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Sample records for peptide mapping analysis

  1. Mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis and structural characterization of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, C; Klein, J; Post, K; Suckau, D; Schneider, K; Thomas, H; Oesch, F; Przybylski, M

    1990-01-01

    The direct molecular weight determination and structural analysis of polypeptides and peptide mixtures have become amenable by the recent development of fast atom bombardment (FABMS) and 252Cf-plasma desorption (PDMS) mass spectrometry. FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping, i.e., the direct analysis of peptide mixtures resulting from proteolytic digestion, have been developed as powerful methods for the structural characterization of epoxide-metabolizing isoenzymes. The major advantage of this approach is provided by the selectivity of the endoproteolytic cleavage, combined with the specific and accurate molecular weight determination of complex digest mixtures containing peptides up to several thousands daltons in size. Furthermore, the mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis can be combined with a range of protein-chemical modification reactions and with sequential degradation such as by carboxypeptidases. Both FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping have already been successfully applied to the structural differentiation of glutathione transferase and epoxide hydrolase isoenzymes in cases where references sequence data for at least one isoenzyme form was available. In the application described here, for a series of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DDH) isoenzymes with hitherto undetermined primary structures, a direct correlation between the structural differentiation from peptide mapping data and differences in their substrate specificities could be demonstrated. The mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis of isoenzymes proved to be an efficient basis for the elucidation of the structure of one major DDH isoenzyme form; partial sequence data for this protein are reported. PMID:2272334

  2. High throughput peptide mapping method for analysis of site specific monoclonal antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Jia; Liu, Yan-Hui; Richardson, Daisy; Li, Huijuan; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-19

    Oxidation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often occurs on surface exposed methionine and tryptophan residues during their production in cell culture, purification, and storage, and can potentially impact the binding to their targets. Characterization of site specific oxidation is critical for antibody quality control. Antibody oxidation is commonly determined by peptide mapping/LC-MS methods, which normally require a long (up to 24h) digestion step. The prolonged sample preparation procedure could result in oxidation artifacts of susceptible methionine and tryptophan residues. In this paper, we developed a rapid and simple UV based peptide mapping method that incorporates an 8-min trypsin in-solution digestion protocol for analysis of oxidation. This method is able to determine oxidation levels at specific residues of a mAb based on the peptide UV traces within <1h, from either TBHP treated or UV light stressed samples. This is the simplest and fastest method reported thus far for site specific oxidation analysis, and can be applied for routine or high throughput analysis of mAb oxidation during various stability and degradation studies. By using the UV trace, the method allows more accurate measurement than mass spectrometry and can be potentially implemented as a release assay. It has been successfully used to monitor antibody oxidation in real time stability studies.

  3. High throughput peptide mapping method for analysis of site specific monoclonal antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Jia; Liu, Yan-Hui; Richardson, Daisy; Li, Huijuan; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-19

    Oxidation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often occurs on surface exposed methionine and tryptophan residues during their production in cell culture, purification, and storage, and can potentially impact the binding to their targets. Characterization of site specific oxidation is critical for antibody quality control. Antibody oxidation is commonly determined by peptide mapping/LC-MS methods, which normally require a long (up to 24h) digestion step. The prolonged sample preparation procedure could result in oxidation artifacts of susceptible methionine and tryptophan residues. In this paper, we developed a rapid and simple UV based peptide mapping method that incorporates an 8-min trypsin in-solution digestion protocol for analysis of oxidation. This method is able to determine oxidation levels at specific residues of a mAb based on the peptide UV traces within <1h, from either TBHP treated or UV light stressed samples. This is the simplest and fastest method reported thus far for site specific oxidation analysis, and can be applied for routine or high throughput analysis of mAb oxidation during various stability and degradation studies. By using the UV trace, the method allows more accurate measurement than mass spectrometry and can be potentially implemented as a release assay. It has been successfully used to monitor antibody oxidation in real time stability studies. PMID:27432793

  4. Variable major proteins of Borrelia hermsii. Epitope mapping and partial sequence analysis of CNBr peptides

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The variable major proteins (VMP) of serotypes 7 and 21 of the relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii were isolated by detergent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digestion of the isolated VMP yielded two peptides of apparent molecular weights 20,000 (20 K) and 16 K from VMP7, and three peptides of 14.5, 14, and 7 K mol wt from VMP21. Serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies bound in Western blots to one of each of the two or three CNBr fragments from the homologous VMP. A single monoclonal antibody bound to the whole cells, the isolated VMP, and a CNBr fragment of both serotype 7 and serotype 21. (This crossreactive antibody did not, however, bind to any of four other serotypes examined.) Regional conservation of structure between VMP7 and VMP21 was also shown by amino acid sequence analysis of the N-termini of the five CNBr fragments. One pair of aligned fragments from VMP7 and VMP21 had 80% amino acid homology in sequence; a second pair had 40% homology. The partial amino acid homologies between two VMP suggest that these proteins are products of members of a polygene family. PMID:2409197

  5. Computer prediction of peptide maps: assignment of polypeptides to human and mouse mitochondrial DNA genes by analysis of two-dimensional-proteolytic digest gels.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D C; Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Lott, M T; Oliver, N A; McCarthy, J

    1986-04-01

    We have prepared a computer program that predicts complete and partial peptide maps from amino acid sequences. The program fragments amino acid sequences at designated cleavage sites and calculates the molecular weight and relative labeling of each peptide. These data are graphed as log molecular weight of the original protein (X-axis) vs. log molecular weight of the component peptides (Y-axis). The program is interactive, permitting adjustment of a number of graphic parameters and alteration of the position of proteins in the first dimension to accommodate aberrations in protein mobility. The program has been used to predict the V8 protease peptide maps of the 13 open reading frames (ORFs) identified in the human and the mouse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. The results were compared to the V8 protease peptide maps obtained for mouse and human mitochondrially synthesized proteins by two-dimensional proteolytic digest gels. A high correlation was observed between the predicted and observed peptide maps. These results suggest the assignment of several proteins to mtDNA genes.

  6. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  7. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  8. High-resolution Mapping of Linear Antibody Epitopes Using Ultrahigh-density Peptide Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn; Nilsson, Peter; Uhlen, Mathias; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level. PMID:22984286

  9. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface. PMID:26490468

  10. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  11. Data on the peptide mapping and MS identification for phosphorylated peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tu, Zong-Cai; Liu, Guang-Xian; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This article contains peptides mapping, mass spectrometry and processed data related to the research "Identification and quantification of the phosphorylated ovalbumin by high resolution mass spectrometry under dry-heating treatment" [1]. Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) was used to investigate the specific phosphorylation sites and the degree of phosphorylation (DSP) at each site. Specifically, phosphorylated peptides were monitored through mass shift on the FTICR MS spectrum. DSP was evaluated through the relative abundance levels of the FTICR MS spectrometry. From these data, the calculation method of DSP was exemplified. PMID:27274527

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of Peptide-Material Interactions by a Force Mapping Method: Guidelines for Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Oguchi, Masahiro; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jackman, Joshua A; Ogawa, Tetsu; Lkhamsuren, Ganchimeg; Cho, Nam-Joon; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    2015-07-28

    Peptide coatings on material surfaces have demonstrated wide application across materials science and biotechnology, facilitating the development of nanobio interfaces through surface modification. A guiding motivation in the field is to engineer peptides with a high and selective binding affinity to target materials. Herein, we introduce a quantitative force mapping method in order to evaluate the binding affinity of peptides to various hydrophilic oxide materials by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analysis of adhesion forces and probabilities obtained on substrates with a materials contrast enabled us to simultaneously compare the peptide binding affinity to different materials. On the basis of the experimental results and corresponding theoretical analysis, we discuss the role of various interfacial forces in modulating the strength of peptide attachment to hydrophilic oxide solid supports as well as to gold. The results emphasize the precision and robustness of our approach to evaluating the adhesion strength of peptides to solid supports, thereby offering guidelines to improve the design and fabrication of peptide-coated materials.

  13. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  14. Studies on the autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor from human placenta. Analysis of the sites phosphorylated by two-dimensional peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Tavaré, J M; Denton, R M

    1988-01-01

    1. A partially purified preparation of human placental insulin receptors was incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in the presence or absence of insulin. The 32P-labelled insulin-receptor beta-subunits were then isolated, cleaved with trypsin followed by protease V8 and the [32P]phosphopeptides generated were analysed by thin layer electrophoresis and chromatography. This approach revealed that insulin stimulates autophosphorylation of the insulin-receptor beta-subunit in vitro on at least seven tyrosine residues distributed among three distinct domains. 2. One domain (domain 2), containing tyrosine residues 1146, 1150 and 1151 was the most rapidly phosphorylated and could be recovered as mono-, di- and triphosphorylated peptides cleaved by trypsin at Arg-1143 and either Lys-1153 or Lys-1156. Multiple phosphorylation of this domain appears to partially inhibit the cleavage at Lys-1153 by trypsin. 3. In a second domain (domain 3) containing two phosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 1316 and 1322 the tyrosines were phosphorylated more slowly than those in domain 2. This domain is close to the C-terminus of the beta-subunit polypeptide chain. 4. At least two further tyrosine residues appeared to be phosphorylated after those in domains 2 and 3. These residues probably residue within a domain lying in close proximity to the inner face of the plasma membrane containing tyrosines 953, 960 and 972, but conclusive evidence is still required. 5. The two-dimensional thin-layer analysis employed in this study to investigate insulin-receptor phosphorylation has several advantages over previous methods based on reverse-phase chromatography. It allows greater resolution of 32P-labelled tryptic peptides and, when coupled to radioautography, is considerably more sensitive. The approach can be readily adapted to study phosphorylation of the insulin receptor within intact cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3166375

  15. Proteolytic fragmentation and peptide mapping of human carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.C.; Kaufman, B.; Martin, B.M.

    1989-05-15

    Human tracheobronchial mucin was isolated from lung mucosal gel by chromatography on Sepharose 4B in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents, and its thiol residues were carboxyamidomethylated with iodo(1(-14)C)acetamide. The 14C-carboxyamido-methylated mucin was purified by chromatography on Sepharose 2B. No low molecular weight components were detected by molecular sieve chromatography or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents or by analytical density centrifugation in CsCl/guanidinium chloride. After digestion of the purified 14C-mucin with trypsin-L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, three fractions (TR-1, TR-2, and TR-3) were observed by chromatography on Sepharose 4B. TR-1, a 260-kDa mucin glycopeptide fragment, contained all of the neutral hexose and blood group activity and 20% of the radioactivity in the undigested mucin. TR-1 was refractory to a second incubation with trypsin but could be digested by papain or Pronase to a smaller mucin glycopeptide fraction, as judged by the slight decrease in apparent molecular weight on Sepharose CL-4B. These mucin glycopeptides contained approximately 50% of the radioactivity in the TR-1 fraction, indicating that the glycosylated domains of carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin contained thiol residues. The remainder of the radioactivity from papain or Pronase digests of TR-1 eluted, like the TR-3 fractions, in the salt fraction on Sepharose CL-4B. Peptide mapping of the nonglycosylated TR-3 fraction by TLC and high voltage electrophoresis yielded six principal and several less intensely stained ninhydrin reactive components, with the radiolabel concentrated in one of the latter peptides.

  16. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  17. LC-MS/MS Peptide Mapping with Automated Data Processing for Routine Profiling of N-Glycans in Immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavana; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Chen, Louise; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2014-06-01

    Protein N-Glycan analysis is traditionally performed by high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) on fluorescence-labeled glycans enzymatically released from the glycoprotein. These methods require time-consuming sample preparations and do not provide site-specific glycosylation information. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) peptide mapping is frequently used for protein structural characterization and, as a bonus, can potentially provide glycan profile on each individual glycosylation site. In this work, a recently developed glycopeptide fragmentation model was used for automated identification, based on their MS/MS, of N-glycopeptides from proteolytic digestion of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Experimental conditions were optimized to achieve accurate profiling of glycoforms. Glycan profiles obtained from LC-MS/MS peptide mapping were compared with those obtained from HPAEC, RPLC, and HILIC analyses of released glycans for several mAb molecules. Accuracy, reproducibility, and linearity of the LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method for glycan profiling were evaluated. The LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method with fully automated data analysis requires less sample preparation, provides site-specific information, and may serve as an alternative method for routine profiling of N-glycans on immunoglobulins as well as other glycoproteins with simple N-glycans.

  18. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  19. Development of a Novel Peptide Microarray for Large Scale Epitope Mapping of Food Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Ge, Yongchao; Wang, Julie; Bruni, Francesca M.; Fu, Zhiyan; Han, Youngshin; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The peptide microarray is a novel assay which facilitates high-throughput screening of peptides with a small quantity of sample. Objective We sought to use overlapping peptides of milk allergenic proteins as a model system to establish a reliable and sensitive peptide microarray-based immunoassay for large scale epitope mapping of food allergens. Methods A milk peptide microarray was developed using commercially synthesized peptides (20-mers, 3 offset) covering the primary sequences of αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-caseins, and β-lactoglobulin. Conditions for printing and immunolabeling were optimized using a serum pool of five milk-allergic patients. Reproducibility of the milk peptide microarray was evaluated using replicate arrays immunolabeled with the serum pool, whereas specificity and sensitivity were assessed using serial dilution of the serum pool and a peptide inhibition assay. Results Our results show that epitopes identified by the peptide microarray were mostly consistent with those identified previously by SPOT membrane technology, but with specific binding to a few newly identified epitopes of milk allergens. Data from replicate arrays were reproducible (R≥0.92) regardless of printing lots, immunolabeling and serum pool batches. Using the serially diluted serum pool, we confirmed that IgE antibody binding detected in the array was specific. Peptide inhibition of IgE binding to the same peptide and overlapping peptides further confirmed the specificity of the array. Conclusions A reliable peptide microarray was established for large scale IgE epitope mapping of milk allergens and this robust technology could be applied for epitope mapping of other food allergens. PMID:19577281

  20. Functional region identification in proteins by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping using RP-HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Bas J H; Bakx, E J; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-11-14

    A new method was developed to identify regions in proteins from which peptides are derived with specific functional properties. This method is applicable for systems in which peptides of a hydrolyzed protein possess specific functional properties, but are too large to be sequenced directly and/or the peptide mixture is too complex to purify and characterize each peptide individually. In the present work, aggregating peptides obtained by proteolytic hydrolysis of soy glycinin were used as a case study. The aggregating peptides are isolated and subsequently further degraded with trypsin to result in peptides with a mass <5000 Da to enable sequence identification using RP-HPLC-MS in combination with MS/MS. Prior to RP-HPLC the peptides are fractionated using anion and cation exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained are analyzed with RP-HPLC-MS. The peptides, with identified sequences, were quantified using the peak areas of the RP-HPLC chromatograms measured at 214 nm. Next, the peak areas were corrected for the molar extinction coefficient of the individual peptides, followed by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping. The results show that in complex systems, based on the method described, the regions in the parental protein from which the functional peptides originate can be properly identified.

  1. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  2. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts.

  3. PepMapper: a collaborative web tool for mapping epitopes from affinity-selected peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhan; Guo, William W; Huang, Yanxin; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Epitope mapping from affinity-selected peptides has become popular in epitope prediction, and correspondingly many Web-based tools have been developed in recent years. However, the performance of these tools varies in different circumstances. To address this problem, we employed an ensemble approach to incorporate two popular Web tools, MimoPro and Pep-3D-Search, together for taking advantages offered by both methods so as to give users more options for their specific purposes of epitope-peptide mapping. The combined operation of Union finds as many associated peptides as possible from both methods, which increases sensitivity in finding potential epitopic regions on a given antigen surface. The combined operation of Intersection achieves to some extent the mutual verification by the two methods and hence increases the likelihood of locating the genuine epitopic region on a given antigen in relation to the interacting peptides. The Consistency between Intersection and Union is an indirect sufficient condition to assess the likelihood of successful peptide-epitope mapping. On average from 27 tests, the combined operations of PepMapper outperformed either MimoPro or Pep-3D-Search alone. Therefore, PepMapper is another multipurpose mapping tool for epitope prediction from affinity-selected peptides. The Web server can be freely accessed at: http://informatics.nenu.edu.cn/PepMapper/

  4. Mapping the Vif-A3G interaction using peptide arrays: a basis for anti-HIV lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Viard, Mathias; Jacobs, Amy; Miller, Abigail; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeeseong; Blumenthal, Robert; Kotler, Moshe; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-06-15

    Human apolipoprotein-B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts retroviruses, endogenous retro-elements and DNA viruses. A3G plays a key role in the anti-HIV-1 innate cellular immunity. The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G mainly by leading A3G towards the proteosomal machinery and by direct inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Both activities involve direct interaction between Vif and A3G. Disrupting the interaction between A3G and Vif may rescue A3G antiviral activity and inhibit HIV-1 propagation. Here, mapping the interaction sites between A3G and Vif by peptide array screening revealed distinct regions in Vif important for A3G binding, including the N-terminal domain (NTD), C-terminal domain (CTD) and residues 83-99. The Vif-binding sites in A3G included 12 different peptides that showed strong binding to either full-length Vif, Vif CTD or both. Sequence similarity was found between Vif-binding peptides from the A3G CTD and NTD. A3G peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to counteract Vif action. A3G 211-225 inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell culture and impaired Vif dependent A3G degradation. In vivo co-localization of full-length Vif with A3G 211-225 was demonstrated by use of FRET. This peptide has the potential to serve as an anti-HIV-1 lead compound. Our results suggest a complex interaction between Vif and A3G that is mediated by discontinuous binding regions with different affinities.

  5. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  6. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization. Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5% can usually be obtained. PMID:26424264

  7. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  8. Rapid micro-scale proteolysis of proteins for MALDI-MS peptide mapping using immobilized trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobom, Johan; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Ekman, Rolf; Roepstorff, Peter

    1997-12-01

    In this study we present a rapid method for tryptic digestion of proteins using micro-columns with enzyme immobilized on perfusion chromatography media. The performance of the method is exemplified with acyl-CoA-binding protein and reduced carbamidomethylated bovine serum albumin. The method proved to be significantly faster and yielded a better sequence coverage and an improved signal-to-noise ratio for the MALDI-MS peptide maps, compared to in-solution- and on-target digestion. Only a single sample transfer step is required, and therefore sample loss due to adsorption to surfaces is reduced, which is a critical issue when handling low picomole to femtomole amounts of proteins. An example is shown with on-column proteolytic digestion and subsequent elution of the digest into a reversed-phase micro-column. This is useful if the sample contains large amounts of salt or is too diluted for MALDI-MS analysis. Furthermore, by step-wise elution from the reversedphase column, a complex digest can be fractionated, which reduces signal suppression and facilitates data interpretation in the subsequent MS-analysis. The method also proved useful for consecutive digestions with enzymes of different cleavage specificity. This is exemplified with on-column tryptic digestion, followed by reversed-phase step-wise elution, and subsequent on-target V8 protease digestion.

  9. Structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic alanine-rich antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2.

    PubMed

    Migliolo, Ludovico; Felício, Mário R; Cardoso, Marlon H; Silva, Osmar N; Xavier, Mary-Ann E; Nolasco, Diego O; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Roca-Subira, Ignasi; Vila Estape, Jordi; Teixeira, Leandro D; Freitas, Sonia M; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, several peptides have been studied regarding the defence process against pathogenic microorganisms, which are able to act against different targets, with the purpose of developing novel bioactive compounds. The present work focuses on the structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2, designed based on the peptide Pa-MAP from Pleuronectes americanus. For a better structural understanding, molecular modelling analyses were carried out, together with molecular dynamics and circular dichroism, in different media. Antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and positive bacteria was evaluated, as well as cytotoxicity against human erythrocytes, RAW 264.7, Vero and L6 cells. In silico docking experiments, lipid vesicle studies, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging were carried out to explore the activity of the peptide. In vivo studies on infected mice were also done. The palindromic primary sequence favoured an α-helix structure that was pH dependent, only present on alkaline environment, with dynamic N- and C-terminals that are stabilized in anionic media. Pa-MAP2 only showed activity against Gram-negative bacteria, with a MIC of 3.2 μM, and without any cytotoxic effect. In silico, lipid vesicles and AFM studies confirm the preference for anionic lipids (POPG, POPS, DPPE, DPPG and LPS), with the positively charged lysine residues being essential for the initial electrostatic interaction. In vivo studies showed that Pa-MAP2 increases to 100% the survival rate of mice infected with Escherichia coli. Data here reported indicated that palindromic Pa-MAP2 could be an alternative candidate for use in therapeutics against Gram-negative bacterial infections.

  10. Structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic alanine-rich antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2.

    PubMed

    Migliolo, Ludovico; Felício, Mário R; Cardoso, Marlon H; Silva, Osmar N; Xavier, Mary-Ann E; Nolasco, Diego O; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Roca-Subira, Ignasi; Vila Estape, Jordi; Teixeira, Leandro D; Freitas, Sonia M; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, several peptides have been studied regarding the defence process against pathogenic microorganisms, which are able to act against different targets, with the purpose of developing novel bioactive compounds. The present work focuses on the structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2, designed based on the peptide Pa-MAP from Pleuronectes americanus. For a better structural understanding, molecular modelling analyses were carried out, together with molecular dynamics and circular dichroism, in different media. Antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and positive bacteria was evaluated, as well as cytotoxicity against human erythrocytes, RAW 264.7, Vero and L6 cells. In silico docking experiments, lipid vesicle studies, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging were carried out to explore the activity of the peptide. In vivo studies on infected mice were also done. The palindromic primary sequence favoured an α-helix structure that was pH dependent, only present on alkaline environment, with dynamic N- and C-terminals that are stabilized in anionic media. Pa-MAP2 only showed activity against Gram-negative bacteria, with a MIC of 3.2 μM, and without any cytotoxic effect. In silico, lipid vesicles and AFM studies confirm the preference for anionic lipids (POPG, POPS, DPPE, DPPG and LPS), with the positively charged lysine residues being essential for the initial electrostatic interaction. In vivo studies showed that Pa-MAP2 increases to 100% the survival rate of mice infected with Escherichia coli. Data here reported indicated that palindromic Pa-MAP2 could be an alternative candidate for use in therapeutics against Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27063608

  11. Mapping the peptide and protein immune response in the larvae of the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Ciencialová, Alice; Neubauerová, Tereza; Sanda, Miloslav; Sindelka, Radek; Cvacka, Josef; Voburka, Zdenek; Budesínský, Milos; Kasicka, Václav; Sázelová, Petra; Solínová, Veronika; Macková, Martina; Koutek, Bohumír; Jirácek, Jirí

    2008-06-01

    We chose the larvae of fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata to map the peptide and protein immune response. The hemolymph of the third-instar larvae of S. bullata was used for isolation. The larvae were injected with bacterial suspension to induce an antimicrobial response. The hemolymph was separated into crude fractions, which were subdivided by RP-HPLC, gel electrophoresis, and free-flow electrophoresis. In several fractions, we determined significant antimicrobial activities against the pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among antimicrobially active compounds we identified dipeptide beta-alanyl-L-tyrosine, protein transferrin, and two variants of peptide sapecin. We also partially characterized two novel antimicrobially active polypeptides; odorant-binding protein 99b, and a peptide which remains unidentified.

  12. Towards High-throughput Immunomics for Infectious Diseases: Use of Next-generation Peptide Microarrays for Rapid Discovery and Mapping of Antigenic Determinants.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Santiago J; Nielsen, Morten; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Mucci, Juan; Altcheh, Jaime; Balouz, Virginia; Tekiel, Valeria; Frasch, Alberto C; Campetella, Oscar; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-07-01

    Complete characterization of antibody specificities associated to natural infections is expected to provide a rich source of serologic biomarkers with potential applications in molecular diagnosis, follow-up of chemotherapeutic treatments, and prioritization of targets for vaccine development. Here, we developed a highly-multiplexed platform based on next-generation high-density peptide microarrays to map these specificities in Chagas Disease, an exemplar of a human infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. We designed a high-density peptide microarray containing more than 175,000 overlapping 15 mer peptides derived from T. cruzi proteins. Peptides were synthesized in situ on microarray slides, spanning the complete length of 457 parasite proteins with fully overlapped 15 mers (1 residue shift). Screening of these slides with antibodies purified from infected patients and healthy donors demonstrated both a high technical reproducibility as well as epitope mapping consistency when compared with earlier low-throughput technologies. Using a conservative signal threshold to classify positive (reactive) peptides we identified 2,031 disease-specific peptides and 97 novel parasite antigens, effectively doubling the number of known antigens and providing a 10-fold increase in the number of fine mapped antigenic determinants for this disease. Finally, further analysis of the chip data showed that optimizing the amount of sequence overlap of displayed peptides can increase the protein space covered in a single chip by at least ∼ threefold without sacrificing sensitivity. In conclusion, we show the power of high-density peptide chips for the discovery of pathogen-specific linear B-cell epitopes from clinical samples, thus setting the stage for high-throughput biomarker discovery screenings and proteome-wide studies of immune responses against pathogens.

  13. Correlation between the compact regions predicted by the average distance map (ADM) and the biologically active sites in atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T

    1992-10-01

    The prediction of the short-range compact regions of human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP), one of the biologically active peptides, has been made by means of the Average Distance Map(ADM). We found out that the location of the predicted short-range compact regions is consistent with the structural units determined by the NMR analysis (Kobayashi et al., 1988). Furthermore, the short-range compact regions correspond well to the biologically active areas of atriopeptin (103-125)-amide (which is homologous peptide to alpha-hANP), detected by the glycine substitution technique (Konishi et al., 1987). The results suggest that a predicted short-range compact region can be regarded as a possible active site in a biologically active peptide.

  14. Time-Frequency Analysis of Peptide Microarray Data: Application to Brain Cancer Immunosignatures

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Brian; Maurer, Alexander; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    One of the gravest dangers facing cancer patients is an extended symptom-free lull between tumor initiation and the first diagnosis. Detection of tumors is critical for effective intervention. Using the body’s immune system to detect and amplify tumor-specific signals may enable detection of cancer using an inexpensive immunoassay. Immunosignatures are one such assay: they provide a map of antibody interactions with random-sequence peptides. They enable detection of disease-specific patterns using classic train/test methods. However, to date, very little effort has gone into extracting information from the sequence of peptides that interact with disease-specific antibodies. Because it is difficult to represent all possible antigen peptides in a microarray format, we chose to synthesize only 330,000 peptides on a single immunosignature microarray. The 330,000 random-sequence peptides on the microarray represent 83% of all tetramers and 27% of all pentamers, creating an unbiased but substantial gap in the coverage of total sequence space. We therefore chose to examine many relatively short motifs from these random-sequence peptides. Time-variant analysis of recurrent subsequences provided a means to dissect amino acid sequences from the peptides while simultaneously retaining the antibody–peptide binding intensities. We first used a simple experiment in which monoclonal antibodies with known linear epitopes were exposed to these random-sequence peptides, and their binding intensities were used to create our algorithm. We then demonstrated the performance of the proposed algorithm by examining immunosignatures from patients with Glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. Eight different frameshift targets were identified from the random-sequence peptides using this technique. If immune-reactive antigens can be identified using a relatively simple immune assay, it might enable a diagnostic test with sufficient sensitivity to detect tumors

  15. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity. PMID:20622157

  16. Limited proteolysis and peptide mapping for comparability of biopharmaceuticals: An evaluation of repeatability, intra-assay precision and capability to detect structural change.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Camille; Burkitt, Will; Perraud, Xavier; O'Hara, John; Jone, Carl

    2016-05-10

    The use of limited proteolysis followed by peptide mapping for the comparability of the higher-order structure of biopharmaceuticals was investigated. In this approach the proteolysis is performed under non-reducing and non-denaturing conditions, and the resulting peptide map is determined by the samples primary and higher order structures. This allows comparability of biopharmaceuticals to be made in terms of their higher order structure, using a method that is relatively simple to implement. The digestion of a monoclonal antibody under non-denaturing conditions was analyzed using peptide mapping, circular dichroism (CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This allowed an optimal digestion time to be chosen. This method was then assessed for its ability to detect structural change using a monoclonal antibody, which had been subjected to a range of stresses; deglycosylation, mild denaturation and a batch that had failed specifications due to in-process reduction. The repeatability and inter-assay precision were assessed. It was demonstrated that the limited proteolysis peptide maps of the three stressed samples were significantly different to control samples and that the differences observed were consistent between the occasions when the assays were run. A combination of limited proteolysis and CD or SDS-PAGE analysis was shown to enhance the capacity of these techniques to detect structural change, which otherwise would not have been observed.

  17. Improved Methods for the Enrichment and Analysis of Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Schepmoes, Athena A; Brock, Jonathan W; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Purvine, Samuel O; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2008-12-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. Herein we report improved methods for the enrichment and analysis of glycated peptides using boronate affinity chromatography and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, respectively. The enrichment of glycated peptides was improved by replacing an off-line desalting step with an on-line wash of column-bound glycated peptides using 50 mM ammonium acetate. The analysis of glycated peptides by MS/MS was improved by considering only higher charged (≥3) precursor-ions during data-dependent acquisition, which increased the number of glycated peptide identifications. Similarly, the use of supplemental collisional activation after electron transfer (ETcaD) resulted in more glycated peptide identifications when the MS survey scan was acquired with enhanced resolution. In general, acquiring ETD-MS/MS data at a normal MS survey scan rate, in conjunction with the rejection of both 1+ and 2+ precursor-ions, increased the number of identified glycated peptides relative to ETcaD or the enhanced MS survey scan rate. Finally, an evaluation of trypsin, Arg-C, and Lys-C showed that tryptic digestion of glycated proteins was comparable to digestion with Lys-C and that both were better than Arg-C in terms of the number glycated peptides identified by LC-MS/MS.

  18. Immobilized Pepsin Microreactor for Rapid Peptide Mapping with Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ying; Wood, Troy D.

    2015-01-01

    Most enzymatic microreactors for protein digestion are based on trypsin, but proteins with hydrophobic segments may be difficult to digest because of the paucity of Arg and Lys residues. Microreactors based on pepsin, which is less specific than trypsin, can overcome this challenge. Here, an integrated immobilized pepsin microreactor (IPMR)/nanoelectrospray emitter is examined for its potential for peptide mapping. For myoglobin, equivalent sequence coverage is obtained in a thousandth the time of solution digestion with better sequence coverage. While sequence coverage of cytochrome c is lesser than solution in this short duration, more highly-charged peptic peptides are produced and a number of peaks are unidentified at low-resolution, suggesting that high-resolution mass spectrometry is needed to take full advantage of integrated IPMR/nanoelectrospray devices.

  19. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  20. Mechanical force analysis of peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Takeda, Seiji; Kageshima, Masami; Ito, Miyuki; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sekizawa, Kazuko; Miyake, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Some peptides have previously been reported to bind low molecular weight chemicals. One such peptide with the amino acid sequence His-Ala-Ser-Tyr-Ser was selectively screened from a phage library and bound to a cationic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphine (TMpyP), with a binding constant of 10(5) M(-1) (J. Kawakami, T. Kitano, and N. Sugimoto, Chemical Communications, 1999, pp. 1765-1766). The proposed binding was due to pi-electron stacking from two aromatic amino acids of histidine and tyrosine. In this study, the weak interactions between TMpyP and the peptide were further investigated by force curve analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical force required to unbind the peptide-porphyrin complex was measured by vertical movement of the AFM tip. Peptide self-assembled monolayers were formed on both a gold-coated mica substrate and a gold-coated AFM tip. The TMpyPs could bind between the two peptide layers when the peptide-immobilized AFM tip contacted the peptide-immobilized substrate in solution containing TMpyP. In the retracting process a force that ruptured the interaction between TMpyPs and peptides was observed. The unbinding force values correlated to the concentration of TMpyP. A detection limit of 100 ng/mL porphyrin was obtained for the force measurement, and was similar to surface plasmon resonance sensor detection limits. Furthermore, we calculated the product of the observed force and the length of the molecular elongation to determine the work required to unbind the complexes. The obtained values of unbinding work were in a reasonable range compared to the binding energy of porphyrin-peptide.

  1. Screening Method for the Discovery of Potential Bioactive Cysteine-Containing Peptides Using 3D Mass Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Luuk N.; Pieterse, Mervin; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Verhaert, Peter D. E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Animal venoms and toxins are a valuable source of bioactive peptides with pharmacologic relevance as potential drug leads. A large subset of biologically active peptides discovered up till now contain disulfide bridges that enhance stability and activity. To discover new members of this class of peptides, we developed a workflow screening specifically for those peptides that contain inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bonds by means of three-dimensional (3D) mass mapping. Two intrinsic properties of the sulfur atom, (1) its relatively large negative mass defect, and (2) its isotopic composition, allow for differentiation between cysteine-containing peptides and peptides lacking sulfur. High sulfur content in a peptide decreases the normalized nominal mass defect (NMD) and increases the normalized isotopic shift (NIS). Hence in a 3D plot of mass, NIS, and NMD, peptides with sulfur appear in this plot with a distinct spatial localization compared with peptides that lack sulfur. In this study we investigated the skin secretion of two frog species; Odorrana schmackeri and Bombina variegata. Peptides from the crude skin secretions were separated by nanoflow LC, and of all eluting peptides high resolution zoom scans were acquired in order to accurately determine both monoisotopic mass and average mass. Both the NMD and the NIS were calculated from the experimental data using an in-house developed MATLAB script. Candidate peptides exhibiting a low NMD and high NIS values were selected for targeted de novo sequencing, and this resulted in the identification of several novel inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bond containing peptides.

  2. SUPERFICIAL – Surface mapping of proteins via structure-based peptide library design

    PubMed Central

    Goede, Andrean; Jaeger, Ines S; Preissner, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background The determination of protein surfaces and the detection of binding sites are essential to our understanding of protein-protein interactions. Such binding sites can be characterised as linear and non-linear, the non-linear sites being prevailant. Conventional mapping techniques with arrays of synthetic peptides have limitations with regard to the location of discontinuous or non-linear binding sites of proteins. Results We present a structure-based approach to the design of peptide libraries that mimic the whole surface or a particular region of a protein. Neighbouring sequence segments are linked by short spacers to conserve local conformation. To this end, we have developed SUPERFICIAL, a program that uses protein structures as input and generates library proposals consisting of linear and non-linear peptides. This process can be influenced by a graphical user interface at different stages, from the surface computation up to the definition of spatial regions. Conclusion Based on 3D structures, SUPERFICIAL may help to negotiate some of the existing limitations, since binding sites consisting of several linear pieces can now be detected. PMID:16153304

  3. A conventional procedure to reduce Asn deamidation artifacts during trypsin peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Kori, Yekaterina; Patel, Rekha; Neill, Alyssa; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-01-15

    Asn deamidation is a common post-translational modification of proteins with significant biological consequences. Asn deamidation can cause changes in structure, stability and function of proteins. LC-MS peptide mapping is the most widely used method to detect and quantify Asn deamidation. However, a significant amount of deamidation can occur during sample preparation for peptide mapping, making it challenging to accurately determine the original level of deamidation. Although several protocols to reduce procedure-induced deamidation have been reported, they either require special procedural steps or are not optimal for maintaining trypsin activity. In the current study, several commonly used buffers that are optimal for trypsin activity were evaluated. The results demonstrated that much lower levels of Asn deamidation artifacts were observed when Tris buffer was used, especially at lower concentrations. The addition of 10% acetonitrile further reduced the levels of Asn deamidation artifacts. The utility of the optimized procedure was demonstrated by the digestion of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. The proposed procedure can be readily applied to any laboratory settings as it does not require any special reagents or procedures. PMID:26720699

  4. Phage Display and Peptide Mapping of an Immunoglobulin Light Chain Fibril-Related Conformational Epitope†

    PubMed Central

    O’Nuallain, Brian; Allen, Amy; Ataman, Demet; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils and partially unfolded intermediates can be distinguished serologically from native amyloidogenic precursor proteins or peptides. In this regard, we previously had reported that mAb 11-1F4, generated by immunizing mice with a thermally denatured variable domain (VL) fragment of the human κ4 Bence Jones protein Len, bound to a non-native conformational epitope located within the N-terminal 18 residues of fibrillar, as well as partially denatured, Ig light chains (O’Nuallain B. et al. (2006) Biochemistry 46, 1240–247). To define further the antibody binding site, we used random peptide phage display and epitope mapping of VL Len using wild-type and alanine-mutated Len peptides where it was shown that the antibody epitope was reliant on up to 10 of the first 15 residues of protein Len. Comparison of Vκ and Vλ N-terminal germline consensus sequences with protein Len and 11-1F4-binding phages indicated that this antibody’s cross-reactivity with light chains was related to an invariant proline at position(s) 7 and/or 8, bulky hydrophobic residues at positions 11 and 13, and additionally, to the ability to accommodate amino acid diversity at positions 1–4. Sequence alignments of the phage peptides revealed a central proline, often flanked by aromatic residues. Taken together, these results have provided evidence for the structural basis of the specificity of 11-1F4 for both κ and λ light chain fibrils. We posit that the associated binding site involves a rare type VI β-turn or touch-turn that is anchored by a cis-proline residue. The identification of an 11-1F4-related mimotope should facilitate development of pan-light chain fibril-reactive antibodies that could be used in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with AL amyloidosis. PMID:17944486

  5. Shape analysis of counts maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, M. A.; Göring, D.; Stegmann, C.; Mecke, K.

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach for source detection via structural deviations from the typical features of a random background counts map is presented. Minkowski functionals, powerful tools from integral geometry, quantify the shape of level sets of a counts map. Compared to standard techniques, which use the total number of counts only, additional morphometric information is incorporated without the need for any prior knowledge about the source. Minkowski sky maps quantify local structural deviations; they localize and visualize potential sources.

  6. Comparative peptide mapping of adrenergic and cholinergic neutrotransmitter receptors by reverse-HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlavage, A.R.; Fraser, C.M.; Venter, J.C.; Shreeve, S.M.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have developed a methodology for unambiguously identifying neutrotransmitter receptor proteins and comparing structural features of related receptors as well as those in different classes. These techniques have been applied to the study of the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenergic receptors as well as the muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The method involves comparative peptide mapping of total proteolytic digests of receptor proteins by microbore reverse-phase HPLC in conjunction with covalent modification by specific receptor ligands or (/sup 125/I)-labeling. Femtomole amounts of receptor can be analyzed. The maps of all the (/sup 125/I)-labeled receptors contain between 20 and 25 peaks and each receptor has a unique profile although all are similar in the very hydrophobic region of the map. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor from human platelets has a higher total percentage of hydrophilic peaks than either the guinea pig lung ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor or the porcine atria muscarinic receptor. Two forms of the muscarinic receptor have very similar but clearly distinct profiles. The nicotinic receptor subunits show a higher degree of homology by this method than was revealed by previous mapping studies which utilized SDS-PAGE or thin-layer techniques.

  7. Identification of a 34-kD polypeptide as a light chain of microtubule- associated protein-1 (MAP-1) and its association with a MAP-1 peptide that binds to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We examined the association of a 34-kD light chain component to the heavy chains of MAP-1 using a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds the 34-kD component and labels neuronal microtubules in a specific and saturable manner. Immunoprecipitation of MAP-1 heavy chains together with the 34-kD component by the antibody indicates that the 34-kD polypeptide forms a complex with MAP-1 heavy chains. Both major isoforms of MAP-1 heavy chains (MAP-1A and MAP-1B) were found in the immunoprecipitate. Digestion of MAP-1 with alpha-chymotrypsin and analysis of the chymotryptic peptides reveals a 120-kD fragment of the MAP-1 heavy chain that binds to microtubules and is precipitable with the 34-kD light chain antibody, suggesting that the 34-kD light chain also binds to this domain of the molecule. Since microtubules that contain the 120-kD fragment lack the long lateral projections characteristic of microtubules with intact MAP-1, the 34-kD light chains may be localized at or near the microtubule surface. PMID:3512577

  8. How to unveil self-quenched fluorophores and subsequently map the subcellular distribution of exogenous peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Thiebaut, Frédéric; Di Pisa, Margherita; Gourdin -Bertin, Simon; Tailhades, Julien; Mansuy, Christelle; Burlina, Fabienne; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the most popular technique for mapping the subcellular distribution of a fluorescent molecule and is widely used to investigate the penetration properties of exogenous macromolecules, such as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), within cells. Despite the membrane-association propensity of all these CPPs, the signal of the fluorescently labeled CPPs did not colocalize with the plasma membrane. We studied the origin of this fluorescence extinction and the overall consequence on the interpretation of intracellular localizations from CLSM pictures. We demonstrated that this discrepancy originated from fluorescence self-quenching. The fluorescence was unveiled by a “dilution” protocol, i.e. by varying the ratio fluorescent/non-fluorescent CPP. This strategy allowed us to rank with confidence the subcellular distribution of several CPPs, contributing to the elucidation of the penetration mechanism. More generally, this study proposes a broadly applicable and reliable method to study the subcellular distribution of any fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26839211

  9. Monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 Peptides in Solution Adopt Very Similar Ramachandran Map Distributions That Closely Resemble Random Coil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the aggregation and fibrillation of amyloid peptides Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 into amyloid plaques. Despite strong potential therapeutic interest, the structural pathways associated with the conversion of monomeric Aβ peptides into oligomeric species remain largely unknown. In particular, the higher aggregation propensity and associated toxicity of Aβ1–42 compared to that of Aβ1–40 are poorly understood. To explore in detail the structural propensity of the monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides in solution, we recorded a large set of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters, including chemical shifts, nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), and J couplings. Systematic comparisons show that at neutral pH the Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides populate almost indistinguishable coil-like conformations. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectra collected at very high resolution remove assignment ambiguities and show no long-range NOE contacts. Six sets of backbone J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JNCα, and 1JNCα) recorded for Aβ1–40 were used as input for the recently developed MERA Ramachandran map analysis, yielding residue-specific backbone ϕ/ψ torsion angle distributions that closely resemble random coil distributions, the absence of a significantly elevated propensity for β-conformations in the C-terminal region of the peptide, and a small but distinct propensity for αL at K28. Our results suggest that the self-association of Aβ peptides into toxic oligomers is not driven by elevated propensities of the monomeric species to adopt β-strand-like conformations. Instead, the accelerated disappearance of Aβ NMR signals in D2O over H2O, particularly pronounced for Aβ1–42, suggests that intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic regions of the peptide dominate the aggregation process. PMID:26780756

  10. Monomeric Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) Peptides in Solution Adopt Very Similar Ramachandran Map Distributions That Closely Resemble Random Coil.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the aggregation and fibrillation of amyloid peptides Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) into amyloid plaques. Despite strong potential therapeutic interest, the structural pathways associated with the conversion of monomeric Aβ peptides into oligomeric species remain largely unknown. In particular, the higher aggregation propensity and associated toxicity of Aβ(1-42) compared to that of Aβ(1-40) are poorly understood. To explore in detail the structural propensity of the monomeric Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides in solution, we recorded a large set of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters, including chemical shifts, nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), and J couplings. Systematic comparisons show that at neutral pH the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides populate almost indistinguishable coil-like conformations. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectra collected at very high resolution remove assignment ambiguities and show no long-range NOE contacts. Six sets of backbone J couplings ((3)JHNHα, (3)JC'C', (3)JC'Hα, (1)JHαCα, (2)JNCα, and (1)JNCα) recorded for Aβ(1-40) were used as input for the recently developed MERA Ramachandran map analysis, yielding residue-specific backbone ϕ/ψ torsion angle distributions that closely resemble random coil distributions, the absence of a significantly elevated propensity for β-conformations in the C-terminal region of the peptide, and a small but distinct propensity for αL at K28. Our results suggest that the self-association of Aβ peptides into toxic oligomers is not driven by elevated propensities of the monomeric species to adopt β-strand-like conformations. Instead, the accelerated disappearance of Aβ NMR signals in D2O over H2O, particularly pronounced for Aβ(1-42), suggests that intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic regions of the peptide dominate the aggregation process.

  11. Peptide analysis of the transformation-specific antigen from avian sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, J; Erikson, E; Collett, M S; Erikson, R I

    1978-01-01

    Sera from rabbits bearing tumors induced by avian sarcoma virus (ASV) were ussed to immunopecipitate virus-specific proteins from extracts of chicken, hamster, and field vole cells transformed by ASV. Two virus-specific proteins having molecular weights of 76,000 and 60,000 were found in all cell lines examined. The 76,000-molecular-weight protein, Pr76, is the precursor to the internal core proteins of ASV. The 60,000-molecular-weight (60K) transformation-specific antigen from each cell line was subjected to peptide analysis, using chymotrypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. The resulting peptide maps of the 60K protein from the different ASV-infected cell types were similar for each enzyme, strongly suggesting that the 60K protein is virus coded. Two-dimensional analysis of chymotryptic peptides from Pr76 and 60K reveals that 60K is not related to the gs antigen precursor. Radiolabeling of ASV-transformed cells with inorganic phosphate revealed that 60K is phosphorylated in vivo. The 60K proteins isolated from both ASV-transformed chicken and field vole cells were found to contain one tryptic phosphopeptide. The tryptic phosphopeptides of 60K from both cell lines migrated identically upon two-dimensional peptide analyses, and their migration differed from that of the principal phosphopeptide of Pr76. Images PMID:209218

  12. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  13. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well. PMID:23992420

  14. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  15. Mask Analysis Program (MAP) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A document intended to serve as a User's Manual and a Programmer's Manual for the Mask Analysis Program is presented. The first portion of the document is devoted to the user. It contains all of the information required to execute MAP. The remainder of the document describes the details of MAP software logic. Although the information in this portion is not required to run the program, it is recommended that every user review it to gain an appreciation for the program functions.

  16. Enhanced identification of peptides lacking basic residues by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of singly charged peptides.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2012-05-01

    Peptide sequences lacking basic residues (arginine, lysine, or histidine, referred to as "base-less") are of particular importance in proteomic experiments targeting protein C-termini or employing nontryptic proteases such as GluC or chymotrypsin. We demonstrate enhanced identification of base-less peptides by focused analysis of singly charged precursors in liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Singly charged precursors are often excluded from fragmentation and sequence analysis in LC-MS/MS. We generated different pools of base-less and base-containing peptides by tryptic and nontryptic digestion of bacterial proteomes. Focused LC-MS/MS analysis of singly charged precursor ions yielded predominantly base-less peptide identifications. Similar numbers of base-less peptides were identified by LC-MS/M Sanalysis targeting multiply charged precursors. There was little redundancy between the base-less sequences derived by both MS/MS schemes. In the present experimental outcome, additional LC-MS/MS analysis of singly charged precursors substantially increased the identification rate of base-less sequences derived from multiply charged precursors. In conclusion, LC-MS/MS based identification of base-less peptides is substantially enhanced by additional focused analysis of singly charged precursors.

  17. Mapping the interactions between the Alzheimer's Aβ-peptide and human serum albumin beyond domain resolution.

    PubMed

    Algamal, Moustafa; Milojevic, Julijana; Jafari, Naeimeh; Zhang, William; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ self-association and this novel, to our knowledge, function of HSA is of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. It is known that HSA interacts with Aβ oligomers through binding sites evenly partitioned across the three albumin domains and with comparable affinities. However, as of this writing, no information is available on the HSA-Aβ interactions beyond domain resolution. Here, we map the HSA-Aβ interactions at subdomain and peptide resolution. We show that each separate subdomain of HSA domain 3 inhibits Aβ self-association. We also show that fatty acids (FAs) compete with Aβ oligomers for binding to domain 3, but the determinant of the HSA/Aβ oligomer interactions are markedly distinct from those of FAs. Although salt bridges with the FA carboxylate determine the FA binding affinities, hydrophobic contacts are pivotal for Aβ oligomer recognition. Specifically, we identified a site of Aβ oligomer recognition that spans the HSA (494-515) region and aligns with the central hydrophobic core of Aβ. The HSA (495-515) segment includes residues affected by FA binding and this segment is prone to self-associate into β-amyloids, suggesting that sites involved in fibrilization may provide a lead to develop inhibitors of Aβ self-association. PMID:24094411

  18. MapReduce Implementation of a Hybrid Spectral Library-Database Search Method for Large-Scale Peptide Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.; Latt, Benjamin K.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR- MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs.

  19. PepServe: a web server for peptide analysis, clustering and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Alexandridou, Anastasia; Dovrolis, Nikolas; Tsangaris, George Th.; Nikita, Konstantina; Spyrou, George

    2011-01-01

    Peptides, either as protein fragments or as naturally occurring entities are characterized by their sequence and function features. Many times the researchers need to massively manage peptide lists concerning protein identification, biomarker discovery, bioactivity, immune response or other functionalities. We present a web server that manages peptide lists in terms of feature analysis as well as interactive clustering and visualization of the given peptides. PepServe is a useful tool in the understanding of the peptide feature distribution among a group of peptides. The PepServe web application is freely available at http://bioserver-1.bioacademy.gr/Bioserver/PepServe/. PMID:21572105

  20. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors. PMID:26250896

  1. Peptide Map Comparison of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus-Specific Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, Peter; Rowe, David

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of virus-specific protein synthesis in infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV)-infected rainbow trout gonad cells was undertaken to find a relationship between the coding capacity of the virus genome (two segments of double-stranded RNA of 2.5 × 106 and 2.3 × 106 molecular weight) and the sizes and relative amounts of virus-specific proteins. Using polyacrylamide slabgel electrophoresis and autoradiography, eight distinct virus-specific polypeptides were detected in infected, [35S]methionine-labeled cells. These proteins may be grouped into three size classes on the basis of molecular weight: (i) large, α (90,000); (ii) medium, β1 (59,000), β2 (58,000), and β3 (57,000); and (iii) small, γ1 (29,000), γ1A (28,000), γ2 (27,000), and γ3 (25,000). The combined molecular weight of these polypetides (373,000) is beyond the coding capacity of the virus genome. Purified IPNV contained polypeptides α, β3, γ1, and γ1A. Pulse-chase experiments and tryptic peptide map comparisons revealed that only four of the eight intracellular proteins were primary gene products, namely, α, β1, γ1, and β2, with a combined molecular weight of 205,000. Of these primary gene products only the α polypeptide was found to be stable, whereas the other three underwent intracellular proteolytic cleavage during virus morphogenesis. Polypeptide β1 was cleaved to generate β2 and β3; γ1 was trimmed to produce γ1A, and the only nonstructural primary gene product, γ2, was found to be a precursor of γ3. These results suggest that IPNV possesses a unique mechanism to synthesize three size classes of proteins using mRNA transcripts from two high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA genome segments. Images PMID:563479

  2. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  3. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  4. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G. E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de; Hummer, Gerhard E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  5. Identification and mapping of linear antibody epitopes in human serum albumin using high-density Peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lajla Bruntse; Buus, Soren; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a high-density photolithographic, peptide array technology with a theoretical upper limit of 2 million different peptides per array of 2 cm(2). Here, we have used this to perform complete and exhaustive analyses of linear B cell epitopes of a medium sized protein target using human serum albumin (HSA) as an example. All possible overlapping 15-mers from HSA were synthesized and probed with a commercially available polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA antibody preparation. To allow for identification of even the weakest epitopes and at the same time perform a detailed characterization of key residues involved in antibody binding, the array also included complete single substitution scans (i.e. including each of the 20 common amino acids) at each position of each 15-mer peptide. As specificity controls, all possible 15-mer peptides from bovine serum albumin (BSA) and from rabbit serum albumin (RSA) were included as well. The resulting layout contained more than 200.000 peptide fields and could be synthesized in a single array on a microscope slide. More than 20 linear epitope candidates were identified and characterized at high resolution i.e. identifying which amino acids in which positions were needed, or not needed, for antibody interaction. As expected, moderate cross-reaction with some peptides in BSA was identified whereas no cross-reaction was observed with peptides from RSA. We conclude that high-density peptide microarrays are a very powerful methodology to identify and characterize linear antibody epitopes, and should advance detailed description of individual specificities at the single antibody level as well as serologic analysis at the proteome-wide level.

  6. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable. PMID:27418427

  7. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable.

  8. Inhibition of inflammation by a p38 MAP kinase targeted cell permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Meng, Xianmei; He, Junyun; Gu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    p38 MAPK has been the key therapeutic target for multiple inflammation diseases. However, the clinical applications of p38 inhibitors, most of which target on the ATP binding groove in the kinase, have been held back, largely because of their limited specificity and severe side-effects. An alternative strategy to generate highly selective p38 inhibitor is to block the specific interaction in the p38 signal pathway. Based on the hypothesis that specific binding peptides targeting on the docking groove would interfere the intrinsic interaction between p38 and its partners, we have designed a fusion peptide containing 12aa p38 docking sequence derived from MKK3b and 11aa HIV-TAT transmembrane sequence to form a cell permeable peptide. The peptide specifically binds to p38, and aborts its interaction with upstream kinase as well as downstream substrates, and thus to inhibit p38 phosphorylation and its signaling. Furthermore, the induction and secretion of TNFalpha and other inflammatory factors by LPS are blocked in peptide treated cells and mice. Finally the peptide has been shown to significantly inhibit ear oedema in mice. Therefore, the peptide holds great potential as an anti-inflammation agent for the treatment of inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:18991745

  9. Meteorological analysis of MAPS first shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, M.; Newell, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The data from the MAPS radiometer launched on board the first shuttle flight was analyzed. The meteorological data relevant to the MAPS measurements was also analyzed so that the in situ calibration measurements and any anomalous features within the data set can be evaluated in the context of the atmospheric circulation during the period of observation. The three dimensioned isentropic analysis scheme was used as the main analytical tool. A graphical output of the N and delta channel signals, black body reference temperatures, reduced CO concentrations and ground tracks for orbits 15 and 16 were provided. The insentropic trajectory methods was emphasized because it is a basic requirement that the analysis be extended to incorporate daily data within the tropics.

  10. Conformation Analysis of Peptides Derived from Laminin Alpha 1-2 Chain Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironao; Fukuda, Masaki; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Takasu, Masako

    Laminin is one of the components of the basement membrane and has diverse biological activities. Several functional peptides (EF1-EF5) are identified from LG4 modules of laminin alpha 1-5 chains. Thus, we perform conformation analysis of EF1 and EF2 using molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, we perform structure sampling with NPT ensemble (300 K, 1 bar). Our results show that EF1 peptide has β-sheet structure in water, and EF2 peptide does not have. Likewise, the EF2 peptide has unstable structure compared with the EF1 peptide in water.

  11. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells. PMID:25890221

  12. Quality Analysis of Open Street Map Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Li, Q.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, M.

    2013-05-01

    Crowd sourcing geographic data is an opensource geographic data which is contributed by lots of non-professionals and provided to the public. The typical crowd sourcing geographic data contains GPS track data like OpenStreetMap, collaborative map data like Wikimapia, social websites like Twitter and Facebook, POI signed by Jiepang user and so on. These data will provide canonical geographic information for pubic after treatment. As compared with conventional geographic data collection and update method, the crowd sourcing geographic data from the non-professional has characteristics or advantages of large data volume, high currency, abundance information and low cost and becomes a research hotspot of international geographic information science in the recent years. Large volume crowd sourcing geographic data with high currency provides a new solution for geospatial database updating while it need to solve the quality problem of crowd sourcing geographic data obtained from the non-professionals. In this paper, a quality analysis model for OpenStreetMap crowd sourcing geographic data is proposed. Firstly, a quality analysis framework is designed based on data characteristic analysis of OSM data. Secondly, a quality assessment model for OSM data by three different quality elements: completeness, thematic accuracy and positional accuracy is presented. Finally, take the OSM data of Wuhan for instance, the paper analyses and assesses the quality of OSM data with 2011 version of navigation map for reference. The result shows that the high-level roads and urban traffic network of OSM data has a high positional accuracy and completeness so that these OSM data can be used for updating of urban road network database.

  13. Chaotic map clustering algorithm for EEG analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Stramaglia, S.

    2004-03-01

    The non-parametric chaotic map clustering algorithm has been applied to the analysis of electroencephalographic signals, in order to recognize the Huntington's disease, one of the most dangerous pathologies of the central nervous system. The performance of the method has been compared with those obtained through parametric algorithms, as K-means and deterministic annealing, and supervised multi-layer perceptron. While supervised neural networks need a training phase, performed by means of data tagged by the genetic test, and the parametric methods require a prior choice of the number of classes to find, the chaotic map clustering gives a natural evidence of the pathological class, without any training or supervision, thus providing a new efficient methodology for the recognition of patterns affected by the Huntington's disease.

  14. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results.

  15. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  16. [Amino acid composition and peptide maps of udder and serum albumins in lactating and nonlactating cows].

    PubMed

    Lagodiuk, P Z; Klos, Iu S; Charkin, V A; Kisil', I O

    1983-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides of albumin hydrolyzates from the mammary gland and blood serum were studied for lactating and nonlactating (dry, pregnant 1-4.5 and 4.5-9 months) black-and-white cows. Most pronounced difference between the content of certain amino acids of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins are established for lactating cows and least pronounced for nonlactating dry cows. Dactylography detected 55-57 fragments of products resulted from trypsin hydrolysis of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins of the animals under study. Differences are found in the content and mobility of certain peptides. PMID:6829076

  17. Fetal magnetocardiographic mapping using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Comani, S; Mantini, D; Alleva, G; Di Luzio, S; Romani, G L

    2004-12-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is the only noninvasive technique allowing effective assessment of fetal cardiac electrical activity during the prenatal period. The reconstruction of reliable magnetic field mapping associated with fetal heart activity would allow three-dimensional source localization. The efficiency of independent component analysis (ICA) in restoring reliable fetal traces from multichannel fMCG has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we describe a method of reconstructing a complete set of fetal signals hidden in multichannel fMCG preserving their correct spatial distribution, waveform, polarity and amplitude. Fetal independent components, retrieved with an ICA algorithm (FastICA), were interpolated (fICI method) using information gathered during FastICA iterations. The restored fetal signals were used to reconstruct accurate magnetic mapping for every millisecond during the average beat. The procedure was validated on fMCG recorded from the 22nd gestational week onward with a multichannel MCG system working in a shielded room. The interpolated traces were compared with those obtained with a standard technique, and the consistency of fetal mapping was checked evaluating source localizations relative to fetal echocardiographic information. Good magnetic field distributions during the P-QRS-T waves were attained with fICI for all gestational periods; their reliability was confirmed by three-dimensional source localizations. PMID:15712724

  18. Spectral analysis of noisy nonlinear maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Whitson, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    A path integral equation formalism is developed to obtain the frequency spectrum of nonlinear mappings exhibiting chaotic behavior. The one-dimensional map, x/sub n+1/ = f(x/sub n/), where f is nonlinear and n is a discrete time variable, is analyzed in detail. This map is introduced as a paradigm of systems whose exact behavior is exceedingly complex, and therefore irretrievable, but which nevertheless possess smooth, well-behaved solutions in the presence of small sources of external noise. A Boltzmann integral equation is derived for the probability distribution function p(x,n). This equation is linear and is therefore amenable to spectral analysis. The nonlinear dynamics in f(x) appear as transition probability matrix elements, and the presence of noise appears simply as an overall multiplicative scattering amplitude. This formalism is used to investigate the band structure of the logistic equation and to analyze the effects of external noise on both the invariant measure and the frequency spectrum of x/sub n/ for several values of lambda epsilon (0,1).

  19. Magnetic properties and energy-mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongjun; Lee, Changhoon; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Gong, Xingao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-28

    The magnetic energy levels of a given magnetic solid are closely packed in energy because the interactions between magnetic ions are weak. Thus, in describing its magnetic properties, one needs to generate its magnetic energy spectrum by employing an appropriate spin Hamiltonian. In this review article we discuss how to determine and specify a necessary spin Hamiltonian in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations on the basis of energy-mapping analysis and briefly survey important concepts and phenomena that one encounters in reading the current literature on magnetic solids. Our discussion is given on a qualitative level from the perspective of magnetic energy levels and electronic structures. The spin Hamiltonian appropriate for a magnetic system should be based on its spin lattice, i.e., the repeat pattern of its strong magnetic bonds (strong spin exchange paths), which requires one to evaluate its Heisenberg spin exchanges on the basis of energy-mapping analysis. Other weaker energy terms such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin exchange and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, which a spin Hamiltonian must include in certain cases, can also be evaluated by performing energy-mapping analysis. We show that the spin orientation of a transition-metal magnetic ion can be easily explained by considering its split d-block levels as unperturbed states with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as perturbation, that the DM exchange between adjacent spin sites can become comparable in strength to the Heisenberg spin exchange when the two spin sites are not chemically equivalent, and that the DM interaction between rare-earth and transition-metal cations is governed largely by the magnetic orbitals of the rare-earth cation. PMID:23128376

  20. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences of polypeptides from early region 1A of human adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Downey, J F; Evelegh, C M; Branton, P E; Bayley, S T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments exploring the reasons for a multiplicity of products from early region 1A of adenovirus 5 are described. Labeled early region 1A products from wild-type virus were synthesized in infected cells and in a cell-free system programmed with mRNA from infected cells, immunoprecipitated specifically with an antipeptide serum, E1A-C1, directed against the C-terminal sequence of E1A products, and separated by gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional maps of [35S]methionine-labeled peptides were consistent with antigens of 52,000 daltons (52K) and 48.5K being from the 13S mRNA and antigens of 50K, 45K, and 35K from the 12S mRNA. Partial N-terminal sequences of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K synthesized in vitro showed that each of these antigens was initiated at the predicted ATG at nucleotide 560 in the DNA sequence. These results eliminate multiple initiation sites and proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal end as sources of antigen diversity. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences were obtained in a similar way for E1A products from the Ad5 deletion mutant dl1504, which lacks the normal initiator codon. As predicted, these polypeptides are initiated at the next ATG, 15 codons downstream in the wild-type sequence. These results are discussed in relation to Kozak's ribosomal scanning model. Images PMID:6699947

  1. Peptidomics and genomics analysis of novel antimicrobial peptides from the frog, Rana nigrovittata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufang; Liu, Cunbao; Liu, Xiuhong; Wu, Jing; Yang, Hailong; Wang, Yipeng; Li, Jianxu; Yu, Haining; Lai, Ren

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been paid on amphibian peptides for their wide-ranging pharmacological properties, clinical potential, and gene-encoded origin. More than 300 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibians have been studied. Peptidomics and genomics analysis combined with functional test including microorganism killing, histamine-releasing, and mast cell degranulation was used to investigate antimicrobial peptide diversity. Thirty-four novel AMPs from skin secretions of Rana nigrovittata were identified in current work, and they belong to 9 families, including 6 novel families. Other three families are classified into rugosin, gaegurin, and temporin family of amphibian AMP, respectively. These AMPs share highly conserved preproregions including signal peptides and spacer acidic peptides, while greatly diversified on mature peptides structures. In this work, peptidomics combined with genomics analysis was confirmed to be an effective way to identify amphibian AMPs, especially novel families. Some AMPs reported here will provide leading molecules for designing novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19778602

  2. Identification of 2D-gel proteins : a comparison of MALDI/TOF peptide mass mapping to {mu} LC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Hays, L. G.; Eng, J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Giometti, C. S.; Holden, J. F.; Adams, M. W. W.; Reich, C. I.; Olsen, G. J.; Yates, J. R.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Georgia; Univ. of Illinois

    2003-09-01

    A comparative analysis of protein identification for a total of 162 protein spots separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from two fully sequenced archaea, Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, using MALDI-TOF peptide mass mapping (PMM) and mu LC-MS/MS is presented. 100% of the gel spots analyzed were successfully matched to the predicted proteins in the two corresponding open reading frame databases by mu LC-MS/MS while 97% of them were identified by MALDI-TOF PMM. The high success rate from the PMM resulted from sample desalting/concentrating with ZipTip(C18) and optimization of several PMM search parameters including a 25 ppm average mass tolerance and the application of two different protein molecular weight search windows. By using this strategy, low-molecular weight (<23 kDa) proteins could be identified unambiguously with less than 5 peptide matches. Nine percent of spots were identified as containing multiple proteins. By using mu LC-MS/MS, 50% of the spots analyzed were identified as containing multiple proteins. mu LC-MS/MS demonstrated better protein sequence coverage than MALDI-TOF PMM over the entire mass range of proteins identified. MALDI-TOF and PMM produced unique peptide molecular weight matches that were not identified by mu LC-MS/MS. By incorporating amino acid sequence modifications into database searches, combined sequence coverage obtained from these two complimentary ionization methods exceeded 50% for approximately 70% of the 162 spots analyzed. This improved sequence coverage in combination with enzymatic digestions of different specificity is proposed as a method for analysis of post-translational modification from 2D-gel separated proteins.

  3. Analysis of illegal peptide biopharmaceuticals frequently encountered by controlling agencies.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Celine; Janvier, Steven; Desmedt, Bart; Moens, Goedele; Deconinck, Eric; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in genomics, recombinant expression technologies and peptide synthesis have led to an increased development of protein and peptide therapeutics. Unfortunately this goes hand in hand with a growing market of counterfeit and illegal biopharmaceuticals, including substances that are still under pre-clinical and clinical development. These counterfeit and illegal protein and peptide substances could imply severe health threats as has been demonstrated by numerous case reports. The Belgian Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (FAMHP) and customs are striving, together with their global counterparts, to curtail the trafficking and distributions of these substances. At their request, suspected protein and peptide preparations are analysed in our Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL). It stands to reason that a general screening method would be beneficiary in the battle against counterfeit and illegal peptide drugs. In this paper we present such general screening method employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the identification of counterfeit and illegal injectable peptide preparations, extended with a subsequent quantification method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). The screening method, taking only 30 min, is able to selectively detect 25 different peptides and incorporates the proposed minimum of five identification points (IP) as has been recommended for sports drug testing applications. The group of peptides represent substances which have already been detected in illegal and counterfeit products seized by different European countries as well as some biopharmaceutical peptides which have not been confiscated yet by the controlling agencies, but are already being used according to the many internet users forums. Additionally, we also show that when applying the same LC gradient, it is also possible to quantify these peptides without the need for

  4. Analysis of illegal peptide biopharmaceuticals frequently encountered by controlling agencies.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Celine; Janvier, Steven; Desmedt, Bart; Moens, Goedele; Deconinck, Eric; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in genomics, recombinant expression technologies and peptide synthesis have led to an increased development of protein and peptide therapeutics. Unfortunately this goes hand in hand with a growing market of counterfeit and illegal biopharmaceuticals, including substances that are still under pre-clinical and clinical development. These counterfeit and illegal protein and peptide substances could imply severe health threats as has been demonstrated by numerous case reports. The Belgian Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (FAMHP) and customs are striving, together with their global counterparts, to curtail the trafficking and distributions of these substances. At their request, suspected protein and peptide preparations are analysed in our Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL). It stands to reason that a general screening method would be beneficiary in the battle against counterfeit and illegal peptide drugs. In this paper we present such general screening method employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the identification of counterfeit and illegal injectable peptide preparations, extended with a subsequent quantification method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). The screening method, taking only 30 min, is able to selectively detect 25 different peptides and incorporates the proposed minimum of five identification points (IP) as has been recommended for sports drug testing applications. The group of peptides represent substances which have already been detected in illegal and counterfeit products seized by different European countries as well as some biopharmaceutical peptides which have not been confiscated yet by the controlling agencies, but are already being used according to the many internet users forums. Additionally, we also show that when applying the same LC gradient, it is also possible to quantify these peptides without the need for

  5. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  6. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  7. Meta sequence analysis of human blood peptides and their parent proteins.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Peter; Pendrak, Voitek; Zhu, Peihong; Marshall, John G

    2010-04-18

    Sequence analysis of the blood peptides and their qualities will be key to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to error in LC-ESI-MS/MS. Analysis of peptides and their proteins at the level of sequences is much more direct and informative than the comparison of disparate accession numbers. A portable database of all blood peptide and protein sequences with descriptor fields and gene ontology terms might be useful for designing immunological or MRM assays from human blood. The results of twelve studies of human blood peptides and/or proteins identified by LC-MS/MS and correlated against a disparate array of genetic libraries were parsed and matched to proteins from the human ENSEMBL, SwissProt and RefSeq databases by SQL. The reported peptide and protein sequences were organized into an SQL database with full protein sequences and up to five unique peptides in order of prevalence along with the peptide count for each protein. Structured query language or BLAST was used to acquire descriptive information in current databases. Sampling error at the level of peptides is the largest source of disparity between groups. Chi Square analysis of peptide to protein distributions confirmed the significant agreement between groups on identified proteins.

  8. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of β-Defensin Peptides in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jianbo; Li, Diyan; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Fan, Xiaolan; Xu, Huailiang; Yao, Yongfang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate β-defensins comprise an important family of antimicrobial peptides that protect organisms from a diverse spectrum of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoan parasites. Previous studies have shown a marked variation in the number of β-defensins among species, but the underlying reason is unclear. To address this question, we performed comprehensive computational searches to study the intact β-defensin genes from 29 vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of the β-defensin genes in vertebrates identified frequent changes in the number of β-defensin genes and multiple species-specific gene gains and losses that have been occurring throughout the evolution of vertebrates. The number of intact β-defensin genes varied from 1 in the western clawed frog to 20 in cattle, with numerous expansions and contractions of the gene family throughout vertebrates, especially among tetrapods. The β-defensin gene number in a species is relevant to the ever-changing microbial challenges from the environment that they inhabit. Selection pressure analysis shows there exist three amino acid sites under significant positive selection. Protein structural characteristics analysis suggests that structural diversity determines the diverse functions of β-defensins. Our study provides a new perspective on the relationships among vertebrate β-defensin gene repertoires and different survival circumstances, which helps explain how β-defensins have evolved. PMID:26056425

  9. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of β-Defensin Peptides in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jianbo; Li, Diyan; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Fan, Xiaolan; Xu, Huailiang; Yao, Yongfang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate β-defensins comprise an important family of antimicrobial peptides that protect organisms from a diverse spectrum of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoan parasites. Previous studies have shown a marked variation in the number of β-defensins among species, but the underlying reason is unclear. To address this question, we performed comprehensive computational searches to study the intact β-defensin genes from 29 vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of the β-defensin genes in vertebrates identified frequent changes in the number of β-defensin genes and multiple species-specific gene gains and losses that have been occurring throughout the evolution of vertebrates. The number of intact β-defensin genes varied from 1 in the western clawed frog to 20 in cattle, with numerous expansions and contractions of the gene family throughout vertebrates, especially among tetrapods. The β-defensin gene number in a species is relevant to the ever-changing microbial challenges from the environment that they inhabit. Selection pressure analysis shows there exist three amino acid sites under significant positive selection. Protein structural characteristics analysis suggests that structural diversity determines the diverse functions of β-defensins. Our study provides a new perspective on the relationships among vertebrate β-defensin gene repertoires and different survival circumstances, which helps explain how β-defensins have evolved. PMID:26056425

  10. Morphological and Spectral Analysis for the Daedalia Planum Geological Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Carli, C.; Massironi, M.; Sgavetti, M.

    2010-03-01

    Our study has been focused on the Daedalia Planum geological mapping. THEMIS, MOC, HiRISE images were analyzed to perform a stratigraphic and morphological analysis. OMEGA data revealed spectral differences that permitted to improve our mapping.

  11. Tandem MS Analysis of Selenamide-Derivatized Peptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Chen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study showed that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno) phthalimide (NPSP) can be used for selective and rapid derivatization of protein/peptide thiols in high conversion yield. This paper reports the systematic investigation of MS/MS dissociation behaviors of selenamide-derivatized peptide ions upon collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). In the positive ion mode, derivatized peptide ions exhibit tag-dependent CID dissociation pathways. For instance, ebselen-derivatized peptide ions preferentially undergo Se–S bond cleavage upon CID to produce a characteristic fragment ion, the protonated ebselen (m/z 276), which allows selective identification of thiol peptides from protein digest as well as selective detection of thiol proteins from protein mixture using precursor ion scan (PIS). In contrast, NPSP-derivatized peptide ions retain their phenylselenenyl tags during CID, which is useful in sequencing peptides and locating cysteine residues. In the negative ion CID mode, both types of tags are preferentially lost via the Se–S cleavage, analogous to the S–S bond cleavage during CID of disulfide-containing peptide anions. In consideration of the convenience in preparing selenamide-derivatized peptides and the similarity of Se–S of the tag to the S–S bond, we also examined ETD of the derivatized peptide ions to probe the mechanism for electron-based ion dissociation. Interestingly, facile cleavage of Se–S bond occurs to the peptide ions carrying either protons or alkali metal ions, while backbone cleavage to form c/z ions is severely inhibited. These results are in agreement with the Utah-Washington mechanism proposed for depicting electron-based ion dissociation processes. PMID:21953264

  12. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, ‘Chaos Game Representation’. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  13. Autoradiographic mapping of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in human and guinea pig hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, M.O.; Mak, J.C.; Yacoub, M.; Oldershaw, P.J.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid peptide that is a potent coronary vasodilator. Although CGRP is found in high concentrations around coronary arteries, its precise function in the control of coronary vasomotor tone remains unclear. We studied the distribution of specific receptors for CGRP in guinea pig and human hearts and found that the highest concentration of specific receptors for CGRP was in the major coronary arteries, which is consistent with the hypothesis that CGRP is implicated in control of coronary vasomotor tone. Areas of coronary artery with atheroma contained significantly decreased (158 +/- 35 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 3) binding sites compared with binding sites in normal arteries (266 +/- 10 grains/1,000 microns 2 tissue, n = 11; p less than 0.001, t test). The decrease in receptors for CGRP around atheroma may predispose these vessels to coronary spasm.

  14. UAV for landslide mapping and deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Beiqi; Liu, Chun

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can be a flexible, cost-effective, and accurate method to monitor landslides with high resolution aerial images. Images acquired on 05 May 2013 and 13 December 2014 of the Xishan landslide, China, have been used to produce a high-resolution ortho-mosaic of the entire landslide and digital elevation model (DEM). The UAV capability for imaging detection and displacements on the landslide surface has been evaluated, and the subsequent image processing approaches for suitably georectifying the data have been assessed. Objects derived from the segmentation of a multispectral image were used as classifying units for landslide object-oriented analysis. Spectral information together with various morphometric characteristics was applied for recognizing landslides from false positives. Digital image correlation technique was evaluated to quantify and map terrain displacements. The magnitude and direction of the displacement vectors derived from correlating two temporal UAV images corresponded to a visual interpretation of landslide change. Therefore, the UAV can demonstrate its capability for producing valuable landslide mapping data and deformation information.

  15. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  16. 125I-labeled peptide mapping of some heat-modifiable proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J

    1980-01-01

    Gonococci from opaque colonies have cell wall outer membrane proteins that are lacking from organisms which form transparent colonies. These "colony opacity-associated" proteins are among a group of "minor" proteins that exhibit heat modification of their apparent subunit molecular sizes, are easily extracted by deoxycholate, have apparent subunit molecular weights varying from 24,000 to 29,000 and are exposed on the surfaces of gonococci. Other minor proteins found on gonococci are the "leukocyte association proteins," whose presence correlates with reactivities of gonococci with human neutrophils. Several of the colony opacity-associated proteins and leukocyte association proteins were subjected to 125I-peptide mapping of protein bands separated by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The structural similarities and differences among these heat-modifiable surface proteins were studied, as well as their similarities with the major protein of the gonococcal outer membrane. A relatively high apparent degree of structural homology is found among the heat-modifiable proteins from different strains of opaque colony gonococcal forms. There is also some apparent structural homology for 125I-peptides of heat-modifiable versus major proteins of the gonococcal outer membrane. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6769820

  17. Interrelationships of the subgenera of Coryphaenoides (Teleostei: Gadiformes: Macrouridae): synthesis of allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Raymond R; Attia, Phoebe

    2003-05-01

    DNA sequences of the 12s rRNA mitochondrial gene from 12 species key to the question of the monophyly of the deep-sea fish genus Coryphaenoides (Macrouridae) were analyzed phylogenetically using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood. The results were compared with those of three previous studies in which allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data were similarly analyzed. The allozyme and DNA sequence data suggested that the largest subgenus (Coryphaenoides), which contained most of the species inhabiting continental slopes between approximately 600 and 2000m depth, is monophyletic. Two of the three subgenera containing the species inhabiting abyssal ocean basins below approximately 2000m together formed a sister group to subgenus Coryphaenoides. The macrourids of the abyssal basins and those of the continental slopes thus appear to have experienced separate radiations from a common ancestor. PMID:12695096

  18. Mapping of a cholinergic binding site by means of synthetic peptides, monoclonal antibodies, and. alpha. -bungarotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Conti-Tronconi, B.M.; Tang, Fen; Diethelm, B.M.; Spencer, S.R. ); Reinhardt-Maelicke, S.; Maelicke, A. )

    1990-07-03

    Previous studies by several laboratories have identified a narrow sequence region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) {alpha} subunit, flanking the cysteinyl residues at positions 192 and 193, as containing major elements of, if not all, the binding site for cholinergic ligands. In the present study, the authors used a panel of synthetic peptides as representative structural elements of the AChR to investigate whether additional segments of the AChR sequences are able to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) and several {alpha}-BTX-competitive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The mAbs used (WF6, WF5, and W2) were raised against native Torpedo AChR, specifically recognize the {alpha}-subunit, and bind to AChR in a mutually exclusive fashion with {alpha}-BTX. The binding of WF5 and W2 to Torpedo AChR is inhibited by all cholinergic ligands. WF6 competes with agonists, but not with low mol. wt. antagonists, for AChR binding. Peptides {alpha}181-200 and {alpha}55-74 both inhibited binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX to native Torpedo AChR. None of the peptides corresponding to sequence segments from other subunits bound {alpha}-BTX or WF6, or interfered with their binding. Therefore, the cholinergic binding site is not a single narrow sequence region, but rather two or more discontinuous sequence segments within the N-terminal extracellular region of the AChR {alpha} subunit, folded together in the native structure of the receptor, contribute to form a cholinergic binding region.

  19. Human hair neutron activation analysis: Analysis on population level, mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, L. I.; Kist, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is an outstanding analytical method having very wide applications in various fields. Analysis of human hair within last decades mostly based on neutron activation analysis is a very attractive illustration of the application of nuclear analytical techniques. Very interesting question is how the elemental composition differs in different areas or cities. In this connection the present paper gives average data and maps of various localities in the vicinity of drying-out Aral Sea and of various industrial cities in Central Asia.

  20. Analysis of food proteins and peptides by mass spectrometry-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Caira, Simonetta; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale

    2009-10-23

    Mass spectrometry has arguably become the core technology for the characterization of food proteins and peptides. The application of mass spectrometry-based techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the complex protein mixtures contained in most food preparations is playing a decisive role in the understanding of their nature, structure, functional properties and impact on human health. The application of mass spectrometry to protein analysis has been revolutionized in the recent years by the development of soft ionization techniques such as electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization, and by the introduction of multi-stage and 'hybrid' analyzers able to generate de novo amino acid sequence information. The interfacing of mass spectrometry with protein databases has resulted in entirely new possibilities of protein characterization, including the high sensitivity mapping (femtomole to attomole levels) of post-translational and other chemical modifications, protein conformations and protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, and in general for proteomic studies, building up the core platform of modern proteomic science. MS-based strategies to food and nutrition proteomics are now capable to address a wide range of analytical questions which include issues related to food quality and safety, certification and traceability of (typical) products, and to the definition of the structure/function relationship of food proteins and peptides. These different aspects are necessarily interconnected and can be effectively understood and elucidated only by use of integrated, up-to-date analytical approaches. In this review, the main aspects of current and perspective applications of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies to the structural characterization of food proteins are presented, with focus on issues related to their detection, identification, and quantification, relevant for their biochemical, technological and

  1. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  2. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes.

  3. Mapping a Noncovalent Protein-Peptide Interface by Top-Down FTICR Mass Spectrometry Using Electron Capture Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David J.; Murray, Euan; Hupp, Ted; Mackay, C. Logan; Langridge-Smith, Pat R. R.

    2011-08-01

    Noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes are readily detected using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). Furthermore, recent reports have demonstrated that careful use of electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allows covalent backbone bonds of protein complexes to be dissociated without disruption of noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. In this way the site of protein-ligand interfaces can be identified. To date, protein-ligand complexes, which have proven tractable to this technique, have been mediated by ionic electrostatic interactions, i.e., ion pair interactions or salt bridging. Here we extend this methodology by applying ECD to study a protein-peptide complex that contains no electrostatics interactions. We analyzed the complex between the 21 kDa p53-inhibitor protein anterior gradient-2 and its hexapeptide binding ligand (PTTIYY). ECD fragmentation of the 1:1 complex occurs with retention of protein-peptide binding and analysis of the resulting fragments allows the binding interface to be localized to a C-terminal region between residues 109 and 175. These finding are supported by a solution-phase competition assay, which implicates the region between residues 108 and 122 within AGR2 as the PTTIYY binding interface. Our study expands previous findings by demonstrating that top-down ECD mass spectrometry can be used to determine directly the sites of peptide-protein interfaces. This highlights the growing potential of using ECD and related top-down fragmentation techniques for interrogation of protein-protein interfaces.

  4. Capillary electrochromatography analysis of hormonal cyclic and linear peptides.

    PubMed

    Walhagen, K; Unger, K K; Hearn, M T

    2001-10-15

    The retention behavior of linear and cyclic peptides has been studied by capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with a variety of different n-alkyl silica reversed-phase sorbents and also with mixed-mode phases containing both strong cation-exchange (sulfonic acid) and n-alkyl groups bonded onto the silica surface, using eluents ranging from pH 2.0 to pH 5.0. Depending upon the amino acid sequence, electrochromatographic retention of the peptides was strongly affected by the composition of the eluent, its pH value, and the choice of sorbent packed into the capillaries. The dominant separation processes operating with these charged analytes could be modulated inter alia by the content of organic modifier, acetonitrile, in the eluent, with peptide resolution predominantly arising from electrophoretic migration processes at high acetonitrile content. As the concentration of acetonitrile was decreased, chromatographic retention processes became more pronounced. With the n-alkyl silica CEC columns used in this study, silanophilic interactions between the sorbents and the charged peptides could be suppressed by increasing the molarity of the buffer and by adjusting the pH of the eluent to lower values. On the other hand, electrostatic interactions between basic peptides and the surface of strong cation-exchanger, mixed-mode materials can be suppressed at low pH values by using higher ionic strength conditions in the eluent. Different selectivity behavior was achieved with desmopressin and the other peptides with Spherisorb C18/SCX and Hypersil mixed-mode materials when an identical eluent composition of 60% (v/v) acetonitrile with 7.6 mM triethylammonium phosphate, pH 3.0, was used. These findings confirm that the surface charge density of the sorbent fulfills an important role in the modulation of peptide selectivity in CEC. These studies also confirm that the dependency of the logarithm of the CEC retention coefficients, i.e., log Kcec, of a peptide separated with n

  5. Enrichment/isolation of phosphorylated peptides on hafnium oxide prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, José G; Choi, Yong Seok; Vujcic, Stefan; Wood, Troy D; Colón, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (hafnia) exhibits unique enrichment properties towards phosphorylated peptides that are complementary to those of titanium oxide (titania) and zirconium oxide (zirconia) for use with mass spectrometric analysis in the field of proteomics.

  6. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  7. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer: Software for quantitative analysis of sketch maps.

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2016-03-01

    Sketch maps are effective tools for assessing spatial memory. However, despite their widespread use in cognitive science research, sketch map analysis techniques remain unstandardized and carry limitations. In the present article, we present the Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer (GMDA), an open-source software package for sketch map analysis. GMDA combines novel and established analysis techniques into a graphical user interface that permits rapid computational sketch map analysis. GMDA calculates GMDA-unique measures based on pairwise comparisons between landmarks, as well as bidimensional regression parameters (Friedman & Kohler, 2003), which together reflect sketch map quality at two levels: configural and individual landmark. The configural measures assess the overall landmark configuration and provide a whole-map analysis. Individual landmark measures, introduced in GMDA, assess individual landmark placement and indicate how individual landmarks contribute to the configural scores. Together, these measures provide a more complete psychometric picture of sketch map analysis, allowing for comparisons between sketch maps and between landmarks. The calculated measures reflect specific and cognitively relevant aspects of interlandmark spatial relationships, including distance and angular representation. GMDA supports complex environments (up to 48 landmarks) and two software modes that capture aspects of maps not addressed by existing techniques, such as landmark size and shape variation and interlandmark containment relationships. We describe the software and its operation and present a formal specification of calculation procedures for its unique measures. We then validate the software by demonstrating the capabilities and reliability of its measures using simulation and experimental data. The most recent version of GMDA is available at www.aarongardony.com/tools/map-drawing-analyzer.

  9. Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer: Software for quantitative analysis of sketch maps.

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2016-03-01

    Sketch maps are effective tools for assessing spatial memory. However, despite their widespread use in cognitive science research, sketch map analysis techniques remain unstandardized and carry limitations. In the present article, we present the Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer (GMDA), an open-source software package for sketch map analysis. GMDA combines novel and established analysis techniques into a graphical user interface that permits rapid computational sketch map analysis. GMDA calculates GMDA-unique measures based on pairwise comparisons between landmarks, as well as bidimensional regression parameters (Friedman & Kohler, 2003), which together reflect sketch map quality at two levels: configural and individual landmark. The configural measures assess the overall landmark configuration and provide a whole-map analysis. Individual landmark measures, introduced in GMDA, assess individual landmark placement and indicate how individual landmarks contribute to the configural scores. Together, these measures provide a more complete psychometric picture of sketch map analysis, allowing for comparisons between sketch maps and between landmarks. The calculated measures reflect specific and cognitively relevant aspects of interlandmark spatial relationships, including distance and angular representation. GMDA supports complex environments (up to 48 landmarks) and two software modes that capture aspects of maps not addressed by existing techniques, such as landmark size and shape variation and interlandmark containment relationships. We describe the software and its operation and present a formal specification of calculation procedures for its unique measures. We then validate the software by demonstrating the capabilities and reliability of its measures using simulation and experimental data. The most recent version of GMDA is available at www.aarongardony.com/tools/map-drawing-analyzer. PMID:25673320

  10. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  12. Analysis of peptides in prohormone convertase 1/3 null mouse brain using quantitative peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Jonathan H.; Zhang, Xin; Gagnon, Sandra; Castro, Leandro M.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Steiner, Donald F.; Day, Robert; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides are produced from larger precursors by limited proteolysis, first by endopeptidases and then by carboxypeptidases. Major endopeptidases required for these cleavages include prohormone convertase (PC) 1/3 and PC2. In the present study, quantitative peptidomics analysis was used to characterize the specific role PC1/3 plays in this process. Peptides isolated from hypothalamus, amygdala, and striatum of PC1/3 null mice were compared to those from heterozygous and wild-type mice. Extracts were labeled with stable isotopic tags and fractionated by HPLC, after which relative peptide levels were determined using tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 92 peptides were found, of which 35 were known neuropeptides or related peptides derived from 15 distinct secretory pathway proteins: 7B2, chromogranin A and B, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, procholecystokinin, proenkephalin, promelanin concentrating hormone, proneurotensin, propituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, proSAAS, prosomatosatin, provasoactive intestinal peptide, provasopressin, secretogranin III, and VGF. Among the peptides derived from these proteins, ~1/3 were decreased in the PC1/3 null mice relative to wild-type mice, ~1/3 showed no change, and ~1/3 increased in PC1/3 null. Cleavage sites were analyzed in peptides that showed no change or that decreased in PC1/3 mice, and these results were compared with peptides that showed no change or decreased in previous peptidomic studies with PC2 null mice. Analysis of these sites showed that while PC1/3 and PC2 have overlapping substrate preferences, there are particular cleavage site residues that distinguish peptides preferred by each PC. PMID:20412386

  13. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  14. Analysis of amino-terminal variants of amyloid-β peptides by capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Haußmann, Ute; Jahn, Olaf; Linning, Philipp; Janßen, Christin; Liepold, Thomas; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Bauer, Chris; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Klafki, Hans; Wiltfang, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Here we present a novel assay for the separation and detection of amino-terminal amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide variants by capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) immunoassay. Specific amino-terminally truncated Aβ peptides appear to be generated by β-secretase (BACE1)-independent mechanisms and have previously been observed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after BACE1 inhibitor treatment in an animal model. CIEF immunoassay sensitivity is sufficient to detect total Aβ in CSF without preconcentration. To analyze low-abundance amino-terminally truncated Aβ peptides from cell culture supernatants, we developed a CIEF-compatible immunoprecipitation protocol, allowing for selective elution of Aβ peptides with very low background. CIEF immunoassay and immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry analysis identified peptides starting at residue Arg(5) as the main amino-terminal Aβ variants produced in the presence of tripartite BACE1 inhibitor in our cell culture model. The CIEF immunoassay allows for robust relative quantification of Aβ peptide patterns in biological samples. To assess the future possibility of absolute quantification, we have prepared the Aβ peptides Aβ(x-10), Aβ(x-16), and Aβ(5-38(D23S)) by using solid phase peptide synthesis as internal standards for the CIEF immunoassay.

  15. Engineering and analysis of peptide-recognition domain specificities by phage display and deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Megan E; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2013-01-01

    Protein interaction networks depend in part on the specific recognition of unstructured peptides by folded domains. Understanding how members of a domain family use a similar fold to recognize different peptide sequences selectively is a fundamental question. One way to advance our understanding of peptide recognition is to apply an existing model of peptide recognition for a particular domain toward engineering synthetic domain variants with desired properties. Successes, failures, and unintended outcomes can help refine the model and can illuminate more general principles of peptide recognition. Using the PDZ domain fold as an example, we describe methods for (1) structure-based combinatorial library design and directed evolution of domain variants and (2) specificity profiling of large repertoires of synthetic variants using multiplexed deep sequencing. Peptide-binding preferences for hundreds of variants can be decoded in parallel, enabling comparisons between different library designs and selection pressures. The tremendous depth of coverage of the binding peptide profiles also permits robust computational analysis. This approach to studying peptide recognition can be applied to other domains and to a variety of structural and functional models by tailoring the combinatorial library design and selection pressures accordingly.

  16. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions.

  17. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions. PMID:15187128

  18. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed "maps," which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm-1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  19. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J. K.; Roy, S.; Skinner, J. L.; Zabuga, A. V.; Rizzo, T. R.

    2014-06-14

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala){sub 5}-Lys-H{sup +} in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly {sup 13}C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and {sup 13}C{sup 18}O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm{sup −1} for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  20. Recent trends in the analysis of bioactive peptides in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    Food-derived constituents represent important sources of several classes of bioactive compounds. Among them peptides have gained great attention in the last two decades thanks to the scientific evidence of their beneficial effects on health in addition to their established nutritional value. Several functionalities for bioactive peptides have been described, including antioxidative, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and antimicrobial activity. They are now considered as novel and potential dietary ingredients to promote human health, though in some cases they may also have detrimental effects on health. Bioactive peptides can be naturally occurring, produced in vitro by enzymatic hydrolysis, and formed in vivo during gastrointestinal digestion of proteins. Thus, the need to gain a better understanding of the positive health effects of food peptides has prompted the development of analytical strategies for their isolation, separation, and identification in complex food matrices. Dairy products and milk are potential sources of bioactive peptides: several of them possess extra-nutritional physiological functions that qualify them to be classified under the functional food label. In this trends article we briefly describe the state-of-the-art of peptidomics methods for the identification and discovery of bioactive peptides, also considering recent progress in their analysis and highlighting the difficulty in the analysis of short amino acid sequences and endogenous peptides.

  1. A peptide N-terminal protection strategy for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis using hydrazide chemistry based method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Guang; Mao, Jiawei; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Zhang; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Fangjun; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-05-11

    Enrichment of glycopeptides by hydrazide chemistry (HC) is a popular method for glycoproteomics analysis. However, possible side reactions of peptide backbones during the glycan oxidation in this method have not been comprehensively studied. Here, we developed a proteomics approach to locate such side reactions and found several types of the side reactions that could seriously compromise the performance of glycoproteomics analysis. Particularly, the HC method failed to identify N-terminal Ser/Thr glycopeptides because the oxidation of vicinal amino alcohol on these peptides generates aldehyde groups and after they are covalently coupled to HC beads, these peptides cannot be released by PNGase F for identification. To overcome this drawback, we apply a peptide N-terminal protection strategy in which primary amine groups on peptides are chemically blocked via dimethyl labeling, thus the vicinal amino alcohols on peptide N-termini are eliminated. Our results showed that this strategy successfully prevented the oxidation of peptide N-termini and significantly improved the coverage of glycoproteome.

  2. A peptide N-terminal protection strategy for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis using hydrazide chemistry based method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Guang; Mao, Jiawei; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Zhang; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Fangjun; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of glycopeptides by hydrazide chemistry (HC) is a popular method for glycoproteomics analysis. However, possible side reactions of peptide backbones during the glycan oxidation in this method have not been comprehensively studied. Here, we developed a proteomics approach to locate such side reactions and found several types of the side reactions that could seriously compromise the performance of glycoproteomics analysis. Particularly, the HC method failed to identify N-terminal Ser/Thr glycopeptides because the oxidation of vicinal amino alcohol on these peptides generates aldehyde groups and after they are covalently coupled to HC beads, these peptides cannot be released by PNGase F for identification. To overcome this drawback, we apply a peptide N-terminal protection strategy in which primary amine groups on peptides are chemically blocked via dimethyl labeling, thus the vicinal amino alcohols on peptide N-termini are eliminated. Our results showed that this strategy successfully prevented the oxidation of peptide N-termini and significantly improved the coverage of glycoproteome. PMID:25959593

  3. Mapping of the Signal Peptide-Binding Domain of Escherichia coli SecA Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer†

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Sarah M.; Moses, Julia P.; Musial-Siwek, Monika; Kendall, Debra A.; Oliver, Donald B.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the signal peptide-binding domain within SecA ATPase is an important goal for understanding the molecular basis of SecA preprotein recognition as well as elucidating the chemo-mechanical cycle of this nanomotor during protein translocation. In this study, Förster resonance energy transfer methodology was employed to map the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding domain using a collection of functional monocysteine SecA mutants and alkaline phosphatase signal peptides labeled with appropriate donor–acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements yielded an equilibrium binding constant of 1.4 or 10.7 μM for the alkaline phosphatase signal peptide labeled at residue 22 or 2, respectively, with SecA, and a binding stoichiometry of one signal peptide bound per SecA monomer. Binding affinity measurements performed with a monomer-biased mutant indicate that the signal peptide binds equally well to SecA monomer or dimer. Distance measurements determined for 13 SecA mutants show that the SecA signal peptide-binding domain encompasses a portion of the preprotein cross-linking domain but also includes regions of nucleotide-binding domain 1 and particularly the helical scaffold domain. The identified region lies at a multidomain interface within the heart of SecA, surrounded by and potentially responsive to domains important for binding nucleotide, mature portions of the preprotein, and the SecYEG channel. Our FRET-mapped binding domain, in contrast to the domain identified by NMR spectroscopy, includes the two-helix finger that has been shown to interact with the preprotein during translocation and lies at the entrance to the protein-conducting channel in the recently determined SecA–SecYEG structure. PMID:20025247

  4. Landform Mapping Using Multiscale Topographic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Many ecological and agricultural processes depend on topographic relationships. Topography strongly influences microclimate, the types and productivity of plants, biomass, evapotranspiration rates, carbon storage rates, and fire fuel accumulation. These factors in turn influence the water cycle, stream flow, water quality, and soil formation. Most previous topographic analysis methods have focused on the elevation of a given grid cell (pixel) and very localized measures of slope and aspect (e.g., computed from elevation in a 3x3 window). Some measures have moved beyond a strictly local relationship, such as the compound topographic index, which can be used as a soil wetness index. I introduce a new method of multiscale topographic analysis which can be applied to digital elevation model (DEM) data of any resolution. The method calculates slope and curvature (change of slope) of the land not only in relation to adjacent grid cells but also for much larger distances downstream. The algorithm uses a flow direction grid to create a synthetic stream network as a set of connected line segments (a vector dataset). The multiscale measures are stored on a node attribute table, where the nodes are the endpoints of line segments connecting the original DEM grid cells. A pointer is computed for directly accessing data for nodes at selected distances down the stream network. Baseline distances are selected by counting cells down the flow path by each power of two (1, 2, 4, 8, ... cells downstream). Slope and curvature measures are defined for each of these baselines and are queried to distinguish multiscale topographic characteristics. Several applications of these methods have been tested. A floodplain measure identifies areas that are relatively low on the landscape, even as elevation changes while moving from plains into hills or mountains (study area: South Dakota). The landscape may be partitioned to provide zones for ecological analysis, including selection of field

  5. An Analysis of the Sensitivity of Proteogenomic Mapping of Somatic Mutations and Novel Splicing Events in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, Kelly V; Tang, Zuojian; Wang, Xuya; Grover, Himanshu; Askenazi, Manor; Teubl, Jennifer; Cao, Song; McLellan, Michael D; Clauser, Karl R; Tabb, David L; Mertins, Philipp; Slebos, Robbert; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Li, Shunqiang; Gunawardena, Harsha P; Xie, Ling; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Sun, Shisheng; Hoadley, Katherine A; Perou, Charles M; Chen, Xian; Davies, Sherri R; Maher, Christopher A; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rodland, Karen D; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Ding, Li; Townsend, R Reid; Rodriguez, Henry; Chan, Daniel; Smith, Richard D; Liebler, Daniel C; Carr, Steven A; Payne, Samuel; Ellis, Matthew J; Fenyő, David

    2016-03-01

    Improvements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing provide a new opportunity to determine whether polymorphisms, mutations, and splice variants identified in cancer cells are translated. Herein, we apply a proteogenomic data integration tool (QUILTS) to illustrate protein variant discovery using whole genome, whole transcriptome, and global proteome datasets generated from a pair of luminal and basal-like breast-cancer-patient-derived xenografts (PDX). The sensitivity of proteogenomic analysis for singe nucleotide variant (SNV) expression and novel splice junction (NSJ) detection was probed using multiple MS/MS sample process replicates defined here as an independent tandem MS experiment using identical sample material. Despite analysis of over 30 sample process replicates, only about 10% of SNVs (somatic and germline) detected by both DNA and RNA sequencing were observed as peptides. An even smaller proportion of peptides corresponding to NSJ observed by RNA sequencing were detected (<0.1%). Peptides mapping to DNA-detected SNVs without a detectable mRNA transcript were also observed, suggesting that transcriptome coverage was incomplete (∼80%). In contrast to germline variants, somatic variants were less likely to be detected at the peptide level in the basal-like tumor than in the luminal tumor, raising the possibility of differential translation or protein degradation effects. In conclusion, this large-scale proteogenomic integration allowed us to determine the degree to which mutations are translated and identify gaps in sequence coverage, thereby benchmarking current technology and progress toward whole cancer proteome and transcriptome analysis. PMID:26631509

  6. Analysis of thematic map classification error matrices.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    The classification error matrix expresses the counts of agreement and disagreement between the classified categories and their verification. Thematic mapping experiments compare variables such as multiple photointerpretation or scales of mapping, and produce one or more classification error matrices. This paper presents a tutorial to implement a typical problem of a remotely sensed data experiment for solution by the linear model method.-from Author

  7. Disulfide structures of highly bridged peptides: a new strategy for analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach is described for analyzing disulfide linkage patterns in peptides containing tightly clustered cystines. Such peptides are very difficult to analyze with traditional strategies, which require that the peptide chain be split between close or adjacent Cys residues. The water-soluble tris-(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine (TCEP) reduced disulfides at pH 3, and partially reduced peptides were purified by high performance liquid chromatography with minimal thiol-disulfide exchange. Alkylation of free thiols, followed by sequencer analysis, provided explicit assignment of disulfides that had been reduced. Thiol-disulfide exchange occurred during alkylation of some peptides, but correct deductions were still possible. Alkylation competed best with exchange when peptide solution was added with rapid mixing to 2.2 M iodoacetamide. Variants were developed in which up to three alkylating agents were used to label different pairs of thiols, allowing a full assignment in one sequencer analysis. Model peptides used included insulin (three bridges, intra- and interchain disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), endothelin and apamin (two disulfides; -Cys.x.Cys- pair), conotoxin GI and isomers (two disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), and bacterial enterotoxin (three bridges within 13 residues; two -Cys.Cys- pairs). With insulin, all intermediates in the reduction pathway were identified; with conotoxin GI, analysis was carried out successfully for all three disulfide isomers. In addition to these known structures, the method has been applied successfully to the analysis of several previously unsolved structures of similar complexity. Rates of reduction of disulfide bonds varied widely, but most peptides did not show a strongly preferred route for reduction. PMID:8251945

  8. A peptide resource for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus in host-pathogen interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Michalik, Stephan; Rabe, Alexander; Surmann, Kristin; Brinkmann, Lars; Jehmlich, Nico; Bernhardt, Jörg; Hecker, Michael; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which can cause life-threatening disease. Proteome analyses of the bacterium can provide new insights into its pathophysiology and important facets of metabolic adaptation and, thus, aid the recognition of targets for intervention. However, the value of such proteome studies increases with their comprehensiveness. We present an MS-driven, proteome-wide characterization of the strain S. aureus HG001. Combining 144 high precision proteomic data sets, we identified 19 109 peptides from 2088 distinct S. aureus HG001 proteins, which account for 72% of the predicted ORFs. Peptides were further characterized concerning pI, GRAVY, and detectability scores in order to understand the low peptide coverage of 8.7% (19 109 out of 220 245 theoretical peptides). The high quality peptide-centric spectra have been organized into a comprehensive peptide fragmentation library (SpectraST) and used for identification of S. aureus-typic peptides in highly complex host-pathogen interaction experiments, which significantly improved the number of identified S. aureus proteins compared to a MASCOT search. This effort now allows the elucidation of crucial pathophysiological questions in S. aureus-specific host-pathogen interaction studies through comprehensive proteome analysis. The S. aureus-specific spectra resource developed here also represents an important spectral repository for SRM or for data-independent acquisition MS approaches. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000702 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000702).

  9. StructMap: Elastic Distance Analysis of Electron Microscopy Maps for Studying Conformational Changes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Sorzano, Carlos Oscar; Alvarez-Cabrera, Ana Lucia; Kazemi, Mohsen; Carazo, Jose María; Jonić, Slavica

    2016-04-26

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) has been shown to be very powerful for studying structures and associated conformational changes of macromolecular complexes. In the context of analyzing conformational changes of complexes, distinct EM density maps obtained by image analysis and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction are usually analyzed in 3D for interpretation of structural differences. However, graphic visualization of these differences based on a quantitative analysis of elastic transformations (deformations) among density maps has not been done yet due to a lack of appropriate methods. Here, we present an approach that allows such visualization. This approach is based on statistical analysis of distances among elastically aligned pairs of EM maps (one map is deformed to fit the other map), and results in visualizing EM maps as points in a lower-dimensional distance space. The distances among points in the new space can be analyzed in terms of clusters or trajectories of points related to potential conformational changes. The results of the method are shown with synthetic and experimental EM maps at different resolutions. PMID:27119636

  10. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  11. Linkage Analysis and QTL Mapping Using SNP Dosage Data in a Tetraploid Potato Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christine A.; McLean, Karen; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing and genotyping technologies have enabled researchers to generate high density SNP genotype data for mapping populations. In polyploid species, SNP data usually contain a new type of information, the allele dosage, which is not used by current methodologies for linkage analysis and QTL mapping. Here we extend existing methodology to use dosage data on SNPs in an autotetraploid mapping population. The SNP dosages are inferred from allele intensity ratios using normal mixture models. The steps of the linkage analysis (testing for distorted segregation, clustering SNPs, calculation of recombination fractions and LOD scores, ordering of SNPs and inference of parental phase) are extended to use the dosage information. For QTL analysis, the probability of each possible offspring genotype is inferred at a grid of locations along the chromosome from the ordered parental genotypes and phases and the offspring dosages. A normal mixture model is then used to relate trait values to the offspring genotypes and to identify the most likely locations for QTLs. These methods are applied to analyse a tetraploid potato mapping population of parents and 190 offspring, genotyped using an Infinium 8300 Potato SNP Array. Linkage maps for each of the 12 chromosomes are constructed. The allele intensity ratios are mapped as quantitative traits to check that their position and phase agrees with that of the corresponding SNP. This analysis confirms most SNP positions, and eliminates some problem SNPs to give high-density maps for each chromosome, with between 74 and 152 SNPs mapped and between 100 and 300 further SNPs allocated to approximate bins. Low numbers of double reduction products were detected. Overall 3839 of the 5378 polymorphic SNPs can be assigned putative genetic locations. This methodology can be applied to construct high-density linkage maps in any autotetraploid species, and could also be extended to higher autopolyploids. PMID:23704960

  12. Neural maps in remote sensing image analysis.

    PubMed

    Villmann, Thomas; Merényi, Erzsébet; Hammer, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    We study the application of self-organizing maps (SOMs) for the analyses of remote sensing spectral images. Advanced airborne and satellite-based imaging spectrometers produce very high-dimensional spectral signatures that provide key information to many scientific investigations about the surface and atmosphere of Earth and other planets. These new, sophisticated data demand new and advanced approaches to cluster detection, visualization, and supervised classification. In this article we concentrate on the issue of faithful topological mapping in order to avoid false interpretations of cluster maps created by an SOM. We describe several new extensions of the standard SOM, developed in the past few years: the growing SOM, magnification control, and generalized relevance learning vector quantization, and demonstrate their effect on both low-dimensional traditional multi-spectral imagery and approximately 200-dimensional hyperspectral imagery.

  13. Recursive Frame Analysis: A Practitioner's Tool for Mapping Therapeutic Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Hillary; Keeney, Bradford; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recursive frame analysis (RFA), both a practical therapeutic tool and an advanced qualitative research method that maps the structure of therapeutic conversation, is introduced with a clinical case vignette. We present and illustrate a means of mapping metaphorical themes that contextualize the performance taking place in the room, recursively…

  14. Adapted geomorphological mapping for sediment budget analysis - mapping focus and data base structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J.; Otto, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of alpine sediment cascades requires the identification, differentiation and quantification of sediment sources, storages, and transport processes. Furthermore, in order to understand sediment transfer processes, information on landform coupling and sediment routing pathways are essential. Classical geomorphological field mapping in combination with digital terrain analysis can deliver helpful data that supports the qualitative and quantitative understanding of the sediment cascades. Despite the large number of different geomorphological mapping systems, a uniform approach to account for sediment transfer and storage is still missing. We present a detailed geomorphological map of a high alpine setting that has been generated in order to analyse the sediment transfer system. A fundamental part of the mapping procedure was to capture additional data related to sediment storage and sediment coupling. This data was mainly gathered directly in the field; however post-mapping analysis was performed using high resolution digital elevation data (LIDAR) and digital aerial photography. The applied procedure provides a detailed inventory of sediment storage landforms and their morphometrical characteristics together with additional information on surface characteristics, dominant and secondary erosion and deposition processes, process activity and sediment storage coupling. This data set enables to generate sediment routing pathways and provides the basis for sediment storage quantification using additional data like geophysical soundings. The prior could be used to verify existing attempts to (semi-)automatically extract coupling conditions. The approach emphasises the benefits of combining field mapping with digital elevation data analysis.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of the response of Dickeya dadantii 3937 to plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Rio-Alvarez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Herva, Jose J; Cuartas-Lanza, Raquel; Toth, Ian; Pritchard, Leighton; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2012-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides constitute an important factor in the defense of plants against pathogens, and bacterial resistance to these peptides have previously been shown to be an important virulence factor in Dickeya dadantii, the causal agent of soft-rot disease of vegetables. In order to understand the bacterial response to antimicrobial peptides, a transcriptional microarray analysis was performed upon treatment with sub-lethal concentration of thionins, a widespread plant peptide. In all, 36 genes were found to be overexpressed, and were classified according to their deduced function as i) transcriptional regulators, ii) transport, and iii) modification of the bacterial membrane. One gene encoding a uricase was found to be repressed. The majority of these genes are known to be under the control of the PhoP/PhoQ system. Five genes representing the different functions induced were selected for further analysis. The results obtained indicate that the presence of antimicrobial peptides induces a complex response which includes peptide-specific elements and general stress-response elements contributing differentially to the virulence in different hosts.

  16. A Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of Nitrotyrosine-Containing Peptides in Complex Proteome Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Sacksteder, Colette A.; Chin, Mark H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Camp, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    Elevated levels of protein tyrosine nitration have been found in various neurodegenerative diseases and aging related pathologies; however, the lack of an efficient enrichment method has prevented the analysis of this important low level protein modification. We have developed an efficient method for specific enrichment of nitrotyrosine containing peptides that permits nitrotyrosine peptides and specific nitration sites to be unambiguously identified with LC-MS/MS. The method is based on the derivatization of nitrotyrosine into free sulfhydryl groups followed by high efficiency enrichment of sulfhydryl-containing peptides with thiopropyl sepharose beads. The derivatization process starts with acetylation with acetic anhydride to block all primary amines, followed by reduction of nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, then derivatization of aminotyrosine with N-Succinimidyl S-Acetylthioacetate (SATA), and finally deprotecting of S-acetyl on SATA to form free sulfhydryl groups. This method was evaluated using nitrotyrosine containing peptides, in-vitro nitrated human histone 1.2, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). 91% and 62% of the identified peptides from enriched histone and BSA samples were nitrotyrosine derivatized peptides, respectively, suggesting relative high specificity of the enrichment method. The application of this method to in-vitro nitrated mouse brain homogenate resulted in 35% of identified peptides containing nitrotyrosine (compared to only 5.9% observed from the global analysis of unenriched sample), and a total of 150 unique nitrated peptides covering 102 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate estimated at 3.3% from duplicate LC-MS/MS analyses of a single enriched sample.

  17. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  18. Influence of Analysis Methods on Interpretation of Hazard Maps

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure or hazard mapping is becoming increasingly popular among industrial hygienists. Direct-reading instruments used for hazard mapping of data collection are steadily increasing in reliability and portability while decreasing in cost. Exposure measurements made with these instruments generally require no laboratory analysis although hazard mapping can be a time-consuming process. To inform decision making by industrial hygienists and management, it is crucial that the maps generated from mapping data are as accurate and representative as possible. Currently, it is unclear how many sampling locations are necessary to produce a representative hazard map. As such, researchers typically collect as many points as can be sampled in several hours and interpolation methods are used to produce higher resolution maps. We have reanalyzed hazard-mapping data sets from three industrial settings to determine which interpolation methods yield the most accurate results. The goal is to provide practicing industrial hygienists with some practical guidelines to generate accurate hazard maps with ‘off-the-shelf’ mapping software. Visually verifying the fit of the variogram model is crucial for accurate interpolation. Exponential and spherical variogram models performed better than Gaussian models. It was also necessary to diverge from some of the default interpolation parameters such as the number of bins used for the experimental variogram and whether or not to allow for a nugget effect to achieve reasonable accuracy of the interpolation for some data sets. PMID:23258453

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Information Product Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heien, Christopher Harris

    2012-01-01

    Information Product Maps are visual diagrams used to represent the inputs, processing, and outputs of data within an Information Manufacturing System. A data unit, drawn as an edge, symbolizes a grouping of raw data as it travels through this system. Processes, drawn as vertices, transform each data unit input into various forms prior to delivery…

  20. Indentification of venom proteins of spider S. huwena on two-dimensional electrophoresis gel by N-terminal microsequencing and mass spectrometric peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Liang, S; Li, X; Cao, M; Xie, J; Chen, P; Huang, R

    2000-04-01

    Venom proteins of the spider Selenocosmia huwena were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, with the separation in the first dimension on a wide range of immobilized pH (3-10) gradients. Over 300 protein spots were presented on a silver-stained 2D gel. The protein spots with molecular weight >10 kDa were analyzed, after electrotransferring to polyvinyldene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, by N-terminal microseqencing. Some of the silver-stained protein spots with molecular weight over 10 kDa were analyzed and identified by employing an improved procedure of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, including (1) in-gel reduction, alkylation, and enzymatic digestion; (2) extraction and desalting by using the pipette tip containing a small C18 microcolumn (Ziptip); and (3) direct MAIDI-TOF mass analysis and protein database searching. Several known toxins such as HWTX-I, HWTX-II, HWTX-IV, and SHL-I were identified and some new components were found among these protein spots. PMID:10981815

  1. Fine-mapping naturally occurring NY-ESO-1 antibody epitopes in melanoma patients' sera using short overlapping peptides and full-length recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Nobukazu; Jackson, Heather M; Chan, Kok-fei; Oveissi, Sara; Cebon, Jonathan; Itoh, Kyogo; Chen, Weisan

    2013-07-01

    The tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 is one of the most antigenic cancer-testis antigens, first identified by serologic analysis of a recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX). NY-ESO-1 is expressed in different types of cancers including melanoma. NY-ESO-1-specific spontaneous humoral and cellular immune responses are detected in a large proportion of patients with advanced NY-ESO-1-expressing cancers. Therefore NY-ESO-1 is a good candidate antigen for immunotherapy. Although cellular immune responses to NY-ESO-1 are well characterized, much less is known about the humoral immune responses. In this study, we finely mapped linear antibody epitopes using sera from melanoma patients and shorter overlapping peptide sets. We have shown that melanoma patients' humoral immune systems responded to NY-ESO-1 differently in each individual with widely differing antibody specificity, intensity and antibody subtypes. This knowledge will help us further understand anti-tumor immunity and may also help us to monitor cancer progress and cancer vaccine efficacy in the future.

  2. Gas-phase ion isomer analysis reveals the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values, which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M → (c)b) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored.

  3. Recognition of ZnT8, Proinsulin, and Homologous MAP Peptides in Sardinian Children at Risk of T1D Precedes Detection of Classical Islet Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Paccagnini, Daniela; Mannu, Carla; Targhetta, Clara; Songini, Marco; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2016-01-01

    As numerous studies put in evidence the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children, an early diagnosis is of great importance to define correct treatment and diet. Currently, the identification of classical islet autoantibodies is the primary biomarker for diagnosis in subjects at risk, especially in pediatric patients. Recent studies suggest that detection of antibodies against ZnT8 protein in preclinical phase can predict the development of T1D. We previously demonstrated a significant association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) with T1D in adult Sardinian patients. To enforce this finding, we investigated the presence of antibodies against ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI) with respective homologous epitopes: MAP3865c133-141/ZnT8186-194, MAP3865c125-133/ZnT8178-186, MAP2404c70-85/PI46-61, and MAP1,4αgbp157-173/PI64-80, in 23 children at risk for T1D, formerly involved in the TRIGR study, and 22 healthy controls (HCs). Positivity to anti-MAP and homologous human peptides was detected in 48% of at-risk subjects compared to 5,85% HCs, preceding appearance of islet autoantibodies. Being MAP easily transmitted to humans with infected cow's milk and detected in retail infant formulas, MAP epitopes could be present in extensively hydrolyzed formula and act as antigens stimulating β-cell autoimmunity.

  4. Recognition of ZnT8, Proinsulin, and Homologous MAP Peptides in Sardinian Children at Risk of T1D Precedes Detection of Classical Islet Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Paccagnini, Daniela; Mannu, Carla; Targhetta, Clara; Songini, Marco; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    As numerous studies put in evidence the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children, an early diagnosis is of great importance to define correct treatment and diet. Currently, the identification of classical islet autoantibodies is the primary biomarker for diagnosis in subjects at risk, especially in pediatric patients. Recent studies suggest that detection of antibodies against ZnT8 protein in preclinical phase can predict the development of T1D. We previously demonstrated a significant association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) with T1D in adult Sardinian patients. To enforce this finding, we investigated the presence of antibodies against ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI) with respective homologous epitopes: MAP3865c133–141/ZnT8186–194, MAP3865c125–133/ZnT8178–186, MAP2404c70–85/PI46–61, and MAP1,4αgbp157–173/PI64–80, in 23 children at risk for T1D, formerly involved in the TRIGR study, and 22 healthy controls (HCs). Positivity to anti-MAP and homologous human peptides was detected in 48% of at-risk subjects compared to 5,85% HCs, preceding appearance of islet autoantibodies. Being MAP easily transmitted to humans with infected cow's milk and detected in retail infant formulas, MAP epitopes could be present in extensively hydrolyzed formula and act as antigens stimulating β-cell autoimmunity. PMID:26824044

  5. High-sensitivity HLA class I peptidome analysis enables a precise definition of peptide motifs and the identification of peptides from cell lines and patients' sera.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Danilo; Gloger, Andreas; Weide, Benjamin; Garbe, Claus; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-05-01

    The characterization of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is of fundamental importance for understanding CD8+ T cell-driven immunological processes and for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. However, until now, the mass spectrometric analysis of HLA-bound peptides has typically required billions of cells, still resulting in relatively few high-confidence peptide identifications. Capitalizing on the recent developments in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, we have implemented a methodology for the efficient recovery of acid-eluted HLA peptides after purification with the pan-reactive antibody W6/32 and have identified a total of 27 862 unique peptides with high confidence (1% false discovery rate) from five human cancer cell lines. More than 93% of the identified peptides were eight to 11 amino acids in length and contained signatures that were in excellent agreement with published HLA binding motifs. Furthermore, by purifying soluble HLA class I complexes (sHLA) from sera of melanoma patients, up to 972 high-confidence peptides could be identified, including melanoma-associated antigens already described in the literature. Knowledge of the HLA class I peptidome should facilitate multiplex tetramer technology-based characterization of T cells, and allow the development of patient selection, stratification and immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:26992070

  6. Mapping Rise Time Information with Down-Shift Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T. W., Machorro, E. A., Diaz, A. B.

    2011-11-01

    These viewgraphs summarize the application of recent developments in digital down-shift (DDS) analysis of up converted PDV data to map out how well the PDV diagnostic would capture rise time information (mid point and rise time) in short rise time (<1 ns) shock events. The mapping supports a PDV vs VISAR challenge. The analysis concepts are new (~September FY 2011), simple, and run quickly, which makes them good tools to map out (with ~1 million Monte Carlo simulations) how well PDV captures rise time information as function of baseline velocity, rise time, velocity jump, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus)

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  9. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species.

  10. Biologically-Inspired Peptide Reagents for Enhancing IMS-MS Analysis of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Brian C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2011-09-01

    The binding properties of a peptidoglycan recognition protein are translated via combinatorial chemistry into short peptides. Non-adjacent histidine, tyrosine, and arginine residues in the protein's binding cleft that associate specifically with the glycan moiety of a peptidoglycan substrate are incorporated into linear sequences creating a library of 27 candidate tripeptide reagents (three possible residues permutated across three positions). Upon electrospraying the peptide library and carbohydrate mixtures, some noncovalent complexes are observed. The binding efficiencies of the peptides vary according to their amino acid composition as well as the disaccharide linkage and carbohydrate ring-type. In addition to providing a charge-carrier for the carbohydrate, peptide reagents can also be used to differentiate carbohydrate isomers by ion mobility spectrometry. The utility of these peptide reagents as a means of enhancing ion mobility analysis of carbohydrates is illustrated by examining four glucose-containing disaccharide isomers, including a pair that is not resolved by ion mobility alone. The specificity and stoichiometry of the peptide-carbohydrate complexes are also investigated. Trihistidine demonstrates both suitable binding efficiency and successful resolution of disaccharides isomers, suggesting it may be a useful reagent in IMS analyses of carbohydrates.

  11. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  12. Expression analysis and identification of antimicrobial peptide transcripts from six North American frog species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Laura S.; Fellers, Gary M.; Marranca, Jamie Marie; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs secrete antimicrobial peptides onto their skin. We describe an assay to preserve and analyze antimicrobial peptide transcripts from field-collected skin secretions that will complement existing methods for peptide analysis. We collected skin secretions from 4 North American species in the field in California and 2 species in the laboratory. Most frogs appeared healthy after release; however, Rana boylii in the Sierra Nevada foothills, but not the Coast Range, showed signs of morbidity and 2 died after handling. The amount of total RNA extracted from skin secretions was higher in R. boylii and R. sierrae compared to R. draytonii, and much higher compared to Pseudacris regilla. Interspecies variation in amount of RNA extracted was not explained by size, but for P. regilla it depended upon collection site and date. RNA extracted from skin secretions from frogs handled with bare hands had poor quality compared to frogs handled with gloves or plastic bags. Thirty-four putative antimicrobial peptide precursor transcripts were identified. This study demonstrates that RNA extracted from skin secretions collected in the field is of high quality suitable for use in sequencing or quantitative PCR (qPCR). However, some species do not secrete profusely, resulting in very little extracted RNA. The ability to measure transcript abundance of antimicrobial peptides in field-collected skin secretions complements proteomic analyses and may provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms that could affect peptide abundance.

  13. Identification and expression analysis of hepcidin-like antimicrobial peptides in bony fish.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Susan E; Gallant, Jeffrey W; Liebscher, Ryan S; Dacanay, Andrew; Tsoi, Stephen C M

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides play a crucial role as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Several types of antimicrobial peptides have been isolated from fish, mostly of the cationic alpha-helical variety. Here, we present the cDNA sequences of five highly disulphide-bonded hepcidin-like peptides from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum) and two from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar (L.). These hepcidin-like molecules consist of a 24 amino acid signal peptide and an acidic propiece of 38-40 amino acids in addition to the mature processed peptide of 19-27 amino acids. Exhaustive data mining of GenBank with these sequences revealed that similar peptides are encoded in the genomes of Japanese flounder, rainbow trout, hybrid striped bass and medaka, indicating that they are widespread among fish. Southern hybridization analysis suggests that closely related hepcidin-like genes are present in other flatfish species, and that they exist as a multigene family clustered on the winter flounder genome. Hepcidin variants are differentially expressed during bacterial challenge, during larval development of P. americanus and in different tissues of adult fish.

  14. Use of a porous silicon-gold plasmonic nanostructure to enhance serum peptide signals in MALDI-TOF analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Tan, Jie; Yu, Jiekai; Feng, Jiandong; Pan, Aiwu; Zheng, Shu; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    Small peptides in serum are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. The identification of peptide biomarkers in human plasma/serum has become an area of high interest in medical research. However, the direct analysis of peptides in serum samples using mass spectrometry is challenging due to the low concentration of peptides and the high abundance of high-molecular-weight proteins in serum, the latter of which causes severe signal suppression. Herein, we reported that porous semiconductor-noble metal hybrid nanostructures can both eliminate the interference from large proteins in serum samples and significantly enhance the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) yields of peptides captured on the nanostructure. Serum peptide fingerprints with high fidelity can be acquired rapidly, and successful discrimination of colorectal cancer patients based on peptide fingerprints is demonstrated.

  15. Meteorological data analysis using MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, V S; Wen, XueZhi; Pan, Wubin

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric science, the scale of meteorological data is massive and growing rapidly. K-means is a fast and available cluster algorithm which has been used in many fields. However, for the large-scale meteorological data, the traditional K-means algorithm is not capable enough to satisfy the actual application needs efficiently. This paper proposes an improved MK-means algorithm (MK-means) based on MapReduce according to characteristics of large meteorological datasets. The experimental results show that MK-means has more computing ability and scalability.

  16. Automated reduction and interpretation of multidimensional mass spectra for analysis of complex peptide mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Anna; Dutkowski, Janusz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Kluge, Boguslaw; Kowalczyk, Krzysztof; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Bakun, Magda; Dadlez, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Here we develop a fully automated procedure for the analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) datasets collected during the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. We present the underlying algorithm and outcomes of several experiments justifying its applicability. The novelty of our approach is to exploit the multidimensional character of the datasets. It is common knowledge that highly complex peptide mixtures can be analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, but we are not aware of any existing automated MS spectra interpretation procedure designed to take into account the multidimensional character of the data. Our work fills this gap by providing an effective algorithm for this task, allowing for automated conversion of raw data to the list of masses of peptides.

  17. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

  18. Bioaffinity magnetic reactor for peptide digestion followed by analysis using bottom-up shotgun proteomics strategy.

    PubMed

    Korecká, Lucie; Jankovicová, Barbora; Krenková, Jana; Hernychová, Lenka; Slováková, Marcela; Le-Nell, Anne; Chmelik, Josef; Foret, Frantisek; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Bilková, Zusana

    2008-02-01

    We report an efficient and streamlined way to improve the analysis and identification of peptides and proteins in complex mixtures of soluble proteins, cell lysates, etc. By using the shotgun proteomics methodology combined with bioaffinity purification we can remove or minimize the interference contamination of a complex tryptic digest and so avoid the time-consuming separation steps before the final MS analysis. We have proved that by means of enzymatic fragmentation (endoproteinases with Arg-C or/and Lys-C specificity) connected with the isolation of specific peptides we can obtain a simplified peptide mixture for easier identification of the entire protein. A new bioaffinity sorbent was developed for this purpose. Anhydrotrypsin (AHT), an inactive form of trypsin with an affinity for peptides with arginine (Arg) or lysine (Lys) at the C-terminus, was immobilized onto micro/nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties (silica magnetite particles (SiMAG)-Carboxyl, Chemicell, Germany). This AHT carrier with a determined binding capacity (26.8 nmol/mg of carrier) was tested with a model peptide, human neurotensin, and the resulting MS spectra confirmed the validity of this approach. PMID:18266262

  19. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  20. Optical Nano-mapping and Analysis of Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Cheng; Deal, Karin R; Murray, Armond; Zhu, Tingting; Hastie, Alex R; Stedman, Will; Sadowski, Henry; Saghbini, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Application of optical mapping based on BioNano Genomics Irys(®) technology ( http://www.bionanogenomics.com/ ) is growing rapidly since its debut in November 2012. The technology can be used to facilitate genome sequence assembly and analysis of genome structural variations. We describe here the detailed protocol that we used to generate a whole genome BioNano map for Aegilops tauschii, the D genome progenitor of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). We are using the whole genome BioNano map to validate sequence assembly based on the next-generation sequencing, order sequence scaffolds, and ultimately build pseudomolecules for the genome. PMID:27511170

  1. Linear Algebraic Method for Non-Linear Map Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,L.; Nash, B.

    2009-05-04

    We present a newly developed method to analyze some non-linear dynamics problems such as the Henon map using a matrix analysis method from linear algebra. Choosing the Henon map as an example, we analyze the spectral structure, the tune-amplitude dependence, the variation of tune and amplitude during the particle motion, etc., using the method of Jordan decomposition which is widely used in conventional linear algebra.

  2. G-Protein binding domains of the angiotensin II AT1A receptors mapped with synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, H; Alexander, R W; Ushio-Fukai, M; Lyons, P R; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1998-01-01

    The vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1AR) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. We mapped the G-protein binding domains of the AT1AR using synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence, which interfere with AT1AR-G-protein coupling. Membrane GTPase activity was used as a measure of the functional coupling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of the second intracellular loop (residues 125-137), the N-terminal region of the third intracellular loop (217-227) and the juxtamembranous region of the C-terminal tail (304-316) inhibited angiotensin II-induced GTPase activation by 30%, 30%, and 70%, respectively. The latter two domains (217-227 and 304-316) are predicted to form amphiphilic alpha-helices. Only the peptide representing residues 217-227 stimulated basal activity (45%). No synthetic peptide had a significant effect on either the number or the affinity of the AT1AR binding. These observations indicate that domains of the second and third regions and the cytoplasmic tail of the AT1AR interact with G-proteins, and that multiple contacts with these receptor domains may be important for binding and activation of the G-proteins. PMID:9620883

  3. Mapping the Future, Mapping Education: An Analysis of the 2011 State of the Union Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a discourse analysis of President Barack Obama's 2011 State of the Union Address. Fredric Jameson's concepts of cognitive mapping, cultural revolution, and the unconscious are employed to examine the president's vision of educational and economic transformation. Ultimately, it is argued this vision evokes a world in which…

  4. Fine mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes of peste des petits ruminants virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruisong; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Wanxiang; Li, Wentao; Dong, Shijuan; Zhu, Yumin; He, Yaping; Tang, Haiping; Du, Rong; Li, Zhen

    2015-01-30

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein of morbillivirus, and is presently the basis of most diagnostic assays for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). In this study, fine epitope mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes on the PPRV NP has been undertaken using biosynthetic peptides. Nineteen linear B-cell epitopes were identified and their corresponding minimal motifs were located on the NP of PPRV China/Tibet/Geg/07-30. Conservation analysis indicated that ten of the 19 minimal motifs were conserved among 46 PPRV strains. Peptides containing the minimal motifs were recognized using anti-PPRV serum from a goat immunized with PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Identified epitopes and their motifs improve our understanding of the antigenic characteristics of PPRV NP and provide a basis for the development of epitope-based diagnostic assays. PMID:25465659

  5. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of plasma Aβ peptides concentrations in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chouraki, V; De Bruijn, R F A G; Chapuis, J; Bis, J C; Reitz, C; Schraen, S; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Grenier-Boley, B; Delay, C; Rogers, R; Demiautte, F; Mounier, A; Fitzpatrick, A L; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Breteler, M; Becker, J T; Lathrop, M; Schupf, N; Alpérovitch, A; Mayeux, R; van Duijn, C M; Buée, L; Amouyel, P; Lopez, O L; Ikram, M A; Tzourio, C; Lambert, J-C

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are the major components of senile plaques, one of the main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, Aβ peptides' functions are not fully understood and seem to be highly pleiotropic. We hypothesized that plasma Aβ peptides concentrations could be a suitable endophenotype for a genome-wide association study (GWAS) designed to (i) identify novel genetic factors involved in amyloid precursor protein metabolism and (ii) highlight relevant Aβ-related physiological and pathophysiological processes. Hence, we performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of four studies totaling 3 528 healthy individuals of European descent and for whom plasma Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides levels had been quantified. Although we did not observe any genome-wide significant locus, we identified 18 suggestive loci (P<1 × 10(-)(5)). Enrichment-pathway analyses revealed canonical pathways mainly involved in neuronal functions, for example, axonal guidance signaling. We also assessed the biological impact of the gene most strongly associated with plasma Aβ1-42 levels (cortexin 3, CTXN3) on APP metabolism in vitro and found that the gene protein was able to modulate Aβ1-42 secretion. In conclusion, our study results suggest that plasma Aβ peptides levels are valid endophenotypes in GWASs and can be used to characterize the metabolism and functions of APP and its metabolites.

  6. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  7. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  8. Computational analysis of LDDMM for brain mapping

    PubMed Central

    Ceritoglu, Can; Tang, Xiaoying; Chow, Margaret; Hadjiabadi, Darian; Shah, Damish; Brown, Timothy; Burhanullah, Muhammad H.; Trinh, Huong; Hsu, John T.; Ament, Katarina A.; Crocetti, Deana; Mori, Susumu; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Yantis, Steven; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2013-01-01

    One goal of computational anatomy (CA) is to develop tools to accurately segment brain structures in healthy and diseased subjects. In this paper, we examine the performance and complexity of such segmentation in the framework of the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) registration method with reference to atlases and parameters. First we report the application of a multi-atlas segmentation approach to define basal ganglia structures in healthy and diseased kids' brains. The segmentation accuracy of the multi-atlas approach is compared with the single atlas LDDMM implementation and two state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms—Freesurfer and FSL—by computing the overlap errors between automatic and manual segmentations of the six basal ganglia nuclei in healthy subjects as well as subjects with diseases including ADHD and Autism. The high accuracy of multi-atlas segmentation is obtained at the cost of increasing the computational complexity because of the calculations necessary between the atlases and a subject. Second, we examine the effect of parameters on total LDDMM computation time and segmentation accuracy for basal ganglia structures. Single atlas LDDMM method is used to automatically segment the structures in a population of 16 subjects using different sets of parameters. The results show that a cascade approach and using fewer time steps can reduce computational complexity as much as five times while maintaining reliable segmentations. PMID:23986653

  9. Different target surfaces for the analysis of peptides, peptide mixtures and peptide mass fingerprints by AP-MALDI ion trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Kassler, Alexander; Haubner, Roland; Allmaier, Günter

    2011-06-10

    The desorption/ionization behavior of individual peptides, an equimolare peptide mixture and a tryptic digest was investigated by AP-MALDI-IT-MS using four different target materials (gold-covered stainless steel (SS), titanium nitride-covered SS, hand-polished SS, and microdiamond-covered hardmetal) under identical conditions. Gold-covered as well as polished SS targets yielded comparable mass spectra for peptides and peptide mixture in the low pMol-range. The first target exhibited superior data down to the 10fMol-range. In contrast, titanium nitride-covered SS and microdiamond-covered hardmetal AP-MALDI-targets yielded poor sensitivity. These observations could be correlated with the surface roughness of the targets determined by 3D-confocal-white-light-microscopy. The roughest surfaces were found for titanium nitride-covered SS and microdiamond-covered hardmetal material showing both poor MS sensitivity. A less rough surface could be determined for the hand-polished SS target and the smoothest surface was found for the gold-covered target yielding the best sensitivity of all surfaces. These differences in the roughness having a strong impact on the ultimate sensitivity obtainable for peptide samples could be corroborated by electron microscopy. A peptide mixture covering a wide range of molecular weights and a tryptic protein digest (from 2-DE) exhibit the same behavior. This clearly indicates that the smooth gold-covered SS target is the surface of choice in AP-MALDI MS proteomics.

  10. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  11. NMR-Based Mapping of Disulfide Bridges in Cysteine-Rich Peptides: Application to the μ-Conotoxin SxIIIA*

    PubMed Central

    Walewska, Aleksandra; Skalicky, Jack J.; Davis, Darrell R.; Zhang, Min-Min; Lopez-Vera, Estuardo; Watkins, Maren; Han, Tiffany S.; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides represent a megadiverse group of natural products with very promising therapeutic potential. To accelerate their functional characterization, high-throughput chemical synthesis and folding methods are required, including efficient mapping of multiple disulfide bridges. Here, we describe a novel approach for such mapping and apply it to a three-disulfide bridged conotoxin, μ-SxIIIA (from the venom of Conus striolatus) whose discovery is also reported here for the first time. μ-SxIIIA was chemically synthesized with three cysteine residues labeled 100% with 15N/13C, while the remaining three cysteine residues were incorporated using a mixture of 70%:30% unlabeled:labeled Fmoc-protected residues. After oxidative folding, the major product was analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Sequence-specific resonance assignments for the isotope-enriched Cys residues were determined with 2D versions of standard triple resonance (1H,13C,15N) NMR experiments and 2D [13C,1H] HSQC. Disulfide patterns were directly determined with cross-disulfide NOEs confirming that the oxidation product had the disulfide connectivities characteristic of μ-conotoxins. μ-SxIIIA was found to be a potent blocker of the sodium channel subtype NaV1.4 (IC50 = 7 nM). These results suggest that differential incorporation of isotope-labeled cysteine residues is an efficient strategy to map disulfides and should facilitate the discovery and structure-function studies of many bioactive peptides. PMID:18831583

  12. Immunohistochemical mapping of pro-opiomelanocortin- and pro-dynorphin-derived peptides in the alpaca (Lama pacos) diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Manso, B; Sánchez, M L; Medina, L E; Aguilar, L A; Díaz-Cabiale, Z; Narváez, J A; Coveñas, R

    2014-09-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibres containing non-opioid peptides (adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) and opioid peptides (beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-neo-endorphin, leucine-enkephalin) in the alpaca diencephalon. No immunoreactive cell bodies containing ACTH were found. Perikarya containing the other four peptides were observed exclusively in the hypothalamus and their distribution was restricted. Perikarya containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin showed a more widespread distribution than those containing leucine-enkephalin or beta-endorphin (1-27). Cell bodies containing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were observed in the arcuate nucleus, anterior and lateral hypothalamic areas and in the ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei, whereas perikarya containing alpha-neo-endorphin (a pro-dynorphin-derived peptide) were found in the arcuate nucleus, dorsal and lateral hypothalamic areas, and in the paraventricular, ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei. Immunoreactive cell bodies containing leucine-enkephalin were found in the lateral hypothalamic area and in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Immunoreactive fibres expressing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were more numerous than those expressing pro-dynorphin-derived peptides. A close anatomical relationship was observed: in all the diencephalic nuclei in which beta-endorphin (1-27)-immunoreactive fibres were found, fibres containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were also observed. Fibres containing beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were widely distributed throughout the diencephalon, but fibres containing ACTH or leucine-enkephalin showed a moderate distribution. The distribution of the five peptides studied here is also compared with that reported previously in

  13. On-Plate Desalting and SALDI-MS Analysis of Peptides with Hydrophobic Silicate Nanofilms on a Gold Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jicheng; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Quan

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of silicate nanofilms for on-plate desalting and subsequently direct laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometric (LDI-MS) analysis of peptides. A hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) monolayer is formed on a calcinated nanofilm on a gold substrate to facilitate sample deposition and interaction with the surface that allows effective removal of MS-incompatible contaminants such as salts and surfactants by simple on-plate washing while the peptides are retained on the spot. By eliminating interferences from matrix-related ions and contaminants, sensitivity of MS analysis has been enhanced over ca. 20 times, leading to improved detection of peptides at the low-fmol level. A high recovery rate of the peptides is obtained by using relatively rough nanofilms, which are prepared through a modified layer-by-layer (LbL)-deposition/calcination process. The performance of the films has been investigated with peptide samples in the presence of high salts (NaCl and sodium acetate) and urea. Compared to MALDI analysis with CHCA-matrix, LDI with on-plate desalting offers marked improvement for analysis of peptides due to low background ions and reduction of sample complexity. Additionally, selective capture of the hydrophobic components of a protein can be achieved, providing a highly useful strategy for specific peptide enrichment. LDI with on-plate desalting approach has also been successfully applied to peptide analysis from protein digests. PMID:20964322

  14. Mapping of epitopes on U1 snRNP polypeptide A with synthetic peptides and autoimmune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, S; Briand, J P; Abuaf, N; van Regenmortel, M H; Muller, S

    1991-01-01

    The ability of synthetic peptides encompassing almost the entire sequence of snRNP U1A polypeptide to be recognized in ELISA by sera of autoimmune patients was investigated. Sera from 18 patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 145 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 120 with other rheumatic autoimmune diseases were tested with 13 overlapping peptides. Among them, peptide 257-282 and, to a lower extent, peptide 1-11 were recognized by MCTD, SLE and Sjögren's syndrome sera. In contrast, peptide 35-58 was recognized by 94% of MCTD and only 19% of SLE sera. It did not react with any of the other patient sera. The ELISA results were compared with the pattern of reactivity observed in immunoblotting. The results indicate that peptide 35-58 probably contains a major epitope recognized by MCTD autoantibodies. It is noteworthy that in snRNP particles, this region of U1A interacts with RNA and presents only limited homology with the corresponding sequence 32-50 of U2B''. Images Fig. 3 PMID:1717192

  15. Epitope mapping of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis: microwave-assisted synthesis of the peptide antigens and ELISA screening.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Giulia; Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Nuti, Francesca; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Larregola, Maud; Aharoni, Rina; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathologic auto-antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in multiple sclerosis is a highly controversial matter. As the use of animal models may enable to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human disorder, numerous studies on multiple sclerosis are carried out using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In particular, the most extensively used EAE model is obtained by immunizing C57BL/6 mice with the immunodominant peptide MOG(35-55). In this scenario, we analyzed the anti-MOG antibody response in this model using the recombinant refolded extracellular domain of the protein, MOG(1-117). To assess the presence of a B-cell intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism, we tested also five synthetic peptides mapping the 1-117 sequence of MOG, including MOG(35-55). For this purpose, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and on-column refolded MOG(1-117), and we applied an optimized microwave-assisted solid-phase synthetic strategy to obtain the designed peptide sequences. Subsequently, we set up a solid-phase immunoenzymatic assay testing both naïve and EAE mice sera and using MOG protein and peptides as antigenic probes. The results obtained disclose an intense IgG antibody response against both the recombinant protein and the immunizing peptide, while no response was observed against the other synthetic fragments, thus excluding the presence of an intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism. Furthermore, as the properly refolded recombinant probe is able to bind antibodies with greater efficiency compared with MOG(35-55), we hypothesize the presence of both linear and conformational epitopes on MOG(35-55) sequence. PMID:26663200

  16. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  17. Mapping Creativity: Creativity Measurements Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Igor Reszka; Cruz, Roberto Moraes

    2014-01-01

    This article borrowed network analysis tools to discover how the construct formed by the set of all measures of creativity configures itself. To this end, using a variant of the meta-analytical method, a database was compiled simulating 42,381 responses to 974 variables centered on 64 creativity measures. Results, although preliminary, indicate…

  18. Molecular Design, Structural Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Derivatives of Peptide CGA-N46.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Zhi-Fang; Sun, Ya-Nan; Chen, Shi-Hua; Yi, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Ru; Yang, Shuo-Ye; Yu, Guang-Hai; Huang, Liang; Li, Chao-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Chromogranin A (CGA)-N46, a derived peptide of human chromogranin A, has antifungal activity. To further research the active domain of CGA-N46, a series of derivatives were designed by successively deleting amino acid from both terminus of CGA-N46, and the amino acid sequence of each derivative was analyzed by bioinformatic software. Based on the predicted physicochemical properties of the peptides, including half-life time in mammalian reticulocytes (in vitro), yeast (in vivo) and E. coli (in vivo), instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), the secondary structure, net charge, the distribution of hydrophobic residues and hydrophilic residues, the final derivatives CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The results of bioinformatic analysis showed that CGA-N46 and its derivatives were α-helix, neutral or weak positive charge, hydrophilic, and CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were more stable than the other derivatives. The results of circular dichroism confirmed that CGA-N46 and its derived peptides displayed α-helical structure in an aqueous solution and 30 mM sodium dodecylsulfate, but α-helical contents decreased in hydrophobic lipid vesicles. CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 had higher antifungal activities than their mother peptide CGA-N46. Among of the derived peptides, CGA-N12 showed the least hemolytic activity. In conclusion, we have successfully identified the active domain of CGA-N46 with strong antifungal activity and weak hemolytic activity, which provides the possibility to develop a new class of antibiotics.

  19. Large Improvements in MS/MS Based Peptide Identification Rates using a Hybrid Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Rawlins, Mitchell M.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-05-06

    We have developed a hybrid method for identifying peptides from global proteomics studies that significantly increases sensitivity and specificity in matching peptides to tandem mass spectra using database searches. The method increased the number of spectra that can be assigned to a peptide in a global proteomics study by 57-147% at an estimated false discovery rate of 5%, with clear room for even greater improvements. The approach combines the general utility of using consensus model spectra typical of database search methods1-3 with the accuracy of the intensity information contained in spectral libraries4-6. This hybrid approach is made possible by recent developments that elucidated the statistical framework common to both data analysis and statistical thermodynamics, resulting in a chemically inspired approach to incorporating fragment intensity information into both database searches and spectral library searches. We applied this approach to proteomics analysis of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, a cyanobacterium that is a model organism for studies of photosynthetic carbon fixation and biofuels development. The increased specificity and sensitivity of this approach allowed us to identify many more peptides involved in the processes important for photoautotrophic growth.

  20. Genome mining and genetic analysis of cypemycin biosynthesis reveal an unusual class of posttranslationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Claesen, Jan; Bibb, Mervyn

    2010-09-14

    Posttranslational modification of amino acids confers a range of structural features and activities on ribosomally synthesized peptides, many of which have potent antimicrobial or other biological activities. Cypemycin is an extensively modified linear peptide produced by Streptomyces sp. OH-4156 with potent in vitro activity against mouse leukemia cells. Cypemycin does not contain lanthionine bridges but exhibits some of the structural features of lantibiotics, notably dehydrated threonines (dehydrobutyrines) and a C-terminal S-[(Z)-2-aminovinyl]-D-cysteine. Consequently it was classified as a member of the lantibiotic family of posttranslationally modified peptides. Cypemycin also possesses two L-allo-isoleucine residues and an N-terminal N,N-dimethylalanine, both unique amino acid modifications. We identified and heterologously expressed the cypemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and performed a mutational analysis of each individual gene. We show that even the previously described modifications are carried out by unusual enzymes or via a modification pathway unrelated to lantibiotic biosynthesis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the widespread occurrence of cypemycin-like gene clusters within the bacterial kingdom and in the Archaea. Cypemycin is the founding member of an unusual class of posttranslationally modified ribosomally synthesized peptides, the linaridins.

  1. Strain mapping analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Sergey; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2009-03-01

    The focus of the work is meso-scale analysis (scale level of the fabric unit cell) of textile composite deformation and failure. The surface strain measurement is used for: (1) experimental investigation, which includes study of strain distribution at various stages of deformation, plasticity detection, damage initiation; (2) numerical validation of the correspondent finite element (FE) models. Two examples are considered: carbon-epoxy triaxial-braided and glass polypropylene-woven composite. The surface strain measurement (by digital image correlation technique) accompanies the tensile tests, aiming at: (1) elastic anisotropic constants characterisation, (2) study of non-linear material behaviour (for the thermoplastic composite), (3) control of homogeneity of the macro-strain distribution, and (4) analysis of damage initiation in brittle composites. Validation of meso-FE models by strain measurements encounters difficulties arising from (1) resolution of the strain measurements, (2) irregularities of the initial structure such as random layer nesting, ply interaction, and deviation of yarns from their theoretical position, which affects the measured strain fields. The paper discusses these difficulties and demonstrates a qualitative agreement with the FE analysis of idealised composite configurations.

  2. All-atom molecular dynamics analysis of multi-peptide systems reproduces peptide solubility in line with experimental observations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Suenaga, Atsushi; Sato, Yuji; Kosuda, Satoshi; Taiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the contribution of individual amino acids to protein and peptide solubility, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 106 Å3 cubic boxes containing ~3 × 104 water molecules and 27 tetra-peptides regularly positioned at 23 Å from each other and composed of a single amino acid type for all natural amino acids but cysteine and glycine. The calculations were performed using Amber with a standard force field on a special purpose MDGRAPE-3 computer, without introducing any “artificial” hydrophobic interactions. Tetra-peptides composed of I, V, L, M, N, Q, F, W, Y, and H formed large amorphous clusters, and those containing A, P, S, and T formed smaller ones. Tetra-peptides made of D, E, K, and R did not cluster at all. These observations correlated well with experimental solubility tendencies as well as hydrophobicity scales with correlation coefficients of 0.5 to > 0.9. Repulsive Coulomb interactions were dominant in ensuring high solubility, whereas both Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) energies contributed to the aggregations of low solubility amino acids. Overall, this very first all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a multi-peptide system appears to reproduce the basic properties of peptide solubility, essentially in line with experimental observations. PMID:26817663

  3. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A.; Friedrich, David P.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7–30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  4. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A; Friedrich, David P; Gabriel, Erin E; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7-30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  5. Global land cover mapping: a review and uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Congalton, Russell G.; Gu, Jianyu; Yadav, Kamini; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Ozdogan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Given the advances in remotely sensed imagery and associated technologies, several global land cover maps have been produced in recent times including IGBP DISCover, UMD Land Cover, Global Land Cover 2000 and GlobCover 2009. However, the utility of these maps for specific applications has often been hampered due to considerable amounts of uncertainties and inconsistencies. A thorough review of these global land cover projects including evaluating the sources of error and uncertainty is prudent and enlightening. Therefore, this paper describes our work in which we compared, summarized and conducted an uncertainty analysis of the four global land cover mapping projects using an error budget approach. The results showed that the classification scheme and the validation methodology had the highest error contribution and implementation priority. A comparison of the classification schemes showed that there are many inconsistencies between the definitions of the map classes. This is especially true for the mixed type classes for which thresholds vary for the attributes/discriminators used in the classification process. Examination of these four global mapping projects provided quite a few important lessons for the future global mapping projects including the need for clear and uniform definitions of the classification scheme and an efficient, practical, and valid design of the accuracy assessment.

  6. Identification and expression analysis of the zebrafish orthologues of the mammalian MAP1LC3 gene family.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Swamynathan; Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Newman, Morgan; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-10-15

    Autophagy is the principle pathway within cells involved in clearing damaged proteins and organelles. Therefore autophagy is necessary to maintain the turnover balance of peptides and homoeostasis. Autophagy occurs at basal levels under normal conditions but can be upregulated by chemical inducers or stress conditions. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) serves as a versatile tool to understand the functions of genes implicated in autophagy. We report the identification of the zebrafish orthologues of mammalian genes MAP1LC3A (map1lc3a) and MAP1LC3B (map1lc3b) by phylogenetic and conserved synteny analysis and we examine their expression during embryonic development. The zebrafish map1lc3a and map1lc3b genes both show maternally contributed transcripts in early embryogenesis. However, levels of map1lc3a transcript steadily increase until at least 120h post-fertilisation while the levels of map1lc3b show a more variable pattern across developmental time. We have also validated the LC3I ratio/LC3I immunoblot autophagy assay in the presence of chloroquine (a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor). We found that the LC3II/LC3I ratio is significantly increased in the presence of sodium azide with chloroquine supporting that hypoxia induces autophagy in zebrafish. This was supported by our qPCR assay that showed increased map1lc3a transcript levels in the presence of sodium azide. In contrast, levels of map1lc3b transcripts were reduced in the presence of rapamycin but the decrease in the presence of sodium azide did not reach statistical significance. Our study supports the use of zebrafish for analysing the interplay between hypoxia, development and autophagy. PMID:25051050

  7. WAMI: a web server for the analysis of minisatellite maps

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Minisatellites are genomic loci composed of tandem arrays of short repetitive DNA segments. A minisatellite map is a sequence of symbols that represents the tandem repeat array such that the set of symbols is in one-to-one correspondence with the set of distinct repeats. Due to variations in repeat type and organization as well as copy number, the minisatellite maps have been widely used in forensic and population studies. In either domain, researchers need to compare the set of maps to each other, to build phylogenetic trees, to spot structural variations, and to study duplication dynamics. Efficient algorithms for these tasks are required to carry them out reliably and in reasonable time. Results In this paper we present WAMI, a web-server for the analysis of minisatellite maps. It performs the above mentioned computational tasks using efficient algorithms that take the model of map evolution into account. The WAMI interface is easy to use and the results of each analysis task are visualized. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, WAMI is the first server providing all these computational facilities to the minisatellite community. The WAMI web-interface and the source code of the underlying programs are available at http://www.nubios.nileu.edu.eg/tools/wami. PMID:20525398

  8. Extreme diversity of scorpion venom peptides and proteins revealed by transcriptomic analysis: implication for proteome evolution of scorpion venom arsenal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibao; He, Yawen; Zhao, Ruiming; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2012-02-16

    Venom is an important genetic development crucial to the survival of scorpions for over 400 million years. We studied the evolution of the scorpion venom arsenal by means of comparative transcriptome analysis of venom glands and phylogenetic analysis of shared types of venom peptides and proteins between buthids and euscorpiids. Fifteen types of venom peptides and proteins were sequenced during the venom gland transcriptome analyses of two Buthidae species (Lychas mucronatus and Isometrus maculatus) and one Euscorpiidae species (Scorpiops margerisonae). Great diversity has been observed in translated amino acid sequences of these transcripts for venom peptides and proteins. Seven types of venom peptides and proteins were shared between buthids and euscorpiids. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least five of the seven common types of venom peptides and proteins were likely recruited into the scorpion venom proteome before the lineage split between Buthidae and Euscorpiidae with their corresponding genes undergoing individual or multiple gene duplication events. These are α-KTxs, βKSPNs (β-KTxs and scorpines), anionic peptides, La1-like peptides, and SPSVs (serine proteases from scorpion venom). Multiple types of venom peptides and proteins were demonstrated to be continuously recruited into the venom proteome during the evolution process of individual scorpion lineages. Our results provide an insight into the recruitment pattern of the scorpion venom arsenal for the first time.

  9. Conservation Analysis of Dengue Virus T-cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Candidates Using Peptide Block Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets of broadly covering antigens. Since T-cell epitopes are recognized as peptides rather than individual residues, this method is based on calculating the information content of blocks of peptides from a multiple sequence alignment of homologous proteins rather than using the information content of individual residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage of variant antigens. We applied the block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which cover 99% of available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides. In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008) resulted in 165 conserved 9-mer peptides. Many of the conserved blocks are located consecutively in the proteins. Connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides 110 comprised predicted HLA binder sets. In total, 457 subunit peptides that encompass the diversity of all sequenced DENV strains of which 333 are T-cell epitope candidates. PMID:22566858

  10. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of plasma Aβ peptides concentrations in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chouraki, V; De Bruijn, RFAG; Chapuis, J; Bis, JC; Reitz, C; Schraen, S; Ibrahim-Verbaas, CA; Grenier-Boley, B; Delay, C; Rogers, R; Demiautte, F; Mounier, A; Fitzpatrick, AL; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Uitterlinden, AG; Hofman, A; Breteler, M; Becker, JT; Lathrop, M; Schupf, N; Alpérovitch, A; Mayeux, R; van Duijn, CM; Buée, L; Amouyel, P; Lopez, OL; Ikram, MA; Tzourio, C; Lambert, J-C

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are the major components of senile plaques, one of the main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, Aβ peptides’ functions are not fully understood and seem to be highly pleiotropic. We hypothesized that plasma Aβ peptides concentrations could be a suitable endophenotype for a genome-wide association study (GWAS) designed to (i) identify novel genetic factors involved in amyloid precursor protein metabolism and (ii) highlight relevant Aβ-related physiological and pathophysiological processes. Hence, we performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of four studies totaling 3 528 healthy individuals of European descent and for whom plasma Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides levels had been quantified. Although we did not observe any genome-wide significant locus, we identified 18 suggestive loci (P<1 × 10−5). Enrichment-pathway analyses revealed canonical pathways mainly involved in neuronal functions, for example, axonal guidance signaling. We also assessed the biological impact of the gene most strongly associated with plasma Aβ1–42 levels (cortexin 3, CTXN3) on APP metabolism in vitro and found that the gene protein was able to modulate Aβ1–42 secretion. In conclusion, our study results suggest that plasma Aβ peptides levels are valid endophenotypes in GWASs and can be used to characterize the metabolism and functions of APP and its metabolites. PMID:24535457

  11. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  12. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease.

  13. Epitope mapping of antigenic MUC1 peptides to breast cancer antibody fragment B27.29: a heteronuclear NMR study.

    PubMed

    Grinstead, Jeffrey S; Schuman, Jason T; Campbell, A Patricia

    2003-12-01

    MUC1 mucin is a breast cancer-associated transmembrane glycoprotein, of which the extracellular domain is formed by the repeating 20-amino acid sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAH. In neoplastic breast tissue, the highly immunogenic sequence PDTRPAP (in bold above) is exposed. Antibodies raised directly against MUC1-expressing tumors offer unique access to this neoplastic state, as they represent immunologically relevant "reverse templates" of the tumor-associated mucin. In a previous study [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], (1)H NMR methods were used to correlate the effects of cryptic glycosylation outside of the PDTRPAP core epitope sequence on the recognition and binding of Mab B27.29, a monoclonal antibody raised against breast tumor cells. In the study presented here, isotope-edited NMR methods, including (15)N and (13)C relaxation measurements, were used to probe the recognition and binding of the PDTRPAP epitope sequence to Fab B27.29. Two peptides were studied: a one-repeat MUC1 16mer peptide of the sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTA and a two-repeat MUC1 40mer peptide of the sequence (VTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAHG)(2). (15)N and (13)C NMR relaxation parameters were measured for both peptides free in solution and bound to Fab B27.29. The (13)C(alpha) T(1) values best represent changes in the local correlation time of the peptide epitope upon binding antibody, and demonstrate that the PDTRPAP sequence is immobilized in the antibody-combining site. This result is also reflected in the appearance of the (15)N- and (13)C-edited HSQC spectra, where line broadening of the same peptide epitope resonances is observed. The PDTRPAP peptide epitope expands upon the peptide epitope identified previously in our group as PDTRP by homonuclear NMR experiments [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], and illustrates the usefulness of the heteronuclear NMR experiments. The implications of these results are discussed within the context of MUC1 breast

  14. Analysis of variance of thematic mapping experiment data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    As an example of the methodology, data from an experiment using three scales of land-use and land-cover mapping have been analyzed. The binomial proportions of correct interpretations have been analyzed untransformed and transformed by both the arcsine and the logit transformations. A weighted analysis of variance adjustment has been used. There is evidence of a significant difference among the three scales of mapping (1:24 000, 1:100 000 and 1:250 000) using the transformed data. Multiple range tests showed that all three scales are different for the arcsine transformed data. - from Author

  15. Multiple Trait Analysis of Genetic Mapping for Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, C.; Zeng, Z. B.

    1995-01-01

    We present in this paper models and statistical methods for performing multiple trait analysis on mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) based on the composite interval mapping method. By taking into account the correlated structure of multiple traits, this joint analysis has several advantages, compared with separate analyses, for mapping QTL, including the expected improvement on the statistical power of the test for QTL and on the precision of parameter estimation. Also this joint analysis provides formal procedures to test a number of biologically interesting hypotheses concerning the nature of genetic correlations between different traits. Among the testing procedures considered are those for joint mapping, pleiotropy, QTL by environment interaction, and pleiotropy vs. close linkage. The test of pleiotropy (one pleiotropic QTL at a genome position) vs. close linkage (multiple nearby nonpleiotropic QTL) can have important implications for our understanding of the nature of genetic correlations between different traits in certain regions of a genome and also for practical applications in animal and plant breeding because one of the major goals in breeding is to break unfavorable linkage. Results of extensive simulation studies are presented to illustrate various properties of the analyses. PMID:7672582

  16. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  17. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H.; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids.

  18. A cost-benefit analysis of The National Map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halsing, David L.; Theissen, Kevin; Bernknopf, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The Geography Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted this cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of The National Map. This analysis is an evaluation of the proposed Geography Discipline initiative to provide the Nation with a mechanism to access current and consistent digital geospatial data. This CBA is a supporting document to accompany the Exhibit 300 Capital Asset Plan and Business Case of The National Map Reengineering Program. The framework for estimating the benefits is based on expected improvements in processing information to perform any of the possible applications of spatial data. This analysis does not attempt to determine the benefits and costs of performing geospatial-data applications. Rather, it estimates the change in the differences between those benefits and costs with The National Map and the current situation without it. The estimates of total costs and benefits of The National Map were based on the projected implementation time, development and maintenance costs, rates of data inclusion and integration, expected usage levels over time, and a benefits estimation model. The National Map provides data that are current, integrated, consistent, complete, and more accessible in order to decrease the cost of implementing spatial-data applications and (or) improve the outcome of those applications. The efficiency gains in per-application improvements are greater than the cost to develop and maintain The National Map, meaning that the program would bring a positive net benefit to the Nation. The average improvement in the net benefit of performing a spatial data application was multiplied by a simulated number of application implementations across the country. The numbers of users, existing applications, and rates of application implementation increase over time as The National Map is developed and accessed by spatial data users around the country. Results from the 'most likely' estimates of model parameters and data inputs indicate that

  19. MALDI MS sample preparation by using paraffin wax film: systematic study and application for peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Chen, Ruibing; Ma, Mingming; Li, Lingjun

    2008-01-15

    Recently developed sample preparation techniques employing hydrophobic sample support have improved the detection sensitivity and mass spectral quality of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). These methods concentrate the samples on target by minimizing the sample area via the solvent repellent effect of the target surface. In the current study, we employed the use of paraffin wax film (Parafilm M) for improved MALDI MS analysis of low-abundance peptide mixtures, including neuronal tissue releasate and protein tryptic digests. This thin film was found to strongly repel polar solvents including water, methanol, and acetonitrile, which enabled the application of a wide range of sample preparation protocols that involved the use of various organic solvents. A "nanoliter-volume deposition" technique employing a capillary column has been used to produce tiny ( approximately 400 microm) matrix spots of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid on the film. By systematically optimizing the sample volume, solvent composition, and film treatment, the Parafilm M substrate in combination with the nanoliter-volume matrix deposition method allowed dilute sample to be concentrated on the film for MALDI MS analysis. Peptide mixtures with nanomolar concentrations have been detected by MALDI time-of-flight and MALDI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers. Overall, the use of Parafilm M enabled improved sensitivity and spectral quality for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures.

  20. Benzimidazole, coumrindione and flavone derivatives as alternate UV laser desorption ionization (LDI) matrices for peptides analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is a soft ionization mass spectrometric technique, allowing the analysis of bio-molecules and other macromolecules. The matrix molecules require certain characteristic features to serve in the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. Therefore, only a limited number of compounds have been identified as ultraviolet- laser desorption/ionization (UV-LDI) matrices. However, many of these routine matrices generate background signals that useful information is often lost in them. We have reported flavones, coumarindione and benzimidazole derivatives as alternate UV-LDI matrices. Results Thirty one compounds have been successfully employed by us as matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight (LMW) peptides (up to 2000 Da). Two peptides, bradykinin and renin substrate tetra-decapeptide were analyzed by using the newly developed matrices. The MS measurements were made after mixing the matrix solution with analyte by using dried droplet sample preparation procedures. The synthesized matrix materials showed better S/N ratios and minimal background signals for low mass range. Furthermore, pico molar concentrations of [Glu1]-fibrinopeptide B human could be easily analyzed with these matrices. Finally, BSA-digest was analyzed and identified through database search against Swiss-Prot by using Mascot. Conclusions These results validate the good performance of the synthesized UV-laser desorption/ionization (LDI) matrices for the analysis of low molecular weight peptides. PMID:23621998

  1. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  2. In silico prediction of peptide binding affinity to class I mouse major histocompatibility complexes: a comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) study.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for the in silico identification of T cell epitopes (which form the basis of many vaccines, diagnostics, and reagents) rely on the accurate prediction of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) affinity. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for the prediction of peptide binding to class I MHC molecules was established using the comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) method. Three MHC alleles were studied: H2-D(b), H2-K(b), and H2-K(k). Models were produced for each allele. Each model consisted of five physicochemical descriptors-steric bulk, electrostatic potentials, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen-bond donor and hydrogen-bond acceptor abilities. The models have an acceptable level of predictivity: cross-validation leave-one-out statistical terms q2 and SEP (standard error of prediction) ranged between 0.490 and 0.679 and between 0.525 and 0.889, respectively. The non-cross-validated statistical terms r2 and SEE (standard error of estimate) ranged between 0.913 and 0.979 and between 0.167 and 0.248, respectively. The use of coefficient contour maps, which indicate favored and disfavored areas for each position of the MHC-bound peptides, allowed the binding specificity of each allele to be identified, visualized, and understood. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of CoMSIA as a method for studying peptide-MHC interactions. The peptides used in this study are available on the Internet (http://www.jenner.ac.uk/AntiJen). The partial least-squares method is available commercially in the SYBYL molecular modeling software package. PMID:16180918

  3. Mass spectrometry analysis and quantitation of peptides presented on the MHC II molecules of mouse spleen dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yu, Haiqiang; Zebroski, Henry A.; Dengjel, Jörn; Deng, Haiteng; Mojsov, Svetlana; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells and display short bound peptide fragments derived from self and nonself antigens. These peptide-MHC complexes function to maintain immunological tolerance in the case of self antigens and initiate the CD4+ T cell response in the case of foreign proteins. Here we report the application of LC-MS/MS analysis to identify MHC II peptides derived from endogenous proteins expressed in freshly isolated murine splenic DCs. The cell number was enriched in vivo upon treatment with Flt3L-B16 melanoma cells. In a typical experiment, starting with about 5× 108 splenic DCs, we were able to reliably identify a repertoire of over 100 MHC II peptides originating from about 55 proteins localized in membrane (23%), intracellular (26%), endo-lysosomal (12%), nuclear (14%) and extracellular (25%) compartments. Using synthetic isotopically labeled peptides corresponding to the sequences of representative bound MHC II peptides, we quantified by LC-MS relative peptide abundance. In a single experiment, peptides were detected in a wide concentration range spanning from 2.5 fmol/μL to 12 pmol/μL or from approximately 13 copies to 2×105 copies per DC. These peptides were found in similar amounts on B cells where we detected about 80 peptides originating from 55 proteins distributed homogenously within the same cellular compartments as in DCs. About 90 different binding motifs predicted by the epitope prediction algorithm were found within the sequences of the identified MHC II peptides. These results set a foundation for future studies to quantitatively investigate the MHC II repertoire on DCs generated under different immunization conditions. PMID:21913724

  4. Porcine MAP3K5 analysis: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variations associated with residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Zhang, L C; Zhang, J S; Song, X; Wang, L G; Liang, J; Zhang, Y B; Liu, X; Yan, H; Zhang, T; Yue, J W; Li, N; Wu, Q Q; Wang, L X

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5) is essential for apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and is a candidate marker for residual feed intake (RFI) in pig. We cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of porcine MAP3K5 by rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The 5451-bp gene contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (718 bp), a coding region (3738 bp), and a 3'-UTR (995 bp), and encodes a peptide of 1245 amino acids, which shares 97, 99, 97, 93, 91, and 84% sequence identity with cattle, sheep, human, mouse, chicken, and zebrafish MAP3K5, respectively. The deduced MAP3K5 protein sequence contains two conserved domains: a DUF4071 domain and a protein kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that porcine MAP3K5 forms a separate branch to vicugna and camel MAP3K5. Tissue expression analysis using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that MAP3K5 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, muscle, fat, pancrea, ileum, and stomach tissues. Copy number variation was detected for porcine MAP3K5 and validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, a significant increase in average copy number was detected in the low RFI group when compared to the high RFI group in a Duroc pig population. These results provide useful information regarding the influence of MAP3K5 on RFI in pigs. PMID:27525933

  5. Geoscience data visualization and analysis using GeoMapApp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, Vicki; Carbotte, Suzanne; Ryan, William; Chan, Samantha

    2013-04-01

    Increased availability of geoscience data resources has resulted in new opportunities for developing visualization and analysis tools that not only promote data integration and synthesis, but also facilitate quantitative cross-disciplinary access to data. Interdisciplinary investigations, in particular, frequently require visualizations and quantitative access to specialized data resources across disciplines, which has historically required specialist knowledge of data formats and software tools. GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org) is a free online data visualization and analysis tool that provides direct quantitative access to a wide variety of geoscience data for a broad international interdisciplinary user community. While GeoMapApp provides access to online data resources, it can also be packaged to work offline through the deployment of a small portable hard drive. This mode of operation can be particularly useful during field programs to provide functionality and direct access to data when a network connection is not possible. Hundreds of data sets from a variety of repositories are directly accessible in GeoMapApp, without the need for the user to understand the specifics of file formats or data reduction procedures. Available data include global and regional gridded data, images, as well as tabular and vector datasets. In addition to basic visualization and data discovery functionality, users are provided with simple tools for creating customized maps and visualizations and to quantitatively interrogate data. Specialized data portals with advanced functionality are also provided for power users to further analyze data resources and access underlying component datasets. Users may import and analyze their own geospatial datasets by loading local versions of geospatial data and can access content made available through Web Feature Services (WFS) and Web Map Services (WMS). Once data are loaded in GeoMapApp, a variety options are provided to export data and/or 2D/3D

  6. Kinetic analysis of artificial peptide self-replication. Part I: the homochiral case.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jesús Rivera; Pimienta, Véronique; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Buhse, Thomas

    2003-03-25

    Computational kinetic analysis of a lately discovered homochiral peptide self-replicator is presented. A 6-step kinetic model was designed that addresses the main reactions and hydrophobic interactions involved in this template-directed, autocatalytic system and that gave rise to excellent fitting of 4 previously published independent experimental series. The model sheds light on the mechanistic principle of the reaction system and illustrates directly a number of dynamic properties such as the observed autocatalytic efficiency. It was found that the dynamics are basically governed by two reversible hydrophobic interactions: between the template and a peptide fragment and between two template species. The later association was determined to be considerably more favored, which leads to the predominant presence of the catalytically inactive template dimer in the reaction system. Our results show that the involvement of a template trimer is not necessary to obtain the observed fittings.

  7. Ionospheric mapping by regional spherical harmonic analysis: New developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franceschi, G.; de Santis, A.; Pau, S.

    1994-12-01

    The method of Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis (SCHA) /1/ has been applied /2/ to the critical frequency of the F2 layer (f0F2) for mapping and modelling it over Europe. The model was based on longitudinal expansion in Fourier series, and fractional Legendre colatitudinal functions over a spherical cap including Europe. Here a new and simpler technique, previously developed for the regional modelling of the geomagnetic field /3/, is introduced and described. The basic improvement of the new method, called Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis (ASHA), implies the use of conventional Spherical Harmonic (SH) functions after the colatitude interval is adjusted to that of a hemisphere. Examples are shown dealing with the application of ASHA to retrospective mapping and modelling of the monthly medians of f0F2 over Europe.

  8. Homogenization of soil properties map by Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde Arias, Omar; Garrido, Alberto; Villeta, Maria; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    It is widely known that extreme climatic phenomena occur with more intensity and frequency. This fact has put more pressure over farming, becoming very important to implement agriculture risk management policies by governments and institutions. One of the main strategies is transfer risk by agriculture insurance. Agriculture insurance based in indexes has gained importance in the last decade. And consist in a comparison between measured index values with a defined threshold that triggers damage losses. However, based index insurance could not be based on an isolated measurement. It is necessary to be integrated in a complete monitoring system that uses many sources of information and tools. For example, index influence areas, crop production risk maps, crop yields, claim statistics, and so on. To establish index influence area is necessary to have a secondary information that show us homogeneous climatic and soil areas, which inside of each homogeneous classes, index measurements on crops of interest are going to be similar, and in this way reduce basis risk. But it is necessary an efficient method to accomplish this aim, to get homogeneous areas that not depends on only in expert criteria and that could be widely used, for this reason this study asses two conventional agricultural and geographic methods (control and climatic maps) based in expert criteria, and one classical statistical method of multi-factorial analysis (factorial map), all of them to homogenize soil and climatic characteristics. Resulting maps were validated by agricultural and spatial analysis, obtaining very good results in statistical method (Factorial map) that proves to be an efficient and accuracy method that could be used for similar porpoises.

  9. Comprehensive Analysis of the Naturally Processed Peptide Repertoire: Differences between HLA-A and B in the Immunopeptidome

    PubMed Central

    Spijkers, Sanne N. M.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; van der Poel, Kees; Costa, Ana I.; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; van Baarle, Debbie; Kesmir, Can

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response is determined by the peptide repertoire presented by the HLA class I molecules of an individual. We performed an in-depth analysis of the peptide repertoire presented by a broad panel of common HLA class I molecules on four B lymphoblastoid cell-lines (BLCL). Peptide elution and mass spectrometry analysis were utilised to investigate the number and abundance of self-peptides. Altogether, 7897 unique self-peptides, derived of 4344 proteins, were eluted. After viral infection, the number of unique self-peptides eluted significantly decreased compared to uninfected cells, paralleled by a decrease in the number of source proteins. In the overall dataset, the total number of unique self-peptides eluted from HLA-B molecules was larger than from HLA-A molecules, and they were derived from a larger number of source proteins. These results in B cells suggest that HLA-B molecules possibly present a more diverse repertoire compared to their HLA-A counterparts, which may contribute to their immunodominance. This study provides a unique data set giving new insights into the complex system of antigen presentation for a broad panel of HLA molecules, many of which were never studied this extensively before. PMID:26375851

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of the antibiotic teicoplanin and its aglycone with cell-wall peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, P; Laynez, J; Menendez, M; Cañada, J; Garcia-Blanco, F

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the interaction of the glycopeptidic antibiotic teicoplanin and its peptidic moiety with analogues of bacterial cell-wall peptides were studied by means of calorimetric and spectrophotometric techniques. The analysis of the thermodynamic data has allowed us to evaluate the contributions of the different peptide groups to the binding process. The nature of the primary binding forces is also discussed for each interacting group, on the basis of their enthalpic and entropic contribution and in connection with the detailed structural information available for these antibiotics from n.m.r. data. Similar analyses for the case of vancomycin and ristocetin are also reported. PMID:2137332

  11. Peptidomic analysis of antimicrobial peptides in skin secretions of Amolops mantzorum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhong; Yu, Zhijun; Xu, Shiqi; Hu, Yonghong; Guo, Chao; Li, Fengjiao; Li, Jing; Liu, Jingze; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Amphibian skin secretions contain abundant bioactive peptides that are valuable natural resources for human beings. However, many amphibians are disappearing from the world, making relevant scientific studies even more important. In this study, 24 cDNA sequences encoding antimicrobial peptide (AMP) precursors were initially cloned by screening a cDNA library derived from the skin of the Sichuan torrent frog, Amolops mantzorum. Eighteen mature AMPs belonging to 11 different families were deduced from these cDNA clones. Biological function was confirmed in each family of these AMPs. Some of them were purified from the skin secretions, and their molecular structures were determined by Edman degradation. Liquid chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based peptidomics was used to further confirm the actual presence and characteristics of mature AMPs in the skin secretions of A. mantzorum. Incomplete tryptic digestion and gas-phase fractionation (GPF) analysis were used to increase the peptidome coverage and reproducibility of peptide ion selection. PMID:24601776

  12. A high throughput MHC II binding assay for quantitative analysis of peptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Regina; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-03-25

    Biochemical assays with recombinant human MHC II molecules can provide rapid, quantitative insights into immunogenic epitope identification, deletion, or design(1,2). Here, a peptide-MHC II binding assay is scaled to 384-well format. The scaled down protocol reduces reagent costs by 75% and is higher throughput than previously described 96-well protocols(1,3-5). Specifically, the experimental design permits robust and reproducible analysis of up to 15 peptides against one MHC II allele per 384-well ELISA plate. Using a single liquid handling robot, this method allows one researcher to analyze approximately ninety test peptides in triplicate over a range of eight concentrations and four MHC II allele types in less than 48 hr. Others working in the fields of protein deimmunization or vaccine design and development may find the protocol to be useful in facilitating their own work. In particular, the step-by-step instructions and the visual format of JoVE should allow other users to quickly and easily establish this methodology in their own labs.

  13. A High Throughput MHC II Binding Assay for Quantitative Analysis of Peptide Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Salvat, Regina; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical assays with recombinant human MHC II molecules can provide rapid, quantitative insights into immunogenic epitope identification, deletion, or design1,2. Here, a peptide-MHC II binding assay is scaled to 384-well format. The scaled down protocol reduces reagent costs by 75% and is higher throughput than previously described 96-well protocols1,3-5. Specifically, the experimental design permits robust and reproducible analysis of up to 15 peptides against one MHC II allele per 384-well ELISA plate. Using a single liquid handling robot, this method allows one researcher to analyze approximately ninety test peptides in triplicate over a range of eight concentrations and four MHC II allele types in less than 48 hr. Others working in the fields of protein deimmunization or vaccine design and development may find the protocol to be useful in facilitating their own work. In particular, the step-by-step instructions and the visual format of JoVE should allow other users to quickly and easily establish this methodology in their own labs. PMID:24686319

  14. Protein separation and characterization by np-RP-HPLC followed by intact MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping analyses.

    PubMed

    Dauly, Claire; Perlman, David H; Costello, Catherine E; McComb, Mark E

    2006-07-01

    Because of their complexity, the separation of intact proteins from complex mixtures is an important step to comparative proteomics and the identification and characterization of the proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). In the study reported, we evaluated the use of nonporous-reversed-phase (np-RP)-HPLC for intact protein separation prior to MS analyses. The separation system was characterized and compared to 1D-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis in terms of resolution and sensitivity. We demonstrate that np-RP-HPLC protein separation is highly reproducible and provides intact protein fractions which can be directly analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS for intact molecular weight determination. An in-well digestion protocol was developed, allowing for rapid protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and resulted in comparable or improved peptide recovery compared with in-gel digestion. The np-RP sensitivity of detection by UV absorbance at 214 nm for intact proteins was at the low ng level and the sensitivity of peptide analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS was in the 10-50 fmol level. A membrane protein fraction was characterized to demonstrate application of this methodology. Among the identified proteins, multiple forms of vimentin were observed. Overall, we demonstrate that np-RP-HPLC followed by MALDI-TOF-MS allows for rapid, sensitive, and reproducible protein fractionation and very specific protein characterization by integration of PMF analysis with MS intact molecular weight information.

  15. Conjoint analysis for evaluating parameterized gamut mapping algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zolliker, Peter; Baranczuk, Zofia; Sprow, Iris; Giesen, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    We show that conjoint analysis, a popular multi-attribute preference assessment technique used in market research, is a well suited tool to evaluate a multitude of gamut mapping algorithms simultaneously. Our analysis is based on data from psycho-visual tests assessed in a laboratory and in a web environment. Conjoint analysis allows us to quantify the contribution of every single parameter value to the perceived value of the algorithm; it also allows us to test the influence of additional parameters like gamut size or color shifts. We show that conjoint analysis can be individualized to images or observers if enough data is available. Especially promising in this respect is the combination of individual and population data.

  16. Why Map Issues? On Controversy Analysis as a Digital Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article takes stock of recent efforts to implement controversy analysis as a digital method in the study of science, technology, and society (STS) and beyond and outlines a distinctive approach to address the problem of digital bias. Digital media technologies exert significant influence on the enactment of controversy in online settings, and this risks undermining the substantive focus of controversy analysis conducted by digital means. To address this problem, I propose a shift in thematic focus from controversy analysis to issue mapping. The article begins by distinguishing between three broad frameworks that currently guide the development of controversy analysis as a digital method, namely, demarcationist, discursive, and empiricist. Each has been adopted in STS, but only the last one offers a digital “move beyond impartiality.” I demonstrate this approach by analyzing issues of Internet governance with the aid of the social media platform Twitter. PMID:26336325

  17. Children's Understanding of Large-Scale Mapping Tasks: An Analysis of Talk, Drawings, and Gesture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Cordy, Michelle; Langemeyer, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This research examined how children represent motion in large-scale mapping tasks that we referred to as "motion maps". The underlying mathematical content was transformational geometry. In total, 19 children, 8- to 10-year-old, created motion maps and captured their motion maps with accompanying verbal description digitally. Analysis of…

  18. A LiDAR based analysis of hydraulic hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorzi, F.; De Luca, A.; Checchinato, A.; Segna, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2012-04-01

    Mapping hydraulic hazard is a ticklish procedure as it involves technical and socio-economic aspects. On the one hand no dangerous areas should be excluded, on the other hand it is important not to exceed, beyond the necessary, with the surface assigned to some use limitations. The availability of a high resolution topographic survey allows nowadays to face this task with innovative procedures, both in the planning (mapping) and in the map validation phases. The latter is the object of the present work. It should be stressed that the described procedure is proposed purely as a preliminary analysis based on topography only, and therefore does not intend in any way to replace more sophisticated analysis methods requiring based on hydraulic modelling. The reference elevation model is a combination of the digital terrain model and the digital building model (DTM+DBM). The option of using the standard surface model (DSM) is not viable, as the DSM represents the vegetation canopy as a solid volume. This has the consequence of unrealistically considering the vegetation as a geometric obstacle to water flow. In some cases the topographic model construction requires the identification and digitization of the principal breaklines, such as river banks, ditches and similar natural or artificial structures. The geometrical and topological procedure for the validation of the hydraulic hazard maps is made of two steps. In the first step the whole area is subdivided into fluvial segments, with length chosen as a reasonable trade-off between the need to keep the hydrographical unit as complete as possible, and the need to separate sections of the river bed with significantly different morphology. Each of these segments is made of a single elongated polygon, whose shape can be quite complex, especially for meandering river sections, where the flow direction (i.e. the potential energy gradient associated to the talweg) is often inverted. In the second step the segments are analysed

  19. Expanding the repertoire of secretory peptides controlling root development with comparative genome analysis and functional assays.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Sarieh; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Parizot, Boris; Fernandez, Ana; Njo, Maria Fransiska; Van de Peer, Yves; Beeckman, Tom; Hilson, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Plant genomes encode numerous small secretory peptides (SSPs) whose functions have yet to be explored. Based on structural features that characterize SSP families known to take part in postembryonic development, this comparative genome analysis resulted in the identification of genes coding for oligopeptides potentially involved in cell-to-cell communication. Because genome annotation based on short sequence homology is difficult, the criteria for the de novo identification and aggregation of conserved SSP sequences were first benchmarked across five reference plant species. The resulting gene families were then extended to 32 genome sequences, including major crops. The global phylogenetic pattern common to the functionally characterized SSP families suggests that their apparition and expansion coincide with that of the land plants. The SSP families can be searched online for members, sequences and consensus (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/PlantSSP/). Looking for putative regulators of root development, Arabidopsis thaliana SSP genes were further selected through transcriptome meta-analysis based on their expression at specific stages and in specific cell types in the course of the lateral root formation. As an additional indication that formerly uncharacterized SSPs may control development, this study showed that root growth and branching were altered by the application of synthetic peptides matching conserved SSP motifs, sometimes in very specific ways. The strategy used in the study, combining comparative genomics, transcriptome meta-analysis and peptide functional assays in planta, pinpoints factors potentially involved in non-cell-autonomous regulatory mechanisms. A similar approach can be implemented in different species for the study of a wide range of developmental programmes.

  20. Expanding the repertoire of secretory peptides controlling root development with comparative genome analysis and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Sarieh; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Parizot, Boris; Fernandez, Ana; Njo, Maria Fransiska; Van de Peer, Yves; Beeckman, Tom; Hilson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes encode numerous small secretory peptides (SSPs) whose functions have yet to be explored. Based on structural features that characterize SSP families known to take part in postembryonic development, this comparative genome analysis resulted in the identification of genes coding for oligopeptides potentially involved in cell-to-cell communication. Because genome annotation based on short sequence homology is difficult, the criteria for the de novo identification and aggregation of conserved SSP sequences were first benchmarked across five reference plant species. The resulting gene families were then extended to 32 genome sequences, including major crops. The global phylogenetic pattern common to the functionally characterized SSP families suggests that their apparition and expansion coincide with that of the land plants. The SSP families can be searched online for members, sequences and consensus (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/PlantSSP/). Looking for putative regulators of root development, Arabidopsis thaliana SSP genes were further selected through transcriptome meta-analysis based on their expression at specific stages and in specific cell types in the course of the lateral root formation. As an additional indication that formerly uncharacterized SSPs may control development, this study showed that root growth and branching were altered by the application of synthetic peptides matching conserved SSP motifs, sometimes in very specific ways. The strategy used in the study, combining comparative genomics, transcriptome meta-analysis and peptide functional assays in planta, pinpoints factors potentially involved in non-cell-autonomous regulatory mechanisms. A similar approach can be implemented in different species for the study of a wide range of developmental programmes. PMID:26195730

  1. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides.

  2. Synergistic effect of vasoactive intestinal peptides on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts: amplification of p44/p42 MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Jun; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Minamitani, Chiho; Kato, Kenji; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2010-05-01

    We previously showed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in these cells. VIP, which by itself slightly stimulated IL-6 synthesis, synergistically enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The synergistic effect of VIP on the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis was concentration-dependent in the range between 1 and 70 nM. We previously reported that VIP stimulated cAMP production in MC3T3-E1 cells. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, or 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8bromo-cAMP), a plasma membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, markedly enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis as well as VIP. VIP markedly up-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. The Akt phosphorylation stimulated by TNF-alpha was only slightly affected by VIP. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, significantly suppressed the enhancement of TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis by VIP. The synergistic effect of a combination of VIP and TNF-alpha on the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase was diminished by H-89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results strongly suggest that VIP synergistically enhances TNF-alpha-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via up-regulating p44/p42 MAP kinase through the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system in osteoblasts.

  3. Dissociation behavior of a bifunctional tempo-active ester reagent for peptide structure analysis by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihling, Christian; Falvo, Francesco; Kratochvil, Isabel; Sinz, Andrea; Schäfer, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional active ester cross-linking reagent containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) moiety connected to a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate MS analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). The TEMPO-Bz-linker was reacted with all 20 proteinogenic amino acids as well as with model peptides to gain detailed insights into its fragmentation mechanism upon collision activation. The final goal of this proof-of-principle study was to evaluate the potential of the TEMPO-Bz-linker for chemical cross-linking studies to derive 3D-structure information of proteins. Our studies were motivated by the well documented instability of the central NO-C bond of TEMPO-Bz reagents upon collision activation. The fragmentation of this specific bond was investigated in respect to charge states and amino acid composition of a large set of precursor ions resulting in the identification of two distinct fragmentation pathways. Molecular ions with highly basic residues are able to keep the charge carriers located, i.e. protons or sodium cations, and consequently decompose via a homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond of the TEMPO-Bz-linker. This leads to the formation of complementary open-shell peptide radical cations, while precursor ions that are protonated at the TEMPO-Bz-linker itself exhibit a charge-driven formation of even-electron product ions upon collision activation. MS(3) product ion experiments provided amino acid sequence information and allowed determining the cross-linking site. Our study fully characterizes the CID behavior of the TEMPO-Bz-linker and demonstrates its potential, but also its limitations for chemical cross-linking applications utilizing the special features of open-shell peptide ions on the basis of selective tandem MS analysis.

  4. Peptide linkage mapping of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded type IV secretion system reveals protein subassemblies.

    PubMed

    Ward, Doyle V; Draper, Olga; Zupan, John R; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2002-08-20

    Numerous bacterial pathogens use type IV secretion systems (T4SS) to deliver virulence factors directly to the cytoplasm of plant, animal, and human host cells. Here, evidence for interactions among components of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens vir-encoded T4SS is presented. The results derive from a high-resolution yeast two-hybrid assay, in which a library of small peptide domains of T4SS components was screened for interactions. The use of small peptides overcomes problems associated with assaying for interactions involving membrane-associated proteins. We established interactions between VirB11 (an inner membrane pore-forming protein), VirB9 (a periplasmic protein), and VirB7 (an outer membrane-associated lipoprotein and putative pilus component). We provide evidence for an interaction pathway, among conserved members of a T4SS, spanning the A. tumefaciens envelope and including a potential pore protein. In addition, we have determined interactions between VirB1 (a lytic transglycosylase likely involved in the local remodeling of the peptidoglycan) and primarily VirB8, but also VirB4, VirB10, and VirB11 (proteins likely to assemble the core structure of the T4SS). VirB4 interacts with VirB8, VirB10, and VirB11, also establishing a connection to the core components. The identification of these interactions suggests a model for assembly of the T4SS. PMID:12177441

  5. Polypyrrole-peptide microarray for biomolecular interaction analysis by SPR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Cortès, Sandra; Brakha, Carine; Marche, Patrice; Roget, André; Livache, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, high-throughput analysis of biological events is a great challenge which could take benefit of the recent development of microarray devices. The great potential of such technology is related to the availability of a chip bearing a large set of probes, stable and easy to obtain, and suitable for ligand binding detection. Here, we described a new method based on polypyrrole chemistry and allowing the covalent immobilization of peptides in a microarray format and on a gold surface compatible with the use of Surface Plasmon Resonance. This technique is then illustrated by the detection and characterization of antibodies induced by hepatitis C virus and present in patients’serums. PMID:19649603

  6. Sustained Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation Investigated with Centrality Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiangyu; Huang, Wenjing; Napadow, Vitaly; Liang, Fanrong; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Witt, Claudia M.; Nierhaus, Till; Pach, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can have instant and sustained effects, however, its mechanisms of action are still unclear. Here, we investigated the sustained effect of acupuncture by evaluating centrality changes in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging after manually stimulating the acupuncture point ST36 at the lower leg or two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome). Data from a previously published experiment evaluating instant BOLD effects and S2-seed-based resting state connectivity was re-analyzed using eigenvector centrality mapping and degree centrality mapping. These data-driven methods might add new insights into sustained acupuncture effects on both global and local inter-region connectivity (centrality) by evaluating the summary of connections of every voxel. We found higher centrality in parahippocampal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus after ST36 stimulation in comparison to the two control points. These regions are positively correlated to major hubs of the default mode network, which might be the primary network affected by chronic pain. The stronger integration of both regions within the whole-brain connectome after stimulation of ST36 might be a potential contributor to pain modulation by acupuncture. These findings highlight centrality mapping as a valuable analysis for future imaging studies investigating clinically relevant outcomes associated with physiological response to acupuncture stimulation. Clinical trial registration: NCT01079689, ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:27803655

  7. Application of automated multispectral analysis to Delaware's coastal vegetation mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Daiber, D.; Bartlett, D. S.; Crichton, O. W.; Fornes, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Overlay maps of Delaware's wetlands have been prepared, showing the dominant species or group of species of vegetation present. Five such categories of vegetation were used indicating marshes dominated by: (1) salt marsh cord grass; (2) salt marsh hay and spike grass; (3) reed grass; (4) high tide bush and sea myrtle; and (5) a group of fresh water species found in impounded areas built to attract water fowl. Fifteen such maps cover Delaware's wetlands from the Pennsylvania to the Maryland borders. The mapping technique employed utilizes the General Electric multispectral data processing system. This system is a hybrid analog-digital system designed as an analysis tool to be used by an operator whose own judgment and knowledge of ground truth can be incorporated at any time into the analyzing process. The result is a high speed, cost effective method for producing enhanced photomaps showing a number of spectral classes, each enhanced spectral class being representative of a vegetative species or group of species.

  8. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  9. Stakeholder analysis and mapping as targeted communication strategy.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author highlights the importance of stakeholder theory and discusses how to apply the theory to conduct a stakeholder analysis. This article also provides an explanation of how to use related stakeholder mapping techniques with targeted communication strategies.

  10. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  11. Stakeholder analysis and mapping as targeted communication strategy.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author highlights the importance of stakeholder theory and discusses how to apply the theory to conduct a stakeholder analysis. This article also provides an explanation of how to use related stakeholder mapping techniques with targeted communication strategies. PMID:22922747

  12. School children dyslexia analysis using self organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Novák, D; Kordík, P; Macas, M; Vyhnálek, M; Brzezny, R; Lhotská, L

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the study is an unsupervised classification of school children dyslexia. Eye movements of 49 subjects were measured using videooculographic technique (VOG) during two non-reading and one reading tasks. A feature selection was performed obtaining data set consisting of 26 features. Next an inductive modelling technique was applied to data set resulting in extraction of six features which were used as the input to self-organizing map (SOM). Three clusters were finally formed by the SOM proving that the proposed methodology is suitable for automatic dyslexia analysis.

  13. Mitochondrial DAMPs from femoral reamings activate neutrophils via formyl peptide receptors and P44/42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Carl J.; Sursal, Tolga; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Appleton, Paul T.; Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis Fractures and femoral reaming are associated with lung injury. The mechanisms linking fractures and inflammation are unclear; but tissue disruption might release mitochondria. Mitochondria are evolutionarily derived from bacteria and contain “Damage Associated Molecular Patterns” (DAMPs) like formylated peptides that can activate immunocytes. We therefore studied whether fracture reaming releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) and how MTD act on immune cells. Methods Femur fracture reamings (FFx) from 10 patients were spun to remove bone particulates. Supernatants were assayed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria were isolated from the residual reaming slurry, sonicated and spun at 12,000g. The resultant MTD were assayed for their ability to cause neutrophil (PMN) Ca2+ transient production, p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, IL-8 release and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) release with and without formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) blockade. Rats were injected with MTD and whole lung assayed for p44/42 activation. Results mtDNA appears at many thousand fold normal plasma levels in FFx and at intermediate levels in patients’ plasma, suggesting release from fracture to plasma. FFx MTD caused brisk PMN Ca2+ flux, activated PMN p44/42 MAPK and caused PMN release of IL-8 and MMP9. Responses to MTD were inhibited by FPR1 blockade using Cyclosporin H and anti-FPR1. MTD injection caused P44/42 phosphorylation in rat lung. Conclusions FFx reaming releases mitochondria into the wound and circulation. MTD then activates PMN. Release of damage signals like MTD from FFx may underlie activation of the cytokine cascades known to be associated with facture fixation and lung injury. PMID:20736789

  14. Frames of reference for helicopter electronic maps - The relevance of spatial cognition and componential analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-generated map displays for NOE and low-level helicopter flight were formed according to prior research on maps, navigational problem solving, and spatial cognition in large-scale environments. The north-up map emphasized consistency of object location, wheareas, the track-up map emphasized map-terrain congruency. A component analysis indicates that different cognitive components, e.g., orienting and absolute object location, are supported to varying degrees by properties of different frames of reference.

  15. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of a labeled peptide bound to a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P C; Altman, J D; Boniface, J J; Sakaguchi, K; Reay, P A; Omichinski, J G; Appella, E; Davis, M M

    1993-07-20

    The formation of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes and their subsequent recognition by T cells is a pivotal event in the initiation of an immune response. While X-ray crystal structures are now available for class I MHC/peptide complexes, little detailed structural information is known about the class II MHC equivalent, and there are no solution structure data for either. A 16 amino acid residue moth cytochrome c peptide (residues 88 to 103) was 13C-labeled for two-dimensional isotope-edited NMR analysis. The peptide was labeled either selectively in the methyl groups of alanine residues or uniformly at every carbon position, and bound to unlabeled soluble mouse I-Ek class II MHC molecules. Although alpha-helical in the native cytochrome c protein and with no uniform structure in solution, the peptide is bound to the I-Ek molecule with the alpha-carbon atoms of the 11 C-terminal residues held in the binding groove. This indicates that the class II MHC peptide binding site is somewhat larger than that of class I MHC molecules (> or = 11 amino acid residues versus 8 to 10 amino acid residues), consistent with recent data on eluted peptides. Despite the large size of the complex (approximately 70 kDa), nuclear Overhauser effects are clearly detectable between peptide side-chains and the MHC molecule. Indications of the buried or exposed nature of particular side-chains within the bound peptide are derived from the NMR data and these are used together with information from previous biological studies to propose a crude model of the interaction of the peptide with the groove of the MHC molecule. We find no evidence for a conformational change in the peptide/MHC complex in the spectra at pH 5.0 versus pH 7.0, despite a 40-fold faster on-rate for the peptide at the lower pH value. PMID:8393933

  16. N-Terminal Peptide Detection with Optimized Peptide-Spectrum Matching and Streamlined Sequence Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lycette, Brynne E; Glickman, Jacob W; Roth, Samuel J; Cram, Abigail E; Kim, Tae Hee; Krizanc, Danny; Weir, Michael P

    2016-09-01

    We identified tryptic peptides in yeast cell lysates that map to translation initiation sites downstream of the annotated start sites using the peptide-spectrum matching algorithms OMSSA and Mascot. To increase the accuracy of peptide-spectrum matching, both algorithms were run using several standardized parameter sets, and Mascot was run utilizing a, b, and y ions from collision-induced dissociation. A large fraction (22%) of the detected N-terminal peptides mapped to translation initiation downstream of the annotated initiation sites. Expression of several truncated proteins from downstream initiation in the same reading frame as the full-length protein (frame 1) was verified by western analysis. To facilitate analysis of the larger proteome of Drosophila, we created a streamlined sequence library from which all duplicated trypsin fragments had been removed. OMSSA assessment using this "stripped" library revealed 171 peptides that map to downstream translation initiation sites, 76% of which are in the same reading frame as the full-length annotated proteins, although some are in different reading frames creating new protein sequences not in the annotated proteome. Sequences surrounding implicated downstream AUG start codons are associated with nucleotide preferences with a pronounced three-base periodicity N1^G2^A3.

  17. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  18. New Mexico Play Fairway Analysis: Particle Tracking ArcGIS Map Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Pepin

    2015-11-15

    These are map packages used to visualize geochemical particle-tracking analysis results in ArcGIS. It includes individual map packages for several regions of New Mexico including: Acoma, Rincon, Gila, Las Cruces, Socorro and Truth or Consequences.

  19. Mapping the E-Government Research with Social Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Nuša; Todorovski, Ljupčo

    About fifteen years of e-government research (EGR) lead to a research field that is looking forward to define an identity as a proper and autonomous scientific discipline. This paper proposes the use of social network analysis as a methodology for building a map of EGR and consequently contributing to the process of establishing EGR identity. The paper analyzes the network of citation between authors induced by papers published in the four proceedings of this conference (International Conference on e-Government) in the period from 2005 to 2008. The analysis helps us identify the authors that had most influence on the EGR field development and relate them to the thematic topics that prevailed the conference papers in the last four years.

  20. Analysis of radiotracking data using digitized habitat maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmer, D.S.; Miller, S.E.; Cowardin, L.M.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described that provides a rapid and accurate analysis of habitat used by radio-equipped animals. The digitizer (basically an X-Y plotter in reverse) converts maps into digital form by describing each habitat unit as a polygon that closely approximates the actual shape of the unit. The coordinates of each polygon are then stored on magnetic tape. Habitat classification data and other information are coded and combined with the proper polygon coordinates. This results in one file containing all habitat data. A computer program with inputs of tracking data and habitat data provides a listing of the habitat used by the animals studied. Analysis of habitat used by radio-equipped ducks is demonstrated using this method.

  1. “Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes”

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S.

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for LC-MS/MS analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments, or with identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different –SOH specific probes, and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impedes product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  2. Peptidomic analysis of the extensive array of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of the dodecaploid frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Coquet, Laurent; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Jouenne, Thierry; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Uganda clawed frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis with a karyotype of 2n=108 is one of the very few vertebrates with dodecaploid status. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from this species led to the isolation and structural characterization of 23 host-defense peptides belonging to the following families: magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 6 peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; 3 peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; 8 peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; 3 peptides). In addition, the secretions contained caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, and two peptides that were identified as members of the trefoil factor family (TFF). The data indicate that silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following polyploidization has been appreciable and non-uniform. Consistent with data derived from comparison of nucleotide sequences of mitochrondrial and nuclear genes, cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of the host-defense peptides provide support for an evolutionary scenario in which X. ruwenzoriensis arose from an allopolyploidization event involving an octoploid ancestor of the present-day frogs belonging to the Xenopus amieti species group and a tetraploid ancestor of Xenopus pygmaeus. PMID:27290612

  3. AHTPDB: a comprehensive platform for analysis and presentation of antihypertensive peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Sharma, Minakshi; Nagpal, Gandharva; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Singh, Sandeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2015-01-01

    AHTPDB (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ahtpdb/) is a manually curated database of experimentally validated antihypertensive peptides. Information pertaining to peptides with antihypertensive activity was collected from research articles and from various peptide repositories. These peptides were derived from 35 major sources that include milk, egg, fish, pork, chicken, soybean, etc. In AHTPDB, most of the peptides belong to a family of angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibiting peptides. The current release of AHTPDB contains 5978 peptide entries among which 1694 are unique peptides. Each entry provides detailed information about a peptide like sequence, inhibitory concentration (IC50), toxicity/bitterness value, source, length, molecular mass and information related to purification of peptides. In addition, the database provides structural information of these peptides that includes predicted tertiary and secondary structures. A user-friendly web interface with various tools has been developed to retrieve and analyse the data. It is anticipated that AHTPDB will be a useful and unique resource for the researchers working in the field of antihypertensive peptides. PMID:25392419

  4. Develop Advanced Nonlinear Signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1997-01-01

    During the development of the SSME, a hierarchy of advanced signal analysis techniques for mechanical signature analysis has been developed by NASA and AI Signal Research Inc. (ASRI) to improve the safety and reliability for Space Shuttle operations. These techniques can process and identify intelligent information hidden in a measured signal which is often unidentifiable using conventional signal analysis methods. Currently, due to the highly interactive processing requirements and the volume of dynamic data involved, detailed diagnostic analysis is being performed manually which requires immense man-hours with extensive human interface. To overcome this manual process, NASA implemented this program to develop an Advanced nonlinear signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System (ATMS) to provide automatic/unsupervised engine diagnostic capabilities. The ATMS will utilize a rule-based Clips expert system to supervise a hierarchy of diagnostic signature analysis techniques in the Advanced Signal Analysis Library (ASAL). ASAL will perform automatic signal processing, archiving, and anomaly detection/identification tasks in order to provide an intelligent and fully automated engine diagnostic capability. The ATMS has been successfully developed under this contract. In summary, the program objectives to design, develop, test and conduct performance evaluation for an automated engine diagnostic system have been successfully achieved. Software implementation of the entire ATMS system on MSFC's OISPS computer has been completed. The significance of the ATMS developed under this program is attributed to the fully automated coherence analysis capability for anomaly detection and identification which can greatly enhance the power and reliability of engine diagnostic evaluation. The results have demonstrated that ATMS can significantly save time and man-hours in performing engine test/flight data analysis and performance evaluation of large volumes of dynamic test data.

  5. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations.

  6. Analysis of the haptoglobin binding region on the apolipoprotein A-I-derived P2a peptide.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Di Stasi, Rossella; De Rosa, Lucia; Maresca, Bernadetta; Cigliano, Luisa; D'Andrea, Luca D

    2013-04-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is the main protein component of the high density lipoproteins and it plays an important role in the reverse cholesterol transport. In particular, it stimulates cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells toward liver and activates the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Haptoglobin (Hpt), a plasma α2-glycoprotein belonging to the family of acute-phase proteins, binds to ApoA-I inhibiting the stimulation of the enzyme LCAT. Previously, we reported that a synthetic peptide, P2a, binds to and displaces Hpt from ApoA-I restoring the LCAT cholesterol esterification activity in the presence of Hpt. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants underlining the interaction between Hpt and P2a peptide. Analysis of truncated P2a analogs showed that P2a sequence can only be slight reduced in length at the N-terminal to preserve the ability of binding to Hpt. Binding assays showed that charged residues are not involved in Hpt recognition; actually, E146A and D157A substitutions increase the binding affinity to Hpt. Biological characterization of the corresponding P2a peptide analogs, Apo146 and Apo157, showed that the two peptides interfere with Hpt binding to HDL and are more effective than P2a peptide in rescue LCAT activity from Hpt inhibition. This result suggests novel hints to design peptides with anti-atherogenic activity. PMID:23420675

  7. Analysis of peptides using an integrated microchip HPLC-MS/MS system.

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brian J.; Chirica, Gabriela S.; Reichmuth, David S.

    2004-06-01

    Hyphendated LC-MS techniques are quickly becoming the standard tool for protemic analyses. For large homogeneous samples, bulk processing methods and capillary injection and separation techniques are suitable. However, for analysis of small or heterogeneous samples, techniques that can manipulate picoliter samples without dilution are required or samples will be lost or corrupted; further, static nanospray-type flowrates are required to maximize SNR. Microchip-level integration of sample injection with separation and mass spectrometry allow small-volume analytes to be processed on chip and immediately injected without dilution for analysis. An on-chip HPLC was fabricated using in situ polymerization of both fixed and mobile polymer monoliths. Integration of the chip with a nanospray MS emitter enables identification of peptides by the use of tandem MS. The chip is capable of analyzing of very small sample volumes (< 200 pl) in short times (< 3 min).

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  10. Mechanism of interaction of optimized Limulus-derived cyclic peptides with endotoxins: thermodynamic, biophysical and microbiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Howe, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; Leiva-León, José; Moriyon, Ignacio; Bartels, Rainer; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    On the basis of formerly investigated peptides corresponding to the endotoxin-binding domain from LALF [Limulus anti-LPS (lipopolysaccharide) factor], a protein from Limulus polyphemus, we have designed and synthesized peptides of different lengths with the aim of obtaining potential therapeutic agents against septic shock syndrome. For an understanding of the mechanisms of action, we performed a detailed physicochemical and biophysical analysis of the interaction of rough mutant LPS with these peptides by applying FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), calorimetric techniques [DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry)] and FFTEM (freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy). Also, the action of the peptides on bacteria of different origin in microbial assays was investigated. Using FTIR and DSC, our results indicated a strong fluidization of the lipid A acyl chains due to peptide binding, with a decrease in the endothermic melting enthalpy change of the acyl chains down to a complete disappearance in the 1:0.5 to 1:2 [LPS]:[peptide] molar ratio range. Via ITC, it was deduced that the binding is a clearly exothermic process which becomes saturated at a 1:0.5 to 1:2 [LPS]:[peptide] molar ratio range. The results obtained with SAXS indicated a drastic change of the aggregate structures of LPS into a multilamellar stack, which was visualized in electron micrographs as hundreds of lamellar layers. This can be directly correlated with the inhibition of the LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor alpha in human mononuclear cells, but not with the action of the peptides on bacteria.

  11. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    peptides covalently attached to carboxylic acid-modified polyethylene and proteins (200 pmol to 5 nmol) noncovalently applied to Zitex (porous Teflon). The generality of our automated C-terminal sequencing methodology was examined by sequencing model peptides containing all 20 of the common amino acids. All of the amino acids tested were found to sequence in good yield except for proline, which was found not to be capable of derivatization. In spite of this limitation, the methodology should be a valuable tool for the C-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1304893

  12. Coumarin tags for analysis of peptides by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS. 2. Alexa Fluor 350 tag for increased peptide and protein Identification by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Pashkova, Anna; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Rejtar, Tomas; Zang, Xin; Giese, Roger; Andreev, Victor; Moskovets, Eugene; Karger, Barry L

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study was the development of N-terminal tags to improve peptide identification using high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Part 1 of the study was focused on the influence of derivatization on the intensities of MALDI-TOF MS signals of peptides. In part 2, various derivatization approaches for the improvement of peptide fragmentation efficiency in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS are explored. We demonstrate that permanent cation tags, while significantly improving signal intensity in the MS mode, lead to severe suppression of MS/MS fragmentation, making these tags unsuitable for high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis. In the present work, it was found that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350, a coumarin tag containing a sulfo group, along with guanidation of epsilon-amino groups of Lys, could enhance unimolecular fragmentation of peptides with the formation of a high-intensity y-ion series, while the peptide intensities in the MS mode were not severely affected. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of tryptic peptides from the SCX fractions of an E. coli lysate revealed improved peptide scores, a doubling of the total number of peptides, and a 30% increase in the number of proteins identified, as a result of labeling. Furthermore, by combining the data from native and labeled samples, confidence in correct identification was increased, as many proteins were identified by different peptides in the native and labeled data sets. Additionally, derivatization was found not to impair chromatographic behavior of peptides. All these factors suggest that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350 is a promising approach to the high-throughput LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of proteomic samples.

  13. CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis of ACE-inhibitory, antimicrobial and bitter-tasting peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; Li, Tonghe; Lu, Dan; He, Zhimin

    2014-09-12

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were applied to the ACE-inhibitory, antimicrobial, and bitter-tasting peptides. Predictive 3D-QSAR models were established using SYBYL multifit molecular alignment rule over a training set and a test set. The optimum models were all statistically significant with cross-validated coefficients (Q(2)) >0.5 and conventional coefficients (R(2)) >0.9, indicating that they were reliable enough for activity prediction. The obtained results may aid in the design of novel bioactive peptides.

  14. Source separation in astrophysical maps using independent factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuruoğlu, Ercan E; Bedini, Luigi; Paratore, Maria T; Salerno, Emanuele; Tonazzini, Anna

    2003-01-01

    A microwave sky map results from a combination of signals from various astrophysical sources, such as cosmic microwave background radiation, synchrotron radiation and galactic dust radiation. To derive information about these sources, one needs to separate them from the measured maps on different frequency channels. Our insufficient knowledge of the weights to be given to the individual signals at different frequencies makes this a difficult task. Recent work on the problem led to only limited success due to ignoring the noise and to the lack of a suitable statistical model for the sources. In this paper, we derive the statistical distribution of some source realizations, and check the appropriateness of a Gaussian mixture model for them. A source separation technique, namely, independent factor analysis, has been suggested recently in the literature for Gaussian mixture sources in the presence of noise. This technique employs a three layered neural network architecture which allows a simple, hierarchical treatment of the problem. We modify the algorithm proposed in the literature to accommodate for space-varying noise and test its performance on simulated astrophysical maps. We also compare the performances of an expectation-maximization and a simulated annealing learning algorithm in estimating the mixture matrix and the source model parameters. The problem with expectation-maximization is that it does not ensure global optimization, and thus the choice of the starting point is a critical task. Indeed, we did not succeed to reach good solutions for random initializations of the algorithm. Conversely, our experiments with simulated annealing yielded initialization-independent results. The mixing matrix and the means and coefficients in the source model were estimated with a good accuracy while some of the variances of the components in the mixture model were not estimated satisfactorily.

  15. Peptide Vocabulary Analysis Reveals Ultra-Conservation and Homonymity in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek

    2007-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for vocabulary analysis (word detection) in texts of human origin. It performs at 60%–70% overall accuracy and greater than 80% accuracy for longer words, and approximately 85% sensitivity on Alice in Wonderland, a considerable improvement on previous methods. When applied to protein sequences, it detects short sequences analogous to words in human texts, i.e. intolerant to changes in spelling (mutation), and relatively context-independent in their meaning (function). Some of these are homonyms of up to 7 amino acids, which can assume different structures in different proteins. Others are ultra-conserved stretches of up to 18 amino acids within proteins of less than 40% overall identity, reflecting extreme constraint or convergent evolution. Different species are found to have qualitatively different major peptide vocabularies, e.g. some are dominated by large gene families, while others are rich in simple repeats or dominated by internally repetitive proteins. This suggests the possibility of a peptide vocabulary signature, analogous to genome signatures in DNA. Homonyms may be useful in detecting convergent evolution and positive selection in protein evolution. Ultra-conserved words may be useful in identifying structures intolerant to substitution over long periods of evolutionary time. PMID:20066129

  16. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  17. Chemical genetic analysis reveals the effects of NMU2R on the expression of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liyan; Zhang, Mancang; Li, Chunxia; Dong, Suzhen; Hu, Yinghe

    2006-08-14

    Neuromedin U 2 receptor (NMU2R) plays important roles for the regulation of food intake and body weight. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the action of NMU2R has not been clearly defined. We have taken chemical genetic approach to examine the involvement of peptides in the regulation of NMU2R effects. A cell-based reporter gene assay has been developed and used for the screening of human NMU2R agonist. Three natural product compounds, EUK2010, EUK2011 and EUK2012, were identified that could activate the reporter gene expression in the cell-based functional assay. Although these compounds showed high EC50 at hundreds micro-molar range, in vitro pharmacological analysis suggested that they were specific agonists for the human NMU2R. The natural compounds could decrease food intake and lead to the reduction of body weight in different animal models. To understand the molecular basis of the NMU2R regulation of food intake and body weight, we examined the expression of a number of key genes in hypothalamus and adipose tissues after oral administration of EUK2010 in mice. Our results demonstrated that the expression levels of a number of neuropeptide genes were altered after the treatment of EUK2010. Interestingly, EUK2010 increased the expression of Leptin in white fat. These results suggested that these peptides may participate in the regulation of NMU2R effects in mice. PMID:16781063

  18. Structural analysis of the N- and C-termini in a peptide with consensus sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y.; Zhou, H. X.; Guo, M.; Kallenbach, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    We present a structural analysis of a peptide, the sequence of which includes amino acids that show preferences for specific positions near the N- and C-termini in protein helices. This peptide has the sequence ac-YMSEDELKAAEAAFKRHGVP-amide, which includes a strong version of an N-terminal Harper-Rose capping box structure as well as a Gly located close to the C-terminus designed to elucidate its role in C-terminal capping. The sequence of five residues at the middle is inserted to separate effects at the two ends via a helix-stabilizing linker. Application of a simulated annealing procedure using interproton distance constraints derived from 1H NOESY experiments in water reveals the presence of a C-terminal structure in this model. The C-terminus forms a folded back structure in a significant fraction of structures generated by the annealing, in most of which Gly assumes an alpha L conformation. This structure occurs within a highly flexible region of the molecule and hence is occupied only a fraction of the time. PMID:8520470

  19. Historical shoreline mapping (II): application of the Digital Shoreline Mapping and Analysis Systems (DSMS/DSAS) to shoreline change mapping in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.

    1994-01-01

    A new, state-of-the-art method for mapping historical shorelines from maps and aerial photographs, the Digital Shoreline Mapping System (DSMS), has been developed. The DSMS is a freely available, public domain software package that meets the cartographic and photogrammetric requirements of precise coastal mapping, and provides a means to quantify and analyze different sources of error in the mapping process. The DSMS is also capable of resolving imperfections in aerial photography that commonly are assumed to be nonexistent. The DSMS utilizes commonly available computer hardware and software, and permits the entire shoreline mapping process to be executed rapidly by a single person in a small lab. The DSMS generates output shoreline position data that are compatible with a variety of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). A second suite of programs, the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) has been developed to calculate shoreline rates-of-change from a series of shoreline data residing in a GIS. Four rate-of-change statistics are calculated simultaneously (end-point rate, average of rates, linear regression and jackknife) at a user-specified interval along the shoreline using a measurement baseline approach. An example of DSMS and DSAS application using historical maps and air photos of Punta Uvero, Puerto Rico provides a basis for assessing the errors associated with the source materials as well as the accuracy of computed shoreline positions and erosion rates. The maps and photos used here represent a common situation in shoreline mapping: marginal-quality source materials. The maps and photos are near the usable upper limit of scale and accuracy, yet the shoreline positions are still accurate ±9.25 m when all sources of error are considered. This level of accuracy yields a resolution of ±0.51 m/yr for shoreline rates-of-change in this example, and is sufficient to identify the short-term trend (36 years) of shoreline change in the study area.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of Helicobacter pylori CagA Antigen Recognized by Child Serum Antibodies and Its Epitope Mapping by Peptide Array

    PubMed Central

    Akada, Junko; Okuda, Masumi; Hiramoto, Narumi; Kitagawa, Takao; Zhang, Xiulian; Kamei, Shuichi; Ito, Akane; Nakamura, Mikiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiwatani, Tomoko; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Teruko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Serum antibodies against pathogenic bacteria play immunologically protective roles, and can be utilized as diagnostic markers of infection. This study focused on Japanese child serum antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, a chronically-infected gastric bacterium which causes gastric cancer in adults. Serological diagnosis for H. pylori infection is well established for adults, but it needs to be improved for children. Serum samples from 24 children, 22 H. pylori (Hp)-positive and 2 Hp-negative children, were used to catalogue antigenic proteins of a Japanese strain CPY2052 by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblot and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 24 proteins were identified as candidate antigen proteins. Among these, the major virulence factor, cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) was the most reactive antigen recognized by all the Hp-positive sera even from children under the age of 3 years. The major antigenic part of CagA was identified in the middle region, and two peptides containing CagA epitopes were identified using a newly developed peptide/protein-combined array chip method, modified from our previous protein chip method. Each of the epitopes was found to contain amino acid residue(s) unique to East Asian CagA. Epitope analysis of CagA indicated importance of the regional CagA antigens for serodiagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. PMID:25141238

  1. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dengue virus type 1 for epitope mapping and serological detection by epitope-based peptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ching; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Lin, Chin-Tarng; Chen, Yi-Fang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu, Han-Chung

    2007-04-01

    Dengue virus (DEN), the pathogen behind dengue hemorrhagic fever, remains a public health problem in Asia and South America. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against DEN serotype 1 (DEN-1) were generated by fusing NSI/1-Ag4-1 mouse myeloma cells with lymphocytes from BALB/c mice immunized with DEN-1. Twelve MAbs were found to react specifically to the DENs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence analysis, and immunoblotting analysis. Five MAbs, namely, DA4-7, DA6-7, DA9-5, DA10-2, and DA11-13, were found to react with envelope proteins of DEN-1. Two serotype-specific MAbs of DEN-1, DA6-7 and DA11-13, were further shown to neutralize DEN-1 infection by a plaque reduction neutralization test. The neutralizing epitopes of these MAbs were further identified from a random peptide library displayed on phage. Immunopositive phage clones reacted specifically with these MAbs and did not react with normal mouse serum. Epitope-based peptide antigens were proved able to detect antibodies in serum samples collected from DEN-1-infected patients but not in those taken from DEN-2-infected patients or healthy controls. We believe that these MAbs and neutralizing epitopes will provide information that will lead to the development of DEN-1 serotype-specific diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

  2. Construction and Analysis of High-Density Linkage Map Using High-Throughput Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Hui; Zeng, Huaping; Deng, Dejing; Xin, Huaigen; Song, Jun; Xu, Chunhua; Sun, Xiaowen; Hou, Xilin; Wang, Xiaowu; Zheng, Hongkun

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps enable the study of important biological questions. The construction of high-density linkage maps appears more feasible since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), which eases SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping of large population. However, the marker number explosion and genotyping errors from NGS data challenge the computational efficiency and linkage map quality of linkage study methods. Here we report the HighMap method for constructing high-density linkage maps from NGS data. HighMap employs an iterative ordering and error correction strategy based on a k-nearest neighbor algorithm and a Monte Carlo multipoint maximum likelihood algorithm. Simulation study shows HighMap can create a linkage map with three times as many markers as ordering-only methods while offering more accurate marker orders and stable genetic distances. Using HighMap, we constructed a common carp linkage map with 10,004 markers. The singleton rate was less than one-ninth of that generated by JoinMap4.1. Its total map distance was 5,908 cM, consistent with reports on low-density maps. HighMap is an efficient method for constructing high-density, high-quality linkage maps from high-throughput population NGS data. It will facilitate genome assembling, comparative genomic analysis, and QTL studies. HighMap is available at http://highmap.biomarker.com.cn/. PMID:24905985

  3. Electricity Consumption Risk Map - The use of Urban Climate Mapping for smarter analysis: Case study for Birmingham, UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes Azevedo, Juliana; Burghardt, René; Chapman, Lee; Katzchner, Lutz; Muller, Catherine L.

    2015-04-01

    Climate is a key driving factor in energy consumption. However, income, vegetation, building mass structure, topography also impact on the amount of energy consumption. In a changing climate, increased temperatures are likely to lead to increased electricity consumption, affecting demand, distribution and generation. Furthermore, as the world population becomes more urbanized, increasing numbers of people will need to deal with not only increased temperatures from climate change, but also from the unintentional modification of the urban climate in the form of urban heat islands. Hence, climate and climate change needs to be taken into account for future urban planning aspects to increase the climate and energy resilience of the community and decrease the future social and economic costs. Geographical Information Systems provide a means to create urban climate maps as part of the urban planning process. Geostatistical analyses linking these maps with demographic and social data, enables a geo-statistical analysis to identify linkages to high-risk groups of the community and vulnerable areas of town and cities. Presently, the climatope classification is oriented towards thermal aspects and the ventilation quality (roughness) of the urban areas but can also be adapted to take into account other structural "environmental factors". This study aims to use the climatope approach to predict areas of potential high electricity consumption in Birmingham, UK. Several datasets were used to produce an average surface temperature map, vegetation map, land use map, topography map, building height map, built-up area roughness calculations, an average air temperature map and a domestic electricity consumption map. From the correlations obtained between the layers it is possible to average the importance of each factor and create a map for domestic electricity consumption to understand the influence of environmental aspects on spatial energy consumption. Based on these results city

  4. Modern methods of documentation for conservation - digital mapping in metigo® MAP, Software for documentation, mapping and quantity survey and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedler, Gunnar; Vetter, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Several years of experience of heritage documentation have given a background to develop methods of cartography and digital evaluation. The outcome of which is the development of a 2D-mapping software with integrated image rectification over a period of more then 10 years and that became the state of the art software in Germany initially and now elsewhere for Conservation and Restoration projects. If there are no mapping bases (image plan or CAD-drawing), the user can create its own image plans using different types of rectification functions. Based on true to scale mappings, quantity surveys of areas and lines can be calculated automatically. Digital maps were used for the documentation and analysis of materials and damages, for planning of required action and for calculation of costs. With the help of the hierarchy even large mapping projects with many sub projects can be managed. The results of quantification can be exported to excel spreadsheets for further processing. The combination of image processing and CAD-functionality makes operation of the programm user-friendly, both in the office and on-site. metigo MAP was developed in close cooperation with conservators and restorers. Based on simple equipment consisting of digital camera, laser measuring instrument for measuring distances or total station and standard notebook the mapping software is used in many restoration companies.

  5. Canonical integration and analysis of periodic maps using non-standard analysis and life methods

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, E.; Berz, M.

    1988-06-01

    We describe a method and a way of thinking which is ideally suited for the study of systems represented by canonical integrators. Starting with the continuous description provided by the Hamiltonians, we replace it by a succession of preferably canonical maps. The power series representation of these maps can be extracted with a computer implementation of the tools of Non-Standard Analysis and analyzed by the same tools. For a nearly integrable system, we can define a Floquet ring in a way consistent with our needs. Using the finite time maps, the Floquet ring is defined only at the locations s/sub i/ where one perturbs or observes the phase space. At most the total number of locations is equal to the total number of steps of our integrator. We can also produce pseudo-Hamiltonians which describe the motion induced by these maps. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  7. Symplectic maps for the n-body problem - Stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Holman, Matthew

    1992-01-01

    The stability of new symplectic n-body maps is examined from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics. The resonances responsible for the principal artifacts are identified. These are resonances between the stepsize and the difference of mean motions between pairs of planets. For larger stepsizes resonant perturbations are evident in the variation of the energy of the system corresponding to these stepsize resonances. It is shown that the principal instability of the method can be predicted and corresponds to the overlap of the stepsize resonances. It is noted that the analysis suggests that other artifacts will occur. For example, the overlap of a stepsize resonance with a resonance of the actual system may also give a region of chaotic behavior that is an artifact. It is pointed out that the fact that the principal artifacts corresponds to a particular set of stepsize resonances suggests that it may be possible to perturbatively remove the effect when the stepsize resonances are nonoverlapping.

  8. An Analysis of Prospective Teachers' Knowledge for Constructing Concept Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan; Esprívalo Harrell, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Literature contends that a teacher's knowledge of concept map-based tasks influence how their students perceive the task and execute the creation of acceptable concept maps. Teachers who are skilled concept mappers are able to (1) understand and apply the operational terms to construct a hierarchical/non-hierarchical concept map; (2)…

  9. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from meat proteins using in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I, EC 3.4.15.1), renin (EC 3.4.23.15), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5) play key roles in the control of hypertension and the development of type-2 diabetes and other diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to utilize known in silico methodologies, peptide databases and software including ProtParam (http://web.expasy.org/protparam/), Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST), ExPASy PeptideCutter (http://web.expasy.org/peptide_cutter/) and BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/pl/biopep) to assess the release of potentially bioactive DPP-IV, renin and ACE-I inhibitory peptides from bovine and porcine meat proteins including hemoglobin, collagen and serum albumin. These proteins were chosen as they are found commonly in meat by-products such as bone, blood and low-value meat cuts. In addition, the bioactivities of identified peptides were confirmed using chemical synthesis and in vitro bioassays. The concentration of peptide required to inhibit the activity of ACE-I and DPP-IV by 50% was determined for selected, active peptides. Novel ACE-I and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified in this study using both in silico analysis and a literature search to streamline enzyme selection for peptide production. These novel peptides included the ACE-I inhibitory tri-peptide Ile-Ile-Tyr and the DPP-IV inhibitory tri-peptide Pro-Pro-Leu corresponding to sequences f (182-184) and f (326-328) of both porcine and bovine serum albumin which can be released following hydrolysis with the enzymes papain and pepsin, respectively. This work demonstrates that meat proteins are a suitable resource for the generation of bioactive peptides and further demonstrates the usefulness of in silico methodologies to streamline identification and generation of bioactive peptides.

  10. Peptidomic analysis of skin secretions from the bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus (Ranidae) identifies multiple peptides with potent insulin-releasing activity.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Ojo, Opeolu O; Meetani, Mohammed A; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H A; Flatt, Peter R; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2011-02-01

    Using a combination of reversed-phase HPLC and electrospray mass spectrometry, peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus Shaw, 1802 led to the identification and characterization of five newly described peptides (ranatuerin-1CBb, ranatuerin-2CBc, and -CBd, palustrin-2CBa, and temporin-CBf) together with seven peptides previously isolated on the basis of their antimicrobial activity (ranatuerin-1CBa, ranatuerin-2CBa, brevinin-1CBa, and -1CBb, temporin-CBa, -CBb, and -CBd). The abilities of the most abundant of the purified peptides to stimulate the release of insulin from the rat BRIN-BD11 clonal β cell line were evaluated. Ranatuerin-2CBd (GFLDIIKNLGKTFAGHMLDKIRCTIGTCPPSP) was the most potent peptide producing a significant stimulation of insulin release (119% of basal rate, P<0.01) from BRIN-BD11 cells at a concentration of 30nM, with a maximum response (236% of basal rate, P<0.001) at a concentration of 3μM. Ranatuerin-2CBd did not stimulate release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase at concentrations up to 3μM, indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. Brevinin-1CBb (FLPFIARLAAKVFPSIICSVTKKC) produced the maximum stimulation of insulin release (285% of basal rate, P<0.001 at 3μM) but the peptide was cytotoxic at this concentration. PMID:21087647

  11. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  12. Statically Adsorbed Coatings for High Separation Efficiency and Resolution in CE-MS Peptide Analysis: Strategies and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Pattky, Martin; Barkovits, Katalin; Marcus, Katrin; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Huhn, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Coatings are necessary to prevent protein and peptide adsorption to the capillary surface and obtain high intermediate precision. In this protocol, we first present our basic strategy to address peptide separation using three different coatings: one neutral and two cationic coatings, the latter largely differing in their induced electroosmotic mobility. In detail, we will describe how we apply the statically adsorbed coatings to obtain very high plate numbers and high repeatability.With some model examples, we clearly describe the scope of the method for the analysis of peptide samples: tryptic digests are addressed as well as small glycoproteins and glycopeptides largely differing in their effective electrophoretic mobility. We also show that the method is suitable for a fast screening of peptide samples despite a high matrix load comprising of up to 500 mmol/L sodium chloride. We demonstrate that this basic CE-MS method is rather independent of the polarity of the analytes with a very fast near-baseline separation of very hydrophobic Aβ peptides related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. These examples will give an impression, which coating is most suitable for a specific analytical application.Special attention is paid to difficult aspects of the coating procedure and the CE-MS method, e.g., the potential of cross-contamination when changing the coatings. PMID:27645731

  13. Integrating Recent Land Cover Mapping Efforts to Update the National Gap Analysis Program's Species Habitat Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKerrow, A. J.; Davidson, A.; Earnhardt, T. S.; Benson, A. L.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, great progress has been made to develop national extent land cover mapping products to address natural resource issues. One of the core products of the GAP Program is range-wide species distribution models for nearly 2000 terrestrial vertebrate species in the U.S. We rely on deductive modeling of habitat affinities using these products to create models of habitat availability. That approach requires that we have a thematically rich and ecologically meaningful map legend to support the modeling effort. In this work, we tested the integration of the Multi-Resolution Landscape Characterization Consortium's National Land Cover Database 2011 and LANDFIRE's Disturbance Products to update the 2001 National GAP Vegetation Dataset to reflect 2011 conditions. The revised product can then be used to update the species models. We tested the update approach in three geographic areas (Northeast, Southeast, and Interior Northwest). We used the NLCD product to identify areas where the cover type mapped in 2011 was different from what was in the 2001 land cover map. We used Google Earth and ArcGIS base maps as reference imagery in order to label areas identified as "changed" to the appropriate class from our map legend. Areas mapped as urban or water in the 2011 NLCD map that were mapped differently in the 2001 GAP map were accepted without further validation and recoded to the corresponding GAP class. We used LANDFIRE's Disturbance products to identify changes that are the result of recent disturbance and to inform the reassignment of areas to their updated thematic label. We ran species habitat models for three species including Lewis's Woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis) and the White-tailed Jack Rabbit (Lepus townsendii) and Brown Headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla). For each of three vertebrate species we found important differences in the amount and location of suitable habitat between the 2001 and 2011 habitat maps. Specifically, Brown headed nuthatch habitat in

  14. The importance of source area mapping for rockfall hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2013-04-01

    A problem in the characterization of the area affected by rockfall is the correct source areas definition. Different positions or different size of the source areas along a cliff result in different possibilities of propagation and diverse interaction with passive countermeasures present in the area. Through the use of Hy-Stone (Crosta et al., 2004), a code able to perform 3D numerical modeling of rockfall processes, different types of source areas were tested on a case study slope along the western flank of the Mt. de La Saxe (Courmayeur, AO), developing between 1200 and 2055 m s.l.m. The first set of source areas consists of unstable rock masses identified on the basis of field survey and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (IMAGEO, 2011). A second set of source areas has been identified by using different thresholds of slope gradient. We tested slope thresholds between 50° and 75° at 5° intervals. The third source area dataset has been generating by performing a kinematic stability analysis. For this analysis, we mapped the join sets along the rocky cliff by means of the software COLTOP 3D (Jaboyedoff, 2004), and then we identified the portions of rocky cliff where planar/wedge and toppling failures are possible assuming an average friction angle of 35°. Through the outputs of the Hy-Stone models we extracted and analyzed the kinetic energy, height of fly and velocity of the blocks falling along the rocky cliff in order to compare the controls of different source areas. We observed strong variations of kinetic energy and fly height among the different models, especially when using unstable masses identified through Terrestrial Laser Scanning. This is mainly related to the size of the blocks identified as susceptible to failure. On the contrary, the slope gradient thresholds does not have a strong impact on rockfall propagation. This contribution highlights the importance of a careful and appropriate mapping of rockfall source area for rockfall hazard analysis and the

  15. xComb: a cross-linked peptide database approach to protein-protein interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Singh, Pragya; Shaffer, Scott A.; Goodlett, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an informatic method to identify tandem mass spectra composed of chemically cross-linked peptides from those of linear peptides and to assign sequence to each of the two unique peptide sequences. For a given set of proteins the key software tool, xComb, combs through all theoretically feasible cross-linked peptides to create a database consisting of a subset of all combinations represented as peptide FASTA files. The xComb library of select theoretical cross-linked peptides may then be used as a database that is examined by a standard proteomic search engine to match tandem mass spectral datasets to identify cross-linked peptides. The database search may be conducted against as many as 50 proteins with a number of common proteomic search engines, e.g. Phenyx, Sequest, OMSSA, Mascot and X!Tandem. By searching against a peptide library of linearized, cross-linked peptides, rather than a linearized protein library, search times are decreased and the process is decoupled from any specific search engine. A further benefit of decoupling from the search engine is that protein cross-linking studies may be conducted with readily available informatics tools for which scoring routines already exist within the proteomic community. PMID:20302351

  16. Variance Component Analysis of a Multi-Site Study for the Reproducibility of Multiple Reaction Monitoring Measurements of Peptides in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jessie Q.; Sedransk, Nell; Feng, Xingdong

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Addona et al. paper (Nature Biotechnology 2009), a large-scale multi-site study was performed to quantify Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) measurements of proteins spiked in human plasma. The unlabeled signature peptides derived from the seven target proteins were measured at nine different concentration levels, and their isotopic counterparts were served as the internal standards. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, the sources of variation are analyzed by decomposing the variance into parts attributable to specific experimental factors: technical replicates, sites, peptides, transitions within each peptide, and higher-order interaction terms based on carefully built mixed effects models. The factors of peptides and transitions are shown to be major contributors to the variance of the measurements considering heavy (isotopic) peptides alone. For the light (12C) peptides alone, in addition to these factors, the factor of study*peptide also contributes significantly to the variance of the measurements. Heterogeneous peptide component models as well as influence analysis identify the outlier peptides in the study, which are then excluded from the analysis. Using a log-log scale transformation and subtracting the heavy/isotopic peptide [internal standard] measurement from the peptide measurements (i.e., taking the logarithm of the peak area ratio in the original scale establishes that), the MRM measurements are overall consistent across laboratories following the same standard operating procedures, and the variance components related to sites, transitions and higher-order interaction terms involving sites have greatly reduced impact. Thus the heavy peptides have been effective in reducing apparent inter-site variability. In addition, the estimates of intercepts and slopes of the calibration curves are calculated for the sub-studies. Conclusions/Significance The MRM measurements are overall consistent across laboratories following the same

  17. High colloidal stability of gold nanorods coated with a peptide-ethylene glycol: Analysis by cyanide-mediated etching and nanoparticle tracking analysis.

    PubMed

    Free, Paul; Conger, Gao; Siji, Wu; Zhang, Jing Bo; Fernig, David G

    2016-10-01

    The stability of gold nanorods was assessed following coating with various charged or uncharged ligands, mostly peptides. Highly stable monodispersed gold nanorods were obtained by coating CTAB-stabilized gold nanorods with a pentapeptide with C-terminal ethylene glycol units (peptide-EG). UV-vis spectroscopy of these nanorods suspended in saline solutions indicated no signs of aggregation, and they were easily purified using size-exclusion chromatography. A more stringent measure of nanorod stability involved observing changes in the UV-vis absorbance of gold nanorods subjected to etching with cyanide. The λmax absorbance of peptide-EG coated nanorods red-shifted in etchant solution. The hypothesis that changes in the nanorod aspect ratio led to this red-shift was confirmed by TEM analysis, which showed pit formation along the transverse axis. The etching process was followed in solution using nanoparticle tracking analysis. The red-shift was shown to occur while the particles remained mono-dispersed, and so was not due to aggregation. Adding both etchant solution and peptide-EG to the nanorods was further shown to allow modulation of the Δλmax red-shift and increase the etchant resistance of peptide-EG nanorods. Thus, very stable gold nanorods can be produced using the peptide-EG coating approach and their optical properties modulated with etchant. PMID:27455407

  18. A Statistical Analysis of the PPII Propensity of Amino Acid Guests in Proline-Rich Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino-acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, the propensity scale is based on the behavior of guest amino-acid residues placed in the middle of polyproline hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations, with state-of-the-art force fields to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of the proline-based host oligopeptides with single guests. The tracked structural characteristics include the PPII content, the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds, the puckering of the pyrrolidine rings of the proline residues, and the secondary structural motifs. We find no evidence for an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids other than proline. Instead, the PPII content as derived from experiments may be explained in terms of: 1), a local correlation between the dihedral angles of the guest amino acid and the proline residue immediately preceding it; and 2), a nonlocal correlation between the cis/trans states of the peptide bonds. In terms of the latter, we find that the presence of a guest (other than proline, tyrosine, or tryptophan) increases the trans content of most of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase of the peptide PPII content. With respect to the local dihedral correlations, we find that these are well described in terms of the so-called odds-ratio statistic. Expressed in terms of free energy language, the PPII content based on the odds-ratio of the relevant residues correlate well with the experimentally measured PPII content. PMID:21320454

  19. Peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Ha, K S

    1997-10-31

    The partial amino acid sequences of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24 have been determined by analysis of peptides after cleavages with endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Glu-C, trypsin, and chemicals (cyanogen bromide and BNPS-skatole). They include 248 amino acid sequences (4 fragments) of CD I1 and 211 amino acid sequences (5 fragments) of CD I2. Two enzymes have more than 50% sequence homology with type I catechol 1,2-dioxygenases and less than 30% sequence homology with type II catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. Two enzymes have similar hydropathy profiles in the N-terminal region, suggesting that they have similar secondary structures. PMID:9387151

  20. Optimization of field-amplified sample injection for analysis of peptides by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2006-07-15

    A versatile experimental approach is described to achieve very high sensitivity analysis of peptides by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry with sheath flow configuration based on optimization of field-amplified sample injection. Compared to traditional hydrodynamic injection methods, signal enhancement in terms of detection sensitivity of the bioanalytes by more than 3000-fold can be achieved. The effects of injection conditions, composition of the acid and organic solvent in the sample solution, length of the water plug, sample injection time, and voltage on the efficiency of the sample stacking have been systematically investigated, with peptides in the low-nanomolar (10(-9) M) range readily detected under the optimized conditions. Linearity of the established stacking method was found to be excellent over 2 orders of magnitude of concentration. The method was further evaluated for the analysis of low concentration bioactive peptide mixtures and tryptic digests of proteins. A distinguishing feature of the described approach is that it can be employed directly for the analysis of low-abundance protein fragments generated by enzymatic digestion and a reversed-phase-based sample-desalting procedure. Thus, rapid identification of protein fragments as low-abundance analytes can be achieved with this new approach by comparison of the actual tandem mass spectra of selected peptides with the predicted fragmentation patterns using online database searching algorithms. PMID:16841892

  1. Digital floodplain mapping and an analysis of errors involved

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamblen, C.S.; Soong, D.T.; Cai, X.

    2007-01-01

    Mapping floodplain boundaries using geographical information system (GIS) and digital elevation models (DEMs) was completed in a recent study. However convenient this method may appear at first, the resulting maps potentially can have unaccounted errors. Mapping the floodplain using GIS is faster than mapping manually, and digital mapping is expected to be more common in the future. When mapping is done manually, the experience and judgment of the engineer or geographer completing the mapping and the contour resolution of the surface topography are critical in determining the flood-plain and floodway boundaries between cross sections. When mapping is done digitally, discrepancies can result from the use of the computing algorithm and digital topographic datasets. Understanding the possible sources of error and how the error accumulates through these processes is necessary for the validation of automated digital mapping. This study will evaluate the procedure of floodplain mapping using GIS and a 3 m by 3 m resolution DEM with a focus on the accumulated errors involved in the process. Within the GIS environment of this mapping method, the procedural steps of most interest, initially, include: (1) the accurate spatial representation of the stream centerline and cross sections, (2) properly using a triangulated irregular network (TIN) model for the flood elevations of the studied cross sections, the interpolated elevations between them and the extrapolated flood elevations beyond the cross sections, and (3) the comparison of the flood elevation TIN with the ground elevation DEM, from which the appropriate inundation boundaries are delineated. The study area involved is of relatively low topographic relief; thereby, making it representative of common suburban development and a prime setting for the need of accurately mapped floodplains. This paper emphasizes the impacts of integrating supplemental digital terrain data between cross sections on floodplain delineation

  2. Immobilization of trypsin onto 1,4-diisothiocyanatobenzene-activated porous glass for microreactor-based peptide mapping by capillary electrophoresis: effect of calcium ions on the immobilization procedure.

    PubMed

    Dartiguenave, Catherine; Hamad, Hussein; Waldron, Karen C

    2010-03-24

    The immobilization conditions and kinetic behaviour of trypsin, covalently immobilized via the 1,4-diisothiocyanatobenzene (DITC) linker onto aminopropylated controlled pore glass (CPG) particles, have been evaluated to establish a rapid and efficient protocol for fabrication of an immobilized enzyme microreactor (IMER) for protein hydrolysis and subsequent peptide mapping. Addition of calcium ions to either the immobilization reaction solution or hydrolysis assay was studied for a synthetic substrate. Activity was slightly higher when immobilization was carried out in the presence of Ca(2+) whereas more enzyme could be immobilized in its absence. A protocol requiring less than 3 h was devised to obtain maximal enzymatic activity with the lowest ratio of soluble trypsin to DITC-CPG particles. The resulting immobilized enzyme was found to retain an acceptable percentage (ca. 35%) of its activity after immobilization. The particles were dry-packed into a capillary to make a microscale IMER. Repeatability, reusability and digestion efficiency of the microIMER were investigated for the substrate beta-casein using capillary electrophoretic-based peptide mapping. In initial tests, a single device showed reproducible peptide maps for 21 digestions lasting 2 h each, carried out over a period of 2 months. Complete digestion of beta-casein could be achieved in a few minutes (86 s residence time in the microIMER followed by a wash step).

  3. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature, pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system; (2) develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amount of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. High compression ratio can be achieved to allow minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities; and (3) integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of

  4. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    The SSME has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) Develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system. (2) Develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amounts of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. A high compression ratio can be achieved to allow the minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities. (3) Integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for a quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of malfunction, and indicate

  5. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry for Peptide analysis: target-based approaches and proteomics/peptidomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Kašička, Václav

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the potential of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) for peptide analysis is demonstrated by the presentation of two different strategies typically followed in analysis of these biomolecules by CE-MS. The first one is a target-based approach and it is used to detect a toxic oligopeptide in a complex matrix. Namely, CE-MS using an ion trap MS analyzer is applied to detect and quantify γ-glutamyl-S-ethenyl-cysteine (GEC) bioactive dipeptide in a legume plant. The second one is a shotgun-like methodology used for proteomic analysis. Particularly, CE-MS using a time-of-flight MS analyzer is employed to investigate the substantial equivalence between a genetically modified (GM) variety of soybean and its conventional isogenic counterpart. These generic methods have broad applications for the analysis of peptides in a large variety of matrices, including applications in the area of proteomics and peptidomics. PMID:23386342

  6. Computational analysis of binding free energies between peptides and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, G. R.; Li, Z. R.; Lu, C.

    2006-07-01

    Coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with peptides can solubilize the nanotubes in water solvent. To explore the utilization of CNTs in solvent and the affinities of CNTs for different peptides, binding free energies of peptides to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are calculated and analyzed. The interactions between different peptides and SWCNTs are simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The binding free energies of peptides onto the outer-surface of the SWCNTs are then estimated based on thermodynamics theory. The estimated results of binding free energies are qualitatively comparable to binding affinities observed in experiments. Furthermore, the conformations of the binding peptides, as well as the energetic contributions to total binding free energies are analyzed to reveal the physical mechanisms of the interactions, which would be difficult to observe using experimental approaches. The van der Waals interaction is found to play a key role in binding of peptides to SWCNTs. Other effects such as hydrophobicity and aromatic rings of peptides are also examined. The findings of this study provide better understanding of the binding strength between proteins and CNTs, and therefore have potential applications in both scientific research and in industry for controlling CNT self-assembly, designing bio-functionalized CNTs as biosensors, and drug and gene delivery devices.

  7. Reducing spatial uncertainty in climatic maps through geostatistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesquer, Lluís; Ninyerola, Miquel; Pons, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Climatic maps from meteorological stations and geographical co-variables can be obtained through correlative models (Ninyerola et al., 2000)*. Nevertheless, the spatial uncertainty of the resulting maps could be reduced. The present work is a new stage over those approaches aiming to study how to obtain better results while characterizing spatial uncertainty. The study area is Catalonia (32000 km2), a region with highly variable relief (0 to 3143 m). We have used 217 stations (321 to 1244 mm) to model the annual precipitation in two steps: 1/ multiple regression using geographical variables (elevation, distance to the coast, latitude, etc) and 2/ refinement of the results by adding the spatial interpolation of the regression residuals with inverse distance weighting (IDW), regularized splines with tension (SPT) or ordinary kriging (OK). Spatial uncertainty analysis is based on an independent subsample (test set), randomly selected in previous works. The main contribution of this work is the analysis of this test set as well as the search for an optimal process of division (split) of the stations in two sets, one used to perform the multiple regression and residuals interpolation (fit set), and another used to compute the quality (test set); optimal division should reduce spatial uncertainty and improve the overall quality. Two methods have been evaluated against classical methods: (random selection RS and leave-one-out cross-validation LOOCV): selection by Euclidian 2D-distance, and selection by anisotropic 2D-distance combined with a 3D-contribution (suitable weighted) from the most representative independent variable. Both methods define a minimum threshold distance, obtained by variogram analysis, between samples. Main preliminary results for LOOCV, RS (average from 10 executions), Euclidian criterion (EU), and for anisotropic criterion (with 1.1 value, UTMY coordinate has a bit more weight than UTMX) combined with 3D criteria (A3D) (1000 factor for elevation

  8. Conformational dynamics of peptide T molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2002-05-01

    Using a method of the theoretical conformational analysis, a conformational dynamics of the side chains of the amino acid residues of peptide T, a competitor of the human immuno-deficiency virus in the binding to human T cells, was investigated. For this purpose, the conformational maps of the potential surfaces were constructed over the angles of the side chains for the preferable conformations of peptide T molecule. Permissible deviations of these angles from the optimal values were determined. It has been found that the angles of the side chains of the amino acid residues involved in physiologically active fragment Thr4-Thr8 are more rigid than in the other segment of the molecule. This fact confirms the existence of such a regular structure as β-turn revealed previously in studies of the spatial structure of the peptide T molecule.

  9. Structural prediction and analysis of VIH-related peptides from selected crustacean species.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Ganji Purna Chandra; Kumari, Nunna Siva; Prasad, Ganji Lakshmi Vara; Rajitha, Balney; Meenu, Madan; Rao, Manam Sreenivasa; Naik, Bannoth Reddya

    2009-08-17

    The tentative elucidation of the 3D-structure of vitellogenesis inhibiting hormone (VIH) peptides is conversely underprivileged by difficulties in gaining enough peptide or protein, diffracting crystals, and numerous extra technical aspects. As a result, no structural information is available for VIH peptide sequences registered in the Genbank. In this situation, it is not surprising that predictive methods have achieved great interest. Here, in this study the molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) of the kuruma prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus) is used, to predict the structure of four VIHrelated peptides in the crustacean species. The high similarity of the 3D-structures and the calculated physiochemical characteristics of these peptides suggest a common fold for the entire family.

  10. Automated tryptic digestion procedure for HPLC/MS/MS peptide mapping of immunoglobulin gamma antibodies in pharmaceutics.

    PubMed

    Chelius, Dirk; Xiao, Gang; Nichols, Andrew C; Vizel, Alona; He, Bing; Dillon, Thomas M; Rehder, Douglas S; Pipes, Gary D; Kraft, Edmund; Oroska, Asha; Treuheit, Michael J; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2008-06-01

    The rapid growth of antibody drugs and drug candidates in the biopharmaceutical industry has created a demand for automated proteolytic digestion to assist in pharmaceutical stability studies, identity assays and quality control of these therapeutic proteins. Here, we describe the development of a fully automated proteolytic digestion procedure for monoclonal antibodies in solution, which requires a high concentration of denaturants for unfolding. The antibody samples were placed in a 96-well plate or in 0.5-mL Eppendorf tubes. The proteins were then reduced and alkylated in a denaturing solution of 6M guanidine HCl. The denaturing solution was replaced with a digestion buffer using a custom-designed 96-well size-exclusion plate for desalting. The sample was digested for 5 h with two additions of trypsin. The completeness and reproducibility of digestion were verified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analysis of the digestion products. The performance of the automatic digestion was comparable to the currently used manual digestion procedure, but saved time, reduced manual labor, and increased the reproducibility of the tryptic digests. Our method should be useful not only for high-throughput analysis of antibodies, but for other therapeutic protein samples as well. Other applications like gel-free proteomics, where the analysis of a large number of samples is often needed and the completeness of the liquid digestion is critical for the identification of a large number of different proteins, should also benefit from this fully automated liquid proteolytic digestion procedure.

  11. Quantitative Architectural Analysis: A New Approach to Cortical Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleicher, Axel; Morosan, Patricia; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Results from functional imaging studies are often still interpreted using the classical architectonic brain maps of Brodmann and his successors. One obvious weakness in traditional, architectural mapping is the subjective nature of localizing borders between cortical areas by means of a purely visual, microscopical examination of histological…

  12. A Mathematical Analysis of Semantic Maps, with Theoretical and Applied Implications for Blended Learning Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Michael; David, Hyerle; Byrne, Roxanne; Tran, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a mathematical (Boolean) analysis a set of cognitive maps called Thinking Maps[R], based on Albert Upton's semantic principles developed in his seminal works, Design for Thinking (1961) and Creative Analysis (1961). Albert Upton can be seen as a brilliant thinker who was before his time or after his time depending on the future of…

  13. Classification Algorithms for Big Data Analysis, a Map Reduce Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayma, V. A.; Ferreira, R. S.; Happ, P.; Oliveira, D.; Feitosa, R.; Costa, G.; Plaza, A.; Gamba, P.

    2015-03-01

    Since many years ago, the scientific community is concerned about how to increase the accuracy of different classification methods, and major achievements have been made so far. Besides this issue, the increasing amount of data that is being generated every day by remote sensors raises more challenges to be overcome. In this work, a tool within the scope of InterIMAGE Cloud Platform (ICP), which is an open-source, distributed framework for automatic image interpretation, is presented. The tool, named ICP: Data Mining Package, is able to perform supervised classification procedures on huge amounts of data, usually referred as big data, on a distributed infrastructure using Hadoop MapReduce. The tool has four classification algorithms implemented, taken from WEKA's machine learning library, namely: Decision Trees, Naïve Bayes, Random Forest and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The results of an experimental analysis using a SVM classifier on data sets of different sizes for different cluster configurations demonstrates the potential of the tool, as well as aspects that affect its performance.

  14. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Tommasi, Andrea; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature (≈0.98Tm). Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strain heterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is therefore a model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements at sample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo- Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) provide a solid database for analyzing the relative impact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRX mechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneous dislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of the dislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation between high dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging, subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  15. Operational mode analysis of the maps NTP system

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, F.L.; Bernard, S.; Carruge, D.; Poitevin, Y.; Raepsaet, X.

    1996-03-01

    Within the framework of the french NTP program MAPS, the analysis of the (start-up/shut-down) transient sequences whose negative impact on the specific impulsion Isp is important, requires the evaluation of the hydrogen system performance and consequently the development of a simulation computer program. This work induces a preliminary evaluation of the hydrogen system performance under nominal operating conditions. A first approach of the transient operating mode has been simultaneously performed; more specifically the evolution of the core during a shut-down sequence has been studied in order to improve the residual power evacuation and optimize necessary hydrogen amounts for cooling. Furthermore the {open_quote}{open_quote}SIMAPS{close_quote}{close_quote} computer program based on the 3D thermohydraulic code {open_quote}{open_quote}FLICA 4{close_quote}{close_quote} is being developed to analyze transient process and its benchmarking under nominal conditions is under way. Its summary presentation is given in conclusion. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  17. Quantitative architectural analysis: a new approach to cortical mapping.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Axel; Morosan, Patricia; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2009-11-01

    Results from functional imaging studies are often still interpreted using the classical architectonic brain maps of Brodmann and his successors. One obvious weakness in traditional, architectural mapping is the subjective nature of localizing borders between cortical areas by means of a purely visual, microscopical examination of histological specimens. To overcome this limitation, objective mapping procedures based on quantitative cytoarchitecture have been generated. As a result, new maps for various species including man were established. In our contribution, principles of quantitative cytoarchitecture and algorithm-based cortical mapping are described for a cytoarchitectural parcellation of the human auditory cortex. Defining cortical borders based on quantified changes in cortical lamination is the decisive step towards a novel, highly improved probabilistic brain atlas.

  18. Potential uses of human salivary protein and peptide analysis in the diagnosis of disease.

    PubMed

    Al Kawas, Sausan; Rahim, Zubaidah H A; Ferguson, David B

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid containing a complex mixture of proteins, peptides and other substances. These are not only important in maintaining the health of the oral cavity but also may yield information about oral and systemic disease. Comprehensive analysis and identification of the proteomic content of human saliva may contribute to the understanding of oral pathophysiology and provide a foundation for the recognition of potential biomarkers of human disease. The collection of saliva samples is non-invasive, safe, and inexpensive. It seems likely that testing methods can be developed which can be used in general medical or dental practice. However, it is important to realize that the collection of saliva must be carefully controlled. In this paper we review the progress in the analysis of the human salivary proteome and summarise the diagnostic possibilities that have been explored. The precautions in collecting saliva, and some of the factors which would have to be considered if a diagnostic test were to be generally adopted are discussed.

  19. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: Lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovska, Ganna; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms of order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such descriptions are inaccurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-state-models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy order parameter as well as the dynamics of a disordered peptide illustrates the possibility to build accurate descriptions of molecular processes on the sole basis of order parameter time series without using any supplementary information.

  20. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide.

    PubMed

    Berezovska, Ganna; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-11-21

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms of order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such descriptions are inaccurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-state-models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy order parameter as well as the dynamics of a disordered peptide illustrates the possibility to build accurate descriptions of molecular processes on the sole basis of order parameter time series without using any supplementary information. PMID:23181288

  1. Mapping Upper Mantle Seismic Discontinuities Using Singular Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Dokht, R.; Sacchi, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic discontinuities are fundamental to the understanding of mantle composition and dynamics. Their depth and impedance are generally determined using secondary seismic phases, most commonly SS precursors and P-to-S converted waves. However, the analysis and interpretation using these approaches often suffer from incomplete data coverage, high noise levels and interfering seismic phases, especially near tectonically complex regions such as subduction zones and continental margins. To overcome these pitfalls, we apply Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) to remove random noise, reconstruct missing traces and enhance the robustness of SS precursors and P-to-S conversions from seismic discontinuities. Our method takes advantage of the predictability of time series in frequency-space domain and performs a rank reduction using a singular value decomposition of the trajectory matrix. We apply SSA to synthetic record sections as well as observations of 1) SS precursors beneath the northwestern Pacific subduction zones, and 2) P-to-S converted waves from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). In comparison with raw or interpolated data, the SSA enhanced reflectivity maps show a greater resolution and a stronger negative correlation between the depths of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. These effects can be attributed to the suppression of incoherent noise, which tends to reduce the signal amplitude during normal averaging procedures, through rank reduction and the emphasis of principle singular values. Our new results suggest a more laterally coherent 520 km reflection in the western Pacific regions. Similar improvements in data imaging are achieved in western Canada, where strong lateral variations in discontinuity topography are observed in the craton-Cordillera boundary zone. Improvements from SSA relative to conventional approaches are most notable in under-sampled regions.

  2. Application of GelC-MS/MS to Proteomic Profiling of Chikungunya Virus Infection: Preparation of Peptides for Analysis.

    PubMed

    Paemanee, Atchara; Wikan, Nitwara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R

    2016-01-01

    Gel-enhanced liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) is a labor intensive, but relatively straightforward methodology that generates high proteome coverage which can be applied to the proteome analysis of a range of starting materials such as cells or patient specimens. Sample proteins are resolved electrophoretically in one dimension through a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel after which the lanes are sliced into sections. The sections are further diced and the gel cubes generated are subjected to in-gel tryptic digestion. The resultant peptides can then be analyzed by tandem mass spectroscopy to identify the proteins by database searching. The methodology can routinely detect several thousand proteins in one analysis. The protocol we describe here has been used with both cells in culture that have been infected with chikungunya virus and specimens from Chikungunya fever patients. This protocol details the process for generating peptides for subsequent mass spectroscopic and bioinformatic analysis. PMID:27233271

  3. rMAPS: RNA map analysis and plotting server for alternative exon regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juw Won; Jung, Sungbo; Rouchka, Eric C.; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a critical role in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS), a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptomic and proteomic diversity in eukaryotic cells. Studies have shown that AS can be regulated by RBPs in a binding-site-position dependent manner. Depending on where RBPs bind, splicing of an alternative exon can be enhanced or suppressed. Therefore, spatial analyses of RBP motifs and binding sites around alternative exons will help elucidate splicing regulation by RBPs. The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies has allowed transcriptome-wide analyses of AS and RBP–RNA interactions. Given a set of differentially regulated alternative exons obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) experiments, the rMAPS web server (http://rmaps.cecsresearch.org) performs motif analyses of RBPs in the vicinity of alternatively spliced exons and creates RNA maps that depict the spatial patterns of RBP motifs. Similarly, rMAPS can also perform spatial analyses of RBP–RNA binding sites identified by cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) experiments. We anticipate rMAPS will be a useful tool for elucidating RBP regulation of alternative exon splicing using high-throughput sequencing data. PMID:27174931

  4. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  5. Prediction and Analysis of Quorum Sensing Peptides Based on Sequence Features

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Akanksha; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing peptides (QSPs) are the signaling molecules used by the Gram-positive bacteria in orchestrating cell-to-cell communication. In spite of their enormous importance in signaling process, their detailed bioinformatics analysis is lacking. In this study, QSPs and non-QSPs were examined according to their amino acid composition, residues position, motifs and physicochemical properties. Compositional analysis concludes that QSPs are enriched with aromatic residues like Trp, Tyr and Phe. At the N-terminal, Ser was a dominant residue at maximum positions, namely, first, second, third and fifth while Phe was a preferred residue at first, third and fifth positions from the C-terminal. A few motifs from QSPs were also extracted. Physicochemical properties like aromaticity, molecular weight and secondary structure were found to be distinguishing features of QSPs. Exploiting above properties, we have developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM) based predictive model. During 10-fold cross-validation, SVM achieves maximum accuracy of 93.00%, Mathew’s correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.86 and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of 0.98 on the training/testing dataset (T200p+200n). Developed models performed equally well on the validation dataset (V20p+20n). The server also integrates several useful analysis tools like “QSMotifScan”, “ProtFrag”, “MutGen” and “PhysicoProp”. Our analysis reveals important characteristics of QSPs and on the basis of these unique features, we have developed a prediction algorithm “QSPpred” (freely available at: http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/qsppred). PMID:25781990

  6. North Alaska petroleum analysis: the regional map compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey initiated an effort to model north Alaskan petroleum systems. The geographic and geologic basis for modeling systems is provided by a set of regional digital maps that allow evaluation of the widest possible extent of each system. Accordingly, we laid out a rectangular map grid 1300 km (800 miles) east-west and 600 km (375 miles) north-south. The resulting map area extends from the Yukon Territory of Canada on the east to the Russian-U.S. Chukchi Sea on the west and from the Brooks Range on the south to the Canada basin-Chukchi borderland on the north. Within this map region, we combined disparate types of publicly available data to produce structure contour maps. Data types range from seismic-based mapping as in the National Petroleum Reserve to well penetrations in areas of little or no seismic data where extrapolation was required. With these types of data, we produced structure contour maps on three horizons: top of pre-Mississippian (basement), top of Triassic (Ellesmerian sequence), and top of Neocomian (Beaufortian sequence). These horizons, when combined with present-day topography and bathymetry, provide the bounding structural/stratigraphic surfaces of the north Alaskan petroleum province that mark major defining moments of the region's geologic history and allow regional portrayal of preserved sediment accumulations.

  7. A Systematic Analysis of Drosophila Regulatory Peptide Expression in Enteroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Kim, Seol-min; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    The digestive system is gaining interest as a major regulator of various functions including immune defense, nutrient accumulation, and regulation of feeding behavior, aside from its conventional function as a digestive organ. The Drosophila midgut epithelium is completely renewed every 1–2 weeks due to differentiation of pluripotent intestinal stem cells in the midgut. Intestinal stem cells constantly divide and differentiate into enterocytes that secrete digestive enzymes and absorb nutrients, or enteroendocrine cells that secrete regulatory peptides. Regulatory peptides have important roles in development and metabolism, but study has mainly focused on expression and functions in the nervous system, and not much is known about the roles in endocrine functions of enteroendocrine cells. We systemically examined the expression of 45 regulatory peptide genes in the Drosophila midgut, and verified that at least 10 genes are expressed in the midgut enteroendocrine cells through RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, antisera, and 25 regulatory peptide-GAL transgenes. The Drosophila midgut is highly compartmentalized, and individual peptides in enteroendocrine cells were observed to express in specific regions of the midgut. We also confirmed that some peptides expressed in the same region of the midgut are expressed in mutually exclusive enteroendocrine cells. These results indicate that the midgut enteroendocrine cells are functionally differentiated into different subgroups. Through this study, we have established a basis to study regulatory peptide functions in enteroendocrine cells as well as the complex organization of enteroendocrine cells in the Drosophila midgut. PMID:27025390

  8. Isolation and sequence analysis of peptides from the venom of Protonectarina sylveirae (Hymenoptera-Vespidae).

    PubMed

    Dohtsu, K; Okumura, K; Hagiwara, K; Palma, M S; Nakajima, T

    1993-01-01

    Three new venom peptides were isolated from the Brazilian wasp; Protonectarina sylveirae and their complete amino acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation as well as by FAB-mass spectrometry. One (P-8) of them was a new analog of mastoparan family; therefore, we named it Protonectarina mastoparan. Another peptide (P-10) had an amino acid sequence homology with Ves-CP-T, a chemotactic peptide of wasp venom, and bombolitin-V, the venom peptide from bumblebee. The third peptide (P-6) was structurally unique, possessing an intramolecular disulfide bond. Not only Protonectarina mastoparan (P-8) but also P-6 and P-10 caused histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells as potently as mastoparan (EC50s were about 1 x 10(-6) M for P-6 and 2 x 10(-6) M for P-10). In addition, P-10 in a concentration higher than 1 x 10(-5) M induced hemolysis though whose hemolytic activity was about a half potency of that of mastoparan. However, P-6 did not cause hemolysis up to the concentration of 10 microM. We have named them sylverin for the peptide P-6 and protonectin for the peptide P-10.

  9. Effectiveness of CID, HCD, and ETD with FT MS/MS for Degradomic-Peptidomic Analysis: Comparison of Peptide Identification Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Purvine, Samuel O.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald, J.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-09-02

    We report on use of an Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer for comparison of fragmentation methods namely CID-, HCD-, and ETD for FT MS/MS analysis of human blood plasma peptidomic peptides. The peptidomic peptides were able to be identified from CID, HCD, and ETD spectra on specific confidence levels (e.g., 1% false discovery rate) with use of conventional SEQUEST database search software, and the number of identified peptides was increased by ~50% using accurate fragments (e.g., with mass tolerance of 0.05Da) in comparison with traditional moderate accuracy fragments (e.g., with 1 Da mass tolerance) for database search. However, the peptide datasets identified with such decoy search strategy were found to be varied by ~25% in the dataset size and ~20% in the dataset content with type of decoy database and precursor mass tolerances used for database search. CID was evaluated as the largest contributor to the identified peptide datasets, and HCD, and ETD provided ~20% and ~22% respectively additional peptides with accurate fragments for peptide identification, in contrast to ~25% and ~13% respectively with use of moderate accuracy fragments. When long (typically ≥7 amino acids) sequences were used for identification of peptides from the previously published UStags and de novo sequencing methods, HCD was evaluated as the largest contributor, and CID and ETD provided ~26% and ~8% respectively additional peptides from the UStags method and ~26% and ~6% respectively additional peptides from the de novo sequencing method. The peptide datasets identified with the UStags method were little influenced by the decoy database and mass tolerance and 98-99% peptide overlaps could be achieved between these datasets. CID, HCD, and ETD contributed their identifications of various charge state peptides in the m/z range highly overlapped and complementary implementation of CID, HCD, and ETD should be applied to maximize the number of peptides identified. Finally, the investigation

  10. Analysis of Endogenous D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lu; Sheeley, Sarah; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Peptides are chiral molecules with their structure determined by the composition and configuration of their amino acid building blocks. The naturally occurring amino acids, except glycine, possess two chiral forms. This allows the formation of multiple peptide diastereomers that have the same sequence. Although living organisms use L-amino acids to make proteins, a group of D-amino acid-containing peptides (DAACPs) has been discovered in animals that have at least one of their residues isomerized to the D-form via an enzyme-catalyzed process. In many cases, the biological functions of these peptides are enhanced due to this structural conversion. These DAACPs are different from those known to occur in bacterial cell wall and antibiotic peptides, the latter of which are synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner. DAACPs have now also been identified in a number of distinct groups throughout the Metazoa. Their serendipitous discovery has often resulted from discrepancies observed in bioassays or in chromatographic behavior between natural peptide fractions and peptides synthesized according to a presumed all-L sequence. Because this L-to-D post-translational modification is subtle and not detectable by most sequence determination approaches, it is reasonable to suspect that many studies have overlooked this change; accordingly, DAACPs may be more prevalent than currently thought. Although diastereomer separation techniques developed with synthetic peptides in recent years have greatly aided in the discovery of natural DAACPs, there is a need for new, more robust methods for naturally complex samples. In this review, a brief history of DAACPs in animals is presented, followed by discussion of a variety of analytical methods that have been used for diastereomeric separation and detection of peptides. PMID:20490347

  11. Isolation and structural analysis of antihypertensive peptides that exist naturally in Gouda cheese.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Nakamura, T; Kitazawa, H; Kawai, Y; Itoh, T

    2000-07-01

    Seven kinds of ripened cheeses (8-mo-aged and 24-mo-aged Gouda, Emmental, Blue, Camembert, Edam, and Havarti) were homogenized with distilled water, and water-soluble peptides were prepared by C-18 hydrophobic chromatography. The inhibitory activity to angiotensin I-converting enzyme and decrease in the systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats were measured before and after oral administration of each peptide sample. The strongest depressive effect in the systolic blood pressure (-24.7 mm Hg) and intensive inhibitory activity to angiotensin I-converting enzyme (75.7%) were detected in the peptides from 8-mo-aged Gouda cheese. Four peptides were isolated by HPLC with reverse-phase and gel filtration modes. Their chemical structures and origins, clarified by combination analyses of protein sequencing, amino acid composition, and mass spectrometry, were as follows: peptide A, Arg-Pro-Lys-His-Pro-Ile-Lys-His-Gln [alpha(s1)-casein (CN), B-8P; f 1-9]; peptide B, Arg-Pro-Lys-His-Pro-Ile-Lys-His-Gln-Gly-Leu-Pro-Gln (alpha(s1)-CN, B-8P; f 1-13); peptide F, Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro-Ile-Pro-Asn (beta-CN, A2-5P; f 60-68); and peptide G, Met-Pro-Phe-Pro-Lys-Tyr-Pro-Val-Gln-Pro-Phe (beta-CN, A2-5P; f 109-119). Peptides A and F, which were chemically synthesized, showed potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity with little antihypertensive effects.

  12. Mapping and genotypic analysis of the NK-lysin gene in chicken

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are important elements of the first line of defence against pathogens in animals. NK-lysin is a cationic AMP that plays a critical role in innate immunity. The chicken NK-lysin gene has been cloned and its antimicrobial and anticancer activity has been described but its location in the chicken genome remains unknown. Here, we mapped the NK-lysin gene and examined the distribution of a functionally significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) among different chicken inbred lines and heritage breeds. Results A 6000 rad radiation hybrid panel (ChickRH6) was used to map the NK-lysin gene to the distal end of chromosome 22. Two additional genes, the adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1-like gene (AEBP1) and the DNA polymerase delta subunit 2-like (POLD2) gene, are located in the same NW_003779909 contig as NK-lysin, and were thus indirectly mapped to chromosome 22 as well. Previously, we reported a functionally significant SNP at position 271 of the NK-lysin coding sequence in two different chicken breeds. Here, we examined this SNP and found that the A allele appears to be more common than the G allele in these heritage breeds and inbred lines. Conclusions The chicken NK-lysin gene mapped to the distal end of chromosome 22. Two additional genes, AEBP1 and POLD2, were indirectly mapped to chromosome 22 also. SNP analyses revealed that the A allele, which encodes a peptide with a higher antimicrobial activity, is more common than the G allele in our tested inbred lines and heritage breeds. PMID:25001618

  13. A contact map matching approach to protein structure similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Raquel C; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo R; Fernandes, Fernando A; da Silveira, Carlos Henrique; Santoro, Marcelo M; Carceroni, Rodrigo L; Meira, Wagner; Araújo, Arnaldo de A

    2006-01-01

    We modeled the problem of identifying how close two proteins are structurally by measuring the dissimilarity of their contact maps. These contact maps are colored images, in which the chromatic information encodes the chemical nature of the contacts. We studied two conceptually distinct image-processing algorithms to measure the dissimilarity between these contact maps; one was a content-based image retrieval method, and the other was based on image registration. In experiments with contact maps constructed from the protein data bank, our approach was able to identify, with greater than 80% precision, instances of monomers of apolipoproteins, globins, plastocyanins, retinol binding proteins and thioredoxins, among the monomers of Protein Data Bank Select. The image registration approach was only slightly more accurate than the content-based image retrieval approach. PMID:16819709

  14. CapsidMaps: Protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L.; Reddy, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu. PMID:25697908

  15. CapsidMaps: protein-protein interaction pattern discovery platform for the structural analysis of virus capsids using Google Maps.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Montiel-García, Daniel Jorge; Brooks, Charles L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis and visualization of protein-protein interactions is a challenging task since it is difficult to appreciate easily the extent of all contacts made by the residues forming the interfaces. In the case of viruses, structural analysis becomes even more demanding because several interfaces coexist and, in most cases, these are formed by hundreds of contacting residues that belong to multiple interacting coat proteins. CapsidMaps is an interactive analysis and visualization tool that is designed to benefit the structural virology community. Developed as an improved extension of the φ-ψ Explorer, here we describe the details of its design and implementation. We present results of analysis of a spherical virus to showcase the features and utility of the new tool. CapsidMaps also facilitates the comparison of quaternary interactions between two spherical virus particles by computing a similarity (S)-score. The tool can also be used to identify residues that are solvent exposed and in the process of locating antigenic epitope regions as well as residues forming the inside surface of the capsid that interact with the nucleic acid genome. CapsidMaps is part of the VIPERdb Science Gateway, and is freely available as a web-based and cross-browser compliant application at http://viperdb.scripps.edu.

  16. Analysis of peptide-protein binding using amino acid descriptors: prediction and experimental verification for human histocompatibility complex HLA-A0201.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2005-11-17

    Amino acid descriptors are often used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of proteins and peptides. In the present study, descriptors were used to characterize peptides binding to the human MHC allele HLA-A0201. Two sets of amino acid descriptors were chosen: 93 descriptors taken from the amino acid descriptor database AAindex and the z descriptors defined by Wold and Sandberg. Variable selection techniques (SIMCA, genetic algorithm, and GOLPE) were applied to remove redundant descriptors. Our results indicate that QSAR models generated using five z descriptors had the highest predictivity and explained variance (q2 between 0.6 and 0.7 and r2 between 0.6 and 0.9). Further to the QSAR analysis, 15 peptides were synthesized and tested using a T2 stabilization assay. All peptides bound to HLA-A0201 well, and four peptides were identified as high-affinity binders. PMID:16279801

  17. Data Processing Algorithms for Analysis of High Resolution MSMS Spectra of Peptides with Complex Patterns of Posttranslational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Shenheng; Burlingame, Alma L.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of efficient fragmentation methods such as electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) provides the opportunity for detailed structural characterization of heavily covalently modified large peptides and small proteins such as intact histones. Even with effective gas phase ion isolation so that a single molecular precursor ion is selected, the MSMS spectrum of a heavily modified peptide may reveal the presence of a mixture of peptides with the same amino acid sequence and the same total number of posttranslational modification (PTM) moieties (same PTM composition) but with different PTM configurations or site-specific occupancy isoforms. Currently available data analysis methods depend on a deisotoping procedure, which becomes less effective when spectra (fragmentation patterns) contain many overlapping isotopic distributions. Peptide database search engines can only identify the most abundant PTM configuration (PTM arrangement on different residues) in such mixtures. To identify all the PTM configurations present in these mixtures and to estimate their relative abundances, we extended our fragment assignment by visual assistance program to search for ions representing all possible configurations, subjected to the total PTM composition constraint. This resulted in the identification of PTM configurations supported by unique fragment ions, and their relative abundances were estimated by use of a non-negative least squares procedure. PMID:19955076

  18. Ga + TOF-SIMS lineshape analysis for resolution enhancement of MALDI MS spectra of a peptide mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, D. I.; Chen, H.; Wilkerson, A. L.; Tracy, E. R.; Cooke, W. E.; Manos, D. M.; Sasinowski, M.; Semmes, O. J.

    2004-06-01

    The use of mass spectrometry to obtain molecular profiles indicative of alteration of concentrations of peptides in body fluids is currently the subject of intense investigation. For surface-based time-of-flight mass spectrometry the reliability and specificity of such profiling methods depend both on the resolution of the measuring instrument and on the preparation of samples. The present work is a part of a program to use Ga + beam TOF-SIMS alone, and as an adjunct to MALDI, in the development of reliable protein and peptide markers for diseases. Here, we describe techniques to prepare samples of relatively high-mass peptides, which serve as calibration standards and proxies for biomarkers. These are: Arg8-vasopressin, human angiotensin II, and somatostatin. Their TOF-SIMS spectra show repeatable characteristic features, with mass resolution exceeding 2000, including parent peaks and chemical adducts. The lineshape analysis for high-resolution parent peaks is shown to be useful for filter construction and deconvolution of inferior resolution SELDI-TOF spectra of calibration peptide mixture.

  19. SUBMILLIMETER NUMBER COUNTS FROM STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF BLAST MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Patanchon, Guillaume; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We describe the application of a statistical method to estimate submillimeter galaxy number counts from confusion-limited observations by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). Our method is based on a maximum likelihood fit to the pixel histogram, sometimes called 'P(D)', an approach which has been used before to probe faint counts, the difference being that here we advocate its use even for sources with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios. This method has an advantage over standard techniques of source extraction in providing an unbiased estimate of the counts from the bright end down to flux densities well below the confusion limit. We specifically analyze BLAST observations of a roughly 10 deg{sup 2} map centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South field. We provide estimates of number counts at the three BLAST wavelengths 250, 350, and 500 mum; instead of counting sources in flux bins we estimate the counts at several flux density nodes connected with power laws. We observe a generally very steep slope for the counts of about -3.7 at 250 mum, and -4.5 at 350 and 500 mum, over the range approx0.02-0.5 Jy, breaking to a shallower slope below about 0.015 Jy at all three wavelengths. We also describe how to estimate the uncertainties and correlations in this method so that the results can be used for model-fitting. This method should be well suited for analysis of data from the Herschel satellite.

  20. In silico analysis and experimental validation of lipoprotein and novel Tat signal peptides processing in Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sonika; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Signal peptide (SP) plays a pivotal role in protein translocation. Lipoprotein- and twin arginine translocase (Tat) dependent signal peptides were studied in All3087, a homolog of competence protein of Synechocystis PCC6803 and in two putative alkaline phosphatases (ALPs, Alr2234 and Alr4976), respectively. In silico analysis of All3087 is shown to possess the characteristics feature of competence proteins such as helix-hairpin-helix, N and C-terminal HKD endonuclease domain, calcium binding domain and N-terminal lipoprotein signal peptide. The SP recognition-cleavage site in All3087 was predicted (AIA-AC) using SignalP while further in-depth analysis using Pred-Lipo and WebLogo analysis for consensus sequence showed it as IAA-C. Activities of putative ALPs were confirmed by heterologous overexpression, activity assessment and zymogram analysis. ALP activity in Anabaena remains cell bound in log-phase, but during late log/stationary phase, an enhanced ALP activity was detected in extracellular milieu. The enhancement of ALP activity during stationary phase was not only due to inorganic phosphate limitation but also contributed by the presence of novel bipartite Tat-SP. The Tat signal transported the folded active ALPs to the membrane, followed by anchoring into the membrane and successive cleavage enabling transportation of the ALPs to the extracellular milieu, because of bipartite architecture and processing of transit Tat-SP.

  1. Enrichment of Extracellular Matrix Proteins from Tissues and Digestion into Peptides for Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naba, Alexandra; Clauser, Karl R; Hynes, Richard O

    2015-07-23

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex meshwork of cross-linked proteins that provides biophysical and biochemical cues that are major regulators of cell proliferation, survival, migration, etc. The ECM plays important roles in development and in diverse pathologies including cardio-vascular and musculo-skeletal diseases, fibrosis, and cancer. Thus, characterizing the composition of ECMs of normal and diseased tissues could lead to the identification of novel prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and potential novel therapeutic targets. However, the very nature of ECM proteins (large in size, cross-linked and covalently bound, heavily glycosylated) has rendered biochemical analyses of ECMs challenging. To overcome this challenge, we developed a method to enrich ECMs from fresh or frozen tissues and tumors that takes advantage of the insolubility of ECM proteins. We describe here in detail the decellularization procedure that consists of sequential incubations in buffers of different pH and salt and detergent concentrations and that results in 1) the extraction of intracellular (cytosolic, nuclear, membrane and cytoskeletal) proteins and 2) the enrichment of ECM proteins. We then describe how to deglycosylate and digest ECM-enriched protein preparations into peptides for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae treated with the designed antimicrobial peptides, DM3

    PubMed Central

    Le, Cheng-Foh; Gudimella, Ranganath; Razali, Rozaimi; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we generated a short 13 amino acid antimicrobial peptide (AMP), DM3, showing potent antipneumococcal activity in vitro and in vivo. Here we analyse the underlying mechanisms of action using Next-Generation transcriptome sequencing of penicillin (PEN)-resistant and PEN-susceptible pneumococci treated with DM3, PEN, and combination of DM3 and PEN (DM3PEN). DM3 induced differential expression in cell wall and cell membrane structural and transmembrane processes. Notably, DM3 altered the expression of competence-induction pathways by upregulating CelA, CelB, and CglA while downregulating Ccs16, ComF, and Ccs4 proteins. Capsular polysaccharide subunits were downregulated in DM3-treated cells, however, it was upregulated in PEN- and DM3PEN-treated groups. Additionally, DM3 altered the amino acids biosynthesis pathways, particularly targeting ribosomal rRNA subunits. Downregulation of cationic AMPs resistance pathway suggests that DM3 treatment could autoenhance pneumococci susceptibility to DM3. Gene enrichment analysis showed that unlike PEN and DM3PEN, DM3 treatment exerted no effect on DNA-binding RNA polymerase activity but observed downregulation of RpoD and RNA polymerase sigma factor. In contrast to DM3, DM3PEN altered the regulation of multiple purine/pyrimidine biosynthesis and metabolic pathways. Future studies based on in vitro experiments are proposed to investigate the key pathways leading to pneumococcal cell death caused by DM3. PMID:27225022

  3. Transcriptome analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae treated with the designed antimicrobial peptides, DM3.

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-Foh; Gudimella, Ranganath; Razali, Rozaimi; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we generated a short 13 amino acid antimicrobial peptide (AMP), DM3, showing potent antipneumococcal activity in vitro and in vivo. Here we analyse the underlying mechanisms of action using Next-Generation transcriptome sequencing of penicillin (PEN)-resistant and PEN-susceptible pneumococci treated with DM3, PEN, and combination of DM3 and PEN (DM3PEN). DM3 induced differential expression in cell wall and cell membrane structural and transmembrane processes. Notably, DM3 altered the expression of competence-induction pathways by upregulating CelA, CelB, and CglA while downregulating Ccs16, ComF, and Ccs4 proteins. Capsular polysaccharide subunits were downregulated in DM3-treated cells, however, it was upregulated in PEN- and DM3PEN-treated groups. Additionally, DM3 altered the amino acids biosynthesis pathways, particularly targeting ribosomal rRNA subunits. Downregulation of cationic AMPs resistance pathway suggests that DM3 treatment could autoenhance pneumococci susceptibility to DM3. Gene enrichment analysis showed that unlike PEN and DM3PEN, DM3 treatment exerted no effect on DNA-binding RNA polymerase activity but observed downregulation of RpoD and RNA polymerase sigma factor. In contrast to DM3, DM3PEN altered the regulation of multiple purine/pyrimidine biosynthesis and metabolic pathways. Future studies based on in vitro experiments are proposed to investigate the key pathways leading to pneumococcal cell death caused by DM3. PMID:27225022

  4. Higher efficiency soluble prokaryotic expression, purification, and structural analysis of antimicrobial peptide G13.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yinghu; Zha, Xiangdong; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Ma, Lijuan; Xu, Xuejiao

    2016-03-01

    G13 is a 19-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from granulysin. In order to achieve high-level expression of G13 in Escherichia coli cells, and to reduce downstream processing costs, we introduced an Asp-Pro acid labile bond between the His-Patch thioredoxin and G13 and constructed the recombinant plasmid pThiohisA-DP-G13. The plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). After induction with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside for 5 h, the fusion protein accumulated up to 200 mg/L in soluble form. The fusion protein was released by a high pressure homogenizer, cleaved using 13% acetic acid at 50 °C hydrolysis for 72 h. The recombinant G13 (r-G13) was then successively purified by fractional precipitation with ammonium sulfate and trichloroacetic acid, followed by one-step cation exchange chromatography. The purified r-G13 displayed a single band (about 2.2 kDa) as analyzed by Tris-Tricine buffered SDS-PAGE, and its precise molecular weight was confirmed using tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of r-G13 by circular dichroism (CD) indicated that r-G13 contained predominantly β-sheet and random coil. Agar plate diffusion assay revealed that the r-G13 exhibited antibacterial activity against both Bacillus subtilis and E. coli.

  5. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop. PMID:27800552

  6. Analysis of protamine peptides in insulin pharmaceutical formulations by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lamalle, Caroline; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Demelenne, Alice; Crommen, Jacques; Fillet, Marianne

    2016-03-01

    Protamines are a group of highly basic peptides that are sometimes added to insulin formulations to prolong the pharmacological action. In this study, different methods were investigated to identify protamine in insulin formulations. Capillary electrophoresis in aqueous and non-aqueous media was tested to separate these peptides with very close amino acid sequences. Different buffers (phosphate or formate, both acidified) and various additives (principally negatively charged and neutral surfactants) were investigated to optimize peptide separation. Finally, a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography method using a capillary of 120 cm effective length and an aqueous background electrolyte made up of 100 mM phosphate buffer (pH 2) and 50 mM Thesit® gave the best results, providing the separation of the four major protamine peptides within 25 min. PMID:26829340

  7. [The Qualitative Analysis of the Amide Derivative of HLDF-6 Peptide and Its Metabolites with the Use of Tritium- and Deuterium-Labeled Derivatives].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, A; Dadayan, A K; Kost, N V; Voevodina, M E; Sokolov, O Y; Kozik, V S; Shram, S I; Azev, V N; Bocharov, E V; Bogachouk, A P; Lipkin, V M; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elaborate the pharmacokinetics methods of the amide derivative of peptide HLDF-6 (TGENHR-NH2) and its range of nootropic and neuroprotective activity is wide. The hexapeptide 41TGENHR46 is a fragment of the HDLF differentiation factor. It forms the basis for the development of preventive and therapeutic preparations for treating cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative conditions. Pharmacokinetic and molecular mechanisms of the action of the HLDF-6 peptide were studied using tritium- and deuterium-labeled derivatives of this peptide, produced with the use of the high-temperature solid-state catalytic isotope exchange reaction (HSCIE). This reaction was employed to produce the tritium-labeled peptide [3H]TGENHR-NH2 with a molar radioactivity of 230 Ci/mmol and the deuterium-labeled peptide [2H]TGENHR-NH2 with an average deuterium incorporation equal to 10.5 atoms. It was shown by the NMR spectroscopy that the isotope label distribution over the labeled peptide's molecule was uniform, which allowed qualitative analysis ofboth the peptide itself and its fragments in the organism's tissues to be conducted. The newly developed pharmacokinetics method makes it possible to avoid almost completely losses of the peptides under study due to biodegradation during the analysis of tissues. These labeled peptides were used in mice, rats and rabbits to study the pharmacokinetics of the peptide and to calculate the values of its principal pharmacokinetic parameters. Characteristics of its pharmacokinetic profile in the blood were obtained, the hypothesis of pharmacokinetics linearity tested, its metabolism analyzed and its bioavailability value, 34%, calculated. It has been shown that the studied TGENHR-NH2 peptide shows high resistance to hydrolysis in the blood plasma, with dipeptidyl aminopeptidases making the largest contribution to its hydrolysis. PMID:27125017

  8. [The Qualitative Analysis of the Amide Derivative of HLDF-6 Peptide and Its Metabolites with the Use of Tritium- and Deuterium-Labeled Derivatives].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, A; Dadayan, A K; Kost, N V; Voevodina, M E; Sokolov, O Y; Kozik, V S; Shram, S I; Azev, V N; Bocharov, E V; Bogachouk, A P; Lipkin, V M; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elaborate the pharmacokinetics methods of the amide derivative of peptide HLDF-6 (TGENHR-NH2) and its range of nootropic and neuroprotective activity is wide. The hexapeptide 41TGENHR46 is a fragment of the HDLF differentiation factor. It forms the basis for the development of preventive and therapeutic preparations for treating cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative conditions. Pharmacokinetic and molecular mechanisms of the action of the HLDF-6 peptide were studied using tritium- and deuterium-labeled derivatives of this peptide, produced with the use of the high-temperature solid-state catalytic isotope exchange reaction (HSCIE). This reaction was employed to produce the tritium-labeled peptide [3H]TGENHR-NH2 with a molar radioactivity of 230 Ci/mmol and the deuterium-labeled peptide [2H]TGENHR-NH2 with an average deuterium incorporation equal to 10.5 atoms. It was shown by the NMR spectroscopy that the isotope label distribution over the labeled peptide's molecule was uniform, which allowed qualitative analysis ofboth the peptide itself and its fragments in the organism's tissues to be conducted. The newly developed pharmacokinetics method makes it possible to avoid almost completely losses of the peptides under study due to biodegradation during the analysis of tissues. These labeled peptides were used in mice, rats and rabbits to study the pharmacokinetics of the peptide and to calculate the values of its principal pharmacokinetic parameters. Characteristics of its pharmacokinetic profile in the blood were obtained, the hypothesis of pharmacokinetics linearity tested, its metabolism analyzed and its bioavailability value, 34%, calculated. It has been shown that the studied TGENHR-NH2 peptide shows high resistance to hydrolysis in the blood plasma, with dipeptidyl aminopeptidases making the largest contribution to its hydrolysis.

  9. Structural analysis of leader peptide binding enables leader-free cyanobactin processing.

    PubMed

    Koehnke, Jesko; Mann, Greg; Bent, Andrew F; Ludewig, Hannes; Shirran, Sally; Botting, Catherine; Lebl, Tomas; Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel; Naismith, James H

    2015-08-01

    Regioselective modification of amino acids within the context of a peptide is common to a number of biosynthetic pathways, and many of the resulting products have potential as therapeutics. The ATP-dependent enzyme LynD heterocyclizes multiple cysteine residues to thiazolines within a peptide substrate. The enzyme requires the substrate to have a conserved N-terminal leader for full activity. Catalysis is almost insensitive to immediately flanking residues in the substrate, suggesting that recognition occurs distant from the active site. Nucleotide and peptide substrate co-complex structures of LynD reveal that the substrate leader peptide binds to and extends the β-sheet of a conserved domain of LynD, whereas catalysis is accomplished in another conserved domain. The spatial segregation of catalysis from recognition combines seemingly contradictory properties of regioselectivity and promiscuity, and it appears to be a conserved strategy in other peptide-modifying enzymes. A variant of LynD that efficiently processes substrates without a leader peptide has been engineered.

  10. Disposable pencil graphite electrode modified with peptide nanotubes for Vitamin B12 analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Betül Bozdoğan; Vural, Tayfun; Kuralay, Filiz; Çırak, Tamer; Bolat, Gülçin; Abacı, Serdar; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-06-01

    In this study, peptide nanostructures from diphenylalanine were synthesized in various solvents with various polarities and characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD) techniques. Formation of peptide nanofibrils, nanovesicles, nanoribbons, and nanotubes was observed in different solvent mediums. In order to investigate the effects of peptide nanotubes (PNT) on electrochemical behavior of disposable pencil graphite electrodes (PGE), electrode surfaces were modified with fabricated peptide nanotubes. Electrochemical activity of the pencil graphite electrode was increased with the deposition of PNTs on the surface. The effects of the solvent type, the peptide nanotube concentration, and the passive adsorption time of peptide nanotubes on pencil graphite electrode were studied. For further electrochemical studies, electrodes were modified for 30 min by immobilizing PNTs, which were prepared in water at 6 mg/mL concentration. Vitamin B12 analyses were performed by the Square Wave (SW) voltammetry method using modified PGEs. The obtained data showed linearity over the range of 0.2 μM and 9.50 μM Vitamin B12 concentration with high sensitivity. Results showed that PNT modified PGEs were highly simple, fast, cost effective, and feasible for the electro-analytical determination of Vitamin B12 in real samples.

  11. Association analysis of formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) polymorphisms and aspirin exacerbated respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Park, Jong-Sook; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Uh, Soo-Taek; Chung, Il Yup; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S; Park, Byung-Lae; Shin, Hyoung-Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2012-04-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases (AERD) are associated with the metabolism of arachidonic acid. FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor2) is a high-affinity ligand receptor for potent anti-inflammatory lipid metabolites: lipoxins. Thus, functional alterations of the FPR2 may contribute to AERD. We investigated the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FPR2 and AERD. Asthmatics were categorized into AERD <15% decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), and/or naso-ocular reactions after oral aspirin challenge (n=170) and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n=268). In all, 11 SNPs were genotyped. FPR2 protein expressions on CD14-positive monocytes in peripheral blood were measured using flow cytometric analysis. We performed RT-PCR of the FPR2 mRNA expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Logistic regression analysis showed that the minor allele frequency of FPR2 -4209T>G (rs1769490) in intron 2 was significantly lower in the AERD group (n=170) than in the ATA group (n=268) (P=0.006, P(corr)=0.04, recessive model). The decline of FEV(1) after aspirin challenge was significantly lower in the subjects with GG homozygotes of FPR2 -4209T>G than those with the other genotypes (P=0.0002). Asthmatic homozygotes for FPR2 -4209T>G minor allele exhibited significantly higher FPR2 protein expression in CD14-positive monocytes than did those with the common allele of FPR2 -4209T>G allele (P=0.01). There was no difference in the expression of the wild form and the exon 2 deleted variant form of FPR2 gene according to the genotypes of FPR2 -4209T>G. The minor allele at FPR2 -4209T>G may have a protective role against the development of AERD, via increase of FPR2 protein expression in inflammatory cells. PMID:22377711

  12. Error analysis of deep sequencing of phage libraries: peptides censored in sequencing.

    PubMed

    Matochko, Wadim L; Derda, Ratmir

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N × 1 frequency vector n = ||ni||, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N × N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa). The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq). Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq = Sa IN, where IN is a N × N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN), which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process. PMID:24416071

  13. Multivariate analysis of spectral data with frequency shifts: application to temperature dependent infrared spectra of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan

    2013-10-15

    Changes in the amide I' IR band with temperature are widely used for elucidation of peptide and protein conformational transitions and folding equilibria. Since amide I' exhibits inherent temperature dependent frequency shifts, standard mixture analysis methods are not applicable. To reliably extract the true thermodynamic states, frequency shifts of the component spectra must be explicitly taken into account. For this purpose, new methods termed shifted multivariate spectra analysis (SMSA) and parametric SMSA (pSMSA) are developed and tested on sets of synthetic data as well as real experimental amide I' spectra for thermal unfolding of an α-helical peptide. SMSA uses no specific functional form for the transition (soft modeling), while the parametric variant (pSMSA) assumes a thermodynamic model (hard modeling). The implementation is optimized specifically for amide I' IR in that it takes advantage of known, linear dependence of the frequencies as well as intensities on temperature. The synthetic data tests demonstrate the robustness of the methods; the initial test parameters are recovered with a high degree of reliability, although the nonparameteric SMSA is subject to the rotational ambiguity. Application to the peptide experimental amide I' data illustrates additional complications encountered with the analysis of real systems, such as correction for the side-chain spectra and interference of spectral shape changes. Nevertheless, the results are in excellent agreement with the independent control using circular dichroism (CD) data. The general applicability and limitations of the methods are discussed along with potential extensions.

  14. Assessing the Health Impacts of Air Pollution Regulations Using BenMAP, the Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbell, B.; McCubbin, D.; Hallberg, A.

    2003-12-01

    The U.S. EPA Office of Air and Radiation has developed BenMAP, the environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program, a new software tool for estimating the health and environmental impacts of environmental regulations. BenMAP is the US EPA's premier tool for estimating benefits associated with air pollution reduction strategies, and has recently been used in evaluating US EPA's Proposed Non-Road Diesel Vehicle Standards and the proposed Clear Skies Act legislation. BenMAP is a geographic information system (GIS) that uses modeled and monitored air quality data combined with population forecasts to develop estimates of changes in community level exposure to ambient environmental pollution (currently ambient air pollution, e.g. ozone and PM). These estimated changes in exposure to ambient pollution are used as inputs to concentration-response functions derived from the epidemiological literature, along with data on baseline incidence of health effects, i.e. county level age and cause specific mortality rates. The resulting point estimates of changes in incidence of health effects, along with their associated uncertainty distributions (currently based on reported standard errors in the literature), are then multiplied by economic unit values (represented by distributions), i.e. the cost of a hospital admission, to derive dollar estimates of health benefits. BenMAP is unique in that it uses highly detailed census and health data matched with spatially detailed environmental quality data to estimate health benefits. The program can also provide estimates of the uncertainty associated with the estimated benefits. Other features of the program include the ability to pool results from multiple studies of the same endpoint, using fixed or random effects weights, or user supplied weights. BenMAP also incorporates functions to manipulate and combine information on environmental quality from many different sources. For the current version focusing on air pollution, these

  15. Genome mapping by random anchoring: A discrete theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Q.; Marr, T. G.

    1993-11-01

    As a part of the international human genome project, large-scale genomic maps of human and other model organisms are being generated. More recently, mapping using various anchoring (as opposed to the traditional "fingerprinting") strategies have been proposed based largely on mathematical models. In all of the theoretical work dealing with anchoring, an anchor has been idealized as a point on a continuous, infinite-length genome. In general, it is not desirable to make these assumptions, since in practice they may be violated under a variety of actual biological situations. Here we analyze a discrete model that can be used to predict the expected progress made when mapping by random anchoring. By virtue of keeping all three length scales (genome length, clone length, and probe length) finite, our results for the random anchoring strategy are derived in full generality, which contain previous results as special cases and hence can have broad application for planning mapping experiments or assessing the accuracy of the continuum models. Finally, we pose a challenging nonrandom anchoring model corresponding to a more efficient mapping scheme.

  16. Cubic map algebra functions for spatio-temporal analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mennis, J.; Viger, R.; Tomlin, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an extension of map algebra to three dimensions for spatio-temporal data handling. This approach yields a new class of map algebra functions that we call "cube functions." Whereas conventional map algebra functions operate on data layers representing two-dimensional space, cube functions operate on data cubes representing two-dimensional space over a third-dimensional period of time. We describe the prototype implementation of a spatio-temporal data structure and selected cube function versions of conventional local, focal, and zonal map algebra functions. The utility of cube functions is demonstrated through a case study analyzing the spatio-temporal variability of remotely sensed, southeastern U.S. vegetation character over various land covers and during different El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases. Like conventional map algebra, the application of cube functions may demand significant data preprocessing when integrating diverse data sets, and are subject to limitations related to data storage and algorithm performance. Solutions to these issues include extending data compression and computing strategies for calculations on very large data volumes to spatio-temporal data handling.

  17. Analysis of RapidEye imagery for agricultural land mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Huiyong; Zhang, Jixian; Zhai, Liang; Xie, Wenhan; Sun, Xiaoxia

    2015-12-01

    With the improvement of remote sensing technology, the spatial, structural and texture information of land covers are present clearly in high resolution imagery, which enhances the ability of crop mapping. Since the satellite RapidEye was launched in 2009, high resolution multispectral imagery together with wide red edge band has been utilized in vegetation monitoring. Broad red edge band related vegetation indices improved land use classification and vegetation studies. RapidEye high resolution imagery was used in this study to evaluate the potential of red edge band in agricultural land cover/use mapping using an objected-oriented classification approach. A new object-oriented decision tree classifier was introduced in this study to map agricultural lands in the study area. Besides the five bands of RapidEye image, the vegetation indexes derived from spectral bands and the structural and texture features are utilized as inputs for agricultural land cover/use mapping in the study. The optimization of input features for classification by reducing redundant information improves the mapping precision about 18% for AdaTree. WL decision tree, and 5% for SVM, the accuracy is over 90% for both classifiers.

  18. Elucidation of binding specificity of Jacalin toward O-glycosylated peptides: quantitative analysis by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Nakamura, Sachiko; Wang, Han; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Tachibana, Kahori; Maebara, Kanako; Cheng, Lamei; Hirabayashi, J; Narimatsu, H

    2006-01-01

    Jacalin, a lectin from the jackfruit Artocarpus integrifolia, has been known as a valuable tool for specific capturing of O-glycoproteins such as mucins and IgA1. Though its sugar-binding preference for T/Tn-antigens is well established, its detailed specificity has not been elucidated. In this study, we prepared a series of mucin-type glycopeptides using human glycosyltransferases, that is, ST6GalNAc1, Core1Gal-T1 and -T2, beta3Gn-T6, and Core2GnT1, and investigated their binding to immobilized Jacalin by frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). As a result, consistent with the previous observation, Jacalin showed high affinity for T-antigen (Core1) and Tn-antigen (alpha N-acetylgalactosamine)-attached peptides. Furthermore, we here show as novel findings that (1) Jacalin also showed significant affinity for Core3 and sialyl-T (ST)-attached peptides, but (2) Jacalin could not bind to Core2, Core6, and sialyl-Tn (STn)-attached peptides. The results were also confirmed by FAC using p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-derivatized saccharides. In conclusion, Jacalin binds to a GalNAcalpha1-peptide, in which C6-OH of alphaGalNAc is free (i.e., Core1, Tn, Core3, and ST), whereas it cannot recognize a GalNAcalpha1-peptide with a substitution at the C6 position (i.e., Core2, Core6, and STn). These findings provide useful information when applying jacalin for functional analysis of mucin-type glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

  19. Lunar terrain mapping and relative-roughness analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C.; Mccauley, J. F.; Holm, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Terrain maps of the equatorial zone were prepared at scales of 1:2,000,000 and 1:1,000,000 to classify lunar terrain with respect to roughness and to provide a basis for selecting sites for Surveyor and Apollo landings, as well as for Ranger and Lunar Orbiter photographs. Lunar terrain was described by qualitative and quantitative methods and divided into four fundamental classes: maria, terrae, craters, and linear features. Some 35 subdivisions were defined and mapped throughout the equatorial zone, and, in addition, most of the map units were illustrated by photographs. The terrain types were analyzed quantitatively to characterize and order their relative roughness characteristics. For some morphologically homogeneous mare areas, relative roughness can be extrapolated to the large scales from measurements at small scales.

  20. Sweat pore mapping using a fluorescein-polymer composite film for fingerprint analysis.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Minkyeong; Lee, Joosub; Baek, Woohyun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2015-02-21

    A simple but efficient sweat pore mapping method based on a fluorescein-PVP composite film was developed for fingerprint analysis. The composite film displays a fluorometric turn-on response upon contact with a small quantity of water secreted from human sweat pores, allowing precise mapping of sweat pores on a fingertip.

  1. Issues in analysis of soil-landscape effects in a large regional yield map collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield maps are commonly collected by producers and precision agriculture service providers and are accumulating in warehouse scale data-stores. A key goal in analysis of yield maps is to understand how climate interacts with soil landscapes to cause spatial and temporal variability in grain yield. H...

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  3. MAPS - a computerized management analysis and planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packe, D. R.; Raffaeli, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Program lists work structure of projects at all levels. System integrates work item, its schedule, its status against the schedule, responsible personnel, and explanatory comments. structure of MAPS promotes natural organization of project work elements, project features and uses are given.

  4. Using Concept Maps to Engage Adult Learners in Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelich Biniecki, Susan M.; Conceição, Simone C. O.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of learning theories can help adult educators become more effective practitioners and meet the needs of the learners they serve. Adult educators who understand how individuals learn can be better prepared to use effective strategies during the learning process. This article addresses the use of concept maps as a strategy to engage…

  5. Identification and quantitation of MHC class II-bound peptides from mouse spleen dendritic cells by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yu, Haiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Advances in immunology and immune therapies require knowledge of antigenic peptide sequences that are presented on MHC class II and class I molecules of antigen presenting cells. The most specialized antigen presenting cells are dendritic cells (DCs). In the past, the small number of DCs that can be isolated from mouse spleen prevented direct analysis of the MHC II peptide repertoire presented by DCs. Here we describe a protocol that integrates immunological methods (in vivo enrichment of mouse spleen DCs by Flt3L treatment and immunoprecipation of MHC II-peptide complexes), mass spectrometry analysis and peptide synthesis (LC-MS/MS and quantitation analysis for non tryptic peptides) to identify and quantitate the endogenous peptides that are bound to MHC II molecules on DCs. The described method produces quantitative data that are reproducible and reliable enough to cover a wide range of peptide copy numbers. We propose the application of this method in future studies to quantitatively investigate the MHC II repertoire on DCs presented during viral infections or different immunizations in vaccine development research. PMID:23963941

  6. Analysis of Radarsat-2 Full Polarimetric Data for Forest Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Yasser

    Forests are a major natural resource of the Earth and control a wide range of environmental processes. Forests comprise a major part of the planet's plant biodiversity and have an important role in the global hydrological and biochemical cycles. Among the numerous potential applications of remote sensing in forestry, forest mapping plays a vital role for characterization of the forest in terms of species. Particularly, in Canada where forests occupy 45% of the territory, representing more than 400 million hectares of the total Canadian continental area. In this thesis, the potential of polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) Radarsat-2 data for forest mapping is investigated. This thesis has two principle objectives. First is to propose algorithms for analyzing the PolSAR image data for forest mapping. There are a wide range of SAR parameters that can be derived from PolSAR data. In order to make full use of the discriminative power offered by all these parameters, two categories of methods are proposed. The methods are based on the concept of feature selection and classifier ensemble. First, a nonparametric definition of the evaluation function is proposed and hence the methods NFS and CBFS. Second, a fast wrapper algorithm is proposed for the evaluation function in feature selection and hence the methods FWFS and FWCBFS. Finally, to incorporate the neighboring pixels information in classification an extension of the FWCBFS method i.e. CCBFS is proposed. The second objective of this thesis is to provide a comparison between leaf-on (summer) and leaf-off (fall) season images for forest mapping. Two Radarsat-2 images acquired in fine quad-polarized mode were chosen for this study. The images were collected in leaf-on and leaf-off seasons. We also test the hypothesis whether combining the SAR parameters obtained from both images can provide better results than either individual datasets. The rationale for this combination is that every dataset has some parameters which may be

  7. Identification of biological pathways regulated by PGRN and GRN peptide treatments using transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, Sara; Young, Kate; Bennion-Callister, Janis; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in progranulin (PGRN) have been linked to two neurodegenerative disorders, heterozygote mutations with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and homozygote mutations with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Human PGRN is 593aa secreted growth factor, made up of seven and a half repeats of a highly conserved granulin motif that is cleaved to produce the granulin peptides A-G and paragranulin. While it is thought that PGRN protects against neurodegeneration through its role in inflammation and tissue repair, the role of PGRN and granulins in the nervous system is currently unclear. To better understand this, we prepared recombinant PGRN, granulin A-F and paragranulin, and used these to treat differentiated neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Using RNA sequencing and bioinformatics techniques we investigated the functional effects of PGRN and the individual granulins upon the transcriptome. For PGRN treatment we show that the main effect of short-duration treatments is the down-regulation of transcripts, supporting that signalling pathway induction appears to be dominant effect. Gene ontology analysis, however, also supports the regulation of biological processes such as the spliceosome and proteasome in response to PGRN treatment, as well as the lysosomal pathway constituents such as CHMP1A, further supporting the role of PGRN in lysosomal function. We also show that the response to granulin treatments involves the regulation of numerous non-coding RNA's, and the granulins cluster into groups of similar activity on the basis of expression profile with paragranulin and PGRN having similar expression profiles, while granulins B, D, E and G appear more similar. PMID:27307215

  8. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  9. Peptide-MHC Cellular Microarray with Innovative Data Analysis System for Simultaneously Detecting Multiple CD4 T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xinhui; Gebe, John A.; Bollyky, Paul L.; James, Eddie A.; Yang, Junbao; Stern, Lawrence J.; Kwok, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peptide:MHC cellular microarrays have been proposed to simultaneously characterize multiple Ag-specific populations of T cells. The practice of studying immune responses to complicated pathogens with this tool demands extensive knowledge of T cell epitopes and the availability of peptide:MHC complexes for array fabrication as well as a specialized data analysis approach for result interpretation. Methodology/Principal Findings We co-immobilized peptide:DR0401 complexes, anti-CD28, anti-CD11a and cytokine capture antibodies on the surface of chamber slides to generate a functional array that was able to detect rare Ag-specific T cell populations from previously primed in vitro T cell cultures. A novel statistical methodology was also developed to facilitate batch processing of raw array-like data into standardized endpoint scores, which linearly correlated with total Ag-specific T cell inputs. Applying these methods to analyze Influenza A viral antigen-specific T cell responses, we not only revealed the most prominent viral epitopes, but also demonstrated the heterogeneity of anti-viral cellular responses in healthy individuals. Applying these methods to examine the insulin producing beta-cell autoantigen specific T cell responses, we observed little difference between autoimmune diabetic patients and healthy individuals, suggesting a more subtle association between diabetes status and peripheral autoreactive T cells. Conclusions/Significance The data analysis system is reliable for T cell specificity and functional testing. Peptide:MHC cellular microarrays can be used to obtain multi-parametric results using limited blood samples in a variety of translational settings. PMID:20634998

  10. Structural analysis of a functional DIAP1 fragment bound to grim and hid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Cocina, A E; Chai, J; Hay, B A; Shi, Y

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in Drosophila, with the second BIR domain (BIR2) playing an important role. Three proteins, Hid, Grim, and Reaper, promote apoptosis, in part by binding to DIAP1 through their conserved N-terminal sequences. The crystal structures of DIAP1-BIR2 by itself and in complex with the N-terminal peptides from Hid and Grim reveal that these peptides bind a surface groove on DIAP1, with the first four amino acids mimicking the binding of the Smac tetrapeptide to XIAP. The next 3 residues also contribute to binding through hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, peptide binding induces the formation of an additional alpha helix in DIAP1. Our study reveals the structural conservation and diversity necessary for the binding of IAPs by the Drosophila Hid/Grim/Reaper and the mammalian Smac proteins.

  11. Evaluation of prenylated peptides for use in cellular imaging and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Igbavboa, Urule; Wood, W. Gibson; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of a farnesyl (C15) or geranylgeranyl (C20) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of approximately 2% of all mammalian proteins. This hydrophobic modification serves to direct membrane association of the protein. Due to the finding that the oncogenic protein Ras is naturally prenylated, several researchers have developed inhibitors of the prenyltransferase enzymes as cancer therapeutics. Despite numerous studies on the enzymology of prenylation in vitro, many questions remain about the process of prenylation in living cells. Using a combination of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we have shown that synthetic fluorescently-labeled prenylated peptides enter a variety of different cell types. Additionally, using capillary electrophoresis we have shown that these peptides can be detected in minute quantities from lysates of cells treated with these peptides. This method will allow for further study of the enzymology of protein prenylation in living cells. PMID:24146406

  12. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria . E-mail: garciaze@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-04-06

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in {alpha} helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  13. Regional analysis assessment of landslide hazard and zoning map for transmission line route selection using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Omar, R. C.; Usman, F.; Mejan, M. A.; Abd Halim, M. K.; Zainol, M. A.; Zulkarnain, M. S.

    2013-06-01

    The stability of ground as foundation for infrastructure development is always associated with geology and geomorphology aspects. Failure to carefully analyze these aspects may induce ground instability such subsidence and landslide which eventually can cause catastrophe to the infrastructure i.e. instability of transmission tower. However, in some cases such as the study area this is unavoidable. A GIS system for analysis of route was favoured to perform optimal route predictions based selection by incorporating multiple influence factors into its analysis by incorporating the Landslide Hazard Map (LHM) that was produced on basis of slope map, aspect map, land use map and geological map with the help of ArcGIS using weighted overlay method. Based on LHM it is safe to conclude that the proposed route for Ulu Jelai- Neggiri-Lebir-LILO transmission line has very low risk in term of landslides.

  14. A Framework for the Validation of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Maps Using Strong Ground Motion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bydlon, S. A.; Beroza, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent debate on the efficacy of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA), and the utility of hazard maps (i.e. Stein et al., 2011; Hanks et al., 2012), has prompted a need for validation of such maps using recorded strong ground motion data. Unfortunately, strong motion records are limited spatially and temporally relative to the area and time windows hazard maps encompass. We develop a framework to test the predictive powers of PSHA maps that is flexible with respect to a map's specified probability of exceedance and time window, and the strong motion receiver coverage. Using a combination of recorded and interpolated strong motion records produced through the ShakeMap environment, we compile a record of ground motion intensity measures for California from 2002-present. We use this information to perform an area-based test of California PSHA maps inspired by the work of Ward (1995). Though this framework is flexible in that it can be applied to seismically active areas where ShakeMap-like ground shaking interpolations have or can be produced, this testing procedure is limited by the relatively short lifetime of strong motion recordings and by the desire to only test with data collected after the development of the PSHA map under scrutiny. To account for this, we use the assumption that PSHA maps are time independent to adapt the testing procedure for periods of recorded data shorter than the lifetime of a map. We note that accuracy of this testing procedure will only improve as more data is collected, or as the time-horizon of interest is reduced, as has been proposed for maps of areas experiencing induced seismicity. We believe that this procedure can be used to determine whether PSHA maps are accurately portraying seismic hazard and whether discrepancies are localized or systemic.

  15. Highly sensitive and ultrafast read mapping for RNA-seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Medina, I; Tárraga, J; Martínez, H; Barrachina, S; Castillo, M I; Paschall, J; Salavert-Torres, J; Blanquer-Espert, I; Hernández-García, V; Quintana-Ortí, E S; Dopazo, J

    2016-04-01

    As sequencing technologies progress, the amount of data produced grows exponentially, shifting the bottleneck of discovery towards the data analysis phase. In particular, currently available mapping solutions for RNA-seq leave room for improvement in terms of sensitivity and performance, hindering an efficient analysis of transcriptomes by massive sequencing. Here, we present an innovative approach that combines re-engineering, optimization and parallelization. This solution results in a significant increase of mapping sensitivity over a wide range of read lengths and substantial shorter runtimes when compared with current RNA-seq mapping methods available. PMID:26740642

  16. A common precursor to two major crab neurosecretory peptides.

    PubMed

    Stuenkel, E L

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis of proteins by the X-organ sinus gland (XOSG) neurosecretory system of the crab, Cardisoma carnifex was studied using the pulse-chase technique. Analysis of radioactive proteins following 2D-PAGE showed that during pulse incubations of less than or equal to 30 min a single predominant 14Kd prohormone was synthesized. With chase less than or equal to 3 hr the primary 14Kd protein was found to undergo differential and/or multiple post-translational modifications prior to its proteolytic cleavage. Increasing the chase to greater than 3 hr showed a shift in labeling from the 14Kd forms to 3 separate 6Kd proteins. Two of the 6Kd proteins were identified as crustacean hyperglycemic peptides (CHH). Similarity in protein labeling using [3H]leucine and [35S]cysteine suggest a second major peptide group, the H peptide, known to lack cysteine, is also contained within the 14Kd precursor. Peptide mapping of the 14Kd proteins and of unlabeled CHH and peptide H provide substantive evidence for this biosynthetic scheme. Thus, both the CHH and H peptide groups, which together constitute greater than 90% of the XOSG peptide content, in this species, arise from a common 14Kd precursor molecule.

  17. Process mapping as a tool for home health network analysis.

    PubMed

    Pluto, Delores M; Hirshorn, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Process mapping is a qualitative tool that allows service providers, policy makers, researchers, and other concerned stakeholders to get a "bird's eye view" of a home health care organizational network or a very focused, in-depth view of a component of such a network. It can be used to share knowledge about community resources directed at the older population, identify gaps in resource availability and access, and promote on-going collaborative interactions that encourage systemic policy reassessment and programmatic refinement. This article is a methodological description of process mapping, which explores its utility as a practice and research tool, illustrates its use in describing service-providing networks, and discusses some of the issues that are key to successfully using this methodology.

  18. Analysis, assessment and mapping of groundwater quality of Chandigarh (India).

    PubMed

    Bansal, Rajesh; Sharma, L N; John, Siby

    2011-04-01

    Chandigarh (India) has been depending on groundwater resources to meet its water requirements in addition to the surface water source (Bhakra Main Canal). With a view to assess the groundwater quality, samples were collected from geo-referenced tube wells in different localities of the city. Samples were analysed for conventional parameters indicative of the physico-chemical quality of groundwater. The groundwater quality mapping was attempted using the ARCGIS 9.0. Thematic maps were generated for each parameter of groundwater quality. This paper presents the spatial distribution of groundwater quality of Chandigarh city. The quality of groundwater was found to be varying with geology of the area as well as the land use and land cover.

  19. Comprehensive objective maps of macromolecular conformations by quantitative SAXS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hura, Greg L.; Budworth, Helen; Dyer, Kevin N.; Rambo, Robert P.; Hammel, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive perspectives of macromolecular conformations are required to connect structure to biology. Here we present a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) Structural Similarity Map (SSM) and Volatility of Ratio (VR) metric providing comprehensive, quantitative and objective (superposition-independent) perspectives on solution state conformations. We validate VR and SSM utility on human MutSβ, a key ABC ATPase and chemotherapeutic target, by revealing MutSβ DNA sculpting and identifying multiple conformational states for biological activity. PMID:23624664

  20. Quinine-Based Zwitterionic Chiral Stationary Phase as a Complementary Tool for Peptide Analysis: Mobile Phase Effects on Enantio- and Stereoselectivity of Underivatized Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Ianni, Federica; Sardella, Roccaldo; Carotti, Andrea; Natalini, Benedetto; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Peptide stereoisomer analysis is of importance for quality control of therapeutic peptides, the analysis of stereochemical integrity of bioactive peptides in food, and the elucidation of the stereochemistry of peptides from a natural chiral pool which often contains one or more D-amino acid residues. In this work, a series of model peptide stereoisomers (enantiomers and diastereomers) were analyzed on a zwitterionic ion-exchanger chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak ZWIX(+) 5 µm), in order to investigate the retention and separation performance for such compounds on this chiral stationary phase and elucidate its utility for this purpose. The goal of the study focused on 1) investigations of the effects of the sample matrix used to dissolve the peptide samples; 2) optimization of the mobile phase (enabling deriving information on factors of relevance for retention and separation); and 3) derivation of structure-selectivity relationships. It turned out that small di- and tripeptides can be well resolved under optimized conditions, typically with resolutions larger than 1.5. The optimized mobile phase often consisted of methanol-tetrahydrofuran-water (49:49:2; v/v/v) with 25 mM formic acid and 12.5 mM diethylamine. This work proposes some guidance on which mobile phases can be most efficiently used for peptide stereoisomer separations on Chiralpak ZWIX. Chirality 28:5-16, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR), including T877A (hydroxyflutamide [HF]) and W741(C/L) (bicalutamide [CDX]). Here, we found that anti-androgens bound mt-ARs (HF-T877A-AR-LBD and CDX-W741L-AR-LBD) have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) bound wild type (wt) AR (DHT-wt-AR-LBD). Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex at 2.1 Å resolution revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and Gln733 of the AR AF2 domain, suggesting that peptides with Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motifs can interact with wt or mutated ARs. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed transactivation of both DHT-wt-AR and HF-T877A-AR by interrupting AR N- and C-terminal interactions, thereby inhibiting wt and mutant AR-mediated prostate cancer cell growth. Collectively, these results suggest the combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis as a new strategy for developing anti-androgens that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function. PMID:25091737

  2. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from meat proteins using in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I, EC 3.4.15.1), renin (EC 3.4.23.15), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5) play key roles in the control of hypertension and the development of type-2 diabetes and other diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to utilize known in silico methodologies, peptide databases and software including ProtParam (http://web.expasy.org/protparam/), Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST), ExPASy PeptideCutter (http://web.expasy.org/peptide_cutter/) and BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/pl/biopep) to assess the release of potentially bioactive DPP-IV, renin and ACE-I inhibitory peptides from bovine and porcine meat proteins including hemoglobin, collagen and serum albumin. These proteins were chosen as they are found commonly in meat by-products such as bone, blood and low-value meat cuts. In addition, the bioactivities of identified peptides were confirmed using chemical synthesis and in vitro bioassays. The concentration of peptide required to inhibit the activity of ACE-I and DPP-IV by 50% was determined for selected, active peptides. Novel ACE-I and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified in this study using both in silico analysis and a literature search to streamline enzyme selection for peptide production. These novel peptides included the ACE-I inhibitory tri-peptide Ile-Ile-Tyr and the DPP-IV inhibitory tri-peptide Pro-Pro-Leu corresponding to sequences f (182-184) and f (326-328) of both porcine and bovine serum albumin which can be released following hydrolysis with the enzymes papain and pepsin, respectively. This work demonstrates that meat proteins are a suitable resource for the generation of bioactive peptides and further demonstrates the usefulness of in silico methodologies to streamline identification and generation of bioactive peptides. PMID:25020248

  3. Summarization vs Peptide-Based Models in Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics: Performance, Pitfalls, and Data Analysis Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, Ludger J E; Argentini, Andrea; Martens, Lennart; Clement, Lieven

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative label-free mass spectrometry is increasingly used to analyze the proteomes of complex biological samples. However, the choice of appropriate data analysis methods remains a major challenge. We therefore provide a rigorous comparison between peptide-based models and peptide-summarization-based pipelines. We show that peptide-based models outperform summarization-based pipelines in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision. We also demonstrate that the predefined FDR cutoffs for the detection of differentially regulated proteins can become problematic when differentially expressed (DE) proteins are highly abundant in one or more samples. Care should therefore be taken when data are interpreted from samples with spiked-in internal controls and from samples that contain a few very highly abundant proteins. We do, however, show that specific diagnostic plots can be used for assessing differentially expressed proteins and the overall quality of the obtained fold change estimates. Finally, our study also illustrates that imputation under the "missing by low abundance" assumption is beneficial for the detection of differential expression in proteins with low abundance, but it negatively affects moderately to highly abundant proteins. Hence, imputation strategies that are commonly implemented in standard proteomics software should be used with care. PMID:25827922

  4. Capillary zone electrophoresis for analysis of phytochelatins and other thiol peptides in complex biological samples derivatized with monobromobimane.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rama, Mónica; Torres Vaamonde, Enrique; Abalde Alonso, Julio

    2005-02-01

    A new method to improve the analysis of phytochelatins and their precursors (cysteine, gamma-Glu-Cys, and glutathione) derivatized with monobromobimane (mBrB) in complex biological samples by capillary zone electrophoresis is described. The effects of the background electrolyte pH, concentration, and different organic additives (acetonitrile, methanol, and trifluoroethanol) on the separation were studied to achieve optimum resolution and number of theoretical plates of the analyzed compounds in the electropherograms. Optimum separation of the thiol peptides was obtained with 150 mM phosphate buffer at pH 1.60. Separation efficiency was improved when 2.5% v/v methanol was added to the background electrolyte. The electrophoretic conditions were 13 kV and capillary dimensions with 30 cm length from the inlet to the detector (38 cm total length) and 50 microm inner diameter. The injection was by pressure at 50 mbar for 17 s. Under these conditions, the separation between desglycyl-peptides and phytochelatins was also achieved. We also describe the optimum conditions for the derivatization of biological samples with mBrB to increase electrophoretic sensitivity and number of theoretical plates. The improved method was shown to be simple, reproducible, selective, and accurate in measuring thiol peptides in complex biological samples, the detection limit being 2.5 microM glutathione at a wavelength of 390 nm.

  5. Photocross-Linked Peptide-Protein Complexes Analysis: A Comparative Study of CID and ETD Fragmentation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavier, Séverine; Bolbach, Gérard; Sachon, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are among the keys to organizing cellular processes in space and time. One of the only direct ways to identify such interactions in their cellular environment is to covalently bond the interacting partners to fix the interaction. Photocross-linking in living cells is thus a very promising technique. The feasibility of in cellulo photocross-linking reactions has been shown and mass spectrometry is a tool of choice to analyze photocross-linked proteins. However, the interpretation of the MS and MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked peptides remains one of the most important bottlenecks of the method and still limits its potential for large-scale applications (interactomics). Fundamental studies are still necessary to understand and characterize the fragmentation behavior of photocross-linked peptides. Here, we report the successful identification of the interaction sites in a well-characterized model of in vitro interaction between a protein and a peptide. We describe in detail the fragmentation pattern of these photocross-linked species in order to identify trends that could be generalized. In particular, we compare CID and ETD fragmentation modes (and HCD in a lesser extent), demonstrating the complementarity of both methods and the advantage of ETD for the analysis of photocross-linked species. The information should help further development of dedicated software to properly score MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked species.

  6. Analysis of the Linker Region Joining the Adenylation and Carrier Protein Domains of the Modular Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Drake, Eric J.; Makin, Thomas A.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs) are multi-modular proteins capable of producing important peptide natural products. Using an assembly-line process the amino acid substrate and peptide intermediates are passed between the active sites of different catalytic domains of the NRPS while bound covalently to a peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain. Examination of the linker sequences that join the NRPS adenylation and PCP domains identified several conserved proline residues that are not found in standalone adenylation domains. We examined the roles of these proline residues and neighboring conserved sequences through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of the reaction catalyzed by the adenylation domain and the fully reconstituted NRPS pathway. In particular, we identified a conserved LPxP motif at the start of the adenylation-PCP linker. The LPxP motif interacts with a region on the adenylation domain to stabilize a critical catalytic lysine residue belonging to the A10 motif that immediately precedes the linker. Further, this interaction with the C-terminal sub-domain of the adenylation domain may coordinate movement of the PCP with the conformational change of the adenylation domain. Through this work, we extend the conserved A10 motif of the adenylation domain and identify residues that enable proper adenylation domain function. PMID:24975514

  7. Quantitative analysis of peptides and proteins in biomedicine by targeted mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Michael A; Carr, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming widely used in academia and in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries for sensitive and quantitative detection of proteins, peptides and post-translational modifications. Here we describe the increasing importance of targeted MS technologies in clinical proteomics and the potential key roles these techniques will have in bridging biomedical discovery and clinical implementation. PMID:23269374

  8. N-Amino-imidazolin-2-one Peptide Mimic Synthesis and Conformational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Base-promoted 5-exo-dig cyclizations of aza-propargylglycinamides provided N-amino-imidazolin-2-one peptide mimics, which exhibited turn geometry in X-ray crystallographic and NMR spectroscopic analyses. Sonogashira coupling prior to cyclization afforded N-amino-imidazolin-2-ones with diverse 4-position aromatic substituents with potential to serve as Phe and Trp mimics. PMID:22892053

  9. In silico analysis and experimental verification of OSR1 kinase - Peptide interaction.

    PubMed

    Austin, Thomas M; Nannemann, David P; Deluca, Samuel L; Meiler, Jens; Delpire, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The oxidative-stress-responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) and the STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) are key enzymes in a signaling cascade regulating the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC1-2) and Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Both kinases have a conserved carboxyl-terminal (CCT) domain, which recognizes a unique peptide motif present in OSR1- and SPAK-activating kinases (with-no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) and WNK4) as well as their substrates (NKCC1, NKCC2, and NCC). Utilizing various modalities of the Rosetta Molecular Modeling Software Suite including flexible peptide docking and protein design, we comprehensively explored the sequence space recognized by the CCT domain. Specifically, we studied single residue mutations as well as complete unbiased designs of a hexapeptide substrate. The computational study started from a crystal structure of the CCT domain of OSR1 in complex with a hexapeptide derived from WNK4. Point mutations predicted to be favorable include Arg to His or Trp substitutions at position 2 and a Phe to Tyr substitution at position 3 of the hexapeptide. In addition, de novo design yielded two peptides predicted to bind to the CCT domain: FRFQVT and TRFDVT. These results, which indicate a little bit more freedom in the composition of the peptide, were confirmed through the use of yeast two-hybrid screening.

  10. Intracellular trafficking of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with TAT peptide: 3-dimensional electron tomography analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Baiju G.; Fukuda, Takahiro; Mizuki, Toru; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Maekawa, Toru

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the intracellular localisation of TAT-SPIONs using 3-D electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D images of TAT-SPIONs in a cell are clearly shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Release of TAT-SPIONs from endocytic vesicles into the cytoplasm is clearly shown. -- Abstract: Internalisation of nanoparticles conjugated with cell penetrating peptides is a promising approach to various drug delivery applications. Cell penetrating peptides such as transactivating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptides derived from HIV-1 proteins are effective intracellular delivery vectors for a wide range of nanoparticles and pharmaceutical agents thanks to their amicable ability to enter cells and minimum cytotoxicity. Although different mechanisms of intracellular uptake and localisation have been proposed for TAT conjugated nanoparticles, it is necessary to visualise the particles on a 3-D plane in order to investigate the actual intracellular uptake and localisation. Here, we study the intracellular localisation and trafficking of TAT peptide conjugated superparamagnetic ion oxide nanoparticles (TAT-SPIONs) using 3-D electron tomography. 3-D tomograms clearly show the location of TAT-SPIONs in a cell and their slow release from the endocytic vesicles into the cytoplasm. The present methodology may well be utilised for further investigations of the behaviours of nanoparticles in cells and eventually for the development of nano drug delivery systems.

  11. Kinetic and structural analysis of fluorescent peptides on cotton cellulose nanocrystals as elastase sensors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette T; French, Alfred D; Concha, Monica; Condon, Brian D

    2015-02-13

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) are serine proteases with destructive proteolytic activity. Because of this activity, there is considerable interest in elastase sensors. Herein we report the synthesis, characterization, and kinetic profiles of tri- and tetrapeptide substrates of elastase as glycine-esterified fluorescent analogs of cotton cellulose nanocrystals (CCN). The degree of substitution of peptide incorporated in CCN was 3-4 peptides per 100 anhydroglucose units. Glycine and peptide-cellulose-nanocrystals revealed crystallinity indices of 79 and 76%, respectively, and a crystallite size of 58.5 Å. A crystallite model of the peptide-cellulose conjugate is shown. The tripeptide conjugate of CCN demonstrated five-fold greater efficiency in HNE than the tripeptide in solution judged by its kcat/Km of 33,515. The sensor limits of detection at 2mg of the tri- and tetrapeptide CCN conjugates over a 10 min reaction time course were 0.03 U/mL PPE and 0.05 U/mL HNE, respectively.

  12. Common wheat determination in durum wheat samples through LC/MS analysis of gluten peptides.

    PubMed

    Prandi, Barbara; Bencivenni, Mariangela; Tedeschi, Tullia; Marchelli, Rosangela; Dossena, Arnaldo; Galaverna, Gianni; Sforza, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    A method to detect the presence of common wheat in durum wheat flour samples was developed and tested. Flour samples, or ground wheat samples, were digested by pepsin and chymotrypsin, and the peptide mixture obtained was analyzed by LC/ESI-MS and LC/ESI-MS/MS, which led to the identification of two marker peptides. One peptide was coded only in the DD genome, and thus present only in common wheat; the second was present in all wheat samples (both common and durum), so it was used as marker of the total wheat content. The ratio of the chromatographic areas of these two peptides, as determined by LC/ESI-MS, was related to the proportion of common wheat in the sample using a calibration curve that was constructed with standards of known composition. The proportions of common wheat in samples obtained by mixing different common and durum wheat varieties were accurately determined by this method. Finally, the method was applied in a survey of several durum wheat flour brands present on the Italian market. The results of the survey revealed that contamination of durum wheat flour with common wheat is commonplace.

  13. Quantum Chemical Analysis of MHC-Peptide Interactions for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, W.A; Patarroyo, M.E

    2010-01-01

    The development of an adequate immune response against pathogens is mediated by molecular interactions between different cell types. Among them, binding of antigenic peptides to the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecule expressed on the membrane of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and their subsequent recognition by the T cell receptor have been demonstrated to be crucial for developing an adequate immune response. The present review compiles computational quantum chemistry studies about the electrostatic potential variations induced on the MHC binding region by peptide’s amino acids, carried out with the aim of describing MHC–peptide binding interactions. The global idea is that the electrostatic potential can be represented in terms of a series expansion (charge, dipole, quadrupole, hexadecapole, etc.) whose three first terms provide a good local approximation to the molecular electrostatic ‘landscape’ and to the variations induced on such landscape by targeted modifications on the residues of the antigenic peptide. Studies carried out in four MHC class II human allele molecules, which are the most representative alleles of their corresponding haplotypes, showed that each of these molecules have conserved as well as specific electrostatic characteristics, which can be correlated at a good extent with the peptide binding profiles reported experimentally for these molecules. The information provided by such characteristics would help increase our knowledge about antigen binding and presentation, and could ultimately contribute to developing a logical and rational methodology for designing chemically synthesized, multi-antigenic, subunit-based vaccines, through the application of quantum chemistry methods. PMID:20394575

  14. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  15. Interspecies conservation of structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein. Similarities and differences as adjudged by peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, T M; Wiggert, B; Robey, F A; Chader, G J

    1986-01-01

    Structural properties of the retinal extracellular-matrix glycolipoprotein interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) from human, monkey and bovine retinas have been compared. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoretic analysis of limited tryptic and Staphylococcus aureus-V8-proteinase digests show virtually identical patterns for the monkey and human proteins, whereas both sets differ considerably from the bovine protein pattern. Time-course digestion shows monkey IRBP to be more readily cleaved than bovine IRBP and also cleaved to smaller fragments. Also, reversed-phase h.p.l.c. of complete tryptic digests of the IRBPs indicate that, although they have in common a similar preponderance of hydrophobic peptides, all three proteins differ extensively in their fine structure. The N-terminal sequences of monkey and bovine IRBPs have been extended beyond those presented in our previous report [Redmond, Wiggert, Robey, Nguyen, Lewis, Lee & Chader (1985) Biochemistry 24, 787-793] to over 30 residues each. The sequences yet show extensive homology, differing at only two positions, although the major monkey sequence has an additional five amino acid residues at its N-terminus ('n + 5' sequence) not observed with bovine IRBP ('n' sequence). The newly determined N-terminal sequence of human IRBP demonstrates the presence of equal amounts of the 'n' and 'n+5' sequences that are qualitatively identical with those of the monkey. The presence of the five-amino-acid-residue extension in primate, but not bovine, IRBP may indicate variation in post-translational processing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3827838

  16. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  17. Comprehensive two-dimensional separation system by coupling capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography to capillary isoelectric focusing for peptide and protein mapping with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional (2-D) separation system, coupling capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography (cRPLC) to capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), is described for protein and peptide mapping. cRPLC, the first dimension, provided high-resolution separations for salt-free proteins. CIEF, the second dimension with an orthogonal mechanism to cRPLC afforded excellent resolution capability for proteins with efficient protein enrichment. Since all sample fractions in cRPLC effluents could be transferred to the CIEF dimensions, the combination of the two high-efficiency separations resulted in maximal separation capabilities of each dimension. Separation effectiveness of this approach was demonstrated using complex protein/peptide samples, such as yeast cytosol and a BSA tryptic digest. A peak capacity of more than 10 000 had been achieved. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector, developed for this system, allowed for high-sensitive detection, with a fmol level of peptide detection for the BSA digest. FITC and BODIPY maleimide were used to tag the proteins, and the latter was found better both for separation and detection in our 2-D system.

  18. Bovine serum albumin as a universal suppressor of non-specific peptide binding in vials prior to nano-chromatography coupled mass-spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Anikanov, Nikolay A; Ivanova, Olga M; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Govorun, Vadim M

    2015-09-17

    Non-specific binding (NSB) is a well-known problem for any application that deals with ultralow analyte quantities. The modern nano-flow chromatography coupled tandem mass-spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) works with the lowest conceivable analyte concentrations. However, while the NSB problem is widely accepted and investigated for metabolomics and single-peptide medicine-related assays, its impact is not studied for complex peptide mixtures in proteomic applications. In this work peptide NSB to a common plastic autosampler vial was studied for a model mixture of 46 synthetic peptides. A significant NSB level was demonstrated for total peptide concentrations of up to 1 mg mL(-1). Different agents were tried for NSB suppression and compatibility with nanoLC-MS/MS analysis: a chaotropic agent, an amino acid mixture, a peptide mixture and a protein solution. The first two were inefficacious. The peptide matrix blocked NSB, however, it also led to analyte ionization suppression in nanoLC-MS/MS. The protein solution (0.1% BSA) efficiently eliminated NSB, while a trap-elute nanoHPLC configuration together with a small-pore reverse-phased sorbent effectively and quantitatively extracted the model peptides and depleted protein material from the sample. Higher protein concentration partially impeded peptide extraction. Thus, the 0.1% BSA solution might be regarded as an effective non-interfering blockader of NSB for sample resuspension and storage in an autosampler prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:26398423

  19. Key issues in the acquisition and analysis of qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometry data for peptide-centric proteomic experiments.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew J; Abu, Mika; Hanger, Diane P

    2012-09-01

    Proteomic technologies have matured to a level enabling accurate and reproducible quantitation of peptides and proteins from complex biological matrices. Analysis of samples as diverse as assembled protein complexes, whole cell lysates or sub-cellular proteomes from cell cultures, and direct analysis of animal and human tissues and fluids demonstrate the incredible versatility of the fundamental nature of the technique that forms the basis of most proteomic applications today (mass spectrometry). Determining the mass of biomolecules and their fragments or related products with high accuracy can convey a highly specific assay for detection and identification. Importantly, ion currents representative of these specifically identified analytes can be accurately quantified with the correct application of smart isobaric tagging chemistries, heavy and light isotopically derivatised samples or standards, or by careful application of workflows to compare unlabelled samples in so-called 'label-free' and targeted selected reaction monitoring experiments. In terms of exploring biology, a myriad of protein changes and modifications are being increasingly probed and quantified, including diverse chemical changes from relatively decisive modifications such as protein splicing and truncation, to more transient dynamic modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitination. Proteomic workflows can be complex beasts and several key considerations to ensure effective applications have been outlined in the recent literature. The past year has witnessed the publication of several excellent reviews that thoroughly describe the fundamental principles underlying the state of the art. This review further elaborates on specific critical issues introduced by these publications and raises other important unaddressed considerations and new developments that directly impact on the effectiveness of proteomic technologies, in particular for, but not necessarily exclusive to peptide

  20. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Hydrothermal Alteration Map

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This is a hydrothermal alteration map of the Tularosa Basin area, New Mexico and Texas that was created using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) multispectral data band ratios based upon diagnostic features of clay, calcite, silica, gypsum, ferric iron, and ferrous iron. Mesoproterozoic granite in the San Andreas Range often appeared altered, but this may be from clays produced by weathering or, locally, by hydrothermal alteration. However, no field checking was done. This work was done under U.S. D.O.E. Contract #DE-EE0006730

  1. Epitope mapping and functional analysis of sigma A and sigma NS proteins of avian reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pi H.; Li, Ying J.; Su, Yu P.; Lee, Long H.; Liu, Hung J. . E-mail: hjliu@mail.npust.edu.tw

    2005-02-20

    We have previously shown that avian reovirus (ARV) {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins possess dsRNA and ssRNA binding activity and suggested that there are two epitopes on {sigma}A (I and II) and three epitopes (A, B, and C) on {sigma}NS. To further define the location of epitopes on {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins and to further elucidate the biological functions of these epitopes by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 62, 1F9, H1E1, and 4A123 against the ARV S1133 strain, the full-length and deletion fragments of S2 and S4 genes of ARV generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were cloned into pET32 expression vectors and the fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. Epitope mapping using MAbs and E. coli-expressed deletion fragments of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS of the ARV S1133 strain, synthetic peptides, and the cross reactivity of MAbs to heterologous ARV strains demonstrated that epitope II on {sigma}A was located at amino acid residues {sup 340}QWVMAGLVSAA{sup 350} and epitope B on {sigma}NS at amino acid residues {sup 180}MLDMVDGRP{sup 188}. The MAbs (62, 1F9, and H1E1) directed against epitopes II and B did not require the native conformation of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS, suggesting that their binding activities were conformation-independent. On the other hand, MAb 4A123 only reacted with complete {sigma}NS but not with truncated {sigma}NS fusion proteins in Western blot, suggesting that the binding activity of MAb to epitope A on {sigma}NS was conformation-dependent. Amino acid sequence analysis and the binding assays of MAb 62 to heterologous ARV strains suggested that epitope II on {sigma}A was highly conserved among ARV strains and that this epitope is suitable as a serological marker for the detection of ARV antibodies following natural infection in chickens. On the contrary, an amino acid substitution at position 183 (M to V) in epitope B of ARV could hinder the reactivity of the {sigma}NS with MAb 1F9. The {sigma}NS of ARV with ss

  2. Comprehensive Evaluation and Analysis of China's Mainstream Online Map Service Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Jiang, J.; Huang, W.; Wang, Q.; Gu, X.

    2012-08-01

    With the flourish development of China's Internet market, all kinds of users for map service demand is rising continually, within it contains tremendous commercial interests. Many internet giants have got involved in the field of online map service, and defined it as an important strategic product of the company. The main purpose of this research is to evaluate these online map service websites comprehensively with a model, and analyse the problems according to the evaluation results. Then some corresponding solving measures are proposed, which provides a theoretical and application guidance for the future development of fiercely competitive online map websites. The research consists of three stages: (a) the mainstream online map service websites in China are introduced and the present situation of them is analysed through visit, investigation, consultant, analysis and research. (b) a whole comprehensive evaluation quota system of online map service websites from the view of functions, layout, interaction design color position and so on, combining with the data indexes such as time efficiency, accuracy, objectivity and authority. (c) a comprehensive evaluation to these online map service websites is proceeded based on the fuzzy evaluation mathematical model, and the difficulty that measure the map websites quantitatively is solved.

  3. Reversible Major Histocompatibility Complex I-Peptide Multimers Containing Ni2+-Nitrilotriacetic Acid Peptides and Histidine Tags Improve Analysis and Sorting of CD8+ T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julien; Guillaume, Philippe; Irving, Melita; Baumgaertner, Petra; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel F.

    2011-01-01

    MHC-peptide multimers containing biotinylated MHC-peptide complexes bound to phycoerythrin (PE) streptavidin (SA) are widely used for analyzing and sorting antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe alternative T cell-staining reagents that are superior to conventional reagents. They are built on reversible chelate complexes of Ni2+-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) with oligohistidines. We synthesized biotinylated linear mono-, di-, and tetra-NTA compounds using conventional solid phase peptide chemistry and studied their interaction with HLA-A*0201-peptide complexes containing a His6, His12, or 2×His6 tag by surface plasmon resonance on SA-coated sensor chips and equilibrium dialysis. The binding avidity increased in the order His6 < His12 < 2×His6 and NTA1 < NTA2 < NTA4, respectively, depending on the configuration of the NTA moieties and increased to picomolar KD for the combination of a 2×His6 tag and a 2×Ni2+-NTA2. We demonstrate that HLA-A2–2×His6-peptide multimers containing either Ni2+-NTA4-biotin and PE-SA- or PE-NTA4-stained influenza and Melan A-specific CD8+ T cells equal or better than conventional multimers. Although these complexes were highly stable, they very rapidly dissociated in the presence of imidazole, which allowed sorting of bona fide antigen-specific CD8+ T cells without inducing T cell death as well as assessment of HLA-A2-peptide monomer dissociation kinetics on CD8+ T cells. PMID:21990358

  4. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in aqueous media. V. The effect of the disulfide bridge on the structural features of the peptide hormone somatostatin-14.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Carelli, Claude; Coïc, Yves-Marie; De Coninck, Joël; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2009-09-24

    To emphasize the role played by the S-S bridge in the structural features of somatostatin-14 (SST-14), newly recorded CD and Raman spectra of this cyclic peptide and its open analogue obtained by Cys-->Ser substitution are presented. CD spectra of both peptides recorded in aqueous solutions in the 100-500 microM concentration range are strikingly similar. They reveal principally that random conformers constitute the major population in both peptides. Consequently, the S-S bridge has no structuring effect at submillimolar concentrations. In methanol, the CD spectrum of somatostatin-14 keeps globally the same spectral shape as that observed in water, whereas its open analogue presents a major population of helical conformers. Raman spectra recorded as a function of peptide concentration (5-20 mM) and also in the presence of 150 mM NaCl provide valuable conformational information. All Raman spectra present a mixture of random and beta-hairpin structures for both cyclic and open peptides. More importantly, the presence or the absence of the disulfide bridge does not seem to influence considerably different populations of secondary structures within this range of concentrations. CD and Raman data obtained in the submillimolar and millimolar ranges of concentrations, respectively, lead us to accept the idea that SST-14 monomers aggregate upon increasing concentration, thus stabilizing beta-hairpin conformations in solution. However, even at high concentrations, random conformers do not disappear. Raman spectra of SST-14 also reveal a concentration effect on the flexibility of the S-S linkage and consequently on that of its cyclic part. In conclusion, although the disulfide linkage does not seem to markedly influence the SST-14 conformational features in aqueous solutions, its presence seems to be necessary to ensure the flexibility of the cyclic part of this peptide and to maintain its closed structure in lower dielectric constant environments.

  5. The BrainMap strategy for standardization, sharing, and meta-analysis of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging researchers have developed rigorous community data and metadata standards that encourage meta-analysis as a method for establishing robust and meaningful convergence of knowledge of human brain structure and function. Capitalizing on these standards, the BrainMap project offers databases, software applications, and other associated tools for supporting and promoting quantitative coordinate-based meta-analysis of the structural and functional neuroimaging literature. Findings In this report, we describe recent technical updates to the project and provide an educational description for performing meta-analyses in the BrainMap environment. Conclusions The BrainMap project will continue to evolve in response to the meta-analytic needs of biomedical researchers in the structural and functional neuroimaging communities. Future work on the BrainMap project regarding software and hardware advances are also discussed. PMID:21906305

  6. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. uPAR peptide antagonist alters regulation of MAP kinases and Bcl-2 family members in favor of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tarighi, P.; Montazeri, H.; Khorramizadeh, M.R.; sobhani, A. Madadkar; Ostad, S.N.; Ghahremani, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligands play a major role in many tumors by mediating extracellular matrix degradation and signaling cascades leading to tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Recently we introduced uPAR decapeptide antagonist with cytotoxic effect on MDA-MB-231 cell line. In this study we assessed the alteration in uPAR downstream signaling following treatment with the peptide antagonist. In this regard, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 from mitogen-activated protein kinase family and Bcl-2, Bim and Bax from Bcl-2 protein family were investigated. Our data revealed that the peptide caused p38 activation and low ERK activation. On the other hand, the peptide induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bim without Bax modulation. Changes in target protein expression/activation explain the apoptotic property of the peptide and highlight its potential to be used as a therapeutic agent in cancerous cells expressing high levels of uPAR. PMID:26600846

  8. [Military tropical medicine and maps: analysis of 100 years of publication (1864-1963)].

    PubMed

    Birchenall, C

    2009-12-01

    As early as 1864, maps began appearing in articles published in Tropical Medicine. Initially used for illustration only, maps gradually became an essential tool for research and communication of scientific findings. Analysis of maps published in the Tropical Medicine Revue from 1864 to 1964 reflects the progression in the use of this informational tool by authors. Study of these documents also provides insight into the scientific and sociopolitical context and provides new knowledge that improves understanding of how history and science were viewed by mapmakers and readers.

  9. Discovery and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Novel Splice-junction Peptides Using RNA-Seq*

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    Human proteomic databases required for MS peptide identification are frequently updated and carefully curated, yet are still incomplete because it has been challenging to acquire every protein sequence from the diverse assemblage of proteoforms expressed in every tissue and cell type. In particular, alternative splicing has been shown to be a major source of this cell-specific proteomic variation. Many new alternative splice forms have been detected at the transcript level using next generation sequencing methods, especially RNA-Seq, but it is not known how many of these transcripts are being translated. Leveraging the unprecedented capabilities of next generation sequencing methods, we collected RNA-Seq and proteomics data from the same cell population (Jurkat cells) and created a bioinformatics pipeline that builds customized databases for the discovery of novel splice-junction peptides. Eighty million paired-end Illumina reads and ∼500,000 tandem mass spectra were used to identify 12,873 transcripts (19,320 including isoforms) and 6810 proteins. We developed a bioinformatics workflow to retrieve high-confidence, novel splice junction sequences from the RNA data, translate these sequences into the analogous polypeptide sequence, and create a customized splice junction database for MS searching. Based on the RefSeq gene models, we detected 136,123 annotated and 144,818 unannotated transcript junctions. Of those, 24,834 unannotated junctions passed various quality filters (e.g. minimum read depth) and these entries were translated into 33,589 polypeptide sequences and used for database searching. We discovered 57 splice junction peptides not present in the Uniprot-Trembl proteomic database comprising an array of different splicing events, including skipped exons, alternative donors and acceptors, and noncanonical transcriptional start sites. To our knowledge this is the first example of using sample-specific RNA-Seq data to create a splice-junction database and

  10. Analysis of HLA class I expression in different metastases from two melanoma patients undergoing peptide immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Serrano, A; Jäger, E; Maleno, I; Ruiz-Cabello, F; Knuth, A; Garrido, F

    2001-06-01

    We characterized the HLA class I alterations in five metastases obtained from two patients with melanoma immunized with Melan A/MART-1, tyrosinase and gp100 tumor peptides. All three metastases analyzed in the first patient (NW145) showed a similar HLA class I alteration with a dual population of melanoma cells. One population was HLA class I antigen positive and the other had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the short arm of chromosome 6 leading to an HLA haplotype loss (A02011, B4007, Cw1). The absence of HLA-A2 antigen may explain why this patient did not develop HLA-A2 restricted, Melan A/MART-1 specificity immunization, since this HLA molecule is the restriction element for the tumor peptides used. However, this HLA-deficient population was not selected after peptide immunotherapy. The primary tumor in this patient presented LOH in region 6q, but only in the vertical growth phase of the lesion, whereas LOH at 6p was observed only in DNA from metastatic material. The second patient (NW16) also presented two metastatic lesions with an identical HLA molecular defect, i.e. HLA B locus downregulation (HLA B51011: serological B51; B1503: serological B70). One lesion expressed the tumor antigen (Melan A/ MART-1), but the other did not. Interestingly, the antigen-positive metastasis regressed after peptide immunotherapy, whereas the other progressed rapidly. These findings provide the first indication that multiple metastases generated in the same host can have identically altered HLA class I phenotypes.

  11. Analysis and machine mapping of the distribution of band recoveries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method of calculating distance and bearing from banding site to recovery location based on the solution of a spherical triangle is presented. X and Y distances on an ordinate grid were applied to computer plotting of recoveries on a map. The advantages and disadvantages of tables of recoveries by State or degree block, axial lines, and distance of recovery from banding site for presentation and comparison of the spatial distribution of band recoveries are discussed. A special web-shaped partition formed by concentric circles about the point of banding and great circles at 30-degree intervals through the point of banding has certain advantages over other methods. Comparison of distributions by means of a X? contingency test is illustrated. The statistic V = X?/N can be used as a measure of difference between two distributions of band recoveries and its possible use is illustrated as a measure of the degree of migrational homing.

  12. Mutational and structural analysis of KIR3DL1 reveals a lineage-defining allotypic dimorphism that impacts both HLA and peptide sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Geraldine M; Vivian, Julian P; Widjaja, Jacqueline M; Bridgeman, John S; Gostick, Emma; Lafont, Bernard A P; Anderson, Stephen K; Price, David A; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie; McVicar, Daniel W

    2014-03-15

    Killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) control the activation of human NK cells via interactions with peptide-laden HLAs. KIR3DL1 is a highly polymorphic inhibitory receptor that recognizes a diverse array of HLA molecules expressing the Bw4 epitope, a group with multiple polymorphisms incorporating variants within the Bw4 motif. Genetic studies suggest that KIR3DL1 variation has functional significance in several disease states, including HIV infection. However, owing to differences across KIR3DL1 allotypes, HLA-Bw4, and associated peptides, the mechanistic link with biological outcome remains unclear. In this study, we elucidated the impact of KIR3DL1 polymorphism on peptide-laden HLA recognition. Mutational analysis revealed that KIR residues involved in water-mediated contacts with the HLA-presented peptide influence peptide binding specificity. In particular, residue 282 (glutamate) in the D2 domain underpins the lack of tolerance of negatively charged C-terminal peptide residues. Allotypic KIR3DL1 variants, defined by neighboring residue 283, displayed differential sensitivities to HLA-bound peptide, including the variable HLA-B*57:01-restricted HIV-1 Gag-derived epitope TW10. Residue 283, which has undergone positive selection during the evolution of human KIRs, also played a central role in Bw4 subtype recognition by KIR3DL1. Collectively, our findings uncover a common molecular regulator that controls HLA and peptide discrimination without participating directly in peptide-laden HLA interactions. Furthermore, they provide insight into the mechanics of interaction and generate simple, easily assessed criteria for the definition of KIR3DL1 functional groupings that will be relevant in many clinical applications, including bone marrow transplantation.

  13. Global Phenotype Screening and Transcript Analysis Outlines the Inhibitory Mode(s) of Action of Two Amphibian-Derived, α-Helical, Cationic Peptides on Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Morton, C. Oliver; Hayes, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Rash, Bharat M.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Coote, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Dermaseptin S3(1-16) [DsS3(1-16)] and magainin 2 (Mag 2) are two unrelated, amphibian-derived cationic peptides that adopt an α-helical structure within microbial membranes and have been proposed to kill target organisms via membrane disruption. Using a combination of global deletion mutant library phenotypic screening, expression profiling, and physical techniques, we have carried out a comprehensive in vitro analysis of the inhibitory action of these two peptides on the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene ontology profiling (of biological processes) was used to identify both common and unique effects of each peptide. Resistance to both peptides was conferred by genes involved in telomere maintenance, chromosome organization, and double-strand break repair, implicating a common inhibitory action of DNA damage. Crucially, each peptide also required unique genes for maintaining resistance; for example, DsS3(1-16) required genes involved in protein targeting to the vacuole, and Mag 2 required genes involved in DNA-dependent DNA replication and DNA repair. Thus, DsS3(1-16) and Mag 2 have both common and unique antifungal actions that are not simply due to membrane disruption. Physical techniques revealed that both peptides interacted with DNA in vitro but in subtly different ways, and this observation was supported by the functional genomics experiments that provided evidence that both peptides also interfered with DNA integrity differently in vivo. This implies that both peptides are able to pass through the cytoplasmic membrane of yeast cells and damage DNA, an inhibitory action that has not been previously attributed to either of these peptides. PMID:17846143

  14. Single liposome analysis of peptide translocation by the ABC transporter TAPL

    PubMed Central

    Zollmann, Tina; Moiset, Gemma; Tumulka, Franz; Tampé, Robert; Poolman, Bert; Abele, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters use ATP to drive solute transport across biological membranes. Members of this superfamily have crucial roles in cell physiology, and some of the transporters are linked to severe diseases. However, understanding of the transport mechanism, especially of human ABC exporters, is scarce. We reconstituted the human lysosomal polypeptide ABC transporter TAPL, expressed in Pichia pastoris, into lipid vesicles (liposomes) and performed explicit transport measurements. We analyzed solute transport at the single liposome level by monitoring the coincident fluorescence of solutes and proteoliposomes in the focal volume of a confocal microscope. We determined a turnover number of eight peptides per minute, which is two orders of magnitude higher than previously estimated from macroscopic measurements. Moreover, we show that TAPL translocates peptides against a large concentration gradient. Maximal filling is not limited by an electrochemical gradient but by trans-inhibition. Countertransport and reversibility studies demonstrate that peptide translocation is a strictly unidirectional process. Altogether, these data are included in a refined model of solute transport by ABC exporters. PMID:25646430

  15. Construction and Analysis of High-Complexity Ribosome Display Random Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Min; Wang, Jing-Lin; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yan-hua; Hu, Ting-Mao

    2008-01-01

    Random peptide libraries displayed on the ribosome are becoming a new tool for the in vitro selection of biologically relevant macromolecules, including epitopes, antagonists, enzymes, and cell-surface receptors. Ribosome display is a cell-free system of coupling individual nascent proteins (phenotypes) to their corresponding mRNA (genotypes) by the formation of stable protein-ribosome-mRNA complexes and permitting the selection of a functional nascent protein by iterative cycles of panning and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification in vitro. The complexity of the random peptide library is critical for the success of a panning experiment; greater the diversity of sequences within the library, the more likely it is that the library comprises sequences that can bind a given target with specific affinity. Here, we have used the cell-free system Escherichia coli S30 lysate to construct high-complexity random peptide libraries (>1014 independent members) by introducing strategies that are different from the methods described by Mattheakis et al. and Lamla et al. The key step in our method is to produce nanomole (nmol) amounts of DNA elements that are necessary for in vitro transcription/translation by using PCR but not plasmid DNA. Library design strategies and protocols that facilitate rapid identification are also presented. PMID:18493302

  16. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  17. A Molecular Dynamics Study and Free Energy Analysis of Complexes between the Mlc1p Protein and Two IQ Motif Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ganoth, Assaf; Friedman, Ran; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem

    2006-01-01

    The Mlc1p protein from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a Calmodulin-like protein, which interacts with IQ-motif peptides located at the yeast's myosin neck. In this study, we report a molecular dynamics study of the Mlc1p-IQ2 protein-peptide complex, starting with its crystal structure, and investigate its dynamics in an aqueous solution. The results are compared with those obtained by a previous study, where we followed the solution structure of the Mlc1p-IQ4 protein-peptide complex by molecular dynamics simulations. After the simulations, we performed an interaction free-energy analysis using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach. Based on the dynamics of the Mlc1p-IQ protein-peptide complexes, the structure of the light-chain-binding domain of myosin V from the yeast S. cerevisiae is discussed. PMID:16844751

  18. Structure–Function Analysis of the Two-Peptide Bacteriocin Plantaricin EF

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Plantaricin EF is a two-peptide bacteriocin that depends on the complementary action of two different peptides (PlnE and PlnF) to function. The structures of the individual peptides have previously been analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Fimland, N. et al. (2008), Biochim. Biophys. Acta1784, 1711−171918555030), but the bacteriocin structure and how the two peptides interact have not been determined. All two-peptide bacteriocins identified so far contain GxxxG motifs. These motifs, together with GxxxG-like motifs, are known to mediate helix–helix interactions in membrane proteins. We have mutated all GxxxG and GxxxG-like motifs in PlnE and PlnF in order to determine if any of these motifs are important for antimicrobial activity and thus possibly for interactions between PlnE and PlnF. Moreover, the aromatic amino acids Tyr and Trp in PlnE and PlnF were substituted, and four fusion polypeptides were constructed in order to investigate the relative orientation of PlnE and PlnF in target cell membranes. The results obtained with the fusion polypeptides indicate that PlnE and PlnF interact in an antiparallel manner and that the C-terminus of PlnE and N-terminus of PlnF are on the outer part of target cell membranes and the N-terminus of PlnE and C-terminus of PlnF are on the inner part. The preference for an aromatic residue at position 6 in PlnE suggests a positioning of this residue in or near the membrane interface on the cells inside. Mutations in the GxxxG motifs indicate that the G5xxxG9 motif in PlnE and the S26xxxG30 motif in PlnF are involved in helix–helix interactions. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of a structural model consistent with the results confirmed the stability of the structure and its orientation in membranes. The simulation approved the anticipated interactions and revealed additional interactions that further increase the stability of the proposed structure. PMID:27538436

  19. Structure-Function Analysis of the Two-Peptide Bacteriocin Plantaricin EF.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Bie; Kyriakou, Panagiota K; Oppegård, Camilla; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Kristiansen, Per Eugen

    2016-09-13

    Plantaricin EF is a two-peptide bacteriocin that depends on the complementary action of two different peptides (PlnE and PlnF) to function. The structures of the individual peptides have previously been analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( Fimland, N. et al. ( 2008 ) , Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1784 , 1711 - 1719 ), but the bacteriocin structure and how the two peptides interact have not been determined. All two-peptide bacteriocins identified so far contain GxxxG motifs. These motifs, together with GxxxG-like motifs, are known to mediate helix-helix interactions in membrane proteins. We have mutated all GxxxG and GxxxG-like motifs in PlnE and PlnF in order to determine if any of these motifs are important for antimicrobial activity and thus possibly for interactions between PlnE and PlnF. Moreover, the aromatic amino acids Tyr and Trp in PlnE and PlnF were substituted, and four fusion polypeptides were constructed in order to investigate the relative orientation of PlnE and PlnF in target cell membranes. The results obtained with the fusion polypeptides indicate that PlnE and PlnF interact in an antiparallel manner and that the C-terminus of PlnE and N-terminus of PlnF are on the outer part of target cell membranes and the N-terminus of PlnE and C-terminus of PlnF are on the inner part. The preference for an aromatic residue at position 6 in PlnE suggests a positioning of this residue in or near the membrane interface on the cells inside. Mutations in the GxxxG motifs indicate that the G5xxxG9 motif in PlnE and the S26xxxG30 motif in PlnF are involved in helix-helix interactions. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of a structural model consistent with the results confirmed the stability of the structure and its orientation in membranes. The simulation approved the anticipated interactions and revealed additional interactions that further increase the stability of the proposed structure. PMID:27538436

  20. Mapping Pedagogical Opportunities Provided by Mathematics Analysis Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a taxonomy of the pedagogical opportunities that are offered by mathematics analysis software such as computer algebra systems, graphics calculators, dynamic geometry or statistical packages. Mathematics analysis software is software for purposes such as calculating, drawing graphs and making accurate diagrams. However, its…

  1. High-throughput identification of putative receptors for cancer-binding peptides using biopanning and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Bhave, Sandeep R; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Hunn, Jeremy C; Wildman, Scott A; Hong, Charles; Dadey, David Y. A.; Muhoro, Lincoln K.; Jaboin, Jerry J; Thotala, Dinesh; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Phage-display peptide biopanning has been successfully used to identify cancer-targeting peptides in multiple models. For cancer-binding peptides, identification of the peptide receptor is necessary to demonstrate mechanism of action and to further optimize specificity and target binding. The process of receptor identification can be slow and some peptides may turn out to bind ubiquitous proteins not suitable for further drug development. In this report, we describe a high-throughput method for screening a large number of peptides in parallel to identify peptide receptors, which we have termed “reverse biopanning,” which can then be selected for further development based on their peptide receptor. To demonstrate this method, we screened a library of 39 peptides previously identified in our laboratory to bind specifically cancers after irradiation. The reverse biopanning process identified 2 peptides, RKFLMTTRYSRV and KTAKKNVFFCSV, as candidate ligands for the protein tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1), a protein previously identified in our laboratory to be expressed in the cell surface in tumors and upregulated after exposure to ionizing radiation. We used computational modeling as the initial method for rapid validation of peptide-TIP-1 binding. Pseudo-binding energies were calculated to be −360.645 kcal/mol, −487.239 kcal/mol, and −595.328 kcal/mol for HVGGSSV, TTRYSRV, and NVFFCSV respectively, suggesting that the peptides would have at least similar, if not stronger, binding to TIP-1 compared to the known TIP-1 binding peptide HVGGSSV. We validated peptide in vitro via electrophoretic mobility shift assay, which showed strong binding of RKFLMTTRYSRV and the truncated form TTRYSRV. This method allows for the identification of many peptide receptors and subsequent selection of peptides for further drug development based on the peptide receptor. PMID:23147990

  2. Recent developments in capillary and microchip electroseparations of peptides (2013-middle 2015).

    PubMed

    Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    The review brings a comprehensive survey of recent developments and applications of high performance capillary and microchip electroseparation methods (zone electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, isoelectric focusing, affinity electrophoresis, electrokinetic chromatography, and electrochromatography) to analysis, micropreparation, purification, and physicochemical and biochemical characterization of peptides in the years 2013, 2014, and ca. up to the middle of 2015. Advances in the investigation of electromigration properties of peptides, in the methodology of their analysis, including sample preseparation, preconcentration and derivatization, adsorption suppression and EOF control, as well as in detection of peptides, are described. New developments in particular CE and CEC modes are presented and several types of their applications to peptide analysis are reported: conventional qualitative and quantitative analysis, determination in complex (bio)matrices, monitoring of chemical and enzymatical reactions and physical changes, amino acid, sequence, and chiral analysis, and peptide mapping of proteins. Some micropreparative peptide separations are shown and capabilities of CE and CEC techniques to provide important physicochemical characteristics of peptides are demonstrated. PMID:26332110

  3. Top-Down Analysis of Highly Post-Translationally Modified Peptides by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Andres; Lerno, Larry; Barile, Daniela; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-03-01

    Bovine κ-caseinoglycomacropeptide (GMP) is a highly modified peptide from κ-casein produced during the cheese making process. The chemical nature of GMP makes analysis by traditional proteomic approaches difficult, as the peptide bears a strong net negative charge and a variety of post-translational modifications. In this work, we describe the use of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) for the top-down analysis of GMP. The method allows the simultaneous detection of different GMP forms that result from the combination of amino acid genetic variations and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation and O-glycosylation. The different GMP forms were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode and confirmation was achieved by tandem MS. The results showed the predominance of two genetic variants of GMP that occur as either mono- or bi-phosphorylated species. Additionally, these four forms can be modified with up to two O-glycans generally sialylated. The results demonstrate the presence of glycosylated, bi-phosphorylated forms of GMP never described before.

  4. Glycoprotein identification and localization of O-glycosylation sites by mass spectrometric analysis of deglycosylated/alkylaminylated peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, F G; Jovanovic, M; Peter-Katalinic, J

    2001-03-01

    In-gel digestion of densely O-glycosylated proteins, an essential step in proteome analysis, is often hampered by steric hindrance of the proteases. To overcome this technical problem a simple and convenient method has been developed, which combines several advantages: (1) Approximately 70% of the oligosaccharides are cleaved without significant protein hydrolysis at the optimal reaction conditions of 70% ethylamine, and quantitative cleavage is achieved with 40% methylamine, at 50 degrees C. (2) To the unsaturated derivatives of Ser and Thr the alkylamine is added as a label of previous O-glycosylation sites. (3) The alkylaminylated protein is effectively cleaved by proteolysis. (4) The modified peptides are identified by MALDI mass spectrometry under consideration of incremental mass increases. (5) The alkylamine label is stable under MALDI post-source-decay analysis as well as in collision-induced dissociation experiments allowing sequencing and peptide localization of O-glycosylation sites. Applicability of the method is evaluated with a series of synthetic glycopeptides, the densely O-glycosylated human glycophorin A, and with the mucin MUC1 from human milk fat globule membranes.

  5. Biomass Thermogravimetric Analysis: Uncertainty Determination Methodology and Sampling Maps Generation

    PubMed Central

    Pazó, Jose A.; Granada, Enrique; Saavedra, Ángeles; Eguía, Pablo; Collazo, Joaquín

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a methodology for the determination of the maximum sampling error and confidence intervals of thermal properties obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (TG), including moisture, volatile matter, fixed carbon and ash content. The sampling procedure of the TG analysis was of particular interest and was conducted with care. The results of the present study were compared to those of a prompt analysis, and a correlation between the mean values and maximum sampling errors of the methods were not observed. In general, low and acceptable levels of uncertainty and error were obtained, demonstrating that the properties evaluated by TG analysis were representative of the overall fuel composition. The accurate determination of the thermal properties of biomass with precise confidence intervals is of particular interest in energetic biomass applications. PMID:20717532

  6. Conformal mapping analysis of multipactor breakdown in waveguide irises

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E.; Udiljak, R.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Puech, J.

    2008-03-15

    Multipactor breakdown in a single waveguide iris is analyzed using the quasistatic approximation for the spatial distribution of the rf field in the iris. Based on the conformal mapping approach, an analytical description is given of the rf field structure in the iris. It is shown that in the central part of any iris with a length to height ratio greater than approximately 0.5, the rf field structure is close to that between two parallel plates. The multipactor threshold for the iris is determined mainly by electron losses from the central part of the iris where the losses are due to the tangential component of the emission velocity of secondary electrons. The effective length of the iris central part is determined and an estimate of the multipactor threshold for the iris is found in terms of the conventional parameters: Applied rf voltage, product of rf frequency and iris height, and iris length to height ratio. Numerical simulations are also carried out using the exact analytical description of the quasistatic rf field and taking into account a spread of electron emission velocities.

  7. Configurational salience of landmarks: an analysis of sketch maps using Space Syntax.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Frankenstein, Julia

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a visibility graph analysis (a Space Syntax method) of a virtual environment to examine how the configurational salience of global and local landmarks (i.e., their relative positions in the environment) as compared to their visual salience affects the probability of their depiction on sketch maps. Participants of two experimental conditions produced sketch maps from memory after exploration with a layout map or without a map, respectively. Participants of a third condition produced sketch maps in parallel to exploration. More detailed sketch maps were produced in the third condition, but landmarks with higher configurational salience were depicted more frequently across all experimental conditions. Whereas the inclusion of global landmarks onto sketch maps was best predicted by their size, both visual salience and isovist size (i.e., the area a landmark was visible from) predicted the frequency of depiction for local landmarks. Our findings imply that people determine the relevance of landmarks not only by their visual, but even more by their configurational salience. PMID:26239756

  8. Configurational salience of landmarks: an analysis of sketch maps using Space Syntax.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Frankenstein, Julia

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a visibility graph analysis (a Space Syntax method) of a virtual environment to examine how the configurational salience of global and local landmarks (i.e., their relative positions in the environment) as compared to their visual salience affects the probability of their depiction on sketch maps. Participants of two experimental conditions produced sketch maps from memory after exploration with a layout map or without a map, respectively. Participants of a third condition produced sketch maps in parallel to exploration. More detailed sketch maps were produced in the third condition, but landmarks with higher configurational salience were depicted more frequently across all experimental conditions. Whereas the inclusion of global landmarks onto sketch maps was best predicted by their size, both visual salience and isovist size (i.e., the area a landmark was visible from) predicted the frequency of depiction for local landmarks. Our findings imply that people determine the relevance of landmarks not only by their visual, but even more by their configurational salience.

  9. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. Methods and Results To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. Conclusions and Significance We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV. PMID:27191594

  10. MyriMatch: highly accurate tandem mass spectral peptide identification by multivariate hypergeometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, David L.; Fernando, Christopher G.; Chambers, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics experiments are dependent upon database search engines to identify peptides from tandem mass spectra. Many of these algorithms score potential identifications by evaluating the number of fragment ions matched between each peptide sequence and an observed spectrum. These systems, however, generally do not distinguish between matching an intense peak and matching a minor peak. We have developed a statistical model to score peptide matches that is based upon the multivariate hypergeometric distribution. This scorer, part of the “MyriMatch” database search engine, places greater emphasis on matching intense peaks. The probability that the best match for each spectrum has occurred by random chance can be employed to separate correct matches from random ones. We evaluated this software on data sets from three different laboratories employing three different ion trap instruments. Employing a novel system for testing discrimination, we demonstrate that stratifying peaks into multiple intensity classes improves the discrimination of scoring. We compare MyriMatch results to those of Sequest and X!Tandem, revealing that it is capable of higher discrimination than either of these algorithms. When minimal peak filtering is employed, performance plummets for a scoring model that does not stratify matched peaks by intensity. On the other hand, we find that MyriMatch discrimination improves as more peaks are retained in each spectrum. MyriMatch also scales well to tandem mass spectra from high-resolution mass analyzers. These findings may indicate limitations for existing database search scorers that count matched peaks without differentiating them by intensity. This software and source code is available under Mozilla Public License at this URL: http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/msrc/bioinformatics/. PMID:17269722

  11. Structural analysis of new antihypertensive peptides derived from cheese whey protein by proteinase K digestion.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, A; Saito, T; Kitazawa, H; Kawai, Y; Itoh, T

    1998-12-01

    Whey protein was digested with one of seven kinds of proteases at 37 degrees C (trypsin, proteinase K, actinase E, thermolysin, or papain) or at 25 degrees C (pepsin or chymotrypsin) for 24 h. The digested samples were assayed for the inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and for changes in the systolic blood pressure caused in spontaneously hypertensive rats after gastric intubation. The strongest depressive effect on the systolic blood pressure (-55 mm Hg) was observed at 6 h after gastric intubation of the whey protein that was digested by proteinase K. Finally, six peptides were chromatographically isolated from the proteinase K digest by a combination of hydrophobic reversed-phase HPLC and gel filtration. The amino acid sequences and their origins were clarified as follows: Val-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Gly [beta-casein (CN); f 59-64], Gly-Lys-Pro (beta 2-microglobulin; f 18-20), Ile-Pro-Ala (beta-lactoglobulin; f 78-80), Phe-Pro (serum albumin; f 221-222; beta-CN, f 62-63, f 157-158, and f 205-206), Val-Tyr-Pro (beta-CN; f 59-61), and Thr-Pro-Val-Val-Val-Pro-Pro-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro (beta-CN; f 80-90). Chemical synthesis of these six peptides confirmed that all peptides, except an undecapeptide, have antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The synthetic tripeptide Ile-Pro-Ala, originating from beta-lactoglobulin, showed the strongest antihypertensive activity (-31 mm Hg).

  12. Precision Analysis of Point-And Photogrammetric Measurements for Corridor Mapping: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Blázquez, M.; Sastre, J.; Colomina, I.

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the key aspects of the sensor orientation and calibration approach within the mapKITE concept for corridor mapping, focusing on the contribution analysis of point-and-scale measurements of kinematic ground control points. MapKITE is a new mobile, simultaneous terrestrial and aerial, geodata acquisition and post-processing method. On one hand, the acquisition system is a tandem composed of a terrestrial mobile mapping system and an unmanned aerial system, the latter equipped with a remote sensing payload, and linked through a 'virtual tether', that is, a real-time waypoint supply from the terrestrial vehicle to the unmanned aircraft. On the other hand, mapKITE entails a method for geodata post-processing (specifically, sensor orientation and calibration) based on the described acquisition paradigm, focusing on few key aspects: the particular geometric relationship of a mapKITE network - the aerial vehicle always observes the terrestrial one as they both move -, precise air and ground trajectory determination - the terrestrial vehicle is regarded as a kinematic ground control point - and new photogrammetric measurements - pointing on and measuring the scale of an optical target on the roof of the terrestrial vehicle - are exploited. In this paper, we analyze the performance of aerial image orientation and calibration in mapKITE for corridor mapping, which is the natural application niche of mapKITE, based on the principles and procedures of integrated sensor orientation with the addition of point-and-scale photogrammetric measurements of the kinematic ground control points. To do so, traditional (static ground control points, photogrammetric tie points, aerial control) and new (pointing-and-scaling of kinematic ground control points) measurements have been simulated for mapKITE corridor mapping missions, consisting on takeoff and calibration pattern, single-pass corridor operation potentially performing calibration patterns, and landing and

  13. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  14. Admixture Aberration Analysis: Application to Mapping in Admixed Population Using Pooled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Geiger, Dan

    Admixture mapping is a gene mapping approach used for the identification of genomic regions harboring disease susceptibility genes in the case of recently admixed populations such as African Americans. We present a novel method for admixture mapping, called admixture aberration analysis (AAA), that uses a DNA pool of affected admixed individuals. We demonstrate through simulations that AAA is a powerful and economical mapping method under a range of scenarios, capturing complex human diseases such as hypertension and end stage kidney disease. The method has a low false-positive rate and is robust to deviation from model assumptions. Finally, we apply AAA on 600 prostate cancer-affected African Americans, replicating a known risk locus. Simulation results indicate that the method can yield over 96% reduction in genotyping. Our method is implemented as a Java program called AAAmap and is freely available.

  15. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  16. A spherical electron-channelling pattern map for use in quartz petrofabric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, G.E.; Ferguson, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Electron channelling patterns (ECP's) are formed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by the interaction between the incident electrons and the lattice of crystalline specimens. The patterns are unique for a particular crystallographic orientation and are therefore of considerable potential in petrofabric studies provided they can be accurately indexed. Indexing requires an ECP-map of the crystallographic stereogram or unit triangle covering all possible orientations and hence ECP patterns. Due to the presence of long-range distortions in planar ECP-maps, it is more convenient to construct the maps over a spherical surface. This also facilitates the indexing of individual ECP's. A spherical ECP-map for quartz is presented together with an example of its use in petrofabric analysis. ?? 1986.

  17. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  18. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472. PMID:27454336

  19. Molecular genetic map construction and QTL analysis of fruit maturation period in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y H; Su, K; Guo, Y H; Ma, H F; Guo, X W

    2016-06-20

    In this study, we aimed at finding the genetic regularity of grape maturation period. Early-maturing grapevine, "87-1", was used as the female parent and late-maturing, "9-22", as the male parent, to create an F1 hybrid population. A total of 149 individual plants and their parents were selected as the mapping population. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism and simple-sequence repeat analyses were performed. We performed a linkage analysis and constructed a molecular genetic map. In the obtained map, the female and male parents each covered 19 linkage groups containing 188 and 175 maker loci, respectively. The total map distances for the female and male parents were 1074.5 and 1100.2 cM, respectively, whereas the average genetic distances between each two loci were 5.7 and 7.8 cM, respectively. The interval-mapping method was used in a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for fruit maturation period. A total of 12 QTLs associated with fruit maturation period were detected. These included four QTLs in the male parent genetic map that were located in linkage groups M5, M11, M14-1, and M16, with a 62.6-75.7% rate of contribution of each QTL. Another three QTLs were found in the female parent genetic map, located in linkage groups F6, F14-1, and F18, with a 72.7-77.7% rate of contribution of each QTL. Five more QTLs were detected in the consensus map, located in linkage groups LG11, LG14-1, LG16, LG17, and LG18, with 8.9-75.7% phenotypic variance explained by each QTL.

  20. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis of the CLAVATA3/EMBRYO-SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) and the CLE-LIKE signal peptide genes in the Pinophyta

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a rapidly growing awareness that plant peptide signalling molecules are numerous and varied and they are known to play fundamental roles in angiosperm plant growth and development. Two closely related peptide signalling molecule families are the CLAVATA3-EMBRYO-SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) and CLE-LIKE (CLEL) genes, which encode precursors of secreted peptide ligands that have roles in meristem maintenance and root gravitropism. Progress in peptide signalling molecule research in gymnosperms has lagged behind that of angiosperms. We therefore sought to identify CLE and CLEL genes in gymnosperms and conduct a comparative analysis of these gene families with angiosperms. Results We undertook a meta-analysis of the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ gymnosperm EST database and the Picea abies and P. glauca genomes and identified 93 putative CLE genes and 11 CLEL genes among eight Pinophyta species, in the genera Cryptomeria, Pinus and Picea. The predicted conifer CLE and CLEL protein sequences had close phylogenetic relationships with their homologues in Arabidopsis. Notably, perfect conservation of the active CLE dodecapeptide in presumed orthologues of the Arabidopsis CLE41/44-TRACHEARY ELEMENT DIFFERENTIATION (TDIF) protein, an inhibitor of tracheary element (xylem) differentiation, was seen in all eight conifer species. We cloned the Pinus radiata CLE41/44-TDIF orthologues. These genes were preferentially expressed in phloem in planta as expected, but unexpectedly, also in differentiating tracheary element (TE) cultures. Surprisingly, transcript abundances of these TE differentiation-inhibitors sharply increased during early TE differentiation, suggesting that some cells differentiate into phloem cells in addition to TEs in these cultures. Applied CLE13 and CLE41/44 peptides inhibited root elongation in Pinus radiata seedlings. We show evidence that two CLEL genes are alternatively spliced via 3′-terminal acceptor exons encoding separate CLEL peptides

  1. Cascades/Aleutian Play Fairway Analysis: Data and Map Files

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Shevenell

    2015-11-15

    Contains Excel data files used to quantifiably rank the geothermal potential of each of the young volcanic centers of the Cascade and Aleutian Arcs using world power production volcanic centers as benchmarks. Also contains shapefiles used in play fairway analysis with power plant, volcano, geochemistry and structural data.

  2. Learning with Concept and Knowledge Maps: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, John C.; Adesope, Olusola O.

    2006-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviews experimental and quasi-experimental studies in which students learned by constructing, modifying, or viewing node-link diagrams. Following an exhaustive search for studies meeting specified design criteria, 67 standardized mean difference effect sizes were extracted from 55 studies involving 5,818 participants. Students…

  3. Mapping Learning and Game Mechanics for Serious Games Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnab, Sylvester; Lim, Theodore; Carvalho, Maira B.; Bellotti, Francesco; de Freitas, Sara; Louchart, Sandy; Suttie, Neil; Berta, Riccardo; De Gloria, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a consensus on the instructional potential of Serious Games (SGs), there is still a lack of methodologies and tools not only for design but also to support analysis and assessment. Filling this gap is one of the main aims of the Games and Learning Alliance (http://www.galanoe.eu) European Network of Excellence on Serious Games,…

  4. Alteration mapping at Goldfield, Nevada, by cluster and discriminant analysis of Landsat digital data. [mapping of hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballew, G.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of Landsat multispectral digital data to differentiate among 62 combinations of rock and alteration types at the Goldfield mining district of Western Nevada was investigated by using statistical techniques of cluster and discriminant analysis. Multivariate discriminant analysis was not effective in classifying each of the 62 groups, with classification results essentially the same whether data of four channels alone or combined with six ratios of channels were used. Bivariate plots of group means revealed a cluster of three groups including mill tailings, basalt and all other rock and alteration types. Automatic hierarchical clustering based on the fourth dimensional Mahalanobis distance between group means of 30 groups having five or more samples was performed using Johnson's HICLUS program. The results of the cluster analysis revealed hierarchies of mill tailings vs. natural materials, basalt vs. non-basalt, highly reflectant rocks vs. other rocks and exclusively unaltered rocks vs. predominantly altered rocks. The hierarchies were used to determine the order in which sets of multiple discriminant analyses were to be performed and the resulting discriminant functions were used to produce a map of geology and alteration which has an overall accuracy of 70 percent for discriminating exclusively altered rocks from predominantly altered rocks.

  5. Structure-Activity Analysis of the Dermcidin-derived Peptide DCD-1L, an Anionic Antimicrobial Peptide Present in Human Sweat*

    PubMed Central

    Paulmann, Maren; Arnold, Thomas; Linke, Dirk; Özdirekcan, Suat; Kopp, Annika; Gutsmann, Thomas; Kalbacher, Hubert; Wanke, Ines; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Habeck, Michael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Schittek, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Dermcidin encodes the anionic amphiphilic peptide DCD-1L, which displays a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity under conditions resembling those in human sweat. Here, we have investigated its mode of antimicrobial activity. We found that DCD-1L interacts preferentially with negatively charged bacterial phospholipids with a helix axis that is aligned flat on a lipid bilayer surface. Upon interaction with lipid bilayers DCD-1L forms oligomeric complexes that are stabilized by Zn2+. DCD-1L is able to form ion channels in the bacterial membrane, and we propose that Zn2+-induced self-assembly of DCD-1L upon interaction with bacterial lipid bilayers is a prerequisite for ion channel formation. These data allow us for the first time to propose a molecular model for the antimicrobial mechanism of a naturally processed human anionic peptide that is active under the harsh conditions present in human sweat. PMID:22262861

  6. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA-adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  7. Biophysical analysis of the interaction of granulysin-derived peptides with enterobacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Howe, Jörg; Andrä, Jörg; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; da Silva, Ana Paula Galvão; Krensky, Alan M; Clayberger, Carol; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    To combat infections by Gram-negative bacteria, it is not only necessary to kill the bacteria but also to neutralize pathogenicity factors such as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The development of antimicrobial peptides based on mammalian endotoxin-binding proteins is a promising tool in the fight against bacterial infections, and septic shock syndrome. Here, synthetic peptides derived from granulysin (Gra-pep) were investigated in microbiological and biophysical assays to understand their interaction with LPS. We analyzed the influence of the binding of Gra-pep on (1) the acyl chain melting of the hydrophobic moiety of LPS, lipid A, by Fourier-transform spectroscopy, (2) the aggregate structure of LPS by small-angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, and 3) the enthalpy change by isothermal titration calorimetry. In addition, the influence of Gra-pep on the incorporation of LPS and LPS-LBP (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) complexes into negatively charged liposomes was monitored. Our findings demonstrate a characteristic change in the aggregate structure of LPS into multilamellar stacks in the presence of Gra-pep, but little or no change of acyl chain fluidity. Neutralization of LPS by Gra-pep is not due to a scavenging effect in solution, but rather proceeds after incorporation into target membranes, suggesting a requisite membrane-bound step.

  8. In-depth proteomic analysis of banana (Musa spp.) fruit with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Musa ssp. is among the world's leading fruit crops. Although a strong interest on banana biochemistry exists in the scientific community, focused on metabolite composition, proteins have been scarcely investigated even if they play an important role in food allergy and stability, are a source of biologically active peptides, and can provide information about nutritional aspects of this fruit. In this work we have employed the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries after different types of protein extractions, for searching the very low-abundance proteins in banana. The use of advanced MS techniques and Musa ssp. mRNAs database in combination with the Uniprot_viridiplantae database allowed us to identify 1131 proteins. Among this huge amount of proteins we found several already known allergens such as Mus a 1, pectinesterase, superoxide dismutase, and potentially new allergens. Additionally several enzymes involved in degradation of starch granules and strictly correlated to ripening stage were identified. This is the first in-depth exploration of the banana fruit proteome and one of the largest descriptions of the proteome of any vegetable system. PMID:23161558

  9. Kinetic analysis of artificial peptide self-replication. Part II: the heterochiral case.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jesús Rivera; Pimienta, Véronique; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Buhse, Thomas

    2003-03-25

    A kinetic model has been designed to describe and to analyze the stereoselective behavior of a recently discovered heterochiral template-directed peptide self-replicator by Ghadiri and co-workers [Nature 409 (2001) 797-801]. It turned out that previous assumptions stating that exclusively homochiral species participate in a stereoselective and autocatalytic pathway and that heterochiral species originate only from uncatalyzed background reactions could not be validated by our model. On the contrary, excellent fitting of experimental data indicated that the whole combinatorial variety of possible cross-catalytic processes involving L- and D- peptide species play an important role and need to be taken into account. The system shows no net creation of chiral matter but only a redistribution of the initially present chiral material. Both, the separation of an optically inactive meso-type template dimer and a slight chiroselective autocatalytic effect, contribute to a predicted amplification of enantiomeric excess that, in some cases, can simultaneously result in a substantial amount of optically active matter.

  10. Structural analysis of a signal peptide inside the ribosome tunnel by DNP MAS NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sascha; Franks, W. Trent; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Döring, Kristina; Geiger, Michel A.; Linden, Arne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in cells by ribosomes and, in parallel, prepared for folding or targeting. While ribosomal protein synthesis is progressing, the nascent chain exposes amino-terminal signal sequences or transmembrane domains that mediate interactions with specific interaction partners, such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the SecA–adenosine triphosphatase, or the trigger factor. These binding events can set the course for folding in the cytoplasm and translocation across or insertion into membranes. A distinction of the respective pathways depends largely on the hydrophobicity of the recognition sequence. Hydrophobic transmembrane domains stabilize SRP binding, whereas less hydrophobic signal sequences, typical for periplasmic and outer membrane proteins, stimulate SecA binding and disfavor SRP interactions. In this context, the formation of helical structures of signal peptides within the ribosome was considered to be an important factor. We applied dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate the conformational states of the disulfide oxidoreductase A (DsbA) signal peptide stalled within the exit tunnel of the ribosome. Our results suggest that the nascent chain comprising the DsbA signal sequence adopts an extended structure in the ribosome with only minor populations of helical structure. PMID:27551685

  11. In-depth proteomic analysis of banana (Musa spp.) fruit with combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Musa ssp. is among the world's leading fruit crops. Although a strong interest on banana biochemistry exists in the scientific community, focused on metabolite composition, proteins have been scarcely investigated even if they play an important role in food allergy and stability, are a source of biologically active peptides, and can provide information about nutritional aspects of this fruit. In this work we have employed the combinatorial peptide ligand libraries after different types of protein extractions, for searching the very low-abundance proteins in banana. The use of advanced MS techniques and Musa ssp. mRNAs database in combination with the Uniprot_viridiplantae database allowed us to identify 1131 proteins. Among this huge amount of proteins we found several already known allergens such as Mus a 1, pectinesterase, superoxide dismutase, and potentially new allergens. Additionally several enzymes involved in degradation of starch granules and strictly correlated to ripening stage were identified. This is the first in-depth exploration of the banana fruit proteome and one of the largest descriptions of the proteome of any vegetable system.

  12. Analysis of the brain ACTH-immunoreactive peptide spectrum in inbred mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, Yu.L.; Blednov, Yu.A.; Seredenin, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Mice of the BALB/c (C) and C57BL/6 (B6) strains, characterized by high and low emotionality respectively in open field tests, have been shown to differ considerably in both the initial level and the time course of changes in the plasma ACTH concentration after exposure to stress in an open field and after administration of a benzodiazepine tranquilizer. The ACTH concentration in the pituitary gland of animals of these lines also differs. The ACTH molecule is known to contain regions with neurotropic activity. It can therefore be postulated that differences in the level of this hormone and the products of its bioconversion in the brain are an essential factor in the mechanisms of formation of the hereditary features of emotional behavior. In this first stage of this investigation, represented in this paper and undertaken to test this hypothesis, spectra of ACTH-immunoreactive peptides were studied in chromatographic fractions of an acid brain extract as well as in the blood plasma of mice belonging to B6 and C lines and their hybrids. The peptides were determined by radioimmunoassay.

  13. Identification and quantification of peptides and proteins secreted from prostate epithelial cells by unbiased liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using goodness of fit and analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Florentinus, Angelica K; Bowden, Peter; Sardana, Girish; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Marshall, John G

    2012-02-01

    The proteins secreted by prostate cancer cells (PC3(AR)6) were separated by strong anion exchange chromatography, digested with trypsin and analyzed by unbiased liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with an ion trap. The spectra were matched to peptides within proteins using a goodness of fit algorithm that showed a low false positive rate. The parent ions for MS/MS were randomly and independently sampled from a log-normal population and therefore could be analyzed by ANOVA. Normal distribution analysis confirmed that the parent and fragment ion intensity distributions were sampled over 99.9% of their range that was above the background noise. Arranging the ion intensity data with the identified peptide and protein sequences in structured query language (SQL) permitted the quantification of ion intensity across treatments, proteins and peptides. The intensity of 101,905 fragment ions from 1421 peptide precursors of 583 peptides from 233 proteins separated over 11 sample treatments were computed together in one ANOVA model using the statistical analysis system (SAS) prior to Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) testing. Thus complex mixtures of proteins were identified and quantified with a high degree of confidence using an ion trap without isotopic labels, multivariate analysis or comparing chromatographic retention times.

  14. A Comparison of Spatial Analysis Methods for the Construction of Topographic Maps of Retinal Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Gisholt, Eduardo; Hemmi, Jan M.; Hart, Nathan S.; Collin, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic maps that illustrate variations in the density of different neuronal sub-types across the retina are valuable tools for understanding the adaptive significance of retinal specialisations in different species of vertebrates. To date, such maps have been created from raw count data that have been subjected to only limited analysis (linear interpolation) and, in many cases, have been presented as iso-density contour maps with contour lines that have been smoothed ‘by eye’. With the use of stereological approach to count neuronal distribution, a more rigorous approach to analysing the count data is warranted and potentially provides a more accurate representation of the neuron distribution pattern. Moreover, a formal spatial analysis of retinal topography permits a more robust comparison of topographic maps within and between species. In this paper, we present a new R-script for analysing the topography of retinal neurons and compare methods of interpolating and smoothing count data for the construction of topographic maps. We compare four methods for spatial analysis of cell count data: Akima interpolation, thin plate spline interpolation, thin plate spline smoothing and Gaussian kernel smoothing. The use of interpolation ‘respects’ the observed data and simply calculates the intermediate values required to create iso-density contour maps. Interpolation preserves more of the data but, consequently includes outliers, sampling errors and/or other experimental artefacts. In contrast, smoothing the data reduces the ‘noise’ caused by artefacts and permits a clearer representation of the dominant, ‘real’ distribution. This is particularly useful where cell density gradients are shallow and small variations in local density may dramatically influence the perceived spatial pattern of neuronal topography. The thin plate spline and the Gaussian kernel methods both produce similar retinal topography maps but the smoothing parameters used may affect

  15. Value flow mapping: Using networks to inform stakeholder analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Bruce G.; Crawley, Edward F.; Loureiro, Geilson; Rebentisch, Eric S.

    2008-02-01

    Stakeholder theory has garnered significant interest from the corporate community, but has proved difficult to apply to large government programs. A detailed value flow exercise was conducted to identify the value delivery mechanisms among stakeholders for the current Vision for Space Exploration. We propose a method for capturing stakeholder needs that explicitly recognizes the outcomes required of the value creating organization. The captured stakeholder needs are then translated into input-output models for each stakeholder, which are then aggregated into a network model. Analysis of this network suggests that benefits are infrequently linked to the root provider of value. Furthermore, it is noted that requirements should not only be written to influence the organization's outputs, but also to influence the propagation of benefit further along the value chain. A number of future applications of this model to systems architecture and requirement analysis are discussed.

  16. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  17. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  18. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  19. Mapping soils, crops, and rangelands by machine analysis of multitemporal ERTS-1 data. [Kansas and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, M. F.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 data, obtained during the period 25 August 1972 to 5 September 1973 over a range of test sites in the Central United States, have been used for identifying and mapping differences in soil patterns, species and conditions of cultivated crops, and conditions of rangelands. Multispectral scanner data from multiple ERTS passes over certain test sites have provided the opportunity to study temporal changes in the scene. Multispectral classifications delineating soils boundaries in different test sites compared well with existing soil association maps prepared by conventional means. Spectral analysis of ERTS data was used to identify, maps, and make areal measurements of wheat in western Kansas. Multispectral analysis of ERTS-1 data provided patterns in rangelands which can be related to soils differences, range management practices, and the extent of infestation of grasslands by mesquite (prosopis fuliflora) and juniper (juniperus spp.).

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of MapReduce for High-Performance Climate Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Daniel Q.; Schnase, John L.; Thompson, John H.; Freeman, Shawn M.; Clune, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    MapReduce is an approach to high-performance analytics that may be useful to data intensive problems in climate research. It offers an analysis paradigm that uses clusters of computers and combines distributed storage of large data sets with parallel computation. We are particularly interested in the potential of MapReduce to speed up basic operations common to a wide range of analyses. In order to evaluate this potential, we are prototyping a series of canonical MapReduce operations over a test suite of observational and climate simulation datasets. Our initial focus has been on averaging operations over arbitrary spatial and temporal extents within Modern Era Retrospective- Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. Preliminary results suggest this approach can improve efficiencies within data intensive analytic workflows.

  1. U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Road Map: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Olis, D.; Warren, A.

    2011-09-01

    This report lays out the strategy envisioned by the stakeholders in the U.S. Virgin Islands, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Interior to achieve the ambitious goal of achieving a 60% reduction in business-as-usual fossil fuel demand by 2025 (60x25) within the electricity sector. This work and supporting analysis provides a framework within which decisions can begin to be made, a concrete vision of what the future might hold, and a guide to determine what questions should follow.

  2. Isolation of cross-linked peptides by diagonal strong cation exchange chromatography for protein complex topology studies by peptide fragment fingerprinting from large sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Buncherd, Hansuk; Roseboom, Winfried; Ghavim, Behrad; Du, Weina; de Koning, Leo J; de Koster, Chris G; de Jong, Luitzen

    2014-06-27

    Knowledge of spatial proximity of amino acid residues obtained by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometric analysis provides information about protein folding, protein-protein interactions and topology of macromolecular assemblies. We show that the use of bis(succinimidyl)-3-azidomethyl glutarate as a cross-linker provides a solution for two major analytical problems of cross-link mapping by peptide fragment fingerprinting (PFF) from complex sequence databases, i.e., low abundance of protease-generated target peptides and lack of knowledge of the masses of linked peptides. Tris(carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) reduces the azido group in cross-linked peptides to an amine group in competition with cleavage of an amide bond formed in the cross-link reaction. TCEP-induced reaction products were separated by diagonal strong cation exchange (SCX) from unmodified peptides. The relation between the sum of the masses of the cleavage products and the mass of the parent cross-linked peptide enables determination of the masses of candidate linked peptides. By reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis of secondary SCX fractions, we identified several intraprotein and interprotein cross-links in a HeLa cell nuclear extract, aided by software tools supporting PFF from the entire human sequence database. The data provide new information about interacting protein domains, among others from assemblies involved in splicing.

  3. Easy and Rapid Binding Assay for Functional Analysis of Disulfide-Containing Peptides by a Pull-Down Method Using a Puromycin-Linker and a Cell-Free Translation System

    PubMed Central

    Tanemura, Yutaro; Mochizuki, Yuki; Kumachi, Shigefumi; Nemoto, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Constrained peptides are an attractive class as affinity reagents or drug leads owing to their excellent binding properties. Many kinds of these peptides, such as cyclic peptides containing disulfide bridges, are found in nature or designed artificially by directed evolution. However, confirming the binding properties of the disulfide-rich peptides can be generally difficult, because of oxidative folding problems in the preparation steps. Therefore, a method for evaluating the binding properties of such peptides rapidly and easily is required. Here, we report an easy and rapid method for preparing biotin-attached peptides containing disulfide bridges or a chemical cross-linker using a cell-free translation system and a puromycin-linker, which is applicable to pull-down assays for protein (or peptide) molecular interaction analysis. PMID:25738808

  4. Study of immobilized metal affinity chromatography sorbents for the analysis of peptides by on-line solid-phase extraction capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martin, Lorena; Benavente, Fernando; Medina-Casanellas, Silvia; Giménez, Estela; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2015-03-01

    Several commercial immobilized metal affinity chromatography sorbents were evaluated in this study for the analysis of two small peptide fragments of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) (Aβ(1-15) and Aβ(10-20) peptides) by on-line immobilized metal affinity SPE-CE (IMA-SPE-CE). The performance of a nickel metal ion (Ni(II)) sorbent based on nitrilotriacetic acid as a chelating agent was significantly better than two copper metal ion (Cu(II)) sorbents based on iminodiacetic acid. A BGE of 25 mM phosphate (pH 7.4) and an eluent of 50 mM imidazole (in BGE) yielded a 25-fold and 5-fold decrease in the LODs by IMA-SPE-CE-UV for Aβ(1-15) and Aβ(10-20) peptides (0.1 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively) with regard to CE-UV (2.5 μg/mL for both peptides). The phosphate BGE was also used in IMA-SPE-CE-MS, but the eluent needed to be substituted by a 0.5% HAc v/v solution. Under optimum preconcentration and detection conditions, reproducibility of peak areas and migration times was acceptable (23.2 and 12.0%RSD, respectively). The method was more sensitive for Aβ(10-20) peptide, which could be detected until 0.25 μg/mL. Linearity for Aβ(10-20) peptide was good in a narrow concentration range (0.25-2.5 μg/mL, R(2) = 0.93). Lastly, the potential of the optimized Ni(II)-IMA-SPE-CE-MS method for the analysis of amyloid peptides in biological fluids was evaluated by analyzing spiked plasma and serum samples. PMID:25640944

  5. Mapping Sleeping Bees within Their Nest: Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Worker Honey Bee Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barrett Anthony; Stiegler, Martin; Klein, Arno; Tautz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of behavior within societies have long been visualized and interpreted using maps. Mapping the occurrence of sleep across individuals within a society could offer clues as to functional aspects of sleep. In spite of this, a detailed spatial analysis of sleep has never been conducted on an invertebrate society. We introduce the concept of mapping sleep across an insect society, and provide an empirical example, mapping sleep patterns within colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Honey bees face variables such as temperature and position of resources within their colony's nest that may impact their sleep. We mapped sleep behavior and temperature of worker bees and produced maps of their nest's comb contents as the colony grew and contents changed. By following marked bees, we discovered that individuals slept in many locations, but bees of different worker castes slept in different areas of the nest relative to position of the brood and surrounding temperature. Older worker bees generally slept outside cells, closer to the perimeter of the nest, in colder regions, and away from uncapped brood. Younger worker bees generally slept inside cells and closer to the center of the nest, and spent more time asleep than awake when surrounded by uncapped brood. The average surface temperature of sleeping foragers was lower than the surface temperature of their surroundings, offering a possible indicator of sleep for this caste. We propose mechanisms that could generate caste-dependent sleep patterns and discuss functional significance of these patterns. PMID:25029445

  6. Mapping sleeping bees within their nest: spatial and temporal analysis of worker honey bee sleep.

    PubMed

    Klein, Barrett Anthony; Stiegler, Martin; Klein, Arno; Tautz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of behavior within societies have long been visualized and interpreted using maps. Mapping the occurrence of sleep across individuals within a society could offer clues as to functional aspects of sleep. In spite of this, a detailed spatial analysis of sleep has never been conducted on an invertebrate society. We introduce the concept of mapping sleep across an insect society, and provide an empirical example, mapping sleep patterns within colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Honey bees face variables such as temperature and position of resources within their colony's nest that may impact their sleep. We mapped sleep behavior and temperature of worker bees and produced maps of their nest's comb contents as the colony grew and contents changed. By following marked bees, we discovered that individuals slept in many locations, but bees of different worker castes slept in different areas of the nest relative to position of the brood and surrounding temperature. Older worker bees generally slept outside cells, closer to the perimeter of the nest, in colder regions, and away from uncapped brood. Younger worker bees generally slept inside cells and closer to the center of the nest, and spent more time asleep than awake when surrounded by uncapped brood. The average surface temperature of sleeping foragers was lower than the surface temperature of their surroundings, offering a possible indicator of sleep for this caste. We propose mechanisms that could generate caste-dependent sleep patterns and discuss functional significance of these patterns. PMID:25029445

  7. Calibration and systematic error analysis for the COBE(1) DMR 4year sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Gorski, K.M.; Hinshaw,G.; Jackson, P.D.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Smoot, G.F.; Tenorio,L.; Wright, E.L.

    1996-01-04

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has mapped the full microwave sky to mean sensitivity 26 mu K per 7 degrees held of view. The absolute calibration is determined to 0.7 percent with drifts smaller than 0.2 percent per year. We have analyzed both the raw differential data and the pixelized sky maps for evidence of contaminating sources such as solar system foregrounds, instrumental susceptibilities, and artifacts from data recovery and processing. Most systematic effects couple only weakly to the sky maps. The largest uncertainties in the maps result from the instrument susceptibility to Earth's magnetic field, microwave emission from Earth, and upper limits to potential effects at the spacecraft spin period. Systematic effects in the maps are small compared to either the noise or the celestial signal: the 95 percent confidence upper limit for the pixel-pixel rms from all identified systematics is less than 6 mu K in the worst channel. A power spectrum analysis of the (A-B)/2 difference maps shows no evidence for additional undetected systematic effects.

  8. Mapping sleeping bees within their nest: spatial and temporal analysis of worker honey bee sleep.

    PubMed

    Klein, Barrett Anthony; Stiegler, Martin; Klein, Arno; Tautz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of behavior within societies have long been visualized and interpreted using maps. Mapping the occurrence of sleep across individuals within a society could offer clues as to functional aspects of sleep. In spite of this, a detailed spatial analysis of sleep has never been conducted on an invertebrate society. We introduce the concept of mapping sleep across an insect society, and provide an empirical example, mapping sleep patterns within colonies of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Honey bees face variables such as temperature and position of resources within their colony's nest that may impact their sleep. We mapped sleep behavior and temperature of worker bees and produced maps of their nest's comb contents as the colony grew and contents changed. By following marked bees, we discovered that individuals slept in many locations, but bees of different worker castes slept in different areas of the nest relative to position of the brood and surrounding temperature. Older worker bees generally slept outside cells, closer to the perimeter of the nest, in colder regions, and away from uncapped brood. Younger worker bees generally slept inside cells and closer to the center of the nest, and spent more time asleep than awake when surrounded by uncapped brood. The average surface temperature of sleeping foragers was lower than the surface temperature of their surroundings, offering a possible indicator of sleep for this caste. We propose mechanisms that could generate caste-dependent sleep patterns and discuss functional significance of these patterns.

  9. Advanced technologies for genomic analysis in farm animals and its application for QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Yu; Feng, Chungang; Liu, Qiuyue; Wang, Xiaobo; Du, Zhuo; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Ning

    2009-06-01

    Rapid progress in farm animal breeding has been made in the last few decades. Advanced technologies for genomic analysis in molecular genetics have led to the identification of genes or markers associated with genes that affect economic traits. Molecular markers, large-insert libraries and RH panels have been used to build the genetic linkage maps, physical maps and comparative maps in different farm animals. Moreover, EST sequencing, genome sequencing and SNPs maps are helping us to understand how genomes function in various organisms and further areas will be studied by DNA microarray technologies and proteomics methods. Because most economically important traits in farm animals are controlled by multiple genes and the environment, the main goal of genome research in farm animals is to map and characterize genes determining QTL. There are two main strategies to identify trait loci, candidate gene association tests and genome scan approaches. In recent years, some new concepts, such as RNAi, miRNA and eQTL, have been introduced into farm animal research, especially for QTL mapping and finding QTN. Several genes that influence important traits have already been identified or are close to being identified, and some of them have been applied in farm animal breeding programs by marker-assisted selection.

  10. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this

  11. Analysis of hydrogen bonds in peptides, based on the hydration affinity of amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perczel, András; Lengyel, Istvan; Mantsch, Henry H.; Fasman, Gerald D.

    1993-08-01

    The difference in the affinity for water of peptide groups embedded in different molecular environments was investigated. The chemical shift of an amide proton is sensitive to conformational variations, as well as to changes in the molecular environment [D.S. Wishat, B.D. Sykes and F.M. Richards, J. Mol. Biol., 222 (1991) 311-333]. Therefore, if the conformational motions are minimized or excluded, the observed changes in the chemical shift can simply be related to the environmental effects. The conformation(s) of the cyclic β-turn models studied in this work has been previously reported using X-ray, NMR, circular dichroism, and (FT-IR) spectroscopic methods, as well as MD calculations. [M. Hollósi, K.E. Köver, S. Holly, L. Radics and G.D. Fasman, Biopolymers, 26 (1987) 1527-1572; A. Perczel, M. Hollósi, B.M. Foxman and G.D. Fasman, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 113 (1991) 9772-9784; and H.H. Mantsch, A. Perczel, M. Hollósi and G.D. Fasman, Biopolymers, 33 (1993) 201-207]. The backbone of the cyclo[(δ)Ava—Gly—Pro—Aaa—Gly] (where Aaa = Ser(O tBu), Ser or Thr(O tBu), and δ(Ava) is δ-aminovaleric acid) compounds was found to be rigidly incorporated in the structure and to contain two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. These β-turn models also include one (or two) "free" amide group(s) that are not involved in any type of interaction. The "water titration" of these amide groups in acetonitrile, where they are involved in various degrees of hydrogen bonding, revealed their molecular environment. Owing to the rigidity of these structures, the observed changes in the amide proton chemical shifts, during titration were attributed to their involvement in hydrogen bonding. This was confirmed by monitoring the water titration simultaneously with FT-IR spectroscopy. The phenomenon described here, with the proposed characterization of the investigated peptide/water system, comprise an improvement in the NMR method for analyzing the hydrogen bonding of small rigid peptides.

  12. Error modeling based on geostatistics for uncertainty analysis in crop mapping using Gaofen-1 multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiong; Pei, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    With the development of remote sensing technology, its applications in agriculture monitoring systems, crop mapping accuracy, and spatial distribution are more and more being explored by administrators and users. Uncertainty in crop mapping is profoundly affected by the spatial pattern of spectral reflectance values obtained from the applied remote sensing data. Errors in remotely sensed crop cover information and the propagation in derivative products need to be quantified and handled correctly. Therefore, this study discusses the methods of error modeling for uncertainty characterization in crop mapping using GF-1 multispectral imagery. An error modeling framework based on geostatistics is proposed, which introduced the sequential Gaussian simulation algorithm to explore the relationship between classification errors and the spectral signature from remote sensing data source. On this basis, a misclassification probability model to produce a spatially explicit classification error probability surface for the map of a crop is developed, which realizes the uncertainty characterization for crop mapping. In this process, trend surface analysis was carried out to generate a spatially varying mean response and the corresponding residual response with spatial variation for the spectral bands of GF-1 multispectral imagery. Variogram models were employed to measure the spatial dependence in the spectral bands and the derived misclassification probability surfaces. Simulated spectral data and classification results were quantitatively analyzed. Through experiments using data sets from a region in the low rolling country located at the Yangtze River valley, it was found that GF-1 multispectral imagery can be used for crop mapping with a good overall performance, the proposal error modeling framework can be used to quantify the uncertainty in crop mapping, and the misclassification probability model can summarize the spatial variation in map accuracy and is helpful for

  13. Evidence of Allopolyploidy in Urochloa humidicola Based on Cytological Analysis and Genetic Linkage Mapping.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Bianca B Z; Santos, Jean C S; Jungmann, Leticia; do Valle, Cacilda B; Mollinari, Marcelo; Pastina, Maria M; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Garcia, Antonio A F; Souza, Anete P

    2016-01-01

    The African species Urochloa humidicola (Rendle) Morrone & Zuloaga (syn. Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick.) is an important perennial forage grass found throughout the tropics. This species is polyploid, ranging from tetra to nonaploid, and apomictic, which makes genetic studies challenging; therefore, the number of currently available genetic resources is limited. The genomic architecture and evolution of U. humidicola and the molecular markers linked to apomixis were investigated in a full-sib F1 population obtained by crossing the sexual accession H031 and the apomictic cultivar U. humidicola cv. BRS Tupi, both of which are hexaploid. A simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based linkage map was constructed for the species from 102 polymorphic and specific SSR markers based on simplex and double-simplex markers. The map consisted of 49 linkage groups (LGs) and had a total length of 1702.82 cM, with 89 microsatellite loci and an average map density of 10.6 cM. Eight homology groups (HGs) were formed, comprising 22 LGs, and the other LGs remained ungrouped. The locus that controls apospory (apo-locus) was mapped in LG02 and was located 19.4 cM from the locus Bh027.c.D2. In the cytological analyses of some hybrids, bi- to hexavalents at diakinesis were observed, as well as two nucleoli in some meiocytes, smaller chromosomes with preferential allocation within the first metaphase plate and asynchronous chromosome migration to the poles during anaphase. The linkage map and the meiocyte analyses confirm previous reports of hybridization and suggest an allopolyploid origin of the hexaploid U. humidicola. This is the first linkage map of an Urochloa species, and it will be useful for future quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis after saturation of the map and for genome assembly and evolutionary studies in Urochloa spp. Moreover, the results of the apomixis mapping are consistent with previous reports and confirm the need for additional studies to search for a co

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of peptide deformylase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masayuki; Kudo, Norio; Lee, Woo Cheol; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Tanokura, Masaru

    2004-07-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is responsible for cleaving the formyl group at the N-terminus of nascent polypeptide chains in eubacteria and is essential to bacterial cell viability. A recombinant PDF of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1) or P4(3), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.58, c = 105.27 A, and are most likely to contain two molecules in an asymmetric unit, giving a crystal volume per protein weight (V(M)) of 2.3 A(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 46.7%.

  15. Comparative analysis reveals loss of the appetite-regulating peptide hormone ghrelin in falcons.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2015-05-15

    Ghrelin and leptin are key peripherally secreted appetite-regulating hormones in vertebrates. Here we consider the ghrelin gene (GHRL) of birds (class Aves), where it has been reported that ghrelin inhibits rather than augments feeding. Thirty-one bird species were compared, revealing that most species harbour a functional copy of GHRL and the coding region for its derived peptides ghrelin and obestatin. We provide evidence for loss of GHRL in saker and peregrine falcons, and this is likely to result from the insertion of an ERVK retrotransposon in intron 0. We hypothesise that the loss of anorexigenic ghrelin is a predatory adaptation that results in increased food-seeking behaviour and feeding in falcons.

  16. Stability analysis of glutamic acid linked peptides coupled to NOTA through different chemical linkages.

    PubMed

    Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-11-01

    Glutamic acid is a commonly used linker to form dimeric peptides with enhanced binding affinity than their corresponding monomeric counterparts. We have previously labeled NOTA-Bn-NCS-PEG3-E[c(RGDyK)]2 (NOTA-PRGD2) [1] with [(18)F]AlF and (68)Ga for imaging tumor angiogenesis. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was attached to E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2] through a mini-PEG with a thiourea linkage, and the product [1] was stable at radiolabeling condition of 100 °C and pH 4.0 acetate buffer. However, when the same p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was directly attached to the α-amine of E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], the product NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] became unstable under similar conditions and the release of monomeric c(RGDfK) [5] was observed. The purpose of this work was to use HPLC and LC-MS to monitor the decomposition of glutamic acid linked dimeric peptides and their NOTA derivatives. A c(RGDyK) [6] and bombesin (BBN) [7] heterodimer c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and a dimeric bombesin E(BBN)2 [9], both with a glutamic acid as the linker, along with a model compound PhSCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10] were also studied. All the compounds were dissolved in 0.5 M pH 4.0 acetate buffer at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mL of each sample was heated at 100 °C for 10 min and the more stable compounds were heated for another 30 min. The samples at both time points were analyzed with analytical HPLC to monitor the decomposition of the heated samples. The samples with decomposition were further analyzed by LC-MS to determine the mass of products from the decomposition for possible structure elucidation. After 10 min heating, the obvious release of c(RGDfK) [5] was observed for NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] and Ph-SCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10]. Little or no release of monomers was observed for the remaining samples at this time point. After further heating, the release of monomers was clearly observed for E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2], E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and E(BBN)2 [9]. No decomposition or little decomposition was observed for NOTA

  17. 76 FR 78015 - Revised Analysis and Mapping Procedures for Non-Accredited Levees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Revised Analysis and Mapping Procedures for Non-Accredited Levees AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency... Division, Office of Chief Counsel, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Room 835, 500 C Street...

  18. Sporting Bodies, Ageing, Narrative Mapping and Young Team Athletes: An Analysis of Possible Selves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix, Cassandra; Sparkes, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on life history data generated from interviews with young athletes at an English university, this paper explores the narrative maps provided to them by older team members and the ways in which these influence perceptions of self-ageing. Three possible selves associated with mid-life emerged from the analysis for detailed focus. These are…

  19. Situational Analysis and Mapping for Use in Education Research: A Reflexive Methodology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    den Outer, Birgit; Handley, Karen; Price, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    In the quest for a better reflexive research practice and to respond to the challenge of expanding on an education research repertoire, the authors consider "situational analysis," proposed as a post-modern approach to grounded theory using maps. Originally situating their research projects within a social constructivist theoretical…

  20. Molecular cloning, expression analysis, and appetite regulatory effect of peptide YY in Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Xin; Hao, Jin; Chen, Defang; Liu, Ju; Gao, Yundi; Zhu, Jieyao; Wu, Hongwei; Lin, Fangjun; Pu, Yundan; Yuan, Dengyue; Wei, Rongbin; Zhou, Chaowei; Wang, Tao; Li, Zhiqiong

    2015-06-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is an anorectic brain-gut peptide involved in feeding regulation and well characterized in mammals. However, the functional role of PYY in the appetite regulatory of fish is not clear. In this study, we characterized a high conservation of PYY cDNA and found high expression levels of PYY mRNA in the brain and digestive tract of Siberian sturgeon. Then, we examined preprandial (pre- and post-feeding) changes of PYY mRNA expression in the brain that showed a significantly increased in 3h post-feeding, suggesting an anorectic possible function of PYY in Siberian sturgeon. Next, we examined the expression of PYY mRNA during 15 days fasting and refeed after fasting. The SsPYY mRNA expression of unfed fish had a significant 2.4, 1.7, 2.0, 2.2, and 2.1-fold decrease compared to 1-, 3-, 6-, 10- and 15-day ad libitum fed animals, respectively. After refeed, SsPYY mRNA significantly increased 1.9 and 4.1-fold above that of the 15-day fed and unfed fish control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, a single intraperitoneal injection of 10, 100 and 200 ng/g BW SsPYY1-36 caused a reduction in the next feeding and no significant reduction in food intake was observed in fish injected with a 1 ng/g BW. Overall, PYY has a potentially role in food intake attenuation of Siberian sturgeon.

  1. Alpha-2 domain polymorphism and HLA class I peptide loading.

    PubMed

    Prilliman, K R; Crawford, D; Hickman, H D; Jackson, K W; Wang, J; Hildebrand, W H

    1999-11-01

    Diversity within the class I HLA antigen binding groove is positioned to moderate the presentation of peptide ligands. Polymorphism is widely dispersed about the peptide binding groove, and unravelling the functional significance of a given polymorphism requires comparative analysis of peptides presented by class I subtypes differing at the position(s) in question. Previous studies have demonstrated that not all class I polymorphisms act equally, and to determine the impact of substitutions specifically located in the alpha2 domain, peptides purified from B*1501, B*1512, B*1510, and B*1518 were examined by pooled Edman sequencing and comparative mass spectrometric analysis. Molecule B*1512 differs from B*1501 at residues 166 (Glu to Asp) and 167 (Trp to Gly) of the alpha2 domain. The pooled motif and ion mass ligand maps for B*1512 tightly matched those of B*1501, demonstrating that the 166/167 polymorphism between B*1501 and B*1512 has little impact upon ligand presentation. Although the 166/167 polymorphism minimally affects peptide binding preferences, this polymorphism makes B*1512 and B*1501 quite distinct by serology. We then compared the B70 molecules B*1510 and B*1518. The two are almost indistinguishable by serology and differ only by an alpha2 polymorphism at 116. Comparative peptide mapping shows that a Tyr to Ser polymorphism at 116 drastically changes the ligands bound by B*1510 and B*1518; no overlaps could be found. Polymorphisms in alpha2 therefore vary from subtle to extreme in the manner by which they moderate ligand presentation, and serologic crossreactivity did not reflect the ligands presented by these B15 subtypes.

  2. Systematic Analysis of Intracellular-targeting Antimicrobial Peptides, Bactenecin 7, Hybrid of Pleurocidin and Dermaseptin, Proline-Arginine-rich Peptide, and Lactoferricin B, by Using Escherichia coli Proteome Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Shah, Pramod; Chen, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) act either through membrane lysis or by attacking intracellular targets. Intracellular targeting AMPs are a resource for antimicrobial agent development. Several AMPs have been identified as intracellular targeting peptides; however, the intracellular targets of many of these peptides remain unknown. In the present study, we used an Escherichia coli proteome microarray to systematically identify the protein targets of three intracellular targeting AMPs: bactenecin 7 (Bac7), a hybrid of pleurocidin and dermaseptin (P-Der), and proline-arginine-rich peptide (PR-39). In addition, we also included the data of lactoferricin B (LfcinB) from our previous study for a more comprehensive analysis. We analyzed the unique protein hits of each AMP in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. The results indicated that Bac7 targets purine metabolism and histidine kinase, LfcinB attacks the transcription-related activities and several cellular carbohydrate biosynthetic processes, P-Der affects several catabolic processes of small molecules, and PR-39 preferentially recognizes proteins involved in RNA- and folate-metabolism-related cellular processes. Moreover, both Bac7 and LfcinB target purine metabolism, whereas LfcinB and PR-39 target lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. This suggested that LfcinB and Bac7 as well as LfcinB and PR-39 have a synergistic effect on antimicrobial activity, which was validated through antimicrobial assays. Furthermore, common hits of all four AMPs indicated that all of them target arginine decarboxylase, which is a crucial enzyme for Escherichia coli survival in extremely acidic environments. Thus, these AMPs may display greater inhibition to bacterial growth in extremely acidic environments. We have also confirmed this finding in bacterial growth inhibition assays. In conclusion, this comprehensive identification and systematic analysis of intracellular targeting AMPs reveals crucial insights into the intracellular

  3. Systematic Analysis of Intracellular-targeting Antimicrobial Peptides, Bactenecin 7, Hybrid of Pleurocidin and Dermaseptin, Proline-Arginine-rich Peptide, and Lactoferricin B, by Using Escherichia coli Proteome Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Shah, Pramod; Chen, Yi-Wen; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) act either through membrane lysis or by attacking intracellular targets. Intracellular targeting AMPs are a resource for antimicrobial agent development. Several AMPs have been identified as intracellular targeting peptides; however, the intracellular targets of many of these peptides remain unknown. In the present study, we used an Escherichia coli proteome microarray to systematically identify the protein targets of three intracellular targeting AMPs: bactenecin 7 (Bac7), a hybrid of pleurocidin and dermaseptin (P-Der), and proline-arginine-rich peptide (PR-39). In addition, we also included the data of lactoferricin B (LfcinB) from our previous study for a more comprehensive analysis. We analyzed the unique protein hits of each AMP in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. The results indicated that Bac7 targets purine metabolism and histidine kinase, LfcinB attacks the transcription-related activities and several cellular carbohydrate biosynthetic processes, P-Der affects several catabolic processes of small molecules, and PR-39 preferentially recognizes proteins involved in RNA- and folate-metabolism-related cellular processes. Moreover, both Bac7 and LfcinB target purine metabolism, whereas LfcinB and PR-39 target lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. This suggested that LfcinB and Bac7 as well as LfcinB and PR-39 have a synergistic effect on antimicrobial activity, which was validated through antimicrobial assays. Furthermore, common hits of all four AMPs indicated that all of them target arginine decarboxylase, which is a crucial enzyme for Escherichia coli survival in extremely acidic environments. Thus, these AMPs may display greater inhibition to bacterial growth in extremely acidic environments. We have also confirmed this finding in bacterial growth inhibition assays. In conclusion, this comprehensive identification and systematic analysis of intracellular targeting AMPs reveals crucial insights into the intracellular

  4. Scientometric analysis and mapping of 20 years of glaucoma research

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Pakravan, Mohammad; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    AIM To provide a scientometric analysis in the field of glaucoma. METHODS A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view of the scientific production in field of glaucoma by data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) from 1993 to 2013. Specific parameters were retrieved from the ISI. Articles about glaucoma were analyzed regarding the topics' structure, history, and document relationships using HistCite software. Also, the trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. RESULTS The number of articles was constantly increasing, and most highly cited articles addressed clinical and epidemiologic topics in this field. During the past three years, there has been a trend towards genomic research studies and also more molecular translational research. CONCLUSION This was the first scientometric report on glaucoma, analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. A constant increase was observed in the number of papers, while the subject of papers had a shift in the past three years towards genomic research studies. PMID:27672601

  5. Scientometric analysis and mapping of 20 years of glaucoma research

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Pakravan, Mohammad; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    AIM To provide a scientometric analysis in the field of glaucoma. METHODS A bibliometric method was used to obtain a view of the scientific production in field of glaucoma by data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) from 1993 to 2013. Specific parameters were retrieved from the ISI. Articles about glaucoma were analyzed regarding the topics' structure, history, and document relationships using HistCite software. Also, the trends in the most influential publications and authors were analyzed. RESULTS The number of articles was constantly increasing, and most highly cited articles addressed clinical and epidemiologic topics in this field. During the past three years, there has been a trend towards genomic research studies and also more molecular translational research. CONCLUSION This was the first scientometric report on glaucoma, analyzing the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. A constant increase was observed in the number of papers, while the subject of papers had a shift in the past three years towards genomic research studies.

  6. IgE-binding epitopic peptide mapping on a three-dimensional model built for the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).

    PubMed

    Sordet, Camille; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Didier, Alain; Rougé, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    The three-dimensional model built for the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) consists of three protomers exhibiting the cupin motif, arranged in a homotrimer around a three-fold symmetry axis. Using the SPOT technique, 11 continuous IgE-binding epitopic peptides were characterized on the molecular surface of the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat. Except for one of them, they all correspond to well exposed regions containing electropositiveley and/or electronegatively charged residues, which cover up to 40% of the molecular surface of the allergen. Some of these epitopes come in close contact to probably create more extended discontinuous epitopes, especially those located on the edge of the 13S globulin homotrimer. Half of the identified epitope peptides remain unaltered in a core structure protected against hydrolysis by digestive proteases and are thus assumed to promote the allergenicity of the 13S globulin. In addition, a few of these epitopes coincide with sequential IgE-binding epitopes previously characterized in soybean 11S globulins, that could account for the IgE-binding cross-reactions observed between soybean and buckwheat in Western blot experiments.

  7. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  8. A Karnaugh map based approach towards systemic reviews and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdul Wahab; Hassan, Ahmad Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Studying meta-analysis and systemic reviews since long had helped us conclude numerous parallel or conflicting studies. Existing studies are presented in tabulated forms which contain appropriate information for specific cases yet it is difficult to visualize. On meta-analysis of data, this can lead to absorption and subsumption errors henceforth having undesirable potential of consecutive misunderstandings in social and operational methodologies. The purpose of this study is to investigate an alternate forum for meta-data presentation that relies on humans' strong pictorial perception capability. Analysis of big-data is assumed to be a complex and daunting task often reserved on the computational powers of machines yet there exist mapping tools which can analyze such data in a hand-handled manner. Data analysis on such scale can benefit from the use of statistical tools like Karnaugh maps where all studies can be put together on a graph based mapping. Such a formulation can lead to more control in observing patterns of research community and analyzing further for uncertainty and reliability metrics. We present a methodological process of converting a well-established study in Health care to its equaling binary representation followed by furnishing values on to a Karnaugh Map. The data used for the studies presented herein is from Burns et al (J Publ Health 34(1):138-148, 2011) consisting of retrospectively collected data sets from various studies on clinical coding data accuracy. Using a customized filtration process, a total of 25 studies were selected for review with no, partial, or complete knowledge of six independent variables thus forming 64 independent cells on a Karnaugh map. The study concluded that this pictorial graphing as expected had helped in simplifying the overview of meta-analysis and systemic reviews. PMID:27064957

  9. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  10. A web-based tool for groundwater mapping and drought analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, S.; Burns, M.; Jones, N.; Strassberg, G.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011-2012, the state of Texas saw the worst one-year drought on record. Fluctuations in gravity measured by GRACE satellites indicate that as much as 100 cubic kilometers of water was lost during this period. Much of this came from reservoirs and shallow soil moisture, but a significant amount came from aquifers. In response to this crisis, a Texas Drought Technology Steering Committee (TDTSC) consisting of academics and water managers was formed to develop new tools and strategies to assist the state in monitoring, predicting, and responding to drought events. In this presentation, we describe one of the tools that was developed as part of this effort. When analyzing the impact of drought on groundwater levels, it is fairly common to examine time series data at selected monitoring wells. However, accurately assessing impacts and trends requires both spatial and temporal analysis involving the development of detailed water level maps at various scales. Creating such maps in a flexible and rapid fashion is critical for effective drought analysis, but can be challenging due to the massive amounts of data involved and the processing required to generate such maps. Furthermore, wells are typically not sampled at the same points in time, and so developing a water table map for a particular date requires both spatial and temporal interpolation of water elevations. To address this challenge, a Cloud-based water level mapping system was developed for the state of Texas. The system is based on the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) groundwater database, but can be adapted to use other databases as well. The system involves a set of ArcGIS workflows running on a server with a web-based front end and a Google Earth plug-in. A temporal interpolation geoprocessing tool was developed to estimate the piezometric heads for all wells in a given region at a specific date using a regression analysis. This interpolation tool is coupled with other geoprocessing tools to filter

  11. MRSA: a density-equalizing mapping analysis of the global research architecture.

    PubMed

    Addicks, Johann P; Uibel, Stefanie; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Bundschuh, Matthias; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2014-09-30

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as an alarming public health thread due to its global spread as hospital and community pathogen. Despite this role, a scientometric analysis has not been performed yet. Therefore, the NewQIS platform was used to conduct a combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric study. As database, the Web of Science was used, and all entries between 1961 and 2007 were analyzed. In total, 7671 entries were identified. Density equalizing mapping demonstrated a distortion of the world map for the benefit of the USA as leading country with a total output of 2374 publications, followed by the UK (1030) and Japan (862). Citation rate analysis revealed Portugal as leading country with a rate of 35.47 citations per article, followed by New Zealand and Denmark. Country cooperation network analyses showed 743 collaborations with US-UK being most frequent. Network citation analyses indicated the publications that arose from the cooperation of USA and France as well as USA and Japan as the most cited (75.36 and 74.55 citations per collaboration article, respectively). The present study provides the first combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of MRSA research. It illustrates the global MRSA research architecture. It can be assumed that this highly relevant topic for public health will achieve even greater dimensions in the future.

  12. MRSA: A Density-Equalizing Mapping Analysis of the Global Research Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Addicks, Johann P.; Uibel, Stefanie; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Bundschuh, Matthias; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as an alarming public health thread due to its global spread as hospital and community pathogen. Despite this role, a scientometric analysis has not been performed yet. Therefore, the NewQIS platform was used to conduct a combined density-equalizing mapping and scie