial cells is described. Background information and procedures for using the apparatus during a classroom demonstration are included. (JN)

  4. Penicillin and cephalosporin drug allergies: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Medication hypersensitivity is a constant variable that podiatric physicians face during their professional day. To avoid potential patient harm, an understanding of penicillin and cephalosporin hypersensitivities as it pertains to podiatric medicine needs to be achieved. To accomplish this, a narrative describing the signs, symptoms, and immunologic mechanisms for the basis of penicillin and cephalosporin drug hypersensitivities is presented. Second, specific medical literature serving as clinical-based evidence to support the prescribing of cephalosporins in patients with documented penicillin allergy is presented. Finally, a review of the medical and legal literature describing health-care provider liability regarding subsequent drug hypersensitivity is presented. The information contained in this review allows for the evolving paradigm that permits the prescribing of selective cephalosporins to patients with a history of penicillin allergy as long as the allergic symptoms were not serious or life-threatening.

  5. Compartmentalization in penicillin G biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum PQ-96.

    PubMed

    Kurzątkowski, Wiesław; Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Gębska-Kuczerowska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of organelles in the sub-apical productive non-growing vacuolated hyphal cells of the high- and the low-penicillin-pro- ducing strains Penicillium chrysogenum was compared using transmission electron microscopy. In the productive cells of the high-yielding strain the endoplasmic reticulum and the polyribosomes with associated peroxisomes are frequently arranged at the periphery of the cytoplasm and around the vacuoles. At the high activity of penicillin G biosynthesis the immuno-label of the cytosolic isopenicillin N synthase is concentrated at the polyribosomes arranged in the peripheral cytoplasm and along the tonoplast as well as around the peroxisomes. On the basis of the obtained results the compartmentalization of the pathway of penicillin G biosymthesis is discussed. The obtained results support the phenylacetic acid detoxification hypothesis of penicillin G biosynthesis.

  6. [Proper antibiotic therapy. From penicillin to pharmacogenomic].

    PubMed

    Caramia, G; Ruffini, E

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. The use of penicillin by Flaming, opened up the golden era of antibiotics and now is hard to imagine the practice of medicine without antibiotics. Life-threatening infections, such as meningitis, endocarditis, bacteremic pneumonia sepsis, would again prove fatal. Also aggressive chemotherapy and transplant procedures would prove impossible. Another real wonder has been the rise of antibiotic resistance soon after the clinical use of penicillin in hospitals and communities. Several study demonstrated an excessive amount of antibiotic prescribing for communities patients and inpatients and in some hospital up to 50% of antibiotic usage is inappropriate: the benefits of antibiotic treatment come with the risk of antibiotic resistance development. In hospitals, infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are associated with higher mortality, morbidity and prolonged hospital stay compared with infections caused by antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. A variety of strategies has been proposed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of medication use. Education, guidelines and evidence based recommendations are considered to be essential elements of any program designed to influence prescribing behavior and can provide a foundation of knowledge that will enhance and increase the acceptance of stewardship strategies. Evidence-based recommendations, an approach to clinical practice helping to make decisions based on clinical expertise and on intimate knowledge of the individual patient's situations, beliefs, and priorities, enhance antimicrobial stewardship, that include appropriate selection, dosing, route, and duration of antimicrobial therapy can maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection while limiting the unintended consequences, such as the emergence of resistance, adverse drug events, and cost. These evidence-based guidelines are not a substitute for clinical

  7. Multimodular Penicillin-Binding Proteins: An Enigmatic Family of Orthologs and Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Colette; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie

    1998-01-01

    The monofunctional penicillin-binding dd-peptidases and penicillin-hydrolyzing serine β-lactamases diverged from a common ancestor by the acquisition of structural changes in the polypeptide chain while retaining the same folding, three-motif amino acid sequence signature, serine-assisted catalytic mechanism, and active-site topology. Fusion events gave rise to multimodular penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). The acyl serine transferase penicillin-binding (PB) module possesses the three active-site defining motifs of the superfamily; it is linked to the carboxy end of a non-penicillin-binding (n-PB) module through a conserved fusion site; the two modules form a single polypeptide chain which folds on the exterior of the plasma membrane and is anchored by a transmembrane spanner; and the full-size PBPs cluster into two classes, A and B. In the class A PBPs, the n-PB modules are a continuum of diverging sequences; they possess a five-motif amino acid sequence signature, and conserved dicarboxylic amino acid residues are probably elements of the glycosyl transferase catalytic center. The PB modules fall into five subclasses: A1 and A2 in gram-negative bacteria and A3, A4, and A5 in gram-positive bacteria. The full-size class A PBPs combine the required enzymatic activities for peptidoglycan assembly from lipid-transported disaccharide-peptide units and almost certainly prescribe different, PB-module specific traits in peptidoglycan cross-linking. In the class B PBPs, the PB and n-PB modules cluster in a concerted manner. A PB module of subclass B2 or B3 is linked to an n-PB module of subclass B2 or B3 in gram-negative bacteria, and a PB module of subclass B1, B4, or B5 is linked to an n-PB module of subclass B1, B4, or B5 in gram-positive bacteria. Class B PBPs are involved in cell morphogenesis. The three motifs borne by the n-PB modules are probably sites for module-module interaction and the polypeptide stretches which extend between motifs 1 and 2 are sites for

  8. Seasonal variation in penicillin susceptibility and invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Madoff, Lawrence C; O'Connell, Michael; Pelton, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated prospectively laboratory surveillance data from Massachusetts to investigate whether seasonal variation in invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with the proportion of penicillin-susceptible isolates. The proportion of penicillin-susceptible isolates associated with invasive pneumococcal disease varied by season, with proportions highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, and rates of invasive disease were highest in the autumn and winter seasons and lowest in the summer.

  9. Seasonal Variation in Penicillin Susceptibility and Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Pui-Ying Iroh; Madoff, Lawrence C.; O'Connell, Michael; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated prospectively laboratory surveillance data from Massachusetts to investigate whether seasonal variation in invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with the proportion of penicillin susceptible isolates. The proportion of penicillin susceptible isolates associated with invasive pneumococcal disease varied by season, with proportions highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, and rates of invasive disease were highest in the autumn and winter seasons and lowest in the summer. PMID:25379834

  10. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  11. Pro-sequence and Ca2+-binding: implications for folding and maturation of Ntn-hydrolase penicillin amidase from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Wischnewski, Frank; Notbohm, Holger; Kasche, Volker

    2005-05-13

    Penicillin amidase (PA) is a bacterial periplasmic enzyme synthesized as a pre-pro-PA precursor. The pre-sequence mediates membrane translocation. The intramolecular pro-sequence is expressed along with the A and B chains but is rapidly removed in an autocatalytic manner. In extensive studies we show here that the pro-peptide is required for the correct folding of PA. Pro-PA and PA unfold via a biphasic transition that is more pronounced in the case of PA. According to size-exclusion chromatography and limited proteolysis experiments, the inflection observed in the equilibrium unfolding curves corresponds to an intermediate in which the N-terminal domain (A-chain) still possesses native-like topology, whereas the B-chain is unfolded to a large extent. In a series of in vitro experiments with a slow processing mutant pro-PA, we show that the pro-sequence in cis functions as a folding catalyst and accelerates the folding rate by seven orders of magnitude. In the absence of the pro-domain the PA refolds to a stable inactive molten globule intermediate that has native-like secondary but little tertiary structure. The pro-sequence of the homologous Alcaligenes faecalis PA can facilitate the folding of the hydrolase domain of Escherichia coli PA when added in trans (as a separate polypeptide chain). The isolated pro-sequence has a random structure in solution. However, difference circular dichroism spectra of native PA and native PA with pro-peptide added in trans suggest that the pro-sequence adopts an alpha-helical conformation in the context of the mature PA molecule. Furthermore, our results establish that Ca2+, found in the crystal structure, is not directly involved in the folding process. The cation shifts the equilibrium towards the native state and facilitates the autocatalytic processing of the pro-peptide.

  12. Diagnosis of penicillin allergy by skin testing: the Manitoba experience.

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R. J.; Simons, F. E.; Ho, H. W.; Gorski, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of skin testing in the diagnosis of penicillin allergy was studied in 86 adults and 167 children with a history of possible hypersensitivity reactions to penicillin. Skin testing was done with the major antigenic determinant of benzylpenicillin and minor determinants of benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin, methicillin and cephalothin. The overall frequency of positive skin reactions was 11.5%. Among the patients with positive skin reactions about half had a history of immediate or accelerated reactions to penicillins, but 2 of 11 adults and 50% of the children in this group had a history of maculopapular rash of delayed onset. There was a low frequency of positive skin reactions when there was a long interval between the times of clinical reaction and skin testing. Of 169 patients reacting negatively to skin testing who received a specific drug challenge only 2 manifested mild urticaria; this indicates the reliability of the skin tests in predicting penicillin allergy. The major and minor determinants of benzylpenicillin were the most useful reagents. One fifth of the patients with penicillin hypersensitivity would have been missed if the major determinant of benzylpenicillin alone had been used for skin testing. The additional use of the minor determinants of other penicillin derivatives, however, did not increase substantially the clinical reliability of the skin testing procedure. PMID:638909

  13. INACTIVATION OF SOME SEMISYNTHETIC PENICILLINS BY GRAM-NEGATIVE BACILLI

    PubMed Central

    Sabath, Leon; Finland, Maxwell

    1963-01-01

    Sabath, Leon (Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass.) and Maxwell Finland. Inactivation of some semisynthetic penicillins by gram-negative bacilli. J. Bacteriol. 85:314–321. 1963.—An agar diffusion method was used to test 55 strains of gram-negative bacilli for their ability to inactivate penicillin G, methicillin, biphenylpenicillin, oxacillin, and ampicillin; 26 strains inactivated one or more of them. All strains of Klebsiella-Aerobacter, nearly all of Escherichia coli, and some of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not those of Proteus or Salmonella, were active by this method. Penicillin G was inactivated by the largest number of strains, biphenylpenicillin and ampicillin by somewhat fewer, and oxacillin and methicillin by about half as many. When the five penicillins were incubated with four strains of different bacteria in broth at 37 C, all were inactivated to a considerable extent by all the strains, each penicillin to a different degree, but to about the same extent by all the strains. Adsorption alone did not account for the loss of activity. The results suggest that there are qualitative, as well as quantitative, differences among species or even strains of gram-negative bacilli in their ability to inactivate the various penicillins. Images PMID:13975857

  14. On-plate selective enrichment and self-desalting of peptides/proteins for direct MALDI MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhoufang; Wang, Yandong; Shi, Shoulei; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Xinhua; Lu, Nan

    2012-03-06

    In this paper, a new technique has been proposed to achieve simultaneous peptides/proteins enrichment and wash-free self-desalting on a novel sample support with a circle hydrophobic-hydrophilic-hydrophobic pattern. Upon deposition, the sample solution is first concentrated in a small area by repulsion of the hydrophobic outer layer, and then, the peptides/proteins and coexisting salt contaminants are selectively captured in different regions of the pattern through strong hydrophobic and hydrophilic attractions, respectively. As a result, the detection sensitivity is improved by 2 orders of magnitude better than the use of the traditional MALDI plate, and high-quality mass spectra are obtained even in the presence of NaCl (1 M), NH(4)HCO(3) (100 mM), or urea (1 M). The practical application of this method is further demonstrated by the successful analysis of myoglobin digests with high sequence coverage, demonstrating the great potential in proteomic research.

  15. Studies on isolation and purification of penicillin acylase by adsorption on bentonite.

    PubMed

    Sun, W

    1994-01-01

    When bentonite I as an absorbent according to 0.6% (w/v) was added to the supernatant of the fermentation broth for adsorption of penicillin acylase from Bacillus megatherium, 100% activity of penicillin acylase and about 10% protein in the supernatant were adsorbed. The adsorption of enzyme was not obviously changed with different pH and salt concentration of the supernatant. Various kinds of buffer with different pH were used to wash the enzyme-adsorbent complex. Only 1% enzyme activity adsorbed was washed out; however, it can wash out about 15% protein adsorbed. When phosphate buffer containing 10% PEG and NaCl as an eluent was used to elute the complex, 100% of enzyme activity adsorbed on the complex would be eluted, and purification and concentration times of enzyme could achieve about 25 and 6, respectively. The isolation and purification process can be carried out at room temperature. Its characters were very simple and showed a high recovery yield of enzyme activity, and it can be directly used for isolation and purification of penicillin acylase from the fermentation broth.

  16. DNA Binding Peptide Directed Synthesis of Continuous DNA Nanowires for Analysis of Large DNA Molecules by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Lee, Seonghyun; Jin, Xuelin; Kim, Su Ji; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of smooth and continuous DNA nanowires, preserving the original structure of native DNA, and allowing its analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM), is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles densely assembled on the DNA backbone via thiol-tagged DNA binding peptides work as seeds for metallization of DNA. This method allows whole analysis of DNA molecules with entangled 3D features. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Site-directed and global incorporation of orthogonal and isostructural noncanonical amino acids into the ribosomal lasso peptide capistruin.

    PubMed

    Al Toma, Rashed S; Kuthning, Anja; Exner, Matthias P; Denisiuk, Alexander; Ziegler, Juliane; Budisa, Nediljko; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2015-02-09

    Expansion of the structural diversity of peptide antibiotics was performed through two different methods. Supplementation-based incorporation (SPI) and stop-codon suppression (SCS) approaches were used for co-translational incorporation of isostructural and orthogonal noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into the lasso peptide capistruin. Two ncAAs were employed for the SPI method and five for the SCS method; each of them probing the incorporation of ncAAs in strategic positions of the molecule. Evaluation of the assembly by HR-ESI-MS proved more successful for the SCS method. Bio-orthogonal chemistry was used for post-biosynthetic modification of capistruin congener Cap_Alk10 containing the ncAA Alk (Nε-Alloc-L-lysine) instead of Ala. A second-generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst was used for an in vitro metathesis reaction with Cap_Alk10 and an allyl alcohol, which offers options for post-biosynthetic modifications. The use of synthetic biology allows for the in vivo production of new peptide-based antibiotics from an expanded amino acid repertoire.

  18. The effects of linking substituents on the in vivo behavior of site-directed, peptide-based, diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Prasanphanich, Adam F; Lane, Stephanie R; Figueroa, Said D; Ma, Lixin; Rold, Tammy L; Sieckman, Gary L; Hoffman, Timothy J; McCrate, Joseph M; Smith, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    A number of human cancers are known to over-express the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) on cell surfaces. The high specificity and affinity of bombesin (BBN), an amphibian analogue of mammalian gastrin-releasing peptide, for the GRPr makes it an ideal candidate for delivery of diagnostic probes, such as 99mTc radiometal, to tumor sites. An optimized targeting agent possesses high tumor uptake with minimal uptake in normal tissues. In this study, 99mTc-targeting vectors of bombesin using various amino acid/aliphatic pharmacokinetic modifiers or linking groups were evaluated to determine the effect of the spacer on receptor binding affinity, internalization/externalization and biodistribution. Conjugates of the general type [DPR-X-BBN] (X = amino acid/aliphatic pharmacokinetic modifier) were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and metallated with either low-valent, radioactive Tc-99m(I) or non-radioactive Re(I)-tricarbonyl precursors. All of the new non-metallated and metallated conjugates were characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Receptor binding affinity, internalization/externalization and biodistribution studies in normal (CF-1) and tumor (human prostate PC-3-bearing mice) are reported. The effectiveness of targeting xenografted PC-3 tumors in rodents for two of the new 99mTc-BBN conjugates is demonstrated herein using small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  19. Daily penicillin serum concentrations following injection of 1.2 mega-units of ”all-purpose” penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Tinkler, A. E.; Hedges, A. J.; Shannon, R.

    1965-01-01

    In view of evidence suggesting that 1.2 mega-units of ”all-purpose” penicillin (300 000 IU potassium penicillin G, 300 000 IU procaine penicillin G and 600 000 IU benzathine penicillin) did not maintain treponemicidal serum concentrations during the week following injection—which if true, might necessitate a reappraisal of prophylactic and treatment schedules in wide use against syphilis—daily assays were performed to determine the penicillinaemia levels in ambulant adult males for one week following intramuscular injection with this dosage of two ”all-purpose” products (168 assays in all, 24 each day). Statistical evaluation of the results showed that the mean daily serum concentrations were, in fact, treponemicidal during the whole week after injection. The means of groups of 24 assays fell within narrow daily ranges on each of the seven post-injection days, suggesting that the long-acting component (benzathine penicillin) gives reliable and predictable daily levels in a high proportion of cases. This is in contrast to those penicillins which rely for their long-acting property on the oily gel in which they are suspended. On the other hand, the extremes of penicillinaemia for any individual in a large group were shown to cover a very wide range, demonstrating that a particular patient's failure to respond to standard treatment or prophylaxis can be due to factors quite unrelated to the quality or specificity of the product or to the sensitivity of the organism causing disease. PMID:5294592

  20. Kinetic study of serum penicillin concentrations after single doses of benzathine and benethamine penicillins in young and old people.

    PubMed Central

    Collart, P; Poitevin, M; Milovanovic, A; Herlin, A; Durel, J

    1980-01-01

    In a comparative kinetic study of the serum concentrations of two penicillin complexes--medium-long-acting (benethamine penicillin) and long-acting (benzathine bipenicillin)--after a single injection in young adults and elderly people, the following results were confirmed statistically: (a) age was a major factor in the variations in serum penicillin concentrations and in their persistence in the serum; (b) the penicillin was absorbed faster in young than in elderly subjects even when a long-acting complex was used; (c) serum concentrations below the level regarded as lethal for treponemes appeared much earlier and more frequently in young than in old people; and (d) the bioequivalence between penicillin preparations could not be estimated solely for the number of units of the agent used but from the bioavailability of the chosen formulation. Thus a uniform and standard penicillin dosage allowing no safety margin may help in the superficial healing of a syphilitic chancre or the resolution of a roseola but it will certainly be insufficient to kill Treponema pallidum. It seems essential therefore to provide an antibiotic cover at high dosage over a long period of time. PMID:7448577

  1. The alpha9/alpha10-containing nicotinic ACh receptor is directly modulated by opioid peptides, endomorphin-1, and dynorphin B, proposed efferent cotransmitters in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Glowatzki, E; Holt, J C; Boulter, J; Zadina, J E; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2002-08-01

    Opioid peptides have been detected in the auditory and vestibular efferent neurons where they colocalize with the major neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. We investigated the function of opioids to modulate neurotransmission mediated by hair cell's alpha9/alpha10-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha9/alpha10nAChRs). The endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 (mu agonist) and dynorphin B (kappa agonist), but not a delta agonist [D-Pen2,D-Pen-5]enkephalin, inhibited the acetylcholine-evoked currents in frog saccular hair cells and rat inner hair cells. This inhibition was noncompetitive, voltage-independent, and was accompanied by an acceleration of the rate of current decay. Selective mu- and kappa-opioid receptor antagonists did not block the inhibition, although partial reduction by naloxone was observed. All opioid antagonists tested also reduced the acetylcholine response. Endomorphin-1 and dynorphin B inhibited the acetylcholine-evoked currents in alpha9/alpha10-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Because oocytes lack opioid receptors, it provides strong evidence for the direct interaction of opioid peptides with alpha9/alpha10nAChR. alpha9/alpha10nAChR is a target for modulation by endomorphin-1 and dynorphin B, efferent cotransmitters in the inner ear.

  2. The C-terminal peptide of Aquifex aeolicus riboflavin synthase directs encapsulation of native and foreign guests by a cage-forming lumazine synthase.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yusuke; Zschoche, Reinhard; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-06-23

    Encapsulation of specific enzymes in self-assembling protein cages is a hallmark of bacterial compartments that function as counterparts to eukaryotic organelles. The cage-forming enzyme lumazine synthase (LS) from Bacillus subtilis (BsLS), for example, encapsulates riboflavin synthase (BsRS), enabling channeling of lumazine from the site of its generation to the site of its conversion to vitamin B2 Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these supramolecular complexes could help inform new approaches for metabolic engineering, nanotechnology, and drug delivery. To that end, we investigated a thermostable LS from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS) and found that it also forms cage complexes with the cognate riboflavin synthase (AaRS) when both proteins are co-produced in the cytosol of Escherichia coli A 12-amino acid-long peptide at the C terminus of AaRS serves as a specific localization sequence responsible for targeting the guest to the protein compartment. Sequence comparisons suggested that analogous peptide segments likely direct RS complexation by LS cages in other bacterial species. Covalent fusion of this peptide tag to heterologous guest molecules led to their internalization into AaLS assemblies both in vivo and in vitro, providing a firm foundation for creating tailored biomimetic nanocompartments for medical and biotechnological applications. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Non-hydrolyzed in digestive tract and blood natural L-carnosine peptide ("bioactivated Jewish penicillin") as a panacea of tomorrow for various flu ailments: signaling activity attenuating nitric oxide (NO) production, cytostasis, and NO-dependent inhibition of influenza virus replication in macrophages in the human body infected with the virulent swine influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2013-01-01

    in excessive amounts mediate the overreaction of the host's immune response against the organs or tissues in which viruses are replicating, and this may explain the mechanism of tissue injuries observed in influenza virus infection of various types. In this article, the types of protection of carnosine in its bioavailable non-hydrolyzed forms in formulations are considered against reactive oxygen radical species-dependent injury, peroxynitrite damage, and other types of viral injuries in which impaired immune responses to viral pathogens are usually involved. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) shows the pharmacological intracellular correction of NO release, which might be one of the important factors of natural immunity in controlling the initial stages of influenza A virus infection (inhibition of virus replication) and virus-induced regulation of cytokine gene expression. The protective effects of orally applied non-hydrolyzed formulated species of carnosine include at least the direct interaction with NO, inhibition of cytotoxic NO-induced proinflammatory condition, and attenuation of the effects of cytokines and chemokines that can exert profound effects on inflammatory cells. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that natural products, such as chicken soup and chicken breast extracts rich in carnosine and its derivative anserine (β-alanyl-1-methyl-L-histidine), could contribute to the pathogenesis and prevention of influenza virus infections and cold but have a limitation due to the susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis of dipeptides with serum carnosinase and urine excretion after oral ingestion of a commercial chicken extract. The formulations of non-hydrolyzed in digestive tract and blood natural carnosine peptide and isopeptide (γ-glutamyl-carnosine) products, manufactured at the cGMP-certified facility and patented by the authors, have promise in the control and prevention of influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, cough, and cold.

  4. High-affinity Anticalins with aggregation-blocking activity directed against the Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Rauth, Sabine; Hinz, Dominik; Börger, Michael; Uhrig, Markus; Mayhaus, Manuel; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Skerra, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, in particular Aβ42 and Aβ40, exert neurotoxic effects and their overproduction leads to amyloid deposits in the brain, thus constituting an important biomolecular target for treatments of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We describe the engineering of cognate Anticalins as a novel type of neutralizing protein reagent based on the human lipocalin scaffold. Phage display selection from a genetic random library comprising variants of the human lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) with mutations targeted at 20 exposed amino acid positions in the four loops that form the natural binding site was performed using both recombinant and synthetic target peptides and resulted in three different Anticalins. Biochemical characterization of the purified proteins produced by periplasmic secretion in Escherichia coli revealed high folding stability in a monomeric state, with Tm values ranging from 53.4°C to 74.5°C, as well as high affinities for Aβ40, between 95 pM and 563 pM, as measured by real-time surface plasmon resonance analysis. The central linear VFFAED epitope within the Aβ sequence was mapped using a synthetic peptide array on membranes and was shared by all three Anticalins, despite up to 13 mutual amino acid differences in their binding sites. All Anticalins had the ability–with varying extent–to inhibit Aβ aggregation in vitro according to the thioflavin-T fluorescence assay and, furthermore, they abolished Aβ42-mediated toxicity in neuronal cell culture. Thus, these Anticalins provide not only useful protein reagents to study the molecular pathology of AD but they also show potential as alternative drug candidates compared with antibodies. PMID:27029347

  5. The Structure And Synthetic Capabilities Of A Catalytic Peptide Formed By Substrate-Directed Mechanism Implications To Prebiotic Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleminger, Gideon; Yaron, Tal; Eisenstein, Miriam; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    2005-08-01

    Previously, we have shown that a small substrate may serve as a template in the formation of a specific catalytic peptide, a phenomenon which might have had a major role in prebiotic synthesis of peptide catalysts. This was demonstrated experimentally by the formation of a catalytic metallo-dipeptide, Cys2-Fe2+, around o-nitrophenyl β-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG), by dicyandiamide (DCDA)-assisted condensation under aqueous conditions. This dipeptide was capable of hydrolyzing ONPG at a specific activity lower only 1000 fold than that of β galactosidase. In the present paper we use molecular modeling techniques to elucidate the structure of this catalyst and its complex with the substrate and propose a putative mechanism for the catalyst formation and its mode of action as a “mini enzyme”. This model suggests that interaction of Fe2+ ion with ONPG oxygens and with two cysteine SH groups promotes the specific formation of the Cys2-Fe2+ catalyst. Similarly, the interaction of the catalyst with ONPG is mediated by its Fe2+ with the substrate oxygens, leading to its hydrolysis. In addition, immobilized forms of the catalyst were synthesized on two carriers Eupergit C and amino glass beads. These preparations were capable of catalyzing the formation of ONPG from β-D-galactose and o-nitrophenol (ONP) under anhydrous conditions. The ability of the catalyst to synthesize the substrate that mediates its own formation creates an autocatalytic cycle where ONPG catalyzes the formation of a catalyst which, in turn, catalyzes ONPG formation. Such autocatalytic cycle can only operate by switching between high and low water activity conditions, such as in tidal pools cycling between wet and dry environments. Implications of the substrate-dependent formation of catalytically active peptides to prebiotic processes are discussed

  6. The structure and synthetic capabilities of a catalytic peptide formed by substrate-directed mechanism--implications to prebiotic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, Gideon; Yaron, Tal; Eisenstein, Miriam; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    2005-08-01

    Previously, we have shown that a small substrate may serve as a template in the formation of a specific catalytic peptide, a phenomenon which might have had a major role in prebiotic synthesis of peptide catalysts. This was demonstrated experimentally by the formation of a catalytic metallo-dipeptide, Cys2-Fe2+, around o-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG), by dicyandiamide (DCDA)-assisted condensation under aqueous conditions. This dipeptide was capable of hydrolyzing ONPG at a specific activity lower only 1000 fold than that of beta galactosidase. In the present paper we use molecular modeling techniques to elucidate the structure of this catalyst and its complex with the substrate and propose a putative mechanism for the catalyst formation and its mode of action as a "mini enzyme". This model suggests that interaction of Fe2+ ion with ONPG oxygens and with two cysteine SH groups promotes the specific formation of the Cys2-Fe2+ catalyst. Similarly, the interaction of the catalyst with ONPG is mediated by its Fe2+ with the substrate oxygens, leading to its hydrolysis. In addition, immobilized forms of the catalyst were synthesized on two carriers--Eupergit C and amino glass beads. These preparations were capable of catalyzing the formation of ONPG from beta-D-galactose and o-nitrophenol (ONP) under anhydrous conditions. The ability of the catalyst to synthesize the substrate that mediates its own formation creates an autocatalytic cycle where ONPG catalyzes the formation of a catalyst which, in turn, catalyzes ONPG formation. Such autocatalytic cycle can only operate by switching between high and low water activity conditions, such as in tidal pools cycling between wet and dry environments. Implications of the substrate-dependent formation of catalytically active peptides to prebiotic processes are discussed.

  7. A new expression vector for high level protein production, one step purification and direct isotopic labeling of calmodulin-binding peptide fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, C F; Simcox, T; Xu, L; Vaillancourt, P

    1997-02-20

    Calmodulin-binding peptide (CBP), a peptide of 26 amino acids derived from muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), binds to calmodulin with nanomolar affinity. Proteins fused in frame with CBP can be purified from crude E. coli lysates in a single step using calmodulin affinity chromatography (Stofko-Hahn et al., 1992). Because the binding between CBP and calmodulin is calcium-dependent, the fusion protein can be eluted from the resin with virtually any buffer containing EGTA (2 mM) and used directly for many applications. To take full advantage of this affinity purification system, we constructed the versatile CBP fusion protein expression vector pCAL-n. The CBP coding sequence was positioned for fusion at the N-terminus, an advantage that ensures consistent high level synthesis of fusion proteins due to the efficient translation of the CBP in E. coli. The production of fusion proteins from pCAL-n is controlled by the tightly regulated T7(lac)O promoter. A versatile multiple cloning site (MCS) was included to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest. The protein coding sequence for the enzyme c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was inserted into the MCS of pCAL-n, and the resulting fusion protein CBP-JNK synthesized in E. coli cells at 15-20 mg/1 culture. CBP-JNK was purified to near homogeneity in one step with calmodulin affinity resin. Purified CBP-JNK is fully active, and the CBP peptide tag can be removed by cleavage with thrombin. We also show that CBP can be efficiently phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Hence, the purified fusion proteins can be labeled directly with [gamma-32P]ATP and used to probe protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions.

  8. Direct Measurement of Pore Dynamics and Leakage Induced by a Model Antimicrobial Peptide in Single Vesicles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Matthew G; Huang, Qi M; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D; Palombo, Enzo A; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-06-28

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising therapeutic alternatives to counter growing antimicrobial resistance. Their precise mechanism of action remains elusive, however, particularly with respect to live bacterial cells. We investigated the interaction of a fluorescent melittin analogue with single giant unilamellar vesicles, giant multilamellar vesicles, and bilamellar Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was employed to determine the population distribution of the fluorescent melittin analogue between pore state and membrane surface state, and simultaneously measure the leakage of entrapped fluorescent species from the vesicle (or bacterium) interior. In giant unilamellar vesicles, leakage from vesicle interior was correlated with an increase in level of pore states, consistent with a stable pore formation mechanism. In giant multilamellar vesicles, vesicle leakage occurred more gradually and did not appear to correlate with increased pore states. Instead pore levels remained at a low steady-state level, which is more in line with coupled equilibria. Finally, in single bacterial cells, significant increases in pore levels were observed over time, which were correlated with only partial loss of cytosolic contents. These observations suggested that pore formation, as opposed to complete dissolution of membrane, was responsible for the leakage of contents in these systems, and that the bacterial membrane has an adaptive capacity that resists peptide attack. We interpret the three distinct pore dynamics regimes in the context of the increasing physical and biological complexity of the membranes.

  9. Development of a penicillin biosensor using a single optical imaging fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Brian G.; Walt, David R.

    1995-05-01

    A penicillin biosensor has been fabricated by photodepositing penicillin-sensitive polymer matrices and pH-sensitive polymer matrices on different regions of an optical imaging fiber. Penicillin is detected by coupling the enzymatic activity of penicillinase with the pH sensitivity of fluorescein. Penicillin concentration is correlated to the pH change in the microenvironment of the penicillin-sensitive matrix relative to the pH of the sample solution. This dual sensor removes the need to maintain a constant solution pH when measuring penicillin and should enhance greatly the application of biosensors.

  10. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  11. Recent advances in the understanding of the penicillin urticarias.

    PubMed

    Jillson, O F; Porter, P S

    1965-08-01

    The three major groups of immunoglobulins (gamma G, gamma A, and gamma M) associated with this disease are reviewed. The presence or absence of atopic disease may account for percentage variability of gamma A because reagins (skin-sensitizing antibodies) are found in this immunoglobulin. The gamma A is the antibody usually responsible for anaphylaxis, rather than the gamma G precipitins, so stressed in the past. All three immunoglobulins may be found in serum sickness, which could account for the complex nature of this type of penicillin urticaria. The merits of the immunological tests (penicilloyl-polylysine, benzyl penicillin, hemagglutination, basophil degranulation) for the detection of penicillin sensitivity are analyzed, particularly as each applies to the various types of penicillin urticaria (serum sickness, anaphylactic, dermographic, delayed dermographic, and simple chronic urticaria and the lupus diathesis). The penicilloyl-polylysine test is greatly overrated as a means of predicting possible anaphylaxis. The benzyl penicillin skin test properly performed is an excellent means of indicating this.

  12. Penicillin-binding protein 3 of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its application in screening of β-lactams in milk.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zhanhui; Wen, Kai; Liang, Xiao; Shen, Jianzhong

    2013-11-15

    The soluble form of penicillin-binding protein 3 (sPBP3(∗)) from Streptococcus pneumoniae was expressed in Escherichia coli as a six-histidine fusion protein. The protein was purified and used to develop a microplate assay in direct competitive format for the detection of penicillins and cephalosporins in milk. The assay was based on competitive inhibition of the binding of horseradish peroxidase-labeled ampicillin (HRP-Amp) to the sPBP3(∗) by free β-lactam antibiotics in milk. Under optimized conditions, most of the β-lactam antibiotics (11 penicillins and 16 cephalosporins) could be detected at concentrations corresponding to the maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by the European Union. Analysis of spiked milk samples showed that acceptable recoveries ranged from 74.06 to 106.31% in skimmed milk and from 63.97 to 107.26% in whole milk, with coefficients of variation (CVs) less than 16%. With the high sensitivity and wide-range affinities to penicillins and cephalosporins, the developed assay based on sPBP3(∗) exhibited the potential to be a screening assay for fast detection of β-lactam antibiotics in milk.

  13. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β -Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mbah, Andreas N; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates acquired a new protein called β -lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2'). The PBP-2' functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β -lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2' protein. We conducted a complete structural and functional regulatory analysis of PBP-2' protein. Our analysis revealed that the PBP-2' is very stable with more hydrophilic amino acids expressing antigenic sites. PBP-2' has three striking regulatory points constituted by first penicillin binding site at Ser25, second penicillin binding site at Ser405, and finally a single metallic ligand binding site at Glu657 which binds to Zn(2+) ions. This report highlights structural features of PBP-2' that can serve as targets for developing new chemotherapeutic agents and conducting site direct mutagenesis experiments.

  14. Documenting Penicillin Allergy: The Impact of Inconsistency

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirav S.; Ridgway, Jessica P.; Pettit, Natasha; Fahrenbach, John; Robicsek, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Background Allergy documentation is frequently inconsistent and incomplete. The impact of this variability on subsequent treatment is not well described. Objective To determine how allergy documentation affects subsequent antibiotic choice. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Participants 232,616 adult patients seen by 199 primary care providers (PCPs) between January 1, 2009 and January 1, 2014 at an academic medical system. Main Measures Inter-physician variation in beta-lactam allergy documentation; antibiotic treatment following beta-lactam allergy documentation. Key Results 15.6% of patients had a reported beta-lactam allergy. Of those patients, 39.8% had a specific allergen identified and 22.7% had allergic reaction characteristics documented. Variation between PCPs was greater than would be expected by chance (all p<0.001) in the percentage of their patients with a documented beta-lactam allergy (7.9% to 24.8%), identification of a specific allergen (e.g. amoxicillin as opposed to “penicillins”) (24.0% to 58.2%) and documentation of the reaction characteristics (5.4% to 51.9%). After beta-lactam allergy documentation, patients were less likely to receive penicillins (Relative Risk [RR] 0.16 [95% Confidence Interval: 0.15–0.17]) and cephalosporins (RR 0.28 [95% CI 0.27–0.30]) and more likely to receive fluoroquinolones (RR 1.5 [95% CI 1.5–1.6]), clindamycin (RR 3.8 [95% CI 3.6–4.0]) and vancomycin (RR 5.0 [95% CI 4.3–5.8]). Among patients with beta-lactam allergy, rechallenge was more likely when a specific allergen was identified (RR 1.6 [95% CI 1.5–1.8]) and when reaction characteristics were documented (RR 2.0 [95% CI 1.8–2.2]). Conclusions Provider documentation of beta-lactam allergy is highly variable, and details of the allergy are infrequently documented. Classification of a patient as beta-lactam allergic and incomplete documentation regarding the details of the allergy lead to beta-lactam avoidance and use of other antimicrobial

  15. Immunogenic HLA-DR-Presented Self-Peptides Identified Directly from Clinical Samples of Synovial Tissue, Synovial Fluid, or Peripheral Blood in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lyme Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Drouin, Elise E; Yao, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jiyang; Huang, Yu; Leon, Deborah R; Steere, Allen C; Costello, Catherine E

    2017-01-06

    Human leukocyte antigen-antigen D related (HLA-DR) molecules are highly expressed in synovial tissue (ST), the target of the immune response in chronic inflammatory forms of arthritis. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to identify HLA-DR-presented self-peptides in cells taken directly from clinical samples: ST, synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC), or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and eight with Lyme arthritis (LA). We identified 1593 non-redundant HLA-DR-presented peptides, derived from 870 source proteins. A total of 67% of the peptides identified in SFMC and 55% of those found in PBMC were found in ST, but analysis of SFMC/PBMC also revealed new antigen-presented peptides. Peptides were synthesized and examined for reactivity with the patients' PBMC. To date, three autoantigens in RA and four novel autoantigens in LA, presented in ST and/or PBMC, were shown to be targets of T- and B-cell responses in these diseases; ongoing analyses may add to this list. Thus, immunoprecipitation and LC-MS/MS can now identify hundreds of HLA-DR-presented self-peptides from individual patients' tissues or fluids with mixed cell populations. Importantly, identification of HLA-DR-presented peptides from SFMC or PBMC allows testing of more patients, including those early in the disease. Direct analysis of clinical samples facilitates identification of novel immunogenic T-cell epitopes.

  16. Regulation and the circulation of knowledge: penicillin patents in Spain.

    PubMed

    Romero de Pablos, Ana

    2011-01-01

    This paper tells the early history of penicillin patenting in Spain. Patents turn out to be useful instruments for analysing the management of knowledge and its circulation in different professional and geographical domains. They protected knowledge while contributing to standardisation. Patents also ensured quality and guaranteed reliability in manufacturing, delivering and prescribing new drugs. They gained special prominence by allowing the creation of a network in which political, economic and business, industrial power, public health and international cooperation fields came together. The main source of information used for this purpose has been the earliest patent applications for penicillin in Spain between 1948 and 1950, which are kept in the Historical Archives of the Oficina Española de Patentes y Marcas. The study of these patents for penicillin shows their role as agents in introducing this drug in Spain.

  17. Severe serum sickness reaction to oral and intramuscular penicillin.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brychan M; Kotti, George H; Shah, Anand D; Conger, Nicholas G

    2006-05-01

    Serum sickness is a type III hypersensitivity reaction mediated by immune complex deposition with subsequent complement activation, small-vessel vasculitis, and tissue inflammation. Although the overall incidence of serum sickness is declining because of decreased use of heterologous sera and improved vaccinations, rare sporadic cases of serum sickness from nonprotein drugs such as penicillins continue to occur. Drug-induced serum sickness is usually self-limited, with symptoms lasting only 1-2 weeks before resolving. We report an unusual case of a severe and prolonged serum sickness reaction that occurred after exposure to an intramuscular penicillin depot injection (probable relationship by Naranjo score) and discuss how pharmacokinetics may have played a role. Clinicians should be familiar with serum sickness reactions particularly as they relate to long-acting penicillin preparations. Accurate diagnosis in conjunction with cessation of drug exposure and prompt initiation of antiinflammatory treatment with corticosteroids can produce complete recovery

  18. A Synthetic, Xeno-Free Peptide Surface for Expansion and Directed Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sha; Yao, Huantong; Weber, Jennifer L.; Melkoumian, Zara K.; Ye, Kaiming

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to become an unlimited cell source for cell replacement therapy. The realization of this potential, however, depends on the availability of culture methods that are robust, scalable, and use chemically defined materials. Despite significant advances in hiPSC technologies, the expansion of hiPSCs relies upon the use of animal-derived extracellular matrix extracts, such as Matrigel, which raises safety concerns over the use of these products. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of expanding and differentiating hiPSCs on a chemically defined, xeno-free synthetic peptide substrate, i.e. Corning Synthemax® Surface. We demonstrated that the Synthemax Surface supports the attachment, spreading, and proliferation of hiPSCs, as well as hiPSCs’ lineage-specific differentiation. hiPSCs colonies grown on Synthemax Surfaces exhibit less spread and more compact morphology compared to cells grown on Matrigel™. The cytoskeleton characterization of hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface revealed formation of denser actin filaments in the cell-cell interface. The down-regulation of vinculin and up-regulation of zyxin expression were also observed in hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface. Further examination of cell-ECM interaction revealed that hiPSCs grown on the Synthemax Surface primarily utilize αvβ5 integrins to mediate attachment to the substrate, whereas multiple integrins are involved in cell attachment to Matrigel. Finally, hiPSCs can be maintained undifferentiated on the Synthemax Surface for more than ten passages. These studies provide a novel approach for expansion of hiPSCs using synthetic peptide engineered surface as a substrate to avoid a potential risk of contamination and lot-to-lot variability with animal derived materials. PMID:23226418

  19. The structural HCV genes delivered by MPG cell penetrating peptide are directed to enhance immune responses in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mehrlatifan, Saloume; Mirnurollahi, Seyyedeh Masumeh; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Pooneh; Soleymani, Sepehr; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-10-01

    One of the significant problems in vaccination projects is the lack of an effective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). The goal of the current study is to evaluate and compare two DNA constructs encoding HCV core and coreE1E2 genes alone or complexed with MPG peptide as a delivery system for stimulation of antibody responses and IFN-γ secretion in Balb/c mice model. Indeed, MPG cell penetrating peptide was used to improve DNA immunization in mice. Our results demonstrated that MPG forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with pcDNA-core and pcDNA-coreE1E2 at an N/P ratio of 10:1. The in vitro transfection efficiency of core or coreE1E2 DNA using MPG and TurboFect delivery systems was confirmed by western blot analysis. The results indicated the expression of the full-length core (∼21 kDa), and coreE1E2 (∼83 kDa) proteins using an anti-His monoclonal antibody. In addition, the expression of HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins was performed in bacteria and the purified recombinant proteins were injected to mice with Montanide 720 adjuvant. Our data showed that the immunized mice with HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins generated the mixture of sera IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes considerably higher than other groups. Furthermore, DNA constructs encoding core and coreE1E2 complexed with MPG could significantly induce IFN-γ secretion in lower concentrations than the naked core and coreE1E2 DNAs. Taken together, the DNA formulations as well as protein regimens used in this study triggered high-level IFN-γ production in mice, an important feature for the development of Th1 immune responses.

  20. Penicillin-induced immunohemolytic anemia associated with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Funicella, T; Weinger, R S; Moake, J L; Spruell, M; Rossen, R D

    1977-01-01

    Eleven days after administration of multiple penicillin analogs, a 55-year-old female developed a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. The patient's erythrocytes were coated with IgG, complement components (C4/C3) and her serum contained elevated 125I-Clq binding activity (a measure of the presence of immune complexes). Her serum, in the presence of fresh complement and penicillin, induced complement sensitization of normal erythrocytes. Immune complex-mediated complement activation and the haptene type of erythrocyte sensitization accounted for accelerated red blood cell destruction in this patient.

  1. Post-translational enzyme modification by the phosphopantetheinyl transferase is required for lysine and penicillin biosynthesis but not for roquefortine or fatty acid formation in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Ullán, Ricardo V; Velasco-Conde, Tania; Godio, Ramiro P; Teijeira, Fernando; Vaca, Inmaculada; Feltrer, Raúl; Kosalková, Katarina; Mauriz, Elba; Martín, Juan F

    2008-10-15

    NRPSs (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases) and PKSs (polyketide synthases) require post-translational phosphopantetheinylation to become active. This reaction is catalysed by a PPTase (4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase). The ppt gene of Penicillium chrysogenum, encoding a protein that shares 50% similarity with the stand-alone large PPTases, has been cloned. This gene is present as a single copy in the genome of the wild-type and high-penicillin-producing strains (containing multiple copies of the penicillin gene cluster). Amplification of the ppt gene produced increases in isopenicillin N and benzylpenicillin biosynthesis. A PPTase-defective mutant (Wis54-PPT(-)) was obtained. It required lysine and lacked pigment and penicillin production, but it still synthesized normal levels of roquefortine. The biosynthesis of roquefortine does not appear to involve PPTase-mediated modification of the synthesizing enzymes. The PPT(-) mutant did not require fatty acids, which indicates that activation of the fatty acid synthase is performed by a different PPTase. Complementation of Wis54-PPT(-) with the ppt gene restored lysine biosynthesis, pigmentation and penicillin production, which demonstrates the wide range of processes controlled by this gene.

  2. Successful treatment of Aerococcus viridans endocarditis in a patient allergic to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Yu, Wen-Chung; Huang, Suang-Hao; Lin, Mei-Lin; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone; Liu, Cheng-Yi

    2012-04-01

    Aerococcus viridans is a rare human pathogen that occasionally causes endocarditis. Most of the reported cases of endocarditis have been treated with penicillin. Here we describe a patient who was allergic to penicillin and was successfully treated with cefotaxime.

  3. Production of Penicillin by Fungi Growing on Food Products: Identification of a Complete Penicillin Gene Cluster in Penicillium griseofulvum and a Truncated Cluster in Penicillium verrucosum

    PubMed Central

    Laich, Federico; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F.

    2002-01-01

    Mycobiota growing on food is often beneficial for the ripening and development of the specific flavor characteristics of the product, but it can also be harmful due to the production of undesirable compounds such as mycotoxins or antibiotics. Some of the fungi most frequently isolated from fermented and cured meat products such as Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium nalgiovense are known penicillin producers; the latter has been shown to be able to produce penicillin when growing on the surface of meat products and secrete it to the medium. The presence of penicillin in food must be avoided, since it can lead to allergic reactions and the arising of penicillin resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria. In this article we describe a study of the penicillin production ability among fungi of the genus Penicillium that are used as starters for cheese and meat products or that are frequently isolated from food products. Penicillium griseofulvum was found to be a new penicillin producer and to have a penicillin gene cluster similar to that of Penicillium chrysogenum. No other species among the studied fungi were found to produce penicillin or to possess the penicillin biosynthetic genes, except P. verrucosum, which contains the pcbAB gene (as shown by hybridization and PCR cloning of fragments of the gene) but lacks pcbC and penDE. Antibacterial activities due to the production of secondary metabolites other than penicillin were observed in some fungi. PMID:11872470

  4. Production of penicillin by fungi growing on food products: identification of a complete penicillin gene cluster in Penicillium griseofulvum and a truncated cluster in Penicillium verrucosum.

    PubMed

    Laich, Federico; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F

    2002-03-01

    Mycobiota growing on food is often beneficial for the ripening and development of the specific flavor characteristics of the product, but it can also be harmful due to the production of undesirable compounds such as mycotoxins or antibiotics. Some of the fungi most frequently isolated from fermented and cured meat products such as Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium nalgiovense are known penicillin producers; the latter has been shown to be able to produce penicillin when growing on the surface of meat products and secrete it to the medium. The presence of penicillin in food must be avoided, since it can lead to allergic reactions and the arising of penicillin resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria. In this article we describe a study of the penicillin production ability among fungi of the genus Penicillium that are used as starters for cheese and meat products or that are frequently isolated from food products. Penicillium griseofulvum was found to be a new penicillin producer and to have a penicillin gene cluster similar to that of Penicillium chrysogenum. No other species among the studied fungi were found to produce penicillin or to possess the penicillin biosynthetic genes, except P. verrucosum, which contains the pcbAB gene (as shown by hybridization and PCR cloning of fragments of the gene) but lacks pcbC and penDE. Antibacterial activities due to the production of secondary metabolites other than penicillin were observed in some fungi.

  5. A re-appraisal of the conventional history of antibiosis and Penicillin.

    PubMed

    Arseculeratne, S N; Arseculeratne, G

    2017-02-01

    The popular perception of the history of antibiosis and penicillin is that Alexander Fleming was the sole researcher on penicillin. The literature, however, has documentation of preceding persons who reported definitively on these topics, from the late 19(th) century. Divergent reports on "firsts" in the discovery of antimicrobial activity of Penicillium and on the use of penicillin as a therapeutic agent, are present. This review adds knowledge from diverse sources, and restores historical priorities to the conventional story of Penicillin.

  6. The shoot-specific expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase directs the long-distance transport of thiol-peptides to roots conferring tolerance to mercury and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujing; Dankher, Om Parkash; Carreira, Laura; Smith, Aaron P; Meagher, Richard B

    2006-05-01

    Thiol-peptides synthesized as intermediates in phytochelatin (PC) biosynthesis confer cellular tolerance to toxic elements like arsenic, mercury, and cadmium, but little is known about their long-distance transport between plant organs. A modified bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (ECS) gene, S1ptECS, was expressed in the shoots of the ECS-deficient, heavy-metal-sensitive cad2-1 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). S1ptECS directed strong ECS protein expression in the shoots, but no ECS was detected in the roots of transgenic plant lines. The S1ptECS gene restored full mercury tolerance and partial cadmium tolerance to the mutant and enhanced arsenate tolerance significantly beyond wild-type levels. After arsenic treatment, the root concentrations of gamma-glutamylcysteine (EC), PC2, and PC3 peptides in a S1ptECS-complemented cad2-1 line increased 6- to 100-fold over the mutant levels and were equivalent to wild-type concentrations. The shoot and root levels of glutathione were 2- to 5-fold above those in wild-type plants, with or without treatment with toxicants. Thus, EC and perhaps glutathione are efficiently transported from shoots to roots. The possibility that EC or other PC pathway intermediates may act as carriers for the long-distance phloem transport and subsequent redistribution of thiol-reactive toxins and nutrients in plants is discussed.

  7. Heat shock protein 90-mediated peptide-selective presentation of cytosolic tumor antigen for direct recognition of tumors by CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Caballero, Otavia L; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2012-04-15

    Tumor Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells play important functions in tumor immunosurveillance, and in certain cases they can directly recognize HLA class II-expressing tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of intracellular Ag presentation to CD4(+) T cells by tumor cells has not yet been well characterized. We analyzed two naturally occurring human CD4(+) T cell lines specific for different peptides from cytosolic tumor Ag NY-ESO-1. Whereas both lines had the same HLA restriction and a similar ability to recognize exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein, only one CD4(+) T cell line recognized NY-ESO-1(+) HLA class II-expressing melanoma cells. Modulation of Ag processing in melanoma cells using specific molecular inhibitors and small interfering RNA revealed a previously undescribed peptide-selective Ag-presentation pathway by HLA class II(+) melanoma cells. The presentation required both proteasome and endosomal protease-dependent processing mechanisms, as well as cytosolic heat shock protein 90-mediated chaperoning. Such tumor-specific pathway of endogenous HLA class II Ag presentation is expected to play an important role in immunosurveillance or immunosuppression mediated by various subsets of CD4(+) T cells at the tumor local site. Furthermore, targeted activation of tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells by vaccination or adoptive transfer could be a suitable strategy for enhancing the efficacy of tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Use of mutated self-cleaving 2A peptides as a molecular rheostat to direct simultaneous formation of membrane and secreted anti-HIV immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kenneth K; Aguilar, Kiefer; Tsai, Jonathan; Galimidi, Rachel; Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2012-01-01

    In nature, B cells produce surface immunoglobulin and secreted antibody from the same immunoglobulin gene via alternative splicing of the pre-messenger RNA. Here we present a novel system for genetically programming B cells to direct the simultaneous formation of membrane-bound and secreted immunoglobulins that we term a "Molecular Rheostat", based on the use of mutated "self-cleaving" 2A peptides. The Molecular Rheostat is designed so that the ratio of secreted to membrane-bound immunoglobulins can be controlled by selecting appropriate mutations in the 2A peptide. Lentiviral transgenesis of Molecular Rheostat constructs into B cell lines enables the simultaneous expression of functional b12-based IgM-like BCRs that signal to the cells and mediate the secretion of b12 IgG broadly neutralizing antibodies that can bind and neutralize HIV-1 pseudovirus. We show that these b12-based Molecular Rheostat constructs promote the maturation of EU12 B cells in an in vitro model of B lymphopoiesis. The Molecular Rheostat offers a novel tool for genetically manipulating B cell specificity for B-cell based gene therapy.

  9. Use of Mutated Self-Cleaving 2A Peptides as a Molecular Rheostat to Direct Simultaneous Formation of Membrane and Secreted Anti-HIV Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kenneth K.; Aguilar, Kiefer; Tsai, Jonathan; Galimidi, Rachel; Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2012-01-01

    In nature, B cells produce surface immunoglobulin and secreted antibody from the same immunoglobulin gene via alternative splicing of the pre-messenger RNA. Here we present a novel system for genetically programming B cells to direct the simultaneous formation of membrane-bound and secreted immunoglobulins that we term a “Molecular Rheostat”, based on the use of mutated “self-cleaving” 2A peptides. The Molecular Rheostat is designed so that the ratio of secreted to membrane-bound immunoglobulins can be controlled by selecting appropriate mutations in the 2A peptide. Lentiviral transgenesis of Molecular Rheostat constructs into B cell lines enables the simultaneous expression of functional b12-based IgM-like BCRs that signal to the cells and mediate the secretion of b12 IgG broadly neutralizing antibodies that can bind and neutralize HIV-1 pseudovirus. We show that these b12-based Molecular Rheostat constructs promote the maturation of EU12 B cells in an in vitro model of B lymphopoiesis. The Molecular Rheostat offers a novel tool for genetically manipulating B cell specificity for B-cell based gene therapy. PMID:23209743

  10. Direct measurement of peptide-specific CD8+ T cells using HLA-A2:Ig dimer for monitoring the in vivo immune response to a HER2/neu vaccine in breast and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Woll, Michael M; Fisher, Christine M; Ryan, Gayle B; Gurney, Jennifer M; Storrer, Catherine E; Ioannides, Constantin G; Shriver, Craig D; Moul, Judd W; McLeod, David G; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Peoples, George E

    2004-07-01

    HER2/neu is a proto-oncogene and a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family of proteins that is overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. We are currently conducting clinical trials with the HER2/neu E75 peptide vaccine in breast and prostate cancer patients. We have evaluated the use of HLA-A2 dimer molecule for the immunological monitoring of cancer patients receiving the E75 peptide vaccine. Peripheral blood samples from patients receiving the vaccine were stained with HLA-A2 dimers containing the vaccine peptide E75 or control peptides and analyzed by flow cytometry. We compared the HLA-A2 dimer assay to standard methods of immunologic monitoring (IFN-gamma release, lymphocyte proliferation, and cytotoxicity). The HLA-A2 dimer assay was also compared with the HLA-A2 tetramer assay. E75 peptide-specific CD8 T cells were detected directly in the peripheral blood of patients by staining with E75-HLA-A2 dimers and CD8 antibodies. T cell cultures generated by repeated stimulations using E75 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells showed increased staining with E75-peptide loaded HLA-A2 dimers. Simultaneously analysis by the dimer assay and standard immunologic assays demonstrated that the dimer-staining assay correlated well with these methods of immunologic monitoring. A direct comparison using E75-specific HLA-A2 tetramers and HLA-A2 dimers for the detection of E75-specific CD8 T cells in peripheral blood showed comparable results with the two assays. Our findings indicate that the HLA-A2 dimer is a powerful new tool for directly quantifying and monitoring immune responses of antigen-specific T cells in peptide vaccine clinical trials.

  11. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  14. Heat-shock protein ClpL/HSP100 increases penicillin tolerance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Penicillin resistance and tolerance has been an increasing threat to the treatment of pneumococcal pneumoniae. However, no penicillin tolerance-related genes have been claimed. Here we show that a major heat shock protein ClpL/HSP100 could modulate the expression of a cell wall synthesis enzyme PBP2x, and subsequently increase cell wall thickness and penicillin tolerance in Streptococus pneumoniae.

  15. Different roads to discovery; Prontosil (hence sulfa drugs) and penicillin (hence beta-lactams).

    PubMed

    Bentley, Ronald

    2009-06-01

    The important chemotherapeutic agents, Prontosil and pentenylpenicillin (penicillin F), were investigated initially by two men, Domagk and Fleming, who had been influenced by the horrendous wound infections of World War I. The very different pathways leading to their development and to that of the successor antibacterials (sulfa drugs, further penicillins, semi-synthetic penicillins), including the role played by patents, are discussed.

  16. 21 CFR 524.1484h - Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484h Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension. (a... milligrams of neomycin, 10,000 international units of penicillin G procaine, 5,000 international units of...

  17. 21 CFR 524.1484h - Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484h Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension. (a... milligrams of neomycin, 10,000 international units of penicillin G procaine, 5,000 international units of...

  18. 21 CFR 524.1484h - Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484h Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension. (a... milligrams of neomycin, 10,000 international units of penicillin G procaine, 5,000 international units of...

  19. 21 CFR 524.1484h - Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484h Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin, hydrocortisone suspension. (a... milligrams of neomycin, 10,000 international units of penicillin G procaine, 5,000 international units of...

  20. Feasibility, Benefits, and Limitations of a Penicillin Allergy Skin Testing Service.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Prasanna P; Jeffres, Meghan N

    2017-06-01

    To critically examine the feasibility, benefits, and limitations of an inpatient penicillin skin testing service and how pharmacists can be utilized. A PubMed search was performed from July 2016 through September 2016 using the following search terms: penicillin skin testing, penicillin allergy, β-lactam allergy. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All English-language studies assessing the use of penicillin skin testing as well as management and clinical outcomes of patients with a β-lactam allergy were evaluated. The prevalence of people self-identifying as penicillin allergic ranges from 10% to 20% in the United States. Being improperly labeled as penicillin allergic is associated with higher health care costs, worse clinical outcomes, and an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections. Penicillin skin testing can be a tool used to clarify penicillin allergies and has been demonstrated to be a successful addition to antimicrobial stewardship programs in multiple health care settings. Prior to implementing a penicillin skin testing service, institutions will need to perform a feasibility analysis of who will supply labor and accept the financial burden as well as identify if the positive benefits of a penicillin skin testing service overcome the limitations of this diagnostic test. We conclude that institutions with high percentages of patients receiving non-β-lactams because of penicillin allergy labels would likely benefit the most from a penicillin skin testing service.

  1. 21 CFR 526.1696d - Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary... DRUGS § 526.1696d Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. For lactating cattle: each 10-milliliter dose contains 100,000 units of penicillin G procaine and 150...

  2. 21 CFR 526.1696d - Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary... DRUGS § 526.1696d Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. For lactating cattle: each 10-milliliter dose contains 100,000 units of penicillin G procaine and 150...

  3. 21 CFR 526.1696d - Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary... DRUGS § 526.1696d Penicillin G procaine-novobiocin for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. For lactating cattle: each 10-milliliter dose contains 100,000 units of penicillin G procaine and 150...

  4. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  5. Management of allergy to penicillins and other beta-lactams.

    PubMed

    Mirakian, R; Leech, S C; Krishna, M T; Richter, A G; Huber, P A J; Farooque, S; Khan, N; Pirmohamed, M; Clark, A T; Nasser, S M

    2015-02-01

    The Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) and an expert panel have prepared this guidance for the management of immediate and non-immediate allergic reactions to penicillins and other beta-lactams. The guideline is intended for UK specialists in both adult and paediatric allergy and for other clinicians practising allergy in secondary and tertiary care. The recommendations are evidence based, but where evidence is lacking, the panel reached consensus. During the development of the guideline, all BSACI members were consulted using a Web-based process and all comments carefully considered. Included in the guideline are epidemiology of allergic reactions to beta-lactams, molecular structure, formulations available in the UK and a description of known beta-lactam antigenic determinants. Sections on the value and limitations of clinical history, skin testing and laboratory investigations for both penicillins and cephalosporins are included. Cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins is discussed in detail. Recommendations on oral provocation and desensitization procedures have been made. Guidance for beta-lactam allergy in children is given in a separate section. An algorithm to help the clinician in the diagnosis of patients with a history of penicillin allergy has also been included.

  6. The effect of penicillin on Chlamydia trachomatis DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lambden, Paul R; Pickett, Mark A; Clarke, Ian N

    2006-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis L2 was used to infect BGMK cells at an m.o.i. of 1.0, and the developmental cycle was followed by transmission electron microscopy and quantitative PCR (QPCR) for both chromosomal and plasmid DNA. Samples were taken at sequential 6 h time points. Subsequent analysis by QPCR showed that there was an initial slow replication period (0-18 h), followed by a rapid phase (18-36 h) coinciding with exponential division when the DNA doubling time was 4.6 h. Chromosomal DNA was amplified 100-200-fold corresponding to 7-8 generations for the complete developmental cycle. Penicillin (10 and 100 units ml(-1)) was added to cultures at 20 h post-infection (p.i.). This blocked binary fission and also prevented reticulate body (RB) to elementary body transition. However, exposure to penicillin did not prevent chromosomal or plasmid DNA replication. After a short lag period, following the addition of penicillin, chlamydial chromosomal DNA replication resumed at the same rate as in control C. trachomatis-infected cells. C. trachomatis-infected host cells exposed to penicillin did not lyse, but instead harboured large, aberrant RBs in massive inclusions that completely filled the cell cytoplasm. In these RBs, the DNA continued to replicate well beyond the end of the normal developmental cycle. At 60 h p.i. each aberrant RB contained a minimum of 16 chromosomal copies.

  7. Scale-down of penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Lodewijk P; Buijs, Nicolaas A A; ten Pierick, Angela; Deshmukh, Amit; Zhao, Zheng; Kiel, Jan A K W; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2011-08-01

    In large-scale production reactors the combination of high broth viscosity and large broth volume leads to insufficient liquid-phase mixing, resulting in gradients in, for example, the concentrations of substrate and oxygen. This often leads to differences in productivity of the full-scale process compared with laboratory scale. In this scale-down study of penicillin production, the influence of substrate gradients on process performance and cell physiology was investigated by imposing an intermittent feeding regime on a laboratory-scale culture of a high yielding strain of Penicillium chrysogenum. It was found that penicillin production was reduced by a factor of two in the intermittently fed cultures relative to constant feed cultivations fed with the same amount of glucose per hour, while the biomass yield was the same. Measurement of the levels of the intermediates of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway, along with the enzyme levels, suggested that the reduction of the flux through the penicillin pathway is mainly the result of a lower influx into the pathway, possibly due to inhibitory levels of adenosine monophosphate and pyrophosphate and lower activating levels of adenosine triphosphate during the zero-substrate phase of each cycle of intermittent feeding.

  8. Improving the Effectiveness of Penicillin Allergy De-labeling.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Jack; Pavlos, Rebecca; James, Ian; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10-20% of hospitalized patients are labeled as penicillin allergic, and this is associated with significant health and economic costs. We looked at the effectiveness of penicillin allergy de-labeling in clinical practice with the aim of deriving risk stratification models to guide testing strategies. Consecutive patients aged 15 years or more, referred to a Western Australian public hospital drug allergy service between 2008 and 2013 for beta-lactam allergy, were included. Follow-up surveys were conducted. Results of skin prick testing and intradermal testing (SPT/IDT) and oral challenge (OC), and follow-up of post testing antibiotic usage were the main outcomes. SPT/IDT was performed in 401 consecutive patients with immediate (IMM) (≤ 1 hour) (n = 151) and nonimmediate (NIM) (>1 hour) (n = 250) reactions. Of 341 patients, 42 (12.3%) were SPT/IDT+ to ≥ 1 penicillin reagents, including 35/114 (30.4%) in the IMM group and 7/227 (3.1%) in the NIM group (P < .0001). Of 355 SPT/IDT patients, 3 (0.8%), all in the IMM group, had nonserious positive OC reactions to single dose penicillin VK (SPT/IDT negative predictive value [NPV] 99.2%). Selective or unrestricted beta-lactam was recommended in almost 90% overall, including 238/250 (95.2%) in the NIM group and 126/151 (83.4%) in the IMM group (P = .0001). Of 182 patients, 137 (75.3%) were following the allergy label modifications (ALM) at the time of follow-up. Penicillin SPT/IDT/OC safely de-labels penicillin-allergic patients and identifies selective beta-lactam allergies; however, incomplete adherence to ALM recommendations impairs effectiveness. Infrequent SPT/IDT+ and absent OC reactions in patients with NIM reactions suggest OC alone to be a safe and cost-effective de-labeling strategy that could improve the coverage of penicillin allergy de-labeling in lower risk populations. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Free radicals properties of gamma-irradiated penicillin-derived antibiotics: piperacillin, ampicillin, and crystalline penicillin.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Sławomir; Pilawa, Barbara; Koprowski, Robert; Wróbel, Zygmunt; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Swakoń, Jan; Olko, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the concentrations and properties of free radicals in piperacillin, ampicillin, and crystalline penicillin after gamma irradiation. The radicals were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using an X-band spectrometer (9.3 GHz). Gamma irradiation was performed at a dose of 25 kGy. One- and two-exponential functions were fitted to the experimental data, in order to assess the influence of the antibiotics' storage time on the measured EPR lines. After gamma irradiation, complex EPR lines were recorded confirming the presence of a large number of free radicals formed during the irradiation. For all tested antibiotics, concentrations of free radicals and parameters of EPR spectra changed with storage time. The results obtained demonstrate that concentration of free radicals and other spectroscopic parameters can be used to select the optimal parameters of radiation sterilization of β-lactam antibiotics. The most important parameters are the constants τ (τ (1(A),(I)) and τ (2(A),(I))) and K (K (0(A),(I)), K (1(A),(I)), K (2(A),(I))) of the exponential functions that describe free radicals decay during samples storage.

  10. Efficient cascade synthesis of ampicillin from penicillin G potassium salt using wild and mutant penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Senwen; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Su, Erzheng; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-02-10

    To avoid isolation and purification of the intermediate 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), a two-enzyme two-step cascade synthesis of ampicillin from penicillin G was established. In purely aqueous medium, penicillin G hydrolysis and ampicillin synthesis were catalyzed by immobilized wild-type and mutagenized penicillin G acylases from Alcaligenes faecalis (Af PGA), respectively (Fig. 1). The βF24 G mutant Af PGA (the 24th Phenylalanine of the β-subunit was replaced by Glycine) was employed for its superior performance in enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin. By optimizing the reaction conditions, including enzyme loading, temperature, initial pH and D-PGME/6-APA ratio, the conversion of the second step of ampicillin synthesis reached approximately 90% in 240 min and less than 1.7 mole D-PGME were required to produce 1 mole ampicillin. Overall, in a 285 min continuous two-step procedure, an ampicillin yield of 87% was achieved, demonstrating the possibility of improving the cascade synthesis of ampicillin by mutagenized PGA, providing an economically efficient and environmentally benign procedure for semi-synthetic penicillins antibiotics synthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cloning, expression and purification of penicillin-binding protein 3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMCC 10104.

    PubMed

    An, Yan Dong; Du, Qi Zhen; Tong, Li Yan; Yu, Zhao Wu; Gong, Xing Wen

    2015-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary target of β-lactams used to treat pseudomonas infections. Meanwhile, structure change and overproduction of PBP3 play important roles in the drug resistance of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, studies on the gene and structure of PBP3 are urgently needed. P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104 is a type culture strain common used in China. However, there is no report on its genomic and proteomic profiles. In this study, based on ftsI of P. aeruginosa PAO1, the gene encoding PBP3 was cloned from CMCC 10104. A truncated version of the ftsI gene, omitting the bases encoding the hydrophobic leader peptide (amino acids 1-34), was amplified by PCR. The cloned DNA shared 99.76% identity with ftsI from PAO1. Only four bases were different (66 C-A, 1020 T-C, 1233 T-C, and 1527 T-C). However, there were no differences between their deduced amino acid sequences. The recombinant PBP3 (rPBP3), containing a 6-histidine tag, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose was used for its purification. The purified rPBP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and showed a single band at about 60kDa with purity higher than 95%. The penicillin-binding assay indicated that the obtained rPBP3 was functional and not hindered by the presence of the C-terminal His-tag. The protocol described in this study offers a method for obtaining purified recombinant PBP3 from P. aeruginosa CMCC 10104. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Failure of penicillin to eradicate group A beta-hemolytic streptococci tonsillitis: causes and management.

    PubMed

    Brook, I

    2001-12-01

    Despite the fact that group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) is always susceptible to penicillin, bacteriologic failure occurs in up to 20% of the patients treated with penicillin, and half of these cases are also a clinical failure. Various theories have been offered to explain this phenomenon. One explanation is that beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (BLPB) "shield" GABHS by inactivating penicillin. Beta-lactamase-producing bacteria were recovered from over 75% of the tonsils of patients who had tonsillectomy for recurrent infection. The absence of interfering aerobic and anaerobic organisms in many patients may also lead to failure of penicillin therapy in these individuals. Other explanations include noncompliance with a 10-day course of therapy, carrier state, re-infection, bacterial interference, GABHS intracellular internalization, and penicillin tolerance. Penicillin is still considered the antibiotic of choice for the therapy of GABHS tonsillitis. However, antibiotics other than penicillin were found to be more effective in eradicating the infection. These included cephalosporins (of all generations), clindamycin, macrolides, and amoxicillin-clavulanate. These agents were more effective than penicillin, especially in treating patients who failed previous penicillin therapy. Treatment of tonsillitis in patients who failed penicillin therapy is aimed at the eradication of the the BLPB that protect GABHS from penicillin, while preserving the oropharyngeal "protective" organisms. This review will describe the scientific and clinical data that demonstrate and explain the phenomena of beta-lactamase production and bacterial interference.

  13. Penicillin allergy: optimizing diagnostic protocols, public health implications, and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Unverified penicillin allergy is being increasingly recognized as a public health concern. The ideal protocol for verifying true clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy needs to use only commercially available materials, be well tolerated and easy to perform in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, and minimize false-positive determinations. This review concentrates on articles published in 2013 and 2014 that present new data relating to the diagnosis and management of penicillin allergy. Penicillin allergy can be safely evaluated at this time, in patients with an appropriate clinical history of penicillin allergy, using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G as skin test reagents, if an oral challenge with amoxicillin 250 mg, followed by 1 h of observation, is given to all skin test negative individuals. Millions of individuals falsely labeled with penicillin allergy need to be evaluated to safely allow them to use penicillin-class antibiotics and avoid morbidity associated with penicillin avoidance. Further research is needed to determine optimal protocol(s). There will still be a 1-2% rate of adverse reactions reported with all future therapeutic penicillin-class antibiotic use, even with optimal methods used to determine acute penicillin tolerance. Only a small minority of these new reactions will be IgE-mediated.

  14. Relation of β-Lactamase Activity and Cellular Location to Resistance of Enterobacter to Penicillins and Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Harold C.; Winshell, Elaine B.

    1972-01-01

    The Enterobacter species E. aerogenes, E. cloacae, and E. hafnia were examined for resistance to penicillin and cephalosporin derivatives. All were resistant to benzyl penicillin, ampicillin, 6 [d(−)α-amino-p-hydroxyphenylacetamido] penicillanic acid, cephaloridine, cephalothin, and cephalexin. A significant number were sensitive to carbenicillin and 6 [d(−)α-carboxy-3-thienylacetamido] penicillanic acid. No differences among the three species were noted. The β-lactamase activity was cell-bound, and was not released by osmotic shock, toluene treatment, or diphenylamine treatment. It was rarely released into the growth medium. The β-lactamase activity was primarily directed against cephalosporin derivatives. Synthesis of β-lactamase was chromosomally mediated. Resistance to ampicillin seemed to be partly related to entry of the molecule into the bacteria since exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetate lowered the minimal inhibitory concentration. PMID:4218941

  15. Signal transduction by the formyl peptide receptor. Studies using chimeric receptors and site-directed mutagenesis define a novel domain for interaction with G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, T T; Dragas-Graonic, S; Holmes, R; Perez, H D

    1995-11-24

    The binding of small peptide ligands to high affinity chemoattractant receptors on the surface of neutrophils and monocytes leads to activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequently to the inflammatory response. It was recently shown (Amatruda, T. T., Gerard, N. P., Gerard, C., and Simon, M. I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139-10144) that the receptor for the chemoattractant peptide C5a specifically interacts with G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit of the Gq class, to trigger ligand-dependent stimulation of PI-PLC in transfected cells. In order to further characterize this chemoattractant peptide signal transduction pathway, we transfected cDNAs encoding the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor (fMLPR) into COS cells and measured the production of inositol phosphates. Ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC was seen in COS cells transfected with the fMLPR and G alpha 16 and stimulated with fMLP but not in cells transfected with receptor alone or with receptor plus G alpha q. Chimeric receptors in which the N-terminal extracellular domain, the second intracellular domain, or the intracellular C-terminal tail of the fMLP receptor was replaced with C5a receptor domains (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L. R., Adams, R. R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295) were capable of ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC when co-transfected with G alpha 16. A chimeric receptor exchanging the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR was constitutively activated, stimulating PI-PLC in the absence of ligand. Constitutive activation of PI-PLC, to a level 233% of that seen in cells transfected with wild-type fMLP receptors, was dependent on G alpha 16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR (amino acids 54-62) reveals this to be a domain necessary for ligand-dependent activation of G alpha 16. These results suggest that

  16. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Combination with antimicrobial peptide lyses improves loop-mediated isothermal amplification based method for Chlamydia trachomatis detection directly in urine sample.

    PubMed

    Jevtuševskaja, Jekaterina; Uusna, Julia; Andresen, Liis; Krõlov, Katrin; Laanpere, Made; Grellier, Tiia; Tulp, Indrek; Langel, Ülo

    2016-07-13

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human pathogen and is the most common cause of sexually transmitted diseases affecting both men and women. The pathogen can cause prostatitis and epididymitis in men. In women, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and acute or chronic pelvic pain are frequent complications. More than half of C. trachomatis-positive patients have minimal or no symptoms, providing an ongoing reservoir for the infection. The lack of sensitive large-scale applicable point- of- care (POC) tests for C. trachomatis detection makes it difficult to diagnose chlamydia infection efficiently in resource-limited environments. A rapid and sensitive assay based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP) was combined with antimicrobial peptide lysis, which is able to detect at least 7 C. trachomatis pathogens per reaction directly from urine samples. Our study comprising 91 first-void urine samples showed that specificity of the assay is 100 % and sensitivity 73 % when using antimicrobial peptide lysis mix. Additionally we demonstrate that our assay does not give any cross-reactivity with 30 pathogen's DNA potentially present in the urine samples. Furthermore, the assay's novel approach does not require purification or extraction of DNA from clinical sample prior to amplification, so the need for specialized equipment is eliminated. The whole procedure is significantly less laborious, less time-consuming and consequently less expensive for early detection and identification of infectious disease. C. trachomatis specific LAMP assay is relatively simple to perform and could therefore be applied in numerous POC settings.

  18. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Aβ42)-lowering compounds directly bind to Aβ and interfere with amyloid precursor protein (APP) transmembrane dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Luise; Munter, Lisa-Marie; Ness, Julia; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Dasari, Muralidhar; Unterreitmeier, Stephanie; Bulic, Bruno; Beyermann, Michael; Gust, Ronald; Reif, Bernd; Weggen, Sascha; Langosch, Dieter; Multhaup, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Following ectodomain shedding by β-secretase, successive proteolytic cleavages within the transmembrane sequence (TMS) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) catalyzed by γ-secretase result in the release of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides of variable length. Aβ peptides with 42 amino acids appear to be the key pathogenic species in Alzheimer’s disease, as they are believed to initiate neuronal degeneration. Sulindac sulfide, which is known as a potent γ-secretase modulator (GSM), selectively reduces Aβ42 production in favor of shorter Aβ species, such as Aβ38. By studying APP–TMS dimerization we previously showed that an attenuated interaction similarly decreased Aβ42 levels and concomitantly increased Aβ38 levels. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which GSMs modulate Aβ production is still unclear. In this study, using a reporter gene-based dimerization assay, we found that APP–TMS dimers are destabilized by sulindac sulfide and related Aβ42-lowering compounds in a concentration-dependent manner. By surface plasmon resonance analysis and NMR spectroscopy, we show that sulindac sulfide and novel sulindac-derived compounds directly bind to the Aβ sequence. Strikingly, the attenuated APP–TMS interaction by GSMs correlated strongly with Aβ42-lowering activity and binding strength to the Aβ sequence. Molecular docking analyses suggest that certain GSMs bind to the GxxxG dimerization motif in the APP–TMS. We conclude that these GSMs decrease Aβ42 levels by modulating APP–TMS interactions. This effect specifically emphasizes the importance of the dimeric APP–TMS as a promising drug target in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:20679249

  19. Molecular characterization of a fungal gene paralogue of the penicillin penDE gene of Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Penicillium chrysogenum converts isopenicillin N (IPN) into hydrophobic penicillins by means of the peroxisomal IPN acyltransferase (IAT), which is encoded by the penDE gene. In silico analysis of the P. chrysogenum genome revealed the presence of a gene, Pc13g09140, initially described as paralogue of the IAT-encoding penDE gene. We have termed this gene ial because it encodes a protein with high similarity to IAT (IAL for IAT-Like). We have conducted an investigation to characterize the ial gene and to determine the role of the IAL protein in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway. Results The IAL contains motifs characteristic of the IAT such as the processing site, but lacks the peroxisomal targeting sequence ARL. Null ial mutants and overexpressing strains indicated that IAL lacks acyltransferase (penicillin biosynthetic) and amidohydrolase (6-APA forming) activities in vivo. When the canonical ARL motif (leading to peroxisomal targeting) was added to the C-terminus of the IAL protein (IALARL) by site-directed mutagenesis, no penicillin biosynthetic activity was detected. Since the IAT is only active after an accurate self-processing of the preprotein into α and β subunits, self-processing of the IAL was tested in Escherichia coli. Overexpression experiments and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that IAL is also self-processed in two subunits, but despite the correct processing, the enzyme remained inactive in vitro. Conclusion No activity related to the penicillin biosynthesis was detected for the IAL. Sequence comparison among the P. chrysogenum IAL, the A. nidulans IAL homologue and the IAT, revealed that the lack of enzyme activity seems to be due to an alteration of the essential Ser309 in the thioesterase active site. Homologues of the ial gene have been found in many other ascomycetes, including non-penicillin producers. Our data suggest that like in A. nidulans, the ial and penDE genes might have been formed from a single ancestral gene that became

  20. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Krieger, Inna V.; Huizar, John P.; ...

    2014-12-31

    Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows thatmore » Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.« less

  1. Staphylococci in community-acquired infections: Increased resistance to penicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, G B; Chidi, C C; Macon, W L

    1976-01-01

    One hundred patients with community-acquired staphylococcal infections of the skin and soft tissues were treated in the Emergency Ward of Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital from June to October of 1974. Each staphylococcal infection was considered community-acquired if, within two weeks prior to being treated for the first time, the patient had not received antibiotics, had not been hospitalized, and had not been in contact with other recently hospitalized persons. Of 100 community-acquired staphylococcal infections, 85 were resistant to penicillin. Almost no resistance to other tested antibiotics was observed. Unless indicated otherwise by bacteriologic testing, penicillin is a poor drug of choice in those skin and soft tissue infections suspected of harboring staphylococci. PMID:1267491

  2. Thermodynamics of Association of Structurally Related Amphiphilic Penicillins.

    PubMed

    Taboada; Attwood; García; Jones; Ruso; Mosquera; Sarmiento

    2000-01-15

    Critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of the penicillins cloxacillin and dicloxacillin in water were determined by conductivity measurements over the temperature range 288.15 to 313.15 K. Both penicillins showed minimum CMCs at temperatures close to 298.15 K. Thermodynamic parameters of aggregate formation were derived from the variation of the CMC with temperature using a modified form of the mass action model applicable to systems of low aggregation number. Values for the enthalpy of aggregate formation, DeltaH(0)(m), calculated by this method showed that the aggregation of both cloxacillin and dicloxacillin became increasingly exothermic with increase in temperature. The predicted DeltaH(0)(m) at 298.15 K was in good agreement with the value determined experimentally by calorimetry for each drug. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Merlin Pryce (1902-1976) and penicillin: an abiding mystery.

    PubMed

    Wyn Jones, Emyr; Wyn Jones, R Gareth

    2002-12-01

    In the scientific and medical pantheon few have received more adulation and honour than Sir Alexander Fleming. Even so it is abundantly clear that his triumphant discovery of penicillin owed much to the work of others, especially Florey and Chain, who accomplished the difficult task of taking penicillin from the test tube to patient. This essay does not attempt a detailed re-examination of that discovery. Rather the present study suggests that even the initial observation on that critical day in September 1928 and its subsequent ramifications were even more complex and perplexing than the accepted version. It is likely that Professor Daniel Merlin Pryce, a somewhat unconventional but gifted son of the Welsh mining valleys played an important, quite possibly a crucial, role in the original observation. However one which, except for a very few occasions, he himself sought to downplay, even virtually to deny.

  4. The prevalence of suspected and challenge-verified penicillin allergy in a university hospital population.

    PubMed

    Borch, Jakob E; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2006-04-01

    Suspected penicillin allergy is common among hospitalised patients, but the quality of the information given by the patient is often doubtful. Alleged penicillin allergic are likely to be treated with more toxic, broad-spectrum, and more expensive antibiotics, with effects on microbial resistance patterns and public economy as a consequence. We performed a cross-sectional case-control study with two visits to all clinical departments of a large university hospital in order to find in-patients with medical files labelled "penicillin allergy" or who reported penicillin allergy upon admission. Patient histories were obtained via a questionnaire, and they were offered investigation for penicillin allergy with specific IgE, basophil histamine release, skin prick tests, intradermal tests and drug challenge tests. Finally, the pharmaco-economical consequences of the penicillin allergy were estimated. In a cohort of 3642 patients, 96 fulfilled the inclusion criteria giving a point-prevalence of alleged penicillin allergy of 5% in a hospital in-patient population. Mean time elapsed since the alleged first reaction to penicillin was 20 years. The skin was the most frequently affected organ (82.2%), maculo-papular exanthema (35.4%) and urticaria (10.4%) being the most frequently reported reactions. 25% did not recall the time of their reaction. 82.2% did not remember the name of the penicillin they reacted to. 34.8% had been treated with penicillins after suspicion of penicillin allergy had been raised. None of these reacted to penicillins. 33.3% of the patients receiving antibiotics during their current hospitalisation were prescribed penicillins. 2% developed non-severe exanthema. The average acquisition costs for antibiotics to penicillin allergic patients were euro 278, compared to euro 119 had they been non-allergic. The prevalence of suspected penicillin allergy was lower than reported elsewhere. A substantial number of patients failed to recall basic information about

  5. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  6. Effectiveness of penicillin, dicloxacillin and cefuroxime for penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: a retrospective, propensity-score-adjusted case-control and cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jette Lindbjerg; Skov, Robert; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Ostergaard, Christian; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Benfield, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates account for a fifth of cases of S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) in Denmark, but little is known about treatment outcomes with penicillins or other antimicrobials. Here we compare penicillin, dicloxacillin and cefuroxime as definitive treatments in relation to 30 day mortality. A retrospective chart review of 588 penicillin-susceptible S. aureus cases at five centres from January 1995 to December 2010. Data on demographics, antimicrobial treatment, clinical signs and symptoms, and mortality at day 30 were collected. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs associated with mortality were modelled using propensity-score-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Propensity-score-matched case-control studies were carried out. Definitive therapy with cefuroxime was associated with an increased risk of 30 day mortality compared with penicillin (adjusted HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.49-4.32). Other variables that were statistically significantly associated with 30 day mortality included increasing age, disease severity and a primary respiratory focus. Osteomyelitis/arthritis was associated with a lower risk of death than were other secondary manifestations. Propensity-score-matched case-control studies confirmed an increased risk of 30 day mortality: cefuroxime treatment (39%) versus penicillin treatment (20%), P = 0.037; and cefuroxime treatment (38%) versus dicloxacillin treatment (10%), P = 0.004. Definitive therapy for penicillin-susceptible SAB with cefuroxime was associated with a significantly higher mortality than was seen with therapy with penicillin or dicloxacillin.

  7. Affinity of cefoperazone for penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Minami, S; Matsuhashi, M; Takaoka, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-01-01

    Cefoperazone (T-1551, CFP) a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, has a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. We investigated the affinity of CFP to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) and the inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis by CFP. CFP had high affinities for Escherichia coli PBP-3, -1Bs, -2, and -1A, in descending order, and low affinities for PBP-4, -5, and -6. Similarly, CFP showed high affinity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP-3, -1A, -1B, -2, and -4, in descending order. It is known that E. coli PBP-3 and P. aeruginosa PBP-3 participate in cell division. These results are in good agreement with the formation of filamentous cells of E. coli and P. aeruginosa treated with CFP. CFP had lower inhibitory activities on D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA and IB of E. coli than that of penicillin G, but its inhibitory activities on the cross-link formation in peptidoglycan synthesis were the same as those of penicillin G and higher than those of ampicillin. Images PMID:6448021

  8. Studies of migration inhibition tests in penicillin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R J; Sauder, P J; Rutherford, W J

    1979-01-01

    The release of the migration inhibition factors, leucocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) and macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) from stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes has been compared in patients with immediate (IgE-mediated) penicillin allergy and in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin PPD. It has been shown that in these two groups of subjects, a comparable specific proliferative response can occur following stimulation with the appropriate drug (benzylpenicillin) or antigen (PPD). By cell fractionation studies, the proliferation was found to occur in the isolated T cell population in both subject groups. However, the lymphocyte response to benzylpenicillin was rarely associated with the release of LIF or MIF, in contrast to the situation in tuberculin sensitivity where a concomitant release of LIF and MIF was found. In about one third of penicillin allergic subjects, culture supernatants from specifically stimulated lymphocyte cultures induced migration inhibition in the indirect leucocyte migration test, but the inhibitory activity apparently resulted from the presence of penicillin-specific antibody and not from LIF. PMID:393437

  9. Effect of aeration rate on composting of penicillin mycelial dreg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Shihua; Wen, Qinxue; Zheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Pilot scale experiments with forced aeration were conducted to estimate effects of aeration rates on the performance of composting penicillin mycelial dreg using sewage sludge as inoculation. Three aeration rates of 0.15, 0.50 and 0.90L/(min·kg) organic matter (OM) were examined. The principal physicochemical parameters were monitored during the 32day composting period. Results showed that the higher aeration rate of 0.90L/(min·kg) did not corresponded to a longer thermophilic duration and higher rates of OM degradation; but the lower aeration rate of 0.15L/(min·kg) did induce an accumulation of NH4(+)-N contents due to the inhibition of nitrification. On the other hand, aeration rate has little effect on degradation of penicillin. The results show that the longest phase of thermophilic temperatures≥55°C, the maximum NO3(-)-N content and seed germination, and the minimum C/N ratio were obtained with 0.50L/(min·kg) OM. Therefore, aeration rates of 0.50L/(min·kg) OM can be recommended for composting penicillin mycelial dreg. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Polymer immobilized enzyme optrodes for the detection of penicillin

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, T.J.; Camins, I.; Angel, S.M.; Munkholm, C.; Walt, D.R.

    1987-12-15

    The preparation and performance of two enzyme-based fiber-optic sensors (optrodes) capable of detecting penicillin are described. Each sensor consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme penicillinase and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of the ..beta..-lactam ring of penicillin to produce penicilloic acid and, consequently, a pH change in the microenvironment of the membrane. The sensors differ in the way the polymer membrane is constructed and in the type of pH indicator dye used. Both optrodes exhibit response times (40-60 s) significantly lower than those of the corresponding enzyme electrodes (2 min). Each gives a linear response over the concentration range of 0.00025 to 0.01 M penicillin G, when measured in a 0.005 M phosphate buffer. The data indicate that these immobilization strategies produce similar results and may be considered complementary alternatives in future enzyme optrode applications.

  11. Enhancement of the direct antimicrobial activity of Lysep3 against Escherichia coli by inserting cationic peptides into its C terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Guo, Zhimin; Gao, Chencheng; Zhu, Rining; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Ling; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Gu, Jingmin; Yan, Guangmou; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-03-01

    Phage lysins are considered promising antimicrobials against resistant bacterial infections. Some lysins have been reported for the prevention and treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infection. Gram-negative bacterial phage lysins, however, can only destroy the bacterial cell wall from inside because of the obstruction of the bacterial outer membrane that prevents direct hydrolysis of the bacterial wall peptidoglycan from the outside, severely restricting the development of lysins against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, genetic engineering techniques were used to fuse a 5 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRK), a 10 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKR), a 15 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKRKRKRK), and a polypeptide including both cationic and hydrophobic amino acids (KRKRKFFVAIIP) to the C-terminus of the Escherichia coli phage lysin Lysep3 to obtain four fusion lysins (5aa, 10aa, 15aa, Mix). The bactericidal effects of those four lysins on E. coli were then compared in vitro. Our results showed that the fusion of hydrophobic and positively charged amino acids, Mix, can kill E. coli effectively; the fusion of positively charged amino acids alone at the C-terminus (5aa, 10aa, 15aa) also showed bactericidal activity against E. coli from the outside, with the bactericidal activity gradually increasing with the positive charge at the C-terminus of the lysin. Collectively, improving the positive charge at the C-terminus of E. coli bacteriophage lysin Lysep3 increases its bactericidal ability from outside E. coli, providing a new practical method for the development of anti-Gram-negative bacterial lysins.

  12. Elucidation of conditions allowing conversion of penicillin G and other penicillins to deacetoxycephalosporins by resting cells and extracts of Streptomyces clavuligerus NP1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hiroshi; Adrio, José L.; Luengo, José M.; Wolfe, Saul; Ocran, Simeon; Hintermann, Gilberto; Piret, Jacqueline M.; Demain, Arnold L.

    1998-01-01

    Using resting cells and extracts of Streptomyces clavuligerus NP1, we have been able to convert penicillin G (benzylpenicillin) to deacetoxycephalosporin G. Conversion was achieved by increasing by 45× the concentration of FeSO4 (1.8 mM) and doubling the concentration of α-ketoglutarate (1.28 mM) as compared with standard conditions used for the normal cell-free conversion of penicillin N to deacetoxycephalosporin C. ATP, MgSO4, KCl, and DTT, important in cell-free expansion of penicillin N, did not play a significant role in the ring expansion of penicillin G by resting cells or cell-free extracts. When these conditions were used with 14 other penicillins, ring expansion was achieved in all cases. PMID:9751702

  13. Effectiveness of bulking agents for co-composting penicillin mycelial dreg (PMD) and sewage sludge in pilot-scale system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Qinxue; Yang, Lian; Wang, Wenyan; Zheng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin mycelial dreg (PMD) has a distinguishing characteristic of the high content of penicillin residue and nutrients. The existing handling of PMD used as feed additive of livestock and poultry is facing a direct challenge of penicillin transportation into environment due to the inadequate absorption through the digestive system. This work aims at examining the feasibility of co-composting of PMD with sewage sludge (SWS) in a pilot-scale system and evaluating the effect of four bulking agents. Seven treatments were co-composted over a 32-day period in 390-L reactors using the same PMD and SWS with different bulking agents, corresponding to the seven formulas (T-1: PMD + SWS + RS; T-2: PMD + SWS + WS; T-3: PMD + SWS + RS + SD; T-4: PMD + SWS + WS + SD; T-5: PMD + SWS + SD; T-6: PMD + SWS + RS + WS; control: PMD + SWS). The parameters monitored over this period included temperature, organic matter (OM), TN, NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, pH, EC, penicillin residue, as well as germination index (GI). The results showed that co-composting PMD and SWS with BA is feasible. The highest rate of OM mineralization was observed in T-3, while below 30% for T-2, T-4, and T-5. Furthermore, the SD addition resulted in both the increase in the duration of thermophilic stage and maximum temperature and the decrease in TN losses, particularly in T-3, suggesting that the formula of the T-3 is very suitable option for the co-composting of PMD and SWS.

  14. In Vitro Activity of p-Hydroxybenzyl Penicillin (Penicillin X) and Five Other Penicillins Against Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Comparisons of Strains from Patients with Uncomplicated Infections and from Women with Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sackel, Stephen G.; Alpert, Susan; Rosner, Bernard; McCormack, William M.; Finland, Maxwell

    1977-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of six penicillins against 95 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from patients with uncomplicated anogenital infections and 22 strains from women with pelvic inflammatory disease were determined by an agar plate dilution method, using an inocula replicator. Against all 117 strains, the order of activity observed was: BL-P1654 > penicillin X > penicillin G > ampicillin > amoxicillin = carbenicillin. MICs against strains isolated from women with gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease were significantly higher than those against isolates from uncomplicated infections: BL-P1654, P < 0.001; penicillin X, P < 0.001; penicillin G, P < 0.001; ampicillin, P < 0.001; and amoxicillin, P < 0.05. MICs of penicillin G were ≥0.125 μg/ml against 33 (36%) of the 92 strains from patients with uncomplicated infections, as contrasted with 15 (68%) of the 22 isolates from women with pelvic inflammatory disease (P < 0.01). The means of the MICs of penicillin G were 0.06 μg/ml for the former and 0.14 μg/ml for the latter. PMID:407840

  15. Inhibition of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus by a peptide derived from vFLIP through its direct destabilization of viruses.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ho-Jin; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Eun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Chul-Joong; Jung, Jae U; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2017-07-07

    The antiviral activities of synthesized Kα2-helix peptide, which was derived from the viral FLICE-like inhibitor protein (vFLIP) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), against influenza A virus (IAV) were investigated in vitro and in vivo, and mechanisms of action were suggested. In addition to the robust autophagy activity of the Kα2-helix peptide, the present study showed that treatment with the Kα2 peptide fused with the TAT peptide significantly inhibited IAV replication and transmission. Moreover, TAT-Kα2 peptide protected the mice, that were challenged with lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A H5N1 or H1N1 viruses. Mechanistically, we found that TAT-Kα2 peptide destabilized the viral membranes, depending on their lipid composition of the viral envelop. In addition to IAV, the Kα2 peptide inhibited infections with enveloped viruses, such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), without cytotoxicity. These results suggest that TAT-Kα2 peptide is a potential antiviral agent for controlling emerging or re-emerging enveloped viruses, particularly diverse subtypes of IAVs.

  16. A new role for penicillin acylases: degradation of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals by Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C G; Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-03-05

    Use of penicillin acylases for the production of semi-synthetic penicillins is well-known. Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase (EcPGA) has been extensively used for this purpose; however, Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase (KcPGA) is assumed to be a better substitute, owing to its increased resilience to extreme pH conditions and ease of immobilization. In the present article we report a new dimension for the amidase activity of KcPGA by demonstrating its ability to cleave bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) with acyl chain length of 6-8 with or without oxo-substitution at third carbon position. Initial evidence of AHL degrading capability of KcPGA was obtained using CV026 based bioassay method. Kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0 and 50 °C revealed 3-oxo-C6 HSL to be the best substrate for the enzyme with V(max) and K(m) values of 21.37+0.85 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.1+0.01 mM, respectively. C6 HSL was found to be the second best substrate with V(max) and K(m) value of 10.06+0.27 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.28+0.02 mM, respectively. Molecular modeling and docking studies performed on the active site of the enzyme support these findings by showing the fitting of AHLs perfectly within the hydrophobic pocket of the enzyme active site. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Techniques to improve the direct ex vivo detection of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Scheinberg, Philip; Barrett, A. John; Wooldridge, Linda; Roederer, Mario; Sewell, Andrew K.; Price, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to quantify and characterize antigen-specific CD8+ T cells irrespective of functional readouts using fluorochrome-conjugated tetrameric peptide-MHC class I (pMHCI) complexes in conjunction with flow cytometry has transformed our understanding of cellular immune responses over the past decade. In the case of prevalent CD8+ T cell populations that engage cognate pMHCI tetramers with high avidities, direct ex vivo identification and subsequent data interpretation is relatively straightforward. However, the accurate identification of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations can be complicated, especially in situations where TCR-mediated tetramer binding occurs at low avidities. Here, we highlight a few simple techniques that can be employed to improve the visual resolution, and hence the accurate quantification, of tetramer-binding CD8+ T cell populations by flow cytometry. These methodological modifications enhance signal intensity, especially in the case of specific CD8+ T cell populations that bind cognate antigen with low avidity, minimize background noise and enable improved discrimination of true pMHCI tetramer binding events from nonspecific uptake. PMID:18836993

  18. An uncleaved signal peptide directs the Malus xiaojinensis iron transporter protein Mx IRT1 into the ER for the PM secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Tan, Song; Berry, James O; Li, Peng; Ren, Na; Li, Shuang; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei-Bing; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2014-11-07

    Malus xiaojinensis iron-regulated transporter 1 (Mx IRT1) is a highly effective inducible iron transporter in the iron efficient plant Malus xiaojinensis. As a multi-pass integral plasma membrane (PM) protein, Mx IRT1 is predicted to consist of eight transmembrane domains, with a putative N-terminal signal peptide (SP) of 1-29 amino acids. To explore the role of the putative SP, constructs expressing Mx IRT1 (with an intact SP) and Mx DsIRT1 (with a deleted SP) were prepared for expression in Arabidopsis and in yeast. Mx IRT1 could rescue the iron-deficiency phenotype of an Arabidopsis irt1 mutant, and complement the iron-limited growth defect of the yeast mutant DEY 1453 (fet3fet4). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis indicated that a chimeric Mx IRT1-eGFP (enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) construct was translocated into the ER (Endoplasmic reticulum) for the PM sorting pathway. In contrast, the SP-deleted Mx DsIRT1 could not rescue either of the mutant phenotypes, nor direct transport of the GFP signal into the ER. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis indicated that the SP was not cleaved from the mature protein following transport into the ER. Taken together, data presented here provides strong evidence that an uncleaved SP determines ER-targeting of Mx IRT1 during the initial sorting stage, thereby enabling the subsequent transport and integration of this protein into the PM for its crucial role in iron uptake.

  19. An Uncleaved Signal Peptide Directs the Malus xiaojinensis Iron Transporter Protein Mx IRT1 into the ER for the PM Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Tan, Song; Berry, James O.; Li, Peng; Ren, Na; Li, Shuang; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei-Bing; Qi, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Li-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Malus xiaojinensis iron-regulated transporter 1 (Mx IRT1) is a highly effective inducible iron transporter in the iron efficient plant Malus xiaojinensis. As a multi-pass integral plasma membrane (PM) protein, Mx IRT1 is predicted to consist of eight transmembrane domains, with a putative N-terminal signal peptide (SP) of 1–29 amino acids. To explore the role of the putative SP, constructs expressing Mx IRT1 (with an intact SP) and Mx DsIRT1 (with a deleted SP) were prepared for expression in Arabidopsis and in yeast. Mx IRT1 could rescue the iron-deficiency phenotype of an Arabidopsis irt1 mutant, and complement the iron-limited growth defect of the yeast mutant DEY 1453 (fet3fet4). Furthermore, fluorescence analysis indicated that a chimeric Mx IRT1-eGFP (enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) construct was translocated into the ER (Endoplasmic reticulum) for the PM sorting pathway. In contrast, the SP-deleted Mx DsIRT1 could not rescue either of the mutant phenotypes, nor direct transport of the GFP signal into the ER. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis indicated that the SP was not cleaved from the mature protein following transport into the ER. Taken together, data presented here provides strong evidence that an uncleaved SP determines ER-targeting of Mx IRT1 during the initial sorting stage, thereby enabling the subsequent transport and integration of this protein into the PM for its crucial role in iron uptake. PMID:25387073

  20. Techniques to improve the direct ex vivo detection of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I tetramers.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Pratip K; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Scheinberg, Phillip; Barrett, A John; Wooldridge, Linda; Roederer, Mario; Sewell, Andrew K; Price, David A

    2008-11-01

    The ability to quantify and characterize antigen-specific CD8+ T cells irrespective of functional readouts using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I (pMHCI) tetramers in conjunction with flow cytometry has transformed our understanding of cellular immune responses over the past decade. In the case of prevalent CD8+ T cell populations that engage cognate pMHCI tetramers with high avidities, direct ex vivo identification and subsequent data interpretation is relatively straightforward. However, the accurate identification of low frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations can be complicated, especially in situations where T cell receptor-mediated tetramer binding occurs at low avidities. Here, we highlight a few simple techniques that can be employed to improve the visual resolution, and hence the accurate quantification, of tetramer binding CD8+ T cell populations by flow cytometry. These methodological modifications enhance signal intensity, especially in the case of specific CD8+ T cell populations that bind cognate antigen with low avidities, minimize background noise, and enable improved discrimination of true pMHCI tetramer binding events from nonspecific uptake.

  1. Cloning and functional identification of C-4 methyl sterol oxidase genes from the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Qiang; Zhao, Ying; Dai, Meng; Liu, Jing; Zheng, Gui-Zhen; Ren, Zhi-Hong; He, Jian-Gong

    2008-10-01

    Two C-4 methyl sterol oxidase genes (Pcerg25A and Pcerg25B) that are involved in ergosterol biosynthesis have been cloned from the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. cDNAs of both Pcerg25A and Pcerg25B have an ORF 885 bp in length, encoding a peptide of 295 residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of PcErg25A and PcErg25B show 86% identity, and have high identities to the characterized C-4 methyl sterol oxidases from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The function of Pcerg25A and Pcerg25B was identified by complementation of a yeast erg25-deficient strain. Pcerg25A is located in the DNA region containing the penicillin gene cluster, and thus its copy number is dependent on the patterns of the cluster region. Up to eight copies of Pcerg25A were found in the high-productivity strain NCPC 10086. By contrast, Pcerg25B was present in just a single copy in all tested P. chrysogenum genomes. Differences in the transcript level of either Pcerg25A or Pcerg25B were observed in different P. chrysogenum strains by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis.

  2. Injections of Galanin-Like Peptide directly into the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) reduces food intake and body weight but increases metabolic rate and plasma leptin.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Lindy; Rodriguez-Dimitrescu, Carla; Barney, Christopher C; Fraley, Gregory S

    2016-12-29

    Galanin-Like Peptide (GALP) is a hypothalamic neuromediator of metabolism and reproduction. GALP is known to stimulate reproduction and alter food intake and body weight in multiple species. The regulation of body weight involves control of both energy intake and energy expenditure. Since GALP is known to alter food intake - possibly via the autonomic nervous system - we first hypothesized that GALP would increase metabolic rate. First, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannulae and abdominal radiotelemetry temperature transmitters. Following ICV injection with either 5nmol GALP or vehicle, the oxygen consumption of each rat was monitored for 8h. Food intake, core temperature, and general motor activity were monitored for 24h. GALP significantly increased oxygen consumption, an indirect estimator of metabolic rate, without having any significant effect on motor activity. Compared to controls, GALP increased core body temperature during the photophase and reduced food intake over the 24h period following injection. ICV GALP also increased plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH). A second group of male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with abdominal transmitters and given injections of GALP directly into the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS). These injections resulted in a significant reduction in food intake, and a significant increase in both oxygen consumption and core body temperature compared to vehicle injections. Direct injections of GALP into the NTS compared to vehicle also resulted in a significant increase in plasma leptin levels, but not LH levels. GALP appears to increase energy expenditure in addition to decreasing energy input by actions within the NTS and thus may play an important role in the hypothalamic regulation of body weight.

  3. Clinical importance of carbapenem hypersensitivity in patients with self-reported and documented penicillin allergy.

    PubMed

    Prescott, William A; Kusmierski, Kristen A

    2007-01-01

    The risk of carbapenem hypersensitivity in patients with self-reported or documented penicillin allergy needs to be determined so that practitioners can make better-informed decisions regarding antibiotic therapy for this patient population. The risk of cross-reactivity between penicillin and carbapenem antibiotics initially was reported to approach 50%. Recent retrospective studies have suggested that the clinical risk of cross-hypersensitivity between these two drug classes is 9.2-11%, which is significantly lower than initially reported. Patients whose history of penicillin allergy is self-reported and is not type 1 may be at moderate risk for hypersensitivity when treated with a carbapenem antibiotic. The risk of hypersensitivity appears to be higher in patients whose penicillin allergy was documented by a health care provider, those with several antibiotic allergies, and those with a positive penicillin skin test result or a history of type 1 penicillin hypersensitivity.

  4. Identification of Penicillin G Metabolites under Various Environmental Conditions Using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Aldeek, Fadi; Canzani, Daniele; Standland, Matthew; Crosswhite, Mark R; Hammack, Walter; Gerard, Ghislain; Cook, Jo-Marie

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we investigate the stability of penicillin G in various conditions including acidic, alkaline, natural acidic matrices and after treatment of citrus trees that are infected with citrus greening disease. The identification, confirmation, and quantitation of penicillin G and its various metabolites were evaluated using two UHPLC-MS/MS systems with variable capabilities (i.e., Thermo Q Exactive Orbitrap and Sciex 6500 QTrap). Our data show that under acidic and alkaline conditions, penicillin G at 100 ng/mL degrades quickly, with a determined half-life time of approximately 2 h. Penillic acid, penicilloic acid, and penilloic acid are found to be the most abundant metabolites of penicillin G. These major metabolites, along with isopenillic acid, are found when penicillin G is used for treatment of citrus greening infected trees. The findings of this study will provide insight regarding penicillin G residues in agricultural and biological applications.

  5. A New Method to Determine the Half-Life for Penicillin Using Microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.; Zhao, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    The dissolution process of penicillin in normal saline and isotonic glucose solution was reported using a microcalorimeter. Both the integral and differential heats of solution were measured. The quantitative relationships between the amount of heat released and the quantity of dissolved penicillin were established. Meanwhile, the kinetics and the half-life of the dissolution processes as well as the enthalpy of solution, the entropy of dissolution, and the free energy of dissolution were determined. The results showed that a change of the solvent from normal saline to isotonic glucose solution had little effect on the half-life of penicillin in the dissolution process, and there was no significant difference between the stabilities of penicillin in isotonic glucose solution and normal saline. Moreover, the dissolution process of penicillin in isotonic glucose solution followed the first-order kinetics. These results could provide a theoretical basis for the clinical applications of penicillin.

  6. Sequences near the Active Site in Chimeric Penicillin Binding Proteins 5 and 6 Affect Uniform Morphology of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anindya S.; Young, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 5, a dd-carboxypeptidase that removes the terminal d-alanine from peptide side chains of peptidoglycan, plays an important role in creating and maintaining the uniform cell shape of Escherichia coli. PBP 6, a highly similar homologue, cannot substitute for PBP 5 in this respect. Previously, we localized the shape-maintaining characteristics of PBP 5 to the globular domain that contains the active site (domain I), where PBPs 5 and 6 share substantial identity. To identify the specific segment of domain I responsible for shape control, we created a set of hybrids and determined which ones complemented the aberrant morphology of a misshapen PBP mutant, E. coli CS703-1. Fusion proteins were constructed in which 47, 199 and 228 amino-terminal amino acids of one PBP were fused to the corresponding carboxy-terminal amino acids of the other. The morphological phenotype was reversed only by hybrid proteins containing PBP 5 residues 200 to 228, which are located next to the KTG motif of the active site. Because residues 220 to 228 were identical in these proteins, the morphological effect was determined by alterations in amino acids 200 to 219. To confirm the importance of this segment, we constructed mosaic proteins in which these 20 amino acids were grafted from PBP 5 into PBP 6 and vice versa. The PBP 6/5/6 mosaic complemented the aberrant morphology of CS703-1, whereas PBP 5/6/5 did not. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the Asp218 and Lys219 residues were important for shape maintenance by these mosaic PBPs, but the same mutations in wild-type PBP 5 did not eliminate its shape-promoting activity. Homologous enzymes from five other bacteria also complemented the phenotype of CS703-1. The overall conclusion is that creation of a bacterial cell of regular diameter and uniform contour apparently depends primarily on a slight alteration of the enzymatic activity or substrate accessibility at the active site of E. coli PBP 5. PMID

  7. Sequences near the active site in chimeric penicillin binding proteins 5 and 6 affect uniform morphology of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anindya S; Young, Kevin D

    2003-04-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 5, a DD-carboxypeptidase that removes the terminal D-alanine from peptide side chains of peptidoglycan, plays an important role in creating and maintaining the uniform cell shape of Escherichia coli. PBP 6, a highly similar homologue, cannot substitute for PBP 5 in this respect. Previously, we localized the shape-maintaining characteristics of PBP 5 to the globular domain that contains the active site (domain I), where PBPs 5 and 6 share substantial identity. To identify the specific segment of domain I responsible for shape control, we created a set of hybrids and determined which ones complemented the aberrant morphology of a misshapen PBP mutant, E. coli CS703-1. Fusion proteins were constructed in which 47, 199 and 228 amino-terminal amino acids of one PBP were fused to the corresponding carboxy-terminal amino acids of the other. The morphological phenotype was reversed only by hybrid proteins containing PBP 5 residues 200 to 228, which are located next to the KTG motif of the active site. Because residues 220 to 228 were identical in these proteins, the morphological effect was determined by alterations in amino acids 200 to 219. To confirm the importance of this segment, we constructed mosaic proteins in which these 20 amino acids were grafted from PBP 5 into PBP 6 and vice versa. The PBP 6/5/6 mosaic complemented the aberrant morphology of CS703-1, whereas PBP 5/6/5 did not. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the Asp(218) and Lys(219) residues were important for shape maintenance by these mosaic PBPs, but the same mutations in wild-type PBP 5 did not eliminate its shape-promoting activity. Homologous enzymes from five other bacteria also complemented the phenotype of CS703-1. The overall conclusion is that creation of a bacterial cell of regular diameter and uniform contour apparently depends primarily on a slight alteration of the enzymatic activity or substrate accessibility at the active site of E. coli PBP 5.

  8. Safety of meropenem in patients reporting penicillin allergy: lack of allergic cross reactions.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A; Hamid, N S; Krol, V; Eisenstein, L

    2008-04-01

    Over the years, meropenem has become the mainstay of empiric therapy for serious systemic infections in critically ill patients. Although we have had extensive clinical experience since 1996 using meropenem safely in treating hundreds of patients with reported allergic reactions to penicillin without any adverse events, we have not published our experience. This study was conducted to document our clinical practice experience. Accordingly, over a 12-month period we prospectively monitored 110 patients treated with meropenem reporting penicillin allergic reactions for that 12-month period. Since early empiric therapy in such patients is essential, there is often no time for penicillin skin testing. Penicillin skin testing was not done in this "real world" clinical study. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the nature of their penicillin allergic reactions. During a 12-month period, 110 patients with non-anaphylactic (59) and anaphylactic (51) penicillin allergic reactions tolerated prolonged meropenem therapy (1-4 weeks) safely without any allergic reactions. Based on these data and our previous clinical experience, there appears to be little/no potential cross reactivity between meropenem and penicillins even in patients with a definite history of anaphylactic reactions to penicillins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first prospective clinical study demonstrating that meropenem may be safely given to patients with known/unknown allergic reactions to penicillin, including those with anaphylactic reactions, without penicillin skin testing. We conclude that meropenem may be given safely to patients reporting a history of non-anaphylactic or anaphylactic allergic reactions to penicillins without penicillin skin testing.

  9. Penicillin hypersensitivity: value of clinical history and skin testing in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Gregoriou, Stamatios; Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Mousatou, Vassiliki; Katsarou-Katsari, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Penicillin often is excluded as a treatment option based on patients' self-reported history of an adverse reaction to penicillin. The objective of this prospective study was to determine the likelihood of true penicillin allergy in patients with vague and convincing histories of penicillin allergy and to evaluate the diagnostic value added by appropriate skin testing. Six hundred thirty-eight patients with prior beta-lactam intake had a current indication for penicillin therapy and were referred for testing with the major (benzylpenicilloyl polylysine) and minor (minor determinant mixture) penicillin determinants from the inpatient and outpatient service of Athens University Dermatological hospital from January 2000 to December 2002. The prevalence of positive skin tests in the total group and in those patients with vague and convincing histories of penicillin allergy was determined. Positive skin tests were observed in 19/638 (3%) of the total group, 5 out of 542 (0.9%) patients without any history of penicillin allergy, 14 out of 96 (14.6%) patients with vague history (confidence interval [CI] 95% = 5.95-59.92), and 13 out of 18 (72.2%) patients with a convincing history of type I hypersensitivity reaction (chi2 = 286.3: odds ratio = 281.3: CI 95% = 62.19-1440.8). Patients with a vague history of penicillin allergy are 18 times more likely to have a positive penicillin skin test, and a convincing reaction history increases the likelihood by 281-fold compared with patients without a history of penicillin allergy. However, the fact that 5 of 18 (27.8%) patients with a convincing history were negative when skin tested points out that skin testing is helpful if the need for penicillin administration is compelling.

  10. Reappearance and treatment of penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary medical centre.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Matthew R; Stefan, Mihaela S; Friderici, Jennifer; Schimmel, Jennifer; Larioza, Julius

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe trends in the prevalence and treatment patterns of penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections. This was a cross-sectional study of MSSA isolates from blood cultures at a tertiary-care centre between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2012. All blood cultures positive for MSSA drawn during the study period were used to calculate the prevalence of penicillin-susceptible SA. Repeat cultures were excluded if they were isolated within 6 weeks of the index culture. The analysis was then restricted to inpatient blood cultures to assess treatment patterns. Antibiotics administered 48-96 h after the culture were analysed. A total of 446 blood cultures positive for MSSA were included in the analysis. There was a distinct trend showing an increase in the percentage of penicillin-susceptible SA over 10 years from 13.2% (95% CI 4.1%-22.3%) in 2003 to 32.4% (95% CI 17.3%-47.5%) in 2012 (P trend <0.001). During the study period, penicillin use for penicillin-susceptible SA bacteraemia increased from 0.0% in 2003-04 to 50.0% in 2011-12 (P trend = 0.007). Over a decade, there was an ∼3-fold increase in penicillin susceptibility among MSSA blood cultures at a large tertiary-care facility. Although treatment with penicillin increased over the study period, only 50% of penicillin-susceptible SA was treated with penicillin in the final study period. This study suggests that while susceptibility to penicillin appears to be returning in SA, the use of penicillin for penicillin-susceptible SA bacteraemia is low. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus: susceptibility testing, resistance rates and outcome of infection.

    PubMed

    Hagstrand Aldman, Malin; Skovby, Annette; I Påhlman, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is an important human pathogen that causes both superficial and invasive infections. Penicillin is now rarely used in the treatment of SA infections due to widespread resistance and a concern about the accuracy of existing methods for penicillin susceptibility testing. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of penicillin-susceptible SA isolates from blood and wound cultures in Lund, Sweden, and to evaluate methods for penicillin testing in SA. We also wanted to investigate if penicillin-susceptible isolates are associated with higher mortality. Hundred blood culture isolates collected 2008/2009, 140 blood culture isolates from 2014/2015, and 141 superficial wound culture strains from 2015 were examined. Penicillin susceptibility was tested with disk diffusion according to EUCAST guidelines, and results were confirmed with a cloverleaf assay and PCR amplification of the BlaZ gene. Patient data for all bacteraemia cases were extracted from medical records. The disk diffusion method with assessment of both zone size and zone edge appearance had high accuracy in our study. About 57% of bacteraemia isolates from 2008/2009 were sensitive to penicillin compared to 29% in 2014/2015 (p < .0001). In superficial wound cultures, 21% were penicillin susceptible. There was no difference in co-morbidity or mortality rates between patients with penicillin resistant and penicillin sensitive SA bacteraemia. Disk-diffusion is a simple and reliable method to detect penicillin resistance in SA, and susceptibility rates are significant. Penicillin has many theoretical advantages and should be considered in the treatment of SA bacteraemia when susceptible.

  12. Oral penicillin-associated acute kidney injury in an infant with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub; Hacek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactam-associated acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a rare condition in childhood. We report the case of an infant with penicillin-associated ATIN and concomitant acute pyelonephritis resulting in the development of severe acute kidney injury (AKI). The treatment consisted of penicillin suspension and appropriate AKI management, which required a short period of dialysis. Finally, full recovery and normalization of laboratory parameters occurred. We present here the first case of oral penicillin-associated ATIN in childhood.

  13. STUDIES ON THE MECHANISM OF THE FORMATION OF THE PENICILLIN ANTIGEN

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Bernard B.; Ovary, Zoltan

    1961-01-01

    An excess of D-benzylpenicillenic acid (BPE) was reacted with human γ-globulin, human serum albumin, gelatin, and poly-L-lysine in aqueous solution buffered at pH 7.5–8.0. Under these conditions, BPE reacted predominantly with lysine ε-amino groups of the proteins to form the mixture of diastereomers of ε-N-(D-α-benzylpenicilloyl)-lysine groups (Di-BPO-Lys). BPE reacted also, but to a considerably smaller extent, with cystine disulfide linkages of human γ-globulin and human serum albumin to form D-benzylpenicillenic acid-cysteine mixed disulfide groups (BPE-SS-Cys). Conjugates containing large numbers of BPE or D-penicillamine mixed disulfide groups were prepared by reaction of BPE or D-penicillamine with thiolated human γ-globulin under mild oxidizing conditions. Anti-penicillin antibodies were produced in rabbits by immunization with either potassium penicillin G (PG) or a preincubated mixture of PG with normal rabbit serum (PG-NRS) in complete Freund's adjuvant. Specific precipitation analyses in aqueous and gel media (Ouchterlony), PCA analyses, and specific inhibition of these reactions with haptens were carried out on the rabbit anti-PG and anti-(PG-NRS) sera, using the above conjugates as antigens. The anti-penicillin antibodies were found to be directed against the diastereomeric mixture of N-(D-α-benzylpenicilloyl) groups, predominantly the Di-BPO-Lys groups. By these techniques, no antibodies directed against the BPE-mixed disulfide or the D-penicillamine mixed disulfide groups were detected. Three out of six patients with histories of allergic reactions to PG responded with wheal-and-erythema reactions to the N-(D-α-benzylpenicilloyl) (BPO) groups contained in BPE-human gamma globulin conjugate. Another such patient exhibited serum antibodies specific for the BPO group. One patient being treated with 25 gm per day of PG showed the presence of non-dialyzable antigenic BPO-conjugates in his serum. These results demonstrate that the diastereomeric

  14. Cloning, overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a slow-processing mutant of penicillin G acylase from Kluyvera citrophila

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Brannigan, James A.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Suresh, C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase (KcPGA) has recently attracted increased attention relative to the well studied and commonly used Escherichia coli PGA (EcPGA) because KcPGA is more resilient to harsh conditions and is easier to immobilize for the industrial hydrolysis of natural penicillins to generate the 6-aminopenicillin (6-APA) nucleus, which is the starting material for semi-synthetic antibiotic production. Like other penicillin acylases, KcPGA is synthesized as a single-chain inactive pro-PGA, which upon autocatalytic processing becomes an active heterodimer of α and β chains. Here, the cloning of the pac gene encoding KcPGA and the preparation of a slow-processing mutant precursor are reported. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of this precursor protein are described. The protein crystallized in two different space groups, P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.0, b = 124.6, c = 135.1 Å, α = 104.1, β = 101.4, γ = 96.5°, and C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 265.1, b = 54.0, c = 249.2 Å, β = 104.4°, using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected at 100 K and the phases were determined using the molecular-replacement method. The initial maps revealed electron density for the spacer peptide. PMID:23908045

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of reported penicillin allergy in an urban outpatient adult population.

    PubMed

    Albin, Stephanie; Agarwal, Shradha

    2014-01-01

    Penicillin allergy remains the most common drug allergy, with a reported prevalence of 10% in the United States. Epidemiology of penicillin allergy in outpatient populations is relatively scarce. This study sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of reported penicillin allergy in an urban outpatient population and to identify trends in clinical evaluation and management from a tertiary center serving a large inner-city population. A retrospective review of electronic medical records was performed of adult patients seen in the Internal Medicine Associates Clinic of Mount Sinai Hospital between January 31, 2012, and July 31, 2012. Medical records were selected based on the documentation of penicillin in patient's allergy section. Of the 11,761 patients seen in the clinic, 1348 patients (11.5%) reported a history of penicillin allergy. The most common allergic reactions were rash (37%), unknown/undocumented (20.2%), hives (18.9%), swelling/angioedema (11.8%), and anaphylaxis (6.8%). There was an increased prevalence of penicillin allergy in female patients compared with male patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.60, 2.08; p < 0.0001), and there were significantly fewer Asians with penicillin allergy compared with Caucasians (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.83; p = 0.007). However, only 78 (6%) of the patients reporting penicillin allergy had a referral to an allergy specialist. Overall, improved referral to an allergist will help to identify patients who have penicillin allergy requiring avoidance.

  16. Genomic analyses of DNA transformation and penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Fani, Fereshteh; Leprohon, Philippe; Zhanel, George G; Bergeron, Michel G; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in penicillin-binding proteins, the target enzymes for β-lactam antibiotics, are recognized as primary penicillin resistance mechanisms in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Few studies have analyzed penicillin resistance at the genome scale, however, and we report the sequencing of S. pneumoniae R6 transformants generated while reconstructing the penicillin resistance phenotypes from three penicillin-resistant clinical isolates by serial genome transformation. The genome sequences of the three last-level transformants T2-18209, T5-1983, and T3-55938 revealed that 16.2 kb, 82.7 kb, and 137.2 kb of their genomes had been replaced with 5, 20, and 37 recombinant sequence segments derived from their respective parental clinical isolates, documenting the extent of DNA transformation between strains. A role in penicillin resistance was confirmed for some of the mutations identified in the transformants. Several multiple recombination events were also found to have happened at single loci coding for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that increase resistance. Sequencing of the transformants with MICs for penicillin similar to those of the parent clinical strains confirmed the importance of mosaic PBP2x, -2b, and -1a as a driving force in penicillin resistance. A role in resistance for mosaic PBP2a was also observed for two of the resistant clinical isolates.

  17. Antibiotic resistance and penicillin tolerance in clinical isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Betriu, C; Gomez, M; Sanchez, A; Cruceyra, A; Romero, J; Picazo, J J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility patterns of 100 group B streptococcal strains isolated in our hospital and to ascertain tolerance to penicillin by determining quantitative killing curves. We found two strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin and eight strains to ampicillin. Seventeen isolates were tolerant to penicillin, with bacterial counts decreasing 2 to 3 log during the first 8 h but still above 10(2) CFU/ml after 24 h. The kinetic study shows that penicillin tolerance is not rare among group B streptococci isolated in our hospital. PMID:7811042

  18. Identification of a penicillin-sensitive carboxypeptidase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Kuroita, Toshihiro; Tamura, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kazuo

    2003-07-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are penicillin-sensitive DD-peptidases catalyzing the terminal stages of bacterial cell wall assembly. We identified a Dictyostelium discoideum gene that encodes a protein of 522 amino acids showing similarity to Escherichia coli PBP4. The D. discoideum protein conserves three consensus sequences (SXXK, SXN and KTG) that are responsible for the catalytic activities of PBPs. The gene product prepared in the cell-free translation system showed carboxypeptidase activity but the activity was not detected in the presence of penicillin G. These results demonstrate that the D. discoideum gene encodes a eukaryotic form of penicillin-sensitive carboxypeptidase.

  19. Engineering deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase as a catalyst for the bioconversion of penicillins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Keqiang; Lin, Baixue; Tao, Yong; Yang, Keqian

    2017-05-01

    7-aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA) is a key intermediate of many clinically useful semisynthetic cephalosporins that were traditionally prepared by processes involving chemical ring expansion of penicillin G. Bioconversion of penicillins to cephalosporins using deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) is an alternative and environmentally friendly process for 7-ADCA production. Arnold Demain and co-workers pioneered such a process. Later, protein engineering efforts to improve the substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of DAOCS for penicillins have been made by many groups, and a whole cell process using Escherichia coli for bioconversion of penicillins has been developed.

  20. Penicillin-resistant isolates of Neisseria lactamica produce altered forms of penicillin-binding protein 2 that arose by interspecies horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, R; Zhang, Q Y; Sáez Nieto, J A; Jones, D M; Spratt, B G

    1991-01-01

    Isolates of Neisseria lactamica that have increased resistance to penicillin have emerged in recent years. Resistance to penicillin was shown to be due to the production of altered forms of penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) that have reduced affinity for the antibiotic. The sequences of the PBP 2 genes (penA) from two penicillin-resistant isolates were almost identical (less than or equal to 1% sequence divergence) to that of a penicillin-susceptible isolate, except in a 175-bp region where the resistant and susceptible isolates differed by 27%. The nucleotide sequences of these divergent regions were identical (or almost identical) to the sequence of the corresponding region of the penA gene of N. flavescens NCTC 8263. Altered forms of PBP 2 with decreased affinity for penicillin in the two penicillin-resistant isolates of N. lactamica appear, therefore, to have arisen by the replacement of part of the N. lactamica penA gene with the corresponding region from the penA gene of N. flavescens. Images PMID:2024965

  1. Penicillin-resistant isolates of Neisseria lactamica produce altered forms of penicillin-binding protein 2 that arose by interspecies horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lujan, R; Zhang, Q Y; Sáez Nieto, J A; Jones, D M; Spratt, B G

    1991-02-01

    Isolates of Neisseria lactamica that have increased resistance to penicillin have emerged in recent years. Resistance to penicillin was shown to be due to the production of altered forms of penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2) that have reduced affinity for the antibiotic. The sequences of the PBP 2 genes (penA) from two penicillin-resistant isolates were almost identical (less than or equal to 1% sequence divergence) to that of a penicillin-susceptible isolate, except in a 175-bp region where the resistant and susceptible isolates differed by 27%. The nucleotide sequences of these divergent regions were identical (or almost identical) to the sequence of the corresponding region of the penA gene of N. flavescens NCTC 8263. Altered forms of PBP 2 with decreased affinity for penicillin in the two penicillin-resistant isolates of N. lactamica appear, therefore, to have arisen by the replacement of part of the N. lactamica penA gene with the corresponding region from the penA gene of N. flavescens.

  2. In vitro activities of 22 beta-lactam antibiotics against penicillin-resistant and penicillin-susceptible viridans group streptococci isolated from blood.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, F; Liñares, J; Pallares, R; Carratala, J; Benitez, M A; Gudiol, F; Martin, R

    1995-01-01

    A total of 410 strains of viridans group streptococci isolated consecutively from blood were tested by the microdilution method for in vitro susceptibility to 22 beta-lactam antibiotics. One hundred thirty-eight strains (33.6%) were resistant to penicillin with a MIC range of 0.25 to 8 micrograms/ml. MICs of all beta-lactam agents tested were higher for penicillin-resistant strains than for susceptible strains. These antibiotics were classified into three groups according to their in vitro activities (MICs at which 50 and 90% of the isolates are inhibited). Beta-Lactams of the first group (these included imipenem, cefpirome, FK-037, cefditoren, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and cefepime) showed activities higher than or similar to that of penicillin against penicillin-resistant viridans group streptococci. However, 80% of highly penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis organisms required cefotaxime and ceftriaxone MICs of > or = 2 micrograms/ml (range, 2 to 16 micrograms/ml). Beta-Lactams of the second group (cefpodoxime, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin, and cefuroxime) showed lower activities than penicillin. Finally, antibiotics of the third group (cephalothin, oxacillin, ceftazidime, cefixime, cefaclor, cefetamet, cefadroxil, cephalexin, and ceftibuten) showed poor in vitro activities. Therefore, some of the beta-lactam agents included in the first group could be an acceptable alternative in the treatment of serious infections due to strains highly resistant to penicillin, although clinical experience is needed. PMID:8619576

  3. Efficacy of Targeted 5-day Combined Parenteral and Intramammary Treatment of Clinical Mastitis Caused by Penicillin-Susceptible or Penicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Taponen, S; Jantunen, A; Pyörälä, E; Pyörälä, S

    2003-01-01

    Combined parenteral and intramammary treatment of mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus was compared to parenteral treatment only. Cows with clinical mastitis (166 mastitic quarters) caused by S. aureus treated by veterinarians of the Ambulatory Clinic of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine during routine farm calls were included. Treatment was based on in vitro susceptibility testing of the bacterial isolate. Procaine penicillin G (86 cases due to β-lactamase negative strains) or amoxycillin-clavulanic acid (24 cases due to β-lactamase positive strains) was administered parenterally and intramammarily for 5 days. Efficacy of treatments was assessed 2 and 4 weeks later by physical examination, bacteriological culture, determination of CMT, somatic cell count and NAGase activity in milk. Quarters with growth of S. aureus in at least one post-treatment sample were classified as non-cured. As controls we used 41 clinical mastitis cases caused by penicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates treated with procaine penicillin G parenterally for 5 days and 15 cases due to penicillin-resistant isolates treated with spiramycin parenterally for 5 days from the same practice area. Bacteriological cure rate after the combination treatment was 75.6% for quarters infected with penicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, and 29.2% for quarters infected with penicillin-resistant isolates. Cure rate for quarters treated only parenterally with procaine penicillin G was 56.1% and that for quarters treated with spiramycin 33.3%. The difference in cure rates between mastitis due to penicillin-susceptible and penicillin-resistant S. aureus was highly significant. Combined treatment was superior over systemic treatment only in the β-lactamase negative group. PMID:14650544

  4. Active site restructuring regulates ligand recognition in class A penicillin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Macheboeuf, Pauline; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Job, Viviana; Vernet, Thierry; Dideberg, Otto; Dessen, Andréa

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is a complex, multimolecular process that requires biosynthesis of new peptidoglycan by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) during cell wall elongation and septum formation steps. Streptococcus pneumoniae has three bifunctional (class A) PBPs that catalyze both polymerization of glycan chains (glycosyltransfer) and cross-linking of pentapeptidic bridges (transpeptidation) during the peptidoglycan biosynthetic process. In addition to playing important roles in cell division, PBPs are also the targets for β-lactam antibiotics and thus play key roles in drug-resistance mechanisms. The crystal structure of a soluble form of pneumococcal PBP1b (PBP1b*) has been solved to 1.9 Å, thus providing previously undescribed structural information regarding a class A PBP from any organism. PBP1b* is a three-domain molecule harboring a short peptide from the glycosyltransferase domain bound to an interdomain linker region, the transpeptidase domain, and a C-terminal region. The structure of PBP1b* complexed with β-lactam antibiotics reveals that ligand recognition requires a conformational modification involving conserved elements within the cleft. The open and closed structures of PBP1b* suggest how class A PBPs may become activated as novel peptidoglycan synthesis becomes necessary during the cell division process. In addition, this structure provides an initial framework for the understanding of the role of class A PBPs in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:15637155

  5. Interplay between Penicillin-binding proteins and SEDS proteins promotes bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sophie; Derouaux, Adeline; Olatunji, Samir; Fraipont, Claudine; Egan, Alexander J F; Vollmer, Waldemar; Breukink, Eefjan; Terrak, Mohammed

    2017-02-24

    Bacteria utilize specialized multi-protein machineries to synthesize the essential peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall during growth and division. The divisome controls septal PG synthesis and separation of daughter cells. In E. coli, the lipid II transporter candidate FtsW is thought to work in concert with the PG synthases penicillin-binding proteins PBP3 and PBP1b. Yet, the exact molecular mechanisms of their function in complexes are largely unknown. We show that FtsW interacts with PBP1b and lipid II and that PBP1b, FtsW and PBP3 co-purify suggesting that they form a trimeric complex. We also show that the large loop between transmembrane helices 7 and 8 of FtsW is important for the interaction with PBP3. Moreover, we found that FtsW, but not the other flippase candidate MurJ, impairs lipid II polymerization and peptide cross-linking activities of PBP1b, and that PBP3 relieves these inhibitory effects. All together the results suggest that FtsW interacts with lipid II preventing its polymerization by PBP1b unless PBP3 is also present, indicating that PBP3 facilitates lipid II release and/or its transfer to PBP1b after transport across the cytoplasmic membrane. This tight regulatory mechanism is consistent with the cell's need to ensure appropriate use of the limited pool of lipid II.

  6. Interplay between Penicillin-binding proteins and SEDS proteins promotes bacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie; Derouaux, Adeline; Olatunji, Samir; Fraipont, Claudine; Egan, Alexander J. F.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Breukink, Eefjan; Terrak, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria utilize specialized multi-protein machineries to synthesize the essential peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall during growth and division. The divisome controls septal PG synthesis and separation of daughter cells. In E. coli, the lipid II transporter candidate FtsW is thought to work in concert with the PG synthases penicillin-binding proteins PBP3 and PBP1b. Yet, the exact molecular mechanisms of their function in complexes are largely unknown. We show that FtsW interacts with PBP1b and lipid II and that PBP1b, FtsW and PBP3 co-purify suggesting that they form a trimeric complex. We also show that the large loop between transmembrane helices 7 and 8 of FtsW is important for the interaction with PBP3. Moreover, we found that FtsW, but not the other flippase candidate MurJ, impairs lipid II polymerization and peptide cross-linking activities of PBP1b, and that PBP3 relieves these inhibitory effects. All together the results suggest that FtsW interacts with lipid II preventing its polymerization by PBP1b unless PBP3 is also present, indicating that PBP3 facilitates lipid II release and/or its transfer to PBP1b after transport across the cytoplasmic membrane. This tight regulatory mechanism is consistent with the cell’s need to ensure appropriate use of the limited pool of lipid II. PMID:28233869

  7. Penicillin: promise, problems and practice in wartime Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, S

    2016-09-01

    While medical historians have paid ample attention to the introduction of antibiotics and their impact on hospital-based practice during and after the Second World War, the multiple issues surrounding their use in Scottish hospitalsare sorely lacking in current discussions. Drawing on an extensive yet underused range of materials including patient treatment records, oral histories and medical correspondence, this paper explores the introduction of penicillin for civilian treatment at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh during the closing stages of the War. It highlights the success of the drug in clinical treatment as well as its shortcomings, offering an alternative view of its initial impact on surgical practice.

  8. Novel penicillins synthesized by biotransformation using laccase from Trametes spec.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes; Lalk, Michael; Witt, Sabine; Seefeldt, Simone; Hammer, Elke; Schauer, Frieder; Gesell, Manuela; Hessel, Susanne; Jülich, Wolf-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2006-05-01

    Eight novel penicillins were synthesized by heteromolecular reaction of ampicillin or amoxicillin with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid derivatives using a laccase from Trametes spec. All products inhibited the growth of several gram positive bacterial strains in the agar diffusion assay, among them methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci. The products protected mice against an infection with Staphylococcus aureus lethal to the untreated animals. Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity of the new compounds were neglectable. The results show the usefulness of laccase for the synthesis of potential new antibiotics. The biological activity of the new compounds stimulates intensified pharmacological tests.

  9. Susceptibility of Ampicillin-Resistant Haemophilus influenzae to Seven Penicillins

    PubMed Central

    Thornsberry, C.; Baker, C. N.; Kirven, L. A.; Swenson, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Sixty-seven clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae from various sections of the United States, England, and Germany were tested for susceptibility to penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, epicillin, carbenicillin, ticarcillin, and methicillin. Fifty-three of the strains had previously been judged to be ampicillin resistant and 14 had been determined to be ampicillin susceptible. Fifty-two of the 53 resistant strains produced β-lactamase, but none of the susceptible strains produced it. On the basis of minimal inhibitory concentrations, the most active compounds were ticarcillin and carbenicillin. Whether this greater activity is useful clinically has not been established. PMID:1083202

  10. mZD7349 peptide-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles directed against VCAM-1 for targeted delivery of simvastatin to restore dysfunctional HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Imanparast, Fatemeh; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Vatannejad, Akram; Paknejad, Maliheh; Deiham, Behnas; Kobarfard, Farzad; Amani, Amir; Doosti, Mahmood

    2017-02-02

    Endothelial dysfunction is initial and critical step of atherosclerosis. Impaired bioavailability of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is one of the main reasons of endothelial dysfunction. Improving bioavailability of eNOS by increasing its expression or activity using statins is an effective therapeutic strategy in restoring endothelial dysfunction. In this study, simvastatin (SIM) as a poorly water-soluble drug was loaded in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (SIM-PLGA-NPs). NPs were then conjugated with mZD7349 peptide (mZD7349-SIM-PLGA-NPs) and directed against vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). In vitro evaluation of the NPs for targeted delivery of SIM was performed on activated Human Umbilical Cord Vascular Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Effect of mZD7349-SIM-PLGA-NPs and SIM-PLGA-NPs was compared on eNOS phosphorylation (ser-1177). Results of western blot showed SIM post-treatment increased significantly phosphor-eNOS (Ser1177) expression but no total eNOS expression. The study showed that mZD7349-SIM-PLGA-NPs have particle size, zeta potential value, polydispersity index (PDI) and encapsulation efficacy % of 233±18nm, -9.6±1.1mV, 0.59±0.066 and 69±17.3%, respectively. Also phosphor-eNOS (Ser1177) expression in activated HUVECs treated with mZD7349-SIM-PLGA-NPs was significantly (p<0.05) better than treated cells with SIM-PLGA-NPs. The results suggest that mZD7349-SIM-PLGA-NPs may be usable as an appropriate drug carrier for restoring endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Efficient preparation and site-directed immobilization of VHH antibodies by genetic fusion of poly(methylmethacrylate)-binding peptide (PMMA-Tag).

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Kang, Bongmun; Yamakawa, Kagenari; Kishimoto, Michimasa; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    A PMMA-binding peptide (PMMA-tag) was genetically fused with the C-terminal region of an anti-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) single-domain antibody (VHH). It was over-expressed in an insoluble fraction of E. coli cells, and recovered in the presence of 8 M urea via one-step IMAC purification. Monomeric and denatured PMMA-tag-fused VHH (VHH-PM) was successfully prepared via the reduction and oxidation of VHH-PM at a concentration less than 1 mg/mL in the presence of 8 M of urea. Furthermore, the VHH-PM was refolded with a recovery of more than 95% by dialysis against 50 mM TAPS at pH 8.5, because the genetic fusion of PMMA-tag resulted in a decrease in the apparent isoelectric point (pI) of the fusion protein, and its solubility at weak alkaline pH was considerably increased. The antigen-binding activities of VHH-PM in the adsorptive state were 10-fold higher than that of VHH without a PMMA-tag. The density of VHH-PM on a PMMA plate was twice that of VHH, indicating that the site-directed attachment of a PMMA-tag resulted in positive effects to the adsorption amount as well as to the orientation of VHH-PM in its adsorptive state. The preparation and immobilization methods for VHH-PM against hCG developed in the present study were further applied to VHH-PMs against four different antigens, and consequently, those antigens with the concentrations lower than 1 ng/mL were detected by the sandwich ELISA. Thus, the VHH-PMs developed in the present study are useful for preparation of high-performance and economical immunosorbent for detection of biomarkers. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. Probing the Secondary Structure of Membrane Peptides Using (2)H-Labeled d(10)-Leucine via Site-Directed Spin-Labeling and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lishan; Sahu, Indra D; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2016-02-04

    Previously, we reported an electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopic approach for probing the local secondary structure of membrane proteins and peptides utilizing (2)H isotopic labeling and site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL). In order to probe the secondary structure of a peptide sequence, an amino acid residue (i) side chain was (2)H-labeled, such as (2)H-labeled d10-Leucine, and a cysteine residue was strategically placed at a subsequent nearby position (denoted as i + 1 to i + 4) to which a nitroxide spin label was attached. In order to fully access and demonstrate the feasibility of this new ESEEM approach with (2)H-labeled d10-Leu, four Leu residues within the AChR M2δ peptide were fully mapped out using this ESEEM method. Unique (2)H-ESEEM patterns were observed with the (2)H-labeled d10-Leu for the AChR M2δ α-helical model peptide. For proteins and peptides with an α-helical secondary structure, deuterium modulation can be clearly observed for i ± 3 and i ± 4 samples, but not for i ± 2 samples. Also, a deuterium peak centered at the (2)H Larmor frequency of each i ± 4 sample always had a significantly higher intensity than the corresponding i + 3 sample. This unique feature can be potentially used to distinguish an α-helix from a π-helix or 310-helix. Moreover, (2)H modulation depth for ESEEM samples on Leu10 were significantly enhanced which was consistent with a kinked or curved structural model of the AChR M2δ peptide as suggested by previous MD simulations and NMR experiments.

  13. Physician approaches to beta-lactam use in patients with penicillin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prematta, Tracy; Shah, Shenil; Ishmael, Faoud T

    2012-01-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics are widely used, but hypersensitivity reactions are common and difficult to manage. This study was designed to identify lack of knowledge regarding the safe use of alternative beta-lactams in penicillin-allergic patients and assess management differences between allergists and nonallergists. An electronic physician survey was sent to 623 providers in allergy, internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine, querying beta-lactam use in patients with a history of penicillin allergy. A total of 110 (17.7%) surveys were completed. For patients with a prior maculopapular rash to penicillin, most providers were uncomfortable prescribing penicillins again, although they would use other beta-lactams. In patients with an exfoliative dermatitis to penicillin, 46% of responders would not prescribe any beta-lactam again. For patients with a positive skin test to penicillin, only 45.1% of nonallergists were comfortable prescribing monobactams versus 62.5% of allergists; 30.3% of all responders would give a carbapenem. In patients with urticaria to penicillin, pediatricians were the most comfortable prescribing third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins. Providers (both allergists and nonallergists) were unfamiliar with the safety of prescribing penicillin in patients with history of maculopapular rash, the safety of monobactams, and low cross-reactivity with carbapenems in penicillin-allergic individuals. Nonallergists were also unfamiliar with the usefulness of penicillin skin testing. Improved education is needed to address these areas. Additionally, we found variability in responses regarding exfoliative dermatitis and comfort prescribing cephalosporins in patients with suspected IgE-mediated drug allergy to penicillin, highlighting the need for additional research in these areas.

  14. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G induce biofilm formation by field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Fontaine-Gosselin, S-È; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2015-09-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. This is a highly contagious disease that causes important economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Penicillins are extensively used in swine production and these antibiotics are associated with high systemic clearance and low oral bioavailability. This may expose A. pleuropneumoniae to sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G when the antibiotic is administered orally. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin G on the biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Biofilm production of 13 field isolates from serotypes 1, 5a, 7 and 15 was tested in the presence of sub-MIC of penicillin G using a polystyrene microtiter plate assay. Using microscopy techniques and enzymatic digestion, biofilm architecture and composition were also characterized after exposure to sub-MIC of penicillin G. Sub-MIC of penicillin G significantly induced biofilm formation of nine isolates. The penicillin G-induced biofilms contained more poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), extracellular DNA and proteins when compared to control biofilms grown without penicillin G. Additionally, penicillin G-induced biofilms were sensitive to DNase which was not observed with the untreated controls. Furthermore, sub-MIC of penicillin G up-regulated the expression of pgaA, which encodes a protein involved in PGA synthesis, and the genes encoding the envelope-stress sensing two-component regulatory system CpxRA. In conclusion, sub-MICs of penicillin G significantly induce biofilm formation and this is likely the result of a cell envelope stress sensed by the CpxRA system resulting in an increased production of PGA and other matrix components.

  15. Morbidity in Pregnant Women Associated with Unverified Penicillin Allergies, Antibiotic Use, and Group B Streptococcus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shilpa H; Kaplan, Michael S; Chen, Qiaoling; Macy, Eric M

    2017-01-01

    Context: The morbidity potentially associated with unverified penicillin allergy in pregnant women, with and without group B streptococcus (GBS) infections, is unknown. Penicillin allergy testing is safe during pregnancy but is done infrequently. Objective: To determine morbidity associated with antibiotic use in a large cohort of pregnant women, with and without an unverified history of penicillin allergy, and with and without GBS. Design: Retrospective. All pregnant women who delivered live infants in Kaiser Permanente Southern California between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014, were identified. Main Outcome Measures: Penicillin allergy status at delivery, delivery method, maternal and infant hospital utilization, peripartum antibiotic exposures, new antibiotic-associated adverse drug reactions, and new Clostridium difficile infections. Results: There were 170,379 unique women who had 201,316 pregnancies during the study period. There were 16,084 pregnancies in women with an active, but unverified, penicillin allergy at delivery. There were 42,524 pregnancies in GBS-positive women, and 3500 also had a penicillin allergy. Women with a penicillin allergy, with or without GBS, had significantly (about 10%) higher cesarean section rates and spent significantly more (about 0.1) days in the hospital after delivery. Among GBS-positive women, those with an unverified penicillin allergy were exposed to significantly more cefazolin, clindamycin, vancomycin, and gentamicin and had significantly higher rates of adverse drug reactions associated with all antibiotic use. Conclusions: Unverified penicillin allergy is associated with more hospital utilization and additional morbidity. Penicillin allergy testing of pregnant women with a history of penicillin allergy may help reduce these unwanted outcomes. PMID:28333608

  16. Allergy Testing in Children With Low-Risk Penicillin Allergy Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vyles, David; Adams, Juan; Chiu, Asriani; Simpson, Pippa; Nimmer, Mark; Brousseau, David C

    2017-08-01

    Penicillin allergy is commonly reported in the pediatric emergency department (ED). True penicillin allergy is rare, yet the diagnosis results from the denial of first-line antibiotics. We hypothesize that all children presenting to the pediatric ED with symptoms deemed to be low-risk for immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity will return negative results for true penicillin allergy. Parents of children aged 4 to 18 years old presenting to the pediatric ED with a history of parent-reported penicillin allergy completed an allergy questionnaire. A prespecified 100 children categorized as low-risk on the basis of reported symptoms completed penicillin allergy testing by using a standard 3-tier testing process. The percent of children with negative allergy testing results was calculated with a 95% confidence interval. Five hundred ninety-seven parents completed the questionnaire describing their child's reported allergy symptoms. Three hundred two (51%) children had low-risk symptoms and were eligible for testing. Of those, 100 children were tested for penicillin allergy. The median (interquartile range) age at testing was 9 years (5-12). The median (interquartile range) age at allergy diagnosis was 1 year (9 months-3 years). Rash (97 [97%]) and itching (63 [63%]) were the most commonly reported allergy symptoms. Overall, 100 children (100%; 95% confidence interval 96.4%-100%) were found to have negative results for penicillin allergy and had their labeled penicillin allergy removed from their medical record. All children categorized as low-risk by our penicillin allergy questionnaire were found to have negative results for true penicillin allergy. The utilization of this questionnaire in the pediatric ED may facilitate increased use of first-line penicillin antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Intrapartum antibiotic exposure for group B Streptococcus treatment did not increase penicillin allergy in children.

    PubMed

    May, Sara M; Hartz, Martha F; Joshi, Avni Y; Park, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States. Intrapartum administration of antibiotics to mothers with positivity to GBS is performed for prevention, with penicillin being the drug of choice. Previous studies have noted an increase in atopic diseases other than drug allergy associated with intrapartum antibiotic exposure. To determine whether intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS increases the likelihood of penicillin allergy in children. Retrospective chart review was performed for patients from a birth cohort. The birth cohort included children born in 2007 at a tertiary care hospital and had local addresses. Information on GBS status of the mother, intrapartum antibiotic exposure, delivery mode, and birth order was collected and analyzed. Of 927 children identified, 804 were included in the cohort. Eighty children (10%) had a reported penicillin allergy; most were white (79%) and boys (61%). Intrapartum exposure to penicillin (odds ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.45-1.57, P = .59) or to amoxicillin or ampicillin (odds ratio 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.01-3.71, P = .29) did not increase the risk of penicillin allergy in children. In addition, all other factors evaluated did not affect the risk of penicillin allergy in children. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate intrapartum exposure to penicillin for GBS treatment and subsequent development of penicillin allergy in the child. In contrast to other atopic diseases, intrapartum antibiotic exposure does not alter the risk of penicillin allergy. Parents and obstetricians should be reassured when using penicillin for prevention of neonatal GBS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC): outpatient penicillin use in Europe (1997-2009).

    PubMed

    Versporten, Ann; Coenen, Samuel; Adriaenssens, Niels; Muller, Arno; Minalu, Girma; Faes, Christel; Vankerckhoven, Vanessa; Aerts, Marc; Hens, Niel; Molenberghs, Geert; Goossens, Herman

    2011-12-01

    Data on 13 years (1997-2009) of outpatient penicillin use were collected from 33 European countries within the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) project and analysed in detail. For the period 1997-2009, data on outpatient use of systemic penicillins aggregated at the level of the active substance were collected using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/defined daily dose (DDD) method (WHO, version 2011) and expressed in DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID). For detailed analysis of trends over time, seasonal variation and composition of outpatient penicillin use in 33 European countries, we distinguished between narrow-spectrum penicillins (NSP), broad-spectrum penicillins (BSP), penicillinase-resistant penicillins (PRP) and combinations with β-lactamase inhibitors (COP). Total outpatient penicillin (ATC group J01C) use in 2009 varied by a factor of 3.8 between the countries with the highest (16.08 DID in France) and lowest (4.23 DID in the Russian Federation) use. COP represented 45.8%, BSP 40.7%, NSP 10.8% and PRP 2.6% of total European outpatient penicillin use. Total outpatient penicillin use significantly increased over time by 1.53 (SD 0.71) DID between 1997 and 2009. COP (mainly co-amoxiclav) increased by 2.17 (SD 0.40) DID, which was the result of its absolute increase as well as the observed shift from NSP and BSP towards COP. This increase exceeded 10% in 20 countries, where it coincided with a similar decrease in either BSP (15 countries) or NSP (5 countries). Penicillins represented the most widely used antibiotic subgroup in all 33 participating countries, albeit with considerable variation in their use patterns. For Europe, a continuous increase in overall penicillin use and of COP use was observed during the period 1997-2009.

  19. Morbidity in Pregnant Women Associated with Unverified Penicillin Allergies, Antibiotic Use, and Group B Streptococcus Infections.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shilpa H; Kaplan, Michael S; Chen, Qiaoling; Macy, Eric M

    2017-01-01

    The morbidity potentially associated with unverified penicillin allergy in pregnant women, with and without group B streptococcus (GBS) infections, is unknown. Penicillin allergy testing is safe during pregnancy but is done infrequently. To determine morbidity associated with antibiotic use in a large cohort of pregnant women, with and without an unverified history of penicillin allergy, and with and without GBS. Retrospective. All pregnant women who delivered live infants in Kaiser Permanente Southern California between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014, were identified. Penicillin allergy status at delivery, delivery method, maternal and infant hospital utilization, peripartum antibiotic exposures, new antibiotic-associated adverse drug reactions, and new Clostridium difficile infections. There were 170,379 unique women who had 201,316 pregnancies during the study period. There were 16,084 pregnancies in women with an active, but unverified, penicillin allergy at delivery. There were 42,524 pregnancies in GBS-positive women, and 3500 also had a penicillin allergy. Women with a penicillin allergy, with or without GBS, had significantly (about 10%) higher cesarean section rates and spent significantly more (about 0.1) days in the hospital after delivery. Among GBS-positive women, those with an unverified penicillin allergy were exposed to significantly more cefazolin, clindamycin, vancomycin, and gentamicin and had significantly higher rates of adverse drug reactions associated with all antibiotic use. Unverified penicillin allergy is associated with more hospital utilization and additional morbidity. Penicillin allergy testing of pregnant women with a history of penicillin allergy may help reduce these unwanted outcomes.

  20. Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have direct access to and effects on pro-opiomelanocortin/cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Pyke, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide reduces bodyweight, and has recently also been approved for the obesity indication. Acutely, GLP-1 markedly reduces gastric emptying, and this effect was previously believed to at least partly explain the effect on bodyweight loss. However, recent studies in both humans and animals have shown that GLP-1R agonists, such as liraglutide, that lead to pharmacological concentrations for 24 h/day only have a minor effect on gastric emptying; such an effect is unlikely to have lasting effects on appetite reduction. Liraglutide has been shown to have direct effects in the arcuate nucleus of the rodent brain, activating pro-opiomelanocortin neurons and increasing levels of the cocaine- and amphetamine-stimulated transcript neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, which correlate nicely to clinical studies where liraglutide was shown to increase feelings of satiety. However, despite the lack of a GLP-1R on agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y neurons, liraglutide also was able to prevent a hunger associated increase in agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y neuropeptide messenger ribonucleic acid, again with a strong correlation to clinical studies that document reduced hunger feelings in patients while taking liraglutide. Studies using fluorescent labeled liraglutide, as well as other GLP-1R agonists, and analysis using single-plane illumination microscopy show that such medium-sized peptide-based compounds can directly access not only circumventricular organs of the brain, but also directly access discrete regions in the hypothalamus. The direct effects of long-acting GLP-1R agonists in the hypothalamus are likely to be an important new pathway in understanding GLP-1R agonist mediated weight loss.

  1. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins and other betalactams.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, C; Martín, E; Cornejo-García, J A; Blanca-Lopez, N; R-Pena, R; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2006-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams are IgE mediated and constitute the most frequent allergic reactions mediated by specific immunological mechanisms. IgE responses to benzyl penicillin (BP), the first antibiotic producing the benzyl penicilloyl structure (BPO), are characterized by a quick release of inflammatory mediators, resulting in anaphylactic shock, urticaria and angioedema. With the progressive appearance of other structures, comprising cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams and clavulanic acid, IgE selective responses and cross-reactivity reactions were observed. The diagnosis of betalactam hypersensitivity, classically based on skin testing with major and minor determinants of benzyl penicillin or in vitro IgE antibodies to BP, has been modified by the inclusion of different determinants generated from these compounds, for which amoxicillin (AX) is the most relevant, followed by cephalosporins. Some subjects develop positive responses to several betalactams, mostly within the same family, but others develop a selective response. These are relevant for the appropriate selection of antimicrobial drugs in patients who have immediate hypersensitivity to betalactams.

  2. Penicillin-induced liver injury during treatment for ocular neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Janelle; Zainal, Abir; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-07-07

    A 51-year-old man, homosexual, recently diagnosed with ocular neurosyphilis, presented to the emergency room with a 1-day history of fevers and chills. His vital signs were significant for a temperature of 102.8°F and tachycardia of 125 bpm. The patient had experienced blurred vision in his left eye and was diagnosed with ocular neurosyphilis 10 days prior to the current presentation. He was treated with a 14-day course of high-dose intravenous penicillin and oral prednisone. His laboratory studies were significant for transaminitis, with an aspartate aminotransferase of 1826 U/L, alanine aminotransferase of 1743 U/L, total bilirubin of 1.2 mg/dL and alkaline phosphatase of 68 U/L. After ruling out viral aetiologies and toxin-induced hepatic injury, penicillin was discontinued on the day following admission and transaminases promptly improved with resolution of symptoms. The patient's vision returned to normal within 2 weeks after discharge from hospital.

  3. Penicillin resistance and serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Paulo; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Mocelin, Helena; Dias, Cícero; Ruvinsky, Raúl

    2006-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Strep. pneumoniae) is the main cause of bacterial pneumonia in children less than 5 years of age, with high mortality rates in developing countries. In 1993, the Regional System for Vaccines Group (SIREVA) of the pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) began a study involving six Latin American countries to identify serotypes and their representativity in the new conjugated vaccines, and to determine the degree of resistance to penicillin. Serotypes 14 (highest resistance level), 5, 1, 6A/B, 23F, 7F, 9V, 19F, 18C, 19A, 9N, were prevalent in the region, with some differences among countries. Although resistance to penicillin ranged from 2% (Brazil) to 21.1% (Mexico), studies have shown that pneumonia caused by Strep. pneumoniae with diminished sensitivity to penillin can be treated with this antibiotic. Only 58% of the serotypes isolated in the region studied were represented in the seven-valent vaccine. Continual surveillance is essential to determine which formulation of conjugated vaccine will be suitable for use in Latin America.

  4. Re-Directing CD4(+) T Cell Responses with the Flanking Residues of MHC Class II-Bound Peptides: The Core is Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Holland, Christopher J; Cole, David K; Godkin, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant αβ T cell receptors, expressed on T cell membranes, recognize short peptides presented at the cell surface in complex with MHC molecules. There are two main subsets of αβ T cells: CD8(+) T cells that recognize mainly cytosol-derived peptides in the context of MHC class I (pMHC-I), and CD4(+) T cells that recognize peptides usually derived from exogenous proteins presented by MHC class II (pMHC-II). Unlike the more uniform peptide lengths (usually 8-13mers) bound in the MHC-I closed groove, MHC-II presented peptides are of a highly variable length. The bound peptides consist of a core bound 9mer (reflecting the binding motif for the particular MHC-II type) but with variable peptide flanking residues (PFRs) that can extend from both the N- and C-terminus of the MHC-II binding groove. Although pMHC-I and pMHC-II play a virtually identical role during T cell responses (T cell antigen presentation) and are very similar in overall conformation, there exist a number of subtle but important differences that may govern the functional dichotomy observed between CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of structural differences between pMHC-I and pMHC-II and the molecular interactions with the T cell receptor including the functional importance of MHC-II PFRs. We consider how factors such as anatomical location, inflammatory milieu, and particular types of antigen presenting cell might, in theory, contribute to the quantitative (i.e., pMHC ligand frequency) as well as qualitative (i.e., variable PFR) nature of peptide epitopes, and hence offer a means of control and influence of a CD4(+) T cell response. Lastly, we review our recent findings showing how modifications to MHC-II PFRs can modify CD4(+) T cell antigen recognition. These findings may have novel applications for the development of CD4(+) T cell peptide vaccines and diagnostics.

  5. Pneumococcal septicemia despite pneumococcal vaccine and prescription of penicillin prophylaxis in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, G R; Smith, S J

    1986-05-01

    Although polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine and prophylactic penicillin are used to prevent overwhelming Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in infants and young children with sickle cell anemia, infection rates remain high. We have reviewed our seven-year experience with a regimen of twice daily oral penicillin V potassium prophylaxis in 88 affected children. The median age at the start of prophylaxis was 10 months, and the median duration of prophylaxis was 29 months (range, three months to seven years). The total period of observation of patients who were prescribed penicillin was 248 person-years. Most patients also received one or two doses of polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine. Despite penicillin prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccine, eight episodes of S pneumoniae septicemia have occurred and three have been fatal. Four episodes were in children older than 3 years. Suboptimal compliance with the prescribed oral penicillin regimen was usually apparent. With one possible exception, the infections occurred when penicillin had not been taken during the previous 24 hours. The S pneumoniae septicemia rate in this patient population, 3.2 per 100 person-years, is somewhat less than that described in previous reports of children not receiving penicillin but is still unacceptably high. Vigorous advocacy of a penicillin prophylaxis regimen does not eliminate the risk of pneumococcal septicema in this patient population.

  6. Events leading to cell death and lysis of Neisseria meningitidis in low concentrations of penicillin G.

    PubMed Central

    Neirinck, L G; DeVoe, I W; Ingram, J M

    1980-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis SD1C exhibited a low tolerance to penicillin G (0.03 microgram/ml). Loss of viability in the absence of polyvinylpyrrolidone-40 and horse serum was independent of the concentration of antibiotic above the minimum inhibitory concentration, whereas the rate of bacteriolysis was concentration dependent. Penicillin-induced lysis was a secondary event in this organism. At low levels of penicillin G, growth characteristics, i.e., absorbancy changes, respiratory rate, and uptake of Mg2+, appeared normal during the first 90 min in penicillin; however, viability dropped dramatically. Additionally, total cell numbers remained constant while cell mass continued to increase at a rate normal for the population. The increase in cellular mass in the absence of cell division could be observed microscopically. Only one ultrastructural change induced by penicillin correlated with the loss in viability: the loss in continuity of the outer membrane with the peptidoglycan but only at the site of septum formation. This lesion did not occur when cells were grown in media supplemented with the protective agents polyvinylpyrrolidone-40 and horse serum. Under these conditions of growth and with relatively high levels of penicillin, constant viability was maintained, but cell division no longer occurred. Cell populations treated with penicillin in the presence of the protective agents became increasingly more dependent on the presence of these agents for total viability even in the absence of penicillin in the culture. Images PMID:6772094

  7. 21 CFR 522.1696b - Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. 522.1696b Section 522.1696b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696b Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1696b - Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. 522.1696b Section 522.1696b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696b Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1696b - Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. 522.1696b Section 522.1696b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696b Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1696b - Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. 522.1696b Section 522.1696b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696b Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1696b - Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. 522.1696b Section 522.1696b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696b Penicillin G procaine aqueous suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1696b - Penicillin G potassium in drinking water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. 520....1696b Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. Turkeys—(1) Amount. 1,500,000 units per gallon drinking water for...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1696b - Penicillin G potassium in drinking water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. 520....1696b Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. Turkeys—(1) Amount. 1,500,000 units per gallon drinking water for...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1696b - Penicillin G potassium in drinking water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. 520....1696b Penicillin G potassium in drinking water. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. Turkeys—(1) Amount. 1,500,000 units per gallon drinking water for...

  15. Determination of penicillin G in heavy sow urine using immunochromatographic assay and microbial inhibition swab tests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Penicillin is a commonly used antibiotic in food animals. Unfortunately, violative penicillin residues in animal carcasses are sometimes identified by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. Ante-mortem matrices such as urine could prove valuable for predicting possible violativ...

  16. Suppression of intrinsic resistance to penicillins in Staphylococcus aureus by polidocanol, a dodecyl polyethyleneoxid ether.

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, W; Keppeler, H; Baucks, R

    1985-01-01

    With polidocanol, it was possible to reduce the MIC as well as the MBC of methicillin, oxacillin, penicillin G, and ampicillin against resistant staphylococci. The strongest effects were obtained with methicillin and oxacillin. All strains tested could be resensitized to these penicillins independent of the original resistance levels. Polidocanol was not inhibitory by itself for Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, it did not inhibit the activity of staphylococcal beta-lactamase. This permits the conclusion that an intrinsic resistance mechanism is affected by this substance. Its action cannot be simply explained by an improved accessibility of the penicillin targets as uptake, and binding of methicillin and penicillin G in resistant cells was not changed by polidocanol. On the other hand, the lysis induced by combinations of this substance with small amounts of a penicillin was antagonized by chloramphenicol. This suggests that autolytic enzymes are involved in the polidocanol effect and possibly in the intrinsic resistance mechanism itself. Before polidocanol can trigger lysis, the penicillin must act first in some way. As could be seen with a susceptible strain, the resulting lysis did not exceed that obtained with penicillins alone. Thus, polidocanol does not exhibit an independent lytic mechanism but obviously is able to substitute penicillins in their lytic action. Images PMID:3873904

  17. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  19. Engineering the Substrate Specificity of a Thermophilic Penicillin Acylase from Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Leticia L.; Cantero, Ángel; del Valle, Mercedes; Marina, Anabel; López-Gallego, Fernando; Guisán, José M.

    2013-01-01

    A homologue of the Escherichia coli penicillin acylase is encoded in the genomes of several thermophiles, including in different Thermus thermophilus strains. Although the natural substrate of this enzyme is not known, this acylase shows a marked preference for penicillin K over penicillin G. Three-dimensional models were created in which the catalytic residues and the substrate binding pocket were identified. Through rational redesign, residues were replaced to mimic the aromatic binding site of the E. coli penicillin G acylase. A set of enzyme variants containing between one and four amino acid replacements was generated, with altered catalytic properties in the hydrolyses of penicillins K and G. The introduction of a single phenylalanine residue in position α188, α189, or β24 improved the Km for penicillin G between 9- and 12-fold, and the catalytic efficiency of these variants for penicillin G was improved up to 6.6-fold. Structural models, as well as docking analyses, can predict the positioning of penicillins G and K for catalysis and can demonstrate how binding in a productive pose is compromised when more than one bulky phenylalanine residue is introduced into the active site. PMID:23263966

  20. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms. ...

  3. Engineering the substrate specificity of a thermophilic penicillin acylase from thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leticia L; Cantero, Angel; del Valle, Mercedes; Marina, Anabel; López-Gallego, Fernando; Guisán, José M; Berenguer, José; Hidalgo, Aurelio

    2013-03-01

    A homologue of the Escherichia coli penicillin acylase is encoded in the genomes of several thermophiles, including in different Thermus thermophilus strains. Although the natural substrate of this enzyme is not known, this acylase shows a marked preference for penicillin K over penicillin G. Three-dimensional models were created in which the catalytic residues and the substrate binding pocket were identified. Through rational redesign, residues were replaced to mimic the aromatic binding site of the E. coli penicillin G acylase. A set of enzyme variants containing between one and four amino acid replacements was generated, with altered catalytic properties in the hydrolyses of penicillins K and G. The introduction of a single phenylalanine residue in position α188, α189, or β24 improved the K(m) for penicillin G between 9- and 12-fold, and the catalytic efficiency of these variants for penicillin G was improved up to 6.6-fold. Structural models, as well as docking analyses, can predict the positioning of penicillins G and K for catalysis and can demonstrate how binding in a productive pose is compromised when more than one bulky phenylalanine residue is introduced into the active site.

  4. Correlation Between Growth Inhibition and the Binding of Various Penicillins and Cephalosporins to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John R.; Park, James T.

    1969-01-01

    The concentration of penicillin (or cephalosporin) required to achieve a given rate of binding to Staphylococcus aureus H correlates well with that required for inhibition of growth. This result suggests that the irreversible binding of penicillins and cephalosporins to cells is responsible for their biological activity. PMID:5808073

  5. Amoxicillin and Ceftriaxone as Treatment Alternatives to Penicillin for Maternal Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Katanami, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Takaya, Saho; Yamamoto, Kei; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-05-01

    There is no proven alternative to penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis. We report 2 case-patients with maternal syphilis who were successfully treated without penicillin. We used amoxicillin and probenecid for the first case-patient and amoxicillin, probenecid, and ceftriaxone for the second case-patient.

  6. Evaluation of aerobic co-composting of penicillin fermentation fungi residue with pig manure on penicillin degradation, microbial population dynamics and composting maturity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Juan; Yu, Cigang; Dong, Shanshan; Zhang, Dini; Yu, Ran; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Improper treatment of penicillin fermentation fungi residue (PFFR), one of the by-products of penicillin production process, may result in environmental pollution due to the high concentration of penicillin. Aerobic co-composting of PFFR with pig manure was determined to degrade penicillin in PFFR. Results showed that co-composting of PFFR with pig manure can significantly reduce the concentration of penicillin in PFFR, make the PFFR-compost safer as organic fertilizer for soil application. More than 99% of penicillin in PFFR were removed after 7-day composting. PFFR did not affect the composting process and even promote the activity of the microorganisms in the compost. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that the bacteria and actinomycetes number in the AC samples were 40-80% higher than that in the pig-manure compost (CK) samples in the same composting phases. This research indicated that the aerobic co-composting was a feasible PFFR treatment method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Activity of Ticarcillin Against Anaerobic Bacteria Compared with That of Carbenicillin and Penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ira; Bach, Vinh; Thadepalli, Haragopal

    1977-01-01

    A total of 334 clinical anaerobic isolates were tested in an anaerobic glove box by the agar dilution technique for susceptibility to clinically achievable levels of ticarcillin, carbenicillin, and penicillin. Thirty-two micrograms or less of penicillin per milliliter inhibited 91% of all strains, whereas 100 μg of carbenicillin and ticarcillin per ml inhibited 95 and 98%, respectively. A total of 82% (85 strains) of Bacteroides were inhibited by penicillin, and 93 and 96% were inhibited by carbenicillin and ticarcillin, respectively. Thirteen (24%) of 55 strains of Bacteroides fragilis tested were resistant to 32 μg of penicillin per ml, and 6 (11%) and 3 (5%) were resistant to 100 μg of carbenicillin and ticarcillin per ml, respectively. Within the therapeutic range, ticarcillin was the most effective of the three penicillins tested against B. fragilis subsp. fragilis. PMID:848931

  8. Penicillin decreases chloride conductance in crustacean muscle: a model for the epileptic neuron.

    PubMed

    Hochner, B; Spira, M E; Werman, R

    1976-04-30

    The effects of penicillin were studied on the neuromuscular preparation of the ghost crab, Ocypoda cursor. Penicillin in doses lower than 2 mM reduced both the amplitude of inhibitory junction potentials and conductance increases induced by external application of GABA. The nature of the latter effect appears to be 2-fold, a weaker competitive inhibition and a more powerful non-competitive effech which may be ionophore blockade. Penicillin in concentrations above 2 mM diminished resting conductance, especially that of chloride. The action of penicillin is, in general, to decrease chloride conductance in this preparation. The crustacean neuromuscular preparation may provide a useful analogue for understanding penicillin evoked epilepsy. The reduced chloride conductance could explain decreased inhibition, increased excitation and depolarization shifts in cortical neurons.

  9. Synergy between baicalein and penicillins against penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Minyi; Tang, Shusheng; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Chen, Tingting; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-09-01

    The combination of baicalein (the active constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis) with penicillin G/amoxicillin showed potent synergy against 20 clinical penicillinase-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains including 10 isolates that were additionally methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices of penicillins+baiclein ranged from 0.14 to 0.38. Baicalein protected penicillins (penicillin G and amoxicillin) from penicillinase and increased the susceptibility of penicillinase-supplemented S. aureus ATCC 29213 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of penicillinase activity by baicalein should be responsible for the synergism and protective effect. These findings offer us good evidence that the penicillins combined with baicalein showed potent synergistic activity against penicillinase-producing S. aureus and penicillinase-producing MRSA in vitro and might provide promising implications for clinical treatment of these bacterial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of the Arthrobacter viscosus penicillin G acylase gene in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, H; Katsuta, Y; Nagashima, M; Kamei, T; Yano, M

    1989-01-01

    The penicillin G acylase gene cloned from Arthrobacter viscosus 8895GU was subcloned into vectors, and the recombinant plasmids were transferred into Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis. Both E. coli and B. subtilis transformants expressed the A. viscosus penicillin G acylase. The enzyme activity was found in the intracellular portion of the E. coli transformants or in the cultured medium of the B. subtilis transformants. Penicillin G acylase production in the B. subtilis transformants was 7.2 times higher than that in the parent A. viscosus. The A. viscosus penicillin G acylase was induced by phenylacetic acid in A. viscosus, whereas the enzyme was produced constitutively in both the E. coli and B. subtilis transformants carrying the A. viscosus penicillin G acylase gene. Images PMID:2504107

  11. Peptide-directed self-assembly of functionalized polymeric nanoparticles. Part II: effects of nanoparticle composition on assembly behavior and multiple drug loading ability.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xu; Ding, Xiaochu; Moser, Trevor; Gao, Qi; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Heiden, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Peptide-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles were designed and self-assembled into continuous nanoparticle fibers and three-dimensional scaffolds via ionic complementary peptide interaction. Different nanoparticle compositions can be designed to be appropriate for each desired drug, so that the release of each drug is individually controlled and the simultaneous sustainable release of multiple drugs is achieved in a single scaffold. A self-assembled scaffold membrane was incubated with NIH3T3 fibroblast cells in a culture dish that demonstrated non-toxicity and non-inhibition on cell proliferation. This type of nanoparticle scaffold combines the advantages of peptide self-assembly and the versatility of polymeric nanoparticle controlled release systems for tissue engineering.

  12. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x and Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase activities by ceftaroline.

    PubMed

    Zervosen, Astrid; Zapun, André; Frère, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Although the rate of acylation of a penicillin-resistant form of Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin-binding protein 2x (PBP2x) by ceftaroline is 80-fold lower than that of its penicillin-sensitive counterpart, it remains sufficiently high (k(2)/K = 12,600 M(-1) s(-1)) to explain the sensitivity of the penicillin-resistant strain to this new cephalosporin. Surprisingly, the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase is not very sensitive to ceftaroline.

  13. Bioactive Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H.; Lee, Byong H.

    2017-01-01

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development. PMID:28445415

  14. Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  15. 76 FR 14024 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Risk Assessment: A CGMP Framework...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam... guidance for industry entitled ``Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Risk Assessment: A CGMP Framework.'' This... non- penicillin beta-lactam antibiotics. The draft guidance is intended to assist manufacturers...

  16. 75 FR 35044 - Notice of Approval of a Supplemental New Animal Drug Application; Penicillin G Procaine Suspension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Application; Penicillin G Procaine Suspension AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... for a revised formulation of penicillin G procaine injectable suspension that includes lecithin as a... 6JP, Northern Ireland, filed a supplement to NADA 065-010 for use of NOROCILLIN (penicillin G...

  17. Identification of a group of Haemophilus influenzae penicillin-binding proteins that may have complementary physiological roles

    SciTech Connect

    Malouin, F.; Parr, T.R. Jr.; Bryan, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    (35S)penicillin bound to different Haemophilus influenzae proteins in assays performed at 20, 37, or 42{degrees}C. Penicillin-binding proteins 3a, 3b, 4, and 4' formed a group characterized by their affinity for moxalactam, cefotaxime, and piperacillin. Penicillin-binding protein 4' showed specific properties that may reflect its complementary role in septation.

  18. Utilization of side-chain precursors for penicillin biosynthesis in a high-producing strain of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, S H; Jensen, B; Schneider, I; Kaasgaard, S; Olsen, J

    1994-02-01

    Utilization of the side-chain precursors phenoxyacetic acid (POA) and phenylacetic acid (PA) for penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum was studied in shake flasks. Precursor uptake and penicillin production were followed by HPLC analysis of precursors and products in the medium and in the cells. P. chrysogenum used both POA and PA as precursors, producing phenoxymethylpenicillin (penicillin V) and benzylpenicillin (penicillin G), respectively. If both precursors were present simultaneously, the formation of penicillin V was blocked and only penicillin G was produced. When PA was added at different times to cells that were induced initially for POA utilization and were producing penicillin V, the POA utilization and penicillin V formation were blocked, whereas the cells started utilizing PA and produced penicillin G. The blocking of the POA turnover lasted for as long as PA was present in the medium. If POA was added to cultures induced initially for PA utilization and producing penicillin G, this continued irrespective of the presence of POA. Utilization of POA increased concomitant with depletion of PA from the medium. Analysis of cellular pools from a growing cell system with POA as precursor to which PA was added after 48 h showed that the cellular concentration of POA was kept high without production of penicillin V and at a concentration comparable to the concentration in the medium. The cellular concentration of POA was higher than the concentration of PA that was utilized for penicillin G production.

  19. IgE to penicillins with different specificities can be identified by a multiepitope macromolecule: Bihaptenic penicillin structures and IgE specificities.

    PubMed

    Ariza, A; Barrionuevo, E; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Perez-Inestrosa, E; Ruiz-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez-Guéant, R M; Fernández, T D; Guéant, J L; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2014-04-01

    Quantitation of specific IgE by immunoassay is a recommended in vitro test for the diagnosis of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams (BLs), particularly when skin test results are negative. IgE antibodies that recognize the common nuclear structure of all BLs or the specific side chain structure can be mainly distinguished by immunoassays. The aim of this study was to develop an immunoassay system to detect IgE antibodies with different specificities. Cellulose discs conjugated with benzylpenicillin (BP), amoxicillin (AX) or both drugs, with poly-l-lysine (PLL) as carrier molecule, were used as solid phases in the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Direct and inhibition radioimmunoassay studies were made to verify the structures recognized by serum IgE antibodies from penicillin-allergic patients. Our results indicated that the addition of both haptens did not decrease the capacity to capture IgE when serum specific to either BP or AX was used, at least in terms of sensitivity. In addition, the inclusion of two haptens improved significantly the levels of IgE detection in patients who recognized both BP and AX. Therefore, the use of a solid phase with a carrier molecule conjugated with two determinants (AX and BP) is helpful to recognize IgE antibodies against either of these determinants and is useful for screening sera with different specificities.

  20. A flavivirus protein M-derived peptide directly permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes, triggers cell death and reduces human tumor growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Brabant, Magali; Baux, Ludwig; Casimir, Richard; Briand, Jean Paul; Chaloin, Olivier; Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Chauvier, David; Lassalle, Myriam; Lecoeur, Hervé; Langonné, Alain; Dupont, Sylvie; Déas, Olivier; Brenner, Catherine; Rebouillat, Dominique; Muller, Sylviane; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie; Jacotot, Etienne

    2009-10-01

    Dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus family and are responsible for hemorrhagic fever in Human. Dengue virus infection triggers apoptosis especially through the expression of the small membrane (M) protein. Using isolated mitochondria, we found that synthetic peptides containing the C-terminus part of the M ectodomain caused apoptosis-related mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) events. These events include matrix swelling and the dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Protein M Flavivirus sequence alignments and helical wheel projections reveal a conserved distribution of charged residues. Moreover, when combined to the cell penetrating HIV-1 Tat peptide transduction domain (Tat-PTD), this sequence triggers a caspase-dependent cell death associated with DeltaPsi(m) loss and cytochrome c release. Mutational approaches coupled to functional screening on isolated mitochondria resulted in the selection of a protein M derived sequence containing nine residues with potent MMP-inducing properties on isolated mitochondria. A chimeric peptide composed of a Tat-PTD linked to the 9-mer entity triggers MMP and cell death. Finally, local administration of this chimeric peptide induces growth inhibition of xenograft prostate PC3 tumors in immuno-compromised mice, and significantly enhances animal survival. Together, these findings support the notion of using viral genomes as valuable sources to discover mitochondria-targeted sequences that may lead to the development of new anticancer compounds.