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Sample records for peptide mutant g1s

  1. A Novel Intracellular Peptide Derived from G1/S Cyclin D2 Induces Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Christiane B.; Russo, Lilian C.; Castro, Leandro M.; Forti, Fábio L.; do Monte, Elisabete R.; Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Colquhoun, Alison; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular peptides are constantly produced by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and many are probably functional. Here, the peptide WELVVLGKL (pep5) from G1/S-specific cyclin D2 showed a 2-fold increase during the S phase of HeLa cell cycle. pep5 (25–100 μm) induced cell death in several tumor cells only when it was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (pep5-cpp), suggesting its intracellular function. In vivo, pep5-cpp reduced the volume of the rat C6 glioblastoma by almost 50%. The tryptophan at the N terminus of pep5 is essential for its cell death activity, and N terminus acetylation reduced the potency of pep5-cpp. WELVVL is the minimal active sequence of pep5, whereas Leu-Ala substitutions totally abolished pep5 cell death activity. Findings from the initial characterization of the cell death/signaling mechanism of pep5 include caspase 3/7 and 9 activation, inhibition of Akt2 phosphorylation, activation of p38α and -γ, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Further pharmacological analyses suggest that pep5 can trigger cell death by distinctive pathways, which can be blocked by IM-54 or a combination of necrostatin-1 and q-VD-OPh. These data further support the biological and pharmacological potential of intracellular peptides. PMID:24764300

  2. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    PubMed

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  3. Balanced Production of Ribosome Components Is Required for Proper G1/S Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae *

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Maya, Douglas; Arista-Romero, María; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is a very accurate process that ensures cell viability and the genomic integrity of daughter cells. A fundamental part of this regulation consists in the arrest of the cycle at particular points to ensure the completion of a previous event, to repair cellular damage, or to avoid progression in potentially risky situations. In this work, we demonstrate that a reduction in nucleotide levels or the depletion of RNA polymerase I or III subunits generates a cell cycle delay at the G1/S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This delay is concomitant with an imbalance between ribosomal RNAs and proteins which, among others, provokes an accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. Consistently with a direct impact of free L5 on the G1/S transition, rrs1 mutants, which weaken the assembly of L5 and L11 on pre-60S ribosomal particles, enhance both the G1/S delay and the accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. We propose the existence of a surveillance mechanism that couples the balanced production of yeast ribosomal components and cell cycle progression through the accumulation of free ribosomal proteins. This regulatory pathway resembles the p53-dependent nucleolar-stress checkpoint response described in human cells, which indicates that this is a general control strategy extended throughout eukaryotes. PMID:24043628

  4. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch—two central cell fate events—take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3–Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2–Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites. PMID:27094800

  5. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-04-20

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch--two central cell fate events--take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3-Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2-Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites.

  6. G1/S control of anchorage-independent growth in the fibroblast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methodology to identify the block to anchorage- independent growth and position it within the fibroblast cell cycle. Results with NRK fibroblasts show that mitogen stimulation of the G0/G1 transition and G1-associated increases in cell size are minimally affected by loss of cell anchorage. In contrast, the induction of G1/S cell cycle genes and DNA synthesis is markedly inhibited when anchorage is blocked. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anchorage-dependent transition maps to late G1 and shortly before activation of the G1/S p34cdc2-like kinase. The G1/S block was also detectable in NIH-3T3 cells. Our results: (a) distinguish control of cell cycle progression by growth factors and anchorage; (b) indicate that anchorage mediates G1/S control in fibroblasts; and (c) identify a physiologic circumstance in which the phenotype of mammalian cell cycle arrest would closely resemble Saccharomyces cerevisiae START. The close correlation between anchorage independence in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo emphasizes the key regulatory role for G1/S control in mammalian cells. PMID:1955482

  7. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  8. mir-35 is involved in intestine cell G1/S transition and germ cell proliferation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Li; Cai, Qingchun; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhu, Zuoyan; Liu, Dong; Fan, Qichang

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression in many cellular events, yet functions of only a few miRNAs are known in C. elegans. We analyzed the function of mir-35-41 unique to the worm, and show here that mir-35 regulates the G1/S transition of intestinal cells and germ cell proliferation. Loss of mir-35 leads to a decrease of nuclei numbers in intestine and distal mitotic gonad, while re-introduction of mir-35 rescues the mutant phenotypes. Genetic analysis indicates that mir-35 may act through Rb/E2F and SCF pathways. Further bioinformatic and functional analyses demonstrate that mir-35 targets evolutionally conserved lin-23 and gld-1. Together, our study reveals a novel function of mir-35 family in cell division regulation. PMID:21691303

  9. Lipid Tail Protrusion in Simulations Predicts Fusogenic Activity of Influenza Fusion Peptide Mutants and Conformational Models

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per; Kasson, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations. PMID:23505359

  10. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Comparative simulation studies of native and single-site mutant human beta-defensin-1 peptides.

    PubMed

    Toubar, Rabab A; Zhmurov, Artem; Barsegov, Valeri; Marx, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play important roles in a broad range of biological functions, such as microbial defense and immunity. Yet, little is known about their molecular properties, i.e. secondary structure stability, structural variability, important side chain interactions, surface charge distribution, and resistance to thermal fluctuations, and how these properties are related to their functions. To assess these factors, we studied the native human β-defensin-1 monomer and dimer as well as several single-site mutants using molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that disulfide bonds are important determinants in maintaining the defensins' structural integrity, as no structural transitions were observed at 300 K and only minor structural unfolding was detected upon heating to 500 K. The α-helix was less thermally stable than the core β-sheet structure held together by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The monomer α-helix stability was directly correlated, whereas the end-to-end distance was inversely correlated to the experimentally measured β-defensin-1 chemotactic activity, in the order: mutant 2 (Gln24Glu) > mutant 3 (Lys31Ala) = wild type > mutant 1 (Asn4Ala). The structural stability of the β-defensin-1 dimer species exhibited an inverse correlation to their chemotactic activity. In dimers formed by mutants 2 and 3, we observed sliding of one monomer upon the surface of the other in the absence of unbinding. This dynamic sliding feature may enhance the molecular oligomerization of β-defensin-1 peptides contributing to their antibacterial activity. It could also help these peptides orient correctly in the CC chemokine receptor 6 binding site, thereby initiating their chemotactic activity. In agreement with this notion, the remarkable sliding behavior was observed only for the mutants with the highest chemotactic activity.

  13. Overexpression of c-Myc alters G(1)/S arrest following ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Dickson, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    Study of the mechanism(s) of genomic instability induced by the c-myc proto-oncogene has the potential to shed new light on its well-known oncogenic activity. However, an underlying mechanism(s) for this phenotype is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of c-Myc overexpression on the DNA damage-induced G(1)/S checkpoint, in order to obtain mechanistic insights into how deregulated c-Myc destabilizes the cellular genome. The DNA damage-induced checkpoints are among the primary safeguard mechanisms for genomic stability, and alterations of cell cycle checkpoints are known to be crucial for certain types of genomic instability, such as gene amplification. The effects of c-Myc overexpression were studied in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as one approach to understanding the c-Myc-induced genomic instability in the context of mammary tumorigenesis. Initially, flow-cytometric analyses were used with two c-Myc-overexpressing, nontransformed immortal lines (184A1N4 and MCF10A) to determine whether c-Myc overexpression leads to alteration of cell cycle arrest following ionizing radiation (IR). Inappropriate entry into S phase was then confirmed with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay measuring de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Direct involvement of c-Myc overexpression in alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was then confirmed by utilizing the MycER construct, a regulatable c-Myc. A transient excess of c-Myc activity, provided by the activated MycER, was similarly able to induce the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Significantly, the transient expression of full-length c-Myc in normal mortal HMECs also facilitated entry into S phase and the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Furthermore, irradiated, c-Myc-infected, normal HMECs developed a sub-G(1) population and a >4N population of cells. The c-Myc-induced alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was also compared to the effects of expression of MycS (N

  14. PBOV1 promotes prostate cancer proliferation by promoting G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tiejun; Wu, Rongpei; Liu, Bo; Wen, Handong; Tu, Zhong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Jiarong; Shen, Guoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men, and thus, finding new regulators is critical for PC therapy. Prostate and breast cancer overexpressed 1 (PBOV1) is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and bladder cancers, as it is upregulated in the serum of patients with PC, but the role of PBOV1 in PC has not been studied. In this article, we found that PBOV1 was indeed overexpressed in PC cells; PBOV1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and colony formation ability and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and tumorigenicity ability in vitro, whereas knockdown of PBOV1 reduced these effects. Further analysis of PBOV1 overexpression inhibited cell cycle inhibitors, P21 and P27, and increased the phosphorylation level of Rb and cyclin D1 expression, suggesting that PBOV1 promoted cell proliferation through promoting G1/S transition. PMID:26937201

  15. An essential role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box helicase DHH1 in G1/S DNA-damage checkpoint recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Bergkessel, Megan; Reese, Joseph C

    2004-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle displays a degree of plasticity in its regulation; cell cycle progression can be transiently arrested in response to environmental stresses. While the signaling pathways leading to cell cycle arrest are beginning to be well understood, the regulation of the release from arrest has not been well characterized. Here we show that DHH1, encoding a DEAD-box RNA helicase orthologous to the human putative proto-oncogene p54/RCK, is important in release from DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint. DHH1 mutants are not defective for DNA repair and recover normally from the G2/M and replication checkpoints, suggesting a specific function for Dhh1p in recovery from G1/S checkpoint arrest. Dhh1p has been suggested to play a role in partitioning mRNAs between translatable and nontranslatable pools, and our results implicate this modulation of mRNA metabolism in the recovery from G1/S cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. Furthermore, the high degree of conservation between DHH1 and its human ortholog suggests that this mechanism is conserved among all eukaryotes and potentially important in human disease. PMID:15166134

  16. High Dub3 expression in mouse ESCs couples the G1/S checkpoint to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Siem; Tsanov, Nikolay; Crozet, Carole; Maiorano, Domenico

    2013-11-07

    The molecular mechanism underlying G1/S checkpoint bypass in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unknown. DNA damage blocks S phase entry by inhibiting the CDK2 kinase through destruction of its activator, the Cdc25A phosphatase. We observed high Cdc25A levels in G1 that persist even after DNA damage in mouse ESCs. We also found higher expression of Dub3, a deubiquitylase that controls Cdc25A protein abundance. Moreover, we demonstrate that the Dub3 gene is a direct target of Esrrb, a key transcription factor of the self-renewal machinery. We show that Dub3 expression is strongly downregulated during neural conversion and precedes Cdc25A destabilization, while forced Dub3 expression in ESCs becomes lethal upon differentiation, concomitant to cell-cycle remodeling and lineage commitment. Finally, knockdown of either Dub3 or Cdc25A induced spontaneous differentiation of ESCs. Altogether, these findings couple the self-renewal machinery to cell-cycle control through a deubiquitylase in ESCs.

  17. La Crosse virus (LACV) Gc fusion peptide mutants have impaired growth and fusion phenotypes, but remain neurotoxic

    SciTech Connect

    Soldan, Samantha S.; Hollidge, Bradley S.; Wagner, Valentina; Weber, Friedemann; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    La Crosse virus is a leading cause of pediatric encephalitis in the Midwestern United States and an emerging pathogen in the American South. The LACV glycoprotein Gc plays a critical role in entry as the virus attachment protein. A 22 amino acid hydrophobic region within Gc (1066-1087) was recently identified as the LACV fusion peptide. To further define the role of Gc (1066-1087) in virus entry, fusion, and neuropathogenesis, a panel of recombinant LACV (rLACV) fusion peptide mutant viruses was generated. Replication of mutant rLACVs was significantly reduced. In addition, the fusion peptide mutants demonstrated decreased fusion phenotypes relative to LACV-WT. Interestingly, these viruses maintained their ability to cause neuronal loss in culture, suggesting that the fusion peptide of LACV Gc is a determinant of properties associated with neuroinvasion (growth to high titer in muscle cells and a robust fusion phenotype), but not necessarily of neurovirulence.

  18. Profiling of Cross-Functional Peptidases Regulated Circulating Peptides in BRCA1 Mutant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jia; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Yang, Chuan; Ma, Li; Meng, Qing H.; Hu, Tony Y.; Singer, Christian F.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Women with inherited BRCA1 mutations are more likely to develop breast cancer (BC); however, not every carrier will progress to BC. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize circulating peptides that correlate with BC patients carrying BRCA1 mutations. Circulating peptides were enriched using our well-designed nanoporous silica thin films (NanoTraps) and profiled by mass spectrometry to identify among four clinical groups. To determine the corresponding proteolytic processes and their sites of activity, purified candidate peptidases and synthesized substrates were assayed to verify the processes predicted by the MERPOS database. Proteolytic processes were validated using patient serum samples. The peptides, KNG1K438-R457 and C 3fS1304-R1320, were identified as putative peptide candidates to differentiate BRCA1 mutant BC from sporadic BC and cancer-free BRCA1 mutant carriers. Kallikrein-2 (KLK2) is the major peptidase that cleaves KNG1K438-R457 from kininogen-1, and its expressions and activities were also found to be dependent on BRCA1 status. We further determined that KNG1K438-R457 is cleaved at its C-terminal arginine by carboxypeptidase N1 (CPN1). Increased KLK2 activity, with decreased CPN1 activity, results in the accumulation of KNG1K438-R457 in BRCA1-associated BC. Our work outlined a useful strategy for determining the peptide–petidase relationship and thus establishing a biological mechanism for changes in the peptidome in BRCA1-associated BC. PMID:27058005

  19. Combinatorial Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Strategy Protects against Hypervirulent CovR/S Mutant Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie; Powell, Jessica; Batzloff, Michael R; Dietrich, Jes; Good, Michael F

    2016-04-15

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 proteaseStreptococcus pyogenescell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue. We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from the M protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we identified a minimal epitope (S2) that was the target for anti-SpyCEP Abs that could protect IL-8 from SpyCEP-mediated proteolysis. Abs from healthy humans and from mice experimentally infected with GAS also recognized S2, albeit at low titers. Native SpyCEP may be poorly immunogenic (cryptic or subdominant), and it would be to the organism's advantage if the host did not induce a strong Ab response against it. However, S2 conjugated to diphtheria toxoid is highly immunogenic and induces Abs that recognize and neutralize SpyCEP. Hence, we describe a two-component peptide vaccine that induces Abs (anti-S2) that protect IL-8 from proteolysis and other Abs (anti-J8) that cause strain-independent killing in the presence of neutrophils. We show that either component alone is ineffectual in preventing skin infection and bacteremia due to CovR/S mutants but that the combination induces complete protection. This protection correlated with a significant influx of neutrophils to the infection site. The data strongly suggest that the lack of natural immunity to hypervirulent GAS strains in humans could be rectified by this combination vaccine.

  20. Restoration of Epithelial Sodium Channel Function by Synthetic Peptides in Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1B Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Willam, Anita; Aufy, Mohammed; Tzotzos, Susan; Evanzin, Heinrich; Chytracek, Sabine; Geppert, Sabrina; Fischer, Bernhard; Fischer, Hendrik; Pietschmann, Helmut; Czikora, Istvan; Lucas, Rudolf; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Shabbir, Waheed

    2017-01-01

    The synthetically produced cyclic peptides solnatide (a.k.a. TIP or AP301) and its congener AP318, whose molecular structures mimic the lectin-like domain of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), have been shown to activate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in various cell- and animal-based studies. Loss-of-ENaC-function leads to a rare, life-threatening, salt-wasting syndrome, pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1B (PHA1B), which presents with failure to thrive, dehydration, low blood pressure, anorexia and vomiting; hyperkalemia, hyponatremia and metabolic acidosis suggest hypoaldosteronism, but plasma aldosterone and renin activity are high. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the ENaC-activating effect of solnatide and AP318 could rescue loss-of-function phenotype of ENaC carrying mutations at conserved amino acid positions observed to cause PHA1B. The macroscopic Na+ current of all investigated mutants was decreased compared to wild type ENaC when measured in whole-cell patch clamp experiments, and a great variation in the membrane abundance of different mutant ENaCs was observed with Western blotting experiments. However, whatever mechanism leads to loss-of-function of the studied ENaC mutations, the synthetic peptides solnatide and AP318 could restore ENaC function up to or even higher than current levels of wild type ENaC. As therapy of PHA1B is only symptomatic so far, the peptides solnatide and AP318, which directly target ENaC, are promising candidates for the treatment of the channelopathy-caused disease PHA1B. PMID:28286482

  1. Overproduction of Rb protein after the G1/S boundary causes G2 arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Karantza, V; Maroo, A; Fay, D; Sedivy, J M

    1993-01-01

    The Rb protein is known to exert its activity at decision points in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. To investigate whether it may also play some role(s) at later points in the cell cycle, we used a system of rapid inducible gene amplification to conditionally overexpress Rb protein during G2 phase. A cell line expressing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T antigen (T-Ag) was stably transfected with plasmids containing the Rb cDNA linked to the simian virus 40 origin of replication: pRB-wt, pRB-fs, and pRB-Dra, carrying wild-type murine Rb cDNA, a frameshift mutation close to the beginning of the Rb coding region, and a single-amino-acid deletion in the E1A/T-Ag binding pocket, respectively. Numerous independent cell lines were isolated at the nonpermissive temperature; cell lines displaying a high level of episomal amplification of an intact Rb expression cassette following shiftdown to the permissive temperature were chosen for further analysis. Plasmid pRB-fs did not express detectable Rb antigen, while pRB-Dra expressed full-length Rb protein. The Dra mutation has previously been shown to abrogate phosphorylation as well as T-Ag binding. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed that cultures induced to overexpress either wild-type or Dra mutant Rb proteins were significantly enriched for cells with a G2 DNA content. Cultures that amplified pRB-fs or rearranged pRB-wt and did not express Rb protein had normal cell cycle profiles. Double-label FACS analysis showed that cells overexpressing Rb or Rb-Dra proteins were uniformly accumulating in G2, whereas cells expressing endogenous levels of Rb were found throughout the cell cycle. These results indicate that Rb protein is interacting with some component(s) of the cell cycle-regulatory machinery during G2 phase. Images PMID:8413260

  2. Cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of G1/S cell cycle molecules and adult human β-cell replication: a revised model of human β-cell G1/S control.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein-tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion.

  3. Synthesis and secretory expression of hybrid antimicrobial peptide CecA-mag and its mutants in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuqing; Zhu, Mingxing; Zhang, Aijun; Yang, Fengqin; Chen, Puyan

    2012-03-01

    The hybrid peptide CA(1-7)-M(2-12) gene was designed according to the N-terminal 1-7 amino acid sequence of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin A (CA) and the N-terminal 2-12 amino acid sequence of maganin (M) and synthesized using Pichia pastoris preferred codons. The gene was cloned into pPICZαA and transformed into the P. pastoris recipient bacterium SMD1168, regulated by the alcohol oxidase (AOX). Expression of the cecA-mag hybrid antimicrobial peptide (MW, 1.9 kDa) revealed broad-spectrum antibiotic activity and to the ability to inhibit growth of most G(-) and G(+) bacteria. Three mutants of cecA-mag were designed and synthesized by recombination polymerase chain reaction site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the relationship between the structure and function of this antimicrobial peptide. The inhibition titers of these mutants against Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated using the agar diffusion method. Under the conditions of the same concentration and volume, the bacteriostatic diameters of three cecA-mag mutants were 1.2, 1.2 and 1.5 times, respectively, compared with the diameters of wild-type cecA-mag.

  4. miR-150 inhibits proliferation and tumorigenicity via retarding G1/S phase transition in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyong; Liu, Fumei; Lin, Bihua; Luo, Haiqing; Liu, Meilian; Wu, Jinhua; Li, Caihong; Li, Ronggang; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Keyuan; Ren, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a pathological manifestation of uncontrolled proliferation, which results in tumor formation. Therefore, it is necessary to improve understanding of the underlying mechanism of cell cycle control. Here, we report that miR-150 is downregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissues and cells. Upregulation of miR-150 suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell proliferation and induces G1/S arrest in vitro, and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Conversely, silencing miR-150 yields the opposite effect. Our results further demonstrate that miR-150 retards nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and G1/S transition via targeting multiple cell cycle-related genes, including CCND1, CCND2, CDK2 and CCNE2. Therefore, our results uncover a novel mechanistic understanding of miR-150-mediated tumor suppression in NPC, which will facilitate the development of effective cancer therapies against nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:28350089

  5. Cytoplasmic-Nuclear Trafficking of G1/S Cell Cycle Molecules and Adult Human β-Cell Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein–tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493571

  6. Downregulation of FOXP1 Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inducing G1/S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Ji; Cui, Meiling; Zhao, Fangyu; Ge, Chao; Chen, Taoyang; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) belongs to a family of winged-helix transcription factors that are involved in the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and longevity. FOXP1 can affect cell proliferation and migratory ability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanism of FOXP1 in the proliferation of HCC cells. This study aimed to further explore the function of FOXP1 on the proliferation of HCC cells as well as the relevant mechanism involved. Western blot analysis, tumor xenograft models, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to elucidate the function of FOXP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in human HCC. We observed that silencing FOXP1 significantly suppressed the growth ability of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, knockdown of FOXP1 induced G1/S phase arrest, and the expression of total and phosphorylated Rb (active type) as well as the levels of E2F1 were markedly decreased at 24 h; however, other proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and cyclin D1 did not show noticeable changes. In conclusion, downregulation of FOXP1 inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing G1/S phase cell cycle arrest, and the decrease in phosphorylated Rb is the main contributor to this G1/S phase arrest. PMID:27618020

  7. G1/S Inhibitors and the SWI/SNF Complex Control Cell-Cycle Exit during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2015-07-16

    The transition from proliferating precursor cells to post-mitotic differentiated cells is crucial for development, tissue homeostasis, and tumor suppression. To study cell-cycle exit during differentiation in vivo, we developed a conditional knockout and lineage-tracing system for Caenorhabditis elegans. Combined lineage-specific gene inactivation and genetic screening revealed extensive redundancies between previously identified cell-cycle inhibitors and the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Muscle precursor cells missing either SWI/SNF or G1/S inhibitor function could still arrest cell division, while simultaneous inactivation of these regulators caused continued proliferation and a C. elegans tumor phenotype. Further genetic analyses support that SWI/SNF acts in concert with hlh-1 MyoD, antagonizes Polycomb-mediated transcriptional repression, and suppresses cye-1 Cyclin E transcription to arrest cell division of muscle precursors. Thus, SWI/SNF and G1/S inhibitors provide alternative mechanisms to arrest cell-cycle progression during terminal differentiation, which offers insight into the frequent mutation of SWI/SNF genes in human cancers.

  8. Embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs regulate the G1-S transition and promote rapid proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangming; Baskerville, Scott; Shenoy, Archana; Babiarz, Joshua E; Baehner, Lauren; Blelloch, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Dgcr8 knockout embryonic stem (ES) cells lack microprocessor activity and hence all canonical microRNAs (miRNAs). These cells proliferate slowly and accumulate in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here, by screening a comprehensive library of individual miRNAs in the background of the Dgcr8 knockout ES cells, we report that multiple ES cell-specific miRNAs, members of the miR-290 family, rescue the ES cell proliferation defect. Furthermore, rescued cells no longer accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These miRNAs function by suppressing several key regulators of the G1-S transition. These results show that post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs promotes the G1-S transition of the ES cell cycle, enabling rapid proliferation of these cells. Our screening strategy provides an alternative and powerful approach for uncovering the role of individual miRNAs in biological processes, as it overcomes the common problem of redundancy and saturation in the miRNA system.

  9. Cibotium barometz polysaccharides stimulate chondrocyte proliferation in vitro by promoting G1/S cell cycle transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Changlong; Zheng, Chunsong; Lin, Jie; Ye, Jinxia; Mei, Yangyang; Pan, Caibin; Wu, Guangwen; Li, Xihai; Ye, Hongzhi; Liu, Xianxiang

    2017-03-30

    Cibotium barometz polysaccharides (CBPS) are one of the most important bioactive components extracted from the Cibotium barometz plant, which belongs to the Dicksoniaceae family. It has been widely used for the treatment of orthopedic diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the therapeutic effects of CBPS remain to be clarified. In the present study, the concentration of CBPS was detected by phenol-vitriol colorimetry. Furthermore, the effects stimulated by CBPS on the viability and G1/S cell cycle transition in primary chondrocytes from Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. A cell viability assay demonstrated that chondrocyte proliferation may be enhanced by CBPS in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. The mechanism underlying the promotion of chondrocyte cell cycle was suggested to involve the stimulation of G1 to S phase transition. To further confirm the results, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were used to detect the expression of mRNA and protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin‑dependent kinase 4 and retinoblastoma protein. The results suggested that CBPS may stimulate chondrocyte proliferation via promoting G1/S cell cycle transition. Since osteoarthritis is characterized by deficient proliferation in chondrocytes, the present study indicates that CBPS may potentially serve as a novel method for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  10. The Enok acetyltransferase complex interacts with Elg1 and negatively regulates PCNA unloading to promote the G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fu; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Kusch, Thomas; Swanson, Selene K.; Szerszen, Leanne T.; Li, Ge; Dutta, Arnob; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    KAT6 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are involved in cell cycle regulation. However, information regarding their roles in regulating cell cycle progression is limited. Here, we report the identification of subunits of the Drosophila Enok complex and demonstrate that all subunits are important for its HAT activity. We further report a novel interaction between the Enok complex and the Elg1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-unloader complex. Depletion of Enok in S2 cells resulted in a G1/S cell cycle block, and this block can be partially relieved by depleting Elg1. Furthermore, depletion of Enok reduced the chromatin-bound levels of PCNA in both S2 cells and early embryos, suggesting that the Enok complex may interact with the Elg1 complex and down-regulate its PCNA-unloading function to promote the G1/S transition. Supporting this hypothesis, depletion of Enok also partially rescued the endoreplication defects in Elg1-depleted nurse cells. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the roles of KAT6 HATs in cell cycle regulation through modulating PCNA levels on chromatin. PMID:27198229

  11. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome. PMID:321423

  12. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-03-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome.

  13. Human RAD6 Promotes G1-S Transition and Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cyclin D1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Ewelina; Liu, Yan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Chang, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Wenjie; Jing, Yuanya; Chen, Youwei; Jin, Hui; Chen, Su

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitinylation regulates protein stability and activity. RAD6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which that has been substantially biochemically characterized, functions in a number of biologically relevant pathways, including cell cycle progression. In this study, we show that RAD6 promotes the G1-S transition and cell proliferation by regulating the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) in human cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that RAD6 influences the transcription of CCND1 by increasing monoubiquitinylation of histone H2B and trimethylation of H3K4 in the CCND1 promoter region. Our study presents, for the first time, an evidence for the function of RAD6 in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in human cells, raising the possibility that RAD6 could be a new target for molecular diagnosis and prognosis in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25409181

  14. G1/S phase progression is regulated by PLK1 degradation through the CDK1/βTrCP axis.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Servando; Galindo-Moreno, María; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Rivas, A Cristina; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Mora-Santos, Mar; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2017-03-30

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in several stages of the cell cycle, including the entry and exit from mitosis, and cytokinesis. Furthermore, it has an essential role in the regulation of DNA replication. Together with cyclin A, PLK1 also promotes CDH1 phosphorylation to trigger its ubiquitination and degradation, allowing cell cycle progression. The PLK1 levels in different type of tumors are very high compared to normal tissues, which is consistent with its role in promoting proliferation. Therefore, several PLK1 inhibitors have been developed and tested for the treatment of cancer. Here, we further analyzed PLK1 degradation and found that cytoplasmic PLK1 is ubiquitinated and subsequently degraded by the SCF(βTrCP)/proteasome. This procedure is triggered when heat shock protein (HSP) 90 is inhibited with geldanamycin, which results in misfolding of PLK1. We also identified CDK1 as the major kinase involved in this degradation. Our work shows for the first time that HSP90 inhibition arrests cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. This novel mechanism inhibits CDH1 degradation through CDK1-dependent PLK1 destruction by the SCF(βTrCP)/proteasome. In these conditions, CDH1 substrates do not accumulate and cell cycle arrests, providing a novel pathway for regulation of the cell cycle at the G1-to-S boundary.-Giráldez, S., Galindo-Moreno, M., Limón-Mortés, M. C., Rivas, A. C., Herrero-Ruiz, J., Mora-Santos, M., Sáez, C., Japón, M. Á., Tortolero, M., Romero, F. G1/S phase progression is regulated by PLK1 degradation through the CDK1/βTrCP axis.

  15. Modeling ERBB receptor-regulated G1/S transition to find novel targets for de novo trastuzumab resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Özgür; Fröhlich, Holger; Löbke, Christian; Korf, Ulrike; Burmester, Sara; Majety, Meher; Mattern, Jens; Schupp, Ingo; Chaouiya, Claudine; Thieffry, Denis; Poustka, Annemarie; Wiemann, Stefan; Beissbarth, Tim; Arlt, Dorit

    2009-01-01

    Background In breast cancer, overexpression of the transmembrane tyrosine kinase ERBB2 is an adverse prognostic marker, and occurs in almost 30% of the patients. For therapeutic intervention, ERBB2 is targeted by monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in adjuvant settings; however, de novo resistance to this antibody is still a serious issue, requiring the identification of additional targets to overcome resistance. In this study, we have combined computational simulations, experimental testing of simulation results, and finally reverse engineering of a protein interaction network to define potential therapeutic strategies for de novo trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Results First, we employed Boolean logic to model regulatory interactions and simulated single and multiple protein loss-of-functions. Then, our simulation results were tested experimentally by producing single and double knockdowns of the network components and measuring their effects on G1/S transition during cell cycle progression. Combinatorial targeting of ERBB2 and EGFR did not affect the response to trastuzumab in de novo resistant cells, which might be due to decoupling of receptor activation and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, examination of c-MYC in resistant as well as in sensitive cell lines, using a specific chemical inhibitor of c-MYC (alone or in combination with trastuzumab), demonstrated that both trastuzumab sensitive and resistant cells responded to c-MYC perturbation. Conclusion In this study, we connected ERBB signaling with G1/S transition of the cell cycle via two major cell signaling pathways and two key transcription factors, to model an interaction network that allows for the identification of novel targets in the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Applying this new strategy, we found that, in contrast to trastuzumab sensitive breast cancer cells, combinatorial targeting of ERBB receptors or of key signaling intermediates does not have potential for treatment

  16. Downregulated miR-45 Inhibits the G1-S Phase Transition by Targeting Bmi-1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Jun-Ling; Yu, Liang; Liu, Xiang-Xia; Wu, Hong-Mei; Lei, Fang-Yong; Wu, Shu; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bmi-1 (B cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1) is upregulated in breast cancer and was involved in many malignant progressions of breast cells, including cell proliferation, stem cell pluripotency, and cancer initiation. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of Bmi-1 in breast cancer remains unclear. After analysis of the ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666, we comparatively detected the expression levels of miR-495 in 9 examined breast cancer cell lines, normal breast epithelial cells and 8 pairs of fresh clinical tumor samples. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of miR-495 on the progression of breast cancer, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were transduced to stably overexpress miR-495. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, colony formation assays, 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine labeling and immunofluorescence, anchorage-independent growth ability assay, flow cytometry analysis, and luciferase assays were used to test the effect of miR-495 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Xenografted tumor model was also used to evaluate the effect of miR-495 in breast cancer. Herein, we found that miR-495, a predicted regulator of Bmi-1, was frequently downregulated in malignant cells and tissues of breast. Upregulation of miR-495 significantly suppressed breast cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity via G1-S arrest. Further analysis revealed that miR-495 targeted Bmi-1 through its 3′ untranslated region. Moreover, Bmi-1 could neutralize the suppressive effect of miR-495 on cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer in vivo. These data suggested that miR-495 could inhibit the G1-S phase transition that leads to proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition by targeting and suppressing Bmi-1 in breast cancer. PMID:26020378

  17. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Ballana, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  18. CacyBP/SIP protein promotes proliferation and G1/S transition of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong; Mo, Ping; Li, Xiaohua; Zheng, Peichan; Zhao, Lina; Xue, Zengfu; Ren, Gui; Han, Guohong; Wang, Xin; Fan, Daiming

    2011-10-01

    Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a component of the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, could participate in beta-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of pancreatic cancer previously. However, the role of CacyBP/SIP itself in pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, CacyBP/SIP expression was assayed and manipulated to reveal the potential mechanism in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. Here, we show that CacyBP/SIP is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. Down-regulation of CacyBP/SIP by small interference RNA (siRNA) severely suppresses the proliferation and tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer. G1/S transition arrest induced by inhibition of CacyBP/SIP is at least partly mediated by down-regulation of Cyclin E and CDK2 as well as up-regulation of p27 and Rb. Collectively, CacyBP/SIP as an enhancer of pancreatic cancer malignance might develop into another possible therapeutic target.

  19. High-density lipoprotein contribute to G0-G1/S transition in Swiss NIH/3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Angius, Fabrizio; Spolitu, Stefano; Uda, Sabrina; Deligia, Stefania; Frau, Alessandra; Banni, Sebastiano; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Madeddu, Clelia; Serpe, Roberto; Batetta, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDLs) play a crucial role in removing excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Although their concentration is lower during conditions of high cell growth rate (cancer and infections), their involvement during cell proliferation is not known. To this aim, we investigated the replicative cycles in synchronised Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in different experimental conditions: i) contact-inhibited fibroblasts re-entering cell cycle after dilution; ii) scratch-wound assay; iii) serum-deprived cells induced to re-enter G1 by FCS, HDL or PDGF. Analyses were performed during each cell cycle up to quiescence. Cholesterol synthesis increased remarkably during the replicative cycles, decreasing only after cells reached confluence. In contrast, cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis and content were high at 24 h after dilution and then decreased steeply in the successive cycles. Flow cytometry analysis of DiO-HDL, as well as radiolabeled HDL pulse, demonstrated a significant uptake of CE-HDL in 24 h. DiI-HDL uptake, lipid droplets (LDs) and SR-BI immunostaining and expression followed the same trend. Addition of HDL or PDGF partially restore the proliferation rate and significantly increase SR-BI and pAKT expression in serum-deprived cells. In conclusion, cell transition from G0 to G1/S requires CE-HDL uptake, leading to CE-HDL/SR-BI pathway activation and CEs increase into LDs. PMID:26640042

  20. A General G1/S-Phase Cell-Cycle Control Module in the Flowering Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin'Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Pusch, Stefan; Weimer, Annika K.; Bramsiepe, Jonathan; Bouyer, Daniel; Rademacher, Svenja; Nowack, Moritz K.; Novak, Bela; Sprunck, Stefanie; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb)-related 1 (RBR1), the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17), the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2+/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network. PMID:22879821

  1. A turquoise mutant genetically separates expression of genes encoding phycoerythrin and its associated linker peptides.

    PubMed

    Seib, Laura Ort; Kehoe, David M

    2002-02-01

    During complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), cyanobacterial light harvesting structures called phycobilisomes are restructured in response to ambient light quality shifts. Transcription of genes encoding components of the phycobilisome is differentially regulated during this process: red light activates cpcB2A2, whereas green light coordinately activates the cpeCDE and cpeBA operons. Three signal transduction components that regulate CCA have been isolated to date: a sensor-photoreceptor (RcaE) and two response regulators (RcaF and RcaC). Mutations in the genes encoding these components affect the accumulation of both cpcB2A2 and cpeBA gene products. We have isolated and characterized a new pigmentation mutant called Turquoise 1. We demonstrate that this mutant phenotype is due to a dramatic decrease in cpeBA transcript abundance and results from a lesion in the cpeR gene. However, in this mutant cpeCDE RNA levels remain near those found in wild-type cells. Our results show that the coordinate regulation of cpeBA and cpeCDE by green light can be uncoupled by the loss of CpeR, and we furnish the first genetic evidence that different regulatory mechanisms control these two operons. Sequence analysis of CpeR reveals that it shares limited sequence similarity to members of the PP2C class of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. We also demonstrate that cpeBA and cpeCDE retain light quality responsiveness in a mutant lacking the RcaE photoreceptor. This provides compelling evidence for the partial control of CCA through an as-yet-uncharacterized second light quality sensing system.

  2. Live imaging-based model selection reveals periodic regulation of the stochastic G1/S phase transition in vertebrate axial development.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mayu; Saitou, Takashi; Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Imamura, Takeshi; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2014-12-01

    In multicellular organism development, a stochastic cellular response is observed, even when a population of cells is exposed to the same environmental conditions. Retrieving the spatiotemporal regulatory mode hidden in the heterogeneous cellular behavior is a challenging task. The G1/S transition observed in cell cycle progression is a highly stochastic process. By taking advantage of a fluorescence cell cycle indicator, Fucci technology, we aimed to unveil a hidden regulatory mode of cell cycle progression in developing zebrafish. Fluorescence live imaging of Cecyil, a zebrafish line genetically expressing Fucci, demonstrated that newly formed notochordal cells from the posterior tip of the embryonic mesoderm exhibited the red (G1) fluorescence signal in the developing notochord. Prior to their initial vacuolation, these cells showed a fluorescence color switch from red to green, indicating G1/S transitions. This G1/S transition did not occur in a synchronous manner, but rather exhibited a stochastic process, since a mixed population of red and green cells was always inserted between newly formed red (G1) notochordal cells and vacuolating green cells. We termed this mixed population of notochordal cells, the G1/S transition window. We first performed quantitative analyses of live imaging data and a numerical estimation of the probability of the G1/S transition, which demonstrated the existence of a posteriorly traveling regulatory wave of the G1/S transition window. To obtain a better understanding of this regulatory mode, we constructed a mathematical model and performed a model selection by comparing the results obtained from the models with those from the experimental data. Our analyses demonstrated that the stochastic G1/S transition window in the notochord travels posteriorly in a periodic fashion, with doubled the periodicity of the neighboring paraxial mesoderm segmentation. This approach may have implications for the characterization of the

  3. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  4. Chemical genomic screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomewide mutant collection reveals genes required for defense against four antimicrobial peptides derived from proteins found in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lis, Maciej; Bhatt, Sanjay; Schoenly, Nathan E; Lee, Anna Y; Nislow, Corey; Bobek, Libuse A

    2013-02-01

    To compare the effects of four antimicrobial peptides (MUC7 12-mer, histatin 12-mer, cathelicidin KR20, and a peptide containing lactoferricin amino acids 1 to 11) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed a genomewide fitness screen of combined collections of mutants with homozygous deletions of nonessential genes and heterozygous deletions of essential genes. When an arbitrary fitness score cutoffs of 1 (indicating a fitness defect, or hypersensitivity) and -1 (indicating a fitness gain, or resistance) was used, 425 of the 5,902 mutants tested exhibited altered fitness when treated with at least one peptide. Functional analysis of the 425 strains revealed enrichment among the identified deletions in gene groups associated with the Gene Ontology (GO) terms "ribosomal subunit," "ribosome biogenesis," "protein glycosylation," "vacuolar transport," "Golgi vesicle transport," "negative regulation of transcription," and others. Fitness profiles of all four tested peptides were highly similar, particularly among mutant strains exhibiting the greatest fitness defects. The latter group included deletions in several genes involved in induction of the RIM101 signaling pathway, including several components of the ESCRT sorting machinery. The RIM101 signaling regulates response of yeasts to alkaline and neutral pH and high salts, and our data indicate that this pathway also plays a prominent role in regulating protective measures against all four tested peptides. In summary, the results of the chemical genomic screens of S. cerevisiae mutant collection suggest that the four antimicrobial peptides, despite their differences in structure and physical properties, share many interactions with S. cerevisiae cells and consequently a high degree of similarity between their modes of action.

  5. Anti-synthetic peptide antibody reacting at the fusion junction of deletion-mutant epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, P.A.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Fuller, G.N.; Archer, G.E.; Friedman, H.S.; Kwatra, M.M.; Bigner, S.H.; Bigner, D.D. ); Wong, A.J. ); Vogelstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have investigated human gliomas that amplify and rearrange the epidermal growth factor receptor gene, with generation of an in-frame deletion mutation of 802 nucleotides in the external domain. This in-frame deletion mutation generates a local amino acid sequence at the fusion junction of what normally were distant polypeptide sequences in the intact epidermal growth factor receptor. This 14-amino acid peptide was chemically synthesized, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and used as an immunogen in rabbits. The elicited antibody reacted specifically with the fusion peptide in ELISA. The anti-fusion junction peptide antibody was purified by passage of the antiserum over a peptide affinity column with acidic elution. The purified antibody selectively bound the glioma deletion mutant as compared to the intact epidermal growth factor receptor as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation with gel electrophoresis, and binding experiments using radioiodinated antibody. These data indicate that it is feasible to generate site-specific anti-peptide antibodies that are highly selective for mutant proteins in human tumors. The anti-peptide antibody described here, and other mutation site-specific antibodies, should be ideal candidates for tumor immunoimaging and immunotherapy.

  6. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition. PMID:27410035

  7. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition.

    PubMed

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition.

  8. ARTD1 regulates cyclin E expression and consequently cell-cycle re-entry and G1/S progression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Léger, Karolin; Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Fey, Monika; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-08-02

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in a variety of biological processes, many of which are chromatin-dependent and linked to important functions during the cell cycle. However, any study on ADP-ribosylation and the cell cycle faces the problem that synchronization with chemical agents or by serum starvation and subsequent growth factor addition already activates ADP-ribosylation by itself. Here, we investigated the functional contribution of ARTD1 in cell cycle re-entry and G1/S cell cycle progression using T24 urinary bladder carcinoma cells, which synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after splitting without any additional stimuli. In synchronized cells, ARTD1 knockdown, but not inhibition of its enzymatic activity, caused specific down-regulation of cyclin E during cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression through alterations of the chromatin composition and histone acetylation, but not of other E2F-1 target genes. Although Cdk2 formed a functional complex with the residual cyclin E, p27(Kip 1) protein levels increased in G1 upon ARTD1 knockdown most likely due to inappropriate cyclin E-Cdk2-induced phosphorylation-dependent degradation, leading to decelerated G1/S progression. These results provide evidence that ARTD1 regulates cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression via cyclin E expression and p27(Kip 1) stability independently of its enzymatic activity, uncovering a novel cell cycle regulatory mechanism.

  9. Enhanced expression of tandem multimers of the antimicrobial peptide buforin II in Escherichia coli by the DEAD-box protein and trxB mutant.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Cho, J H; Kim, S C

    2002-05-01

    The tandem multimeric expression of various peptides has been explored by many researchers. However, expression levels have usually not been proportional to the degree of multimerization. To increase the expression level in Escherichia coli of tandem multimers of a cationic antimicrobial peptide, buforin II, fused to an anionic peptide, we studied the effect of the DEAD-box protein and the trxB mutant on the expression of tandem multimers. An expression vector with a tac promoter was more effective in directing multimeric expression than one with a T7 promoter. The expression level of large multimers was substantially increased with the tac promoter, possibly through stabilization of long transcripts by synchronization of transcription and translation. Coexpression of the DEAD-box protein, an RNA-binding protein, with the T7 expression system increased the expression level of multimers, especially large multimers, due to protection of the long RNA transcripts. In addition, the use of the trxB mutant also enhanced the expression level of tandem multimers, which contain two cysteine residues at both ends of the monomeric unit. It seems that disulfide bonds formed in the multimers in the trxB mutant might help efficient charge neutralization for inclusion body formation of the multimers, resulting in enhancement of expression. Our results show that the expression of multimers can be improved through the stabilization of the long transcripts by the DEAD-box protein or the expression, under an oxidizing environment, of the trxB mutant in which covalent cross-links through disulfide bonds facilitate inclusion body formation of the multimeric fusion peptide.

  10. Robustness of CDK2 in Triggering Cellular Senescence based on Probability of DNA-damaged Cells Passing G1/S Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2011-06-01

    Recent experiments have shown that cellular senescence, a mechanism employed by cells for thwarting cell proliferation, plays an important role in protecting cells against cancer; therefore, a deeper understanding of cellular senescence can lead to effective cancer treatment. Inhibition of CDK2 is thought to be the critical trigger for cellular senescence. In this study, we first implement a mathematical model of G1/S transition involving the DNA-damage pathway and show that cellular senescence can be achieved by lowering CDK2. The robustness of CDK2 in triggering cellular senescence is determined from the probability (β) of DNA-damaged cells passing G1/S checkpoint for normal CDK2 and CDK2-deficient situations based on different thresholds of the peak time of two important biomarkers, CycE and E2F. The comparison of the values of β under the normal CDK2 and lower CDK2 levels reveals that reducing CDK2 levels can decrease the percentage of damaged cells passing G1/S checkpoint; more importantly, 50% reduction of CDK2 achieves 65% reduction in the percentage of damaged cells passing the G1/S checkpoint. These results point out that the developed model can highlight the possibility of lowering the bar for cellular senescence by reducing CDK2 levels. The results of investigation of β for the different thresholds of the peak times of other biomarkers show that β is insensitive to these perturbations of the peak time indicating that CDK2 activity is robust in lowering the senescence bar for low and high levels of DNA-damage. Furthermore, a mathematical formulation of robustness indicates that the robustness of CDK2-triggered senescence increases with decreasing levels of CDK2, and is slightly greater for low-level DNA damage condition.

  11. Aberrant modulation of the BRCA1 and G1/S cell cycle pathways in alcoholic hepatitis patients with Mallory Denk Bodies revealed by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    French, Barbara A.; Liao, Guanghong; Li, Jun; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W.

    2015-01-01

    Mallory-Denk Bodies (MDBs) are prevalent in various liver diseases including alcoholic hepatitis (AH) and are formed in mice livers by feeding DDC. Liver injury from alcohol administration causes balloon hepatocytes and MDB formation impeding liver regeneration. By comparing AH livers where MDBs had formed with normal liver transcriptomes obtained by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), there was significant upregulation of BRCA1-mediated signaling and G1/S cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The transcriptional architecture of differentially expressed genes from AH livers reflected step-wise transcriptional changes progressing to AH. Key molecules such as BRCA1, p15 and p21 were significantly upregulated both in AH livers and in the livers of the DDC re-fed mice model where MDBs had formed. The increase of G1/S cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors p15 and p21 results in cell cycle arrest and inhibition of liver regeneration, implying that p15 and p21 could be exploited for the identification of specific targets for the treatment of liver disease. Provided here for the first time is the RNA-Seq data that represents the fully annotated catalogue of the expression of mRNAs. The most prominent alterations observed were the changes in BRCA1-mediated signaling and G1/S cell cycle checkpoint pathways. These new findings expand previous and related knowledge in the search for gene changes that might be critical in the understanding of the underlying progression to the development of AH. PMID:26623723

  12. Definition of a FoxA1 Cistrome that is Crucial for G1-S Phase Cell-Cycle Transit in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Zhong; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Zynger, Debra L.; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Yu, Jindan; Luo, Jun; Brown, Myles; Clinton, Steven K.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Li, Wei; Wang, Qianben

    2014-01-01

    The enhancer pioneer transcription factor FoxA1 is a global mediator of steroid receptor (SR) action in hormone-dependent cancers. In castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), FoxA1 acts as an androgen receptor co-factor to drive G2-M phase cell-cycle transit. Here we describe a mechanistically distinct SR-independent role for FoxA1 in driving G1-S phase cell-cycle transit in CRPC. By comparing FoxA1 binding sites in prostate cancer cell genomes, we defined a co-dependent set of FoxA1-MYBL2 and FoxA1-CREB1 binding sites within the regulatory regions of the Cyclin E2 and E2F1 genes that are critical for CRPC growth. Binding at these sites upregulate the Cyclin E2 and Cyclin A2 genes in CRPC but not in earlier stage androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC), establishing a stage-specific role for this pathway in CRPC growth. Mechanistic investigations indicated that FoxA1, MYBL2 or CREB1 induction of histone H3 acetylation facilitated nucleosome disruption as the basis for co-dependent transcriptional activation and G1-S phase cell-cycle transit. Our findings establish FoxA1 as a pivotal driver of the cell-cycle in CRPC which promotes G1-S phase transit as well as G2-M phase transit through two distinct mechanisms. PMID:21900400

  13. Dutch and arctic mutant peptides of {beta} amyloid{sub 1-40} differentially affect the FGF-2 pathway in brain endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Solito, Raffaella; Corti, Federico; Fossati, Silvia; Mezhericher, Emiliya; Donnini, Sandra; Ghiso, Jorge; Giachetti, Antonio; Rostagno, Agueda; Ziche, Marina

    2009-02-01

    Single point mutations of the amyloid precursor protein generate A{beta} variants bearing amino acid substitutions at positions 21-23. These mutants are associated with distinct hereditary phenotypes of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, manifesting varying degrees of tropism for brain vessels, and impaired microvessel remodeling and angiogenesis. We examined the differential effects of E22Q (Dutch), and E22G (Arctic) variants in comparison to WT A{beta} on brain endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenic phenotype expression triggered by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), pseudo-capillary sprouting, and induction of apoptosis. E22Q exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic profile in contrast to E22G, which had a much weaker effect. Investigations on the FGF-2 signaling pathway revealed the greatest differences among the peptides: E22Q and WT peptides suppressed FGF-2 expression while E22G had barely any effect. Phosphorylation of the FGF-2 receptor, FGFR-1, and the survival signal Akt were abolished by E22Q and WT peptides, but not by E22G. The biological dissimilar effect of the mutant and WT peptides on cerebral EC cannot be assigned to a particular A{beta} structure, suggesting that the toxic effect of the A{beta} assemblies goes beyond mere multimerization.

  14. Swedish mutant APP-based BACE1 binding site peptide reduces APP β-cleavage and cerebral Aβ levels in Alzheimer's mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Hou, Huayan; Mori, Takashi; Sawmiller, Darrell; Smith, Adam; Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanjiang; Giunta, Brian; Sanberg, Paul R; Zhang, Sheqing; Tan, Jun

    2015-06-19

    BACE1 initiates amyloid-β (Aβ) generation and the resultant cerebral amyloidosis, as a characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, inhibition of BACE1 has been the focus of a large body of research. The most recent clinical trials highlight the difficulty involved in this type of anti-AD therapy as evidenced by side effects likely due to the ubiquitous nature of BACE1, which cleaves multiple substrates. The human Swedish mutant form of amyloid protein precursor (APPswe) has been shown to possess a higher affinity for BACE1 compared to wild-type APP (APPwt). We pursued a new approach wherein harnessing this greater affinity to modulate BACE1 APP processing activity. We found that one peptide derived from APPswe, containing the β-cleavage site, strongly inhibits BACE1 activity and thereby reduces Aβ production. This peptide, termed APPswe BACE1 binding site peptide (APPsweBBP), was further conjugated to the fusion domain of the HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) at the C-terminus to facilitate its biomembrane-penetrating activity. APPwt and APPswe over-expressing CHO cells treated with this TAT-conjugated peptide resulted in a marked reduction of Aβ and a significant increase of soluble APPα. Intraperitoneal administration of this peptide to 5XFAD mice markedly reduced β-amyloid deposits as well as improved hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  15. The Lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus BvrS/BvrR Mutants Contains Lipid A Modifications and Has Higher Affinity for Bactericidal Cationic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, Lorea; Moriyón, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Weiss, David S.; Koch, Michel H. J.; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    The two-component BvrS/BvrR system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction abrogates expression of some major outer membrane proteins and increases bactericidal peptide sensitivity. Here, we report that BvrS/BvrR mutants have increased surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility to killing by nonimmune serum. The bvrS and bvrR mutant lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) bound more polymyxin B, chimeras constructed with bvrS mutant cells and parental LPS showed augmented polymyxin B resistance, and, conversely, parental cells and bvrS mutant LPS chimeras were more sensitive and displayed polymyxin B-characteristic outer membrane lesions, implicating LPS as being responsible for the phenotype of the BvrS/BvrR mutants. No qualitative or quantitative changes were detected in other envelope and outer membrane components examined: periplasmic β(1-2) glucans, native hapten polysaccharide, and phospholipids. The LPS of the mutants was similar to parental LPS in O-polysaccharide polymerization and fine structure but showed both increased underacylated lipid A species and higher acyl-chain fluidity that correlated with polymyxin B binding. These lipid A changes did not alter LPS cytokine induction, showing that in contrast to other gram-negative pathogens, recognition by innate immune receptors is not decreased by these changes in LPS structure. Transcription of Brucella genes required for incorporating long acyl chains into lipid A (acpXL and lpxXL) or implicated in lipid A acylation control (bacA) was not affected. We propose that in Brucella the outer membrane homeostasis depends on the functioning of BvrS/BvrR. Accordingly, disruption of BvrS/BvrR damages the outer membrane, thus contributing to the severe attenuation manifested by bvrS and bvrR mutants. PMID:16077108

  16. The lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus BvrS/BvrR mutants contains lipid A modifications and has higher affinity for bactericidal cationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Manterola, Lorea; Moriyón, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Weiss, David S; Koch, Michel H J; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2005-08-01

    The two-component BvrS/BvrR system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction abrogates expression of some major outer membrane proteins and increases bactericidal peptide sensitivity. Here, we report that BvrS/BvrR mutants have increased surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility to killing by nonimmune serum. The bvrS and bvrR mutant lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) bound more polymyxin B, chimeras constructed with bvrS mutant cells and parental LPS showed augmented polymyxin B resistance, and, conversely, parental cells and bvrS mutant LPS chimeras were more sensitive and displayed polymyxin B-characteristic outer membrane lesions, implicating LPS as being responsible for the phenotype of the BvrS/BvrR mutants. No qualitative or quantitative changes were detected in other envelope and outer membrane components examined: periplasmic beta(1-2) glucans, native hapten polysaccharide, and phospholipids. The LPS of the mutants was similar to parental LPS in O-polysaccharide polymerization and fine structure but showed both increased underacylated lipid A species and higher acyl-chain fluidity that correlated with polymyxin B binding. These lipid A changes did not alter LPS cytokine induction, showing that in contrast to other gram-negative pathogens, recognition by innate immune receptors is not decreased by these changes in LPS structure. Transcription of Brucella genes required for incorporating long acyl chains into lipid A (acpXL and lpxXL) or implicated in lipid A acylation control (bacA) was not affected. We propose that in Brucella the outer membrane homeostasis depends on the functioning of BvrS/BvrR. Accordingly, disruption of BvrS/BvrR damages the outer membrane, thus contributing to the severe attenuation manifested by bvrS and bvrR mutants.

  17. 7-Epiclusianone, a Benzophenone Extracted from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae), Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1/S Transition in A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ionta, Marisa; Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme A; Niero, Evandro L; Costa, Éderson D'Martin; Martens, Adam A; Rosa, Welton; Soares, Marisi G; Machado-Santelli, Gláucia M; Lago, João Henrique G; Santos, Marcelo H

    2015-07-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Disease stage is the most relevant factor influencing mortality. Unfortunately, most patients are still diagnosed at an advanced stage and their five-year survival rate is only 4%. Thus, it is relevant to identify novel drugs that can improve the treatment options for lung cancer. Natural products have been an important source for the discovery of new compounds with pharmacological potential including antineoplastic agents. We have previously isolated a prenylated benzophenone (7-epiclusianone) from Garcinia brasiliensis (Clusiaceae) that has several biological properties including antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines. In continuation with our studies, the present work aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone in A549 cells. Our data showed that 7-epiclusianone reduced the viability of A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 16.13 ± 1.12 μM). Cells were arrested in G1/S transition and apoptosis was induced. In addition, we observed morphological changes with cytoskeleton disorganization in consequence of the treatment. Taken together, the results showed that cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition is the main mechanism involved with antiproliferative activity of 7-epiclusianone. Our results are promising and open up the prospect of using this compound in further anticancer in vivo studies.

  18. Nuclear accumulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and acceleration of G1/S stage by Epstein-Barr-encoded oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Yongguang; Song Xing; Deng Xiyun; Xie Daxin; Lee, Leo M.; Liu Yiping; Li Wei; Li Lili; Deng Lin; Wu Qiao; Gong Jianping; Cao Ya . E-mail: ycao98@public.cs.hn.cn

    2005-02-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is considered to be the major oncogenic protein of EBV-encoded proteins and has always been the core of the oncogenic mechanism of EBV. Advanced studies on nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family have greatly improved our knowledge of the biological function of cell surface receptors. In this study, we used the Tet-on LMP1 HNE2 cell line as a cell model, which is a dual-stable LMP1-integrated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line and the expression of LMP1 which could be regulated by the Tet system. We found that LMP1 could regulate the nuclear accumulation of EGFR in a dose-dependent manner quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrated that the nuclear localization sequence of EGFR played some roles in the location of the protein within the nucleus under LMP1 regulation and EGFR in the nucleus could bind to the promoters of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, respectively. We further demonstrated that EGFR is involved in the acceleration of the G1/S phase transition by LMP1 through binding to cyclinD1 and cyclinE directly. These findings provided a novel view that the acceleration of LMP1 on the G1/S transition via the nuclear accumulation of EGFR was critical in the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  19. hIgD promotes human Burkitt lymphoma Daudi cell proliferation by accelerated G1/S transition via IgD receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xing; Wu, YuJing; Jia, XiaoYi; Chang, Yan; Wu, HuaXun; Wang, Chun; Chen, HengShi; Chen, WenSheng; Huang, Qiong; Wei, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of human IgD (hIgD) on the proliferation of human Burkitt lymphoma Daudi cells in vitro. Logarithmically growing Daudi cells were treated with hIgD for different time periods, and cell proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The expressions of Daudi surface markers and IgD receptor (IgDR) as well as cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry analysis. Our results showed that hIgD stimulation induced proliferation and IgDR expression and reduced the apoptosis of Daudi cells. Treatment with hIgD promoted progression of the cell cycle at the G1/S transition, and this was accompanied by upregulation of c-myc, cyclin D3, and CDK6 as well as downregulation of p16 mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, hIgD treatment also upregulated the expression of tyrosine phosphorylation of 70 kDa protein (IgDR) and p-Lyn. Taken together, these results indicate that hIgD can induce Daudi cell proliferation through activating IgDR to initiate the tyrosine phosphorylation signaling cascade to accelerate the G1/S transition.

  20. Blocking of G1/S transition and cell death in the regenerating liver of Hepatitis B virus X protein transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, B.-K.; Li, C.-C.; Chen, H.-J.; Chang, J.-L.; Jeng, K.-S.; Chou, C.-K.; Hsu, M.-T.; Tsai, T.-F. . E-mail: tftsai@ym.edu.tw

    2006-02-17

    The Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has been strongly implicated in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, effects of the HBx protein on cell proliferation and cell death are controversial. This study investigates the effects of the HBx protein on liver regeneration in two independent lines of HBx transgenic mice, which developed HCC at around 14 to 16 months of age. High mortality, lower liver mass restoration, and impaired liver regeneration were found in the HBx transgenic mice post-hepatectomy. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and {alpha}-fetoprotein detected post-hepatectomy increased significantly in the HBx transgenic livers, indicating that they were more susceptible to damage during the regenerative process. Prolonged activation of the immediate-early genes in the HBx transgenic livers suggested that the HBx protein creates a strong effect by promoting the transition of the quiescent hepatocytes from G0 to G1 phase. However, impaired DNA synthesis and mitosis, as well as inhibited activation of G1, S, and G2/M markers, were detected. These results indicated that HBx protein exerted strong growth arrest on hepatocytes and imbalanced cell-cycle progression resulting in the abnormal cell death; this was accompanied by severe fat accumulation and impaired glycogen storage in the HBx transgenic livers. In conclusion, this study provides First physiological evidence that HBx protein blocks G1/S transition of the hepatocyte cell-cycle progression and causes both a failure of liver functionality and cell death in the regenerating liver of the HBx transgenic mice.

  1. The Fission Yeast Homeodomain Protein Yox1p Binds to MBF and Confines MBF-Dependent Cell-Cycle Transcription to G1-S via Negative Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Aligianni, Sofia; Lackner, Daniel H.; Klier, Steffi; Rustici, Gabriella; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Marguerat, Samuel; Codlin, Sandra; Brazma, Alvis; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Bähler, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle–regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident. PMID:19714215

  2. Synthesis, biophysical, and biological studies of wild-type and mutant psalmopeotoxins--anti-malarial cysteine knot peptides from Psalmopoeus cambridgei.

    PubMed

    Kamolkijkarn, Pacharin; Prasertdee, Thitawan; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Sarnpitak, Pakornwit; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Deechongkit, Songpon

    2010-04-01

    Psalmopeotoxin I and II (PcFK1 and PcFK2), an anti-malarial peptide first extracted from Psalmopoeus cambridgei was synthesized and characterized. Both peptides belong to the Inhibitor Cystine Knot (ICK) superfamily, containing three disulfide bridges. The six cysteine residues are conserved similar to other members of the ICK superfamily, suggesting their critical role for either folding or function. In this study, the peptides were synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The three disulfide bonds of were constructed by regioselective and random oxidative approaches. The resulting disulfide bond patterns were verified by the HPLC-MS analysis of intact peptides and by the disulfide bond mapping using tryptic digestion. Implications of the disulfide bonds on the biophysical and biological properties of PcFKs were studied using three disulfide mutants in which a particular pair of cysteines was replaced with two isosteric serine residues. Structures and biophysical characteristics of all variants were studied using far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. Biological activities of all variants were evaluated using antiplasmodial assay against the K1 multi-drug-resistant strain of P. falciparum. The experimental results showed that the three disulfide bridges could not be correctly synthesized by the random oxidative strategy. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that all variants had similar structures to the twisted beta-sheet. However, the studies of disulfide bond removal indicated that each disulfide bond had different effects on both biophysical and biological activities of PcFKs. Correlation of biophysical parameters and biological activities showed that both PcFKs may have different mechanisms of actions for antiplasmodial activity.

  3. Creation of Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) Mutant Mice and Correction of Their Hypertriglyceridemia with an ApoC-II Mimetic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai, Akiko; Vaisman, Boris L.; Amar, Marcelo J.; Liu, Chengyu; Gordon, Scott M.; Drake, Steven K.; Pryor, Milton; Sampson, Maureen L.; Yang, Ling; Freeman, Lita A.

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is a cofactor for lipoprotein lipase, a plasma enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides (TGs). ApoC-II deficiency in humans results in hypertriglyceridemia. We used zinc finger nucleases to create Apoc2 mutant mice to investigate the use of C-II-a, a short apoC-II mimetic peptide, as a therapy for apoC-II deficiency. Mutant mice produced a form of apoC-II with an uncleaved signal peptide that preferentially binds high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) due to a 3-amino acid deletion at the signal peptide cleavage site. Homozygous Apoc2 mutant mice had increased plasma TG (757.5 ± 281.2 mg/dl) and low HDL cholesterol (31.4 ± 14.7 mg/dl) compared with wild-type mice (TG, 55.9 ± 13.3 mg/dl; HDL cholesterol, 55.9 ± 14.3 mg/dl). TGs were found in light (density < 1.063 g/ml) lipoproteins in the size range of very-low-density lipoprotein and chylomicron remnants (40–200 nm). Intravenous injection of C-II-a (0.2, 1, and 5 μmol/kg) reduced plasma TG in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum decrease of 90% occurring 30 minutes after the high dose. Plasma TG did not return to baseline until 48 hours later. Similar results were found with subcutaneous or intramuscular injections. Plasma half-life of C-II-a is 1.33 ± 0.72 hours, indicating that C-II-a only acutely activates lipolysis, and the sustained TG reduction is due to the relatively slow rate of new TG-rich lipoprotein synthesis. In summary, we describe a novel mouse model of apoC-II deficiency and show that an apoC-II mimetic peptide can reverse the hypertriglyceridemia in these mice, and thus could be a potential new therapy for apoC-II deficiency. PMID:26574515

  4. Altered expression of G1/S phase cell cycle regulators in placental mesenchymal stromal cells derived from preeclamptic pregnancies with fetal-placental compromise

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Domenica; Masturzo, Bianca; Eva, Carola; Todros, Tullia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herein, we evaluated whether Placental Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (PDMSCs) derived from normal and Preeclamptic (PE) placentae presented differences in the expression of G1/S-phase regulators p16INK4A, p18INK4C, CDK4 and CDK6. Finally, we investigated normal and PE-PDMSCs paracrine effects on JunB, Cyclin D1, p16INK4A, p18INK4C, CDK4 and CDK6 expressions in physiological term villous explants. PDMSCs were isolated from physiological (n = 20) and PE (n = 24) placentae. Passage three normal and PE-PDMSC and conditioned media (CM) were collected after 48h. Physiological villous explants (n = 60) were treated for 72h with normal or PE-PDMSCs CM. Explants viability was assessed by Lactate Dehydrogenase Cytotoxicity assay. Cyclin D1 localization was evaluated by Immuofluorescence (IF) while JunB, Cyclin-D1 p16INK4A, p18INK4C, CDK4 and CDK6 levels were assessed by Real Time PCR and Western Blot assay. We reported significantly increased p16INK4A and p18INK4C expression in PE- relative to normal PDMSCs while no differences in CDK4 and CDK6 levels were detected. Explants viability was not affected by normal or PE-PDMSCs CM. Normal PDMSCs CM increased JunB, p16INK4 and p18INK4C and decreased Cyclin-D1 in placental tissues. In contrast, PE-PDMSCs CM induced JunB downregulation and Cyclin D1 increase in placental explants. Cyclin D1 IF staining showed that CM treatment targeted mainly the syncytiotrophoblast. We showed Cyclin D1-p16INK4A/p18INK4C altered pathway in PE-PDMSCs demonstrating an aberrant G1/S phase transition in these pathological cells. The abnormal Cyclin D1-p16INK4A/p18INK4C expression in explants conditioned by PE-PDMSCs media suggest a key contribution of mesenchymal cells to the altered trophoblast cell cycle regulation typical of PE pregnancies with fetal-placental compromise. PMID:27937072

  5. Costunolide induces G1/S phase arrest and activates mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathways in SK-MES 1 human lung squamous carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    HUA, PEIYAN; ZHANG, GUANGXIN; ZHANG, YIFAN; SUN, MEI; CUI, RANJI; LI, XIN; LI, BINGJIN; ZHANG, XINGYI

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, a safer and more effective modality strategy is required for the treatment of lung cancer. Costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone which isolated from the Saussurea lappa, has potent anticancer properties. In the present study, the effects of costunolide on cell viability, the cell cycle and apoptosis in SK-MES-1 human lung squamous carcinoma cells were investigated. Costunolide induced morphological changes and inhibited growth of SK-MES-1 cells growth. Flow cytometric analysis data demonstrated that costunolide significantly induced apoptosis of SK-MES-1 cells and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase in a dose-dependent manner. Through upregulation in the expression of p53 and Bax, and downregulation in the expression of Bcl-2 and activation of caspase-3, costunolide-induced apoptosis was confirmed by western blot analysis. In addition, the significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential indicated that costunolide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondria-dependent pathway in SK-MES-1 cells. These results highlight the potential effects of costunolide as an anti-cancer agent in a human lung squamous carcinoma cell line. PMID:27073552

  6. Costunolide induces G1/S phase arrest and activates mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathways in SK-MES 1 human lung squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Peiyan; Zhang, Guangxin; Zhang, Yifan; Sun, Mei; Cui, Ranji; Li, Xin; Li, Bingjin; Zhang, Xingyi

    2016-04-01

    Despite the availability of several therapeutic options, a safer and more effective modality strategy is required for the treatment of lung cancer. Costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone which isolated from the Saussurea lappa, has potent anticancer properties. In the present study, the effects of costunolide on cell viability, the cell cycle and apoptosis in SK-MES-1 human lung squamous carcinoma cells were investigated. Costunolide induced morphological changes and inhibited growth of SK-MES-1 cells growth. Flow cytometric analysis data demonstrated that costunolide significantly induced apoptosis of SK-MES-1 cells and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase in a dose-dependent manner. Through upregulation in the expression of p53 and Bax, and downregulation in the expression of Bcl-2 and activation of caspase-3, costunolide-induced apoptosis was confirmed by western blot analysis. In addition, the significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential indicated that costunolide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondria-dependent pathway in SK-MES-1 cells. These results highlight the potential effects of costunolide as an anti-cancer agent in a human lung squamous carcinoma cell line.

  7. Monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 targeting RON receptor tyrosine kinase enhances chemosensitivity of bladder cancer cells to Epirubicin by promoting G1/S arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun-Feng; Yu, Bi-Xia; Yu, Rui; Ma, Liang; Lv, Xiu-Yi; Cheng, Yue; Ma, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Epirubicin (EPI) is one of the most used intravesical chemotherapy agents after transurethral resection to non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (NMIBC) to prevent cancer recurrence and progression. However, even after resection of bladder tumors and intravesical chemotherapy, half of them will recur and progress. RON is a membrane tyrosine kinase receptor usually overexpressed in bladder cancer cells and associated with poor pathological features. This study aims to investigate the effects of anti-RON monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 on the chemosensitivity of bladder cells to EPI. After Zt/g4 treatment, cell cytotoxicity was significantly increased and cell invasion was markedly suppressed in EPI-treated bladder cancer cells. Further investigation indicated that combing Zt/g4 with EPI promoted cell G1/S-phase arrest and apoptosis, which are the potential mechanisms that RON signaling inhibition enhances chemosensitivity of EPI. Thus, combing antibody-based RON targeted therapy enhances the therapeutic effects of intravesical chemotherapy, which provides new strategy for further improvement of NMIBC patient outcomes. PMID:28075465

  8. Breast cancer cell line MCF7 escapes from G1/S arrest induced by proteasome inhibition through a GSK-3β dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gavilán, Elena; Giráldez, Servando; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco; Ruano, Diego; Daza, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway has emerged as a rational approach in the treatment of human cancers. Autophagy has been described as a cytoprotective mechanism to increase tumor cell survival under stress conditions. Here, we have focused on the role of proteasome inhibition in cell cycle progression and the role of autophagy in the proliferation recovery. The study was performed in the breast cancer cell line MCF7 compared to the normal mammary cell line MCF10A. We found that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 induced G1/S arrest in MCF10A, but G2/M arrest in MCF7 cells. The effect of MG132 on MCF7 was reproduced on MCF10A cells in the presence of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor VII. Similarly, MCF7 cells overexpressing constitutively active GSK-3β behaved like MCF10A cells. On the other hand, MCF10A cells remained arrested after MG132 removal while MCF7 recovered the proliferative capacity. Importantly, this recovery was abolished in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Thus, our results support the relevance of GSK-3β and autophagy as two targets for controlling cell cycle progression and proliferative capacity in MCF7, highlighting the co-treatment of breast cancer cells with 3-MA to synergize the effect of the proteasome inhibition. PMID:25941117

  9. White spot syndrome virus IE1 and WSV056 modulate the G1/S transition by binding to the host retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiaozhuo; Bian, Xiaofang; Ji, Yongchang; Yan, Xiumin; Yang, Feng; Li, Fang

    2013-12-01

    DNA viruses often target cellular proteins to modulate host cell cycles and facilitate viral genome replication. However, whether proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) requires regulation of the host cell cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we show that two WSSV paralogs, IE1 and WSV056, can interact with Litopenaeus vannamei retinoblastoma (Rb)-like protein (lv-RBL) through the conserved LxCxE motif. Further investigation revealed that IE1 and WSV056 could also bind to Drosophila retinoblastoma family protein 1 (RBF1) in a manner similar to how they bind to lv-RBL. Using the Drosophila RBF-E2F pathway as a model system, we demonstrated that both IE1 and WSV056 could sequester RBF1 from Drosophila E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) and subsequently activate E2F1 to stimulate the G1/S transition. Our findings provide the first evidence that WSSV may regulate cell cycle progression by targeting the Rb-E2F pathway.

  10. Dactylone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced transformation and phenotype expression of human cancer cells and induces G1-S arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bode, Ann M; Stonik, Valentin A; Dong, Zigang

    2007-06-15

    The marine natural chamigrane-type sesquiterpenoid, dactylone, is closely related to secondary metabolites of some edible species of red algae. In the present study, the effect of dactylone was tested on the mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ Cl41 cell line and its stable transfectants as well as on several human tumor cell lines, including lung (H460), colon (HCT-116), and skin melanomas (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). This natural product was effective at nontoxic doses as a cancer-preventive agent, which exerted its actions, at least in part, through the inhibition of cyclin D3 and Cdk4 expression and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) phosphorylation. The inhibition of these cell cycle components was followed by cell cycle arrest at the G1-S transition with subsequent p53-independent apoptosis. Therefore, these data showed that application of dactylone and related compounds may lead to decreased malignant cell transformation and/or decreased tumor cell proliferation.

  11. Breast cancer cell line MCF7 escapes from G1/S arrest induced by proteasome inhibition through a GSK-3β dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gavilán, Elena; Giráldez, Servando; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco; Ruano, Diego; Daza, Paula

    2015-05-05

    Targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway has emerged as a rational approach in the treatment of human cancers. Autophagy has been described as a cytoprotective mechanism to increase tumor cell survival under stress conditions. Here, we have focused on the role of proteasome inhibition in cell cycle progression and the role of autophagy in the proliferation recovery. The study was performed in the breast cancer cell line MCF7 compared to the normal mammary cell line MCF10A. We found that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 induced G1/S arrest in MCF10A, but G2/M arrest in MCF7 cells. The effect of MG132 on MCF7 was reproduced on MCF10A cells in the presence of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor VII. Similarly, MCF7 cells overexpressing constitutively active GSK-3β behaved like MCF10A cells. On the other hand, MCF10A cells remained arrested after MG132 removal while MCF7 recovered the proliferative capacity. Importantly, this recovery was abolished in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Thus, our results support the relevance of GSK-3β and autophagy as two targets for controlling cell cycle progression and proliferative capacity in MCF7, highlighting the co-treatment of breast cancer cells with 3-MA to synergize the effect of the proteasome inhibition.

  12. Cell cycle arrest by prostaglandin A1 at the G1/S phase interface with up-regulation of oncogenes in S-49 cyc- cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1994-01-01

    Our previous studies have implied that prostaglandins inhibit cell growth independent of cAMP. Recent reports, however, have suggested that prostaglandin arrest of the cell cycle may be mediated through protein kinase A. In this report, in order to eliminate the role of c-AMP in prostaglandin mediated cell cycle arrest, we use the -49 lymphoma variant (cyc-) cells that lack adenylate cyclase activity. We demonstrate that dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) inhibits DNA synthesis and cell growth in cyc- cells. DNA synthesis is inhibited 42% by dmPGA1 (50 microM) despite the fact that this cell line lacks cellular components needed for cAMP generation. The ability to decrease DNA synthesis depends upon the specific prostaglandin structure with the most effective form possessing the alpha, beta unsaturated ketone ring. Dimethyl PGA1 is most effective in inhibiting DNA synthesis in cyc- cells, with prostaglandins PGE1 and PGB1 being less potent inhibitors of DNA synthesis. DmPGE2 caused a significant stimulation of DNA synthesis. S-49 cyc- variant cells exposed to (30-50 microns) dmPGA1, arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle within 24 h. This growth arrest was reversed when the prostaglandin was removed from the cultured cells; growth resumed within hours showing that this treatment is not toxic. The S-49 cyc- cells were chosen not only for their lack of adenylate cyclase activity, but also because their cell cycle has been extensively studied and time requirements for G1, S, G2, and M phases are known. Within hours after prostaglandin removal the cells resume active DNA synthesis, and cell number doubles within 15 h suggesting rapid entry into S-phase DNA synthesis from the G1 cell cycle block.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode

    2016-01-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3–14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27kip1), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  14. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D’Errico, Geradino; De Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin. PMID:28294185

  15. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D’Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  16. Copper ligation to soluble oligomers of the English mutant of the amyloid-β peptide yields a linear Cu(I) site that is resistant to O2 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Kristy L; Clewett, Heather S; Schmitt, Jennifer C; Shearer, Jason

    2013-05-25

    Copper coordination to soluble oligomers of the English (AβH(6)R) mutant of the amyloid-β peptide is probed. Cu(II) coordination yields a square planar (N/O)4 coordination environment, while reduction yields an O2 inert linear bis-His Cu(I) centre.

  17. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  18. Structure of the Constitutively Active Double Mutant CheY[superscript D13K Y106W] Alone and in Complex with a FliM Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Collin M.; Quillin, Michael L.; Campos, Andres; Lu, Justine; McEvoy, Megan M.; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Matsumura, Philip; Matthews, Brian W.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.

    2010-11-16

    CheY is a member of the response regulator protein superfamily that controls the chemotactic swimming response of motile bacteria. The CheY double mutant D13K Y106W (CheY**) is resistant to phosphorylation, yet is a highly effective mimic of phosphorylated CheY in vivo and in vitro. The conformational attributes of this protein that enable it to signal in a phosphorylation-independent manner are unknown. We have solved the crystal structure of selenomethionine-substituted CheY** in the presence of its target, a peptide (FliM{sub 16}) derived from the flagellar motor switch, FliM, to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution with an R-factor of 19.6%. The asymmetric unit contains four CheY** molecules, two with FliM{sub 16} bound, and two without. The two CheY** molecules in the asymmetric unit that are bound to FliM{sub 16} adopt a conformation similar to BeF{sub 3}{sup -}-activated wild-type CheY, and also bind FliM{sub 16} in a nearly identical manner. The CheY** molecules that do not bind FliM{sub 16} are found in a conformation similar to unphosphorylated wild-type CheY, suggesting that the active phenotype of this mutant is enabled by a facile interconversion between the active and inactive conformations. Finally, we propose a ligand-binding model for CheY and CheY**, in which Ile95 changes conformation in a Tyr/Trp106-dependent manner to accommodate FliM.

  19. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  20. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon mutants containing two histidyl binding sites inside peptide chain structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Kadej, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-12-21

    Mononuclear and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations, H1A/H12A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G-COOH, H1A/H9A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, and H1A/H6A H2N-A(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, and EPR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1 was obtained. Over a wide 6-8 pH range, including physiological pH 7.4, and a 1 : 1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio, the peptides studied formed a CuH-1L complex with the 4N{NH2,N(-),2NIm} coordination mode. The presence of the 4N binding site for the CuH-1L complexes prevented the deprotonation and coordination of the second amide nitrogen atom to copper(II) ions (pK-1/-2 7.83-8.07) compared to that of pentaGly (6.81). The amine nitrogen donor and two imidazole nitrogen atoms (H(6)H(9), H(6)H(12) and H(9)H(12)) can be considered to be independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. As a consequence, di- and trinuclear complexes for the metal-to-ligand 2 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios dominate in the solution, respectively. For the Cu(II)-H1A/H9A and Cu(II)-H1A/H12A systems, the Cu3H-9L complexes are likely formed by the coordination of amide nitrogen atoms towards C-termini with ring sizes (7,5,5).

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4) Perturbs the G1-S Cell Cycle Progression via Deregulation of the cyclin D1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Mitra, Jaba; Lee, Stacy; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee; Ha, Taekjip; Jung, Jae U

    2015-10-21

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection modulates the host cell cycle to create an environment optimal for its viral-DNA replication during the lytic life cycle. We report here that KSHV vIRF4 targets the β-catenin/CBP cofactor and blocks its occupancy on the cyclin D1 promoter, suppressing the G1-S cell cycle progression and enhancing KSHV replication. This shows that KSHV vIRF4 suppresses host G1-S transition, possibly providing an intracellular milieu favorable for its replication.

  2. ECA39, a conserved gene regulated by c-Myc in mice, is involved in G1/S cell cycle regulation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Schuldiner, O; Eden, A; Ben-Yosef, T; Yanuka, O; Simchen, G; Benvenisty, N

    1996-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. The realization that myc oncogenes may control the level of expression of other genes has opened the field to search for genetic targets for Myc regulation. Recently, using a subtraction/coexpression strategy, a murine genetic target for Myc regulation, called EC439, was isolated. To further characterize the ECA39 gene, we set out to determine the evolutionary conservation of its regulatory and coding sequences. We describe the human, nematode, and budding yeast homologs of the mouse ECA39 gene. Identities between the mouse ECA39 protein and the human, nematode, or yeast proteins are 79%, 52%, and 49%, respectively. Interestingly, the recognition site for Myc binding, located 3' to the start site of transcription in the mouse gene, is also conserved in the human homolog. This regulatory element is missing in the ECA39 homologs from nematode or yeast, which also lack the regulator c-myc. To understand the function of ECA39, we deleted the gene from the yeast genome. Disruption of ECA39 which is a recessive mutation that leads to a marked alteration in the cell cycle. Mutant haploids and homozygous diploids have a faster growth rate than isogenic wild-type strains. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses indicate that the mutation shortens the G1 stage in the cell cycle. Moreover, mutant strains show higher rates of UV-induced mutations. The results suggest that the product of ECA39 is involved in the regulation of G1 to S transition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8692959

  3. Differences in the Detection of BrdU/EdU Incorporation Assays Alter the Calculation for G1, S, and G2 Phases of the Cell Cycle in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelo Santos; Muñoz, Paula Andrea Marin; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2017-03-04

    Trypanosomatids are the etiologic agents of various infectious diseases in humans. They diverged early during eukaryotic evolution and have attracted attention as peculiar models for evolutionary and comparative studies. Here, we show a meticulous study comparing the incorporation and detection of the thymidine analogs BrdU and EdU in Leishmania amazonensis, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi to monitor their DNA replication. We used BrdU- and EdU-incorporated parasites with the respective standard detection approaches: Indirect Immunofluorescence to detect BrdU after standard denaturation (2 M HCl) and "click" chemistry to detect EdU. We found a discrepancy between these two thymidine analogs due to the poor detection of BrdU, which is reflected on the estimative of the duration of the cell cycle phases G1, S, and G2. To solve this discrepancy, we increase the exposure of incorporated BrdU using different concentrations of HCl. Using a new value for HCl concentration, we re-estimated the phases G1, S, G2+M, and cytokinesis durations, confirming the values found by this approach using EdU. In conclusion, we suggest that the studies using BrdU with standard detection approach, not only in trypanosomatids but also in others cell types, should be reviewed to ensure an accurate estimation of DNA replication monitoring. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. The Outer Membrane of Brucella ovis Shows Increased Permeability to Hydrophobic Probes and Is More Susceptible to Cationic Peptides than Are the Outer Membranes of Mutant Rough Brucella abortus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Enrique; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Weintraub, Andrej; Bengoechea, José-Antonio; Moriyón, Ignacio; Hultenby, Kjell; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane (OM) to hydrophobic probes and its susceptibility to bactericidal cationic peptides were investigated for natural rough Brucella ovis and for mutant rough Brucella abortus strains. The OM of B. ovis displayed an abrupt and faster kinetic profile than rough B. abortus during the uptake of the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine. B. ovis was more sensitive than rough B. abortus to the action of cationic peptides. Bactenecins 5 and 7 induced morphological alterations on the OMs of both rough Brucella strains. B. ovis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) captured considerably more polymyxin B than LPSs from both rough and smooth B. abortus strains. Polymyxin B, poly-l-lysine, and poly-l-ornithine produced a thick coating on the surfaces of both strains, which was more evident in B. ovis than in rough B. abortus. The distinct functional properties of the OMs of these two rough strains correlate with some structural differences of their OMs and with their different biological behaviors in animals and culture cells. PMID:10531286

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  6. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1−/−), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1−/− mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1−/− mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1−/− mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1−/− mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-κB/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  7. Streptavidin mutants

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-08

    The present invention relates to streptavidin proteins and peptides having a altered physical properties such as an increased stability or increased or decreased affinity for binding biotin. The invention also relates to methods for the detection, identification, separation and isolation of targets using streptavidin proteins or peptides. Streptavidin with increased or reduced affinity allows for the use of the streptavidin-biotin coupling systems for detection and isolation systems wherein it is necessary to remove of one or the other of the binding partners. Such systems are useful for the purification of functional proteins and viable cells. The invention also relates to nucleic acids which encode these streptavidin proteins and peptides and to recombinant cells such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells which contain these nucleic acids.

  8. Streptavidin mutants

    DOEpatents

    Sano, Takeshi; Cantor, Charles R.; Vajda, Sandor; Reznik, Gabriel O.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Pandori, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to streptavidin proteins and peptides having a altered physical properties such as an increased stability or increased or decreased affinity for binding biotin. The invention also relates to methods for the detection, identification, separation and isolation of targets using streptavidin proteins or peptides. Streptavidin with increased or reduced affinity allows for the use of the streptavidin-biotin coupling systems for detection and isolation systems wherein it is necessary to remove of one or the other of the binding partners. Such systems are useful for the purification of functional proteins and viable cells. The invention also relates to nucleic acids which encode these streptavidin proteins and peptides and to recombinant cells such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells which contain these nucleic acids.

  9. The retinoblastoma protein: functions beyond the G1-S regulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Chiharu

    2012-12-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is functionally inactivated in a large number of tumors including retinoblastoma, osteosarcoma, small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as bladder, breast and prostate cancers. The best known role of pRB in preventing cancer is inhibition of cell cycle progression by controlling the exit from the cell cycle into G0/G1. In addition, increasing evidence has suggested that pRB has important roles in DNA replication during S phase and G2/M transition. The tumor suppressor function of pRB has also been demonstrated by directly promoting differentiation via cell cycle exit with specific gene expression. Inactivation of pRB function during these cell cycle phases leads to dysregulated cell proliferation and/or chromosomal instability, which are strongly linked to cancer development. Thus pRB plays important roles through multiple functions in determining cell fate, i.e., normal growth/death and differentiation, or tumor formation. Therapeutic intervention by reactivation of pRB function would be expected to be an effective treatment against various cancers.

  10. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients. PMID:26571381

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  12. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon peptide mutants containing two different histidyl (H(1) and H(6) or H(9) or H(12)) binding sites Structure Stability and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mono- and dinuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations H9A/H12A H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVA(12)G, H6A/H12A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G and H6A/H9A H(1)GVSGA(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at metal-to-ligand molar ratios 1:1 and 2:1 was obtained. For all systems studied in the 5 - 6.5 pH range, the CuL complex dominates with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6 or 9 or 12)} binding site. The stability of the CuL complexes for the ligands studied varies according to the H9A/H12A>H6A/H12A>H6A/H9A series. For the dinuclear systems the amine/imidazole nitrogen donor atoms of the histidine residue H(1) and the imidazole nitrogen atoms of H(6) or H(9) or H(12) can be considered as independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. The stability of the dinuclear complexes is higher when two coordinated copper(II) ions are closer to each other. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 have been studied. The H6A/H9A, H6A/H12A peptides displayed lower hemocytotoxic activity compared to that of alloferon 1, while the H9A/H12A analogue was not active. Among the copper(II) complexes, the most active was the Cu(II)-H9A/H12A complex formed at pH7.4 with 3N{NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6)} (CuL) and 3N{NH2,N(-),NIm-H(6)} and/or 4N{NH2,NIm-H(1),N(-),NIm-H(6)} (CuH-1L) binding sites. The Cu(II)-H6A/H9A and Cu(II)-H6A/H12A complexes were not active.

  13. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  14. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  15. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  16. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides stimulated growth; however, cells still metabolized carbohydrates, and amino acid transport systems were shown to be functional. A tryptic digest of casein was fractionated into four electrophoretically different peptide fractions of 1,000 to 1,200 molecular weight which supported growth to varying degrees. The best of these was further fractionated to two highly hydrophopic peptides. N-terminal modifications eliminated biological activity. Fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody to rabbit immunoglobulin G was used as a probe to detect antipeptide antibody-peptide complexes on membrane preparations. Cells grown on peptone distributed the peptide into both inner and outer membranes. The peptide could be removed with chaotropic agents, and cells had to be pregrown in peptone-containing media to bind the hydrophobic peptide. The gene (hyp) responsible for peptide auxotrophy was mapped at 44 to 45 units by conjugation. Images PMID:7024254

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  18. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes.

  19. Determination of the minimal fusion peptide of bovine leukemia virus gp30

    SciTech Connect

    Lorin, Aurelien; Lins, Laurence; Stroobant, Vincent; Brasseur, Robert . E-mail: brasseur.r@fsagx.ac.be; Charloteaux, Benoit

    2007-04-13

    In this study, we determined the minimal N-terminal fusion peptide of the gp30 of the bovine leukemia virus on the basis of the tilted peptide theory. We first used molecular modelling to predict that the gp30 minimal fusion peptide corresponds to the 15 first residues. Liposome lipid-mixing and leakage assays confirmed that the 15-residue long peptide induces fusion in vitro and that it is the shortest peptide inducing optimal fusion since longer peptides destabilize liposomes to the same extent but not shorter ones. The 15-residue long peptide can thus be considered as the minimal fusion peptide. The effect of mutations reported in the literature was also investigated. Interestingly, mutations related to glycoproteins unable to induce syncytia in cell-cell fusion assays correspond to peptides predicted as non-tilted. The relationship between obliquity and fusogenicity was also confirmed in vitro for one tilted and one non-tilted mutant peptide.

  20. Novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides use different antimicrobial mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Kathryn E; Spinella, Sara A; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-03-01

    The increase in multidrug resistant bacteria has sparked an interest in the development of novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides that operate by crossing the cell membrane may also have the potential to deliver drugs to intracellular targets. Buforin 2 (BF2) is an antimicrobial peptide that shares sequence identity with a fragment of histone subunit H2A and whose bactericidal mechanism depends on membrane translocation and DNA binding. Previously, novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAPs) were designed based on properties of BF2, and DesHDAP1 and DesHDAP3 showed significant antibacterial activity. In this study, their DNA binding, permeabilization, and translocation abilities were assessed independently and compared to antibacterial activity to determine whether they share a mechanism with BF2. To investigate the importance of proline in determining the peptides' mechanisms of action, proline to alanine mutants of the novel peptides were generated. DesHDAP1, which shows significant similarities to BF2 in terms of secondary structure, translocates effectively across lipid vesicle and bacterial membranes, while the DesHDAP1 proline mutant shows reduced translocation abilities and antimicrobial potency. In contrast, both DesHDAP3 and its proline mutant translocate poorly, though the DesHDAP3 proline mutant is more potent. Our findings suggest that a proline hinge can promote membrane translocation in some peptides, but that the extent of its effect on permeabilization depends on the peptide's amphipathic properties. Our results also highlight the different antimicrobial mechanisms exhibited by histone-derived peptides and suggest that histones may serve as a source of novel antimicrobial peptides with varied properties.

  1. Cadmium-sensitive, cad1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana are phytochelatin deficient.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Goldsbrough, P B; Andersen, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-01-01

    An allelic series of cad1, cadmium-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, was isolated. These mutants were sensitive to cadmium to different extents and were deficient in their ability to form cadmium-peptide complexes as detected by gel-filtration chromatography. Each mutant was deficient in its ability to accumulate phytochelatins (PCs) as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of PCs accumulated by each mutant correlated with its degree of sensitivity to cadmium. The mutants had wild-type levels of glutathione, the substrate for PC biosynthesis, and in vitro assays demonstrated that each of the mutants was deficient in PC synthase activity. These results demonstrate conclusively the importance of PCs for cadmium tolerance in plants. PMID:7770517

  2. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  3. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  4. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  5. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  6. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  8. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  9. Phenotypic and Transcriptomic Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Mutants with Grossly Altered Membrane Composition▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Letal I.; Helmann, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis membrane contains diacylglycerol-based lipids with at least five distinct headgroups that together help to define the physical and chemical properties of the lipid bilayer. Here, we describe the phenotypic characterization of mutant strains lacking one or more of the following lipids: glycolipids (ugtP mutants), phosphatidylethanolamine (pssA and psd mutants), lysylphosphatidylglycerol (mprF), and cardiolipin (ywnE and ywjE). Alterations of membrane lipid headgroup composition are generally well-tolerated by the cell, and even severe alterations lead to only modest effects on growth proficiency. Mutants with decreased levels of positively charged lipids display an increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial compounds, and cells lacking glycolipids are more sensitive to the peptide antibiotic sublancin and are defective in swarming motility. A quadruple mutant strain (ugtP pssA mprF ywnE), with a membrane comprised predominantly of phosphatidylglycerol, is viable and grows at near-wild-type rates, although it forms long, coiled filaments. Transcriptome comparisons identified numerous regulons with altered expression in cells of the ugtP mutant, the pssA mprF ywnE triple mutant, and the ugtP pssA mprF ywnE quadruple mutant. These effects included a general decrease in expression of the SigD and FapR regulons and increased expression of cell envelope stress responses mediated by σM and the YvrGHb two-component system. PMID:18820022

  10. Roles of Cx43 and AKAP95 in ovarian cancer tissues in G1/S phase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Hua, Suhang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yangyang; Yang, Jinghui; Deng, Jiali; Huo, Yunjie; Chen, Xiaoxuan; Teng, Bogang; Yu, Xiuyi; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), cell cycle protein E1 (cyclinE1) and D1 (cyclinD1), and gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in ovarian cancer tissues, the relationship between four proteins and clinicopathologic parameters, and the correlation between these proteins. Methods: The expression of proteins in 54 cases of ovarian cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical method. Results: The positive expression rates of AKAP95, cyclinD1 and cyclinE1 in ovarian cancer tissues were 72.22%, 66.67% and 79.63%, respectively, which were higher than that of ovarian pericarcinoma tissues expressing as 33.33%, 25% and 8.30% (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of Cx43 in ovarian cancer tissues was 40.74%, which was lower than that of ovarian pericarcinoma tissues expressing as 75%; respectively, and the difference was statistically significant between groups (P<0.05). The expression of cyclinD1 in ovarian cancer tissues was related to the histologic type (P<0.05) while it showed no correlation with the degree of differentiation (P>0.05). Additionally, the expression of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 in ovarian cancer tissues showed no correlation with the degree of differentiation or the histologic type (P>0.05). Protein expressions of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 were correlated with each other (P<0.05), and the expressions of cyclinD1, cyclinE1 and Cx43 were also correlated with each other (P<0.05). However, AKAP95 and cyclinD1 showed no correlation (P>0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, cyclinD1 and cyclinE1 play an important role in promoting the process of ovarian cancer formation. The tumor inhibitory effects of Cx43 protein on the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer were weakened. The expression of cyclinD1 in ovarian cancer tissues is related to the histologic type while it shows no correlation with the degree of differentiation. Additionally, the expression of AKAP95, Cx43 and cyclinE1 in ovarian cancer tissues shows no correlation with the degree of differentiation or the histologic type. AKAP95 expression is correlated with Cx43 and cyclinE1 expression; Cx43 expression is correlated with AKAP95, cyclinD1 and cyclinE1 expression; cyclinE1 expression is correlated with AKAP95, Cx43, cyclinD1 expression; cyclinD1 expression is correlated with Cx43 and cyclinE1 expression, while AKAP95 and cyclinD1 show no correlation. PMID:26823747

  11. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  12. Structural Determinants for the Interaction of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 with Peptide Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Qiong; Troksa, Erica L.; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pardo, Leonardo; Ye, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), FPR2/ALX (FPR2) interacts with peptides of diverse sequences but has low affinity for the Escherichia coli-derived chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF). Using computer modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the structural requirements for FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides of different length and composition. In calcium flux assay, the N-formyl group of these peptides is necessary for activation of both FPR2 and FPR1, whereas the composition of the C-terminal amino acids appears more important for FPR2 than FPR1. FPR2 interacts better with pentapeptides (fMLFII, fMLFIK) than tetrapeptides (fMLFK, fMLFW) and tripeptide (fMLF) but only weakly with peptides carrying negative charges at the C terminus (e.g. fMLFE). In contrast, FPR1 is less sensitive to negative charges at the C terminus. A CXCR4-based homology model of FPR1 and FPR2 suggested that Asp-2817.32 is crucial for the interaction of FPR2 with certain formyl peptides as its negative charge may be repulsive with the terminal COO- group of fMLF and negatively charged Glu in fMLFE. Asp-2817.32 might also form a stable interaction with the positively charged Lys in fMLFK. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to remove the negative charge at position 281 in FPR2. The D2817.32G mutant showed improved affinity for fMLFE and fMLF and reduced affinity for fMLFK compared with wild type FPR2. These results indicate that different structural determinants are used by FPR1 and FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides. PMID:24285541

  13. Energy Homeostasis Control in Drosophila Adipokinetic Hormone Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gáliková, Martina; Diesner, Max; Klepsatel, Peter; Hehlert, Philip; Xu, Yanjun; Bickmeyer, Iris; Predel, Reinhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of biological functions under negative energy balance depends on mobilization of storage lipids and carbohydrates in animals. In mammals, glucagon and glucocorticoid signaling mobilizes energy reserves, whereas adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) play a homologous role in insects. Numerous studies based on AKH injections and correlative studies in a broad range of insect species established the view that AKH acts as master regulator of energy mobilization during development, reproduction, and stress. In contrast to AKH, the second peptide, which is processed from the Akh encoded prohormone [termed “adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptide” (APRP)] is functionally orphan. APRP is discussed as ecdysiotropic hormone or as scaffold peptide during AKH prohormone processing. However, as in the case of AKH, final evidence for APRP functions requires genetic mutant analysis. Here we employed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to create AKH and AKH plus APRP-specific mutants in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Lack of APRP did not affect any of the tested steroid-dependent processes. Similarly, Drosophila AKH signaling is dispensable for ontogenesis, locomotion, oogenesis, and homeostasis of lipid or carbohydrate storage until up to the end of metamorphosis. During adulthood, however, AKH regulates body fat content and the hemolymph sugar level as well as nutritional and oxidative stress responses. Finally, we provide evidence for a negative autoregulatory loop in Akh gene regulation. PMID:26275422

  14. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Ambrose, Karita D.; Zughaier, Susu; Zhou, Xiaoliu; Miller, Yoon K.; Shafer, William M.; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are important components of the innate host defense system against microbial infections and microbial products. However, the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis is intrinsically highly resistant to CAMPs, such as polymyxin B (PxB) (MIC ≥ 512 μg/ml). To ascertain the mechanisms by which meningococci resist PxB, mutants that displayed increased sensitivity (≥4-fold) to PxB were identified from a library of mariner transposon mutants generated in a meningococcal strain, NMB. Surprisingly, more than half of the initial PxB-sensitive mutants had insertions within the mtrCDE operon, which encodes proteins forming a multidrug efflux pump. Additional PxB-sensitive mariner mutants were identified from a second round of transposon mutagenesis performed in an mtr efflux pump-deficient background. Further, a mutation in lptA, the phosphoethanolamine (PEA) transferase responsible for modification of the lipid A head groups, was identified to cause the highest sensitivity to PxB. Mutations within the mtrD or lptA genes also increased meningococcal susceptibility to two structurally unrelated CAMPs, human LL-37 and protegrin-1. Consistently, PxB neutralized inflammatory responses elicited by the lptA mutant lipooligosaccharide more efficiently than those induced by wild-type lipooligosaccharide. mariner mutants with increased resistance to PxB were also identified in NMB background and found to contain insertions within the pilMNOPQ operon involved in pilin biogenesis. Taken together, these data indicated that meningococci utilize multiple mechanisms including the action of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump and lipid A modification as well as the type IV pilin secretion system to modulate levels of CAMP resistance. The modification of meningococcal lipid A head groups with PEA also prevents neutralization of the biological effects of endotoxin by CAMP. PMID:16030233

  15. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  16. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology.

  17. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase.

  18. Attenuated virulence of a Francisella mutant lacking the lipid A 4′-phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Abraham, Soman N.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a highly contagious disease of animals and humans, but the virulence features of F. tularensis are poorly defined. F. tularensis and the related mouse pathogen Francisella novicida synthesize unusual lipid A molecules lacking the 4′-monophosphate group typically found in the lipid A of Gram-negative bacteria. LpxF, a selective phosphatase located on the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, removes the 4′-phosphate moiety in the late stages of F. novicida lipid A assembly. To evaluate the relevance of the 4′-phosphatase to pathogenesis, we constructed a deletion mutant of lpxF and compared its virulence with wild-type F. novicida. Intradermal injection of 106 wild-type but not 108 mutant F. novicida cells is lethal to mice. The rapid clearance of the lpxF mutant is associated with a stronger local cytokine response and a greater influx of neutrophils compared with wild-type. The F. novicida mutant was highly susceptible to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin. LpxF therefore represents a kind of virulence factor that confers a distinct lipid A phenotype, preventing Francisella from activating the host innate immune response and preventing the bactericidal actions of cationic peptides. Francisella lpxF mutants may be useful for immunization against tularemia. PMID:17360489

  19. Transposon-Derived Brucella abortus Rough Mutants Are Attenuated and Exhibit Reduced Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chris A.; Adams, L. Garry; Ficht, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The O antigen of Brucella abortus has been described as a major virulence determinant based on the attenuated survival of fortuitously isolated rough variants. However, the lack of genetic definition of these mutants and the virulence of naturally occurring rough species, Brucella ovis and Brucella canis, has confused interpretation. To better characterize the role of O antigen in virulence and survival, transposon mutagenesis was used to generate B. abortus rough mutants defective in O-antigen presentation. Sequence analysis of DNA flanking the site of Tn5 insertion was used to verify insertion in genes encoding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic functions. Not surprisingly, each of the rough mutants was attenuated for survival in mice, but unexpected differences among the mutants were observed. In an effort to define the basis for the observed differences, the structure of the rough LPS and the sensitivity of these mutants to individual killing mechanisms were examined in vitro. All of the B. abortus rough mutants exhibited a 4- to 5-log-unit increase, compared to the smooth parental strain, in sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. Little change was evident in the sensitivity of these organisms to hydrogen peroxide, consistent with an inability of O antigen to exclude relatively small molecules. Sensitivity to polymyxin B, which was employed as a model cationic, amphipathic peptide similar to defensins found in phagocytic cells, revealed survival differences among the rough mutants similar to those observed in the mouse. One mutant in particular exhibited hypersensitivity to polymyxin B and reduced survival in mice. This mutant was characterized by a truncated rough LPS. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a transposon interruption in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase (pmm), suggesting that this activity may be required for the synthesis of a full-length core polysaccharide in addition to O antigen. B. abortus O antigen appears to be essential

  20. Mutagenesis of NosM Leader Peptide Reveals Important Elements in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Wu, Xuri; Xue, Yanjiu; Jin, Yue; Wang, Shuzhen; Chen, Yijun

    2017-02-15

    Nosiheptide, a typical member of the ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), exhibits potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The precursor peptide of nosiheptide (NosM) is comprised of a leader peptide with 37 amino acids and a core peptide containing 13 amino acids. To pinpoint elements in the leader peptide that are essential for nosiheptide biosynthesis, a collection of mutants with unique sequence features, including N- and C-terminal motifs, peptide length, and specific sites in the leader peptide, was generated by mutagenesis in vivo The effects of various mutants on nosiheptide biosynthesis were evaluated. In addition to the necessity of a conserved motif LEIS box, native length and the N-terminal 12 amino acid residues were indispensable, and single-site substitutions of these 12 amino acid residues resulted in changes ranging from a greater-than-5-fold decrease to a 2-fold increase of nosiheptide production, depending on the sites and substituted residues. Moreover, although the C-terminal motif is not conservative, significant effects of this portion on nosiheptide production were also evident. Taken together, the present results further highlight the importance of the leader peptide in nosiheptide biosynthesis, and provide new insights into the diversity and specificity of leader peptides in the biosynthesis of various RiPPs.

  1. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  3. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  4. Roles of different peptide transporters in nutrient acquisition in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Nico; Hertlein, Tobias; Franz, Renate; Reuß, Oliver; Sasse, Christoph; Schäfer, Tina; Ohlsen, Knut; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Fungi possess two distinct proton-coupled peptide transport systems, the dipeptide/tripeptide transporters (PTR) and the oligopeptide transporters (OPT), which enable them to utilize peptides as nutrients. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, peptide transporters are encoded by gene families consisting of two PTR genes and eight OPT genes. To gain insight into the functions and importance of specific peptide transporters, we generated mutants lacking the two dipeptide/tripeptide transporters Ptr2 and Ptr22, as well as the five major oligopeptide transporters Opt1 to Opt5. These mutants were unable to grow in media containing peptides as the sole nitrogen source. Forced expression of individual peptide transporters in the septuple mutants showed that Ptr2 and Ptr22 could utilize all tested dipeptides as substrates but differed in their abilities to transport specific tripeptides. Interestingly, several oligopeptide transporters, which are thought to transport peptides consisting of more than three amino acids, also mediated the uptake of tripeptides. Opt1 especially turned out to be a highly flexible transporter that enabled growth on all tripeptides tested and could even utilize a dipeptide, a function that has never been ascribed to this family of peptide transporters. Despite their inability to grow on proteins or peptides, the opt1Δ opt2Δ opt3Δ opt4Δ opt5Δ ptr2Δ ptr22Δ septuple mutants had no in vivo fitness defect in a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization. Therefore, the nutritional versatility of C. albicans enables it to utilize alternative nitrogen sources in this host niche, which probably contributes to its success as a commensal and pathogen in mammalian hosts.

  5. Roles of Different Peptide Transporters in Nutrient Acquisition in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Dunkel, Nico; Hertlein, Tobias; Franz, Renate; Reuß, Oliver; Sasse, Christoph; Schäfer, Tina; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Fungi possess two distinct proton-coupled peptide transport systems, the dipeptide/tripeptide transporters (PTR) and the oligopeptide transporters (OPT), which enable them to utilize peptides as nutrients. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, peptide transporters are encoded by gene families consisting of two PTR genes and eight OPT genes. To gain insight into the functions and importance of specific peptide transporters, we generated mutants lacking the two dipeptide/tripeptide transporters Ptr2 and Ptr22, as well as the five major oligopeptide transporters Opt1 to Opt5. These mutants were unable to grow in media containing peptides as the sole nitrogen source. Forced expression of individual peptide transporters in the septuple mutants showed that Ptr2 and Ptr22 could utilize all tested dipeptides as substrates but differed in their abilities to transport specific tripeptides. Interestingly, several oligopeptide transporters, which are thought to transport peptides consisting of more than three amino acids, also mediated the uptake of tripeptides. Opt1 especially turned out to be a highly flexible transporter that enabled growth on all tripeptides tested and could even utilize a dipeptide, a function that has never been ascribed to this family of peptide transporters. Despite their inability to grow on proteins or peptides, the opt1Δ opt2Δ opt3Δ opt4Δ opt5Δ ptr2Δ ptr22Δ septuple mutants had no in vivo fitness defect in a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization. Therefore, the nutritional versatility of C. albicans enables it to utilize alternative nitrogen sources in this host niche, which probably contributes to its success as a commensal and pathogen in mammalian hosts. PMID:23376942

  6. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  7. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin; Hjort, Karin; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersson, Dan I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AMPs are not fully understood. Objectives We show that in vitro serial passage of a clinical USA300 MRSA strain in a host-mimicking environment containing host-derived AMPs results in the selection of stable AMP resistance. Methods Serial passage experiments were conducted using steadily increasing concentrations of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model of sepsis. Results AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions These findings suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with cross-resistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated. PMID:27650186

  8. A novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting residues that bind the substrate peptide.

    PubMed

    Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Hisami; Parker, Lorien; Yuki, Hitomi; Taruya, Shigenao; Nakagawa, Yukari; Kamei, Daisuke; Mori, Masumi; Ogawa, Naoko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Honma, Teruki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-03-30

    A new screening method using fluorescent correlation spectroscopy was developed to select kinase inhibitors that competitively inhibit the binding of a fluorescently labeled substrate peptide. Using the method, among approximately 700 candidate compounds selected by virtual screening, we identified a novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting its peptide binding residues. X-ray crystal analysis of the complex structure of Pim-1 with the inhibitor indicated that the inhibitor actually binds to the ATP-binding site and also forms direct interactions with residues (Asp128 and Glu171) that bind the substrate peptide. These interactions, which cause small side-chain movements, seem to affect the binding ability of the fluorescently labeled substrate. The compound inhibited Pim-1 kinase in vitro, with an IC(50) value of 150 nM. Treatment of cultured leukemia cells with the compound reduced the amount of p21 and increased the amount of p27, due to Pim-1 inhibition, and then triggered apoptosis after cell-cycle arrest at the G(1)/S phase. This screening method may be widely applicable for the identification of various new Pim-1 kinase inhibitors targeting the residues that bind the substrate peptide.

  9. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells.

  10. Characterization of antimicrobial activity against Listeria and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its mutant variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Singh, Atul K; Wu, Xiaoyu; Lyu, Yuan; Bhunia, Arun K; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are relatively short peptides that have the ability to penetrate the cell membrane, form pores leading to cell death. This study compares both antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its two mutants, namely, melittin I17K (GIGAVLKVLTTGLPALKSWIKRKRQQ) with a higher charge and lower hydrophobicity and mutant G1I (IIGAVLKVLTTGLPALISWIKRKRQQ) of higher hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity against different strains of Listeria was investigated by bioassay, viability studies, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay on mammalian Caco-2 cells. The minimum inhibitory concentration of native, mutant I17K, mutant G1I against Listeria monocytogenes F4244 was 0.315±0.008, 0.814±0.006 and 0.494±0.037μg/ml respectively, whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration values were 3.263±0.0034, 7.412±0.017 and 5.366±0.019μg/ml respectively. Lag time for inactivation of L. monocytogenes F4244 was observed at concentrations below 0.20 and 0.78μg/ml for native and mutant melittin I17K respectively. The antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes F4244 was in the order native>G1I>I17K. Native melittin was cytotoxic to mammalian Caco-2 cells above concentration of 2μg/ml, whereas the two mutants exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 8μg/ml. Pore formation in cell wall/membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of native and its mutants indicated that (i) surface native melittin and G1I exhibited higher tendency to penetrate a mimic of bacterial cell membrane and (ii) transmembrane native and I17K formed water channel in mimics of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes.

  11. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  12. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  14. Oxidative stress is involved in age-dependent spermatogenic damage of Immp2l mutant mice.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E; Lu, Baisong

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in spermatogenic damage, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse in which the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene is mutated. This Immp2l mutation impairs the processing of signal peptide sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome c₁ and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion, which causes age-dependent spermatogenic damage. Here we confirm age-dependent spermatogenic damage in a new cohort of mutants, which started at the age of 10.5 months. Compared with age-matched controls, protein carbonyl content was normal in testes of 2- to 5-month-old mutants, but significantly elevated in testes of 13-month-old mutants, indicating elevated oxidative stress in the testes at the time of impaired spermatogenesis. Testicular expression of superoxide dismutases was not different between control and mutant mice, whereas that of catalase was increased in young and old mutants. The expression of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase 4 (phospholipid hydroperoxidase) in testes was significantly reduced in 13-month-old mutants, concomitant with impaired spermatogenesis. Apoptosis of all testicular populations was increased in mutant mice with spermatogenic damage. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate in germ cells of mutant mice with impaired spermatogenesis was unchanged, excluding a major role of mtDNA mutation in ROS-mediated spermatogenic damage. Our data show that increased mitochondrial ROS are one of the driving forces for spermatogenic impairment.

  15. Calreticulin mutants in mice induce an MPL-dependent thrombocytosis with frequent progression to myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Caroline; Pecquet, Christian; Nivarthi, Harini; El-Khoury, Mira; Chachoua, Ilyas; Tulliez, Micheline; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Raslova, Hana; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-03-10

    Frameshift mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are seen in about 30% of essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis patients. To address the contribution of the CALR mutants to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we engrafted lethally irradiated recipient mice with bone marrow cells transduced with retroviruses expressing these mutants. In contrast to wild-type CALR, CALRdel52 (type I) and, to a lesser extent, CALRins5 (type II) induced thrombocytosis due to a megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia. Disease was transplantable into secondary recipients. After 6 months, CALRdel52-, in contrast to rare CALRins5-, transduced mice developed a myelofibrosis associated with a splenomegaly and a marked osteosclerosis. Monitoring of virus-transduced populations indicated that CALRdel52 leads to expansion at earlier stages of hematopoiesis than CALRins5. However, both mutants still specifically amplified the MK lineage and platelet production. Moreover, a mutant deleted of the entire exon 9 (CALRdelex9) did not induce a disease, suggesting that the oncogenic property of CALR mutants was related to the new C-terminus peptide. To understand how the CALR mutants target the MK lineage, we used a cell-line model and demonstrated that the CALR mutants, but not CALRdelex9, specifically activate the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL) to induce constitutive activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5/3/1. We confirmed in c-mpl- and tpo-deficient mice that expression of Mpl, but not of Tpo, was essential for the CALR mutants to induce thrombocytosis in vivo, although Tpo contributes to disease penetrance. Thus, CALR mutants are sufficient to induce thrombocytosis through MPL activation.

  16. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  17. Role of SbmA in the uptake of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-peptide conjugates in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Vitali, Ally; Stach, James E M; Nielsen, Peter E

    2013-02-15

    Antisense PNA oligomers targeting essential genes (acpP or ftsZ) and conjugated to the delivery peptide L((KFF)(3)K) show complete growth inhibition of wild type E. coli strain (MG1655) with submicromolar MIC. In this study we show that resistant mutants generated against such PNA-peptide conjugates had disruptions in the region of sbmA, a gene encoding an inner membrane peptide transporter. The wild type sensitivity to the PNA conjugates was re-established in the resistance mutants by complementation with sbmA. Furthermore, deletion of sbmA in E. coli AS19, a strain that is sensitive to unmodified PNA, resulted in resistance to PNA. Finally, PNA conjugated with the corresponding non-biological H-D((KFF)(3)K) peptide retained antibacterial activity in sbmA deletion strains, whereas the same conjugate with a protease-sensitive linker did not. These results clearly identify SbmA as a carrier of naked PNA over the inner bacterial membrane and thereby infer that the peptide is transporting the PNA conjugates over the outer membrane. Strains lacking SbmA were used to screen novel peptide-PNA carriers that were SbmA-independent. Four such PNA-peptide conjugates, H-D((KFF)(3)K), H-(RFR)(4)-Ahx-βAla, H-(R-Ahx-R)(4)-Ahx-βAla, and H-(R-Ahx)(6)-βAla, were identified that utilize an alternative uptake mechanism but retain their antimicrobial potency. In addition SbmA is the first protein identified to recognize PNA.

  18. Peptide ligands specific to the oxidized form of escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Banach, B. S.; Hamdan, S. M.; Richardson, C. C.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Amunix, Inc.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Harvard Medical School

    2008-11-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a highly conserved redox protein involved in several essential cellular processes. In this study, our goal was to isolate peptide ligands to Escherichia coli Trx that mimic protein-protein interactions, specifically the T7 polymerase-Trx interaction. To do this, we subjected Trx to affinity selection against a panel of linear and cysteine-constrained peptides using M13 phage display. A novel cyclized conserved peptide sequence, with a motif of C(D/N/S/T/G)D(S/T)-hydrophobic-C-X-hydrophobic-P, was isolated to Trx. These peptides bound specifically to the E. coli Trx when compared to the human and spirulina homologs. An alanine substitution of the active site cysteines (CGPC) resulted in a significant loss of peptide binding affinity to the Cys-32 mutant. The peptides were also characterized in the context of Trx's role as a processivity factor of the T7 DNA polymerase (gp5). As the interaction between gp5 and Trx normally takes place under reducing conditions, which might interfere with the conformation of the disulfide-bridged peptides, we made use of a 22 residue deletion mutant of gp5 in the thioredoxin binding domain (gp5{Delta}22) that bypassed the requirements of reducing conditions to interact with Trx. A competition study revealed that the peptide selectively inhibits the interaction of gp5{Delta}22 with Trx, under oxidizing conditions, with an IC50 of {approx} 10 {micro}M.

  19. Identification, validation, and targeting of the mutant p53-PARP-MCM chromatin axis in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei-Gang; Polotskaia, Alla; Xiao, Gu; Di, Lia; Zhao, Yuhan; Hu, Wenwei; Philip, John; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Bargonetti, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Over 80% of triple negative breast cancers express mutant p53. Mutant p53 often gains oncogenic function suggesting that triple negative breast cancers may be driven by p53 protein type. To determine the chromatin targets of this gain-of-function mutant p53 we used inducible knockdown of endogenous gain-of-function mtp53 in MDA-MB-468 cells in conjunction with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture and subcellular fractionation. We sequenced over 70,000 total peptides for each corresponding reciprocal data set and were able to identify 3010 unique cytoplasmic fraction proteins and 3403 unique chromatin fraction proteins. The present proteomics experiment corroborated our previous experiment-based results that poly ADP-ribose polymerase has a positive association with mutant p53 on the chromatin. Here, for the first time we report that the heterohexomeric minichromosome maintenance complex that participates in DNA replication initiation ranked as a high mutant p53-chromatin associated pathway. Enrichment analysis identified the minichromosome maintenance members 2-7. To validate this mutant p53- poly ADP-ribose polymerase-minichromosome maintenance functional axis, we experimentally depleted R273H mutant p53 and found a large reduction of the amount of minichromosome maintenance complex proteins on the chromatin. Furthermore a mutant p53-minichromosome maintenance 2 direct interaction was detected. Overexpressed mutant p53, but not wild type p53, showed a protein-protein interaction with minichromosome maintenance 2 and minichromosome maintenance 4. To target the mutant p53- poly ADP-ribose polymerase-minichromosome maintenance axis we treated cells with the poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor talazoparib and the alkylating agent temozolomide and detected synergistic activation of apoptosis only in the presence of mutant p53. Furthermore when minichromosome maintenance 2-7 activity was inhibited the synergistic activation of apoptosis was blocked

  20. ID4 regulates transcriptional activity of wild type and mutant p53 via K373 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Morton, Derrick J; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Hunt, Aisha; Knowell, Ashley E; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2017-01-10

    Given that mutated p53 (50% of all human cancers) is over-expressed in many cancers, restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function has been sought after as cancer therapy. The conformational flexibility has allowed to restore the normal biological function of mutant p53 by short peptides and small molecule compounds. Recently, studies have focused on physiological mechanisms such as acetylation of lysine residues to rescue the wild type activity of mutant p53. Using p53 null prostate cancer cell line we show that ID4 dependent acetylation promotes mutant p53 DNA-binding capabilities to its wild type consensus sequence, thus regulating p53-dependent target genes leading to subsequent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Specifically, by using wild type, mutant (P223L, V274F, R175H, R273H), acetylation mimics (K320Q and K373Q) and non-acetylation mimics (K320R and K373R) of p53, we identify that ID4 promotes acetylation of K373 and to a lesser extent K320, in turn restoring p53-dependent biological activities. Together, our data provides a molecular understanding of ID4 dependent acetylation that suggests a strategy of enhancing p53 acetylation at sites K373 and K320 that may serve as a viable mechanism of physiological restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function.

  1. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  2. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time.

  3. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses.

    PubMed

    Hancock, R E; Scott, M G

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  4. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert E. W.; Scott, Monisha G.

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  5. Cutting edge: HLA-DM-mediated peptide exchange functions normally on MHC class II-peptide complexes that have been weakened by elimination of a conserved hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Andrea; Gorski, Jack

    2010-02-01

    The mechanism by which HLA-DM (DM) promotes exchange of peptides bound to HLA-DR (DR) is still unclear. We have shown that peptide interaction with DR1 can be considered a folding process as evidenced by cooperativity. However, in DM-mediated ligand exchange, prebound peptide release is noncooperative, which could be a function of the breaking of a critical interaction. The hydrogen bond (H-bond) between beta-chain His(81) and the peptide backbone at the -1 position is a candidate for such a target. In this study, we analyze the exchange of peptides bound to a DR1 mutant in which formation of this H-bond is impaired. We observe that DM still functions normally. However, as expected of a cooperative model, this H-bond contributes to the overall energetics of the complex and its disruption impacts the ability of the exchange ligand to fold with the binding groove into a stable complex.

  6. Selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for the efficient selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants defective in the chemotactic response to folate could be enriched up to 30-fold in one round of selection using a chamber in which a compartment that contained the chemoattractant was separated by a sandwich of four nitrocellulose filters from a compartment that contained buffer. Mutagenized cells were placed in the center of the filter layer and exposed to the attractant gradient built up between the compartments for a period of 3-4 h. While wild-type cells moved through the filters in a wave towards the compartment that contained attractant, mutant cells remained in the filter to which they were applied. After several repetitions of the selection procedure, mutants defective in chemotaxis made up 10% of the total cell population retained in that filter. Mutants exhibiting three types of alterations were collected: motility mutants with either reduced speed of movement, or altered rates of turning; a single mutant defective in production of the attractant- degrading enzyme, folate deaminase; and mutants with normal motility but reduced chemotactic responsiveness. One mutant showed drastically reduced sensitivity in folate-induced cGMP production. Morphogenetic alterations of mutants defective in folate chemotaxis are described. PMID:3793759

  7. Antimicrobial peptides as potential new antifungals.

    PubMed

    Müller, F M; Lyman, C A; Walsh, T J

    1999-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized natural antimicrobial peptides (AP) and their synthetic derivatives are small, cationic, amphipathic molecules of 12-50 amino acids with unusually broad activity spectra. These peptides kill microorganisms by a common mechanism, which involves binding to the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, forming pores, and ultimately followed by cell lysis. Several AP from mammals, amphibians, insects, plants and their synthetic derivatives demonstrate promising in vitro activity against various pathogenic fungi including azole-resistant Candida albicans strains. In addition to their antimicrobial activity, some AP such as lactoferrin, interact with a variety of host cells and can increase the activity of natural killer and lymphokine activated killer cells. Pretreatment of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) or monocytes with these AP also may upregulate superoxide release. AP as potential new antifungal agents offer some advantages, such as rapid killing of pathogenic fungi and the difficulty to raise mutants resistant to these peptides. AP are limited by their nonselective toxicity, stability, immunogenicity and their costs of production. Potential clinical applications of AP in the future have to be further explored in preclinical and clinical studies to assess their impact as a new class of antifungals.

  8. Unpredicted phenotypes of two mutants of the TcR DMF5.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Fitsum G; Mensali, Nadia; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Walseng, Even; Yang, Weiwen; Olweus, Johanna; Wälchli, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    When a T-cell Receptor (TcR) interacts with its cognate peptide-MHC (pMHC), it triggers activation of a signaling cascade that results in the elicitation of a T cell effector function. Different models have been proposed to understand which parameters are needed to obtain an optimal activation of the signaling. It was speculated that improving the binding of a TcR could bring a stronger pMHC recognition, hence a stronger stimulation of the T cell. However, it was recently shown that an increase in affinity does not seem to be sufficient to guarantee improved functionality. A combination of factors is necessary to place the modified TcR in an optimal functional window. We here compared the binding parameters of two mutants of the melanoma antigen peptide MART-127-35 specific TcR DMF5. The first mutant was previously isolated by others in a screen for improved TcR. It was reported to have an increased CD8-independent activity. We confirmed these data and showed that the enhancement was neither due to change in half life (t1/2) nor Kd of the pMHC-TcR complex. The second mutant was designed based on a previous report claiming that a particular polymorphic residue in the TRAV12-2 chain was stabilizing the TcR. We created a DMF5 mutant for this residue and showed that, unexpectedly, this TcR had acquired a reduced overall activity although the TcR-pMHC complex was more stable when compared to the TcR wild type complex (increased t1/2). In addition, the soluble TcR form of this mutant bound target cells less efficiently. From this we concluded that kinetic parameters do not always predict the superior functionality of mutant TcRs.

  9. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  10. Inhibition of mutant BRAF splice variant signaling by next-generation, selective RAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Le, Kaitlyn; Hartsough, Edward J; Aplin, Andrew E

    2014-05-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib block MEK-ERK1/2 signaling and cause tumor regression in the majority of advanced-stage BRAF(V600E) melanoma patients; however, acquired resistance and paradoxical signaling have driven efforts for more potent and selective RAF inhibitors. Next-generation RAF inhibitors, such as PLX7904 (PB04), effectively inhibit RAF signaling in BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells without paradoxical effects in wild-type cells. Furthermore, PLX7904 blocks the growth of vemurafenib-resistant BRAF(V600E) cells that express mutant NRAS. Acquired resistance to vemurafenib and dabrafenib is also frequently driven by expression of mutation BRAF splice variants; thus, we tested the effects of PLX7904 and its clinical analog, PLX8394 (PB03), in BRAF(V600E) splice variant-mediated vemurafenib-resistant cells. We show that paradox-breaker RAF inhibitors potently block MEK-ERK1/2 signaling, G1/S cell cycle events, survival and growth of vemurafenib/PLX4720-resistant cells harboring distinct BRAF(V600E) splice variants. These data support the further investigation of paradox-breaker RAF inhibitors as a second-line treatment option for patients failing on vemurafenib or dabrafenib.

  11. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0360 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey L. Greene, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE September 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant ...approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant ER signaling and

  12. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1- Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...current FDA approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant

  13. De Novo Peptide Design and Experimental Validation of Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, James; Peterson, Meghan B.; Zee, Barry M.; Garapaty, Shivani; Mago, Aashna; Lee, Christina; Giannis, Athanassios; Trojer, Patrick; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-01-01

    Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2. These inhibitors should

  14. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  15. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Electrophysiological study of Drosophila rhodopsin mutants

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Electrophysiological investigations were carried out on several independently isolated mutants of the ninaE gene, which encodes opsin in R1-6 photoreceptors, and a mutant of the ninaD gene, which is probably important in the formation of the rhodopsin chromophore. In these mutants, the rhodopsin content in R1-6 photoreceptors is reduced by 10(2)-10(6)-fold. Light-induced bumps recorded from even the most severely affected mutants are physiologically normal. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis shows that photoreceptor responses of both a ninaE mutant and a ninaD mutant follow the adapting bump model. Since any extensive rhodopsin-rhodopsin interactions are not likely in these mutants, the above results suggest that such interactions are not needed for the generation and adaptation of light-induced bumps. Mutant bumps are strikingly larger in amplitude than wild-type bumps. This difference is observed both in ninaD and ninaE mutants, which suggests that it is due to severe depletion of rhodopsin content, rather than to any specific alterations in the opsin protein. Lowering or buffering the intracellular calcium concentration by EGTA injection mimics the effects of the mutations on the bump amplitude, but, unlike the mutations, it also affects the latency and kinetics of light responses. PMID:3097245

  17. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  18. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  19. Identification of Drosophila Mutants Affecting Defense to an Entomopathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Wang, Jonathan B.; Brown, Markus A.; Euerle, Christopher; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi cause the majority of insect disease. However, to date attempts to model host–fungal interactions with Drosophila have focused on opportunistic human pathogens. Here, we performed a screen of 2,613 mutant Drosophila lines to identify host genes affecting susceptibility to the natural insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma549). Overall, 241 (9.22%) mutant lines had altered resistance to Ma549. Life spans ranged from 3.0 to 6.2 days, with females being more susceptible than males in all lines. Speed of kill correlated with within-host growth and onset of sporulation, but total spore production is decoupled from host genotypes. Results showed that mutations affected the ability of Drosophila to restrain rather than tolerate infections and suggested trade-offs between antifungal and antibacterial genes affecting cuticle and gut structural barriers. Approximately, 13% of mutations where in genes previously associated with host pathogen interactions. These encoded fast-acting immune responses including coagulation, phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization but not the slow-response induction of anti-fungal peptides. The non-immune genes impact a wide variety of biological functions, including behavioral traits. Many have human orthologs already implicated in human disorders; while others were mutations in protein and non-protein coding genes for which disease resistance was the first biological annotation. PMID:26202798

  20. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  1. Functional characterization of sequence motifs in the transit peptide of Arabidopsis small subunit of rubisco.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Sookjin; Lee, Gil-Je; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Cheong, Gang-Won; Hwang, Inhwan

    2006-02-01

    The transit peptides of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins are necessary and sufficient for targeting and import of proteins into chloroplasts. However, the sequence information encoded by transit peptides is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated sequence motifs in the transit peptide of the small subunit of the Rubisco complex by examining the ability of various mutant transit peptides to target green fluorescent protein reporter proteins to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf protoplasts. We divided the transit peptide into eight blocks (T1 through T8), each consisting of eight or 10 amino acids, and generated mutants that had alanine (Ala) substitutions or deletions, of one or two T blocks in the transit peptide. In addition, we generated mutants that had the original sequence partially restored in single- or double-T-block Ala (A) substitution mutants. Analysis of chloroplast import of these mutants revealed several interesting observations. Single-T-block mutations did not noticeably affect targeting efficiency, except in T1 and T4 mutations. However, double-T mutants, T2A/T4A, T3A/T6A, T3A/T7A, T4A/T6A, and T4A/T7A, caused a 50% to 100% loss in targeting ability. T3A/T6A and T4A/T6A mutants produced only precursor proteins, whereas T2A/T4A and T4A/T7A mutants produced only a 37-kD protein. Detailed analyses revealed that sequence motifs ML in T1, LKSSA in T3, FP and RK in T4, CMQVW in T6, and KKFET in T7 play important roles in chloroplast targeting. In T1, the hydrophobicity of ML is important for targeting. LKSSA in T3 is functionally equivalent to CMQVW in T6 and KKFET in T7. Furthermore, subcellular fractionation revealed that Ala substitution in T1, T3, and T6 produced soluble precursors, whereas Ala substitution in T4 and T7 produced intermediates that were tightly associated with membranes. These results demonstrate that the transit peptide contains multiple motifs and that some of them act in concert or

  2. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  3. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  4. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  5. Development of bacterial display peptides for use in biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Kogot, Joshua M.; Sellers, Michael S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Pennington, Joseph M.; Val-Addo, Irene; Adams, Bryn L.; Warner, Candice R.; Carney, James P.; Brown, Rebecca L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for the rapid production of reagent technology in response to biological threats. A synthetic library of peptide mutants built off a bacterial host offers a convenient means to link the peptide sequence, (i.e., identity of individual library members) with the desired molecular recognition traits, but also allows for a relatively simple protocol, amenable to automation. An improved understanding of the mechanisms of recognition and control of synthetic reagent isolation and evolution remain critical to success. In this paper, we describe our approach to development of peptide affinity reagents based on peptide bacterial display technology with improved control of binding interactions for stringent evolution of reagent candidates, and tailored performance capabilities. There are four key elements to the peptide affinity reagent program including: (1) the diverse bacterial library technology, (2) advanced reagent screening amenable to laboratory automation and control, (3) iterative characterization and feedback on both affinity and specificity of the molecular interactions, and (3) integrated multiscale computational prescreening of candidate peptide ligands including in silico prediction of improved binding performance. Specific results on peptides binders to Protective Antigen (PA) protein of Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) will be presented. Recent highlights of on cell vs. off-cell affinity behavior and correlation of the results with advanced docking simulations on the protein-peptide system(s) are included. The potential of this technology and approach to enable rapid development of a new affinity reagent with unprecedented speed (less than one week) would allow for rapid response to new and constantly emerging threats.

  6. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of three chensinin-1 peptides containing mutation of glycine and histidine residues

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weibing; Mao, Xiaoman; Guan, Yue; Kang, Yao; Shang, Dejing

    2017-01-01

    The natural peptide chensinin-1 doesnot exhibit its desired biological properties. In this study, the mutant MC1-1 was designed by replacing Gly in the chensinin-1 sequence with Trp. Mutants MC1-2 and MC1-3 were designed based on the MC1-1 sequence to investigate the specific role of His residues. The mutated peptides presented α-helicity in a membrane-mimetic environment and exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities; in contrast to Trp residues, His residues were dispensable for interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions between the mutant peptides and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) facilitated the ingestion of peptides by Gram-negative bacteria. The binding affinities of the peptides were similar, at approximately 10 μM, but ΔH for MC1-2 was −7.3 kcal.mol−1, which was 6-9 folds higher than those of MC1-1 and MC1-3, probably due to the conformational changes. All mutant peptides demonstrated the ability to inhibit LPS-induced tumour-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release from murine RAW264.7 cells. In addition, the representative peptide MC1-1showed better inhibition of serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels compared to polymyxin B (PMB), a potent binder and neutralizer of LPS as positive control in LPS-challenged mice model. These data suggest that the mutant peptides could be promising molecules for development as chensinin-based therapeutic agents against sepsis. PMID:28054660

  7. Partial complementation of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacA mutant phenotypes by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis BacA protein.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M F F; Haag, A F; Capewell, S; Boshoff, H I; James, E K; McDonald, R; Mair, I; Mitchell, A M; Kerscher, B; Mitchell, T J; Mergaert, P; Barry, C E; Scocchi, M; Zanda, M; Campopiano, D J; Ferguson, G P

    2013-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti BacA ABC transporter protein plays an important role in its nodulating symbiosis with the legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The Mycobacterium tuberculosis BacA homolog was found to be important for the maintenance of chronic murine infections, yet its in vivo function is unknown. In the legume plant as well as in the mammalian host, bacteria encounter host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We found that the M. tuberculosis BacA protein was able to partially complement the symbiotic defect of an S. meliloti BacA-deficient mutant on alfalfa plants and to protect this mutant in vitro from the antimicrobial activity of a synthetic legume peptide, NCR247, and a recombinant human β-defensin 2 (HBD2). This finding was also confirmed using an M. tuberculosis insertion mutant. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis BacA-mediated protection of the legume symbiont S. meliloti against legume defensins as well as HBD2 is dependent on its attached ATPase domain. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis BacA mediates peptide uptake of the truncated bovine AMP, Bac7(1-16). This process required a functional ATPase domain. We therefore suggest that M. tuberculosis BacA is important for the transport of peptides across the cytoplasmic membrane and is part of a complete ABC transporter. Hence, BacA-mediated protection against host AMPs might be important for the maintenance of latent infections.

  8. Enhancers of Conidiation Mutants in Aspergillus Nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Gems, D. H.; Clutterbuck, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Mutants at a number of loci, designated sthenyo, have been isolated as enhancers of the oligoconidial mutations at the medA locus. Two loci have been mapped: sthA on linkage group I, and sthB on linkage group V. Two probable alleles have been identified at each locus but two further mutants were unlinked to either sthA or sthB. Neither sthA nor sthB mutants have conspicuous effects on morphology on their own, nor could the sthA1 sthB2 double mutant be distinguished from wild type. Mutants at both loci also interact with the temperature-sensitive brlA42 mutant at the permissive temperature to give a phenotype described as ``Abacoid.'' sthA1 also induces a slight modification of the phenotype of an abaA mutant. We conclude that sthenyo genes act mainly at the phialide stage of conidiation. We also describe the isolation of new medA mutants arising spontaneously as outgrowths on brlA42 colonies. PMID:8056325

  9. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  10. A halotolerant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Gaxiola, R; Corona, M; Zinker, S

    1996-01-01

    FRD, a nuclear and dominant spontaneous mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of growing in up to 2 M NaCl, was isolated. Compared with parental cells, the mutant cells have a lower intracellular Na+/K+ ratio, shorter generation times in the presence of 1 M NaCl, and alterations in gene expression. PMID:8631691

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  12. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  13. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  14. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  15. Identification of Mutant Genes and Introgressed Tiger Salamander DNA in the Laboratory Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, M Ryan; Vaughn-Wolfe, Jennifer; Elias, Alexandra; Kump, D Kevin; Kendall, Katharina Denise; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir; Perry, Dustin W; Smith, Jeramiah J; Spiewak, Jessica E; Parichy, David M; Voss, S Randal

    2017-12-01

    The molecular genetic toolkit of the Mexican axolotl, a classic model organism, has matured to the point where it is now possible to identify genes for mutant phenotypes. We used a positional cloning-candidate gene approach to identify molecular bases for two historic axolotl pigment phenotypes: white and albino. White (d/d) mutants have defects in pigment cell morphogenesis and differentiation, whereas albino (a/a) mutants lack melanin. We identified in white mutants a transcriptional defect in endothelin 3 (edn3), encoding a peptide factor that promotes pigment cell migration and differentiation in other vertebrates. Transgenic restoration of Edn3 expression rescued the homozygous white mutant phenotype. We mapped the albino locus to tyrosinase (tyr) and identified polymorphisms shared between the albino allele (tyr (a) ) and tyr alleles in a Minnesota population of tiger salamanders from which the albino trait was introgressed. tyr (a) has a 142 bp deletion and similar engineered alleles recapitulated the albino phenotype. Finally, we show that historical introgression of tyr (a) significantly altered genomic composition of the laboratory axolotl, yielding a distinct, hybrid strain of ambystomatid salamander. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying genes for traits in the laboratory Mexican axolotl.

  16. crl mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae resemble both mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis and omnipotent translational suppressor mutants.

    PubMed

    McCusker, J H; Haber, J E

    1988-06-01

    Cyocloheximide resistant lethal (crl) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining 22 unlinked complementation groups, are unable to grow at 37 degrees. They are also highly pleiotropic at their permissive temperature of 25 degrees. The mutants are all unable to arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when grown to stationary phase or when starved for a single amino acid, though they do arrest at G1 when deprived of all nitrogen. The crl mutants are also hypersensitive to various amino acid analogs and to 3-aminotriazole. These mutants also "tighten" leaky auxotrophic mutations that permit wild-type cells to grow in the absence of the appropriate amino acid. All of these phenotypes are also exhibited by gcn mutants affecting general control of amino acid biosynthesis. In addition, the crl mutants are all hypersensitive to hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that stimulates translational misreading. The crl mutations also suppress one nonsense mutation which is phenotypically suppressed by hygromycin B. Many crl mutants are also osmotically sensitive. These are phenotypes which the crl mutations have in common with previously isolated omnipotent suppressors. We suggest that the the crl mutations all affect the fidelity of protein translation.

  17. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  18. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  19. Identification of Mycobacterium avium genes associated with resistance to host antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Nima; Danelishvili, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate immune defence. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is an organism that establishes contact with the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa as a necessary step for infection. M. avium is resistant to high concentrations of polymyxin B, a surrogate for antimicrobial peptides. To determine gene-encoding proteins that are associated with this resistance, we screened a transposon library of M. avium strain 104 for susceptibility to polymyxin B. Ten susceptible mutants were identified and the inactivated genes sequenced. The great majority of the genes were related to cell wall synthesis and permeability. The mutants were then examined for their ability to enter macrophages and to survive macrophage killing. Three clones among the mutants had impaired uptake by macrophages compared with the WT strain, and all ten clones were attenuated in macrophages. The mutants were also shown to be susceptible to cathelicidin (LL-37), in contrast to the WT bacterium. All but one of the mutants were significantly attenuated in mice. In conclusion, this study indicated that the M. avium envelope is the primary defence against host antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24836414

  20. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  1. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  2. PptAB Exports Rgg Quorum-Sensing Peptides in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A transposon mutagenesis screen designed to identify mutants that were defective in peptide-pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/Rgg3 pathway in Streptococcus pyogenes generated insertions in sixteen loci displaying diminished reporter activity. Fourteen unique transposon insertions were mapped to pptAB, an ABC-type transporter recently described to export sex pheromones of Enterococcus faecalis. Consistent with an idea that PptAB exports signaling peptides, the pheromones known as SHPs (short hydrophobic peptides) were no longer detected in cell-free culture supernatants in a generated deletion mutant of pptAB. PptAB exporters are conserved among the Firmicutes, but their function and substrates remain unclear. Therefore, we tested a pptAB mutant generated in Streptococcus mutans and found that while secretion of heterologously expressed SHP peptides required PptAB, secretion of the S. mutans endogenous pheromone XIP (sigX inducing peptide) was only partially disrupted, indicating that a secondary secretion pathway for XIP exists. PMID:27992504

  3. PptAB Exports Rgg Quorum-Sensing Peptides in Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer C; Federle, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    A transposon mutagenesis screen designed to identify mutants that were defective in peptide-pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/Rgg3 pathway in Streptococcus pyogenes generated insertions in sixteen loci displaying diminished reporter activity. Fourteen unique transposon insertions were mapped to pptAB, an ABC-type transporter recently described to export sex pheromones of Enterococcus faecalis. Consistent with an idea that PptAB exports signaling peptides, the pheromones known as SHPs (short hydrophobic peptides) were no longer detected in cell-free culture supernatants in a generated deletion mutant of pptAB. PptAB exporters are conserved among the Firmicutes, but their function and substrates remain unclear. Therefore, we tested a pptAB mutant generated in Streptococcus mutans and found that while secretion of heterologously expressed SHP peptides required PptAB, secretion of the S. mutans endogenous pheromone XIP (sigX inducing peptide) was only partially disrupted, indicating that a secondary secretion pathway for XIP exists.

  4. Targeting the DNA replication checkpoint by pharmacologic inhibition of Chk1 kinase: a strategy to sensitize APC mutant colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R; Brocardo, Mariana G

    2014-10-30

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line component used in colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy however even in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs recurrence is common. Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are considered as the initiating step of transformation in familial and sporadic CRCs. We have previously shown that APC regulates the cellular response to DNA replication stress and recently hypothesized that APC mutations might therefore influence 5-FU resistance. To test this, we compared CRC cell lines and show that those expressing truncated APC exhibit a limited response to 5-FU and arrest in G1/S-phase without undergoing lethal damage, unlike cells expressing wild-type APC. In SW480 APC-mutant CRC cells, 5-FU-dependent apoptosis was restored after transient expression of full length APC, indicating a direct link between APC and drug response. Furthermore, we could increase sensitivity of APC truncated cells to 5-FU by inactivating the Chk1 kinase using drug treatment or siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our findings identify mutant APC as a potential tumor biomarker of resistance to 5-FU, and importantly we show that APC-mutant CRC cells can be made more sensitive to 5-FU by use of Chk1 inhibitors.

  5. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Shayla K; Schnell, Frederick J; McMaster, Sean R; Pinelli, David F; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  6. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  7. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  8. Interaction mechanism of insulin-like peptide 5 with relaxin family peptide receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Jun; Wei, Dian; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jia-Hui; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2017-04-01

    Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a gut peptide hormone belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It is implicated in the regulation of food intake and glucose homeostasis by activating relaxin family peptide receptor 4 (RXFP4). Previous studies have suggested that the B-chain is important for INSL5 activity against RXFP4. However, functionalities of the B-chain residues have not yet been systematically studied. In the present work, we conducted alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the B-chain residues of human INSL5 to obtain an overview of their contributions. Binding and activation assays of these INSL5 mutants with human RXFP4 identified two essential exposed B-chain C-terminal residues (B23Arg and B24Trp) and one important exposed central B-chain residue (B16Ile). These three determinant residues together with the C-terminal carboxylate moiety probably constitute a central receptor-binding patch that forms critical hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with RXFP4 during INSL5 binding. Some other exposed residues, including B10Glu, B12Ile, B13Arg, B17Tyr, B21Ser, and B22Ser, made minor contributions to INSL5 function. These auxiliary residues are scattered around the edge of the central receptor-binding patch, and thus form a peripheral receptor-binding patch on the surface of INSL5. Our present work provides new insights into the interaction mechanism of INSL5 with its receptor RXFP4.

  9. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  10. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  11. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  12. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  13. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  14. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  15. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  16. Characterization of rag1 mutant zebrafish leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Hohn, Claudia; Hanson, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Zebrafish may prove to be one of the best vertebrate models for innate immunology. These fish have sophisticated immune components, yet rely heavily on innate immune mechanisms. Thus, the development and characterization of mutant and/or knock out zebrafish are critical to help define immune cell and immune gene functions in the zebrafish model. The use of Severe Combined Immunodeficient (SCID) and recombination activation gene 1 and 2 mutant mice has allowed the investigation of the specific contribution of innate defenses in many infectious diseases. Similar zebrafish mutants are now being used in biomedical and fish immunology related research. This report describes the leukocyte populations in a unique model, recombination activation gene 1-/- mutant zebrafish (rag1 mutants). Results Differential counts of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) showed that rag1 mutants had significantly decreased lymphocyte-like cell populations (34.7%) compared to wild-types (70.5%), and significantly increased granulocyte populations (52.7%) compared to wild-types (17.6%). Monocyte/macrophage populations were similar between mutants and wild-types, 12.6% and 11.3%, respectively. Differential leukocyte counts of rag1 mutant kidney hematopoietic tissue showed a significantly reduced lymphocyte-like cell population (8%), a significantly increased myelomonocyte population (57%), 34.8% precursor cells, and 0.2% thrombocytes, while wild-type hematopoietic kidney tissue showed 29.4% lymphocytes/lymphocyte-like cells, 36.4% myelomonocytes, 33.8% precursors and 0.5% thrombocytes. Flow cytometric analyses of kidney hematopoietic tissue revealed three leukocyte populations. Population A was monocytes and granulocytes and comprised 34.7% of the gated cells in rag1 mutants and 17.6% in wild-types. Population B consisted of hematopoietic precursors, and comprised 50% of the gated cells for rag1 mutants and 53% for wild-types. Population C consisted of lymphocytes and lymphocyte

  17. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, B B; Lippincott, J A

    1966-10-01

    Lippincott, Barbara B. (Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill.), and James A. Lippincott. Characteristics of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic mutant infectivity. J. Bacteriol. 92:937-945. 166.-Mutants of Agrobacterium tumefaciens auxotrophic for adenine, methionine, or asparagine are less infectious than the wild-type strain B6 from which they were derived and show increased infectivity on pinto bean leaves when the specific compounds required for growth of the mutants are added to the infected leaf. Reversion to a prototrophic form of nutrition is accompanied by increased infectivity. Tumors initiated by these auxotrophic mutants are shown to arise only at large wound sites where nutritional conditions may be less restricting. The data indicate that, after inoculation, the bacteria pass through a phase in which host-supplied nutrients are utilized for the production of one or more factors necessary for successful tumor initiation.

  18. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  19. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  20. Isolation and characterization of unusual gin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Klippel, A; Cloppenborg, K; Kahmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Site-specific inversion of the G segment in phage Mu DNA is promoted by two proteins, the DNA invertase Gin and the host factor FIS. Recombination occurs if the recombination sites (IR) are arranged as inverted repeats and a recombinational enhancer sequence is present in cis. Intermolecular reactions as well as deletions between direct repeats of the IRs rarely occur. Making use of a fis- mutant of Escherichia coli we have devised a scheme to isolate gin mutants that have a FIS independent phenotype. This mutant phenotype is caused by single amino acid changes at five different positions of gin. The mutant proteins display a whole set of new properties in vivo: they promote inversions, deletions and intermolecular recombination in an enhancer- and FIS-independent manner. The mutants differ in recombination activity. The most active mutant protein was analysed in vitro. The loss of site orientation specificity was accompanied with the ability to recombine even linear substrates. We discuss these results in connection with the role of the enhancer and FIS protein in the wild-type situation. Images PMID:2974801

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  2. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  3. Mutant HSP70 reverses autoimmune depigmentation in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mosenson, Jeffrey A; Zloza, Andrew; Nieland, John D; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Eby, Jonathan M; Huelsmann, Erica J; Kumar, Previn; Denman, Cecele J; Lacek, Andrew T; Kohlhapp, Frederick J; Alamiri, Ahmad; Hughes, Tasha; Bines, Steven D; Kaufman, Howard L; Overbeck, Andreas; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Hernandez, Claudia; Nishimura, Michael I; Guevara-Patino, Jose A; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2013-02-27

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by destruction of melanocytes, leaving 0.5% of the population with progressive depigmentation. Current treatments offer limited efficacy. We report that modified inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i) prevents T cell-mediated depigmentation. HSP70i is the molecular link between stress and the resultant immune response. We previously showed that HSP70i induces an inflammatory dendritic cell (DC) phenotype and is necessary for depigmentation in vitiligo mouse models. Here, we observed a similar DC inflammatory phenotype in vitiligo patients. In a mouse model of depigmentation, DNA vaccination with a melanocyte antigen and the carboxyl terminus of HSP70i was sufficient to drive autoimmunity. Mutational analysis of the HSP70i substrate-binding domain established the peptide QPGVLIQVYEG as invaluable for DC activation, and mutant HSP70i could not induce depigmentation. Moreover, mutant HSP70iQ435A bound human DCs and reduced their activation, as well as induced a shift from inflammatory to tolerogenic DCs in mice. HSP70iQ435A-encoding DNA applied months before spontaneous depigmentation prevented vitiligo in mice expressing a transgenic, melanocyte-reactive T cell receptor. Furthermore, use of HSP70iQ435A therapeutically in a different, rapidly depigmenting model after loss of differentiated melanocytes resulted in 76% recovery of pigmentation. Treatment also prevented relevant T cells from populating mouse skin. In addition, ex vivo treatment of human skin averted the disease-related shift from quiescent to effector T cell phenotype. Thus, HSP70iQ435A DNA delivery may offer potent treatment opportunities for vitiligo.

  4. Antigenic Structure of Outer Membrane Protein E of Moraxella catarrhalis and Construction and Characterization of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Brauer, Aimee L.; Yuskiw, Norine; Hiltke, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which possesses several characteristics indicating that the protein will be an effective vaccine antigen. To study the antigenic structure of OMP E, eight monoclonal antibodies were developed and characterized. Three of the antibodies recognized epitopes which are present on the bacterial surface. Fusion peptides corresponding to overlapping regions of OMP E were constructed, and immunoblot assays were performed to localize the areas of the molecule bound by the monoclonal antibodies. These studies identified a surface-exposed epitope in the region of amino acids 80 through 180. To further study the protein, two mutants which lack OMP E were constructed. In bactericidal assays, the mutants were more readily killed by normal human serum compared to the isogenic parent strains. These results indicate that OMP E is involved in the expression of serum resistance of M. catarrhalis. PMID:11035732

  5. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of wild type and a mutant histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a.

    PubMed

    Vanderslice, P; Copeland, W C; Robertus, J D

    1986-11-15

    Prohistidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a is a protein that autoactivates to histidine decarboxylase by cleaving its peptide chain between serines 81 and 82 and converting Ser-82 to a pyruvoyl moiety. The pyruvoyl group serves as the prosthetic group for the decarboxylation reaction. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene for this enzyme from a wild type strain and from a mutant with altered autoactivation properties. The nucleotide sequence modifies the previously determined amino acid sequence of the protein. A tripeptide missed in the chemical sequence is inserted, and three other amino acids show conservative changes. The activation mutant shows a single change of Gly-58 to an Asp. Sequence analysis up- and downstream from the gene suggests that histidine decarboxylase is part of a polycistronic message, and that the transcriptional promotor region is strongly homologous to those of other Gram-positive organisms.

  6. Accelerated amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in double mutant APP/tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ribé, Elena M; Pérez, Mar; Puig, Berta; Gich, Ignasi; Lim, Filip; Cuadrado, Mar; Sesma, Teresa; Catena, Silvia; Sánchez, Belén; Nieto, María; Gómez-Ramos, Pilar; Morán, M Asunción; Cabodevilla, Felipe; Samaranch, Lluis; Ortiz, Lourdes; Pérez, Alberto; Ferrer, Isidro; Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2005-12-01

    Even though the idea that amyloid beta peptide accumulation is the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease has become the leading hypothesis, the causal link between aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing and tau alterations in this type of dementia remains controversial. We further investigated the role of beta-amyloid production/deposition in tau pathology and neuronal cell death in the mouse brain by crossing Tg2576 and VLW lines expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein and human mutant tau, respectively. The resulting double transgenic mice showed enhanced amyloid deposition accompanied by neurofibrillary degeneration and overt neuronal loss in selectively vulnerable brain limbic areas. These findings challenge the idea that tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease is merely a downstream effect of amyloid production/deposition and suggest that reciprocal interactions between beta-amyloid and tau alterations may take place in vivo.

  7. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  8. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  9. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  10. Efficient biosynthesis of a Cecropin A-melittin mutant in Bacillus subtilis WB700

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shengyue; Li, Weili; Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Wang, Meng; Li, Hengxin; Cao, Binyun; Zhang, Hongfu

    2017-01-01

    The efficient production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for clinical applications has attracted the attention of the scientific community. To develop a novel microbial cell factory for the efficient biosynthesis of a cecropin A-melittin mutant (CAM-W), a recombinant Bacillus subtilis WB700 expression system was genetically modified with a novel vector, including a fusion gene encoding CAM-W, the autoprotease EDDIE and the signal peptide SacB under the control of the maltose-inducible promoter Pglv. A total of 159 mg of CAM-W was obtained from 1 L of fermentation supernatant. The purified CAM-W showed a consistent size with the expected molecular weight of 3.2 kDa. Our findings suggest that this novel expression system can be used as a powerful tool for the efficient production of CAM-W. PMID:28071737

  11. Inactivation of Caenorhabditis elegans aminopeptidase DNPP-1 restores endocytic sorting and recycling in tat-1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Chen, Baohui; Yoshina, Sawako; Cai, Tanxi; Yang, Fuquan; Mitani, Shohei; Wang, Xiaochen

    2013-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the P4-ATPase TAT-1 and its chaperone, the Cdc50 family protein CHAT-1, maintain membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) asymmetry, which is required for membrane tubulation during endocytic sorting and recycling. Loss of tat-1 and chat-1 disrupts endocytic sorting, leading to defects in both cargo recycling and degradation. In this study, we identified the C. elegans aspartyl aminopeptidase DNPP-1, loss of which suppresses the sorting and recycling defects in tat-1 mutants without reversing the PS asymmetry defect. We found that tubular membrane structures containing recycling cargoes were restored in dnpp-1 tat-1 double mutants and that these tubules overlap with RME-1–positive recycling endosomes. The restoration of the tubular structures in dnpp-1 tat-1 mutants requires normal functions of RAB-5, RAB-10, and RME-1. In tat-1 mutants, we observed alterations in membrane surface charge and targeting of positively charged proteins that were reversed by loss of dnpp-1. DNPP-1 displays a specific aspartyl aminopeptidase activity in vitro, and its enzymatic activity is required for its function in vivo. Our data reveal the involvement of an aminopeptidase in regulating endocytic sorting and recycling and suggest possible roles of peptide signaling and/or protein metabolism in these processes. PMID:23427264

  12. Streptococcus pyogenes polymyxin B-resistant mutants display enhanced ExPortal integrity.

    PubMed

    Port, Gary C; Vega, Luis A; Nylander, Andrew B; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The ExPortal protein secretion organelle in Streptococcus pyogenes is an anionic phospholipid-containing membrane microdomain enriched in Sec translocons and postsecretion protein biogenesis factors. Polymyxin B binds to and disrupts ExPortal integrity, resulting in defective secretion of several toxins. To gain insight into factors that influence ExPortal organization, a genetic screen was conducted to select for spontaneous polymyxin B-resistant mutants displaying enhanced ExPortal integrity. Whole-genome resequencing of 25 resistant mutants revealed from one to four mutations per mutant genome clustered primarily within a core set of 10 gene groups. Construction of mutants with individual deletions or insertions demonstrated that 7 core genes confer resistance and enhanced ExPortal integrity through loss of function, while 3 were likely due to gain of function and/or combinatorial effects. Core resistance genes include a transcriptional regulator of lipid biosynthesis, several genes involved in nutrient acquisition, and a variety of genes involved in stress responses. Two members of the latter class also function as novel regulators of the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Analysis of the most frequently isolated mutation, a single nucleotide deletion in a track of 9 consecutive adenine residues in pstS, encoding a component of a high-affinity Pi transporter, suggests that this sequence functions as a molecular switch to facilitate stress adaptation. Together, these data suggest the existence of a membrane stress response that promotes enhanced ExPortal integrity and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  14. NMR structure of the Arctic mutation of the Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) peptide docked to SDS micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usachev, K. S.; Filippov, A. V.; Khairutdinov, B. I.; Antzutkin, O. N.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    The “Arctic” point mutation of the Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide is a rare mutation leading to an early onset of Alzheimer's disease. The peptide may interact with neuronal membranes, where it can provide its toxic effects. We used 2D NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the “Arctic” mutant of Aβ1-40 Alzheimer's amyloid peptide in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle solutions, which are the type of amphiphilic structures mimicking some properties of biomembranes. The study showed that the Arctic mutant of Aβ1-40 interacts with the surface of SDS micelles mainly through the Leu17-Asn27 310-helical region, while the Ile31-Val40 region is buried in the hydrophobic interior of the micelle. In contrast, wild-type Aβ1-40 interacts with SDS micelles through the Lys16-Asp23 α-helical region and Gly29-Met35. Both the Arctic mutant and the wild-type Aβ1-40 peptides interactions with SDS micelles are hydrophobic in nature. Aβ peptides are thought to be capable of forming pores in biomembranes that can cause changes in neuronal and endothelial cell membrane permeability. It has also been shown that Aβ peptides containing the “Arctic” mutation are more neurotoxic and aggregate more readily than the wild-type Aβ peptides at physiological conditions. Here, we propose that the extension of the helical structure of Leu17-Asn27 and a high aliphaticity (neutrality) of the C-terminal region in the Arctic Aβ peptides are consistent with the idea that formation of ion-permeable pores by Aβ oligomers may be one of prevailing mechanisms of a larger neuronal toxicity of the Arctic Aβ compared to the wild-type Aβ peptides, independent of oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation.

  15. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  16. A Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 Mutant as a Candidate for Mitigating Lupus Aggravation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, Eliana B.; de Moraes, Luciana V.; Melo, Robson L.; Balan, Andrea; Fernandes, Beatriz L.; Tambourgi, Denise V.; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Hsp60 is an abundant and highly conserved family of intracellular molecules. Increased levels of this family of proteins have been observed in the extracellular compartment in chronic inflammation. Administration of M. leprae Hsp65 [WT] in [NZBxNZW]F1 mice accelerates the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus [SLE] progression whereas the point mutated K409A Hsp65 protein delays the disease. Here, the biological effects of M. leprae Hsp65 Leader pep and K409A pep synthetic peptides, which cover residues 352–371, are presented. Peptides had immunomodulatory effects similar to that observed with their respective proteins on survival and the combined administration of K409A+Leader pep or K409A pep+WT showed that the mutant forms were able to inhibit the deleterious effect of WT on mortality, indicating the neutralizing potential of the mutant molecules in SLE progression. Molecular modeling showed that replacing Lysine by Alanine affects the electrostatic potential of the 352–371 region. The number of interactions observed for WT is much higher than for Hsp65 K409A and mouse Hsp60. The immunomodulatory effects of the point-mutated protein and peptide occurred regardless of the catalytic activity. These findings may be related to the lack of effect on survival when F1 mice were inoculated with Hsp60 or K409A pep. Our findings indicate the use of point-mutated Hsp65 molecules, such as the K409A protein and its corresponding peptide, that may minimize or delay the onset of SLE, representing a new approach to the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21961033

  17. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  18. Validation of a mutant of the pore-forming toxin sticholysin-I for the construction of proteinase-activated immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pentón, David; Pérez-Barzaga, Victor; Díaz, Iscel; Reytor, Mey L; Campos, Javier; Fando, Rafael; Calvo, Loany; Cilli, Eduardo M; Morera, Vivian; Castellanos-Serra, Lila R; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Alvarez, Carlos; Pons, Tirso; Tejuca, Mayra

    2011-06-01

    The use of pore-forming toxins from sea anemones (actinoporins) in the construction of immunotoxins (ITs) against tumour cells is an alternative for cancer therapy. However, the main disadvantage of actinoporin-based ITs obtained so far has been the poor cellular specificity associated with the toxin's ability to bind and exert its activity in almost any cell membrane. Our final goal is the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs using a cysteine mutant at the membrane binding region of sticholysin-I (StI), a cytolysin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. The mutant and the ligand moiety would be linked by proteinase-sensitive peptides through the StI cysteine residue blocking the toxin binding region and hence the IT non-specific killing activity. To accomplish this objective the first step was to obtain the mutant StI W111C, and to evaluate the impact of mutating tryptophan 111 by cysteine on the toxin pore-forming capacity. After proteolysis of the cleavage sequence, a short peptide would remain attached to the toxin. The next step was to evaluate whether this mutant is able to form pores even with a residual peptide linked to cysteine 111. In this work we demonstrated that (i) StI W111C shows pore-forming capacity in a nanomolar range, although it is 8-fold less active than the wild-type recombinant StI, corroborating the previously reported importance of residue 111 for the binding of StI to membranes, and (ii) the mutant is able to form pores even with a residual seven-residue peptide linked to cysteine 111. In addition, it was demonstrated that binding of a large molecule to cysteine 111 renders an inactive toxin that is no longer able to bind to the membrane. These results validate the mutant StI W111C for its use in the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs.

  19. Characterization of shrunken endosperm mutants in barley.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Wei, Long; Wang, Ji-Rui; Chen, Guo-Yue; Liu, Ya-Xi; Li, Wei; Wei, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chunji; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-04-10

    Despite numerous studies on shrunken endosperm mutants caused by either maternal tissues (seg) or kernel per se (sex) in barley, the molecular mechanism for all of the eight seg mutants (seg1-seg8) and some sex mutants is yet to be uncovered. In this study, we determined the amylose content, characterized granule-binding proteins, analyzed the expression of key genes involved in starch synthesis, and examined starch granule structure of both normal (Bowman and Morex) and shrunken endosperm (seg1, seg3, seg4a, seg4b, seg5, seg6, seg7, and sex1) barley accessions. Our results showed that amylose contents of shrunken endosperm mutants ranged from 8.9% (seg4a) to 25.8% (seg1). SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 87 kDa proteins corresponding to the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) and starch synthase II (SSII) were not present in seg1, seg3, seg6, and seg7 mutants. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis indicated that waxy expression levels of seg1, seg3, seg6, and seg7 mutants decreased in varying degrees to lower levels until 27 days after anthesis (DAA) after reaching the peak at 15-21 DAA, which differed from the pattern of normal barley accessions. Further characterization of waxy alleles revealed 7 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequences and 16 SNPs and 8 indels in the promoter sequences of the mutants. Results from starch granule by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that, in comparison with normal barley accessions, seg4a, seg4b, and sex1 had fewer starch granules per grain; seg3 and seg6 had less small B-type granules; some large A-type granules in seg7 had a hollow surface. These results improve our understanding about effects of seg and sex mutants on starch biosynthesis and granule structure during endosperm development and provide information for identification of key genes responsible for these shrunken endosperm mutants.

  20. Roles of the signal peptide and mature domains in the secretion and maturation of the neutral metalloprotease from Streptomyces cacaoi.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S C; Su, M H; Lee, Y H

    1997-01-01

    The neutral metalloprotease (Npr) of Streptomyces cacaoi is synthesized as a prepro-Npr precursor form consisting of a secretory signal peptide, a propeptide and the mature metalloprotease. The maturation of Npr occurs extracellularly via an autoproteolytic processing of the secreted pro-Npr. The integrity of the propeptide is essential for the formation of mature active Npr but not for its secretion [Chang, Chang and Lee (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 3548-3554]. In this study we investigated whether the secretion and maturation of Npr require the integrity of its signal peptide region and mature protease domain. Five signal peptide mutants were generated, including the substitution mutations at the positively charged region (mutant IR6LE), the central hydrophobic region (mutants GI19EL and G19N), the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage region (mutant P30L) and at the residues adjacent to the signal peptidase cleavage site (mutant YA33SM). All these lesions delayed the export of Npr to the growth medium and also resulted in a 2-10-fold decrease in Npr export. The most severe effect was noted in mutants GI19EL and P30L. When these signal peptide mutations were fused separately with the propeptide lacking the Npr mature domain, the secretory defect on the propeptide was also observed, and this impairment was again more severely expressed in mutants GI19EL and P30L. Thus the Npr signal peptide seems to have more constraints on the hydrophobic core region and at the proline residue within the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage site. Deletion mutations within the C-terminal mature protease domain that left its active site intact still blocked the proteolytic processing of mutant precursor forms of pro-Npr, although their secretions were unaffected. These results, together with our previous findings, strongly suggest that the signal peptide of Npr plays a pivotal role in the secretion of both Npr and the propeptide, but not in the maturation of Npr. On the

  1. MHC class II complexes sample intermediate states along the peptide exchange pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Günther, Sebastian; Wehmeyer, Christoph; El Habre, Zeina; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of peptide-MHCII complexes (pMHCIIs) for surveillance by T cells is a well-known immunological concept in vertebrates, yet the conformational dynamics of antigen exchange remain elusive. By combining NMR-detected H/D exchange with Markov modelling analysis of an aggregate of 275 microseconds molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal that a stable pMHCII spontaneously samples intermediate conformations relevant for peptide exchange. More specifically, we observe two major peptide exchange pathways: the kinetic stability of a pMHCII's ground state defines its propensity for intrinsic peptide exchange, while the population of a rare, intermediate conformation correlates with the propensity of the HLA-DM-catalysed pathway. Helix-destabilizing mutants designed based on our model shift the exchange behaviour towards the HLA-DM-catalysed pathway and further allow us to conceptualize how allelic variation can shape an individual's MHC restricted immune response. PMID:27827392

  2. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  3. Computing border bases using mutant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, E.; Abbas Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Border bases, a generalization of Gröbner bases, have actively been addressed during recent years due to their applicability to industrial problems. In cryptography and coding theory a useful application of border based is to solve zero-dimensional systems of polynomial equations over finite fields, which motivates us for developing optimizations of the algorithms that compute border bases. In 2006, Kehrein and Kreuzer formulated the Border Basis Algorithm (BBA), an algorithm which allows the computation of border bases that relate to a degree compatible term ordering. In 2007, J. Ding et al. introduced mutant strategies bases on finding special lower degree polynomials in the ideal. The mutant strategies aim to distinguish special lower degree polynomials (mutants) from the other polynomials and give them priority in the process of generating new polynomials in the ideal. In this paper we develop hybrid algorithms that use the ideas of J. Ding et al. involving the concept of mutants to optimize the Border Basis Algorithm for solving systems of polynomial equations over finite fields. In particular, we recall a version of the Border Basis Algorithm which is actually called the Improved Border Basis Algorithm and propose two hybrid algorithms, called MBBA and IMBBA. The new mutants variants provide us space efficiency as well as time efficiency. The efficiency of these newly developed hybrid algorithms is discussed using standard cryptographic examples.

  4. Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta peptides in vitro electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2017-04-01

    The oxidative behaviour of the human amyloid beta (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42) peptides and a group of similar peptides: control inverse (Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1), mutants (Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35)), rat Aβ1-40Rat, and fragments (Aβ1-28, Aβ1-16, Aβ10-20, Aβ12-28, and Aβ17-42), in solution or adsorbed, at a glassy carbon electrode, by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry, were investigated and compared. Structurally the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 sequences contain five electroactive amino acid residues, one tyrosine (Tyr(10)), three histidines (His(6), His(13) and His(14)) and one methionine (Met(35)). The Aβ peptide 3D structure influenced the exposure of the redox residues to the electrode surface and their oxidation peak currents. Depending on the amino acid sequence length and content, the Aβ peptides gave one or two oxidation peaks. The first electron transfer reaction corresponded to the tyrosine amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to both histidines and methionine amino acid residues. The highest contribution to the second oxidation peak current was from His(13), followed by His(14) and His(6) residues, and Met(35) residue had the lowest contribution. The Aβ peptides electron transfer depended on peptide hydrophobicity and 3D structure, the redox residues position in the sequence, the redox residues close to N-termini giving the highest oxidation peak currents.

  5. N-Terminal Deletion of Peptide:N-Glycanase Results in Enhanced Deglycosylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjun; Xin, Fengxue; Liu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Yuxiao; An, Zhenyi; Qi, Qingsheng; Wang, Peng George

    2009-01-01

    Peptide:N-glycanase catalyzes the detachment of N-linked glycan chains from glycopeptides or glycoproteins by hydrolyzing the β-aspartylglucosaminyl bond. Peptide:N-glycanase in yeast binds to Rad23p through its N-terminus. In this study, the complex formed between Peptide:N-glycanase and Rad23p was found to exhibit enhanced deglycosylation activity, which suggests an important role for this enzyme in the misfolded glycoprotein degradation pathway in vivo. To investigate the role of this enzyme in this pathway, we made stepwise deletions of the N-terminal helices of peptide:N-glycanase. Enzymatic analysis of the deletion mutants showed that deletion of the N-terminal H1 helix (Png1p-ΔH1) enhanced the deglycosylation activity of N-glycanase towards denatured glycoproteins. In addition, this mutant exhibited high deglycosylation activity towards native glycoproteins. Dynamic simulations of the wild type and N-terminal H1 deletion mutant implied that Png1p-ΔH1 is more flexible than wild type Png1p. The efficient deglycosylation of Png1p-ΔH1 towards native and non-native glycoproteins offers a potential biotechnological application. PMID:20016784

  6. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  7. Biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex molecules and generation of T cells in Ii TAP1 double-mutant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tourne, S; van Santen, H M; van Roon, M; Berns, A; Benoist, C; Mathis, D; Ploegh, H

    1996-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules are loaded with peptides in distinct subcellular compartments. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is responsible for delivering peptides derived from cytosolic proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum, where they bind to class I molecules, while the invariant chain (Ii) directs class II molecules to endosomal compartments, where they bind peptides originating mostly from exogenous sources. Mice carrying null mutations of the TAP1 or Ii genes (TAP10) or Ii0, respectively) have been useful tools for elucidating the two MHC/peptide loading pathways. To evaluate to what extent these pathways functionally intersect, we have studied the biosynthesis of MHC molecules and the generation of T cells in Ii0TAP10 double-mutant mice. We find that the assembly and expression of class II molecules in Ii0 and Ii0TAP10 animals are indistinguishable and that formation and display of class I molecules is the same in TAP10 and Ii0TAP10 animals. Thymic selection in the double mutants is as expected, with reduced numbers of both CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ thymocyte compartments. Surprisingly, lymph node T-cell populations look almost normal; we propose that population expansion of peripheral T cells normalizes the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in Ii0TAP10 mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643655

  8. A novel mutant 10Ala/Arg together with mutant 144Ser/Arg of hepatitis B virus X protein involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis in HepG2 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Junwei; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Anna; Guo, Hongliang; Wei, Feili; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Espitia, Stephen; Smith, Davey M.; Liu, Longgen; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a major health problem worldwide. HBV X (HBx) protein is the most common open reading frame that may undergo mutations, resulting in the development of HCC. This study aimed to determine specific HBx mutations that differentiate the central- and para-tumor tissues, and identify their association with HCC development. HBx gene from HCC tumor and para-tumor tissues of 47 HCC patients was amplified, sequenced and statistically analyzed. A novel combination of 2 mutations at residues 10 and 144 was identified which might play a significant role in HCC development. Expression vectors carrying HBx with the specific mutations were constructed and transfected into HepG2 and p53-null HepG2 cells. Compared to wild type (WT) and single mutation of HBx at residue 10 or 144, the 10/144 double mutations strongly up-regulated p21 expression and prolonged G1/S transition in WT- and p53-null HepG2 cells. Apoptosis was also inhibited by HBx harboring 10/44 double-mutation. Binding of 10/144 double-mutant HBx to p53 was lower than WT HBx. Conclusively, the 10/144 double mutation of HBx might play a crucial role in HCC formation. PMID:26706415

  9. Core-Gene-Encoded Peptide Regulating Virulence-Associated Traits in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, high-coverage genome sequence of 57 isolates of Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiological agent of human dental caries, was completed. The SMU.1147 gene, encoding a 61-amino-acid (61-aa) peptide, was present in all sequenced strains of S. mutans but absent in all bacteria in current databases. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that SMU.1147 is cotranscribed with scnK and scnR, which encode the histidine kinase and response regulator, respectively, of a two-component system (TCS). The C terminus of the SMU.1147 gene product was tagged with a FLAG epitope and shown to be expressed in S. mutans by Western blotting with an anti-FLAG antibody. A nonpolar mutant of SMU.1147 formed less biofilm in glucose-containing medium and grew slower than did the wild-type strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, at low pH, or in the presence of H2O2. Mutation of SMU.1147 dramatically reduced genetic competence and expression of comX and comY, compared to S. mutans UA159. The competence defect of the SMU.1147 mutant could not be overcome by addition of sigX-inducing peptide (XIP) in defined medium or by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) in complex medium. Complementation with SMU.1147 on a plasmid restored all phenotypes. Interestingly, mutants lacking either one of the TCS components and a mutant lacking all three genes behaved like the wild-type strain for all phenotypes mentioned above, but all mutant strains grew slower than UA159 in medium supplemented with 0.3 M NaCl. Thus, the SMU.1147-encoded peptide affects virulence-related traits and dominantly controls quorum-sensing pathways for development of genetic competence in S. mutans. PMID:23603743

  10. Recombinant prosegment peptide acts as a folding catalyst and inhibitor of native pepsin.

    PubMed

    Dee, Derek R; Filonowicz, Shaun; Horimoto, Yasumi; Yada, Rickey Y

    2009-12-01

    Porcine pepsin A, a gastric aspartic peptidase, is initially produced as the zymogen pepsinogen that contains an N-terminal, 44 residue prosegment (PS) domain. In the absence of the PS, native pepsin (Np) is irreversibly denatured and when placed under refolding conditions, folds to a thermodynamically stable denatured state. This denatured, refolded pepsin (Rp) state can be converted to Np by the exogenous addition of the PS, which catalyzes the folding of Rp to Np. In order to thoroughly study the mechanism by which the PS catalyzes pepsin folding, a soluble protein expression system was developed to produce recombinant PS peptide in a highly pure form. Using this system, the wild-type and three-mutant PS forms, in which single residue substitutions were made (V4A, R8A and K36A), were expressed and purified. These PS peptides were characterized for their ability to inhibit Np enzymatic activity and to catalyze the folding of Rp to Np. The V4A, R8A and K36A mutant PS peptides were found to have nanomolar inhibition constants, Ki, of 82.4, 58.3 and 95.6 nM, respectively, approximately a two-fold increase from that of the wild-type PS (36.2 nM). All three-mutant PS peptides were found to catalyze Np folding with a rate constant of 0.06 min(-1), five-fold lower than that of the wild-type. The observation that the mutant PS peptides retained their inhibition and folding-catalyst functionality suggests a high level of resilience to mutations of the pepsin PS.

  11. Isolation and characterization of transcription fidelity mutants.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey N; Jin, Ding Jun; Court, Donald L; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Accurate transcription is an essential step in maintaining genetic information. Error-prone transcription has been proposed to contribute to cancer, aging, adaptive mutagenesis, and mutagenic evolution of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The mechanisms controlling transcription fidelity and the biological consequences of transcription errors are poorly understood. Because of the transient nature of mRNAs and the lack of reliable experimental systems, the identification and characterization of defects that increase transcription errors have been particularly challenging. In this review we describe novel genetic screens for the isolation of fidelity mutants in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli RNA polymerases. We obtained and characterized two distinct classes of mutants altering NTP misincorporation and transcription slippage both in vivo and in vitro. Our study not only validates the genetic schemes for the isolation of RNA polymerase mutants that alter fidelity, but also sheds light on the mechanism of transcription accuracy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space.

  12. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants.

    PubMed

    Dissel, Stephane; Angadi, Veena; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Suzuki, Yasuko; Donlea, Jeff; Klose, Markus; Koch, Zachary; English, Denis; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; van Swinderen, Bruno; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-18

    Given the role that sleep plays in modulating plasticity, we hypothesized that increasing sleep would restore memory to canonical memory mutants without specifically rescuing the causal molecular lesion. Sleep was increased using three independent strategies: activating the dorsal fan-shaped body, increasing the expression of Fatty acid binding protein (dFabp), or by administering the GABA-A agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). Short-term memory (STM) or long-term memory (LTM) was evaluated in rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc) mutants using aversive phototaxic suppression and courtship conditioning. Each of the three independent strategies increased sleep and restored memory to rut and dnc mutants. Importantly, inducing sleep also reverses memory defects in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease. Together, these data demonstrate that sleep plays a more fundamental role in modulating behavioral plasticity than previously appreciated and suggest that increasing sleep may benefit patients with certain neurological disorders.

  13. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  14. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  15. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases.

  16. Nonphotic phase shifting in hamster clock mutants.

    PubMed

    Mrosovsky, N; Salmon, P A; Menaker, M; Ralph, M R

    1992-01-01

    Golden hamsters with the tau mutation were kept in the dark and induced to become active through confinement to a novel running wheel for 3 hr. The response of the mutants to this nonphotic phase-shifting stimulus differed from that of wild-type hamsters. The mutants showed larger phase shifts, and their phase response curves differed in shape, with an advance portion at about circadian time 24, a phase at which wild types show delays. The results establish that the tau mutation, in addition to its already known effects, alters the response of the circadian system to nonphotic events.

  17. Fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Pope, C F; Gillespie, S H; Pratten, J R; McHugh, T D

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Burkholderia cepacia mutants were selected on ciprofloxacin. The rate of mutation in gyrA was estimated to be 9.6 x 10(-11) mutations per division. Mutations in gyrA conferred 12- to 64-fold increases in MIC, and an additional parC mutation conferred a large increase in MIC (>256-fold). Growth rate, biofilm formation, and survival in water and during drying were not impaired in strains containing single gyrA mutations. Double mutants were impaired only in growth rate (0.85, relative to the susceptible parent).

  18. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  19. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  20. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  1. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  2. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  3. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  4. Identification, validation, and targeting of the mutant p53-PARP-MCM chromatin axis in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei-Gang; Polotskaia, Alla; Xiao, Gu; Di, Lia; Zhao, Yuhan; Hu, Wenwei; Philip, John; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Bargonetti, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Over 80% of triple negative breast cancers express mutant p53. Mutant p53 often gains oncogenic function suggesting that triple negative breast cancers may be driven by p53 protein type. To determine the chromatin targets of this gain-of-function mutant p53 we used inducible knockdown of endogenous gain-of-function mtp53 in MDA-MB-468 cells in conjunction with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture and subcellular fractionation. We sequenced over 70,000 total peptides for each corresponding reciprocal data set and were able to identify 3010 unique cytoplasmic fraction proteins and 3403 unique chromatin fraction proteins. The present proteomics experiment corroborated our previous experiment-based results that poly ADP-ribose polymerase has a positive association with mutant p53 on the chromatin. Here, for the first time we report that the heterohexomeric minichromosome maintenance complex that participates in DNA replication initiation ranked as a high mutant p53-chromatin associated pathway. Enrichment analysis identified the minichromosome maintenance members 2–7. To validate this mutant p53- poly ADP-ribose polymerase-minichromosome maintenance functional axis, we experimentally depleted R273H mutant p53 and found a large reduction of the amount of minichromosome maintenance complex proteins on the chromatin. Furthermore a mutant p53-minichromosome maintenance 2 direct interaction was detected. Overexpressed mutant p53, but not wild type p53, showed a protein-protein interaction with minichromosome maintenance 2 and minichromosome maintenance 4. To target the mutant p53- poly ADP-ribose polymerase-minichromosome maintenance axis we treated cells with the poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor talazoparib and the alkylating agent temozolomide and detected synergistic activation of apoptosis only in the presence of mutant p53. Furthermore when minichromosome maintenance 2–7 activity was inhibited the synergistic activation of apoptosis was

  5. A functional genome-wide genetic screening identifies new pathways controlling the G1/S transcriptional wave.

    PubMed

    Gaspa, Laura; González-Medina, Alberto; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe MBF complex activates the transcription of genes required for DNA synthesis and S phase. The MBF complex contains several proteins, including the core components Cdc10, Res1 and Res2, the co-repressor proteins Yox1 and Nrm1 and the co-activator Rep2. It has recently been shown how MBF is regulated when either the DNA damage or the DNA synthesis checkpoints are activated. However, how MBF is regulated in a normal unperturbed cell cycle is still not well understood. We have set up a genome-wide genomic screen searching for global regulators of MBF. We have crossed our knock-out collection library with a reporter strain that allows the measurement of MBF activity in live cells by flow cytometry. We confirm previously known regulators of MBF and show that COP9/signalosome and tRNA methyltransferases also regulate MBF activity.

  6. Secreted cyclophilin A mediates G1/S phase transition of cholangiocarcinoma cells via CD147/ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Obchoei, Sumalee; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi; Wongkham, Sopit

    2015-02-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) was shown to be upregulated in human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) tissues. Suppression of intracellular CypA (inCypA) significantly reduces cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, the effect and potential mechanism of secreted CypA (sCypA) on cell proliferation of CCA cell lines were further investigated. CCA cells were treated with sCypA-containing conditioned media (CM) or with purified recombinant human CypA (rhCypA). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, NF-κB, and STAT3 activities were examined by MTS assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. sCypA was detected in CM from MMNK1 (an immortalized human cholangiocyte cell line) and six CCA cell lines. The sCypA levels corresponded to the inCypA levels indicating the intracellular origin of sCypA. Both sCypA-containing CM and rhCypA significantly increased proliferation of CCA cells. CD147 depletion by shRNA-knockdown or neutralizing with a CD147-monoclonal antibody significantly reduced sCypA-, and rhCypA-mediated cell proliferation. Upon rhCypA treatment, ERK1/2 was rapidly phosphorylated; whereas neutralizing CD147 inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in S phase and decrease in G1 population in rhCypA-treated cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-retinoblastoma protein in the rhCypA-treated cells were increased compared with those in the non-treated control cells. p38 MAPK pathway was shown to be suppressed in siCypA-treated cells. In summary, CypA is secreted from CCA cells and enhances cell proliferation in an autocrine/paracrine manner, at least via direct binding with CD147, which may activate the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways.

  7. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  8. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  9. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  10. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  11. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  12. Agravitropic mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus do not complement mutants having a reversed gravitropic response.

    PubMed

    Cove, David J; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2006-07-01

    New mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus have been isolated, which showed abnormal gravitropic responses. The apical cells of protonemal filaments of wild-type strains respond to gravity by growing upwards and are well aligned to the gravity vector. This response only occurs in darkness. Mutants show a range of phenotypes. Some are insensitive to gravity, showing symmetrical growth, while others align to the gravity vector but orient growth downwards. A further class grows in darkness as though it were in light, showing insensitivity to gravity and continued chlorophyll synthesis. Somatic hybrids between mutants and wild-type strains and between pairs of mutants have been selected using transgenic antibiotic resistance as selective markers. Hybrids between wild-type strains and all of the mutants have a wild-type phenotype, and so all mutants therefore have recessive phenotypes. Mutants comprise three complementation groups. One group has a single member, while another has three members. The third has at least 16 members and shows a complex pattern of complementation consistent with a single gene product functioning in both orientation and alignment to gravity, as well as contributing more than one subunit to the mature product.

  13. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway.

  14. Structure-based design and confirmation of peptide ligands for neuronal polo-like kinase to promote neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Cao, He-Li; Chen, Hao; Cui, Yu-Hui; Tian, Heng-Li; Chen, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal polo-like kinase (nPLK) is an essential regular of cell cycle and differentiation in nervous system, and targeting nPLK has been established as a promising therapeutic strategy to treat neurological disorders and to promote neuroregeneration. The protein contains an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-box domain (PBD) that are mutually inhibited by each other. Here, the intramolecular KD-PBD complex in nPLK was investigated at structural level via bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and binding affinity scoring. From the complex interface two regions representing separately two continuous peptide fragments in PBD domain were identified as the hot spots of KD-PBD interaction. Structural and energetic analysis suggested that one (PBD peptide 1) of the two peptides can bind tightly to a pocket nearby the active site of KD domain, which is thus potential as self-inhibitory peptide to target and suppress nPLK kinase activity. The knowledge harvesting from computational studies were then used to guide the structural optimization and mutation of PBD peptide 1. Consequently, two of three peptide mutants separately exhibited moderately and considerably increased affinity as compared to the native peptide. The computationally modeled complex structures of KD domain with these self-inhibitory peptides were also examined in detail to unravel the structural basis and energetic property of nPLK-peptide recognition and interaction.

  15. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    current FDA approved hormonal therapies and that more potent, selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) will enable complete inhibition of mutant...resistance to current FDA approved ER antagonists, but that more potent and selective estrogen receptor antagonists will be sufficiently active to...Antagonist Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Selective Estrogen Receptor Degrader Tamoxifen Fulvestrant Bazedoxifene Raloxifene GDC-0810

  16. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  17. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Michael A.; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V.; Manoil, Colin

    2003-01-01

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering. PMID:14617778

  18. Comprehensive transposon mutant library of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael A; Alwood, Ashley; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Spencer, David; Haugen, Eric; Ernst, Stephen; Will, Oliver; Kaul, Rajinder; Raymond, Christopher; Levy, Ruth; Chun-Rong, Liu; Guenthner, Donald; Bovee, Donald; Olson, Maynard V; Manoil, Colin

    2003-11-25

    We have developed technologies for creating saturating libraries of sequence-defined transposon insertion mutants in which each strain is maintained. Phenotypic analysis of such libraries should provide a virtually complete identification of nonessential genes required for any process for which a suitable screen can be devised. The approach was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen with a 6.3-Mbp genome. The library that was generated consists of 30,100 sequence-defined mutants, corresponding to an average of five insertions per gene. About 12% of the predicted genes of this organism lacked insertions; many of these genes are likely to be essential for growth on rich media. Based on statistical analyses and bioinformatic comparison to known essential genes in E. coli, we estimate that the actual number of essential genes is 300-400. Screening the collection for strains defective in two defined multigenic processes (twitching motility and prototrophic growth) identified mutants corresponding to nearly all genes expected from earlier studies. Thus, phenotypic analysis of the collection may produce essentially complete lists of genes required for diverse biological activities. The transposons used to generate the mutant collection have added features that should facilitate downstream studies of gene expression, protein localization, epistasis, and chromosome engineering.

  19. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  20. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  1. Genotyping-by-sequencing of glossy mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glossy mutants are a common occurrence in Brassica oleracea L. and they have been documented in most crop varieties of the species including cabbage, kale, broccoli, and collard. Glossy phenotypes have been of particular interest to researchers due to observations that they influence insect behavior...

  2. Phenotypic mutant library: potential for gene discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid development of high throughput and affordable Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques has renewed interest in gene discovery using forward genetics. The conventional forward genetic approach starts with isolation of mutants with a phenotype of interest, mapping the mutation within a s...

  3. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  4. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2016-04-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection.

  5. Immune response to synthetic peptides representing antigenic sites on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Huang, C.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Summary ― Monoclonal antibodies against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have been used to react with recombinant expression products in immunoblots and to select neutralization-resistant mutants for sequence analysis. These strategies identified neutralizing and non-neutralizing antigenic sites on the viral glycoprotein. Synthetic peptides based upon the amino acid sequences of these antigenic sites were synthesized and were injected together with an adjuvant into rainbow trout. The constructs generally failed to stimulate neutralizing antibodies in the fish. These results indicate that we need to understand more about the ability of peptide antigens to stimulate fish immune systems.

  6. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  7. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  8. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  9. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  10. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  11. Evidence that transporters associated with antigen processing translocate a major histocompatibility complex class I-binding peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Androlewicz, M J; Anderson, K S; Cresswell, P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the putative peptide transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) by using a permeabilized-cell system. The main objective was to determine whether these molecules, which bear homology to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters, translocate antigenic peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for assembly with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and beta 2-microglobulin light chain. The pore-forming toxin streptolysin O was used to generate permeabilized cells, and peptide translocation was determined by measuring the amount of added radiolabeled peptide bound to endogenous class I molecules. No radiolabeled peptide was associated with MHC class I glycoproteins from unpermeabilized cells. We found that efficient peptide binding to MHC class I molecules in permeabilized cells is both transporter dependent and ATP dependent. In antigen-processing mutant cells lacking a functional transporter, uptake occurs only through a less-efficient transporter and ATP-independent pathway. In addition, short peptides (8-10 amino acids) known to bind MHC class I molecules compete efficiently with a radiolabeled peptide for TAP-dependent translocation, whereas longer peptides and a peptide derived from an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence do not compete efficiently. This result indicates that the optimal substrates for TAP possess the characteristics of MHC-binding peptides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415666

  12. A putative amino acid transporter determines sensitivity to the two-peptide bacteriocin plantaricin JK.

    PubMed

    Oppegård, Camilla; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Kristensen, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum produces a number of antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) that mostly target closely related bacteria. Although bacteriocins are important for the ecology of these bacteria, very little is known about how the peptides target sensitive cells. In this work, a putative membrane protein receptor of the two-peptide bacteriocin plantaricin JK was identified by comparing Illumina sequence reads from plantaricin JK-resistant mutants to a crude assembly of the sensitive wild-type Weissella viridescens genome using the polymorphism discovery tool VAAL. Ten resistant mutants harbored altogether seven independent mutations in a gene encoding an APC superfamily protein with 12 transmembrane helices. The APC superfamily transporter thus is likely to serve as a target for plantaricin JK on sensitive cells.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The

  14. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  15. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  17. Analysis of Sporulation Mutants II. Mutants Blocked in the Citric Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fortnagel, Peter; Freese, Ernst

    1968-01-01

    Sporulation mutants that were unable to incorporate uracil during the developmental period recovered this capacity with the addition of ribose and in most cases with the addition of glutamate. Of the mutants that responded to both ribose and glumate, all but three also responded to citrate, and all but five responded to acetate. One of the exceptional strains was deficient in aconitase and another one in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase; both required glutamate for growth. For the mutants which did not respond to glutamate, the products made from 14C-glutamate were determined by thin-layer chromatography. Significant differences were found which enabled the identification of mutant blocks. The deficiency of the corresponding enzyme activity was verified. Several mutants were deficient in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and one lacked succinic dehydrogenase. These mutants could still grow on glucose as sole carbon source, but not on glutamate. The intact Krebs cycle is therefore not required for vegetative growth of aerobic Bacillis subtilis, but it is indispensable for sporulation. Images PMID:4967197

  18. Amuvatinib has cytotoxic effects against NRAS-mutant melanoma but not BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Inna V; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M; Gibney, Geoffrey T; Smalley, Keiran S M

    2014-10-01

    Effective targeted therapy strategies are still lacking for the 15-20% of melanoma patients whose melanomas are driven by oncogenic NRAS. Here, we report on the NRAS-specific behavior of amuvatinib, a kinase inhibitor with activity against c-KIT, Axl, PDGFRα, and Rad51. An analysis of BRAF-mutant and NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines showed the NRAS-mutant cohort to be enriched for targets of amuvatinib, including Axl, c-KIT, and the Axl ligand Gas6. Increasing concentrations of amuvatinib selectively inhibited the growth of NRAS-mutant, but not BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines, an effect associated with induction of S-phase and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Mechanistically, amuvatinib was noted to either inhibit Axl, AKT, and MAPK signaling or Axl and AKT signaling and to induce a DNA damage response. In three-dimensional cell culture experiments, amuvatinib was cytotoxic against NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines. Thus, we show for the first time that amuvatinib has proapoptotic activity against melanoma cell lines, with selectivity observed for those harboring oncogenic NRAS.

  19. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  20. Analysis of the association of peptides of optimal length to class I molecules on the surface of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rock, K L; Rothstein, L; Benacerraf, B

    1992-01-01

    The association of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on the surface of cells with synthetic antigenic peptides of eight or nine amino acid residues was examined. Peptides were synthesized that correspond to the antigenic sequences from ovalbumin and influenza nucleoprotein believed to be naturally processed and presented by cells with Kb and Db MHC class I molecules, respectively. Consistent with the results of others, these peptides were 10(3)-10(5) times more active in stimulating specific T cells as compared to peptides of longer sequences. When cells are incubated with these peptides at less than 0.01-0.1 microM, the association of the peptides with class I molecules is dependent on (i) the reassociation of free beta 2-microglobulin from the extracellular fluids, (ii) a process that requires cells to be metabolically active, or (iii) stabilization of class I heterodimers by chemical crosslinking. In contrast, when cells are incubated with these peptides at greater than 0.1-1.0 microM, the peptides associate with class I molecules in the absence of exogenous beta 2-microglobulin, energy, or chemical crosslinking. Antigen competition experiments suggest that the class I molecules that bind peptides offered at high concentration become only transiently receptive to binding peptide. The concentration of peptides required for presentation to T cells under these conditions corresponds to those that stabilize Kb molecules on the surface of RMA-S mutant cells in the absence of exogenous beta 2-microglobulin. These results support the concept that the receptivity of class I molecules on cells is determined by the dissociation of beta 2-microglobulin from MHC class I that lacks bound peptides. PMID:1409586

  1. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Horsch, Marion; Garrett, Lillian; Östereicher, Manuela A.; Hans, Wolfgang; Abe, Koichiro; Sagawa, Nobuho; Rozman, Jan; Vargas-Panesso, Ingrid L.; Sandholzer, Michael; Lisse, Thomas S.; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Ehrhard, Nicole; Elvert, Ralf; Gau, Christine; Hölter, Sabine M.; Micklich, Katja; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Racz, Ildiko; Stoeger, Claudia; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Michel, Dian; Diener, Susanne; Wieland, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Favor, John; Graw, Jochen; Klingenspor, Martin; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Strom, Tim M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1–3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3N294K/N294K), which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). Scube3N294K/N294K mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB), associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3. In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3N294K/N294K mice. The Scube3N294K/N294K mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function. PMID:27815347

  2. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  3. Acriflavine-Resistant Mutant of Streptococcus cremoris†

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Selection for resistance to acriflavine in Streptococcus cremoris resulted in cross-resistance to the drugs neomycin, streptomycin, ethidium bromide, mitomycin C, and proflavine. Furthermore, the mutants showed resistance to lytic bacteriophages to which the parental strain was sensitive, and, unlike the parent, the mutants grew well at higher temperatures (40°C). Revertants selected independently either for temperature sensitivity or for acriflavine sensitivity lost resistance to all the drugs and dyes but retained the bacteriophage resistance phenotype. The acriflavine-resistant mutation resulted in an increase in resistance by the bacterial cells to sodium dodecyl sulfate, a potent solvent of lipopolysaccharide and lipoprotein. It is suggested that the acriflavine resistance mutation determines the synthesis of a membrane substance resistant to higher temperatures. PMID:907329

  4. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  5. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  6. Molecular Origin of Gerstmann-Str ussler-Scheinker Syndrome: Insight from Computer Simulation of an Amyloidogenic Prion Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Diadone, Isabella; DiNola, Alfredo; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins become pathogenic through misfolding. Here, we characterize the folding of a peptide consisting of residues 109 122 of the Syrian hamster prion protein (the H1 peptide) and of a more amyloidogenic A117V point mutant that leads in humans to an inheritable form of the Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are performed for 2.5 s. Both peptides lose their -helical starting conformations and assume a -hairpin that is structurally similar in both systems. In each simulation several unfolding/refolding events occur, leading to convergence of the thermodynamics of the conformational states to within 1 kJ/mol. The similar stability of the -hairpin relative to the unfolded state is observed in the two peptides. However, substantial differences are found between the two unfolded states. A local minimum is found within the free energy unfolded basin of the A117V mutant populated by misfolded collapsed conformations of comparable stability to the -hairpin state, consistent with increased amyloidogenicity. This population, in which V117 stabilizes a hydrophobic core, is absent in the wild-type peptide. These results are supported by simulations of oligomers showing a slightly higher stability of the associated structures and a lower barrier to association for the mutated peptide. Hence, a single point mutation carrying only two additional methyl groups is here shown to be responsible for rather dramatic differences of structuring within the unfolded (misfolded) state.

  7. Diverse repertoire of the MHC class II-peptide complexes is required for presentation of viral superantigens.

    PubMed

    Golovkina, T; Agafonova, Y; Kazansky, D; Chervonsky, A

    2001-02-15

    Among other features, peptides affect MHC class II molecules, causing changes in the binding of bacterial superantigens (b-Sag). Whether peptides can alter binding of viral superantigens (v-Sag) to MHC class II was not known. Here we addressed the question of whether mutations limiting the diversity of peptides bound by the MHC class II molecules influenced the presentation of v-Sag and, subsequently, the life cycle of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). T cells reactive to v-Sag were found in mice lacking DM molecules as well as in A(b)Ep-transgenic mice in which MHC class II binding grooves were predominantly occupied by an invariant chain fragment or Ealpha(52-68) peptide, respectively. APCs from the mutant mice failed to present v-Sag, as determined by the lack of Sag-specific T cell activation, Sag-induced T cell deletion, and by the aborted MMTV infection. In contrast, mice that express I-A(b) with a variety of bound peptides presented v-Sag and were susceptible to MMTV infection. Comparison of v-Sag and b-Sag presentation by the same mutant cells suggested that presentation of v-Sag had requirements similar to that for presentation of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Thus, MHC class II peptide repertoire is critical for recognition of v-Sag by the T cells and affects the outcome of infection with a retrovirus.

  8. Identification and Analysis of Multivalent Proteolytically Resistant Peptides from Gluten: Implications for Celiac Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lu; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Molberg, Øyvind; Gray, Gary M.; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-01-01

    Dietary gluten proteins from wheat, rye and barley are the primary triggers for the immuno-pathogenesis of Celiac Sprue, a widespread immune disease of the small intestine. Recent molecular and structural analyses of representative gluten proteins, most notably α- and γ-gliadin proteins from wheat, have improved our understanding of these pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, based on the properties of a 33-mer peptide, generated from α-gliadin under physiological conditions, a link between digestive resistance and inflammatory character of gluten has been proposed. Here we report three lines of investigation in support of this hypothesis. First, biochemical and immunological analysis of deletion mutants of α-2 gliadin confirmed that the DQ2 restricted T cell response to the α-2 gliadin are directed towards the epitopes clustered within the 33-mer. Second, proteolytic analysis of a representative γ-gliadin led to the identification of another multivalent 26-mer peptide that was also resistant to further gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush border degradation, and was a good substrate of human transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Analogous to the 33-mer, the synthetic 26-mer peptide displayed markedly enhanced T cell antigenicity compared to monovalent control peptides. Finally, in silico analysis of the gluten proteome led to the identification of at least 60 putative peptides that share the common characteristics of the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides. Together, these results highlight the pivotal role of physiologically generated, proteolytically stable, TG2-reactive, multivalent peptides in the immune response to dietary gluten in Celiac Sprue patients. Prolyl endopeptidase treatment was shown to abolish the antigenicity of both the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides, and was also predicted to have comparable effects on other proline-rich putatively immunotoxic peptides identified from other polypeptides within the gluten proteome. PMID:16212427

  9. Identification and analysis of multivalent proteolytically resistant peptides from gluten: implications for celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lu; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Molberg, Øyvind; Gray, Gary M; Sollid, Ludvig M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-01-01

    Dietary gluten proteins from wheat, rye, and barley are the primary triggers for the immuno-pathogenesis of Celiac Sprue, a widespread immune disease of the small intestine. Recent molecular and structural analyses of representative gluten proteins, most notably alpha- and gamma-gliadin proteins from wheat, have improved our understanding of these pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, based on the properties of a 33-mer peptide, generated from alpha-gliadin under physiological conditions, a link between digestive resistance and inflammatory character of gluten has been proposed. Here, we report three lines of investigation in support of this hypothesis. First, biochemical and immunological analysis of deletion mutants of alpha-2 gliadin confirmed that the DQ2 restricted T cell response to the alpha-2 gliadin are directed toward the epitopes clustered within the 33-mer. Second, proteolytic analysis of a representative gamma-gliadin led to the identification of another multivalent 26-mer peptide that was also resistant to further gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush border degradation, and was a good substrate of human transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Analogous to the 33-mer, the synthetic 26-mer peptide displayed markedly enhanced T cell antigenicity compared to monovalent control peptides. Finally, in silico analysis of the gluten proteome led to the identification of at least 60 putative peptides that share the common characteristics of the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides. Together, these results highlight the pivotal role of physiologically generated, proteolytically stable, TG2-reactive, multivalent peptides in the immune response to dietary gluten in Celiac Sprue patients. Prolyl endopeptidase treatment was shown to abolish the antigenicity of both the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides, and was also predicted to have comparable effects on other proline-rich putatively immunotoxic peptides identified from other polypeptides within the gluten proteome.

  10. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  11. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  12. Mutant Sodium Channel for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Christensen, Adam P; Pike, Lisa; Wurdinger, Thomas; Perry, Katherine F; Saydam, Okay; Jacobs, Andreas H; García-Añoveros, Jaime; Weissleder, Ralph; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2009-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used to deliver a wide range of therapeutic genes to tumors. In this study, a novel tumor therapy was achieved by the delivery of a mammalian brain sodium channel, ASIC2a, carrying a mutation that renders it constitutively open. This channel was delivered to tumor cells using a herpes simplex virus-1/Epstein–Barr virus (HSV/EBV) hybrid amplicon vector in which gene expression was controlled by a tetracycline regulatory system (tet-on) with silencer elements. Upon infection and doxycycline induction of mutant channel expression in tumor cells, the open channel led to amiloride-sensitive sodium influx as assessed by patch clamp recording and sodium imaging in culture. Within hours, tumor cells swelled and died. In addition to cells expressing the mutant channel, adjacent, noninfected cells connected by gap junctions also died. Intratumoral injection of HSV/EBV amplicon vector encoding the mutant sodium channel and systemic administration of doxycycline led to regression of subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The advantage of this direct mode of tumor therapy is that all types of tumor cells become susceptible and death is rapid with no time for the tumor cells to become resistant. PMID:19259066

  13. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  14. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  15. Substrate specificity of platypus venom L-to-D-peptide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Paramjit S; Torres, Allan M; Crossett, Ben; Wong, Karen K Y; Koh, Jennifer M S; Geraghty, Dominic P; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Kuchel, Philip W

    2008-04-04

    The L-to-D-peptide isomerase from the venom of the platypus (Ornithorhyncus anatinus) is the first such enzyme to be reported for a mammal. In delineating its catalytic mechanism and broader roles in the animal, its substrate specificity was explored. We used N-terminal segments of defensin-like peptides DLP-2 and DLP-4 and natriuretic peptide OvCNP from the venom as substrates. The DLP analogues IMFsrs and ImFsrs (srs is a solubilizing chain; lowercase letters denote D-amino acid) were effective substrates for the isomerase; it appears to recognize the N-terminal tripeptide sequence Ile-Xaa-Phe-. A suite of 26 mutants of these hexapeptides was synthesized by replacing the second residue (Met) with another amino acid, viz. Ala, alpha-aminobutyric acid, Ile, Leu, Lys, norleucine, Phe, Tyr, and Val. It was shown that mutant peptides incorporating norleucine and Phe are substrates and exhibit L- or D-amino acid isomerization, but mutant peptides that contain residues with shorter, beta-branched or long side chains with polar terminal groups, viz. Ala, alpha-aminobutyric acid, Ile, Val, Leu, Lys, and Tyr, respectively, are not substrates. It was demonstrated that at least three N-terminal amino acid residues are absolutely essential for L-to-D-isomerization; furthermore, the third amino acid must be a Phe residue. None of the hexapeptides based on LLH, the first three residues of OvCNP, were substrates. A consistent 2-base mechanism is proposed for the isomerization; abstraction of a proton by 1 base is concomitant with delivery of a proton by the conjugate acid of a second base.

  16. Lipid-induced conformational transition of the amyloid core fragment Abeta(28-35) and its A30G and A30I mutants.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran; Neelakanta Reddy, P; Cereghetti, Damiano M; Padma Malar, E J; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) with neuronal membranes could play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have focused on the interactions of Abeta oligomers to explain the neuronal toxicity accompanying Alzheimer's disease. In our study, we have investigated the role of lipid interactions with soluble Abeta(28-35) (wild-type) and its mutants A30G and A30I in their aggregation and conformational preferences. CD and Trp fluorescence spectroscopic studies indicated that, immediately on dissolution, these peptides adopted a random coil structure. Upon addition of negatively charged 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(glycerol) sodium salt (PG) lipid, the wild-type and A30I mutant underwent reorganization into a predominant beta-sheet structure. However, no conformational changes were observed in the A30G mutant on interaction with PG. In contrast, the presence of zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid had no effect on the conformation of these three peptides. These observations were also confirmed with atomic force microscopy and the thioflavin-T assay. In the presence of PG vesicles, both the wild-type and A30I mutant formed fibrillar structures within 2 days of incubation in NaCl/P(i), but not in their absence. Again, no oligomerization was observed with PC vesicles. The Trp studies also revealed that both ends of the three peptides are not buried deep in the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopy using the environment-sensitive probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene showed an increase in the membrane fluidity upon exposure of the vesicles to the peptides. The latter effect may result from the lipid head group interactions with the peptides. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed that these peptides undergo a random coil-to-sheet conversion in solution on aging and that this process is accelerated by negatively charged lipid vesicles

  17. Defects in functional expression of an influenza virus hemagglutinin lacking the signal peptide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sekikawa, K; Lai, C J

    1983-01-01

    We have investigated the requirement of the signal sequence for expression of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA). For this purpose we used a recombinant prepared from a late-region deletion mutant of simian virus 40 (SV40) and cloned influenza HA DNA; the influenza DNA was inserted into the late region of SV40 previously occupied by the deleted sequences coding for SV40 capsid proteins. A simple in-phase deletion was made in the HA DNA, resulting in loss of 11 internal amino acids from the 16 amino acid signal peptide. This deletion HA recombinant was then used to infect African green monkey kidney cells. Mutant HA was not detected on the cell surface but stably accumulated in the cytoplasm at a level similar to that of wild-type HA. NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel analysis of lysates from infected cells showed that mutant HA was not glycosylated. Significantly, the amount of mutant HA synthesized was not affected by tunicamycin. In contrast, wild-type HA was decreased more than 90% by tunicamycin. These findings suggest that mutant polypeptide is synthesized on free polyribosomes rather than on membrane-bound polyribosomes. The mutant HA failed to agglutinate erythrocytes, probably due to a defect directly or indirectly associated with the lack of carbohydrate side chains. Images PMID:6304718

  18. Designing carbohydrate nanoparticles for prolonged efficacy of antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lin; Yang, Lei; Narsimhan, Ganesan; Bhunia, Arun K; Yao, Yuan

    2011-03-10

    In this work, carbohydrate nanoparticles were created to prolong the efficacy of antimicrobial peptide against pathogens. Nisin and Listeria monocytogenes were used as the peptide and pathogen models, respectively, and phytoglycogen (PG)-based nanoparticles were developed as carriers of nisin. PG from su1 mutant maize was subjected to β-amylolysis as well as subsequent succinate or octenyl succinate substitutions. The goal was to minimize the loss of peptide during storage and meanwhile realize an effective release in the presence of bacteria. The capabilities of PG derivatives as carriers of nisin were evaluated using centrifugal ultrafiltration, zeta-potential, and the initial availability of nisin against L. monocytogenes. All methods indicated that nisin loading was favored by a high degree of substitution (DS), presence of hydrophobic octenyl moiety, and β-amylolysis of PG nanoparticles. To evaluate the prolonged nisin efficacy, preparations containing nisin and PG derivatives were loaded into a BHI-agar deep-well model (mimicking nisin depletion at the nutrient-containing surface). The residual inhibitory activities of preparations against L. monocytogenes were monitored during 21 days of storage at 4 °C. The results showed that all PG derivatives led to the prolonged retention of nisin activity and the longest retention was associated with high DS, β-amylolysis, and octenyl succinate. Evidently, both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are the driving forces of nisin adsorption, and the glucan structure at the nanoparticle surface also affects nisin loading and retention during storage.

  19. Mammalian antimicrobial peptide influences control of cutaneous Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha M.; Barbi, Joseph; McMaster, W. Robert; Gallo, Richard L.; Satoskar, Abhay R.; McGwire, Bradford S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cathelicidin-type antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) are important mediators of innate immunity against microbial pathogens acting through direct interaction with and disruption of microbial membranes and indirectly through modulation of host cell migration and activation. Using a mouse knock-out model in CAMP we studied the role of this host peptide in control of dissemination of cutaneous infection by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. The presence of pronounced host inflammatory infiltration in lesions and lymph nodes of infected animals was CAMP-dependent. Lack of CAMP expression was associated with higher levels of IL-10 receptor expression in bone marrow, splenic and lymph node macrophages as well as higher anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by bone marrow macrophages and spleen cells but reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ by lymph nodes. Unlike wild-type mice, local lesions were exacerbated and parasites were found largely disseminated in CAMP knockouts. Infection of CAMP knockouts with parasite mutants lacking the surface metalloprotease virulence determinant resulted in more robust disseminated infection than in control animals suggesting that CAMP activity is negatively regulated by parasite surface proteolytic activity. This correlated with the ability of the pro-tease to degrade CAMP in vitro and co-localization of CAMP with parasites within macrophages. Our results highlight the interplay of antimicrobial peptides and Leishmania that influence the host immune response and the outcome of infection. PMID:21501359

  20. Isolation and Preliminary Characterization of Developmental Mutants from Microsporum gypseum

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, T. J.; Stock, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    Developmental mutants affected in either sporulation or spore germination have been isolated from Microsporum gypseum with the aid of nitrosoguanidine or as spontaneously occurring mutants. The time course levels of several proteins temporally associated with conidial development have been assayed in the wild-type and mutant strains. The spore germination characteristics of two of the mutants are described. The relationship of alkaline protease accumulation to tyrosinase accumulation and spore germination is discussed. PMID:4992372

  1. Screening of randomly mutagenized glucagon-like peptide-1 library by using an integrated yeast-mammalian assay system.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Tomohiro; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-09-10

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone activating the GLP1 receptor (GLP1R), a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), and is considered to be effective for treating diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Phage display is the first innovative technology in order to prepare and screen a large polypeptide library including GLP1R agonists, but this methodology is not as effective in discovering functional peptides such as activators for GPCRs. Here, we report a novel functional screening system for GPCR-acting peptides, which integrates a yeast peptide secretion system into a biological detection system with GPCR-producing mammalian cells. Using this screening system, we found attractive GLP1R agonists with several substitutions from a random mutant GLP1 library which was secreted by yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system established here not only enables peptides to be analyzed in the soluble form but also needs no chemical synthesis, purification, and condensation of peptides of interests, and therefore, can be widely applied to the discovery of novel bioactive peptides acting on GPCRs.

  2. Role of the Escherichia coli SbmA in the antimicrobial activity of proline-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzo, Maura; Bandiera, Antonella; Gennaro, Renato; Benincasa, Monica; Pacor, Sabrina; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Scocchi, Marco

    2007-10-01

    In contrast to many antimicrobial peptides, members of the proline-rich group of antimicrobial peptides inactivate Gram-negative bacteria by a non-lytic mechanism. Several lines of evidence indicate that they are internalized into bacteria and their activity mediated by interaction with unknown cellular components. With the aim of identifying such interactors, we selected mutagenized Escherichia coli clones resistant to the proline-rich Bac7(1-35) peptide and analysed genes responsible for conferring resistance, whose products may thus be involved in the peptide's mode of action. We isolated a number of genomic regions bearing such genes, and one in particular coding for SbmA, an inner membrane protein predicted to be part of an ABC transporter. An E. coli strain carrying a point mutation in sbmA, as well as other sbmA-null mutants, in fact showed resistance to several proline-rich peptides but not to representative membranolytic peptides. Use of fluorescently labelled Bac7(1-35) confirmed that resistance correlated with a decreased ability to internalize the peptide, suggesting that a bacterial protein, SbmA, is necessary for the transport of, and for susceptibility to, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides of eukaryotic origin.

  3. Catalytic properties of thimet oligopeptidase H600A mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, Mauricio F.M.; Marcondes, Marcelo F.; Rioli, Vanessa; Ferro, Emer S.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Oliveira, Vitor

    2010-04-02

    Thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15, TOP) is a metallo-oligopeptidase that participates in the intracellular metabolism of peptides. Predictions based on structurally analogous peptidases (Dcp and ACE-2) show that TOP can present a hinge-bend movement during substrate hydrolysis, what brings some residues closer to the substrate. One of these residues that in TOP crystallographic structure are far from the catalytic residues, but, moves toward the substrate considering this possible structural reorganization is His{sup 600}. In the present work, the role of His{sup 600} of TOP was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. TOP H600A mutant was characterized through analysis of S{sub 1} and S{sub 1}' specificity, pH-activity profile and inhibition by JA-2. Results showed that TOP His{sup 600} residue makes important interactions with the substrate, supporting the prediction that His{sup 600} moves toward the substrate due to a hinge movement similar to the Dcp and ACE-2. Furthermore, the mutation H600A affected both K{sub m} and k{sub cat}, showing the importance of His{sup 600} for both substrate binding and/or product release from active site. Changes in the pH-profile may indicate also the participation of His{sup 600} in TOP catalysis, transferring a proton to the newly generated NH{sub 2}-terminus or helping Tyr{sup 605} and/or Tyr{sup 612} in the intermediate oxyanion stabilization.

  4. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  5. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  6. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  7. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  8. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  9. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  10. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  11. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  12. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  13. The Alteration of Plant Morphology by Small Peptides Released from the Proteolytic Processing of the Bacterial Peptide TENGU1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Kyoko; Honma, Youhei; Komatsu, Ken; Himeno, Misako; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-borne plant pathogenic bacteria that alter host morphology. TENGU, a small peptide of 38 residues, is a virulence factor secreted by phytoplasmas that induces dwarfism and witches’ broom in the host plant. In this study, we demonstrate that plants process TENGU in order to generate small functional peptides. First, virus vector-mediated transient expression demonstrated that the amino-terminal 11 amino acids of TENGU are capable of causing symptom development in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The deletion of the 11th residue significantly diminished the symptom-inducing activity of TENGU, suggesting that these 11 amino acids constitute a functional domain. Second, we found that TENGU undergoes proteolytic processing in vitro, generating peptides of 19 and 21 residues including the functional domain. Third, we observed similar processing of TENGU in planta, and an alanine substitution mutant of TENGU, for which processing was compromised, showed reduced symptom induction activity. All TENGU homologs from several phytoplasma strains possessed similar symptom induction activity and went through processing, which suggests that the processing of TENGU might be related to its function. PMID:23784461

  14. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  15. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  16. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  17. Overview of the regulation of disulfide bond formation in Peptide and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yuji

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the maintenance of the native conformation of proteins under thermodynamic control. In general, disulfide bond formation is associated with protein folding, and this restricts the formation of folding intermediates such as misbridged disulfide isomers or kinetically trapped conformations, which provide important information related to how proteins fold into their native conformation. Therefore, numerous studies have focused on the structural analysis of folding intermediates in vitro. However, isolating or trapping folding intermediates, as well as the entire proteins, including mutant proteins, is not an easy task. Several chemical methods have recently been developed for examining peptide and protein folding and for producing, e.g., intact, post-translationally modified, or kinetically trapped proteins, or proteins with misbridged disulfide bonds. This overview introduces chemical methods for regulating the formation of disulfide bonds of peptides and proteins in the context of the thermodynamic and kinetic control of peptide and protein folding.

  18. Streptococcus pyogenes Polymyxin B-Resistant Mutants Display Enhanced ExPortal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Port, Gary C.; Vega, Luis A.; Nylander, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The ExPortal protein secretion organelle in Streptococcus pyogenes is an anionic phospholipid-containing membrane microdomain enriched in Sec translocons and postsecretion protein biogenesis factors. Polymyxin B binds to and disrupts ExPortal integrity, resulting in defective secretion of several toxins. To gain insight into factors that influence ExPortal organization, a genetic screen was conducted to select for spontaneous polymyxin B-resistant mutants displaying enhanced ExPortal integrity. Whole-genome resequencing of 25 resistant mutants revealed from one to four mutations per mutant genome clustered primarily within a core set of 10 gene groups. Construction of mutants with individual deletions or insertions demonstrated that 7 core genes confer resistance and enhanced ExPortal integrity through loss of function, while 3 were likely due to gain of function and/or combinatorial effects. Core resistance genes include a transcriptional regulator of lipid biosynthesis, several genes involved in nutrient acquisition, and a variety of genes involved in stress responses. Two members of the latter class also function as novel regulators of the secreted SpeB cysteine protease. Analysis of the most frequently isolated mutation, a single nucleotide deletion in a track of 9 consecutive adenine residues in pstS, encoding a component of a high-affinity Pi transporter, suggests that this sequence functions as a molecular switch to facilitate stress adaptation. Together, these data suggest the existence of a membrane stress response that promotes enhanced ExPortal integrity and resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24794568

  19. The impact of DR3 microvariation on peptide binding: the combinations of specific DR beta residues critical to binding differ for different peptides.

    PubMed

    Posch, P E; Hurley, C K; Geluk, A; Ottenhoff, T H

    1996-09-01

    HLA-DR molecules are a group of highly polymorphic glycoprotein heterodimers that present peptide antigens to T lymphocytes for immune surveillance. To assess the significance of limited polymorphism on the functional differentiation of DR molecules, the binding of several immunogenic peptides to the DR3 microvariants [DR(alpha, beta 1*0302) and DR(alpha, beta 1*0301)] and to mutants of these DR3 molecules was examined. This analysis has shown that each residue (DR beta 26, DR beta 28, DR beta 47, and DR beta 86), which differentiates these two DR3 molecules, contributes to their functional distinction and that the relative contribution of each residue varies for different peptide/DR3 complexes. For example, DR beta 28 and DR beta 86 controlled the mycobacterium tuberculosis 65-kD heat shock protein peptides 3-13 and 4-15 (HSP) binding specificity to DR (alpha, beta 1*0301). [HSP does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)], whereas DR beta 26, DR beta 28, and DR beta 86 controlled the influenza hemagglutinin peptide 306-318 (HA) binding specificity to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302). [HA does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301).] In comparison, DR beta 86 alone controlled the binding level difference of sperm whale myoglobin peptide 132-151 (SWM) and of myelin basic protein peptide 152-170 (MBP) [both bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301) at levels five times greater than to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)] to the DR3 molecules. Although not critical, additional DR beta residues influenced the binding level of individual peptides of each of the DR3 molecules and, again, the combinations of these residues differed for different peptide/DR3 complexes. These data showed that individual DR residues vary in their relative contribution to the interaction between a specific DR molecule and different peptides and that limited polymorphism can create substantial differences in the peptide binding profiles among DR molecules.

  20. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  1. Mechanisms and fitness costs of resistance to antimicrobial peptides LL-37, CNY100HL and wheat germ histones.

    PubMed

    Lofton, Hava; Pränting, Maria; Thulin, Elisabeth; Andersson, Dan I

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a potential new class of antimicrobial drugs with potent and broad-spectrum activities. However, knowledge about the mechanisms and rates of resistance development to AMPs and the resulting effects on fitness and cross-resistance is limited. We isolated antimicrobial peptide (AMP) resistant Salmonella typhimurium LT2 mutants by serially passaging several independent bacterial lineages in progressively increasing concentrations of LL-37, CNY100HL and Wheat Germ Histones. Significant AMP resistance developed in 15/18 independent bacterial lineages. Resistance mutations were identified by whole genome sequencing in two-component signal transduction systems (pmrB and phoP) as well as in the LPS core biosynthesis pathway (waaY, also designated rfaY). In most cases, resistance was associated with a reduced fitness, observed as a decreased growth rate, which was dependent on growth conditions and mutation type. Importantly, mutations in waaY decreased bacterial susceptibility to all tested AMPs and the mutant outcompeted the wild type parental strain at AMP concentrations below the MIC for the wild type. Our data suggests that resistance to antimicrobial peptides can develop rapidly through mechanisms that confer cross-resistance to several AMPs. Importantly, AMP-resistant mutants can have a competitive advantage over the wild type strain at AMP concentrations similar to those found near human epithelial cells. These results suggest that resistant mutants could both be selected de novo and maintained by exposure to our own natural repertoire of defence molecules.

  2. Mutant models of prolonged life span.

    PubMed

    Mahler, J F

    2001-01-01

    Aging is an important biological process that affects all creatures. For humans, age-related diseases and the question of why we age and die also have tremendous social and philosophical impact. We can therefore expect that models to study mechanisms of the aging process will always attract much interest. Until recently, the mutant model approach to study molecular mechanisms of aging has been limited to lower animals such as yeast, worms, and flies. However, given the current power of genetic technology in mammals, we can expect that phenotypes of prolonged life span will increasingly be seen in mice and subject to evaluation by pathologists. A brief review of current models is presented.

  3. Pleiotropic aspartate taxis and serine taxis mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reader, R W; Tso, W W; Springer, M S; Goy, M F; Adler, J

    1979-04-01

    Mutants that at one time were thought to be specifically defective in taxis toward aspartate and related amino acids (tar mutants) or specifically defective in taxis toward serine and related amino acids (tar mutants) are now shown to be pleiotropic in their defects. The tar mutants also lack taxis toward maltose and away from Co2+ and Ni2+. The tsr mutants are altered in their response to a variety of repellents. Double mutants (tar tsr) fail in nearly all chemotactic responses. The tar and tsr mutants provide evidence for two complementary, converging pathways of information flow: certain chemoreceptors feed information into the tar pathway and others into the tsr pathway. The tar and tsr products have been shown to be two different sets of methylated proteins.

  4. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  5. Genetic and biochemical analysis of peptide transport in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli peptide transport mutants have been isolated based on their resistance to toxic tripeptides. These genetic defects were found to map in two distinct chromosomal locations. The transport systems which require expression of the trp-linked opp genes and the oppE gene(s) for activity were shown to have different substrate preferences. Growth of E. coli in medium containing leucine results in increased entry of exogenously supplied tripeptides into the bacterial cell. This leucine-mediated elevation of peptide transport required expression of the trp-linked opp operon and was accompanied by increased sensitivity to toxic tripeptides, by an enhanced capacity to utilize nutritional peptides, and by an increase in both the velocity and apparent steady-state level of L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine accumulation for E. coli grown in leucine-containing medium relative to these parameters of peptide transport measured with bacteria grown in media lacking leucine. Direct measurement of opp operon expression by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that growth of E. coli in the presence of leucine resulted in increased synthesis of the oppA-encoded periplasmic binding protein. The transcriptional regulation of the trp-linked opp operon of E. coli was investigated using lambda placMu51-generated lac operon fusions. Synthesis of ..beta..-galactosidase by strains harboring oppA-lac, oppB-lac, and oppD-lac fusions occurred at a basal level when the fusion-containing strains were grown in minimal medium.

  6. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  7. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on X-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with R osetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several R osetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

  8. A TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Kosanke, Stanley; Awasthi, Shanjana

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and TLR4 is important for host defense. We have recently identified an SPA4 peptide region from the interface of SP-A-TLR4 complex. Here, we studied the involvement of the SPA4 peptide region in SP-A-TLR4 interaction using a two-hybrid system, and biological effects of SPA4 peptide in cell systems and a mouse model. HEK293 cells were transfected with plasmid DNAs encoding SP-A or a SP-A-mutant lacking SPA4 peptide region and TLR4. Luciferase activity was measured as the end-point of SP-A-TLR4 interaction. NF-κB activity was also assessed simultaneously. Next, the dendritic cells or mice were challenged with Escherichia coli-derived LPS and treated with SPA4 peptide. Endotoxic shock-like symptoms and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, NF-κB, leukocyte influx) were assessed. Our results reveal that the SPA4 peptide region contributes to the SP-A-TLR4 interaction and inhibits the LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α. We also observed that the SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and cell influx, and alleviates the endotoxic shock-like symptoms in a mouse model. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of the SPA4 peptide through its binding to TLR4 can be of therapeutic benefit.

  9. Stereospecific capillary electrophoresis assays using pentapeptide substrates for the study of Aspergillus nidulans methionine sulfoxide reductase A and mutant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingfu; El-Mergawy, Rabab G; Zhou, Yuzhen; Chen, Chunyang; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Robaa, Dina; Sippl, Wolfgang; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2016-07-01

    Stereospecific capillary electrophoresis-based methods for the analysis of methionine sulfoxide [Met(O)]-containing pentapeptides were developed in order to investigate the reduction of Met(O)-containing peptide substrates by recombinant Aspergillus nidulans methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) as well as enzymes carrying mutations in position Glu99 and Asp134. The separation of the diastereomers of the N-acetylated, C-terminally 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp)-labeled pentapeptides ac-Lys-Phe-Met(O)-Lys-Lys-Dnp, ac-Lys-Asp-Met(O)-Asn-Lys-Dnp and ac-Lys-Asn-Met(O)-Asp-Lys-Dnp was achieved in 50 mM Tris-HCl buffers containing sulfated β-CD in fused-silica capillaries, while the diastereomer separation of ac-Lys-Asp-Met(O)-Asp-Lys-Dnp was achieved by sulfated β-CD-mediated MEKC. The methods were validated with regard to range, linearity, accuracy, limits of detection and quantitation as well as precision. Subsequently, the substrates were incubated with wild-type MsrA and three mutants in the presence of dithiothreitol as reductant. Wild-type MsrA displayed the highest activity towards all substrates compared to the mutants. Substitution of Glu99 by Gln resulted in the mutant with the lowest activity towards all substrates except for ac-Lys-Asn-Met(O)-Asp-Lys-Dnp, while replacement Asn for Asp134 lead to a higher activity towards ac-Lys-Asp-Met(O)-Asn-Lys-Dnp compared with the Glu99 mutant. The mutant with Glu instead of Asp134 was the most active among the mutant enzymes. Molecular modeling indicated that the conserved Glu99 residue is buried in the Met-S-(O) groove, which might contribute to the correct placing of substrates and, consequently, to the catalytic activity of MsrA, while Asp134 did not form hydrogen bonds with the substrates but only within the enzyme.

  10. A nonviral peptide can replace the entire N terminus of zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus coat protein and permits viral systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Arazi, T; Shiboleth, Y M; Gal-On, A

    2001-07-01

    Systematic deletion and peptide tagging of the amino-terminal domain (NT, ~43 amino acids) of an attenuated zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-AGII) coat protein (CP) were used to elucidate its role in viral systemic infection. Deletion mutants truncated by 8, 13, and 33 amino acid residues from the CP-NT 5' end were systemically infectious and produced symptoms similar to those of the AGII virus. Tagging these deletion mutants with either human c-Myc (Myc) or hexahistidine peptides maintained viral infectivity. Similarly, addition of these peptides to the intact AGII CP-NT did not affect viral life cycle. To determine which parts, if any, of the CP-NT are essential for viral systemic infection, a series of Myc-tagged mutants with 8 to 43 amino acids removed from the CP-NT were constructed. All Myc-tagged CP-NT deletion mutants, including those from which virtually all the viral CP-NT had been eliminated, were able to encapsidate and cause systemic infection. Furthermore, chimeric viruses with deletions of up to 33 amino acids from CP-NT produced symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental AGII virus. In contrast to CP-NT Myc fusion, addition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenic epitope to AGII CP-NT did not permit systemic infection. However, fusion of the Myc peptide to the N terminus of the FMDV peptide restored the capability of the virus to spread systemically. We have demonstrated that all CP-NT fused peptides were exposed on the virion surface, masking natural CP immunogenic determinants. Our findings demonstrate that CP-NT is not essential for ZYMV spread and that it can be replaced by an appropriate foreign peptide while maintaining systemic infectivity.

  11. In vitro study of stability and amyloid-fibril formation of two mutants of human stefin B (cystatin B) occurring in patients with EPM1

    PubMed Central

    Rabzelj, Sabina; Turk, Vito; Žerovnik, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Myoclonus epilepsy of type 1 (EPM1) is a rare monogenic progressive and degenerative epilepsy, also known under the name Unverricht-Lundborg disease. With the aim of comparing their behavior in vitro, wild-type (wt) human stefin B (cystatin B) and the G4R and the R68X mutants observed in EPM1 were expressed and isolated from the Escherichia coli lysate. The R68X mutant (Arg68Stop) is a peptide of 67 amino acids from the N terminus of stefin B. CD spectra have shown that the R68X peptide is not folded, in contrast to the G4R mutant, which folds like wild type. The wild type and the G4R mutant were unfolded by urea and by trifluoroethanol (TFE). It has been shown that both proteins have closely similar stability and that at pH 4.8, where a native-like intermediate was demonstrated, TFE induces unfolding intermediates prior to the major transition to the all-α-helical state. Kinetics of fibril formation were followed by Thioflavin T fluorescence while the accompanying changes of morphology were followed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For the two folded proteins the optimal concentration of TFE producing extensive lag phases and high fibril yields was predenaturational, 9% (v/v). The unfolded R68X peptide, which is highly prone to aggregate, formed amyloid fibrils in aqueous solution and in predenaturing 3% TFE. The G4R mutant exhibited a much longer lag phase than the wild type, with the accumulation of prefibrillar aggregates. Implications for pathology in view of the higher toxicity of prefibrillar aggregates to cells are discussed. PMID:16155205

  12. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropical

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.G.; Rayle, D.L. ); Cleland, R.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  13. Zebrafish Genomic Instability Mutants and Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jessica L.; Rush, Lindsay M.; Breneman, Carol; Mohideen, Manzoor-Ali P. K.; Cheng, Keith C.

    2006-01-01

    Somatic loss of tumor suppressor gene function comprising the second hit of Knudson's two-hit hypothesis is important in human cancer. A genetic screen was performed in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to find mutations that cause genomic instability (gin), as scored by Streisinger's mosaic-eye assay that models this second hit. The assay, based on a visible test for loss of wild-type gene function at a single locus, golden, is representative of genomewide events. Twelve ENU-induced genomic instability (gin) mutations were isolated. Most mutations showed weak dominance in heterozygotes and all showed a stronger phenotype in homozygotes. Trans-heterozygosity for 7 of these mutations showed greatly enhanced instability. A variety of spontaneous tumors were found in heterozygous adults from all gin lines, consistent with the expectation that genomic instability (mutator) mutations can accelerate carcinogenesis. The incidence of spontaneous cancer at 30–34 months was increased 9.6-fold in heterozygotes for the mutant with the strongest phenotype, gin-10. Tumors were seen in skin, colon, kidney, liver, pancreas, ovary, testis, and neuronal tissues, with multiple tumors in some fish. The study of these mutants will add to our understanding of the mechanisms of somatic loss of gene function and how those mechanisms contribute to cancer susceptibility. PMID:16888336

  14. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  15. The LORE1 insertion mutant resource.

    PubMed

    Małolepszy, Anna; Mun, Terry; Sandal, Niels; Gupta, Vikas; Dubin, Manu; Urbański, Dorian; Shah, Niraj; Bachmann, Asger; Fukai, Eigo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Markmann, Katharina; Su, Junyi; Umehara, Yosuke; Soyano, Takashi; Miyahara, Akira; Sato, Shusei; Hayashi, Makoto; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2016-10-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are closely related to retroviruses, and their activities shape eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a complete Lotus japonicus insertion mutant collection generated by identification of 640 653 new insertion events following de novo activation of the LTR element Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) (http://lotus.au.dk). Insertion preferences are critical for effective gene targeting, and we exploit our large dataset to analyse LTR element characteristics in this context. We infer the mechanism that generates the consensus palindromes typical of retroviral and LTR retrotransposon insertion sites, identify a short relaxed insertion site motif, and demonstrate selective integration into CHG-hypomethylated genes. These characteristics result in a steep increase in deleterious mutation rate following activation, and allow LORE1 active gene targeting to approach saturation within a population of 134 682 L. japonicus lines. We suggest that saturation mutagenesis using endogenous LTR retrotransposons with germinal activity can be used as a general and cost-efficient strategy for generation of non-transgenic mutant collections for unrestricted use in plant research.

  16. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  17. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  18. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  19. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  20. Thiostrepton-resistant mutants of Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Dale M.; Thompson, Jill; Gregory, Steven T.; March, Paul E.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2004-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L11 and its associated binding site on 23S rRNA together comprise one of the principle components that mediate interactions of translation factors with the ribosome. This site is also the target of the antibiotic thiostrepton, which has been proposed to act by preventing important structural transitions that occur in this region of the ribosome during protein synthesis. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of spontaneous thiostrepton-resistant mutants of the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus. All mutations were found at conserved positions in the flexible N-terminal domain of L11 or at conserved positions in the L11-binding site of 23S rRNA. A number of the mutant ribosomes were affected in in vitro EF-G-dependent GTP hydrolysis but all showed resistance to thiostrepton at levels ranging from high to moderate. Structure probing revealed that some of the mutations in L11 result in enhanced reactivity of adjacent rRNA bases to chemical probes, suggesting a more open conformation of this region. These data suggest that increased flexibility of the factor binding site results in resistance to thiostrepton by counteracting the conformation-stabilizing effect of the antibiotic. PMID:15199170

  1. Effects of mutant rat dynamin on endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Dynamin is a 100-kD microtubule-activated GTPase. Recent evidence has revealed a high degree of sequence homology with the product of the Drosophila gene shibire, mutations in which block the recycling of synaptic vesicles and, more generally, the formation of coated and non- coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. We have now transfected cultured mammalian COS-7 cells with both wild-type and mutant dynamin cDNAs. Point mutations in the GTP-binding consensus sequence elements of dynamin equivalent to dominant negative mutations in ras, and an NH2- terminal deletion of the entire GTP-binding domain of dynamin, block transferrin uptake and alter the distribution of clathrin heavy chain and alpha-, but not gamma-, adaptin. COOH-terminal deletions reverse these effects, identifying this portion of dynamin as a site of interaction with other components of the endocytic pathway. Over- expression of neither wild-type nor mutant forms of dynamin affected the distribution of microtubules. These results demonstrate a specific role for dynamin and for GTP in the initial stages of receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:8335685

  2. Too many mutants with multiple mutations.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These "multiples" appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts.

  3. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  4. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  5. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  6. Isoxazole‐Derived Amino Acids are Bromodomain‐Binding Acetyl‐Lysine Mimics: Incorporation into Histone H4 Peptides and Histone H3

    PubMed Central

    Sekirnik (née Measures), Angelina R.; Hewings, David S.; Theodoulou, Natalie H.; Jursins, Lukass; Lewendon, Katie R.; Jennings, Laura E.; Rooney, Timothy P. C.; Heightman, Tom D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A range of isoxazole‐containing amino acids was synthesized that displaced acetyl‐lysine‐containing peptides from the BAZ2A, BRD4(1), and BRD9 bromodomains. Three of these amino acids were incorporated into a histone H4‐mimicking peptide and their affinity for BRD4(1) was assessed. Affinities of the isoxazole‐containing peptides are comparable to those of a hyperacetylated histone H4‐mimicking cognate peptide, and demonstrated a dependence on the position at which the unnatural residue was incorporated. An isoxazole‐based alkylating agent was developed to selectively alkylate cysteine residues in situ. Selective monoalkylation of a histone H4‐mimicking peptide, containing a lysine to cysteine residue substitution (K12C), resulted in acetyl‐lysine mimic incorporation, with high affinity for the BRD4 bromodomain. The same technology was used to alkylate a K18C mutant of histone H3. PMID:27264992

  7. Allosteric Mutant IDH1 Inhibitors Reveal Mechanisms for IDH1 Mutant and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoling; Baird, Daniel; Bowen, Kimberly; Capka, Vladimir; Chen, Jinyun; Chenail, Gregg; Cho, YoungShin; Dooley, Julia; Farsidjani, Ali; Fortin, Pascal; Kohls, Darcy; Kulathila, Raviraj; Lin, Fallon; McKay, Daniel; Rodrigues, Lindsey; Sage, David; Touré, B Barry; van der Plas, Simon; Wright, Kirk; Xu, Ming; Yin, Hong; Levell, Julian; Pagliarini, Raymond A

    2017-03-07

    Oncogenic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations contribute to cancer via production of R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we characterize two structurally distinct mutant- and isoform-selective IDH1 inhibitors that inhibit 2-HG production. Both bind to an allosteric pocket on IDH1, yet shape it differently, highlighting the plasticity of this site. Oncogenic IDH1(R132H) mutation destabilizes an IDH1 "regulatory segment," which otherwise restricts compound access to the allosteric pocket. Regulatory segment destabilization in wild-type IDH1 promotes inhibitor binding, suggesting that destabilization is critical for mutant selectivity. We also report crystal structures of oncogenic IDH2 mutant isoforms, highlighting the fact that the analogous segment of IDH2 is not similarly destabilized. This intrinsic stability of IDH2 may contribute to observed inhibitor IDH1 isoform selectivity. Moreover, discrete residues in the IDH1 allosteric pocket that differ from IDH2 may also guide IDH1 isoform selectivity. These data provide a deeper understanding of how IDH1 inhibitors achieve mutant and isoform selectivity.

  8. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in acetate metabolism: isolation and characterization of Acn- mutants.

    PubMed

    McCammon, M T

    1996-09-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn- ("ACetate Nonutilizing") mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism.

  9. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  10. Functional analysis of four single (RGDWL, RGDWM, RGDWP, RGDMN) and two double (RGDNM, RGDMP) mutants: The importance of methionine (M) in the functional potency of recombinant mojastin (r-Moj)

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Daniel A.; Aranda, Ana S.; Carrillo, David A.R.; Koshlaychuk, Melissa A.; Sanchez, Elda E.; Lucena, Sara E.; Soto, Julio G.

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated in previous studies that a single amino acid change can alter the activity of the recombinant disintegrin r-Moj. In this study, four r-Moj recombinants containing single mutations (r-Moj-WL, r-Moj-WM, r-Moj-WP, r-Moj-MN) and two containing double mutations (r-Moj-MP and r-Moj-NM) at the binding loop were produced, purified, and tested. All r-Moj-W_, r-Moj-M_, and r-Moj-NM mutant peptides inhibited platelet aggregation at higher potency than r-Moj-D_ mutants. Five of the seven r-Moj peptides inhibited angiogenesis at different levels. Two of the mutant peptides with a methionine at the second position carboxyl of the RGD (r-Moj-WM and r-Moj-NM) were the strongest angiogenesis inhibitors, with r-Moj-WM being the most potent. Recombinant r-Moj-MP and r-Moj-WN failed to inhibit angiogenesis. Only the r-Moj-MP mutant peptide induced apoptosis of SK-Mel-28 cells significantly (p = 0.001). This was confirmed by chromatin condensation. Proliferation of SK-Mel-28 cells was inhibited at high levels (>70%) by all r-Moj mutant peptides. Recombinant r-Moj-MN and r-Moj-WN failed to inhibit cell migration significantly (p > 0.5). Recombinant r-Moj-NM was the strongest cell migration inhibitor (98% ± 0.69), followed by r-Moj-MP (80% ± 2.87), and r-Moj-WM (61.8% ± 5.45). The lowest inhibitor was r-Moj-WL (50% ± 12.16). Our functional data suggest that the most potent r-Moj disintegrins contain a methionine in the first or the second position carboxyl to the RGD. PMID:27816535

  11. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  12. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  14. Analysis of the V2 Vasopressin Receptor (V2R) Mutations Causing Partial Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Highlights a Sustainable Signaling by a Non-peptide V2R Agonist.

    PubMed

    Makita, Noriko; Sato, Tomohiko; Yajima-Shoji, Yuki; Sato, Junichiro; Manaka, Katsunori; Eda-Hashimoto, Makiko; Ootaki, Masanori; Matsumoto, Naoki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Iiri, Taroh

    2016-10-21

    Disease-causing mutations in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, including the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) gene, often cause misfolded receptors, leading to a defect in plasma membrane trafficking. A novel V2R mutation, T273M, identified in a boy with partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), shows intracellular localization and partial defects similar to the two mutants we described previously (10). Although non-peptide V2R antagonists have been shown to rescue the membrane localization of V2R mutants, their level of functional rescue is weak. Interestingly, it has been reported that a non-peptide agonist, OPC51803, activates misfolded V2R mutants intracellularly without degradation, thus potentially serving as a therapeutic agent against NDI (14). In our current experiments, however, a peptide antagonist blocked arginine vasopressin (AVP)- or OPC51803-stimulated cAMP accumulation both in COS-7 and MDCK cells, suggesting that OPC51803 mainly stimulates cell surface V2R mutants. In addition, our analyses revealed that OPC51803 works not only as a non-peptide agonist that causes activation/β-arrestin-dependent desensitization of V2R mutants expressed at the plasma membrane but also as a pharmacochaperone that promotes the endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutant maturation and trafficking to the plasma membrane. The ratio of the pharmacochaperone effect to the desensitization effect likely correlates negatively with the residual function of the tested mutants, suggesting that OPC5 has a more favorable effect on the V2R mutants with a less residual function. We speculated that the canceling of the desensitization effect of OPC51803 by the pharmacochaperone effect after long-term treatment may produce sustainable signaling, and thus pharmacochaperone agonists such as OPC51803 may serve as promising therapeutics for NDI caused by misfolded V2R mutants.

  15. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Dabney K; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  16. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  17. Natriuretic peptide metabolism, clearance and degradation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide constitute a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, and then specifically discusses the tissue-specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and natriuretic peptide receptor-C.

  18. Disruption of disulfide bond formation alters the trafficking of prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH)-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Barker, Alison J; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2006-01-15

    Rat prothyrotropin releasing hormone (proTRH) is processed in the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells yielding five TRH peptides and several non-TRH peptides. It is not understood how these peptides are targeted to the RSP. We show here that a disulfide bond in the carboxy-terminus of proTRH plays an important role in the trafficking of this prohormone. Recombinant proTRH was observed to migrate faster on a native gel when treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) suggesting the presence of a disulfide bond. In vitro disulfide bond formation was prevented either by DTT treatment or by mutating cysteines 213 and 219 to glycines. In both cases the peptides derived from these mutants exhibited increased constitutive release and processing defects when expressed in AtT20 cells, a neuroendocrine cell line used in our prior studies on proTRH processing. Immunocytochemistry revealed that wild-type proTRH and mutant proTRH localized in a punctate pattern typical of proteins sorted to the regulated secretory pathway. These data suggest that the proposed disulfide bond of proTRH is involved in sorting of proTRH-derived peptides and in their retention within maturing secretory granules. This is the first evidence of structural motifs being important for the sorting of proTRH.

  19. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  20. Open-gate mutants of the mammalian proteasome show enhanced ubiquitin-conjugate degradation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hoon; de Poot, Stefanie A H; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Han, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Finley, Daniel; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-03-09

    When in the closed form, the substrate translocation channel of the proteasome core particle (CP) is blocked by the convergent N termini of α-subunits. To probe the role of channel gating in mammalian proteasomes, we deleted the N-terminal tail of α3; the resulting α3ΔN proteasomes are intact but hyperactive in the hydrolysis of fluorogenic peptide substrates and the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Cells expressing the hyperactive proteasomes show markedly elevated degradation of many established proteasome substrates and resistance to oxidative stress. Multiplexed quantitative proteomics revealed ∼ 200 proteins with reduced levels in the mutant cells. Potentially toxic proteins such as tau exhibit reduced accumulation and aggregate formation. These data demonstrate that the CP gate is a key negative regulator of proteasome function in mammals, and that opening the CP gate may be an effective strategy to increase proteasome activity and reduce levels of toxic proteins in cells.

  1. Expression, purification and characterization of a group of lectin-like peptides from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Peng, Li; Zhang, Yongqun; Chen, Jinjun; Zhang, Dongyi; Liang, Songping

    2009-04-01

    By sequencing random clones from the venom gland cDNA library of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena, a transcript, named SHL-Ib1, encoding a lectin-like peptide was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the putative mature peptide of SHL-Ib1 is identical, except for seven different residues, with that of SHL-I, a lectin found in the venom of O. huwena. The mature peptides of SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c are the mutants of SHL-Ib1 with two or three amino acid residues truncated at the C-terminal. The recombinant SHL-Ib1b and SHL-Ib1c were expressed successfully by the yeast expression system and purified by using a combination of ion-exchange and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The molecular masses of the two expressed peptides were identified by mass spectrometry, indicating that the C-terminals of the two peptides were not amidated. The two peptides can agglutinate human erythrocytes at minimal concentrations of 0.75 and 1.475mg/ml, respectively. Structure modeling of SHL-Ib1 has given a clue to the low agglutination bioactivities of these recombinant toxins. These lectin-like peptides, due to the small molecular sizes, may have the advantage to investigate the binding mechanism of the lectin and have the potential to be the carrier for drug delivery.

  2. Expanded Tropism and Altered Activation of a Retroviral Glycoprotein Resistant to an Entry Inhibitor Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Amberg, Sean M.; Netter, Robert C.; Simmons, Graham; Bates, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The envelope of class I viruses can be a target for potent viral inhibitors, such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitor enfuvirtide, which are derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2) of the transmembrane (TM) subunit. Resistance to an HR2-based peptide inhibitor of a model retrovirus, subgroup A of the Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus genus (ASLV-A), was studied by examining mutants derived by viral passage in the presence of inhibitor. Variants with reduced sensitivity to inhibitor were readily selected in vitro. Sensitivity determinants were identified for 13 different isolates, all of which mapped to the TM subunit. These determinants were identified in two regions: (i) the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) and (ii) the N-terminal segment of TM, between the subunit cleavage site and the fusion peptide. The latter class of mutants identified a region outside of the predicted HR2-binding site that can significantly alter sensitivity to inhibitor. A subset of the HR1 mutants displayed the unanticipated ability to infect nonavian cells. This expanded tropism was associated with increased efficiency of envelope triggering by soluble receptor at low temperatures, as measured by protease sensitivity of the surface subunit (SU) of envelope. In addition, expanded tropism was linked for the most readily triggered mutants with increased sensitivity to neutralization by SU-specific antiserum. These observations depict a class of HR2 peptide-selected mutations with a reduced activation threshold, thereby allowing the utilization of alternative receptors for viral entry. PMID:16352560

  3. Expanded tropism and altered activation of a retroviral glycoprotein resistant to an entry inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Amberg, Sean M; Netter, Robert C; Simmons, Graham; Bates, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The envelope of class I viruses can be a target for potent viral inhibitors, such as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitor enfuvirtide, which are derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2) of the transmembrane (TM) subunit. Resistance to an HR2-based peptide inhibitor of a model retrovirus, subgroup A of the Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus genus (ASLV-A), was studied by examining mutants derived by viral passage in the presence of inhibitor. Variants with reduced sensitivity to inhibitor were readily selected in vitro. Sensitivity determinants were identified for 13 different isolates, all of which mapped to the TM subunit. These determinants were identified in two regions: (i) the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) and (ii) the N-terminal segment of TM, between the subunit cleavage site and the fusion peptide. The latter class of mutants identified a region outside of the predicted HR2-binding site that can significantly alter sensitivity to inhibitor. A subset of the HR1 mutants displayed the unanticipated ability to infect nonavian cells. This expanded tropism was associated with increased efficiency of envelope triggering by soluble receptor at low temperatures, as measured by protease sensitivity of the surface subunit (SU) of envelope. In addition, expanded tropism was linked for the most readily triggered mutants with increased sensitivity to neutralization by SU-specific antiserum. These observations depict a class of HR2 peptide-selected mutations with a reduced activation threshold, thereby allowing the utilization of alternative receptors for viral entry.

  4. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  5. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  7. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  8. Hoxc13 mutant mice lack external hair.

    PubMed

    Godwin, A R; Capecchi, M R

    1998-01-01

    Hox genes are usually expressed temporally and spatially in a colinear manner with respect to their positions in the Hox complex. Consistent with the expected pattern for a paralogous group 13 member, early embryonic Hoxc13 expression is found in the nails and tail. Hoxc13 is also expressed in vibrissae, in the filiform papillae of the tongue, and in hair follicles throughout the body; a pattern that apparently violates spatial colinearity. Mice carrying mutant alleles of Hoxc13 have been generated by gene targeting. Homozygotes have defects in every region in which gene expression is seen. The most striking defect is brittle hair resulting in alopecia (hairless mice). One explanation for this novel role is that Hoxc13 has been recruited for a function common to hair, nail, and filiform papilla development.

  9. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  10. Novel formulations for antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2014-10-09

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  11. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  12. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  13. Characterization of Halobacterium halobium mutants defective in taxis.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, S A; Alam, M; Lebert, M; Spudich, J L; Oesterhelt, D; Hazelbauer, G L

    1990-05-01

    Mutant derivatives of Halobacterium halobium previously isolated by using a procedure that selected for defective phototactic response to white light were examined for an array of phenotypic characteristics related to phototaxis and chemotaxis. The properties tested were unstimulated swimming behavior, behaviorial responses to temporal gradients of light and spatial gradients of chemoattractants, content of photoreceptor pigments, methylation of methyl-accepting taxis proteins, and transient increases in rate of release of volatile methyl groups induced by tactic stimulation. Several distinct phenotypes were identified, corresponding to a mutant missing photoreceptors, a mutant defective in the methyltransferase, a mutant altered in control of the methylesterase, and mutants apparently defective in intracellular signaling. All except the photoreceptor mutant were defective in both chemotaxis and phototaxis.

  14. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii altered in cercosporin synthesis and pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, R.G.; Walker, D.C.; Rollins, J.A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M.E. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  15. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  16. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  17. Escape from R-peptide deletion in a {gamma}-retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Irene C.; Eckhardt, Manon; Brynza, Julia; Collins, Mary K.; Cichutek, Klaus; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-09-30

    The R peptide in the cytoplasmic tail (C-tail) of {gamma}-retroviral envelope proteins (Env) prevents membrane fusion before budding. To analyse its role in the formation of replication competent, infectious particles, we developed chimeric murine leukaemia viruses (MLV) with unmodified or R-peptide deleted Env proteins of the gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV). While titres of these viruses were unaffected, R-peptide deficiency led to strongly impaired spreading. Most remarkably, we isolated an escape mutant which had restored an open reading frame for a C-terminal extension of the truncated C-tail. A reconstituted virus encoding this escape C-tail replicated in cell culture. In contrast to R-peptide deficient Env, particle incorporation of the escape Env was effective due to an enhanced protein expression and restored intracellular co-localisation with Gag proteins. Our data demonstrate that the R peptide not only regulates membrane fusion but also mediates efficient Env protein particle incorporation in {gamma}-retrovirus infected cells.

  18. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, O Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-10-03

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae unencapsulated mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Benedi, V.J.; Ciurana, B.; Tomas, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants were obtained after UV irradiation and negative selection with anticapsular serum. Unencapsulation, rather than expression of a structurally altered capsule, was found in the mutants. The mutant strains showed no alterations in their outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide, and a great similarity with the wild type in the properties tested (serum resistance, antimicrobial sensitivity, and lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage sensitivity), with the exception of a higher cell surface hydrophobicity and resistance to bacteriophage FC3-9.

  20. Mutant Proteins--Enzymes to Hydrolyze Toxic Organophosphates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-15

    strains of infectious bacteria and the serine protease’ lytic protease. We also employ novel chemical modifications of ; mutant proteins to achieve...mutant RTEM -1 8-lactamase. We have previously generated and characterized mutants of RTEM -1 .- lactamase with all possible amino acid substitutions (site...denaturation than wild-type -lactamase. Uniquely among class A B- lactamases, the RTEM -1 (and RTEM -2) enzymes contain a single disulfide bond between Cys

  1. Division pattern of a round mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S

    1997-01-01

    A round mutant of Escherichia coli, when grown in Methocel medium, forms chains of cells and does not form tetrads. This implies that successive division planes of the round mutant are parallel rather than perpendicular. These results differ from a previous proposal that division planes in this round mutant are perpendicular to the prior division plane (W. D. Donachie, S. Addinall, and K. Begg, Bioessays 17:569-576, 1995). PMID:9287016

  2. [Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, A I; Beburov, M Iu; Zhdanov, V G

    1975-01-01

    3 groups of Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 5-10(-3) M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) ahve been obtained. The mutants of the 1st group (Dap-r) are selected from the initial susceptible strain by the ability to grow in the presence of 5-10(-3) M DAP. The mutants of the 2nd group (Azg-Dap-r) are selected in the selective background of two analogues of 5-10(-3) M DAP and 10(-4) M 8-azaguanine (AG). The mutants of the 3rd group (Azg-r - DAP-r) are isolated from the mutant Azg-r 34 resistant to 10(-4) M AG. The results of studying cross-resistance of mutants to DAP, AG and 8-azaadenine (AA) show that Dap-r and Azg-Dap-r mutants in contrast to Azg-r - Dap-r, have common phenotypic properties and can grow only on the analogues of adenine. DAP, but not AA, eliminates the inhibitory effect of AG on the growth of these mutants. This effect is probably due to deaminating DAP to guanine. Mutants Azg-r - Dap-r retain the initial resistance to 10(-4) M AG, but are susceptible to higher concentrations of AG and in this case DAP does not eliminate the inhibitory effect of AG. In all mutants obtained the effectiveness of the incorporation of 14C-adenine (but not 14C-guanine) is sharply reduced, thus indicating the absence of adenosine-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase activity. The mutants do not excrete purine-like compounds into the medium. In the course of the continuous growth of mutants in the presence of DAP but not of guanine the red intracellular pigment is formed which seems to be a complex of riboflavin with DAP. A disturbance in the synthesis of adenosine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase does not influence practically the level of the synthesis of riboflavin in E. ashbyii.

  3. Fatty acid biosynthesis in novel ufa mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Goodrich-Tanrikulu, M; Stafford, A E; Lin, J T; Makapugay, M I; Fuller, G; McKeon, T A

    1994-10-01

    New mutants of Neurospora crassa having the ufa phenotype have been isolated. Two of these mutants, like previously identified ufa mutants, require an unsaturated fatty acid for growth and are almost completely blocked in the de novo synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. The new mutations map to a different chromosomal location than previously characterized ufa mutations. This implies that at least one additional genetic locus controls the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Neurospora.

  4. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  5. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina Politi...CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Phenotypic changes have been observed in EGFR mutant lung cancers that become resistant to targeted

  6. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0225 TITLE: Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric Collisson...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0225 5c...one RAS-dependent. This Aim is underway and has verified that KRAS is indeed essential in the KRAS mutant mouse cell lines. Specific Aim 2. To

  7. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  8. Computational approach for designing tumor homing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Kapoor, Pallavi; Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Tyagi, Atul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor homing peptides are small peptides that home specifically to tumor and tumor associated microenvironment i.e. tumor vasculature, after systemic delivery. Keeping in mind the huge therapeutic importance of these peptides, we have made an attempt to analyze and predict tumor homing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues are preferred in tumor homing peptides. Therefore, we developed support vector machine based models for predicting tumor homing peptides using amino acid composition and binary profiles of peptides. Amino acid composition, dipeptide composition and binary profile-based models achieved a maximum accuracy of 86.56%, 82.03%, and 84.19% respectively. These methods have been implemented in a user-friendly web server, TumorHPD. We anticipate that this method will be helpful to design novel tumor homing peptides. TumorHPD web server is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/tumorhpd/. PMID:23558316

  9. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  10. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  11. Investigating Endogenous Peptides and Peptidases using Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Rather than simply being protein degradation products, peptides have proven to be important bioactive molecules. Bioactive peptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters and antimicrobial agents in vivo. The dysregulation of bioactive peptide signaling is also known to be involved in disease, and targeting peptide hormone pathways has been successful strategy in the development of novel therapeutics. The importance of bioactive peptides in biology has spurred research to elucidate the function and regulation of these molecules. Classical methods for peptide analysis have relied on targeted immunoassays, but certain scientific questions necessitated a broader and more detailed view of the peptidome–all the peptides in a cell, tissue or organism. In this review we discuss how peptidomics has emerged to fill this need through the application of advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods that provide unique insights into peptide activity and regulation. PMID:21786763

  12. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  13. Boosting production yield of biomedical peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is employed to monitor synthesis of biomedical peptides. Application of NMR technique may improve production yields of insulin, ACTH, and growth hormones, as well as other synthesized biomedical peptides.

  14. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  15. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  16. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  17. Digesting New Elements in Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Nissen, Poul

    2015-10-06

    In this issue of Structure, Beale et al. (2015) define structurally and functionally a large extracellular domain unique to mammalian peptide transporters and its implications for the transport of basic di- and tri-peptides (Beale et al., 2015).

  18. Mechanisms and consequences of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Andersson, D I; Hughes, D; Kubicek-Sutherland, J Z

    2016-05-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an intrinsic part of the human innate immune system. Over 100 different human AMPs are known to exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Because of the increased frequency of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is an interest in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. Several cationic peptides that are derivatives of AMPs from the human innate immune system are currently in clinical development. There are also ongoing clinical studies aimed at modulating the expression of AMPs to boost the human innate immune response. In this review we discuss the potential problems associated with these therapeutic approaches. There is considerable experimental data describing mechanisms by which bacteria can develop resistance to AMPs. As for any type of drug resistance, the rate by which AMP resistance would emerge and spread in a population of bacteria in a natural setting will be determined by a complex interplay of several different factors, including the mutation supply rate, the fitness of the resistant mutant at different AMP concentrations, and the strength of the selective pressure. Several studies have already shown that AMP-resistant bacterial mutants display broad cross-resistance to a variety of AMPs with different structures and modes of action. Therefore, routine clinical administration of AMPs to treat bacterial infections may select for resistant bacterial pathogens capable of better evading the innate immune system. The ramifications of therapeutic levels of exposure on the development of AMP resistance and bacterial pathogenesis are not yet understood. This is something that needs to be carefully studied and monitored if AMPs are used in clinical settings.

  19. Growth and development of maize that contains mutant tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Wick

    2004-07-23

    Mutant maize plants containing a Mu transposon disrupting one of the five beta tubulin genes of interest were followed for several generations and hybridized with each other to produce plants containing disruptions in both copies of a single gene or disruption of more than one tubulin gene. Seedlings of some of these plants were grown under chilling conditions for a few weeks. After DOE funding ended, plants have been assessed to see whether mutant are more or less tolerant to chilling. Other mutant plants will be assessed for their male and female fertility relative to non-mutant siblings or other close relatives.

  20. Identification of mutant monoclonal antibodies with increased antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Pollock, R R; French, D L; Gefter, M L; Scharff, M D

    1988-04-01

    Sib selection and an ELISA have been used to isolate hybridoma subclones producing mutant antibodies that bind antigen better than the parental monoclonal antibody. Such mutants arise spontaneously in culture at frequencies of 2.5-5 X 10(-5). The sequences of the heavy and light chain variable regions of the mutant antibodies are identical to that of the parent and the Ka values of the mutants and the parent are the same. The increase in binding is associated with abnormalities of the constant region polypeptide and probably reflect changes in avidity of these antibodies.

  1. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  2. Sulphate metabolism of selenate-resistant Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants.

    PubMed

    Bánszky, Luca; Simonics, Tibor; Maráz, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants were obtained from several strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The obtained mutants all belonged to the same genetic complementation group. They were low in sulphate uptake activity and in ATP sulphurylase activity. They grew on medium containing sulphite, thiosulphate, cysteine or glutathione but not methionine as the sole source of sulphur. From these results, the mutants were concluded to carry mutations in the ATP sulphurylase gene. Inability of the mutants to utilize methionine as a sulphur source is rationalized by the absence of the reverse transsulphurylation pathway in this organism; wild type strains must utilize methionine as a sulphur source after it is degraded to give rise to sulphate.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  4. Aspartate-specific peptidases in Salmonella typhimurium: mutants deficient in peptidase E.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, T H; Miller, C G

    1984-01-01

    The only dipeptide found to serve as a leucine source for a Salmonella strain lacking peptidases N, A, B, D, P, and Q was alpha-L-aspartyl-L-leucine. A peptidase (peptidase E) that specifically hydrolyzes Asp-X peptides was identified and partially purified from cell extracts. The enzyme (molecular weight, 35,000) is inactive toward dipeptides with N-terminal asparagine or glutamic acid. Mutants (pepE) lacking this enzyme were isolated by screening extracts for loss of the activity. Genetic mapping placed the pepE locus at 91.5 map units and established the gene order metA pepE zja-861::Tn5 malB. Duplications of the pepE locus showed a gene dosage effect on levels of peptidase E, suggesting that pepE is the structural gene for this enzyme. Mutations in pepE resulted in the loss of the ability to grow on Asp-Pro as a proline source but did not affect utilization of other dipeptides with N-terminal aspartic acid. Loss of peptidase E did not cause a detectable impairment in protein degradation. Two other peptidases present in cell extracts of mutants lacking peptidases N, A, B, D, P, Q, and E also hydrolyze many Asp-X dipeptides. Images PMID:6086568

  5. Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferase mutants oppositely alter tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana and Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    MacAlister, Cora A; Ortiz-Ramírez, Carlos; Becker, Jörg D; Feijó, José A; Lippman, Zachary B

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyproline O-arabinosyltransferases (HPATs) are members of a small, deeply conserved family of plant-specific glycosyltransferases that add arabinose sugars to diverse proteins including cell wall-associated extensins and small signaling peptides. Recent genetic studies in flowering plants suggest that different HPAT homologs have been co-opted to function in diverse species-specific developmental contexts. However, nothing is known about the roles of HPATs in basal plants. We show that complete loss of HPAT function in Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens results in a shared defect in gametophytic tip cell growth. Arabidopsis hpat1/2/3 triple knockout mutants suffer from a strong male sterility defect as a consequence of pollen tubes that fail to fully elongate following pollination. Knocking out the two HPAT genes of Physcomitrella results in larger multicellular filamentous networks due to increased elongation of protonemal tip cells. Physcomitrella hpat mutants lack cell-wall associated hydroxyproline arabinosides and can be rescued with exogenous cellulose, while global expression profiling shows that cell wall-associated genes are severely misexpressed, implicating a defect in cell wall formation during tip growth. Our findings point to a major role for HPATs in influencing cell elongation during tip growth in plants.

  6. Complexes of mutants of Escherichia coli aminopeptidase P and the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Stephen C.; Guss, J. Mitchell

    2008-09-17

    Aminopeptidase P (APPro) is a manganese-containing enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of the N-terminal residue of a polypeptide if the second residue is proline. Structures of APPro mutants with reduced or negligible activity have been determined in complex with the tripeptide substrate ValProLeu. In the complex of Glu383Ala APPro with ValProLeu one of the two metal sites is only partly occupied, indicating an essential role for Glu383 in metal binding in the presence of substrate. His361Ala APPro clearly possesses residual activity as the ValProLeu substrate has been cleaved in the crystals; difference electron density consistent with bound ProLeu dipeptide and a disordered Val amino acid is present at the active site. Contrary to previous suggestions, the His243Ala mutant is capable of binding substrate. The structure of the His243Ala APPro complex with ValProLeu shows that the peptide interacts with one of the active-site metal atoms via its terminal amino group. The implications of these complexes for the roles of the respective residues in APPro catalysis are discussed.

  7. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  8. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  9. Bi- or multifunctional peptide drugs

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies for the design of bi- or multifunctional drugs are reviewed. A distinction is made between bifunctional drugs interacting in a monovalent fashion with two targets and ligands containing two distinct pharmacophores binding in a bivalent mode to the two binding sites in a receptor heterodimer. Arguments are presented to indicate that some of the so-called “bivalent” ligands reported in the literature are unlikely to simultaneously interact with two binding sites. Aspects related to the development of bi- or multifunctional drugs are illustrated with examples from the field of opioid analgesics. The drug-like properties of the tetrapeptide Dmt1[DALDA] with triple action as a μ opioid agonist, norepinephrine uptake inhibitor and releaser of endogenous opioid peptides to produce potent spinal analgesia are reviewed. Rationales for the development of opioid peptides with mixed agonist/antagonist profiles as analgesics with reduced side effects are presented. Progress in the development of mixed μ opioid agonist/δ opioid antagonists with low propensity to produce tolerance and physical dependence is reviewed. Efforts to develop bifunctional peptides containing a μ opioid agonist and a cholecystokinin antagonist or an NK1 receptor antagonist as analgesics expected to produce less tolerance and dependence are also reviewed. A strategy to improve the drug-like properties of bifunctional opioid peptide analgesics is presented. PMID:19285088

  10. Free-living nematode peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  11. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  12. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  13. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  14. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  15. Free tyrosine and tyrosine-rich peptide-dependent superoxide generation catalyzed by a copper-binding, threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide derived from prion protein.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Goto, Kaishi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Previously, generation of superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) catalyzed by Cu-binding peptides derived from human prion protein (model sequence for helical Cu-binding motif VNITKQHTVTTTT was most active) in the presence of catecholamines and related aromatic monoamines such as phenylethylamine and tyramine, has been reported [Kawano, T., Int J Biol Sci 2007; 3: 57-63]. The peptide sequence (corresponding to helix 2) tested here is known as threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. In the present article, the redox behaviors of aromatic monoamines, 20 amino acids and prion-derived tyrosine-rich peptide sequences were compared as putative targets of the oxidative reactions mediated with the threonine-rich prion-peptide. For detection of O(2)(*-), an O(2)(*-)-specific chemiluminescence probe, Cypridina luciferin analog was used. We found that an aromatic amino acid, tyrosine (structurally similar to tyramine) behaves as one of the best substrates for the O(2)(*-) generating reaction (conversion from hydrogen peroxide) catalyzed by Cu-bound prion helical peptide. Data suggested that phenolic moiety is required to be an active substrate while the presence of neither carboxyl group nor amino group was necessarily required. In addition to the action of free tyrosine, effect of two tyrosine-rich peptide sequences YYR and DYEDRYYRENMHR found in human prion corresponding to the tyrosine-rich region was tested as putative substrates for the threonine-rich neurotoxic peptide. YYR motif (found twice in the Y-rich region) showed 2- to 3-fold higher activity compared to free tyrosine. Comparison of Y-rich sequence consisted of 13 amino acids and its Y-to-F substitution mutant sequence revealed that the tyrosine-residues on Y-rich peptide derived from prion may contribute to the higher production of O(2)(*-). These data suggest that the tyrosine residues on prion molecules could be additional targets of the prion-mediated reactions through intra- or inter-molecular interactions. Lastly, possible

  16. Genomic polymorphism and protein changes of soybean mutant induced by space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Gao, Y.; Sun, Y.

    Soybean 194 4126 of excellent agricultural qualities such as high yield and rounder and wider leaf was selected in six generation after abroad recoverable satellite 15 days in 1996 from Soybean 72163 featured with long-leaf white-blossom grey-hair and infinitude-poding To explore the mechanisms of plant mutation induced by space environment we have experimented at genome and proteome level on Soybean 194 4126 and its control Soybean 72163 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism AFLP was used to identify mutated sits and the result shows that 36 polymorphic bands varying between 100 and 900 bp in 2022 DNA bands varying between 100 and 1500 bp have been amplified out of 64 pairs of primer combinations between mutant Soybean 194 4126 and the control plant So the mutation degree of DNA is 3 56 The protein two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE and peptide mass fingerprint PMF assays were used to investigate the difference of proteins in fruits and leaves between Soybean 194 4126 and its control Results indicate that 62 protein dots specially appear in Soybean 72163 and 39 dots specially in the mutant Soybean 194 4126 by image analysis software PDQuest in the 2-DE maps of soybean seeds Using PMF assay and protein data-base searching to investigate two distinct protein dots we found that the protein specially expressed in the seed of mutant Soybean 194 4126 may be Dehydrin and the other protein specially expressed in the seed of the control Soybean 72163 may be maturation-associated protein MAT1 Because Dehydrin and MAT1 are

  17. Conditional poliovirus mutants made by random deletion mutagenesis of infectious cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, K; Nelsen, B

    1990-01-01

    Small deletions were introduced into DNA plasmids bearing cDNA copies of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus RNA. The procedure used was similar to that of P. Hearing and T. Shenk (J. Mol. Biol. 167:809-822, 1983), with modifications designed to introduce only one lesion randomly into each DNA molecule. Methods to map small deletions in either large DNA or RNA molecules were employed. Two poliovirus mutants, VP1-101 and VP1-102, were selected from mutagenized populations on the basis of their host range phenotype, showing a large reduction in the relative numbers of plaques on CV1 and HeLa cells compared with wild-type virus. The deletions borne by the mutant genomes were mapped to the region encoding the amino terminus of VP1. That these lesions were responsible for the mutant phenotypes was substantiated by reintroduction of the sequenced lesions into a wild-type poliovirus cDNA by deoxyoligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The deletion of nucleotides encoding amino acids 8 and 9 of VP1 was responsible for the VP1-101 phenotype; the VP1-102 defect was caused by the deletion of the sequences encoding the first four amino acids of VP1. The peptide sequence at the VP1-VP3 proteolytic cleavage site was altered from glutamine-glycine to glutamine-methionine in VP1-102; this apparently did not alter the proteolytic cleavage pattern. The biochemical defects resulting from these mutations are discussed in the accompanying report. Images PMID:2152811

  18. Photoperiod Affects the Phenotype of Mitochondrial Complex I Mutants.

    PubMed

    Pétriacq, Pierre; de Bont, Linda; Genestout, Lucie; Hao, Jingfang; Laureau, Constance; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Rzigui, Touhami; Queval, Guillaume; Gilard, Françoise; Mauve, Caroline; Guérard, Florence; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Marion, Jessica; Fresneau, Chantal; Brown, Spencer; Danon, Antoine; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Berthomé, Richard; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Cornic, Gabriel; Pineau, Bernard; Gakière, Bertrand; De Paepe, Rosine

    2017-01-01

    Plant mutants for genes encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), the first enzyme of the respiratory chain, display various phenotypes depending on growth conditions. Here, we examined the impact of photoperiod, a major environmental factor controlling plant development, on two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CI mutants: a new insertion mutant interrupted in both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 genes encoding the NDUFS8 subunit and the previously characterized ndufs4 CI mutant. In the long day (LD) condition, both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 single mutants were indistinguishable from Columbia-0 at phenotypic and biochemical levels, whereas the ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 double mutant was devoid of detectable holo-CI assembly/activity, showed higher alternative oxidase content/activity, and displayed a growth retardation phenotype similar to that of the ndufs4 mutant. Although growth was more affected in ndufs4 than in ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 under the short day (SD) condition, both mutants displayed a similar impairment of growth acceleration after transfer to LD compared with the wild type. Untargeted and targeted metabolomics showed that overall metabolism was less responsive to the SD-to-LD transition in mutants than in the wild type. The typical LD acclimation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation as well as redox-related parameters was not observed in ndufs8.1 ndufs8 Similarly, NAD(H) content, which was higher in the SD condition in both mutants than in Columbia-0, did not adjust under LD We propose that altered redox homeostasis and NAD(H) content/redox state control the phenotype of CI mutants and photoperiod acclimation in Arabidopsis.

  19. An ABC Transporter Is Required for Secretion of Peptide Sex Pheromones in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Varahan, Sriram; Harms, Nathan; Gilmore, Michael S.; Tomich, John M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococci are leading causes of hospital-acquired infection in the United States and continue to develop resistances to new antibiotics. Many Enterococcus faecalis isolates harbor pheromone-responsive plasmids that mediate horizontal transfer of even large blocks of chromosomal genes, resulting in hospital-adapted strains over a quarter of whose genomes consist of mobile elements. Pheromones to which the donor cells respond derive from lipoprotein signal peptides. Using a novel bacterial killing assay dependent on the presence of sex pheromones, we screened a transposon mutant library for functions that relate to the production and/or activity of the effector pheromone. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized, but well-conserved, ABC transporter that contributes to pheromone production. Using three distinct pheromone-dependent mating systems, we show that mutants defective in expressing this transporter display a 5- to 6-order-of-magnitude reduction in conjugation efficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that the ABC transporter mutant displays an altered biofilm architecture, with a significant reduction in biofilm biomass compared to that of its isogenic parent, suggesting that pheromone activity also influences biofilm development. The conservation of this peptide transporter across the Firmicutes suggests that it may also play an important role in cell-cell communication in other species within this important phylum. PMID:25249282

  20. Antimicrobial Evaluation of Nocathiacins, a Thiazole Peptide Class of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.; Bronson, Joanne J.; Barrett, John F.; DenBleyker, Kenneth L.; Discotto, Linda F.; Fung-Tomc, Joan C.; Ueda, Yasutsugu

    2004-01-01

    Nocathiacins are cyclic thiazolyl peptides with inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria. BMS-249524 (nocathiacin I), identified from screening a library of compounds against a multiply antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecium strain, was used as a lead chemotype to obtain additional structurally related compounds. The MIC assay results of BMS-249524 and two more water-soluble derivatives, BMS-411886 and BMS-461996, revealed potent in vitro activities against a variety of gram-positive pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium. Analysis of killing kinetics revealed that these compounds are bactericidal for S. aureus with at least a 3-log10 reduction of bacterial growth within 6 h of exposure to four times the MICs. Nocathiacin-resistant mutants were characterized by DNA sequence analyses. The mutations mapped to the rplK gene encoding the L11 ribosomal protein in the 50S subunit in a region previously shown to be involved in the binding of related thiazolyl peptide antibiotics. These compounds demonstrated potential for further development as a new class of antibacterial agents with activity against key antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacterial pathogens. PMID:15388422

  1. ATLAS: A database linking binding affinities with structures for wild-type and mutant TCR-pMHC complexes.

    PubMed

    Borrman, Tyler; Cimons, Jennifer; Cosiano, Michael; Purcaro, Michael; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-02-03

    The ATLAS (Altered TCR Ligand Affinities and Structures) database (https://zlab.umassmed.edu/atlas/web/) is a manually curated repository containing the binding affinities for wild-type and mutant T cell receptors (TCRs) and their antigens, peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). The database links experimentally measured binding affinities with the corresponding three dimensional (3D) structures for TCR-pMHC complexes. The user can browse and search affinities, structures, and experimental details for TCRs, peptides, and MHCs of interest. We expect this database to facilitate the development of next-generation protein design algorithms targeting TCR-pMHC interactions. ATLAS can be easily parsed using modeling software that builds protein structures for training and testing. As an example, we provide structural models for all mutant TCRs in ATLAS, built using the Rosetta program. Utilizing these structures, we report a correlation of 0.63 between experimentally measured changes in binding energies and our predicted changes. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  3. Future directions for peptide therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Allan A; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The notable expansion of peptide therapeutics development in the late 1990s and the 2000s led to an unprecedented number of marketing approvals in 2012 and has provided a robust pipeline that should deliver numerous approvals during the remainder of the 2010s. To document the current status of the pipeline, we collected data for peptide therapeutics in clinical studies and regulatory review, as well as those recently approved. In this Foundation review, we provide an overview of the pipeline, including therapeutic area and molecular targets, with a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists. Areas for potential expansion, for example constrained peptides and peptide-drug conjugates, are profiled.

  4. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  5. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  6. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  7. Plasmidless, photosynthetically incompetent mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S A; Wimer, L T; Yoch, D C

    1984-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate rendered a high percentage of Rhodospirillum rubrum cells plasmidless and photosynthetically incompetent (Kuhl et al., J. Bacteriol. 156:737-742, 1983). By probing restriction endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these plasmidless strains with 32P-labeled R. rubrum plasmid DNA, we showed that no homology exists between the plasmid and the chromosomal DNA of the mutant. Loss of the plasmid in all the nonphotosynthetic isolates was accompanied by the synthesis of spirilloxanthin under aerobic growth conditions, resistance to cycloserine and HgCl2, and loss of ability to grow fermentatively on fructose. Changes in both the protein and lipid composition of the membranes and the impaired uptake of 203HgCl2 in the plasmidless strains (compared with the wild type) suggest either that membrane modification occurs as a result of plasmid loss, accounting for several of the acquired phenotype characteristics of the cured strains, or that both membrane modification and plasmid loss are part of the same pleiotropic mutation. Images PMID:6434514

  8. Mutant Huntingtin Disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Grima, Jonathan C; Daigle, J Gavin; Arbez, Nicolas; Cunningham, Kathleen C; Zhang, Ke; Ochaba, Joseph; Geater, Charlene; Morozko, Eva; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Glatzer, Jenna C; Pham, Jacqueline T; Ahmed, Ishrat; Peng, Qi; Wadhwa, Harsh; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Duan, Wenzhen; Snyder, Solomon H; Ranum, Laura P W; Thompson, Leslie M; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ross, Christopher A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mechanism(s) by which mutant HTT (mHTT) causes disease is unclear. Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the trafficking of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, is tightly regulated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) made up of nucleoporins (NUPs). Previous studies offered clues that mHTT may disrupt nucleocytoplasmic transport and a mutation of an NUP can cause HD-like pathology. Therefore, we evaluated the NPC and nucleocytoplasmic transport in multiple models of HD, including mouse and fly models, neurons transfected with mHTT, HD iPSC-derived neurons, and human HD brain regions. These studies revealed severe mislocalization and aggregation of NUPs and defective nucleocytoplasmic transport. HD repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins also disrupted nucleocytoplasmic transport. Additionally, overexpression of NUPs and treatment with drugs that prevent aberrant NUP biology also mitigated this transport defect and neurotoxicity, providing future novel therapy targets.

  9. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  10. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  11. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, D

    1976-01-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency. PMID:789362

  12. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  13. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  14. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Long; Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape.

  15. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  16. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  17. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  18. A Mutant Hunt Using the C-Fern (Ceratopteris Richardii)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calie, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    A modification of the popular C-Fern system, the tropical fern Ceratopteris richardii is developed in which students plate out a genetically mixed set of fern spores and then select for specific mutants. This exercise can provide students with an experience in plant mutant selection and can be used as a platform to expose students to a diverse…

  19. Human polyomavirus JCV late leader peptide region contains important regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Akan, Ilhan; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Biffi, Renato; Palermo, Victoria; Woolridge, Stefanie; White, Martyn K.; Amini, Shohreh |; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut . E-mail: msafak@temple.edu

    2006-05-25

    Transcription is a complex process that relies on the cooperative interaction between sequence-specific factors and the basal transcription machinery. The strength of a promoter depends on upstream or downstream cis-acting DNA elements, which bind transcription factors. In this study, we investigated whether DNA elements located downstream of the JCV late promoter, encompassing the late leader peptide region, which encodes agnoprotein, play regulatory roles in the JCV lytic cycle. For this purpose, the entire coding region of the leader peptide was deleted and the functional consequences of this deletion were analyzed. We found that viral gene expression and replication were drastically reduced. Gene expression also decreased from a leader peptide point mutant but to a lesser extent. This suggested that the leader peptide region of JCV might contain critical cis-acting DNA elements to which transcription factors bind and regulate viral gene expression and replication. We analyzed the entire coding region of the late leader peptide by a footprinting assay and identified three major regions (region I, II and III) that were protected by nuclear proteins. Further investigation of the first two protected regions by band shift assays revealed a new band that appeared in new infection cycles, suggesting that viral infection induces new factors that interact with the late leader peptide region of JCV. Analysis of the effect of the leader peptide region on the promoter activity of JCV by transfection assays demonstrated that this region has a positive and negative effect on the large T antigen (LT-Ag)-mediated activation of the viral early and late promoters, respectively. Furthermore, a partial deletion analysis of the leader peptide region encompassing the protected regions I and II demonstrated a significant down-regulation of viral gene expression and replication. More importantly, these results were similar to that obtained from a complete deletion of the late leader

  20. Elucidation of the Photorhabdus temperata Genome and Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library To Identify Motility Mutants Altered in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Sheldon; Rowedder, Holli; Michaels, Brandye; Bullock, Hannah; Jackobeck, Ryan; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Durakovic, Umjia; Gately, Jon; Janicki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora forms a specific mutualistic association with its bacterial partner Photorhabdus temperata. The microbial symbiont is required for nematode growth and development, and symbiont recognition is strain specific. The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of P. temperata and identify genes that plays a role in the pathogenesis of the Photorhabdus-Heterorhabditis symbiosis. A draft genome sequence of P. temperata strain NC19 was generated. The 5.2-Mb genome was organized into 17 scaffolds and contained 4,808 coding sequences (CDS). A genetic approach was also pursued to identify mutants with altered motility. A bank of 10,000 P. temperata transposon mutants was generated and screened for altered motility patterns. Five classes of motility mutants were identified: (i) nonmotile mutants, (ii) mutants with defective or aberrant swimming motility, (iii) mutant swimmers that do not require NaCl or KCl, (iv) hyperswimmer mutants that swim at an accelerated rate, and (v) hyperswarmer mutants that are able to swarm on the surface of 1.25% agar. The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis. The motility-defective mutant P13-7 had an insertion in the RNase II gene and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. Genetic complementation of this mutant restored wild-type activity. These results demonstrate a role for RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions. IMPORTANCE The relationship between Photorhabdus and entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis represents a well-known mutualistic system that has potential as a biological control agent. The elucidation of the genome of the bacterial partner and role that RNase II plays in its life cycle has provided a greater understanding of Photorhabdus as both an insect pathogen and a nematode symbiont. PMID

  1. A hyperfusogenic F protein enhances the oncolytic potency of a paramyxovirus simian virus 5 P/V mutant without compromising sensitivity to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Maria D; Manuse, Mary J; Parks, Griffith D

    2008-10-01

    Viral fusogenic membrane proteins have been proposed as tools to increase the potency of oncolytic viruses, but there is a need for mechanisms to control the spread of fusogenic viruses in normal versus tumor cells. We have previously shown that a mutant of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that harbors mutations in the P/V gene from the canine parainfluenza virus (P/V-CPI(-)) is a potent inducer of type I interferon (IFN) and apoptosis and is restricted for spread through normal but not tumor cells in vitro. Here, we have used the cytopathic P/V-CPI(-) as a backbone vector to test the hypothesis that a virus expressing a hyperfusogenic glycoprotein will be a more effective oncolytic vector but will retain sensitivity to IFN. A P/V mutant virus expressing an F protein with a glycine-to-alanine substitution in the fusion peptide (P/V-CPI(-)-G3A) was more fusogenic than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant. In two model prostate tumor cell lines which are defective in IFN production (LNCaP and DU145), the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant had normal growth properties at low multiplicities of infection and was more effective than the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant at cell killing in vitro. However, in PC3 cells which produce and respond to IFN, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was attenuated for growth and spread. Killing of PC3 cells was equivalent between the parental P/V-CPI(-) mutant and the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant. In a nude mouse model using LNCaP cells, the hyperfusogenic P/V-CPI(-)-G3A mutant was more effective than P/V-CPI(-) at reducing tumor burden. In the case of DU145 tumors, the two vectors based on P/V-CPI(-) were equally effective at limiting tumor growth. Together, our results provide proof of principle that a cytopathic SV5 P/V mutant can serve as an oncolytic virus and that the oncolytic effectiveness of P/V mutants can be enhanced by a fusogenic membrane protein without compromising sensitivity to IFN. The potential advantages of

  2. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  3. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β-sheet structure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa M; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-10-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate the aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. The effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.

  4. A short flagella mutant of Dunaliella sallina (Chlorophyta, Cholorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Vismara, Rosa; Verni, Franco; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Dunaliella salina (Chlorophyta, Chlorophyceae) is a unicellular wall-less biflagellate alga. In this paper we describe a spontaneous mutant of D. salina, isolated from wild type cultures, which is characterized by very short flagella. The ultrastructure showed the basic 9 + 2 organization of wild-type flagella. Immunofluorescence localization of tubulin in this mutant confirmed the normal construction of the axoneme. Although, the mutant does not swim, still it is able to move and perform photobehavior. As shown by track reconstruction, and rotation movements, observed by means of reflection microscopy, this mutant can move, probably gliding by means of its stumpy flagella. A possible model to explain the mutant motion pattern is discussed.

  5. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  6. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; ...

    2015-09-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  7. Architectural phenotypes in the transparent testa mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Buer, Charles S.; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are low molecular weight secondary plant metabolites with a myriad of functions. As flavonoids affect auxin transport (an important growth-controlling hormone) and are biologically active in eukaryotes, flavonoid mutants were expected to have undescribed architectural phenotypes. The Arabidopsis thaliana transparent testa (tt) mutants are compromised in the enzymatic steps or transcriptional regulators affecting flavonoid synthesis. tt mutant seedlings were grown on hard-slanted agar (a stress condition), under varying light conditions, and in soil to examine the resulting growth patterns. These tt mutants revealed a wide variety of architectural phenotypes in root and aerial tissues. Mutants with increased inflorescences, siliques, and lateral root density or reduced stature are traits that could affect plant yield or performance under certain environmental conditions. The regulatory genes affected in architectural traits may provide useful molecular targets for examination in other plants. PMID:19129166

  8. Extreme Vulnerability of IDH1 Mutant Cancers to NAD+ Depletion.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Iafrate, A John; Tanaka, Shota; Loebel, Franziska; Lelic, Nina; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Bedel, Olivier; Deng, Gejing; Zhang, Bailin; He, Timothy; Shi, Xu; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhang, Yiyun; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J; Curry, William T; Zhao, Dan; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Nigim, Fares; Koerner, Mara V A; Ho, Quan; Fisher, David E; Roider, Elisabeth M; Kemeny, Lajos V; Samuels, Yardena; Flaherty, Keith T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Chi, Andrew S; Cahill, Daniel P

    2015-12-14

    Heterozygous mutation of IDH1 in cancers modifies IDH1 enzymatic activity, reprogramming metabolite flux and markedly elevating 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here, we found that 2-HG depletion did not inhibit growth of several IDH1 mutant solid cancer types. To identify other metabolic therapeutic targets, we systematically profiled metabolites in endogenous IDH1 mutant cancer cells after mutant IDH1 inhibition and discovered a profound vulnerability to depletion of the coenzyme NAD+. Mutant IDH1 lowered NAD+ levels by downregulating the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (Naprt1), sensitizing to NAD+ depletion via concomitant nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibition. NAD+ depletion activated the intracellular energy sensor AMPK, triggered autophagy, and resulted in cytotoxicity. Thus, we identify NAD+ depletion as a metabolic susceptibility of IDH1 mutant cancers.

  9. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  10. Biology of the CAPA peptides in insects.

    PubMed

    Predel, R; Wegener, C

    2006-11-01

    CAPA peptides have been isolated from a broad range of insect species as well as an arachnid, and can be grouped into the periviscerokinin and pyrokinin peptide families. In insects, CAPA peptides are the characteristic and most abundant neuropeptides in the abdominal neurohemal system. In many species, CAPA peptides exert potent myotropic effects on different muscles such as the heart. In others, including blood-sucking insects able to transmit serious diseases, CAPA peptides have strong diuretic or anti-diuretic effects and thus are potentially of medical importance. CAPA peptides undergo cell-type-specific sorting and packaging, and are the first insect neuropeptides shown to be differentially processed. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, distribution, receptors and physiological actions of the CAPA peptides.

  11. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ping; Yang, Shilong; Shen, Chuanbin; Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  12. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  13. Lack of the D2 protein in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii psbD mutant affects photosystem II stability and D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jeanne M.; Rahire, Michéle; Malnoë, Pia; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Pierre, Yves; Bennoun, Pierre; Rochaix, Jean-David

    1986-01-01

    D1 and D2, two chloroplast proteins with apparent mol. wt of 32 000-34 000, play an important role in the photosynthetic reactions mediated by the membrane-bound protein complex of photosystem II (PSII). We have isolated and characterized an uniparental, non-photosynthetic mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and show that the mutation is in the chloroplast gene psbD, coding for D2. A 46 bp direct DNA duplication in the coding region of the mutant gene causes a frame-shift which results in a psbD transcript coding for 186 amino acid residues instead of the normal 352. The truncated D2 peptide is never seen, even after pulse-labeling, suggesting that the mutant protein is very unstable. In addition, little or no D1 protein is detected in this mutant although the gene and normal levels of mRNA for D1 are present in mutant cells. All other core PSII proteins are synthesized and inserted into the membrane fraction, but never accumulate. These results suggest that D2 contributes not only to the stabilization of the PSII complex in the membrane, but also may play a specific role in the regulation of the D1 protein, either at the translational or post-translational level. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 6. PMID:16453694

  14. Human Liver Cell Trafficking Mutants: Characterization and Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L.; Novikoff, Phyllis M.; Suadicani, Sylvia O.; Spray, David C.; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W.; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α’’. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype. PMID:24466322

  15. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga.

  16. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fei; Snapp, Erik L; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Potvin, Barry; Wolkoff, Allan W; Stanley, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  17. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  18. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  19. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    PubMed

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  20. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  1. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes.

  2. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  3. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  4. Comparable clinical outcomes in patients with HER2-mutant and EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gow, Chien-Hung; Chang, Hou-Tai; Lim, Chor-Kuan; Liu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jin-Shing; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    HER2 is a major proliferative driver in lung cancer. HER2 gene aberrations impact the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). A one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed using RNA samples from 888 Asian lung cancer patients to detect HER2, EGFR, KRAS, ALK, and ROS1 mutations. The demographic data and treatment outcomes of HER2 mutation-positive lung ADC patients were analyzed and compared to those with HER2 mutation-negative tumors. HER2 mutation was identified in 40 (4.5%) lung ADC patients. HER2 mutations tended to occur in male patients with advanced-stage disease and never-smokers. A775_G776insYVMA (n = 22, 55%) was the most prevalent HER2 mutation, followed by P780_Y781insGSP (n = 4, 10%). For patients diagnosed with stage-IIIB/IV disease, HER2-mutant patients showed clinical outcomes comparable to EGFR-mutant patients (P = 0.721, log-rank test) and a better overall survival (OS) compared to patients lacking driver mutations in the investigated genes (P = 0.033, Breslow test). Specifically, lung ADC patients with stage-IV HER2-mutant tumors treated with chemotherapy or targeted agents, even without afatinib or anti-HER2 targeted therapy, showed similar clinical outcomes to lung ADC patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion or L858R mutations (P = 0.870). In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that HER2 mutation status was not a major risk factor for diminished OS in stage-IV lung cancer. In conclusion, lung ADC harboring HER2 mutations showed distinct characteristics from other driver mutations, including increased chemosensitivity with in advanced stage disease.

  5. Three-dimensional structures of the amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in membrane-mimicking environment.

    PubMed

    Kohno, T; Kobayashi, K; Maeda, T; Sato, K; Takashima, A

    1996-12-17

    The three-dimensional structure of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), which has neurotoxic activity, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy with simulated annealing calculations. A total of 20 converged amyloid beta peptide structures were obtained on the basis of 110 experimental constraints, including 106 distance constraints reduced from the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities and four torsion angle (phi) constraints. The atomic root mean square difference about averaged coordinates is 1.04 +/- 0.25 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 1.39 +/- 0.27 A for all heavy atoms of the entire peptide. The molecular structure of amyloid beta peptide in membrane-mimicking environment is composed of a short alpha helix in the C terminal position. The three residues from the N-terminus are disordered, but the remaining eight C-terminal residues are well-ordered, which is supported by the RMSD values of the C-terminal region, Lys28-Leu34. In this region, the RMS differences from averaged coordinates are 0.26 +/- 0.11 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 0.77 +/- 0.21 A for all heavy atoms, which is very low compared with those for the entire peptide. The four amino acid residues from the N-terminus are hydrophilic and the other seven amino acid residues in C-terminus are hydrophobic. So, our results show that the C-terminal region of amyloid beta peptide (25-35) is buried in the membrane and assumes alpha-helical structure, whereas the N-terminal region is exposed to the solvent with a flexible structure. This structure is very similar to membrane-mediated structure of substance P previously reported. The three-dimensional structure of a non-neurotoxic mutant of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), where Asn27 is replaced by Ala, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was also determined. The structure is similar to that of the wild type amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in the C-terminal region, but the N

  6. Studies on the fusion peptide of a paramyxovirus fusion glycoprotein: roles of conserved residues in cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, C M; Lamb, R A

    1992-01-01

    The role of residues in the conserved hydrophobic N-terminal fusion peptide of the paramyxovirus fusion (F) protein in causing cell-cell fusion was examined. Mutations were introduced into the cDNA encoding the simian virus 5 (SV5) F protein, the altered F proteins were expressed by using an eukaryotic vector, and their ability to mediate syncytium formation was determined. The mutant F proteins contained both single- and multiple-amino-acid substitutions, and they exhibited a variety of intracellular transport properties and fusion phenotypes. The data indicate that many substitutions in the conserved amino acids of the simian virus 5 F fusion peptide can be tolerated without loss of biological activity. Mutant F proteins which were not transported to the cell surface did not cause cell-cell fusion, but all of the mutants which were transported to the cell surface were fusion competent, exhibiting fusion properties similar to or better than those of the wild-type F protein. Mutant F proteins containing glycine-to-alanine substitutions had altered intracellular transport characteristics, yet they exhibited a great increase in fusion activity. The potential structural implications of this substitution and the possible importance of these glycine residues in maintaining appropriate levels of fusion activity are discussed. Images PMID:1548771

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  8. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. ); Berkner, K.L. )

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  9. Restoration of DNA-Binding and Growth-Suppressive Activity of Mutant Forms of p53 Via a PCAF-Mediated Acetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, RICARDO E.; KNIGHTS, CHAD D.; SAHU, GEETARAM; CATANIA, JASON; KOLUKULA, VAMSI K.; STOLER, DANIEL; GRAESSMANN, ADOLF; OGRYZKO, VASILY; PISHVAIAN, MICHAEL; ALBANESE, CHRISTOPHER; AVANTAGGIATI, MARIA LAURA

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived mutant forms of p53 compromise its DNA binding, transcriptional, and growth regulatory activity in a manner that is dependent upon the cell-type and the type of mutation. Given the high frequency of p53 mutations in human tumors, reactivation of the p53 pathway has been widely proposed as beneficial for cancer therapy. In support of this possibility p53 mutants possess a certain degree of conformational flexibility that allows for re-induction of function by a number of structurally different artificial compounds or by short peptides. This raises the question of whether physiological pathways for p53 mutant reactivation also exist and can be exploited therapeutically. The activity of wild-type p53 is modulated by various acetyl-transferases and deacetylases, but whether acetylation influences signaling by p53 mutant is still unknown. Here, we show that the PCAF acetyl-transferase is down-regulated in tumors harboring p53 mutants, where its re-expression leads to p53 acetylation and to cell death. Furthermore, acetylation restores the DNA-binding ability of p53 mutants in vitro and expression of PCAF, or treatment with deacetylase inhibitors, promotes their binding to p53-regulated promoters and transcriptional activity in vivo. These data suggest that PCAF-mediated acetylation rescues activity of at least a set of p53 mutations. Therefore, we propose that dis-regulation of PCAF activity is a pre-requisite for p53 mutant loss of function and for the oncogenic potential acquired by neoplastic cells expressing these proteins. Our findings offer a new rationale for therapeutic targeting of PCAF activity in tumors harboring oncogenic versions of p53. PMID:20589832

  10. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    SciTech Connect

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C.; Brenn, T.

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  11. Atf3 mutant mice show reduced axon regeneration and impaired regeneration-associated gene induction after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Gey, Manuel; Wanner, Renate; Schilling, Corinna; Pedro, Maria T.; Sinske, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) induces a regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response. Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) is such a RAG and ATF3's transcriptional activity might induce ‘effector’ RAGs (e.g. small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a), Galanin (Gal), growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43)) facilitating peripheral axon regeneration. We provide a first analysis of Atf3 mouse mutants in peripheral nerve regeneration. In Atf3 mutant mice, facial nerve regeneration and neurite outgrowth of adult ATF3-deficient primary dorsal root ganglia neurons was decreased. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we identified a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster (vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip), Ngf, Grp, Gal, Pacap) regulated by ATF3. Exogenous administration of neuropeptides enhanced neurite growth of Atf3 mutant mice suggesting that these molecules might be effector RAGs of ATF3's pro-regenerative function. In addition to the induction of growth-promoting molecules, we present data that ATF3 suppresses growth-inhibiting molecules such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. In summary, we show a pro-regenerative ATF3 function during PNS nerve regeneration involving transcriptional activation of a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster. ATF3 is a general injury-inducible factor, therefore ATF3-mediated mechanisms identified herein might apply to other cell and injury types. PMID:27581653

  12. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line–encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC. PMID:27588903

  13. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCR