Science.gov

Sample records for peptide penetratin induces

  1. Selective cleavage of protonated penetratin and its substitutes under low-energy collision-induced dissociation condition.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai; Huang, Lingyun; Wang, Yaru; He, Dacheng

    2010-06-01

    An understanding of the dissociation of penetratin is important for improving its metabolic stability and cargo-delivery efficiency. In this study, we describe the selective cleavage of the K15-K16 amide bond of penetratin under the low-energy collision-induced dissociation condition in mass spectrometry. A variety of penetratin substitutes have been studied in which key basic amino acids have been substituted within the sequence. The calculated structure indicates that an alpha-helix structure prevents the fragmentation of the central peptide domain and the side chain of lysine is involved in the proton translocation process.

  2. Penetratin-induced transdermal delivery from H(II) mesophases of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-05-10

    Penetratin, a cell penetrating peptide is embedded within a reversed hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The H(II) mesophase serves as the solubilization reservoir and gel matrix whereas penetratin is the transdermal penetration enhancer for the drug. The systems were characterized and the interactions between the components were determined by SAXS, ATR-FTIR and SD-NMR. High affinity of Na-DFC to glycerol monooleate (GMO) was revealed, associated with increasing the order within the water channels. This affinity is enhanced upon heating and seems to be associated with GMO dehydration. Penetratin (PEN) is entrapped at the hydrophilic region of the H(II) mesophase, between the GMO headgroups, reducing the order of the system and decreasing the size of the hexagonal domains. The transdermal delivery rate of Na-DFC through porcine skin, from the H(II) mesophases, was enhanced by PEN and so also the cumulative transport crossing the skin. PEN induced accelerated drug diffusion through the stratum corneum, towards the different skin layers. The transdermal delivery enhancement is explained from the results of the ATR-FTIR analysis. It seems that PEN accelerates the structural transition of skin lipids from hexagonal to liquid. The disordering results in enhanced diffusion of Na-DFC through the stratum corneum, followed by enhanced overall penetration of the drug.

  3. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Small Peptides Derived from Penetratin as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Somlai, Csaba; Andujar, Sebastián A; Garro, Adriana D; Lima, Beatriz; Tapia, Alejandro; Feresin, Gabriela; Perczel, Andras; Tóth, Gabor; Cascales, Javier López; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation and conformational study of several small-size peptides acting as antibacterial agents are reported. Among the compounds evaluated, the peptides Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Trp-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2 , Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Arg-NH2 , and Arg-Gln-Ile-Trp-Trp-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity. These were found to be very active antibacterial compounds, considering their small molecular size. In order to better understand the antibacterial activity obtained for these peptides, an exhaustive conformational analysis was performed, using both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations using two different media (water and trifluoroethanol/water) were employed. The results of these theoretical calculations were corroborated by experimental circular dichroism measurements. A brief discussion on the possible mechanism of action of these peptides at molecular level is also presented. Some of the peptides reported here constitute very interesting structures to be used as starting compounds for the design of new small-size peptides possessing antibacterial activity.

  5. Intracellular Toxicity of Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides Shuttled into Mammalian Cells by the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Penetratin

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne; Schäfer, Ingo; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The health threat caused by multiresistant bacteria has continuously increased and recently peaked with pathogens resistant to all current drugs. This has triggered intense research efforts to develop novel compounds to overcome the resistance mechanisms. Thus, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been intensively studied, especially the family of proline-rich AMPs (PrAMPs) that was successfully tested very recently in murine infection models. PrAMPs enter bacteria and inhibit chaperone DnaK. Here, we studied the toxicity of intracellular PrAMPs in HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells. As PrAMPs cannot enter most mammalian cells, we coupled the PrAMPs with penetratin (residues 43 to 58 in the antennapedia homeodomain) via a C-terminally added cysteine utilizing a thioether bridge. The resulting construct could transport the covalently linked PrAMP into mammalian cells. Penetratin ligation reduced the MIC for Gram-negative Escherichia coli only slightly (1 to 8 μmol/liter) but increased the activity against the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus up to 32-fold (MIC ≈ 1 μmol/liter), most likely due to more effective penetration through the bacterial membrane. In contrast to native PrAMPs, the penetratin-PrAMP constructs entered the mammalian cells, aligned around the nucleus, and associated with the Golgi apparatus. At higher concentrations, the constructs reduced the cell viability (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ≈ 40 μmol/liter) and changed the morphology of the cells. No toxic effects or morphological changes were observed at concentrations of 10 μmol/liter or below. Thus, the IC50 values were around 5 to 40 times higher than the MIC values. In conclusion, PrAMPs are in general not toxic to mammalian cells, as they do not pass through the membrane. When shuttled into mammalian cells, however, PrAMPs are only slightly cross-reactive to mammalian chaperones or other intracellular mammalian proteins, providing a second layer of safety for in vivo applications, even if they

  6. A Critical Reassessment of Penetratin Translocation Across Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bárány-Wallje, Elsa; Keller, Sandro; Serowy, Steffen; Geibel, Sebastian; Pohl, Peter; Bienert, Michael; Dathe, Margitta

    2005-01-01

    Penetratin is a short, basic cell-penetrating peptide able to induce cellular uptake of a vast variety of large, hydrophilic cargos. We have reassessed the highly controversial issue of direct permeation of the strongly cationic peptide across negatively charged lipid membranes. Confocal laser scanning microscopy on rhodamine-labeled giant vesicles incubated with carboxyfluorescein-labeled penetratin yielded no evidence of transbilayer movement, in contradiction to previously reported results. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy on black lipid membranes confirmed this finding, which was also not affected by application of a transmembrane electric potential difference. A novel dialysis assay based on tryptophan absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that the permeability of small and large unilamellar vesicles to penetratin is <10−13 m/s. Taken together, the results show that penetratin is not capable of overcoming model membrane systems irrespective of the bilayer curvature or the presence of a transmembrane voltage. Thus, direct translocation across the hydrophobic core of the plasma membrane cannot account for the efficient uptake of penetratin into live cells, which is in accord with recent in vitro studies underlining the importance of endocytosis in the internalization process of cationic cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:16040762

  7. The neuroprotective efficacy of cell-penetrating peptides TAT, penetratin, Arg-9, and Pep-1 in glutamic acid, kainic acid, and in vitro ischemia injury models using primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Craig, Amanda J; Milech, Nadia; Hopkins, Richard M; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides (typically 5-25 amino acids), which are used to facilitate the delivery of normally non-permeable cargos such as other peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, or drugs into cells. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that the TAT CPP has neuroprotective properties. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the TAT and three other CPPs (penetratin, Arg-9, Pep-1) for their neuroprotective properties in cortical neuronal cultures following exposure to glutamic acid, kainic acid, or in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation). Arg-9, penetratin, and TAT-D displayed consistent and high level neuroprotective activity in both the glutamic acid (IC50: 0.78, 3.4, 13.9 μM) and kainic acid (IC50: 0.81, 2.0, 6.2 μM) injury models, while Pep-1 was ineffective. The TAT-D isoform displayed similar efficacy to the TAT-L isoform in the glutamic acid model. Interestingly, Arg-9 was the only CPP that displayed efficacy when washed-out prior to glutamic acid exposure. Neuroprotection following in vitro ischemia was more variable with all peptides providing some level of neuroprotection (IC50; Arg-9: 6.0 μM, TAT-D: 7.1 μM, penetratin/Pep-1: >10 μM). The positive control peptides JNKI-1D-TAT (JNK inhibitory peptide) and/or PYC36L-TAT (AP-1 inhibitory peptide) were neuroprotective in all models. Finally, in a post-glutamic acid treatment experiment, Arg-9 was highly effective when added immediately after, and mildly effective when added 15 min post-insult, while the JNKI-1D-TAT control peptide was ineffective when added post-insult. These findings demonstrate that different CPPs have the ability to inhibit neurodamaging events/pathways associated with excitotoxic and ischemic injuries. More importantly, they highlight the need to interpret neuroprotection studies when using CPPs as delivery agents with caution. On a positive note, the cytoprotective properties of CPPs suggests they are ideal carrier molecules to

  8. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  9. Structure and dynamics of Penetratin's association and translocation to a lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignacio J., General; Asciutto, Eliana K.

    2017-03-01

    Penetratin belongs to the important class of small and positively charged peptides, capable of entering cells. The determination of the optimal peptidic structure for translocation is challenging; results obtained so far are varied and dependent on several factors. In this work, we review the dynamics of association of Penetratin with a modeled dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) lipid membrane using molecular dynamics simulations with last generation force fields. Penetratin's structural preferences are determined using a Markov state model. It is observed that the peptide retains a helical form in the membrane associated state, just as in water, with the exception of both termini which lose helicity, facilitating the interaction of terminal residues with the phosphate groups on the membrane's outer layer. The optimal orientation for insertion is found to be with the peptide's axis forming a small angle with the interface, and with R1 stretching toward the bilayer. The interaction between arginine side-chains and phosphate groups is found to be greater than the corresponding to lysine, mainly due to a higher number of hydrogen bonds between them. The free energy profile of translocation is qualitatively studied using Umbrella Sampling. It is found that there are different paths of penetration, that greatly differ in size of free energy barrier. The lowest path is compatible with residues R10 to K13 leading the way through the membrane and pulling the rest of the peptide. When the other side is reached, the C-terminus overtakes those residues, and finally breaks out of the membrane. The peptide's secondary structure during this traversal suffers some changes with respect to the association structure but, overall, conserves its helicity, with both termini in a more disordered state.

  10. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  11. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Suman; Smith, Carol Anne; del Pino, Pablo; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Berry, Catherine C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation) blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake. PMID:24275948

  12. Massive glycosaminoglycan-dependent entry of Trp-containing cell-penetrating peptides induced by exogenous sphingomyelinase or cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Burlina, Fabienne; Illien, Françoise; Cribier, Sophie; Sagan, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Among non-invasive cell delivery strategies, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) vectors represent interesting new tools. To get fundamental knowledge about the still debated internalisation mechanisms of these peptides, we modified the membrane content of cells, typically by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin or depletion of cholesterol from the membrane outer leaflet. We quantified and visualised the effect of these viable cell surface treatments on the internalisation efficiency of different CPPs, among which the most studied Tat, R9, penetratin and analogues, that all carry the N-terminal biotin-Gly4 tag cargo. Under these cell membrane treatments, only penetratin and R6W3 underwent a massive glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent entry in cells. Internalisation of the other peptides was only slightly increased, similarly in the absence or the presence of GAGs for R9, and only in the presence of GAGs for Tat and R6L3. Ceramide formation (or cholesterol depletion) is known to lead to the reorganisation of membrane lipid domains into larger platforms, which can serve as a trap and cluster receptors. These results show that GAG clustering, enhanced by formation of ceramide, is efficiently exploited by penetratin and R6W3, which contains Trp residues in their sequence but not Tat, R9 and R6L3. Hence, these data shed new lights on the differences in the internalisation mechanism and pathway of these peptides that are widely used in delivery of cargo molecules.

  13. Thermally Targeted Delivery of a c-Myc Inhibitory Peptide In Vivo Using Elastin-Like Polypeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), bactenecin (Bac), penetratin ( Pen ), or Tat, is conjugated to the ELP to enhance delivery of the polypeptide across the...CPPs are short peptides known to enhance the cellular uptake of large cargo. The three CPPs proposed for this study are the penetratin ( Pen ...we conjugated the c-Myc inhibitory peptide and the Pen peptide to ELP for thermally targeted delivery ( Pen -ELP-H1) (1). Uptake of Pen -ELP-H1 in MCF-7

  14. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    PubMed

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  15. Hydroxyapatite surface-induced peptide folding.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Lisa A; Beebe, Thomas P; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-04-25

    Herein, we describe the design and surface-binding characterization of a de novo designed peptide, JAK1, which undergoes surface-induced folding at the hydroxyapatite (HA)-solution interface. JAK1 is designed to be unstructured in buffered saline solution, yet undergo HA-induced folding that is largely governed by the periodic positioning of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues within the primary sequence of the peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation indicate that the peptide remains unfolded and monomeric in solution under normal physiological conditions; however, CD spectroscopy indicates that in the presence of hydroxyapatite, the peptide avidly binds to the mineral surface adopting a helical structure. Adsorption isotherms indicate nearly quantitative surface coverage and Kd = 310 nM for the peptide-surface binding event. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with the adsorption isotherm data suggests that JAK1 binds to HA, forming a self-limiting monolayer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HA surfaces to trigger the intramolecular folding of designed peptides and represents the initial stages of defining the design rules that allow HA-induced peptide folding.

  16. Novel peptides from the RAS-p21 and p53 proteins for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowne, Wilbur B; Michl, Josef; Bluth, Martin H; Zenilman, Michael E; Pincus, Matthew R

    2007-01-01

    We have employed a novel computer-based molecular modeling method to design peptides from the ras-p21 and p53 proteins that block proliferation of cancer cells. The rationale of our approach is to identify peptide domains from each protein that alter conformation in response to oncogenic amino acid substitutions in their polypeptide chain. We accomplish this by first generating and comparing low energy average structures for oncogenic and wild-type proteins using conformational energy calculations. Peptides are then synthesized corresponding to these domains. These domains are then linked to a trans-membrane-penetrating sequence (called penetratin) and tested against cancer and untransformed cell lines. Remarkably, we have found that two ras-p21 peptides, 35-47 and 96-110, called PNC-7 and PNC-2, respectively, can induce phenotypic reversion of ras-transformed TUC-3 pancreatic cancer cells and ras-transformed HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells to their untransformed phenotypes. Moreover, both peptides were found to be cytotoxic to ras-transformed human MIA-PaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells and human U-251 astrocytoma cells. Importantly, these peptides have no effect on the growth of their normal cellular counterparts. We have also synthesized peptides from the p53 protein corresponding to its hdm-2-binding domain sequences (residues 12-26), also linked to the penetratin sequence. Surprisingly, we have found that these peptides induce 100 percent tumor cell necrosis, not apoptosis, in 13 different human cancer cell lines but have no effect on normal pancreatic acinar cells, breast epithelial cells, and human stem cells. Moreover, these peptides are cytotoxic to TUC-3 pancreatic tumor cells in nude mice plus eradicate these tumor cells when administered at sites near these tumors. These novel peptides appear to hold much promise as new, non-toxic anti-cancer agents.

  17. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-07

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure.

  18. Electron induced dissociation of singly deprotonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Anastasia; Grigorean, Gabriela; Håkansson, Kristina

    2011-12-01

    Dissociation of singly charged species is more challenging compared with that of multiply charged precursor ions because singly charged ions are generally more stable. In collision activated dissociation (CAD), singly charged ions also gain less kinetic energy in a fixed electric field compared with multiply charged species. Furthermore, ion-electron and ion-ion reactions that frequently provide complementary and more extensive fragmentation compared with CAD typically require multiply charged precursor ions. Here, we investigate electron induced dissociation (EID) of singly deprotonated peptides and compare the EID fragmentation patterns with those observed in negative ion mode CAD. Fragmentation induced upon electron irradiation and collisional activation is not specific and results in the formation of a wide range of product ions, including b-, y-, a-, x-, c-, and z-type ions. Characteristic amino acid side chain losses are detected in both techniques. However, differences are also observed between EID and CAD spectra of the same species, including formation of odd-electron species not seen in CAD, in EID. Furthermore, EID frequently results in more extensive fragmentation compared with CAD. For modified peptides, EID resulted in retention of sulfonation and phosphorylation, allowing localization of the modification site. The observed differences are likely due to both vibrational and electronic excitation in EID, whereas only the former process occurs in CAD.

  19. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  20. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  1. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  2. Surfactant-induced assembly of enzymatically-stable peptide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brad H.; Martinez, Alina M.; Wheeler, Jill S.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-04-07

    The secondary structure of peptides in the presence of interacting additives is an important topic of study, having implications in the application of peptide science to a broad range of modern technologies. Surfactants constitute a class of biologically relevant compounds that are known to influence both peptide conformation and aggregation or assembly. In addition, we have characterized the secondary structure of a linear nonapeptide composed of a hydrophobic alanine/phenylalanine core flanked by hydrophilic acid/amine units. We show that the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces the formation of β-sheets and macroscopic gelation in this otherwise unstructured peptide. Through comparison to related additives, we propose that SDS-induced secondary structure formation is the result of amphiphilicity created by electrostatic binding of SDS to the peptide. In addition, we demonstrate a novel utility of surfactants in manipulating and stabilizing peptide nanostructures. SDS is used to simultaneously induce secondary structure in a peptide and to inhibit the activity of a model enzyme, resulting in a peptide hydrogel that is impervious to enzymatic degradation. These results complement our understanding of the behavior of peptides in the presence of interacting secondary molecules and provide new potential pathways for programmable organization of peptides by the addition of such components.

  3. Surfactant-induced assembly of enzymatically-stable peptide hydrogels

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Brad H.; Martinez, Alina M.; Wheeler, Jill S.; ...

    2015-04-07

    The secondary structure of peptides in the presence of interacting additives is an important topic of study, having implications in the application of peptide science to a broad range of modern technologies. Surfactants constitute a class of biologically relevant compounds that are known to influence both peptide conformation and aggregation or assembly. In addition, we have characterized the secondary structure of a linear nonapeptide composed of a hydrophobic alanine/phenylalanine core flanked by hydrophilic acid/amine units. We show that the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) induces the formation of β-sheets and macroscopic gelation in this otherwise unstructured peptide. Through comparisonmore » to related additives, we propose that SDS-induced secondary structure formation is the result of amphiphilicity created by electrostatic binding of SDS to the peptide. In addition, we demonstrate a novel utility of surfactants in manipulating and stabilizing peptide nanostructures. SDS is used to simultaneously induce secondary structure in a peptide and to inhibit the activity of a model enzyme, resulting in a peptide hydrogel that is impervious to enzymatic degradation. These results complement our understanding of the behavior of peptides in the presence of interacting secondary molecules and provide new potential pathways for programmable organization of peptides by the addition of such components.« less

  4. Promises of apoptosis-inducing peptides in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Barras, David; Widmann, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Until recently, most research efforts aimed at developing anti-cancer tools were focusing on small molecules. Alternative compounds are now being increasingly assessed for their potential anti-cancer properties, including peptides and their derivatives. One earlier limitation to the use of peptides was their limited capacity to cross membranes but this limitation was alleviated with the characterization of cell-permeable sequences. Additionally, means are designed to target peptides to their malignant targets. Most anti-cancer peptidic compounds induce apoptosis of tumor cells by modulating the activity of Bcl-2 family members that control the release of death factors from the mitochondria or by inhibiting negative regulators of caspases, the proteases that mediate the apoptotic response in cells. Some of these peptides have been shown to inhibit the growth of tumors in mouse models. Hopefully, pro-apoptotic anti-tumor peptides will soon be tested for their efficacy in patients with cancers.

  5. Enhanced oral bioavailability of insulin using PLGA nanoparticles co-modified with cell-penetrating peptides and Engrailed secretion peptide (Sec).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Gao, Yuan; Guo, Feng; Li, Fengying; Xie, Baogang; Zhou, Jianliang; Zhong, Haijun

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug carriers are an attractive strategy for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs. However, their ability to cross the intestinal epithelium membrane is largely limited. Therefore, in the present study, cell-penetrating peptides (R8, Tat, penetratin) and a secretion peptide (Sec) with N-terminal stearylation were introduced to modify nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface to improve oral bioavailability of peptide and protein drugs. In vitro studies conducted in Caco-2 cells showed the value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the nanoparticles co-modified with Sec and penetratin (Sec-Pen-NPs) was about two-times greater than that of the nanoparticles modified with only penetratin (Pen-NPs), while the increase of transcellular transport of nanoparticles modified together with Sec and R8 (Sec-R8-NPs), or Sec and Tat (Sec-Tat-NPs), was not significant compared with nanoparticles modified with only R8 (R8-NPs) or Tat (Tat-NPs). Using insulin as the model drug, in vivo studies performed on rats indicated that compared to Pen-NPs, the relative bioavailability of insulin for Sec-Pen-NPs was 1.71-times increased after ileal segments administration, and stronger hypoglycemic effects was also observed. Therefore, the nanoparticles co-modified with penetratin and Sec could act as attractive carriers for oral delivery of insulin.

  6. Coarse Graining to Investigate Membrane Induced Peptide Folding of Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Sai; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    Information about membrane induced peptide folding mechanisms using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge due to time and length scale issues.We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads.These two dummy particles represent a fluctuating dipole,thus introducing structural polarization into the coarse-grained model.With this model,we were able to achieve significant α- β secondary structure content de novo,without any added bias.We extended the model to zwitterionic and anionic lipids,by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside polar beads, to capture the ability of the head group region to form hydrogen bonds.We use zwitterionic POPC and anionic POPS as our model lipids, and a cationic anticancer peptide,SVS1,as our model peptide.We have characterized the driving forces for SVS1 folding on lipid bilayers with varying anionic and zwitterionic lipid compositions.Based on our results, dipolar interactions between peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilize folded conformations.Cooperativity in folding is induced by both intra peptide and membrane-peptide interaction.

  7. Copper-induced oligomerization of peptides: a model study.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Gitta; Stefanescu, Raluca; Przybylski, Michael; Murariu, Manuela; Hudecz, Ferenc; Drochioiu, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    In this work, copper-binding of the tetraglycine peptide (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly) was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Experiments were performed under alkaline conditions, in the presence of ethanolamine (pH 10.95). We observed that the presence of copper(II) ions induces the aggregation of the peptide and the formation of copper-bound complexes with higher molecular mass is favored, such as the oligomer complexes [3M+2Cu-3H](+) and [4M+3Cu-5H](+). At 1:1 peptide-copper(II) ion ratio, the singly charged [3M+2Cu-3H](+) oligomer complex is the base peak in the mass spectrum. Metal ion-induced oligomer-ization of neurotoxic peptides is well known in the literature; however, there are very few examples in which such oligomerization was directly observed by mass spectrometry. Our results show that application of short peptides can be useful to study the -mechanism of metal ion binding and metal ion-induced oligomerization of peptides.

  8. Peptide and non-peptide opioid-induced hyperthermia in rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular administration of prototype nonpeptide opioid receptor (mu, kappa, and sigma) agonists, morphine, ketocyclazocine, and N-allyl-normetazocine was found to induce hyperthermia in rabbits. The similar administration of peptide opioids like beta-endorphin (BE), methionine-enkephalin (ME), and its synthetic analogue D-ala2-methionine-enkephalinamide (DAME) was also found to cause hyperthermia. Results indicate that only the liver-like transport system is important to the ventricular inactivation of BE and DAME. Prostaglandins and norepinephrine were determined not to be involved in peptide and nonpeptide opioid-induced hyperthermia. In addition, cAMP was not required since a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, did not accentuate the hyperthermia due to peptide and nonpeptide opioids. Naloxone-sensitive receptors were found to be involved in the induction of hyperthermia by morphine, BE, ME, and DAME since naloxone attenuated them. However, the hyperthermic response to ketocyclazocine and N-allyl-normetazocine was not antagonized by naloxone.

  9. Chiral Sulfoxide-Induced Single Turn Peptide α-Helicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Jiang, Fan; Zhao, Bingchuan; Lin, Huacan; Tian, Yuan; Xie, Mingsheng; Bai, Guoyun; Gilbert, Adam M.; Goetz, Gilles H.; Liras, Spiros; Mathiowetz, Alan A.; Price, David A.; Song, Kun; Tu, Meihua; Wu, Yujie; Wang, Tao; Flanagan, Mark E.; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Inducing α-helicity through side-chain cross-linking is a strategy that has been pursued to improve peptide conformational rigidity and bio-availability. Here we describe the preparation of small peptides tethered to chiral sulfoxide-containing macrocyclic rings. Furthermore, a study of structure-activity relationships (SARs) disclosed properties with respect to ring size, sulfur position, oxidation state, and stereochemistry that show a propensity to induce α-helicity. Supporting data include circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), NMR spectroscopy, and a single crystal X-ray structure for one such stabilized peptide. Finally, theoretical studies are presented to elucidate the effect of chiral sulfoxides in inducing backbone α-helicity. PMID:27934919

  10. Mucin-like peptides from Echinococcus granulosus induce antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Noya, Verónica; Bay, Sylvie; Festari, María Florencia; García, Enrique P; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Chiale, Carolina; Ganneau, Christelle; Baleux, Françoise; Astrada, Soledad; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Osinaga, Eduardo; Freire, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    There is substantial evidence suggesting that certain parasites can have antitumor properties. We evaluated mucin peptides derived from the helminth Echinococcus granulosus (denominated Egmuc) as potential inducers of antitumor activity. We present data showing that Egmuc peptides were capable of inducing an increase of activated NK cells in the spleen of immunized mice, a fact that was correlated with the capacity of splenocytes to mediate killing of tumor cells. We demonstrated that Egmuc peptides enhance LPS-induced maturation of dendritic cells in vitro by increasing the production of IL-12p40p70 and IL-6 and that Egmuc-treated DCs may activate NK cells, as judged by an increased expression of CD69. This evidence may contribute to the design of tumor vaccines and open new horizons in the use of parasite-derived molecules in the fight against cancer.

  11. Steric-electronic effects in malarial peptides inducing sterile immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Is it evident that the residues position are relevant regarding of {phi} angular value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The geometry considered for detailing the alterations undergone by HABPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter planar interactions ruled by clashes between the atoms making them up. -- Abstract: Conserved Plasmodium falciparum high activity binding peptides' (HABPs) most relevant proteins involved in malaria parasite invasion are immunologically silent; critical binding residues must therefore be specifically replaced to render them highly immunogenic and protection-inducing. Such changes have a tremendous impact on these peptides' steric-electronic effects, such as modifications to peptide length peptide bonds and electronic orbitals' disposition, to allow a better fit into immune system MHCII molecules and better interaction with the TCR which might account for the final immunological outcome.

  12. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  13. Drug target validation: Lethal infection blocked by inducible peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianshi; Wendler, Philip; Connelly, Gene; Lim, Audrey; Zhang, Jiansu; King, Megan; Li, Tongchuan; Silverman, Jared A.; Schimmel, Paul R.; Tally, Francis P.

    2000-01-01

    Genome projects are generating large numbers of potential new targets for drug discovery. One challenge is target validation, proving the usefulness of a specific target in an animal model. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to validation and assay development. We selected in vitro specific peptide binders to a potential pathogen target. By inducing the expression of a selected peptide in pathogen cells causing a lethal infection in mice, the animals were rescued. Thus, by combining in vitro selection methods for peptide binders with inducible expression in animals, the target's validity was rigorously tested and demonstrated. This approach to validation can be generalized and has the potential to become a valuable tool in the drug discovery process.

  14. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.

  15. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus A J; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2008-04-02

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  16. Biofilm Induced Tolerance towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms. PMID:18382672

  17. Anti-aging peptide bioregulators induce reactivation of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lezhava, T; Monaselidze, J; Kadotani, T; Dvalishvili, N; Buadze, T

    2006-04-01

    The effect of synthetic peptide bioregulators (Epitalon, Livagen and Vilon) on structural and facultative heterochromatin of cultivated lymphocytes have been studied among old (75-88yr.) people. The data obtained indicate that epitalon, livagen and vilon: 1) activate synthetic processes, caused by reactivation of ribosomal genes as a result of deheterochromatinization (decondensation) of nucleolus organizer regions; 2) induce unrolling (deheterochromatinization) of total heterochromatin; 3) release genes repressed by heterochromatinization (condensation) of euchromatic regions forming facultative heterochromatin; 4) epitalon and livagen induce deheterochromatinization (decondensation) of pericentromeric structural heterochromatin of the chromosomes1 and 9. However, vilon does not induce deheterochromatinization of pericentromeric structural heterochromatin. These results indicate that peptide bioregulators Epitalon, Livagen and Vilon cause activation (deheterochromatinization) of chromatin in lymphocytes of old individuals.

  18. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wells, J Mitchell; McLuckey, Scott A

    2005-01-01

    The most commonly used activation method in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of peptides and proteins is energetic collisions with a neutral target gas. The overall process of collisional activation followed by fragmentation of the ion is commonly referred to as collision-induced dissociation (CID). The structural information that results from CID of a peptide or protein ion is highly dependent on the conditions used to effect CID. These include, for example, the relative translational energy of the ion and target, the nature of the target, the number of collisions that is likely to take place, and the observation window of the apparatus. This chapter summarizes the key experimental parameters in the CID of peptide and protein ions, as well as the conditions that tend to prevail in the most commonly employed tandem mass spectrometers.

  19. Assays for Identifying Inducers of the Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Nylén, Frank; Bergman, Peter; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2017-01-01

    One promising approach to meet the growing problem of antibiotic resistance is to modulate host defense mechanisms, i.e., host-directed therapy (HDT), in the fight against infections. Induction of endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) via small molecular compounds, such as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or phenylbutyrate, could provide one such HDT-based approach.We have developed a cell-based screening assay for the identification of novel compounds with the capacity to induce AMP expression and here follows the detailed protocol.

  20. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  1. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification.

    PubMed

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-14

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.10(8) for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  2. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    PubMed Central

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells. PMID:27841303

  3. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by peptides targeting NF-kappa B essential modulator (nemo) oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Courtois, Gilles; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Baleux, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Traincard, François; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2004-12-24

    NF-kappa B essential modulator/IKK-gamma (NEMO/IKK-gamma) plays a key role in the activation of the NF-kappa B pathway in response to proinflammatory stimuli. Previous studies suggested that the signal-dependent activation of the IKK complex involves the trimerization of NEMO. The minimal oligomerization domain of this protein consists of two coiled-coil subdomains named Coiled-coil 2 (CC2) and leucine zipper (LZ) (Agou, F., Traincard, F., Vinolo, E., Courtois, G., Yamaoka, S., Israel, A., and Veron, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 27861-27869). To search for drugs inhibiting NF-kappa B activation, we have rationally designed cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the CC2 and LZ subdomains that mimic the contact areas between NEMO subunits. The peptides were tagged with the Antennapedia/Penetratin motif and delivered to cells prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Peptide transduction was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, and their effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation was quantified using an NF-kappa B-dependent beta-galactosidase assay in stably transfected pre-B 70Z/3 lymphocytes. We show that the peptides corresponding to the LZ and CC2 subdomains inhibit NF-kappa B activation with an IC(50) in the mum range. Control peptides, including mutated CC2 and LZ peptides and a heterologous coiled-coil peptide, had no inhibitory effect. The designed peptides are able to induce cell death in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells exhibiting constitutive NF-kappa B activity. Our results provide the "proof of concept" for a new and promising strategy for the inhibition of NF-kappa B pathway activation through targeting the oligomerization state of the NEMO protein.

  4. Short peptide induces an "uncultivable" microorganism to grow in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nichols, D; Lewis, K; Orjala, J; Mo, S; Ortenberg, R; O'Connor, P; Zhao, C; Vouros, P; Kaeberlein, T; Epstein, S S

    2008-08-01

    Microorganisms comprise the bulk of biodiversity, but only a small fraction of this diversity grows on artificial media. This phenomenon was noticed almost a century ago, repeatedly confirmed, and termed the "great plate count anomaly." Advances in microbial cultivation improved microbial recovery but failed to explain why most microbial species do not grow in vitro. Here we show that at least some of such species can form domesticated variants capable of growth on artificial media. We also present evidence that small signaling molecules, such as short peptides, may be essential factors in initiating growth of nongrowing cells. We identified one 5-amino-acid peptide, LQPEV, that at 3.5 nM induces the otherwise "uncultivable" strain Psychrobacter sp. strain MSC33 to grow on standard media. This demonstrates that the restriction preventing microbial in vitro growth may be different from those offered to date to explain the "great plate count anomaly," such as deficiencies in nutrient composition and concentrations in standard media, medium toxicity, and inappropriate incubation time. Growth induction of MSC33 illustrates that some microorganisms do not grow in vitro because they are removed from their native communities and the signals produced therein. "Uncultivable" species represent the largest source of unexplored biodiversity, and provide remarkable opportunities for both basic and applied research. Access to cultures of some of these species should be possible through identification of the signaling compounds necessary for growth, their addition to standard medium formulations, and eventual domestication.

  5. Determination of the optimal cell-penetrating peptide sequence for intestinal insulin delivery based on molecular orbital analysis with self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Kikuchi, Shingo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Terasawa, Yoshiaki; Yasuda, Akihito; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Ida, Nobuo; Nishio, Reiji; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Our recent work has shown that the intestinal absorption of insulin can be improved significantly by coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), especially penetratin. However, a relatively high dose of penetratin is required to adequately stimulate the intestinal absorption of insulin. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the CPP that most effectively enhanced intestinal insulin absorption. An in situ loop absorption study using 26 penetratin analogues suggested that the chain length, hydrophobicity, and amphipathicity of the CPPs, as well as their basicity, contribute to their absorption-enhancing efficiency. Moreover, a molecular orbital method with self-organizing maps (SOMs) classification suggested that multiple factors, including the molecular weight, basicity, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, absolute hardness, and chemical potential of CPPs, are associated with their effects on intestinal insulin absorption. Furthermore, the new CPPs proposed by SOM clustering had a marked capacity to interact with insulin, and their ability to enhance insulin absorption was much stronger than that of the original penetratin. Therefore, the peptide sequence that optimally enhances intestinal insulin absorption could be defined by SOM with the molecular orbital method, and our present work emphasizes the utility of such methodologies in the development of effective drug delivery systems.

  6. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses.

  7. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K Krishna

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis.

  8. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K. Krishna

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis. PMID:28203481

  9. Fragmentation of intra-peptide and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nanoESI collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mormann, Michael; Eble, Johannes; Schwöppe, Christian; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Pohlentz, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    Characterisation and identification of disulfide bridges is an important aspect of structural elucidation of proteins. Covalent cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein give rise to stabilisation of the native tertiary structure of the molecules. Bottom-up identification and sequencing of proteins by mass spectrometry most frequently involves reductive cleavage and alkylation of disulfide links followed by enzymatic digestion. However, when using this approach, information on cysteine-cysteine contacts within the protein is lost. Mass spectrometric characterisation of peptides containing intra-chain disulfides is a challenging analytical task, because peptide bonds within the disulfide loop are believed to be resistant to fragmentation. In this contribution we show recent results on the fragmentation of intra and inter-peptide disulfide bonds of proteolytic peptides by nano electrospray ionisation collision-induced dissociation (nanoESI CID). Disulfide bridge-containing peptides obtained from proteolytic digests were submitted to low-energy nanoESI CID using a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument as a mass analyser. Fragmentation of the gaseous peptide ions gave rise to a set of b and y-type fragment ions which enabled derivation of the sequence of the amino acids located outside the disulfide loop. Surprisingly, careful examination of the fragment-ion spectra of peptide ions comprising an intramolecular disulfide bridge revealed the presence of low-abundance fragment ions formed by the cleavage of peptide bonds within the disulfide loop. These fragmentations are preceded by proton-induced asymmetric cleavage of the disulfide bridge giving rise to a modified cysteine containing a disulfohydryl substituent and a dehydroalanine residue on the C-S cleavage site.

  10. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration.

  11. Euler buckling, membrane corrugation and pore formation induced by antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Gao, Lianghui; Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Fang, Weihai

    2014-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as defense weapons against bacteria. They are secreted by organisms of plants and animals and have a wide variety in composition and structure. In this study, we theoretically explore the effects of the antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using analytic arguments and the coarse grained dissipative particle dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. Such buckled membrane states have been indeed seen in a number of experiments with bacteria affected by peptide, yet this is the first theoretical study addressing these phenomena more deeply.

  12. Signalling processes involved in C-peptide-induced chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, M; Walcher, D; Giehl, K; Bach, H; Grüb, M; Durst, R; Hombach, V; Marx, N

    2009-06-01

    Previous data from our group demonstrated that C-peptide induces chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes in-vitro, mediated by activation of G-protein and PI 3-kinase gamma, but additional signalling pathways involved in this process remained unexplored. In the present study we further analyze intracellular signalling pathways which lead to C-peptide-induced CD4-positive lymphocyte migration. We provide evidence that C-peptide-induced chemotaxis of CD4-positive lymphocytes is critically dependent on activation of Src-kinase and RhoA, Rac-1 and Cdc42 GTPases. Furthermore, C-peptide stimulates phosphorylation of PAK, LIMK and cofilin downstream of Rac-1 and Cdc42, leading to cofilin inactivation and actin filament stabilization. In addition, C-peptide induces ROCK kinase activity and MLC phosphorylation downstream of RhoA, thereby stimulating myosin mediated cell contraction. In contrast, C-peptide does not activate ERK1/2, p38 or Akt in CD4-positive lymphocytes. Our data support an active role of C-peptide in CD4-positive lymphocyte chemotaxis and elucidate molecular mechanisms in C-peptide-induced cell migration.

  13. Protective effect of wheat peptides against indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Pan, Xingchang; Song, Zhixiu; Wang, Shaokang; Yang, Ligang; Sun, Guiju

    2014-01-29

    Recent studies have demonstrated that wheat peptides protected rats against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal epithelial cells damage, but the mechanism of action is unclear. In the present study, an indomethacin-induced oxidative stress model was used to investigate the effect of wheat peptides on the nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB)-inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide signal pathway in intestinal epithelial cells-6 cells. IEC-6 cells were treated with wheat peptides (0, 125, 500 and 2000 mg/L) for 24 h, followed by 90 mg/L indomethacin for 12 h. Wheat peptides significantly attenuated the indomethacin-induced decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat peptides at 2000 mg/L markedly decreased the expression of the NF-κB in response to indomethacin-induced oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that the addition of wheat peptides to a culture medium significantly inhibited the indomethacin-induced release of malondialdehyde and nitrogen monoxide, and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in IEC-6 cells, thereby providing a possible explanation for the protective effect proposed for wheat peptides in the prevention of indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in small intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. Venom peptides from solitary hunting wasps induce feeding disorder in lepidopteran larvae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ji Hyeong; Ji, Yeounjung; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Lee, Seunghwan; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2011-03-01

    The cell lytic activity and toxicity against lepidopteran larvae of 13 venom peptides (4 OdVPs and 9 EpVPs) from two solitary hunting wasps, Orancistrocerus drewseni and Eumenes pomiformis, were examined with mastoparan as a reference peptide. Of the 13 peptides, 7 were predicted to have α-helical structures that exhibit the typical character of amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptides. The remaining peptides exhibited coil structures; among these, EpVP5 possesses two Cys residues that form an internal disulfide bridge. All the helical peptides including mastoparan showed antimicrobial and insect cell lytic activities, whereas only two of them were hemolytic against human erythrocytes. The helical peptides induced a feeding disorder when injected into the vicinity of the head and thorax of Spodoptera exigua larvae, perhaps because their non-specific neurotoxic or myotoxic action induced cell lysis. At low concentrations, however, these helical peptides increased cell permeability without inducing cell lysis. These findings suggest that the helical venom peptides may function as non-specific neurotoxins or myotoxins and venom-spreading factors at low concentrations, as well as preservatives for long-term storage of the prey via antimicrobial, particularly antifungal, activities.

  15. Peptidal Sex Hormones Inducing Conjugation Tube Formation in Compatible Mating-Type Cells of Tremella mesenterica.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Yoshida, M; Isogai, A; Suzuki, A

    1981-06-26

    The pair of peptidal sex hormones (tremerogen A-10 and tremerogen a-13) that induce conjugation tube formation in compatible type cells (A and a types) of Tremella mesenterica were isolated. Tremerogen A-10 is a dodecapeptide and tremerogen a-13, a tridecapeptide. In both peptides, the sulfiydryl group of the cysteines at the carboxyl terminus was blocked by farnesyl moieties.

  16. Improving the identification rate of endogenous peptides using electron transfer dissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Eisuke; Menschaert, Gerben; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Luyten, Walter; Gevaert, Kris; Baggerman, Geert; Schoofs, Liliane

    2013-12-06

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) combined with bioinformatics tools have enabled fast and systematic protein identification based on peptide-to-spectrum matches. However, it remains challenging to obtain accurate identification of endogenous peptides, such as neuropeptides, peptide hormones, peptide pheromones, venom peptides, and antimicrobial peptides. Since these peptides are processed at sites that are difficult to predict reliably, the search of their MS/MS spectra in sequence databases needs to be done without any protease setting. In addition, many endogenous peptides carry various post-translational modifications, making it essential to take these into account in the database search. These characteristics of endogenous peptides result in a huge search space, frequently leading to poor confidence of the peptide characterizations in peptidomics studies. We have developed a new MS/MS spectrum search tool for highly accurate and confident identification of endogenous peptides by combining two different fragmentation methods. Our approach takes advantage of the combination of two independent fragmentation methods (collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation). Their peptide spectral matching is carried out separately in both methods, and the final score is built as a combination of the two separate scores. We demonstrate that this approach is very effective in discriminating correct peptide identifications from false hits. We applied this approach to a spectral data set of neuropeptides extracted from mouse pituitary tumor cells. Compared to conventional MS-based identification, i.e., using a single fragmentation method, our approach significantly increased the peptide identification rate. It proved also highly effective for scanning spectra against a very large search space, enabling more accurate genome-wide searches and searches including multiple potential post-translational modifications.

  17. Computer-aided designing of immunosuppressive peptides based on IL-10 inducing potential

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Kaur, Harpreet; Singh, Sandeep; Sharma, Meenu; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In the past, numerous methods have been developed to predict MHC class II binders or T-helper epitopes for designing the epitope-based vaccines against pathogens. In contrast, limited attempts have been made to develop methods for predicting T-helper epitopes/peptides that can induce a specific type of cytokine. This paper describes a method, developed for predicting interleukin-10 (IL-10) inducing peptides, a cytokine responsible for suppressing the immune system. All models were trained and tested on experimentally validated 394 IL-10 inducing and 848 non-inducing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues and motifs are more frequent in IL-10 inducing peptides than in non-inducing peptides. Based on this analysis, we developed composition-based models using various machine-learning techniques. Random Forest-based model achieved the maximum Matthews’s Correlation Coefficient (MCC) value of 0.59 with an accuracy of 81.24% developed using dipeptide composition. In order to facilitate the community, we developed a web server “IL-10pred”, standalone packages and a mobile app for designing IL-10 inducing peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/IL-10pred/). PMID:28211521

  18. The prelamin A pre-peptide induces cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Gary L. . E-mail: Gary.Brodsky@uchsc.edu; Bowersox, Jeffrey A.; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Miller, Leslie A.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2007-05-18

    Prelamin A processing is unique amongst mammalian proteins and results in the production of a farnesylated and carboxymethylated peptide. We examined the effect of pathogenic LMNA mutations on prelamin A processing, and of the covalently modified peptide on cardiac and skeletal myoblast differentiation. Here we report a mutation associated with dilated cardiomyopathy prevents prelamin A peptide production. In addition, topical application of the covalently modified C-terminal peptide to proliferating skeletal and cardiac myoblasts induced myotube and striated tissue formation, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that skeletal and cardiac myoblasts are the first cell lines examined to contain unprocessed prelamin A, and immunostaining of peptide-treated cells revealed a previously unidentified role for prelamin A in cytoskeleton formation and intercellular organization. These results demonstrate a direct role for prelamin A in myoblast differentiation and indicate the prelamin A peptide may have therapeutic potential.

  19. Angioedema induced by a peptide derived from complement component C2

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic peptides that correspond to the COOH-terminal portion of C2b enhance vascular permeability in human and guinea pig skin. In human studies, 1 nmol of the most active peptide of 25-amino acid residues produced substantial local edema. A pentapeptide and a heptapeptide corresponding to the COOH-terminal sequence of C2b each induced contraction of estrous rat uterus in the micromole range; a peptide of 25 amino acids from this region induced a like contraction of rat uterus at a concentration 20-fold lower than the smaller peptides. The vascular permeability of guinea pig skin was enhanced by doses of these synthetic peptides in a similar fashion as that observed for the concentration of rat uterus. The induction of localized edema by intradermal injection in both the guinea pig and the human proceeds in the presence of antihistaminic drugs, suggesting that there is a histamine-independent component to the observed increase in vascular permeability. Cleavage of C2 with the enzymic subcomponent of C1, C1s, yields only C2a and C2b, and no small peptides, whereas cleavage of C2 with C1s and plasmin yields a set of small peptides. These plasmin- cleaved peptides are derived from the COOH terminus of C2b, and they induce the contraction of estrous rat uterus. PMID:2972793

  20. Low-energy collision-induced dissociation fragmentation analysis of cysteinyl-modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Oleg V; Goshe, Michael B; Conrads, Thomas P; Rakov, V Sergey; Veenstra, Timothy D; Smith, Richard D

    2002-05-15

    The development of methods to chemically modify and isolate cysteinyl-residue-containing peptides (Cys-peptides) for LC-MS/MS analysis has generated considerable interest in the field of proteomics. Methods using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine (iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin) employ similar Cys-modifying reagents that contain a thiolate-specific biotin group to modify and isolate Cys-containing peptides in conjunction with immobilized avidin. For these strategies to be effective on a proteome-wide level, the presence of the ICAT or acetyl-PEO-biotin tag should not interfere with the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of the modified Cys-peptides by automated database searching algorithms. We have compared the collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation patterns of peptides labeled with iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin and the ICAT reagent to those of the unmodified peptides. CID of Cys-peptides modified with either reagent resulted in the formation of ions attributed to the modified Cys-peptides as well as those unique to the labeling reagent. As demonstrated by analyzing acetyl-PEO-biotin labeled peptides from ribonuclease A and the ICAT-labeled proteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, the presence of these label-specific product ions provides a useful identifier to discern whether a peptide has been modified with the Cys-specific reagent, especially when a number of peptides analyzed using these methods do not contain a modified Cys residue, and to differentiate identical Cys-peptides labeled with either ICAT-d0 or ICAT-d8.

  1. Low-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation Fragmentation Analysis of Cysteinyl-Modified Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, Oleg V.; Goshe, Michael B. ); Conrads, Thomas P. ); Rakov, Vsevolod S. ); Veenstra, Timothy D. ); Smith, Richard D. )

    2002-05-15

    The development of methods to chemically modify and isolate cysteinyl-residue containing peptides (Cys-peptides) for LC-MS/MS analysis has generated considerable interest in the field of proteomics. Methods using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine (iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin) employ similar Cys-modifying reagents that contain a thiolate-specific biotin group to modify and isolate Cys-containing peptides in conjunction with immobilized avidin. For these strategies to be effective on a proteome-wide level, the presence of the ICAT or acetyl-PEO-biotin tag should not interfere with the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of the modified Cys-peptides by automated database searching algorithms. We have compared the collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation patterns of peptides labeled with iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin and the ICAT reagent to those of the unmodified peptides. CID of Cys-peptides modified with either reagent resulted in the formation of ions attributed to the modified Cys-peptides as well as those unique to the labeling reagent. As demonstrated by analyzing acetyl-PEO-biotin labeled peptides from ribonuclease A and the ICAT-labeled proteome of D. radiodurans, the presence of these labeled-specific product ions provides a useful identifier to discern whether a peptide has been modified with the Cys-specific reagent, especially when a number of peptides analyzed using these methods do not contain a modified Cys-residue, and to differentiate identical Cys-peptides labeled with either ICAT-D0 or ICAT-D8.

  2. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  3. Hepatoprotective effects of rice-derived peptides against acetaminophen-induced damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Moritani, Chie; Uraji, Misugi; Fujita, Akiko; Kawakami, Koji; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Suzaki, Etsuko; Tsuboi, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant intracellular antioxidant, protects cells against reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress and regulates intracellular redox status. We found that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic. However, an overdose of acetaminophen causes severe hepatotoxicity via depletion of hepatic glutathione. Here, we investigated the protective effects of rice peptides on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. ICR mice were orally administered rice peptides (0, 100 or 500 mg/kg) for seven days, followed by the induction of hepatotoxicity via intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (700 mg/kg). Pretreatment with rice peptides significantly prevented increases in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels and protected against hepatic glutathione depletion. The expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, a key regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of glutathione, was decreased by treatment with acetaminophen, albeit rice peptides treatment recovered its expression compared to that achieved treatment with acetaminophen. In addition, histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that rice peptides prevented acetaminophen-induced centrilobular necrosis. These results suggest that rice peptides increased intracellular glutathione levels and could protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

  4. Sodium diclofenac and cell-penetrating peptides embedded in H(II) mesophases: physical characterization and delivery.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-09-01

    Glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based mesophases offer extensive prospects for incorporation of various bioactive molecules. This work deals with the solubilization of selected cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) together with sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) within the H(II) mesophase for transdermal applications. The effect of CPPs such as RALA (an amphipatic CPP), penetratin (PEN), and oligoarginine (NONA) on Na-DFC skin permeation kinetics to provide controlled release and tune the drug transdermal diffusion was studied. The location of the drug and the CPPs within the mesophase was probed by DSC and FTIR. Na-DFC was found to be located at the interfacial region between the surfactant chains, leading to denser H(II) mesophase. The hydrophilic NONA was intercalated into the aqueous cylinders and caused their swelling. It induced a significant decrease in the hydrogen binding between the GMO carbonyls and their surrounding. The amphiphilic PEN was entrapped within two different regions, depending on its concentration. PEN and NONA improved Na-DFC permeation by 100%, whereas RALA enhanced permeation by 50%. When estimating Na-DFC migration rate out of the mesophase toward surrounding aqueous media, it appeared to be slower with the CPPs. The peptides were not involved at this diffusion-controlled step. It seems that their effect on skin permeation is based on their specific interaction with the skin.

  5. NIF (neurite-inducing factor): a novel peptide inducing neurite formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A

    1986-01-01

    Neurite-inducing factor (NIF) is a novel protein that has been partially purified from mouse submaxillary glands. NIF induces neurite formation in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and the NIF-induced neurites are indistinguishable from NGF-induced neurites in both their morphology and the time course of their formation. Neurite-inducing activity can be recovered at a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 20,000 Da after fractionation of partially purified preparations via SDS-PAGE. Partially purified preparations of NIF are about half as potent as pure beta NGF, and since the neurite-inducing activity does not correspond to any of the major proteins in this fraction, specific activity of purified NIF will probably be significantly greater than the 60 ng/ml found for our partially purified material. NIF is distinct from beta NGF by four criteria: (1) antibodies to beta NGF can block the activity of beta NGF, but not the activity of NIF; (2) beta NGF can induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in PC12 cells at concentrations significantly below those required to induce neurites, while NIF induces ODC only at concentrations greatly in excess of those required to induce neurite formation; (3) by the criterion of SDS-PAGE, there is insufficient beta NGF in our partially purified preparations of NIF to explain the biological activity of this fraction; and (4) the biological activity of NIF has a molecular weight (20,000 Da) that is distinct from beta NGF (13,000 Da). We conclude that NIF is probably a novel peptide that is very active in promoting morphological differentiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  7. The protective immune response against infectious bronchitis virus induced by multi-epitope based peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tai; Wang, Hong-Ning; Wang, Xue; Tang, Jun-Ni; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Yun-Fei; Guo, Zi-Cheng; Li, Yu-Ling; Gao, Rong; Kang, Run-Min

    2009-07-01

    Peptide vaccine was found to be an effective and powerful approach to a variety of pathogens. To explore multi-epitope based peptide vaccines against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), the immunogenic peptides were fused to the 3' terminal of glutathione S transferase gene (GST) and expressed in Escherichia coli. ELISA and Western blot analysis showed that the purified fusion proteins had excellent immune activity with chicken anti-IBV serum. During the vaccination course, the candidate peptide vaccines induced strong humoral and cellular response, and provided up to 80.0% immune protection, while all non-immunized chickens in the negative control group manifested obvious typical symptoms and died after virus challenge. Our finding provides a new way to develop multi-epitope based peptide vaccine against IBV.

  8. Shotgun collision-induced dissociation of peptides using a time of flight mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Purvine, Samuel; Eppel, Jason-Thomas; Yi, Eugene C; Goodlett, David R

    2003-06-01

    Parallel collision-induced dissociation (CID) of peptides rather than serial, as is customary, results in loss of the obvious parent-fragment ion lineage available from CID on a single ion. We report proof-of-principle results suggesting the feasibility of parallel peptide CID, referred to here as shotgun CID, for protein identification when using the measured mass accuracies available from a time of flight mass analyzer and currently available search routines such as SEQUEST. Additionally, we report that parent-fragment ion lineage may be reconstructed from information encoded in the chromatographic single ion current traces of peptides.

  9. Potent Inducers of Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides for Host Directed Therapy of Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, H.; Nylén, F.; Sarker, P.; Miraglia, E.; Bergman, P.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Raqib, R.; Agerberth, B.; Strömberg, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new concept for treatment of infections is induction of our own antimicrobial peptides and the presented novel class of inducer, aroylated phenylenediamines (APDs), gives up to 20 to 30-fold induction of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, in vitro. In addition, oral administration of an APD in a rabbit model of Shigellosis resulted in recovery from the infection in a few days implying that APD’s are promising candidates for treatment of infections.

  10. Potent Inducers of Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides for Host Directed Therapy of Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ottosson, H.; Nylén, F.; Sarker, P.; Miraglia, E.; Bergman, P.; Gudmundsson, G. H.; Raqib, R.; Agerberth, B.; Strömberg, R.

    2016-01-01

    A new concept for treatment of infections is induction of our own antimicrobial peptides and the presented novel class of inducer, aroylated phenylenediamines (APDs), gives up to 20 to 30-fold induction of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37, in vitro. In addition, oral administration of an APD in a rabbit model of Shigellosis resulted in recovery from the infection in a few days implying that APD’s are promising candidates for treatment of infections. PMID:27827460

  11. Intracellular delivery of fluorescent protein into viable wheat microspores using cationic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bilichak, Andriy; Luu, Justin; Eudes, François

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are specialized generative cells with haploid genome that demonstrate the amenability toward embryogenesis under certain conditions. The induced microspore culture technique is largely exploited by the breeding programs of wheat and other crops due to its high efficiency for generation of the large number of haploid plants in the relatively short period of time. The ability to produce mature double haploid plant from a single cell has also attracted attention of the plant biotechnologists in the past few years. More importantly, the possibility to deliver proteins for improvement of embryogenesis and the genome modification purposes holds great potential for transgene-free wheat biotechnology. In the present study, we examined the ability of cationic and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to convey a covalently-linked mCherry protein inside the viable microspores. We demonstrate that the affinity of CPPs to the microspore cells dependents on their charge with the highest efficiency of CPP-mCherry binding to the cells achieved by cationic CPPs (penetratin and R9). Additionally, due to overall negative charge of the microspore cell wall, the successful uptake of the protein cargo by live microspore cells is attained by utilization of a reversible disulfide bond between the R9 CPP and mCherry protein. Overall, the approach proposed herein can be applied by the other biotechnology groups for the fast and efficient screening of the different CPP candidates for their ability to deliver proteins inside the viable plant cells. PMID:26379691

  12. An analogue peptide from the Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 induces CD8+ T cell responses against naturally processed peptide.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Nicola; Buchan, Sarah; Ingram, Wendy; Khan, Ghazala; Vittes, Gisella; Rice, Jason; Pulford, Karen; Mufti, Ghulam; Stevenson, Freda; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified the novel Cancer/Testis antigen PASD1 by immunoscreening a testis library with pooled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient sera. To develop a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing vaccine, we have now investigated the carboxy-terminal region, known to contain serological determinants, for MHC class I (HLA-A⋆0201)-binding peptides. Algorithm-selected natural peptides failed to show detectable HLA-A⋆0201 binding in T2 assays. However, anchor-modified analogue peptides showed enhanced binding, with decreased off-rates. Analogue peptide-loaded antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induced IFN-γ production by T cells from normal donors and patients. In addition, peptide-specific T cells could be expanded from cancer patients by stimulation with the PASD1 analogue peptide Pa14. For clinical application, a DNA fusion gene vaccine encoding Pa14 was designed and tested in "humanized" mice. Splenocytes from vaccinated mice showed in vitro cytotoxicity against tumour cells, either exogenously loaded with the corresponding wild-type peptide (Pw8) or expressing endogenously processed PASD1 protein. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine encoding an altered PASD1 epitope can induce CTLs to target the natural peptide expressed by human tumour cells.

  13. A Study into the Collision-induced Dissociation (CID) Behavior of Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Giese, Sven H; Fischer, Lutz; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-03-01

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry resolves protein-protein interactions or protein folds by help of distance constraints. Cross-linkers with specific properties such as isotope-labeled or collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable cross-linkers are in frequent use to simplify the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here, we analyzed the mass spectrometric behavior of 910 unique cross-linked peptides in high-resolution MS1 and MS2 from published data and validate the observation by a ninefold larger set from currently unpublished data to explore if detailed understanding of their fragmentation behavior would allow computational delivery of information that otherwise would be obtained via isotope labels or CID cleavage of cross-linkers. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers reveal cross-linked and linear fragments in fragmentation spectra. We show that fragment mass and charge alone provide this information, alleviating the need for isotope-labeling for this purpose. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers also indicate cross-linker-containing, albeit not specifically cross-linked, peptides in MS1. We observed that acquisition can be guided to better than twofold enrich cross-linked peptides with minimal losses based on peptide mass and charge alone. By help of CID-cleavable cross-linkers, individual spectra with only linear fragments can be recorded for each peptide in a cross-link. We show that cross-linked fragments of ordinary cross-linked peptides can be linearized computationally and that a simplified subspectrum can be extracted that is enriched in information on one of the two linked peptides. This allows identifying candidates for this peptide in a simplified database search as we propose in a search strategy here. We conclude that the specific behavior of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometers can be exploited to relax the requirements on cross-linkers.

  14. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Joshua M.; Gettel, Douglas L.; Tabaei, Seyed R.; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Groves, Jay T.; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N.

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity. PMID:26745420

  15. Destabilization of peptide: MHC interaction induces IL-2 resistant anergy in diabetogenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive T cells are responsible for inducing several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. We have developed a strategy to induce unresponsiveness in these cells by destabilizing the peptide:MHC ligand recognized by the T cell receptor. By introducing amino acid substitutions into the immunogenic peptide at residues that bind to the MHC, the half life of the peptide:MHC complex is severely reduced, thereby resulting in abortive T cell activation and anergy. By treating a monoclonal diabetogenic T cell population with an MHC variant peptide, the cells are rendered unresponsive to the wild type ligand, as measured by both proliferation and IL-2 production. Stimulation of T cells with MHC variant peptides results in minimal Erk1/2 phosphorylation or cell division. Variant peptide stimulation effectively initiates a signaling program dominated by sustained tyrosine phosphatase activity, including elevated SHP-1 activity. These negative signaling events result in an anergic phenotype in which the T cells are not competent to signal through the IL-2 receptor, as evidenced by a lack of phospho-Stat5 upregulation and proliferation, despite high expression of the IL-2 receptor. This unique negative signaling profile provides a novel means to shut down the anti-self response. PMID:23895744

  16. Interpretation of collision-induced fragmentation tandem mass spectra of posttranslationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Matthiesen, Rune

    2007-01-01

    Tandem collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectrometry (MS) provides a sensitive means of analyzing the amino acid sequence of peptides. Modern MS instrumentation is capable of rapidly generating many thousands of tandem mass spectra, and protein database search engines have been developed to cope with this avalanche of data. In most studies, there is a schism between discarding perfectly valid data and including nonsensical peptide identifications--this is currently a major bottleneck in data analysis and it calls for manual evaluation of the data. Especially for posttranslationally modified peptides, there is a need for manual validation of the data because search algorithms seldom have been optimized for the identification of modified peptides and because there are many pitfalls for the unwary. This chapter describes some of the issues that should be considered when interpreting and validating low-energy CID tandem mass spectra and gives some useful tables to aid this process.

  17. Potassium Ions are More Effective than Sodium Ions in Salt Induced Peptide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubina, Michael V.; Vyazmin, Sergey Yu.; Boitsov, Vitali M.; Nikolaev, Eugene N.; Popov, Igor A.; Kononikhin, Alexey S.; Eliseev, Igor E.; Natochin, Yuri V.

    2013-04-01

    Prebiotic peptide formation under aqueous conditions in the presence of metal ions is one of the plausible triggers of the emergence of life. The salt-induced peptide formation reaction has been suggested as being prebiotically relevant and was examined for the formation of peptides in NaCl solutions. In previous work we have argued that the first protocell could have emerged in KCl solution. Using HPLC-MS/MS analysis, we found that K+ is more than an order of magnitude more effective in the L-glutamic acid oligomerization with 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole in aqueous solutions than the same concentration of Na+, which is consistent with the diffusion theory calculations. We anticipate that prebiotic peptides could have formed with K+ as the driving force, not Na+, as commonly believed.

  18. Established theory of radiation-induced decay is not generalizable to Bolton-Hunter labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Doran, Amanda C; Wan, Yieh-Ping; Kopin, Alan S; Beinborn, Martin

    2003-05-01

    Peptide hormones radiolabeled with 125I are widely used for the pharmacological characterization of cognate receptors. As a prerequisite for calculating ligand affinities from competition binding assays, and for estimating receptor densities from such studies, it is necessary to know the concentration of bioactive radioligand that is used in respective experiments. It has been demonstrated previously that radioiodinated peptides undergo decay catastrophe, i.e. disintegration of the radioactive label leads to the concomitant destruction of the carrier peptide. Here, we demonstrate that decay catastrophe does not apply to two peptide hormones that are iodinated by Bolton-Hunter conjugation: cholecystokinin octapeptide and glucagon-like peptide 2. The function of aged samples of these radioligands at corresponding recombinantly expressed receptors was assessed by measuring ligand-induced inositol phosphate production or generation of cyclic AMP, respectively. Both of the tested compounds, although predicted by decay catastrophe to contain little or subthreshold remaining bioactivity, stimulated an unexpectedly high level of receptor-mediated second messenger signaling. Quantitative comparison of observed functions with those of corresponding unlabeled peptides suggested that the bioactivity of each radioligand had been largely conserved despite the radioactive decay of the iodine label. Consistent with an apparent absence of decay catastrophe, we noted that the specific radioactivity, when determined immediately following peptide iodination, was close to the theoretical maximum but exponentially decreased over time. These findings raise the possibility that attachment of a Bolton-Hunter conjugate may shield labeled peptides from radiation-induced damage, a scenario that should be considered when performing radioligand binding experiments.

  19. A TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Kosanke, Stanley; Awasthi, Shanjana

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and TLR4 is important for host defense. We have recently identified an SPA4 peptide region from the interface of SP-A-TLR4 complex. Here, we studied the involvement of the SPA4 peptide region in SP-A-TLR4 interaction using a two-hybrid system, and biological effects of SPA4 peptide in cell systems and a mouse model. HEK293 cells were transfected with plasmid DNAs encoding SP-A or a SP-A-mutant lacking SPA4 peptide region and TLR4. Luciferase activity was measured as the end-point of SP-A-TLR4 interaction. NF-κB activity was also assessed simultaneously. Next, the dendritic cells or mice were challenged with Escherichia coli-derived LPS and treated with SPA4 peptide. Endotoxic shock-like symptoms and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, NF-κB, leukocyte influx) were assessed. Our results reveal that the SPA4 peptide region contributes to the SP-A-TLR4 interaction and inhibits the LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α. We also observed that the SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and cell influx, and alleviates the endotoxic shock-like symptoms in a mouse model. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of the SPA4 peptide through its binding to TLR4 can be of therapeutic benefit.

  20. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  1. Peptide Fragmentation Induced by Radicals at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Laiko, Victor V.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essentially atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to ECD/ETD, along with the y-/b- fragments that are specific to CAD. In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source. PMID:19034885

  2. Insect immunity: expression of the two major inducible antibacterial peptides, defensin and diptericin, in Phormia terranovae.

    PubMed Central

    Dimarcq, J L; Zachary, D; Hoffmann, J A; Hoffmann, D; Reichhart, J M

    1990-01-01

    Injections of low doses of bacteria into larvae of Phormia terranovae induce the appearance of potent bactericidal peptides in the blood, among which predominate the anti-Gram positive insect defensins and the anti-Gram negative diptericins. Insect defensins show significant homologies to mammalian (including human) microbicidal peptides present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. We report the molecular cloning of cDNAs and primer extension studies which indicate that insect defensin is produced as a prepro-peptide yielding mature defensin A (40 residues) after cleavage of a putative signal peptide (23 residues) and a prosequence (34 residues). Previous studies have established that diptericin (82 residues) is matured from a pre-peptide by cleavage of a putative signal peptide (19 residues) and C-terminal amidation. Using oligonucleotide probes complementary to the sequences of the mRNAs for defensin and diptericin, we show by in situ hybridization that both antibacterial peptides are concomitantly synthesized by the same cells: thrombocytoids, a specialized blood cell type, and adipocytes. Transcriptional studies based on hybridization of RNAs to cDNAs of defensin and diptericin indicate that the transcription of both genes is induced regardless of the nature of the stimulus (injection of Gram positive or Gram negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharides). Even a sterile injury applied to axenically raised larvae is efficient in inducing the transcription of both genes suggesting that the local disruption of the integument aspecifically initiates a signalling mechanism which the thrombocytoids and the adipocytes are able to interpret. The transcription of immune genes is relatively short lived and a second challenge yields a response similar to that of the first stimulus, indicating that the experimental insects do not keep a 'memory' of their first injection. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2369900

  3. Duck-billed platypus venom peptides induce Ca2+ influx in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masaki; Black, David StC; Ohno, Osamu; Yamada, Kaoru; Kigoshi, Hideo; Uemura, Daisuke

    2009-12-23

    The duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is one of the few venomous Australian mammals. We previously found that its crude venom potently induces Ca(2+) influx in human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. Guided by this bioassay, we identified 11 novel peptides, including the heptapeptide H-His-Asp-His-Pro-Asn-Pro-Arg-OH (1). Compounds 1-4 and 5-11 coincided with the 6-9 N-terminal residues of Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide (OvCNP) and the 132-150 part of OvCNP precursor peptide, respectively. Heptapeptide 1, which is one of the primary components of the venom fluid (approximately 200 ng/microL), induced a significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in IMR-32 cells at 75 microM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the isolation of the N-terminal linear fragments of CNPs in any mammal.

  4. Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage within peptides via ultraviolet irradiation of an electrospray plume.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2013-05-21

    Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage in peptides was demonstrated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) plume using a low pressure mercury (LP-Hg) lamp. Tandem mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements confirmed that the primary reaction products were due to disulfide bond cleavage to form thiol (-SH) and sulfinyl radical (-SO˙). Mechanistic studies showed that the 185 nm emission from a LP-Hg lamp was responsible for UV photolysis of atmospheric O2, which further initiated secondary radical formation and subsequent disulfide bond cleavage by radical attack. The radical induced disulfide bond cleavage was found to be analytically useful in providing rich sequence information for naturally occurring peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds. The utility of this method was also demonstrated for facile disulfide peptide identification and characterization from protein digests.

  5. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells. DO11·10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2–/– background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA323−339) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4+ cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4+ T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA323−339 peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. PMID:17490400

  6. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-08-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells. DO11.10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2(-/-) background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA(323-339)) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4(+) cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4(+) T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA(323-339) peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells.

  7. Combination treatment with Grb7 peptide and Doxorubicin or Trastuzumab (Herceptin) results in cooperative cell growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pero, S C; Shukla, G S; Cookson, M M; Flemer, S; Krag, D N

    2007-05-21

    Grb7 has potential importance in the progression of cancer. We have previously identified a novel peptide that binds to the SH2 domain of Grb7 and inhibits its association with several different receptor tyrosine kinases. We have synthesised the Grb7 peptide, G7-18NATE, with two different cell penetrating peptides, Penetratin and Tat. In this study, we have shown that both Penetratin- and Tat-conjugated G7-18NATE peptides are able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. There was no significant effects on breast cancer MCF-7cells, non-malignant MCF 10A or 3T3 cells. In addition, there was no significant inhibition of proliferation by Penetratin or Tat alone or by their conjugates with arbitrary peptide sequence in any of the cell lines tested. We determined the EC50 of G7-18NATE-P peptide for SK-BR-3 cell proliferation to be 7.663 x 10(-6) M. Co-treatment of G7-18NATE-P peptide plus Doxorubicin in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells resulted in an additional inhibition of proliferation, resulting in 56 and 84% decreases in the Doxorubicin EC50 value in the presence of 5 x 10(-6) and 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide, respectively. Importantly, the co-treatment with Doxorubicin and the delivery peptide did not change the Doxorubicin EC50. Since Grb7 associates with ErbB2, we assessed whether the peptide inhibitor would have a combined effect with a molecule that targets ErbB2, Herceptin. Co-treatment of Herceptin plus 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide in SK-BR-3 cells resulted in a 46% decrease in the Herceptin EC50 value and no decrease following the co-treatment with Herceptin and penetratin alone. This Grb7 peptide has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent alone, in combination with traditional chemotherapy, or in combination with other targeting molecules.

  8. Laser-induced fabrication of gold nanoparticles on shellac-driven peptide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, Shradhey; Mishra, Narendra Kumar; Singh, Ramesh; Yadav, Santosh K. S.; Ballabh Joshi, Khashti

    2017-03-01

    This study demonstrates the synthesis of a new class of peptide amphiphiles derived from aleuritic acid. The aleuritic acid was extracted and purified from the natural source shellac, which was later conjugated with tryptophan, leading to a new class of very short peptide amphiphiles. The self-assembling behavior of this compound was studied using spectroscopic and microscopic tools. This shellac-driven peptide was further used to cultivate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the help of continuous wave (CW) laser light, where the AuNPs were encapsulated by peptide nanostructures. Laser irradiation caused nanoscopically confined heating in the AuNPs-peptide hybrid nanostructures. Such confined heating is mainly the result of scattering and simultaneous absorption of subwavelength power which is subjected to enhanced plasmonic resonances of the metal nanostructures. Hence, the generated heat power/photothermal effect of these AuNPs leads to disruption of the AuNP–peptide hybrids. Such light-induced prototype nano-structure hydrid devices have a wide range of thermal-plasmonic applications in the morphological modification of soft metal hybrid nanostructures for photothermal therapy and drug release.

  9. Bifunctional designed peptides induce mineralization and binding to TiO2.

    PubMed

    Gitelman, Anna; Rapaport, Hanna

    2014-04-29

    A limitation of titanium implants is the rather poor bonding between the metal and the surrounding tissue. In this research, we aimed at developing functional peptides in the form of monomolecular coatings intended to improve adhesion between the native oxide of the metal (TiO2) and the calcium-phosphate mineralization layer with which it is in contact. Accordingly, a bifunctional peptide with a β-strand motif assumed to strongly bind to the oxide through two phosphorylated serine residues, both situated on the same face of the strand, was designed. The β-strand motif was extended by a mineralization "tail" composed of consecutive acidic amino acids capable of adsorbing calcium ions. This peptide was studied together with two additional control peptides, one serving to elucidate the role of the β-strand in stabilizing bonding with the oxide and the other demonstrating the ability of the tail to induce mineralization. The strong adsorption of the three peptides to the oxide surface was revealed by HPLC. That peptide presenting the mineralization tail showed the highest levels of adsorbed calcium and phosphate ions, as well as the largest area of cellular adherence, demonstrating its potential advantages for use with titanium implants in bone tissue.

  10. Lipoproteins/peptides are sepsis-inducing toxins from bacteria that can be neutralized by synthetic anti-endotoxin peptides

    PubMed Central

    de Tejada, Guillermo Martinez; Heinbockel, Lena; Ferrer-Espada, Raquel; Heine, Holger; Alexander, Christian; Bárcena-Varela, Sergio; Goldmann, Torsten; Correa, Wilmar; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Gisch, Nicolas; Sánchez-Gómez, Susana; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Schürholz, Tobias; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a life-threatening syndrome with increasing incidence worldwide, is triggered by an overwhelming inflammation induced by microbial toxins released into the bloodstream during infection. A well-known sepsis-inducing factor is the membrane constituent of Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), signalling via Toll-like receptor-4. Although sepsis is caused in more than 50% cases by Gram-positive and mycoplasma cells, the causative compounds are still poorly described. In contradicting investigations lipoproteins/-peptides (LP), lipoteichoic acids (LTA), and peptidoglycans (PGN), were made responsible for eliciting this pathology. Here, we used human mononuclear cells from healthy donors to determine the cytokine-inducing activity of various LPs from different bacterial origin, synthetic and natural, and compared their activity with that of natural LTA and PGN. We demonstrate that LP are the most potent non-LPS pro-inflammatory toxins of the bacterial cell walls, signalling via Toll-like receptor-2, not only in vitro, but also when inoculated into mice: A synthetic LP caused sepsis-related pathological symptoms in a dose-response manner. Additionally, these mice produced pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of a septic reaction. Importantly, the recently designed polypeptide Aspidasept® which has been proven to efficiently neutralize LPS in vivo, inhibited cytokines induced by the various non-LPS compounds protecting animals from the pro-inflammatory activity of synthetic LP. PMID:26390973

  11. Inhibition of Hepatocyte Apoptosis: An Important Mechanism of Corn Peptides Attenuating Liver Injury Induced by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhili; Hou, Tao; Shi, Wen; Liu, Weiwei; He, Hui

    2015-09-11

    In this study, the effects of mixed corn peptides and synthetic pentapeptide (QLLPF) on hepatocyte apoptosis induced by ethanol were investigated in vivo. QLLPF, was previously characterized from corn protein hydrolysis, which had been shown to exert good facilitating alcohol metabolism activity. Mice were pre-treated with the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide for 1 week and then treated with ethanol. After treatment of three weeks, the biochemical indices and the key ethanol metabolizing enzymes, the serum TNF-α, liver TGF-β1 concentrations and the protein expressions related to apoptosis were determined. We found that the Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c expressions in the intrinsic pathway and the Fas, FasL and NF-κB expressions in the extrinsic pathway together with higher TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations were reversed compared with the model group by both the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide. The activation of caspase3 was also suppressed. Additionally, apoptosis was further confirmed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the TUNEL assay demonstrated peptides suppressed hepatocyte apoptosis. Our results suggest that apoptosis induced by ethanol is alleviated in response to the treatment of corn peptides, potentially due to reversing the related protein expression.

  12. Peptide scrambling during collision-induced dissociation is influenced by N-terminal residue basicity.

    PubMed

    Chawner, Ross; Holman, Stephen W; Gaskell, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2014-11-01

    'Bottom up' proteomic studies typically use tandem mass spectrometry data to infer peptide ion sequence, enabling identification of the protein whence they derive. The majority of such studies employ collision-induced dissociation (CID) to induce fragmentation of the peptide structure giving diagnostic b-, y-, and a- ions. Recently, rearrangement processes that result in scrambling of the original peptide sequence during CID have been reported for these ions. Such processes have the potential to adversely affect ion accounting (and thus scores from automated search algorithms) in tandem mass spectra, and in extreme cases could lead to false peptide identification. Here, analysis of peptide species produced by Lys-N proteolysis of standard proteins is performed and sequences that exhibit such rearrangement processes identified. The effect of increasing the gas-phase basicity of the N-terminal lysine residue through derivatization to homoarginine toward such sequence scrambling is then assessed. The presence of a highly basic homoarginine (or arginine) residue at the N-terminus is found to disfavor/inhibit sequence scrambling with a coincident increase in the formation of b(n-1)+H(2)O product ions. Finally, further analysis of a sequence produced by Lys-C proteolysis provides evidence toward a potential mechanism for the apparent inhibition of sequence scrambling during resonance excitation CID.

  13. Do inhalation general anesthetic drugs induce the neuronal release of endogenous opioid peptides?

    PubMed

    Quock, Raymond M; Vaughn, Linda K

    2005-10-07

    The antagonism of some effects of inhalation general anesthetic agents by naloxone suggests that there may be an opioid component to anesthetic action. There is evidence that this opioid action component is due to neuronal release of endogenous opioid peptides. The strongest evidence is provided by studies that monitor changes in the concentration of opioid peptides in the perfused brain following inhalation of the anesthetic. Indirect or circumstantial evidence also comes from studies of anesthetic effects on regional brain levels of opioid peptides, antagonism of selected anesthetic effects by antisera to opioid peptides and anesthetic-induced changes radioligand binding to opioid receptors. It is likely that some inhalation general anesthetics (e.g., nitrous oxide) can induce neuronal release of opioid peptides and that this may contribute to certain components of general anesthesia (e.g., analgesia). More definitive studies utilizing in vivo microdialysis or autoradiography in selected areas of the brain during induction and successive states of general anesthesia have yet to be conducted.

  14. Peptide-Lipid Interactions of the Stress-Response Peptide TisB That Induces Bacterial Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Prock, Sebastian; Reichert, Johannes; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Zimpfer, Benjamin; Bürck, Jochen; Berditsch, Marina; Elstner, Marcus; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial stress-response peptide TisB in Escherichia coli has been suggested to dissipate the transmembrane potential, such that the depletion of ATP levels induces the formation of dormant persister cells which can eventually form biofilms. We studied the structure and membrane interactions of TisB to find out whether it forms pores or other proton-selective channels. Circular dichroism revealed an amphiphilic α-helical structure when reconstituted in lipid vesicles, and oriented circular dichroism showed that the helix assumes a transmembrane alignment. The addition of TisB to dye-loaded vesicles caused leakage only at very high peptide concentration, notably with a Hill coefficient of 2, which suggests that dimers must be involved. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations showed that membrane binding of monomeric TisB is rapid and spontaneous, and transmembrane insertion is energetically feasible. When TisB oligomers are assembled as transmembrane pores, these channels collapse during the simulations, but transmembrane dimers are found to be stable. Given the pattern of charges on the amphiphilic TisB helix, we postulate that antiparallel dimers could be assembled via a ladder of salt bridges. This electrostatic charge-zipper could enable protons to pass along a wire of trapped water molecules across the hydrophobic membrane. PMID:23062338

  15. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypertension-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mark C; Katki, Khurshed A; Rao, Arundhati; Koehler, Michael; Patel, Parag; Spiekerman, Alvin; DiPette, Donald J; Supowit, Scott C

    2005-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, a potent vasodilator neuropeptide, is localized in perivascular sensory nerves. We have reported that alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout mice have elevated baseline blood pressure and enhanced hypertension-induced renal damage compared with wild-type controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the mechanism and functional significance of this increased hypertension-induced renal damage. We previously demonstrated by telemetric recording that the deoxycorticosterone-salt protocol produces a 35% increase in mean arterial pressure in both alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide knockout and wild-type mice. Both strains of mice were studied at 0, 14, and 21 days after deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension. Renal sections from hypertensive wild-type mice showed no pathological changes at any time point studied. However, on days 14 and 21, hypertensive knockout mice displayed progressive increases in glomerular proliferation, crescent formation, and tubular protein casts, as well as the inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. There was a significant increase in 24-hour urinary isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation, levels at days 14 and 21 in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Urinary microalbumin was significantly higher (2-fold) at day 21 and creatinine clearance was significantly decreased 4-fold in the hypertensive knockout compared with hypertensive wild-type mice. Therefore, in the absence of alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, deoxycorticosterone-salt hypertension induces enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and renal histopathologic damage, resulting in reduced renal function. Thus, sensory nerves, via alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide, appear to be renoprotective against hypertension-induced damage.

  16. Soy peptide-induced stem cell proliferation: involvement of ERK and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jienny; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Deokhoon

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the proliferative effect of vegetable soy peptides on adult stem cells (ASCs) in the absence of serum and their possible mechanisms of action. The proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSCs) treated with soy peptides was found to increase significantly upon 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Click-iT 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine flow cytometry assay. In addition, soy peptides led to stepwise phosphorylation of the p44/42 MAPK (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70 S6 kinase, S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in ADSCs. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the cytokines revealed that the production of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 increased significantly in response to treatment with soy peptides in both ADSCs and CB-MSCs. Similarly, soy peptide-induced phosphorylation of the ERK/mTOR/S6RP/eIF4E pathway was blocked in response to pretreatment with PD98059, a specific ERK inhibitor. Moreover, inhibition of TGF-β1 through PD98059 pretreatment and a consecutive decrease in ADSC proliferation revealed that TGF-β1 induces the phosphorylation of mTOR/S6RP/eIF4E. Collectively, the results of this study indicate that ERK-dependent production of TGF-β1 plays a crucial role in the soy peptide-induced proliferation of ADSCs under serum-free conditions.

  17. Mechanism of Membrane Permeation Induced by Synthetic β-Hairpin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Jang, Hyunbum; Harlen, Kevin; Puri, Anu; Nussinov, Ruth; Schneider, Joel P.; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the membrane destabilizing properties of synthetic amphiphilic cationic peptides, MAX1 and MAX35, which have the propensity to form β-hairpin structures under certain conditions, and a control non-β-hairpin-forming peptide MAX8V16E. All three peptides bind to liposomes containing a mixture of zwitterionic POPC and negatively charged POPS lipids as determined by Zeta potential measurements. Circular dichroism measurements indicated folding of MAX1 and MAX35 in the presence of the POPC/POPS liposomes, whereas no such folding was observed with MAX8V16E. There was no binding or folding of these peptides to liposomes containing only POPC. MAX1 and MAX35 induced release of contents from negatively charged liposomes, whereas MAX8V16E failed to promote solute release under identical conditions. Thus, MAX1 and MAX35 bind to, and fold at the surface of negatively charged liposomes adopting a lytic conformation. We ruled out leaky fusion as a mechanism of release by including 2 mol % PEG-PE in the liposomes, which inhibits aggregation/fusion but not folding of MAX or MAX-induced leakage. Using a concentration-dependent quenching probe (calcein), we determined that MAX-induced leakage of liposome contents was an all-or-none process. At MAX1 concentrations, which cause release of ∼50% of the liposomes that contain small (Rh <1.5 nm) markers, only ∼15% of those liposomes release a fluorescent dextran of 40 kDa. A multimeric model of the pore is presented based on these results. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that barrels consisting of 10 β-hairpin MAX1 and MAX35 peptides are relatively more stable than MAX8V16E barrels in the bilayer, suggesting that barrels of this size are responsible for the peptides lytic action. PMID:24209854

  18. The thrombin receptor extracellular domain contains sites crucial for peptide ligand-induced activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bahou, W F; Coller, B S; Potter, C L; Norton, K J; Kutok, J L; Goligorsky, M S

    1993-01-01

    A thrombin receptor (TR) demonstrating a unique activation mechanism has recently been isolated from a megakaryocytic (Dami) cell line. To further study determinants of peptide ligand-mediated activation phenomenon, we have isolated, cloned, and stably expressed the identical receptor from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) library. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a functional TR (CHO-TR), platelets, and HUVECs were then used to specifically characterize alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced activation responses using two different antibodies: anti-TR34-52 directed against a 20-amino acid peptide spanning the thrombin cleavage site, and anti-TR1-160 generated against the NH2-terminal 160 amino acids of the TR expressed as a chimeric protein in Escherichia coli. Activation-dependent responses to both alpha-thrombin (10 nM) and peptide ligand (20 microM) were studied using fura 2-loaded cells and microspectrofluorimetry. Whereas preincubation of CHO-TR with anti-TR34-52 abolished only alpha-thrombin-induced [Ca2+]i transients, preincubation with anti-TR1-160 abrogated both alpha-thrombin- and peptide ligand-induced responses. This latter inhibitory effect was dose dependent and similar for both agonists, with an EC50 of approximately 90 micrograms/ml. Anti-TR1-160 similarly abolished peptide ligand-induced [Ca2+]i transients in platelets and HUVECs, whereas qualitatively different responses characterized by delayed but sustained elevations in [Ca2+]i transients were evident using alpha-thrombin. Platelet aggregation to low concentrations of both ligands was nearly abolished by anti-TR1-160, although some shape change remained; anti-TR34-52 only inhibited alpha-thrombin-induced aggregation. These data establish that a critical recognition sequence for peptide ligand-mediated receptor activation is contained on the NH2-terminal portion of the receptor, upstream from the first transmembrane domain. Furthermore, alpha-thrombin-induced

  19. Peptide-induced emesis in dogs: possible relevance to radiation-induced emesis. Final report Oct 80-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.O.

    1982-09-01

    Results of earlier investigators indicate that radioemesis is mediated by some humoral agent(s). Peptides are likely candiates since they exert a number of biological effects and are released from storage sites by various stimuli, including radiation. Peptides at various concentrations were injected singly intravenously into conscious dogs, and the dog's emetic response was observed. Of the peptides tested, neurotensin, angiotensin II, vasopressin, oxytocin, and TRH produced consistent emetic responses. Inhibition of drug-induced emesis was studied both centrally (chlorpromazine) and peripherally (domperidone) acting dopamine antagonists. Results indicate inhibition by chlorpromazine, which crosses the blood brain barrier, but only partial blockade by domperidone, which does not cross the blood brain barrier. Preliminary studies were conducted attempting to characterize types of receptors on area postrema neurons. Single-cell recordings from these neurons, challenged by iontophoretic administration of various neurotransmitters, show stimulation by glutamic acid and serotonin and inhibiiton by norepinephrine.

  20. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L.; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state 2H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of a

  1. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  3. Vv-AMP1, a ripening induced peptide from Vitis vinifera shows strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Abré; Vivier, Melané A

    2008-01-01

    Background Latest research shows that small antimicrobial peptides play a role in the innate defense system of plants. These peptides typically contribute to preformed defense by developing protective barriers around germinating seeds or between different tissue layers within plant organs. The encoding genes could also be upregulated by abiotic and biotic stimuli during active defense processes. The peptides display a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities. Their potent anti-pathogenic characteristics have ensured that they are promising targets in the medical and agricultural biotechnology sectors. Results A berry specific cDNA sequence designated Vv-AMP1, Vitis vinifera antimicrobial peptide 1, was isolated from Vitis vinifera. Vv-AMP1 encodes for a 77 amino acid peptide that shows sequence homology to the family of plant defensins. Vv-AMP1 is expressed in a tissue specific, developmentally regulated manner, being only expressed in berry tissue at the onset of berry ripening and onwards. Treatment of leaf and berry tissue with biotic or abiotic factors did not lead to increased expression of Vv-AMP1 under the conditions tested. The predicted signal peptide of Vv-AMP1, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP), showed that the signal peptide allowed accumulation of its product in the apoplast. Vv-AMP1 peptide, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.495 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry. Recombinant Vv-AMP1 was extremely heat-stable and showed strong antifungal activity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogenic fungi, with very high levels of activity against the wilting disease causing pathogens Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The Vv-AMP1 peptide did not induce morphological changes on the treated fungal hyphae, but instead strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of Vv-AMP1 might be associated with altering the membrane permeability of the fungal

  4. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides induce cardiovascular collapse and sepsis-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla Ferreira; McCarthy, Cameron G; Szasz, Theodora; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Webb, R Clinton

    2015-04-01

    Fifty percent of trauma patients who present sepsis-like syndrome do not have bacterial infections. This condition is known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A unifying factor of SIRS and sepsis is cardiovascular collapse. Trauma and severe blood loss cause the release of endogenous molecules known as damage-associated molecular patterns. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) are damage-associated molecular patterns that share similarities with bacterial N-formylated peptides and are potent immune system activators. The goal of this study was to investigate whether F-MIT trigger SIRS, including hypotension and vascular collapse via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) activation. We evaluated cardiovascular parameters in Wistar rats treated with FPR or histamine receptor antagonists and inhibitors of the nitric oxide pathway before and after F-MIT infusion. F-MIT, but not nonformylated peptides or mitochondrial DNA, induced severe hypotension via FPR activation and nitric oxide and histamine release. Moreover, F-MIT infusion induced hyperthermia, blood clotting, and increased vascular permeability. To evaluate the role of leukocytes in F-MIT-induced hypotension, neutrophil, basophil, or mast cells were depleted. Depletion of basophils, but not neutrophils or mast cells, abolished F-MIT-induced hypotension. Rats that underwent hemorrhagic shock increased plasma levels of mitochondrial formylated proteins associated with lung damage and antagonism of FPR ameliorated hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury. Finally, F-MIT induced vasodilatation in isolated resistance arteries via FPR activation; however, F-MIT impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence of blood. These data suggest that F-MIT may be the link among trauma, SIRS, and cardiovascular collapse.

  5. A sleep-inducing peptide from the venom of the Indian cone snail Conus araneosus.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Jayaseelan Benjamin; Rajesh, Rajaian Pushpabai

    2015-09-01

    The marine snail Conus araneosus has unusual significance due to its confined distribution to coastal regions of southeast India and Sri Lanka. Due to its relative scarceness, this species has been poorly studied. In this work, we characterized the venom of C. araneosus to identify new venom peptides. We identified 14 novel compounds. We determined amino acid sequences from chemically-modified and unmodified crude venom using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ten sequences showed six Cys residues arranged in a pattern that is most commonly associated with the M-superfamily of conotoxins. Four other sequences had four Cys residues in a pattern that is most commonly associated with the T-superfamily of conotoxins. The post-translationally modified residue (pyroglutamate) was determined at the N-terminus of two sequences, ar3h and ar3i respectively. In addition, two sequences, ar3g and ar3h were C-terminally amidated. At a dose of 2 nmol, peptide ar3j elicited sleep when injected intraperitoneally into mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a peptide from a molluscivorous cone snail with sleep-inducing effects in mice. The novel peptides characterized herein extend the repertoire of unique peptides derived from cone snails and may add value to the therapeutic promise of conotoxins.

  6. A peptide mimotope of type 8 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide induces a protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Ulrike K; Lees, Andrew; Steinitz, Michael; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and a rising patient population at risk for infection due to impaired immunity underscore the importance of vaccination against pneumococci. However, available capsular polysaccharide vaccines are often poorly immunogenic in patients at risk for pneumococcal disease. The goal of this study was to explore the potential of peptide mimotopes to function as alternative vaccine antigens to elicit a type-specific antibody response to pneumococci. We used a human monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody (NAD) to type 8 Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (type 8 PS) to screen a phage display library, and the phage PUB1 displaying the peptide FHLPYNHNWFAL was selected after three rounds of biopanning. Inhibition studies with phage-displayed peptide or the peptide PUB1 and type 8 PS showed that PUB1 is a mimetic of type 8 PS. PUB1 conjugated to tetanus toxoid (PUB1-TT) induced a type 8 PS-specific antibody response in BALB/c mice, further defining it as a mimotope of type 8 PS. The administration of immune sera obtained from PUB1-TT-immunized mice earlier (days 14 and 21) and later (days 87 and 100) after primary and reimmunization resulted in a highly significant prolongation of the survival of naive mice after pneumococcal challenge compared to controls. The survival of PUB1-TT-immunized mice was also prolonged after pneumococcal challenge nearly 4 months after primary immunization. The efficacy of PUB1-TT-induced immune sera provides proof of principle that a mimotope-induced antibody response can protect against pneumococci and suggests that peptide mimotopes selected by type-specific human antibodies could hold promise as immunogens for pneumococci.

  7. Nucleosomal peptide epitopes for nephritis-inducing T helper cells of murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Nucleosome-specific T helper (Th) cells provide major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted, cognate help to nephritogenic antinuclear autoantibody-producing B cells in lupus. However, the lupus Th cells do not respond when components of the nucleosome, such as free DNA or histones, are individually presented by antigen-presenting cells. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the pathogenic Th cells are probably protected during uptake and processing of the native nucleosome particle as a whole. Therefore, herein we tested 145 overlapping peptides spanning all four core histones in the nucleosome. We localized three regions in core histones, one in H2B at amino acid position 10-33 (H2B(10-33)), and two in H4, at position 16- 39 (H4(16-39)) and position 71-94 (H4(71-94)), that contained the peptide epitopes recognized by the pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th cells of lupus. The peptide autoepitopes also triggered the pathogenic Th cells of (SWR x NZB)F1 lupus mice in vivo to induce the development of severe lupus nephritis. The nucleosomal autoepitopes stimulated the production of Th1-type cytokines, consistent with immunoglobulin IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 being the isotypes of nephritogenic autoantibodies induced in the lupus mice. Interestingly, the Th cell epitopes overlapped with regions in histones that contain B cell epitopes targeted by autoantibodies, as well as the sites where histones contact with DNA in the nucleosome. Identification of the disease-relevant autoepitopes in nucleosomes will help in understanding how the pathogenic Th cells of spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus emerge, and potentially lead to the development of peptide-based tolerogenic therapy for this major autoimmune disease. PMID:8676066

  8. Metacaspase-binding peptide inhibits heat shock-induced death in Leishmania (L.) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Mauricio S; Cabral, Guilherme C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Perez, Katia R; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2017-03-02

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is an important agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. This parasite faces cell death in some situations during transmission to the vertebrate host, and this process seems to be dependent on the activity of metacaspase (MCA), an enzyme bearing trypsin-like activity present in protozoans, plants and fungi. In fact, the association between MCA expression and cell death induced by different stimuli has been demonstrated for several Leishmania species. Regulators and natural substrates of MCA are poorly known. To fulfill this gap, we have employed phage display over recombinant L. (L.) amazonensis MCA to identify peptides that could interact with the enzyme and modulate its activity. Four peptides were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to MCA and interfere with its activity. One of these peptides, similar to ecotin-like ISP3 of L. (L.) major, decreases trypsin-like activity of promastigotes under heat shock, and significantly decreases parasite heat shock-induced death. These findings indicate that peptide ligands identified by phage display affect trypsin-like activity and parasite death, and that an endogenous peptidase inhibitor is a possible natural regulator of the enzyme.

  9. New example of proline-induced fragmentation in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of peptides.

    PubMed

    Maux, Delphine; Enjalbal, Christine; Martinez, Jean; Aubagnac, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    The positive ion electrospray ionization (ESI+) mass spectra of peptides usually display only protonated molecules provided that soft ionization conditions are applied (low cone voltage to prevent in-source dissociations). Such ions can be multiply charged depending on the molecular weight of the studied compounds. We have experienced an unexpected behavior during the ESI analysis of a modified peptide of relatively high mass (3079 Da). A specific fragmentation occurred even under soft energetic conditions, leading to a mass spectrum containing multiply charged molecular and fragment ions. The selective rupture involved the amide bond between the glutamic acid and proline residues (E-P sequence). The successive replacement of each amino acid by an alanine residue (positional scanning study) was undertaken to assess which part of the sequence induced such selective and abundant fragmentation on multiply charged species. The succession P-P was evidenced as the minimum unit giving rise to the first peptide bond rupture in the sequence X-P-P. Any acidic amino acid at the X position (X = D, E) favored the fragmentation by an intramolecular interaction. Such proline-induced fragmentation occurring readily in the source differed from the literature data on the specific behavior of proline-containing peptides where bond ruptures occur solely in dissociation conditions.

  10. Mitophagy induced by nanoparticle-peptide conjugates enabling an alternative intracellular trafficking route.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Yanqing; Liu, Jinyin; Xing, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Jun; Xu, Guoqiang; Kang, Zhenhui; Liu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular behaviors of nanoparticles are fundamentally important for the evaluation of their biosafety and the designs of nano carrier-assisted drug delivery with high therapeutic efficacy. It is still in a great need to discover how functionalized nanoparticles are transported inside the cells, for instance, in a complicated fashion of translocation between different types of cell organelles. Here we report a new understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles and cells by the development of polyoxometalates nanoparticle-peptide conjugates and investigation of their intracellular trafficking behaviors. The as-prepared nanoparticles are featured with a unique combination of fluorescence and high contrast for synchrotron X-ray-based imaging. Functional surface modification with peptides facilitates effective delivery of the nanoparticles onto the target organelle (mitochondria) and subsequent intracellular trafficking in a dynamic mode. Interestingly, our experimental results have revealed that autophagy of mitochondria (mitophagy) can be induced by NP-peptide as a cellular response for recycling the damaged organelles, through molecular mediation associated with the change of mitochondrial membrane potential. The biological effects induced by NP-peptide reciprocally affect the distribution patterns and fates of nanoparticles in the cell metabolism by providing an alternative route of intracellular trafficking. The new understanding of the mutual activities between nanoparticles and cells will enrich our approaches in the development of nanobiotechnology and nano-medicine for disease treatments.

  11. Ethyl ether fraction of Gastrodia elata Blume protects amyloid beta peptide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Moon, Kwang-Deog; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Han

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Recently, it has been reported that Alzheimer's disease is associated with cell death in neuronal cells including the hippocampus. Amyloid beta-peptide stimulates neuronal cell death, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop anti-dementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the effect of the herbal compound Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB) on neuronal cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The fractionation of GEB was carried out in various solvents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of the ethyl ether fraction was more potent than any other fractions. In cells treated with amyloid beta-peptide, the neuroprotective effect of the ethyl ether, chloroform, and butanol fractions was 92, 44, and 39%, respectively, compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that the ethyl ether fraction of GEB contains one or more compounds that dramatically reduce amyloid beta-peptide induced neuronal cell death in vitro.

  12. Photo-induced hydrogen production in a helical peptide incorporating a [FeFe] hydrogenase active site mimic.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindya; Madden, Christopher; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2012-10-11

    There is growing interest in the development of hydrogenase mimics for solar fuel production. Here, we present a bioinspired mimic designed by anchoring a diiron hexacarbonyl cluster to a model helical peptide via an artificial dithiol amino acid. The [FeFe]-peptide complex catalyses photo-induced production of hydrogen in water.

  13. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  14. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  15. Hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins [(gamma-glutamylcysteine)n-serine] are metal-induced peptides of the Poaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Klapheck, S; Fliegner, W; Zimmer, I

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of several species of the family Poaceae to cadmium results in the formation of metal-induced peptides of the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Ser (n=2-4). They are assumed to be formed from hydroxymethyl-glutathione (gamma-Glu-Cys-Ser) and are termed hydroxymethyl-phytochelatins (hm-PCs) in analogy to the homo-phytochelatins [(gamma-Glu-Cys)n-beta-Ala], discovered in legumes, and the phytochelatins [PCs, (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly] found in most other plants and many fungi. The hm-PCs were isolated from the roots of cadmium-exposed rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Strella), and their structure was confirmed by amino acid analysis after total and enzymic hydrolysis and by tandem mass spectrometry. The hm-PCs probably play a significant role in heavy metal detoxication in rice. In addition to this new form of gamma-Glu-Cys (gamma EC) peptide, PCs and gamma EC peptides without C-terminal Ser or Gly are found. All gamma EC peptides are synthesized without delay after incubation of rice plants in 100 microM CdCl2 in the roots as well as in the shoots. Incubation times exceeding 24 h or higher concentrations of cadmium result in a selective enrichment of gamma EC peptides with higher chain length and an increased ratio of PCs to hm-PCs. gamma EC peptide synthesis is accompanied by a decrease of the glutathione content and an increase of the hydroxymethyl-glutathione content in roots and shoots of rice plants. PMID:8016264

  16. Peptides derived from cardiovascular G-protein-coupled receptors induce morphological cardiomyopathic changes in immunized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Matsui, S; Fu, M L; Katsuda, S; Hayase, M; Yamaguchi, N; Teraoka, K; Kurihara, T; Takekoshi, N; Murakami, E; Hoebeke, J; Hjalmarson, A

    1997-02-01

    An experimental model of early-stage cardiomyopathy was created by immunizing rabbits for 1 year with synthetic peptides corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of either beta-adrenoceptors or M2-muscarinic receptors. Thirty male rabbits were used and divided into three groups: a control group (n = 10), a group immunized with the peptide corresponding to the beta-adrenoceptor (beta 1 group) (n = 10) and a group immunized with the peptide corresponding to the M2-muscarinic receptor (M2 group) (n = 10). If the sera from both groups of immunized rabbits high-titres of anti-peptide antibodies were found throughout the study period but not in the sera from control rabbits or in the preimmune sera of immunized rabbits. No significant cross-reaction with peptides other than those used for immunization was found. The myocardial receptor density of both immunized groups displayed a strong trend toward receptor up-regulation. This was significant in the beta 1 group but not in the M2 group. Both groups of immunized rabbits displayed significantly enlarged ventricles and thinner walls, as compared with the control group. However, in contrast to the beta 1 group, which showed enlarged cavities in both left and right ventricles, the M2 group was mainly affected in the right ventricles. Moreover, morphological examinations of the hearts of rabbits from both immunized groups demonstrated focal myofibrillar lysis, loss of myofilament, mitochondrial swelling and condensation, sarcoplasmic vacuolation, deposition of dense granules in the sarcoplasm and the myofibrils. One of the sex control rabbit hearts which were examined showed mild degenerative changes in the myocardium and scant mononuclear cell infiltration. However, when all the control rabbit hearts were examined by electron microscopy, no significant alterations were found. These results suggest that immunization by peptides, corresponding to the target sequences for anti-receptor autoantibodies in

  17. A Novel Intracellular Peptide Derived from G1/S Cyclin D2 Induces Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Christiane B.; Russo, Lilian C.; Castro, Leandro M.; Forti, Fábio L.; do Monte, Elisabete R.; Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Colquhoun, Alison; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular peptides are constantly produced by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and many are probably functional. Here, the peptide WELVVLGKL (pep5) from G1/S-specific cyclin D2 showed a 2-fold increase during the S phase of HeLa cell cycle. pep5 (25–100 μm) induced cell death in several tumor cells only when it was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (pep5-cpp), suggesting its intracellular function. In vivo, pep5-cpp reduced the volume of the rat C6 glioblastoma by almost 50%. The tryptophan at the N terminus of pep5 is essential for its cell death activity, and N terminus acetylation reduced the potency of pep5-cpp. WELVVL is the minimal active sequence of pep5, whereas Leu-Ala substitutions totally abolished pep5 cell death activity. Findings from the initial characterization of the cell death/signaling mechanism of pep5 include caspase 3/7 and 9 activation, inhibition of Akt2 phosphorylation, activation of p38α and -γ, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Further pharmacological analyses suggest that pep5 can trigger cell death by distinctive pathways, which can be blocked by IM-54 or a combination of necrostatin-1 and q-VD-OPh. These data further support the biological and pharmacological potential of intracellular peptides. PMID:24764300

  18. Detection of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides via skimmer collision-induced dissociation/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zolodz, Melissa D; Wood, Karl V

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an important post-translational protein modification in cellular response to environmental change and occurs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identification of the amino acid on individual proteins that become phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimulus is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the intracellular signals that these modifications facilitate. Most protein kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine or tyrosine. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is often the least abundant of the three major phosphorylation sites, it is important owing to its role in signal pathways. Currently available methods for the identification of phosphorylation sites can often miss low levels of tyrosine phosphorylations. This paper describes a method for the identification of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides using electrospray ionization on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Skimmer-activated collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to generate the phosphotyrosine immonium ion at m/z 216. This method is gentle enough that the protonated molecule of the intact peptide is still observed. In-trap CID was employed for the verification of the phosphotyrosine immonium ion. Using this technique, low levels of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides can be identified from peptide mixtures separated by nanoflow micro liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  19. Oral dosing with multi-antigenic construct induces atheroprotective immune tolerance to individual peptides in mice.

    PubMed

    Mundkur, Lakshmi; Ponnusamy, Thiruvelselvan; Philip, Sheena; Rao, Lakshmi Narasimha; Biradar, Suryakant; Deshpande, Vrushali; Kumar, Ramesh; Lu, Xinjie; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory immune response to self-antigens plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Restoring immune tolerance to self-proteins reduces the pro-inflammatory response. We previously showed that oral tolerance to a combination of two peptides is atheroprotective. In the present study we expressed epitopes from apolipoprotein B 100 (ApoB), human heat shock protein (HSP60) and Chlamydia pneumonia outer membrane protein (Cpn) in a single protein scaffold and used this multi-antigenic construct to induce tolerance to individual peptides by oral route in ApoBtm2Sgy/Ldlrtm1Her/J mice. Antigen specific tolerance to individual peptides was observed in treated animals as seen by an increase in regulatory T cells. Tolerance to the peptides resulted in a 46.5% (p=0.002) reduction in the development of atherosclerosis compared with control. Atheroprotection was associated with a significant (p<0.05) decrease in plaque inflammation and an increase in the expression of immune regulatory markers in the aorta. CD11c+ cells coexpressing CD11b and CD103 increased in lymphoid organs and were found to activate regulatory T cells and reduce effector T-cell response. Adoptive transfer of CD11c+ cells was atheroprotective. Our results suggest that atheroprotection by oral tolerance to a multi-antigenic construct is mediated by antigen specific regulatory T cells and CD11c+ cells with immune regulatory properties.

  20. Identification of salt-inducible peptide with putative kinase activity in halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mahmoud-Reza; Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Yoosefi, Mitra; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Ali

    2007-09-01

    Strain XII, a moderately halophilic bacterium, expressed a peptide in response to saline media. This peptide was designated as salt-inducible factor (Sif-A). The purpose of this study is to describe Sif-A, which might be involved in the osmoresistance mechanism of strain XII. The complete sequence of sif-A was determined using PCR. sif-A codes for a polypeptide of 20.518 kDa. The polypeptide has a putative signal peptide of 27 amino acids (2.667 kDa) preceding the mature protein (17.869 kDa). Motif analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that there is a p-loop NTPase domain on the C-terminal of the peptide, which might correlate with its function. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed phylogenetically to classify strain XII. This organism was found to have the closest association with Virgibacillus halodenitrificans, which was proven by its phenotypic characteristics.

  1. A mimotope from a solid-phase peptide library induces a measles virus-neutralizing and protective antibody response.

    PubMed

    Steward, M W; Stanley, C M; Obeid, O E

    1995-12-01

    A solid-phase 8-mer random combinatorial peptide library was used to generate a panel of mimotopes of an epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody to the F protein of measles virus (MV). An inhibition immunoassay was used to show that these peptides were bound by the monoclonal antibody with different affinities. BALB/c mice were coimmunized with the individual mimotopes and a T-helper epitope peptide (from MV fusion protein), and the reactivity of the induced anti-mimotope antibodies with the corresponding peptides and with MV was determined. The affinities of the antibodies with the homologous peptides ranged from 8.9 x 10(5) to 4.4 x 10(7) liters/mol. However, only one of the anti-mimotope antibodies cross-reacted with MV in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and inhibited MV plaque formation. Coimmunization of mice with this mimotope and the T-helper epitope peptide induced an antibody response which conferred protection against fatal encephalitis induced following challenge with MV and with the structurally related canine distemper virus. These results indicate that peptide libraries can be used to identify mimotopes of conformational epitopes and that appropriate immunization with these mimotopes can induce protective antibody responses.

  2. Participation of opioid peptides in sucking-induced oxytocin and prolactin secretions in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Bruna, F A; de Di Nasso, E G; Soaje, M; Deis, R P; Carón, R W

    2010-10-01

    The role of opioid peptides in the secretion of oxytocin (OT) and prolactin (PRL) induced by sucking was studied in goats. Seven goats were isolated with their kids (four singletons and three twins) in individual corrals 3-4 weeks after parturition. On day 1 of the experiment, the kids were separated from the does for 7 h and were weighed before and 15 min after being reunited with their mothers to assess the amount of milk obtained by sucking. The does were blood-sampled 10 min before and at the end of the sucking period. On day 2, a similar protocol was followed, but naloxone was given immediately after the first blood sample. On day 3, the protocol was repeated but saline vehicle was injected instead of naloxone. On day 5, the naloxone experiment was repeated as on day 2. Milk ejection was evaluated as the difference in the weight of the kids before and after sucking for 15 min, and the maternal serum levels of OT and PRL were measured by radioimmunoassay. A significant decrease in the weight gain of the kids was obtained when the mothers were treated with naloxone on day 2. Consistently, serum levels of OT and PRL induced by sucking were significantly reduced; indicating that sucking-induced OT secretion for milk ejection in lactating goats is facilitated by opioid peptides. In a second experiment performed in the same animals 10 days later, the administration of OT, immediately after naloxone administration, prevented the decrease in the weight gain induced by naloxone, suggesting that the effect of the opioid antagonist on milk ejection in goats is a result of a reduced OT secretion. The results of this study confirm the importance of sucking-induced OT secretion for milk ejection in lactating goats, and indicate that OT and PRL secretion are regulated by opioid peptides in this species.

  3. Applying Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Investigate Peptide-Induced Membrane Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain information about whether leakage occurs due to localized membrane perturbations or global membrane destabilization. Here, we outline a detailed step-by-step protocol on how to optimally implement an FCS-based leakage assay. To make the protocol easily accessible to other researchers, it has been supplemented with a number of practical tips and tricks.

  4. Natriuretic peptide type C induces sperm attraction for fertilization in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Nana; Xu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yakun; Hao, Xiaoqiong; Zhao, Yu; Qiao, Jie; Xia, Guoliang; Zhang, Meijia

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa undergo selective movement along the isthmus of the oviduct to the ampulla during ovulation, which is a prerequisite for fertilization. The factor(s) that involves in selective spermatozoa movement is still unknown. In this study, we found that the oviductal epithelium in mouse ampulla expressed high levels of natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC) in the presence of ovulated oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs). Spermatozoa expressed NPPC receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2, a guanylyl cyclase) on the midpiece of flagellum. NPPC increased intracellular levels of cGMP and Ca2+ of spermatozoa, and induced sperm accumulation in the capillary by attraction. Importantly, spermatozoa from Npr2 mutant mice were not attracted by NPPC, preventing fertilization in vivo. Oocyte-derived paracrine factors promoted the expression of Nppc mRNA in the ampulla. Therefore, NPPC secreted by oviductal ampulla attracts spermatozoa towards oocytes, which is essential for fertilization. PMID:28054671

  5. Representing environment-induced helix-coil transitions in a coarse grained peptide model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Globisch, Christoph; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Coarse grained (CG) models are widely used in studying peptide self-assembly and nanostructure formation. One of the recurrent challenges in CG modeling is the problem of limited transferability, for example to different thermodynamic state points and system compositions. Understanding transferability is generally a prerequisite to knowing for which problems a model can be reliably used and predictive. For peptides, one crucial transferability question is whether a model reproduces the molecule's conformational response to a change in its molecular environment. This is of particular importance since CG peptide models often have to resort to auxiliary interactions that aid secondary structure formation. Such interactions take care of properties of the real system that are per se lost in the coarse graining process such as dihedral-angle correlations along the backbone or backbone hydrogen bonding. These auxiliary interactions may then easily overstabilize certain conformational propensities and therefore destroy the ability of the model to respond to stimuli and environment changes, i.e. they impede transferability. In the present paper we have investigated a short peptide with amphiphilic EALA repeats which undergoes conformational transitions between a disordered and a helical state upon a change in pH value or due to the presence of a soft apolar/polar interface. We designed a base CG peptide model that does not carry a specific (backbone) bias towards a secondary structure. This base model was combined with two typical approaches of ensuring secondary structure formation, namely a C α -C α -C α -C α pseudodihedral angle potential or a virtual site interaction that mimics hydrogen bonding. We have investigated the ability of the two resulting CG models to represent the environment-induced conformational changes in the helix-coil equilibrium of EALA. We show that with both approaches a CG peptide model can be obtained that is environment-transferable and that

  6. Charge States of y Ions in the Collision-Induced Dissociation of Doubly Charged Tryptic Peptide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E.

    2011-05-01

    Bonds that break in collision-induced dissociation (CID) are often weakened by a nearby proton, which can, in principle, be carried away by either of the product fragments. Since peptide backbone dissociation is commonly charge-directed, relative intensities of charge states of product y- and b-ions depend on the final location of that proton. This study examines y-ion charge distributions for dissociation of doubly charged peptide ions, using a large reference library of peptide ion fragmentation generated from ion-trap CID of peptide ions from tryptic digests. Trends in relative intensities of y2+ and y1+ ions are examined as a function of bond cleavage position, peptide length (n), residues on either side of the bond and effects of residues remote from the bond. It is found that yn-2/b2 dissociation is the most sensitive to adjacent amino acids, that y2+/y1+ steadily increase with increasing peptide length, that the N-terminal amino acid can have a major influence in all dissociations, and in some cases other residues remote from the bond cleavage exert significant effects. Good correlation is found between the values of y2+/y1+ for the peptide and the proton affinities of the amino acids present at the dissociating peptide bond. A few deviations from this correlation are rationalized by specific effects of the amino acid residues. These correlations can be used to estimate trends in y2+/y1+ ratios for peptide ions from amino acid proton affinities.

  7. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24176852

  8. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence peptide-based biosensor for the determination of prostate-specific antigen based on target-induced cleavage of peptide.

    PubMed

    Qi, Honglan; Li, Min; Dong, Manman; Ruan, Sanpeng; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2014-02-04

    A novel electrogenerated chemiluminescence peptide-based biosensor (ECL-PB) for the determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was developed on the basis of target-induced cleavage of a specific peptide within Nafion film incorporated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and ECL emitting species. A specific peptide (CHSSKLQK) was used as a molecular recognition element; tris(2,2'-ripyridine) dichlororuthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) was used as ECL emitting species, and ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc) was employed as ECL quencher. The ECL-PB biosensor was fabricated by casting the mixture of Nafion and AuNPs onto the surface of glassy carbon electrode to form AuNPs/Nafion film, and then, Ru(bpy)3(2+) was electrostatically adsorbed into the AuNPs/Nafion film; finally, the peptide-tagged with ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc-peptide) was self-assembled onto the surface of the AuNPs. When PSA was present, it specifically cleaved the Fc-peptide, leading the quencher to leave the electrode and resulting in the increase of the ECL intensity obtained from the resulted electrode in 0.1 M phosphate buffer saline (pH 7.4) containing tri-n-propylamine. The results showed that the increased ECL intensity was directly linear to the logarithm of the concentration of PSA in the range from 5.0 × 10(-12) to 5.0 × 10(-9) g/mL. An extremely low detection limit of 8 × 10(-13) g/mL was achieved because of the signal amplification through AuNPs and the ECL background suppression through Fc as ECL quencher. This work demonstrates that the combination of the direct transduction of peptide cleavage events with the highly sensitive ECL method is a promising strategy for the design of enzymatic cleavage-based ECL biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  10. An Analog of the Antimicrobial Peptide CopA5 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, I Na; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2017-02-28

    We previously reported that the CopA3 peptide (LLCIALRKK, D-form) originally isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial and immunosuppressive effects. However, the high cost of producing the synthetic peptide, especially the D-form, has limited the development of CopA3 for therapeutic purposes. Here, we investigated whether the CopA3 deletion derivative, CopA5, which is composed of only five amino acids (LLCIA) and has the L-form structure, could inhibit the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of macrophages. Peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) were isolated from mice and exposed to LPS in the presence or absence of CopA5, and biomarkers of macrophage activation were measured. Our results revealed that LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion, and phagocytic activity of PEM were significantly inhibited by CopA5 treatment. Similar to CopA3, the structurally modified CopA5 peptide had no cell toxicity (as assessed by measurement of cell viability loss and apoptosis) in PEM. Moreover, the LPS-induced upregulation of the activating phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) was markedly inhibited by CopA5 treatment. These results suggest that, similar to CopA3, CopA5 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation and blocking the release of NO and TNF-α. CopA5 may therefore prove therapeutically useful in the realm of immune suppression.

  11. Stress-induced analgesia and endogenous opioid peptides: the importance of stress duration.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Drupad; Hamid, Abdul; Friedman, Theodore C; Nguyen, Khanh; Tseng, Andy; Marquez, Paul; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2011-01-15

    Stress is known to elicit pain relief, a phenomenon referred to as stress-induced analgesia. Based on stress parameters, opioid and non-opioid intrinsic pain inhibitory systems can be activated. In the present study, we assessed whether changing the duration of stress would affect the involvement of endogenous opioids in antinociception elicited by swim in warm water (32 °C), known to be opioid-mediated. Using mice lacking beta-endorphin, enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates, we assessed the role of each opioid peptide in antinociception induced by a short (3 min) vs. long (15 min) swim. Mice were tested for baseline hot plate latency, exposed to swim (3 or 15 min) in warm water (32 °C) and then tested for antinociception at 5, 15 and 30 min. Our results revealed that both swim paradigms induced significant antinociception in wild-type mice. However, the short swim failed to induce antinociception in beta-endorphin-deficient mice, illustrating that beta-endorphin is important in this form of stress-induced antinociception. On the other hand, antinociception elicited by the long swim was only slightly reduced in beta-endorphin-deficient mice despite pretreatment with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the antinociception elicited by the long swim. Nevertheless, a delayed hyperalgesic response developed in mice lacking beta-endorphin following exposure to either swim paradigm. On the other hand, mice lacking enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates expressed a comparable antinociceptive response and did not exhibit the delayed hyperalgesic response. Together, our results suggest that the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin not only mediates antinociception induced by the short swim but also prevents the delayed hyperalgesic response elicited by either swim paradigm.

  12. Stress-induced analgesia and endogenous opioid peptides: the importance of stress duration

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Drupad; Hamid, Abdul; Friedman, Theodore C.; Nguyen, Khanh; Tseng, Andy; Marquez, Paul; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2010-01-01

    Stress is known to elicit pain relief, a phenomenon referred to as stress-induced analgesia. Based on stress parameters, opioid and non-opioid intrinsic pain inhibitory systems can be activated. In the present study, we assessed whether changing the duration of stress would affect the involvement of endogenous opioids in antinociception elicited by swim in warm water (32°C), known to be opioid-mediated. Using mice lacking beta-endorphin, enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates, we assessed the role of each opioid peptide in antinociception induced by a short (3 min) vs. long (15 min) swim. Mice were tested for baseline hot plate latency, exposed to swim (3 or 15 min) in warm water (32°C) and then tested for antinociception at 5, 15 and 30 min. Our results revealed that both swim paradigms induced significant antinociception in wild-type mice. However, the short swim failed to induce antinociception in beta-endorphin-deficient mice, illustrating that beta-endorphin is important in this form of stress-induced antinociception. On the other hand, antinociception elicited by the long swim was only slightly reduced in beta-endorphin-deficient mice despite pretreatment with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the antinociception elicited by the long swim. Nevertheless, a delayed hyperalgesic response developed in mice lacking beta-endorphin following exposure to either swim paradigm. On the other hand, mice lacking enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates expressed a comparable antinociceptive response and did not exhibit the delayed hyperalgesic response. Together, our results suggest that the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin not only mediates antinociception induced by the short swim but also prevents the delayed hyperalgesic response elicited by either swim paradigm. PMID:21044625

  13. Mystixin-7 Peptide Protects Ionotropic Glutamatergic Mechanisms against Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactivation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) causes glutamate excitotoxicity, a process potentially important for many neurological diseases. This study aims to investigate protective effects of the synthetic corticotrophin-releasing factor-like peptide, mystixin-7 (MTX), on model glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in vitro. The technique online monitoring of electrophysiological parameters (excitatory glutamatergic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPAR) and NMDAR-dependent postsynaptic mechanisms) in the olfactory cortex slices was used. Application of L-glutamate in toxic concentration (20 mM) on slices evoked hyperactivation of NMDARs and weaker activation of the AMPARs. Upon further action agonist, the excessive activation of glutamate receptors was replaced by their irreversible blockade. Pretreatment of the slices using MTX in different concentrations (50 and 100 mg/mL) protected both NMDARs and AMPARs from glutamate-induced damage. An enzymatic treatment of MTX reduced hyperactivation of both NMDARs and AMPARs. The present study demonstrated that MTX minipeptide protected the functioning of both NMDARs and AMPARs against glutamate-induced damage. The MTX peptide is a prospective candidate for elaborated medication in treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:27504123

  14. Smac therapeutic Peptide nanoparticles inducing apoptosis of cancer cells for combination chemotherapy with Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingxing; Liu, Peng; Gao, Guanhui; Deng, Jizhe; Pan, Zhengyin; Wu, Xu; Xie, Gaofeng; Yue, Caixia; Cho, Chi Hin; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-04-22

    Smac-conjugated nanoparticle (Smac-NP) was designed to induce the apoptosis of cancer cells and as a drug carrier for combination therapy. It contained three parts, a SmacN7 peptide which could induce apoptosis of cancer cells by interacting with XIAPs, the cell penetrating domain rich in arginine, and four hydrophobic tails for self-assembled Smac-NP. We demonstrated that Smac-NPs exerted an antitumor effect in breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and nonsmall lung cancer (NSCLC) cell H460, which efficiently inhibited cancer cells proliferation without influencing normal liver cell lines LO2. Smac-NPs also significantly induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 and H460 cells through activating pro-caspase-3, down-regulating the expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and up-regulating the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Furthermore, Smac-NPs could be explored as a drug delivery system to load hydrophobic drug such as DOX for combination therapy. The DOX-loaded nanoparticles (DOX-Smac-NPs) exhibited higher cellular uptake efficiency and antitumor effect. Our work provided a new insight into therapeutic peptides integrated with drug simultaneously in one system for cancer combination treatment.

  15. Small-molecule inducers of Aβ-42 peptide production share a common mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Bettayeb, Karima; Oumata, Nassima; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wenjie; Bustos, Victor; Galons, Hervé; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent; Flajolet, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The pathways leading specifically to the toxic Aβ42 peptide production, a key event in Alzheimer's disease (AD), are unknown. While searching for pathways that mediate pathological increases of Aβ42, we identified Aftin-4, a new compound that selectively and potently increases Aβ42 compared to DMSO (N2a cells: 7-fold; primary neurons: 4-fold; brain lysates: 2-fold) with an EC50 of 30 μM. These results were confirmed by ELISA and IP-WB. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified 3 proteins (VDAC1, prohibitin, and mitofilin) relevant to AD that interact with Aftin-4, but not with a structurally similar but inactive molecule. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Aftin-4 induces a reversible mitochondrial phenotype reminiscent of the one observed in AD brains. Sucrose gradient fractionation showed that Aftin-4 perturbs the subcellular localization of γ-secretase components and could, therefore, modify γ-secretase specificity by locally altering its membrane environment. Remarkably, Aftin-4 shares all these properties with two other “AD accelerator” compounds. In summary, treatment with three Aβ42 raising agents induced similar biochemical alterations that lead to comparable cellular phenotypes in vitro, suggesting a common mechanism of action involving three structural cellular targets.—Bettayeb, K., Oumata, N., Zhang, Y., Luo, W., Bustos, V., Galons, H., Greengard, P., Meijer, L., Flajolet, M. Small-molecule inducers of Aβ-42 peptide production share a common mechanism of action. PMID:22972917

  16. Cafestol, a coffee-specific diterpene, induces peripheral antinociception mediated by endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Luciana S; Perez, Andrea C; Romero, Thiago Rl; Azevedo, Adolfo O; Duarte, Igor Dg

    2012-05-01

    The opioid peptides have been implicated in peripheral antinociception induced by non-opioidergic compounds, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and α(2) -adrenoceptor agonists. The aims of the present study were to investigate the possible peripheral antinociceptive effect of cafestol, a diterpene present in the oil derived from coffee beans, and to evaluate the involvement of opioid peptides in its effect. The rat paw pressure test was used to assess antinocipeptive effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E(2) (2 μg/paw). All drugs were locally administered into the hind-paws of male Wistar rats. Intraplantar injection of cafestol (20, 40 and 80 μg) induced peripheral antinociception. The antinociceptive effect of cafestol was due to a local action because the higher dose (80 μg/paw) did not produce any effect in the contralateral paw. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (25, 50 and 100 μg/paw) prevented the action of cafestol (80 μg/paw), whereas the aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin (400 μg/paw) potentiated the antinociceptive effect of cafestol (40 μg/paw). The results of the present study provide evidence that cafestol treatment has a peripheral antinociceptive effect and suggest that this effect is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids.

  17. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  18. Comparison of infrared multiphoton dissociation and collision-induced dissociation of supercharged peptides in ion traps.

    PubMed

    Madsen, James A; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-03-01

    The number and types of diagnostic ions obtained by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were evaluated for supercharged peptide ions created by electrospray ionization of solutions spiked with m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. IRMPD of supercharged peptide ions increased the sequence coverage compared with that obtained by CID for all charge states investigated. The number of diagnostic ions increased with the charge state for IRMPD; however, this trend was not consistent for CID because the supercharged ions did not always yield the greatest number of diagnostic ions. Significantly different fragmentation pathways were observed for the different charge states upon CID or IRMPD with the latter yielding far more immonium ions and often fewer uninformative ammonia, water, and phosphoric acid neutral losses. Pulsed-Q dissociation resulted in an increase in the number of internal product ions, a decrease in sequence-informative ions, and reduced overall ion abundances. The enhanced sequence coverage afforded by IRMPD of supercharged ions was demonstrated for a variety of model peptides, as well as for a tryptic digest of cytochrome c.

  19. Unusual Fragmentation of Pro-Ser/Thr-Containing Peptides Detected in Collision-Induced Dissociation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2012-04-01

    During collision-induced dissociation (CID)-, phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptides frequently undergo neutral loss of phosphoric acid. Subsequent amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the site of phosphorylation results in a y ion with a mass 18 Da lower than the corresponding unmodified y fragment. We report here that when the phosphoserine or phosphothreonine is directly preceded by a proline, an unusual fragment with a mass 10 Da higher than the corresponding unmodified y ion is frequently observed. Accurate mass measurements are consistent with elimination of the phosphoric acid followed by fragmentation between the α carbon and the carbonyl group of the proline residue. We propose a cyclic oxazoline structure for this fragment. Our observation may be explained by the charge-directed SN2 neighboring group participation reaction proposed for the phosphoric acid elimination by Palumbo et al. [Palumbo, A. M., Tepe, J. J., Reid, G. E. Mechanistic Insights into the Multistage Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Phosphoserine- and Phosphothreonine-Containing Peptides. J. Protein Res. 7(2), 771-779 (2008)]. Considering such specific fragment ions for confirmation purposes after regular database searches may boost the confidence of peptide identifications as well as phosphorylation site assignments.

  20. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  1. Production of phytotoxic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells using inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes.

  2. Comparison of Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Collision Induced Dissociation of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize the fragmentation pathways promoted by ultraviolet photoexcitation in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), six adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides in a range of charge states were subjected to 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), 193 nm UVPD, and CID. Similar fragment ions and distributions were observed for 266 nm UVPD and 193 nm UVPD for all peptides investigated. While both UVPD and CID led to preferential cleavage of the Y-S bond for all ACTH peptides [except ACTH (1-39)], UVPD was far less dependent on charge state and location of basic sites for the production of C-terminal and N-terminal ions. For ACTH (1-16), ACTH (1-17), ACTH (1-24), and ACTH (1-39), changes in the distributions of fragment ion types ( a, b, c, x, y, z, and collectively N-terminal ions versus C-terminal ions) showed only minor changes upon UVPD for all charge states. In contrast, CID displayed significant changes in the fragment ion type distributions as a function of charge state, an outcome consistent with the dependence on the number and location of mobile protons that is not prominent for UVPD. Sequence coverages obtained by UVPD showed less dependence on charge state than those determined by CID, with the latter showing a consistent decrease in coverage as charge state increased.

  3. Production of Phytotoxic Cationic α-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides in Plant Cells Using Inducible Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Company, Nuri; Nadal, Anna; Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes. PMID:25387106

  4. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic–inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  5. Membrane aggregation and perturbation induced by antimicrobial peptide of S-thanatin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Guoqiu; Wu, Hongbin; Li, Linxian; Fan, Xiaobo; Ding, Jiaxuan; Li, Xiaofang; Xi, Tao; Shen, Zilong

    2010-04-23

    Thanatin, a 21-residue peptide, is an inducible insect peptide. In our previous study, we have identified a novel thanatin analog of S-thanatin, which exhibited a broad antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi with low hemolytic activity. This study was aimed to delineate the antimicrobial mechanism of S-thanatin and identify its interaction with bacterial membranes. In this study, membrane phospholipid was found to be the target for S-thanatin. In the presence of vesicles, S-thanatin interestingly led to the aggregation of anionic vesicles and sonicated bacteria. Adding S-thanatin to Escherichia coli suspension would result in the collapse of membrane and kill bacteria. The sensitivity assay of protoplast elucidated the importance of outer membrane (OM) for S-thanatin's antimicrobial activity. Compared with other antimicrobial peptide, S-thanatin produced chaotic membrane morphology and cell debris in electron microscopic appearance. These results supported our hypothesis that S-thanatin bound to negatively charged LPS and anionic lipid, impeded membrane respiration, exhausted the intracellular potential, and released periplasmic material, which led to cell death.

  6. PR1 peptide vaccine induces specific immunity with clinical responses in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Qazilbash, M H; Wieder, E; Thall, P F; Wang, X; Rios, R; Lu, S; Kanodia, S; Ruisaard, K E; Giralt, S A; Estey, E H; Cortes, J; Komanduri, K V; Clise-Dwyer, K; Alatrash, G; Ma, Q; Champlin, R E; Molldrem, J J

    2017-03-01

    PR1, an HLA-A2-restricted peptide derived from both proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase, is recognized on myeloid leukemia cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that preferentially kill leukemia and contribute to cytogenetic remission. To evaluate safety, immunogenicity and clinical activity of PR1 vaccination, a phase I/II trial was conducted. Sixty-six HLA-A2+ patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML: 42), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML: 13) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS: 11) received three to six PR1 peptide vaccinations, administered subcutaneously every 3 weeks at dose levels of 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mg. Patients were randomized to the three dose levels after establishing the safety of the highest dose level. Primary end points were safety and immune response, assessed by doubling of PR1/HLA-A2 tetramer-specific CTL, and the secondary end point was clinical response. Immune responses were noted in 35 of 66 (53%) patients. Of the 53 evaluable patients with active disease, 12 (24%) had objective clinical responses (complete: 8; partial: 1 and hematological improvement: 3). PR1-specific immune response was seen in 9 of 25 clinical responders versus 3 of 28 clinical non-responders (P=0.03). In conclusion, PR1 peptide vaccine induces specific immunity that correlates with clinical responses, including molecular remission, in AML, CML and MDS patients.

  7. Characterization of γ-carboxylated tryptic peptides by collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramström, Margareta; Sandberg, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of glutamic acid (Glu) residues into γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) is a post-translational modification essential for normal protein activity of, for example, proteins involved in the blood coagulation system. These proteins may contain as many as 12 sites for γ-carboxylation within a protein sequence of 45 amino acid residues. In the biopharmaceutical industry, powerful analytical techniques are required for identification and localization of modified sites. We here present comparatively easy and rapid methods for studies of Gla-containing proteins using recent technology. The performances of two mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques, collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), were evaluated with respect to γ-carboxylated peptides, applying on-line LC-ion trap MS. ETD MS has so far not been reported for Gla-containing peptides and the applicability of CID for heavily γ-carboxylated proteins has not been evaluated. The anticoagulant protein, protein C, containing nine Gla-sites, was chosen as a model protein. After tryptic digestion, three peptides containing Gla-residues were detected by MS; a 1.2 kDa fragment containing two Gla-residues, a 4.5 kDa peptide containing seven residues and also the 5.6 kDa tryptic peptides containing all nine Gla-residues. Regarding the shortest peptide, both CID and ETD provided extensive peptide sequencing. For the larger peptides, fragmentation by CID resulted in loss of the 44 Da CO(2)-group, while little additional fragmentation of the peptide chain was observed. In contrast, ETD resulted in comprehensive fragmentation of the peptide backbone. The study demonstrates that the combination of both techniques would be beneficial and complementary for investigation of γ-carboxylated proteins and peptides.

  8. On the dynamics of fragment isomerization in collision-induced dissociation of peptides.

    PubMed

    Polfer, Nick C; Bohrer, Brian C; Plasencia, Manolo D; Paizs, Béla; Clemmer, David E

    2008-02-14

    The structures of peptide collision-induced dissociation (CID) product ions are investigated using ion mobility/mass spectrometry techniques combined with theoretical methods. The cross-section results are consistent with a mixture of linear and cyclic structures for both b4 and a4 fragment ions. Direct evidence for cyclic structures is essential in rationalizing the appearance of fragments with scrambled (i.e., permutated) primary structures, as the cycle may not open up where it was initially formed. It is demonstrated here that cyclic and linear a4 structures can interconvert freely as a result of collisional activation, implying that isomerization takes place prior to dissociation.

  9. Catalysis of Dialanine Formation by Glycine in the Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1998-02-01

    Mutual catalysis of amino acids in the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction is demonstrated for the case of glycine/alanine. The presence of glycine enhances dialanine formation by a factor up to 50 and enables dialanine formation at much lower alanine concentrations. The actual amounts of glycine play an important role for this catalytic effect, the optimal glycine concentration is 1/8 of the alanine concentration. The mechanism appears to be based on the formation of the intermediate Gly-Ala-Ala tripeptide, connected to one coordination site of copper(II) ion, and subsequent hydrolysis to dialanine and glycine.

  10. F5-peptide induces aspermatogenesis by disrupting organization of actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletons in the testis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Mruk, Dolores D.; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    During the release of sperm at spermiation, a biologically active F5-peptide, which can disrupt the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ) permeability barrier, is produced at the site of the degenerating apical ES (ectoplasmic specialization). This peptide coordinates the events of spermiation and blood-testis barrier (BTB) remodeling at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle, creating a local apical ES-BTB axis to coordinate cellular events across the epithelium. The mechanism(s) by which F5-peptide perturbs BTB restructuring, and its involvement in apical ES dynamics remain unknown. F5-peptide, besides perturbing BTB integrity, was shown to induce germ cell release from the epithelium following its efficient in vivo overexpression in the testis. Overexpression of F5-peptide caused disorganization of actin- and microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeletons, mediated by altering the spatiotemporal expression of actin binding/regulatory proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. F5-peptide perturbed the ability of actin microfilaments and/or MTs from converting between their bundled and unbundled/defragmented configuration, thereby perturbing adhesion between spermatids and Sertoli cells. Since apical ES and basal ES/BTB are interconnected through the underlying cytoskeletal networks, this thus provides an efficient and novel mechanism to coordinate different cellular events across the epithelium during spermatogenesis through changes in the organization of actin microfilaments and MTs. These findings also illustrate the potential of F5-peptide being a male contraceptive peptide for men. PMID:27611949

  11. Vincamine Alleviates Amyloid-β 25–35 Peptides-induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Qu, Qiumin; Qiao, Jin; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Vincamine is a plant alkaloid used clinically as a peripheral vasodilator that increases cerebral blood flow and oxygen and glucose utilization by neural tissue to combat the effect of aging. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of vincamine on amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) induced cytotoxicity, to gain a better understanding of the neuroprotective effects of this clinically used anti-Alzheimer's disease drug. Materials and Methods: Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring malondialdehyde, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis detection was performed using an Annexin-V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using an ROS Assay Kit. Western blot detection was carried out to detect the protein expression. Results: Our studies showed that pretreatment with vincamine could reduce Aβ25–35 induced oxidative stress. Vincamine markedly inhibited cell apoptosis dose-dependently. More importantly, vincamine increased the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Bcl-2 family protein ratios on preincubation with cells for 2 h. Conclusion: Above observation led us to assume that one possible mechanism of vincamine protects Aβ25-35-induced cell death could be through upregulation of SOD and activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. SUMMARY Vincamine ameliorates amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptides induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cellsVincamine reduces Aβ 25–35 peptides induced apoptosis of PC12 cellsVincamine activates the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathwayVincamine up-regulates the superoxide dismutase. Abbreviation used: Aβ25-35: Amyloid-β 25-35; AD: Alzheimer's disease; BCA: Bicinchoninic acid; GSH: glutathione; PBS: Phosphate buffered solution; SDS: Sodium dodecylsulphate; SOD: Superoxide dismutase PMID:28216895

  12. Novel peptide VIP-TAT with higher affinity for PAC1 inhibited scopolamine induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Yang, Yanxu; Cui, Zekai; Zheng, Lijun; Zeng, Zhixing; Zhang, Huahua

    2014-10-01

    A novel peptide VIP-TAT with a cell penetrating peptide TAT at the C-terminus of VIP was constructed and prepared using intein mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag (IMPACT) system to enhance the brain uptake efficiency for the medical application in central nervous system. It was found by labeling VIP-TAT and VIP with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) that the extension with TAT increased the brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT significantly. Then short-term and long-term treatment with scopolamine (Scop) was used to evaluate the effect of VIP-TAT or VIP on Scop induced amnesia. Both short-term and long-term administration of VIP-TAT inhibited the latent time reduction in step-through test induced by Scop significantly, but long-term administration of VIP aggravated the Scop induced amnesia. Long-term i.p. injection of VIP-TAT was shown to have positive effect by inhibiting the oxidative damage, apoptosis and the cholinergic system activity reduction that induced by Scop, while VIP exerted negative effect in brain opposite to that in periphery system. The in vitro data showed that VIP-TAT had not only protective but also proliferative effect on Neuro2a cells which was inhibited by PAC1 antagonist PACAP(6-38). Competition binding assay and cAMP assay confirmed that VIP-TAT had higher affinity and activation for PAC1 than VIP. So it was concluded that the significantly stronger protective effect of VIP-TAT against Scop induced amnesia than VIP was due to (1) the enhanced brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT and (2) the increased affinity and activation of VIP-TAT for receptor PAC1.

  13. Osmotically induced membrane tension modulates membrane permeabilization by class L amphipathic helical peptides: nucleation model of defect formation.

    PubMed Central

    Polozov, I V; Anantharamaiah, G M; Segrest, J P; Epand, R M

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of action of lytic peptides on membranes is widely studied and is important in view of potential medical applications. Previously (I. V. Polozov, A. I. Polozova, E. M. Tytler, G. M. Anantharamaiah, J. P. Segrest, G. A. Woolley, and R. M., Biochemistry, 36:9237--9245) we analyzed the mechanism of membrane permeabilization by 18L, the archetype lytic peptide featuring the class L amphipathic alpha-helix, according to the classification of Segrest et al. (J. P. Segrest, G. de Loof, J. G. Dohlman, C. G. Brouillette, and G. M. Anantharamaiah, 1990, Proteins, 8:103--117). We concluded that the 18L peptide destabilizes membranes, leading to a transient formation of large defects that result in contents leakage and, in the presence of bilayer-bilayer contact, could lead to vesicle fusion. Here we report that this defect formation is strongly enhanced by the membrane tension induced by osmotic swelling of vesicles. Even below standard leakage-inducing peptide/lipid ratios, membrane resistance to osmotic tension drops from hundreds to tens of milliosmoles. The actual decrease is dependent on the peptide/lipid ratio and on the type of lipid. We propose that under membrane tension a peptidic pore serves as a nucleation site for the transient formation of a lipidic pore. The tension is released upon pore expansion with inclusion of more peptides and lipids into the pore lining. This tension modulation of leakage was observed for other class L peptides (mastoparan, K18L) and thus may be of general applicability for the action of membrane active lytic peptides. PMID:11463637

  14. Peptide-mediated desmoglein 3 crosslinking prevents pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody-induced skin blistering.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Volker; Rötzer, Vera; Dehner, Carina; Kempf, Bettina; Gliem, Martin; Radeva, Mariya; Hartlieb, Eva; Harms, Gregory S; Schmidt, Enno; Waschke, Jens

    2013-02-01

    In pemphigus vulgaris, a life-threatening autoimmune skin disease, epidermal blisters are caused by autoantibodies primarily targeting desmosomal cadherins desmoglein 3 (DSG3) and DSG1, leading to loss of keratinocyte cohesion. Due to limited insights into disease pathogenesis, current therapy relies primarily on nonspecific long-term immunosuppression. Both direct inhibition of DSG transinteraction and altered intracellular signaling by p38 MAPK likely contribute to the loss of cell adhesion. Here, we applied a tandem peptide (TP) consisting of 2 connected peptide sequences targeting the DSG adhesive interface that was capable of blocking autoantibody-mediated direct interference of DSG3 transinteraction, as revealed by atomic force microscopy and optical trapping. Importantly, TP abrogated autoantibody-mediated skin blistering in mice and was effective when applied topically. Mechanistically, TP inhibited both autoantibody-induced p38 MAPK activation and its association with DSG3, abrogated p38 MAPK-induced keratin filament retraction, and promoted desmosomal DSG3 oligomerization. These data indicate that p38 MAPK links autoantibody-mediated inhibition of DSG3 binding to skin blistering. By limiting loss of DSG3 transinteraction, p38 MAPK activation, and keratin filament retraction, which are hallmarks of pemphigus pathogenesis, TP may serve as a promising treatment option.

  15. A T cell receptor antagonist peptide induces T cells that mediate bystander suppression and prevent autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with multiple myelin antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Murtaza, Anwar; Hafler, Brian P.; Sette, Alessandro; Kuchroo, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) residues 139–151 (HSLGKWLGHPDKF) can be prevented by treatment with a T cell receptor (TCR) antagonist peptide (L144/R147) generated by substituting at the two principal TCR contact residues in the encephalitogenic peptide. The TCR antagonist peptide blocks activation of encephalitogenic Th1 helper cells in vitro, but the mechanisms by which the antagonist peptide blocks EAE in vivo are not clear. Immunization with L144/R147 did not inhibit generation of PLP-(139–151)-specific T cells in vivo. Furthermore, preimmunization with L144/R147 protected mice from EAE induced with the encephalitogenic peptides PLP-(178–191) and myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG) residues 92–106 and with mouse myelin basic protein (MBP). These data suggest that the L144/R147 peptide does not act as an antagonist in vivo but mediates bystander suppression, probably by the generation of regulatory T cells. To confirm this we generated T cell lines and clones from animals immunized with PLP-(139–151) plus L144/R147. T cells specific for L144/R147 peptide were crossreactive with the native PLP-(139–151) peptide, produced Th2/Th0 cytokines, and suppressed EAE upon adoptive transfer. These studies demonstrate that TCR antagonist peptides may have multiple biological effects in vivo. One of the principal mechanisms by which these peptides inhibit autoimmunity is by the induction of regulatory T cells, leading to bystander suppression of EAE. These results have important implications for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where there are autopathogenic responses to multiple antigens in the target organ. PMID:9256473

  16. Surface-induced dissociation of small molecules, peptides, and non-covalent protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Vicki H; Joyce, Karen E; Jones, Christopher M; Beardsley, Richard L

    2008-02-01

    This article provides a perspective on collisions of ions with surfaces, including surface-induced dissociation (SID) and reactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS). The content is organized into sections on surface-induced dissociation of small ions, surface characterization of organic thin films by collision of well-characterized ions into surfaces, the use of SID to probe peptide fragmentation, and the dissociation of large non-covalent complexes by SID. Examples are given from the literature with a focus on experiments from the authors' laboratory. The article is not a comprehensive review but is designed to provide the reader with an overview of the types of results possible by collisions of ions into surfaces.

  17. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Small Molecules, Peptides, and Non-covalent Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Vicki H.; Joyce, Karen E.; Jones, Christopher M.; Beardsley, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on collisions of ions with surfaces, including surface-induced dissociation (SID) and reactive ion scattering spectrometry (RISS). The content is organized into sections on surface-induced dissociation of small ions, surface characterization of organic thin films by collision of well-characterized ions into surfaces, the use of SID to probe peptide fragmentation, and the dissociation of large non-covalent complexes by SID. Examples are given from the literature with a focus on experiments from the authors’ laboratory. The article is not a comprehensive review but is designed to provide the reader with an overview of the types of results possible by collisions of ions into surfaces. PMID:18191578

  18. PCR-cloning of cadmium-inducible peptides in the barnacle, Megabalanus volcano.

    PubMed

    Togi, Akiko; Kamino, Kei; Shizuri, Yoshikazu

    2002-04-01

    A 340 bp DNA fragment was amplified from barnacle (Megabalanus volcano) cDNA by polymerase chain reaction using primers designed based on the amino acid sequences of barnacle cadmium-inducible peptides CdlP1 and CdlP2. The whole sequence was determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. The cDNA contained an open reading frame encoding 71 amino acid residues and the sequences for CdlP1 and CdlP2 were found to be located in the center of this coding region. Although CdlP1 and CdlP2 had been detected only in the cadmium-exposed barnacles, their mRNA was present both in cadmium-exposed barnacles and in unexposed barnacles. These results suggest that posttranslational proteolytic processing may be induced in the presence of cadmium.

  19. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity.

  20. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, induce biofilm formation, and inhibit antimicrobial peptide function†

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Jennifer; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Stebounova, Larissa; Wu, Chia-Ming; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Zabner, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Given the increased use of iron-containing nanoparticles in a number of applications, it is important to understand any effects that iron-containing nanoparticles can have on the environment and human health. Since iron concentrations are extremely low in body fluids, there is potential that iron-containing nanoparticles may influence the ability of bacteria to scavenge iron for growth, affect virulence and inhibit antimicrobial peptide (AMP) function. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and AMPs were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, hematite (α-Fe2O3), of different sizes ranging from 2 to 540 nm (2 ± 1, 43 ± 6, 85 ± 25 and 540 ± 90 nm) in diameter. Here we show that the greatest effect on bacterial growth, biofilm formation, and AMP function impairment is found when exposed to the smallest particles. These results are attributed in large part to enhanced dissolution observed for the smallest particles and an increase in the amount of bioavailable iron. Furthermore, AMP function can be additionally impaired by adsorption onto nanoparticle surfaces. In particular, lysozyme readily adsorbs onto the nanoparticle surface which can lead to loss of peptide activity. Thus, this current study shows that co-exposure of nanoparticles and known pathogens can impact host innate immunity. Therefore, it is important that future studies be designed to further understand these types of impacts. PMID:25221673

  1. A newly identified tomato peptide induces cytosolic calcium and may correspond to pathogen defense-related endogenous peptides in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants recognize a variety of stimuli that invoke defenses against attacking pathogens and herbivores. This recognition primes the plant to mount defenses against herbivory and disease. These stimuli include molecules called damage-associated molecular patterns or DAMPs, among them signaling peptide...

  2. Four different synthetic peptides of proteolipid protein induce a distinct antibody response in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Grether, Nicolai B; van der Broeck, Franziska; Ganscher, Alla; Wagner, Nicole; Henke, Erik; Ergün, Süleyman; Schroeter, Michael; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-07-01

    Here we studied the autoantibody specificity elicited by proteolipid protein (PLP) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In C57BL/6 (B6) mice, antibodies were induced by immunization with one of the two extracellular and by the intracellular PLP domain. Antibodies against extracellular PLP were myelin-reactive in oligodendrocyte cultures and induced mild spinal cord demyelination upon transfer into B cell-deficient J(H)T mice. Remarkably, also antibodies against intracellular PLP showed binding to intact oligodendrocytes and were capable of inducing myelin pathology upon transfer into J(H)T mice. In MP4-immunized mice peptide-specific T(H)1/T(H)17 responses were mainly directed against the extracellular PLP domains, but also involved the intracellular epitopes. These data suggest that both extracellular and intracellular epitopes of PLP contribute to the pathogenesis of MP4-induced EAE already in the setting of intact myelin. It remains to be elucidated if this concept also applies to MS itself.

  3. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  4. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  5. Effects of electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) on doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z(·)-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  6. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  7. Changing ABRA protein peptide to fit into the HLA-DRbeta1*0301 molecule renders it protection-inducing.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Luz M; Alba, Martha P; Curtidor, Hernando; Bermúdez, Adriana; Luis E Vargas; Rivera, Zuly J; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-09-10

    The Plasmodium falciparum acidic-basic repeat antigen represents a potential malarial vaccine candidate. One of this protein's high activity binding peptides, named 2150 ((161)KMNMLKENVDYIQKNQNLFK(180)), is conserved, non-immunogenic, and non-protection-inducing. Analogue peptides whose critical binding residues (in bold) were replaced by amino-acids having similar mass but different charge were synthesized and tested to try to modify such immunological properties. These analogues' HLA-DRbeta1* molecule binding ability were also studied in an attempt to explain their biological mechanisms and correlate binding capacity and immunological function with their three-dimensional structure determined by (1)H NMR. A 3(10) distorted helical structure was identified in protective and immunogenic peptide 24922 whilst alpha-helical structure was found for non-immunogenic, non-protective peptides having differences in alpha-helical position. The changes performed on immunogenic, protection-inducing peptide 24922 allowed it to bind specifically to the HLA-DRbeta1*0301 molecule, suggesting that these changes may lead to better interaction with the MHC Class II-peptide-TCR complex rendering it immunogenic and protective, thus suggesting a new way of developing multi-component, sub-unit-based anti-malarial vaccines.

  8. A continuous infusion of a minor histocompatibility antigen-immunodominant peptide induces a delay of male skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Sireci, Guido; Barera, Annalisa; Macaluso, Pasquale; Di Sano, Caterina; Bonanno, Cesira T; Pio La Manna, Marco; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Salerno, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that an inhibition of antigen-specific Interferon-gamma release and cytotoxicity occurs after a continuous infusion of an HY immunodominant peptide although this treatment is not able to cause a significant delay of male skin grafts rejection. In vivo administration of high doses of an HY peptide, through mini-osmotic pumps, in naïve female mice was used to study the effects on the male skin grafts rejection. A continuous infusion of 1mg of an HY peptide induces a significant delay of male skin graft rejection. In vitro HY-specific Interferon-gamma release was inhibited adding peptide-specific suppressor cells: the ability to inhibit Interferon-gamma release was evident when two HY peptides were present on the same dendritic cells indicating that the suppressor cells exert "linked-suppression". The phenotype of the suppressor cells is CD8(+)CD28(-) and these cells express more CD62 ligand and FOXP3 than controls. Suppressor cells were able to cause a significant delay of rejection of male skin grafts when injected in naive female mice. The inhibitory effects of these suppressor cells seem to be due to the impairment of antigen presentation; down-regulation of B7 molecules on dendritic cells occurred. Taken all together, our data demonstrate that a continuous infusion of an immunodominant HY peptide induces a T CD8 suppressor subset able to inhibit immune responses to male tissues and cells.

  9. Effect of delta sleep-inducing peptide on oxidative modification of proteins in rat tissues and blood during physiological aging.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, T I; Sorokina, I A; Mayboroda, E A; Durkanaeva, O A; Kutilin, D S; Mikhaleva, I I

    2012-07-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins (evaluated by the levels of carbonyl and SH groups) in tissues of 2-24-month-old rats (spleen>myocardium>testicles>liver>skeletal muscles) has been demonstrated. Exogenous delta sleep-inducing peptide injected subcutaneously to rats of different age in a dose of 100 μg/kg by monthly 5-day courses protected proteins of the studied tissues from oxidation; its effect was tissue-specific. Delta sleep-inducing peptide exhibited a hypoglycemic effect: it prevented nonenzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin and reduced the level of defective protein molecules during aging.

  10. Mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced hyporeactivity of the rabbit carotid artery to atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Marrachelli, Vannina G; Miranda, Francisco J; Centeno, José M; Miranda, Ignacio; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Burguete, María C; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Salom, Juan B; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique

    2011-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of the vascular complications in diabetes. The working hypothesis was that diabetes might modify the vascular actions of ANP in isolated rabbit carotid arteries and the mechanisms involved in these actions. ANP (10(-12)-10(-7)M) induced a relaxation of precontracted carotid arteries, which was lower in diabetic than in control rabbits. In arteries from both groups of animals, endothelium removal increased the ANP-induced relaxation. Isatin inhibited the relaxation to ANP both in arteries with and without endothelium. Carotid arteries from diabetic rabbits showed a decreased natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A expression and an enhanced NPR-C expression. Inhibition of NO-synthesis did not modify ANP-induced relaxation in control rabbits but inhibited it in diabetic rabbits. In arteries with endothelium indomethacin enhanced the relaxation to ANP in control rabbits but did not modify it in diabetic rabbits. In endothelium-denuded arteries indomethacin inhibited the relaxation to ANP in both groups of animals. In KCl-depolarised arteries, relaxation to ANP was almost abolished both in control and diabetic rabbits. Tetraethylammonium inhibited the relaxation to ANP, and this inhibition was higher in diabetic than in control rabbits. These results suggest that diabetes produces hyporeactivity of the rabbit carotid artery to ANP by a mechanism that at least includes a reduced expression of NPR-A, an enhanced expression of NPR-C and a reduced participation of K(+)-channels. Furthermore, diabetes enhances endothelial NO release and diminishes the ratio thromboxane A(2)/prostacyclin. This increase of vasodilators could result from compensatory mechanisms counteracting the arterial hyporeactivity to ANP.

  11. Laser-induced thermal desorption facilitates postsource decay of peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Hye; Lee, Aera; Song, Jae Yong; Han, Sang Yun

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the thermal mechanism involved in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) of thermally labile molecules from the flat surfaces of amorphous Si (a-Si) and crystalline Si (c-Si). a-Si was selected for this study because of its thermal property, such as low thermal conductivity; thus, it was predicted to be highly susceptible to laser-induced surface heating. By virtue of lack of surface nanostructures, the flat surfaces offer a simple model system to focus on the thermal mechanism, avoiding other effects, including possible non-thermal contributions that can arise from the physical existence of surface nanostructures. For the energetics study, the internal energies of substituted benzylpyridinium ions produced by LDI on the bare and coated surfaces of a-Si and c-Si were obtained using the survival yield method. The results, including LDI thresholds, ion yields, and internal energies all suggested that the LDI mechanism would be indeed thermal, which is most likely promoted by thermal desorption caused by laser-induced surface heating. In addition, the LDI process driven by laser-induced thermal desorption (LITD) was also found to be capable of depositing an excessive internal energy in resulting LDI ions, which underwent a dissociation. It exhibited the essentially same features as in postsource decay (PSD) in MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. We report that the LDI process by LITD offers not only a way of intact ionization but also a facile means for PSD of peptide ions, which this work demonstrates is well suited to peptide sequencing using TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

  12. CXC chemokines and antimicrobial peptides in rhinovirus-induced experimental asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, G; Message, S D; Haas, J J; Kebadze, T; Parker, H; Laza-Stanca, V; Khaitov, M R; Kon, O M; Stanciu, L A; Mallia, P; Edwards, M R; Johnston, S L

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Rhinoviruses (RVs) are the major triggers of asthma exacerbations. We have shown previously that lower respiratory tract symptoms, airflow obstruction, and neutrophilic airway inflammation were increased in experimental RV-induced asthma exacerbations. Objectives We hypothesized that neutrophil-related CXC chemokines and antimicrobial peptides are increased and related to clinical, virologic, and pathologic outcomes in RV-induced exacerbations of asthma. Methods Protein levels of antimicrobial peptides (SLPI, HNP 1–3, elafin, and LL-37) and neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1/GRO-α, CXCL2/GRO-β, CXCL5/ENA-78, CXCL6/GCP-2, CXCL7/NAP-2, and CXCL8/IL-8) were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of 10 asthmatics and 15 normal controls taken before, at day four during and 6 weeks post-experimental infection. Results BAL HNP 1–3 and Elafin were higher, CXCL7/NAP-2 was lower in asthmatics compared with controls at day 4 (P = 0.035, P = 0.048, and P = 0.025, respectively). BAL HNP 1–3 and CXCL8/IL-8 were increased during infection (P = 0.003 and P = 0.011, respectively). There was a trend to increased BAL neutrophils at day 4 compared with baseline (P = 0.076). BAL HNP 1–3 was positively correlated with BAL neutrophil numbers at day 4. There were no correlations between clinical parameters and HNP1–3 or IL-8 levels. Conclusions We propose that RV infection in asthma leads to increased release of CXCL8/IL-8, attracting neutrophils into the airways where they release HNP 1–3, which further enhances airway neutrophilia. Strategies to inhibit CXCL8/IL-8 may be useful in treatment of virus-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24673807

  13. Annexin A1 Induces Skeletal Muscle Cell Migration Acting through Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1, lipocortin-1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, so called since its main property is to bind (i.e. to annex) to cellular membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Although ANXA1 has predominantly been studied in the context of immune responses and cancer, the protein can affect a larger variety of biological phenomena, including cell proliferation and migration. Our previous results show that endogenous ANXA1 positively modulates myoblast cell differentiation by promoting migration of satellite cells and, consequently, skeletal muscle differentiation. In this work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that ANXA1 is able to exert effects on myoblast cell migration acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) following changes in its subcellular localization as in other cell types and tissues. The analysis of the subcellular localization of ANXA1 in C2C12 myoblasts during myogenic differentiation showed an interesting increase of extracellular ANXA1 starting from the initial phases of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. The investigation of intracellular Ca2+ perturbation following exogenous administration of the ANXA1 N-terminal derived peptide Ac2-26 established the engagement of the FPRs which expression in C2C12 cells was assessed by qualitative PCR. Wound healing assay experiments showed that Ac2-26 peptide is able to increase migration of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells and to induce cell surface translocation and secretion of ANXA1. Our results suggest a role for ANXA1 as a highly versatile component in the signaling chains triggered by the proper calcium perturbation that takes place during active migration and differentiation or membrane repair since the protein is strongly redistributed onto the plasma membranes after an rapid increase of intracellular levels of Ca2+. These properties indicate that ANXA1 may be involved in a novel repair mechanism for skeletal muscle and may have therapeutic implications with respect to the

  14. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise; Janjooa, Benjamin Naveed; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial aggregation was obtained by telephone interview of first-degree relatives using a validated semi-structured questionnaire. Results Calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion induced a migraine-like attack in 75% (12 out of 16) of patients with high family load compared to 52% (12 out of 23) with low family load ( P = 0.150). In addition, we found that the migraine response after calcitonin gene-related peptide was not associated with specific or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms of migraine without aura. Conclusion We found no statistical association between familial aggregation of migraine and hypersensitivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine without aura patients. We also demonstrated that the currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms conferring risk of migraine without aura have no additive effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine-like attacks.

  16. Nutrient-induced glucagon like peptide-1 release is modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and serotonin are both involved in food intake regulation. GLP-1 release is stimulated upon nutrient interaction with G-protein coupled receptors by enteroendocrine cells (EEC), whereas serotonin is released from enterochromaffin cells (ECC). The central hypothesis for the current study was that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release from EECs is modulated by serotonin through a process involving serotonin receptor interaction. This was studied by assessing the effects of serotonin reuptake inhibition by fluoxetine on nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release from isolated pig intestinal segments. Next, serotonin-induced GLP-1 release was studied in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells, where effects of serotonin receptor inhibition were studied using specific and non-specific antagonists. Casein (1% w/v), safflower oil (3.35% w/v), sucrose (50mM) and rebaudioside A (12.5mM) stimulated GLP-1 release from intestinal segments, whereas casein only stimulated PYY and CCK release. Combining nutrients with fluoxetine further increased nutrient-induced GLP-1, PYY and CCK release. Serotonin release from intestinal tissue segments was stimulated by casein and safflower oil while sucrose and rebaudioside A had no effect. The combination with fluoxetine (0.155μM) further enhanced casein and safflower oil induced-serotonin release. Exposure of ileal tissue segments to serotonin (30μM) stimulated GLP-1 release whereas it did not induce PYY and CCK release. Serotonin (30 and 100μM) also stimulated GLP-1 release from STC-1 cells, which was inhibited by the non-specific 5HT receptor antagonist asenapine (1 and 10μM). These data suggest that nutrient-induced GLP-1 release is modulated by serotonin through a receptor mediated process.

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide down-regulates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hui; Du, Jie; Li, Dai; Li, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-12-01

    We have found that eIF3a plays an important role in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and up-regulation of eIF3a induced by TGF-β1 is mediated via the ERK1/2 pathway. Whether ERK1/2 - eIF3a signal pathway is involved in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-mediated pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in rats. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured to investigate the proliferation by BrdU incorporation method and flow cytometry. Sensory CGRP depletion by capsaicin exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, as shown by a significant disturbed alveolar structure, marked thickening of the interalveolar septa and dense interstitial infiltration by inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, accompanied with increased expression of TGF-β1, eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. Exogenous application of CGRP significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts concomitantly with decreased expression of eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. These effects of CGRP were abolished in the presence of CGRP8-37. These results suggest that endogenous CGRP is related to the development of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and the inhibitory effect of CGRP on proliferation of lung fibroblasts involves the ERK1/2 - eIF3a signaling pathway.

  18. The Chemopreventive Peptide Lunasin Inhibits d-Galactose- Induced Experimental Cataract in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guangzhi; Zhang, Ping; Ye, Pei; Zhang, Miaoqing; Han, Ning; Shuai, Haoyue; Tan, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage to the constituents of the eye lens is a major mechanism in the initiation and development of cataract. Lunasin, a 43-amino acids chemoprevention peptide, has been proved to possess potent anti-oxidative activity other than its established anticancer activities. Herein, we explored whether lunasin has preventative effects on d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rat. After modeling, SD rats were administrated by instillation, 80 µM of lunasin eye drops to each eye thrice daily and consecutively for 30 days. As a result, lunasin treatment effectively inhibited the progression of d-galactose-induced experimental cataract, and protected the lenses of rats from oxidative damage and attenuated the lipid peroxidation through up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and inhibited the activation of polyol pathway by decreasing AR activity. Additionally, in vitro studies proved that lunasin treatment could protect human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) against d-galactose induced cell damage and apoptosis, and up-regulate antioxidant enzymes. This is the first demonstration that lunasin could inhibit d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rats by protecting against oxidative damage and inhibiting the activation of polyol pathway.

  19. The bee venom peptide tertiapin underlines the role of IKACh in acetylcholine-induced atrioventricular blocks

    PubMed Central

    Drici, Milou-Daniel; Diochot, Sylvie; Terrenoire, Cécile; Romey, Georges; Lazdunski, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neuromodulator of cardiac function that is released upon stimulation of the vagus nerve. Despite numerous reports on activation of IKACh by acetylcholine in cardiomyocytes, it has yet to be demonstrated what role this channel plays in cardiac conduction. We studied the effect of tertiapin, a bee venom peptide blocking IKACh, to evaluate the role of IKACh in Langendorff preparations challenged with ACh.ACh (0.5 μM) reproducibly and reversibly induced complete atrioventricular (AV) blocks in retroperfused guinea-pig isolated hearts (n=12).Tertiapin (10 to 300 nM) dose-dependently and reversibly prevented the AV conduction decrements and the complete blocks in unpaced hearts (n=8, P<0.01).Tertiapin dose-dependently blunted the ACh-induced negative chronotropic response from an ACh-induced decrease in heart rate of 39±16% in control conditions to 3±3% after 300 nM tertiapin (P=0.01). These effects were not accompanied by any significant change in QT intervals.Tertiapin blocked IKACh with an IC50 of 30±4 nM with no significant effect on the major currents classically associated with cardiac repolarisation process (IKr, IKs, Ito1, Isus, IK1 or IKATP) or AV conduction (INa and ICa(L)).In summary, tertiapin prevents dose-dependently ACh-induced AV blocks in mammalian hearts by inhibiting IKACh. PMID:11015309

  20. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  1. A TNF receptor loop peptide mimic blocks RANK ligand-induced signaling, bone resorption, and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Itzstein, Cecile; Ishiguro, Masaji; Shibata, Tatsuya; Blanque, Roland; Mian, Anower Hussain; Takahashi, Mariko; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Yoshimatsu, Masako; Yamaguchi, Akira; Deprez, Pierre; Mollat, Patrick; Murali, Ramachandran; Ohya, Keiichi; Horne, William C; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Activating receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) and TNF receptor (TNFR) promote osteoclast differentiation. A critical ligand contact site on the TNFR is partly conserved in RANK. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that a peptide (WP9QY) that mimics this TNFR contact site and inhibits TNF-alpha-induced activity bound to RANK ligand (RANKL). Changing a single residue predicted to play an important role in the interaction reduced the binding significantly. WP9QY, but not the altered control peptide, inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of RANK-dependent signaling in RAW 264.7 cells but had no effect on M-CSF-induced activation of some of the same signaling events. WP9QY but not the control peptide also prevented RANKL-induced bone resorption and osteoclastogenesis, even when TNFRs were absent or blocked. In vivo, where both RANKL and TNF-alpha promote osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast activity, and bone loss, WP9QY prevented the increased osteoclastogenesis and bone loss induced in mice by ovariectomy or low dietary calcium, in the latter case in both wild-type and TNFR double-knockout mice. These results suggest that a peptide that mimics a TNFR ligand contact site blocks bone resorption by interfering with recruitment and activation of osteoclasts by both RANKL and TNF.

  2. Protective effect of meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules against amyloid-β peptide-induced damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Alves, Catiane B; Souza, Ana Cristina G; Pinton, Simone; Roman, Silvane S; Rhoden, Cristiano R B; Alves, Marta P; Luchese, Cristiane

    2012-04-21

    The objective of present study was to investigate the protective effect of M-NC against aβ (25-35) peptide-induced damage in mice, as the first step to evaluate their potential value for the treatment of AD. Moreover, we compared the effects of M-NC with free meloxicam (M-F). Mice were divided into six groups: (I) sham, (II) aβ, (III) M-NC, (IV) M-F, (V) M-NC+aβ and (VI) M-F+aβ. Mice were pre-treated with M-NC (5mg/kg, by gavage), M-F (5mg/kg, by gavage) or blank nanocapsules (B-NC). Thirty minutes after treatments, aβ peptide (3nmol) or filtered water were i.c.v. injected. Learning and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM) (days 4-7) and step-down-type passive-avoidance (SDPA) (days 7-8) tasks. At the end of the experimental protocol (day 8), animals were euthanized and brains were removed for biochemical determinations (reactive species (RS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST)) and histological examination. Our results confirmed that aβ peptide caused learning and memory deficits in mice. Histological analysis demonstrated neuronal loss, intense cellular accumulation and chromatolysis caused by aβ peptide. Furthermore, this study showed that oxidative stress was increased in mice that received aβ peptide. An important finding of the present study was the protective effect of M-NC in damage induced by aβ peptide. However, M-F did not have protective effect. In summary, the data reported herein clearly demonstrate that meloxicam carried by polymeric nanocapsules protected against learning and memory impairments, loss neuronal and oxidative stress in a mouse model of AD induced by aβ peptide.

  3. Dietary peptides induce satiety via cholecystokinin-A and peripheral opioid receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Jelena; Anderson, G Harvey

    2002-09-01

    We hypothesized that the digestion of proteins gives rise to peptides that initiate several satiety signals from the gut, and that the signals arising will be dependent on the protein source. The role of peripheral opioid and cholecystokinin (CCK)-A receptors was investigated. Casein, soy protein, and casein and soy hydrolysates were administered to rats by gavage (0.5 g protein/4 mL water). Food intake was measured over 2 h. The opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (1.0 mg/kg) given intraperitoneally (i.p.), increased food intake when given at the same time as the hydrolysate preloads, 25 min after the casein preloads and 55 min after the soy protein preloads. The CCK-A receptor antagonist, devazepide (which reverses protein-induced food intake suppression), when given at 0.25 mg/kg, i.p., 60 min before preloads of each of three soy hydrolysates, also blocked suppression of food intake, but the strength and duration of the interaction depended on the preparation. When the two receptor antagonists were both administered with soy or casein preloads, their effects were additive. We conclude that peptides arising from digestion contribute to satiety by independent activation of both opioid and CCK-A receptors.

  4. LXXLL peptide converts transportan 10 to a potent inducer of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tints, Kairit; Prink, Madis; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2014-04-03

    Degenerate expression of transcription coregulator proteins is observed in most human cancers. Therefore, in targeted anti-cancer therapy development, intervention at the level of cancer-specific transcription is of high interest. The steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) is highly expressed in breast, endometrial, and prostate cancer. It is present in various transcription complexes, including those containing nuclear hormone receptors. We examined the effects of a peptide that contains the LXXLL-motif of the human SRC-1 nuclear receptor box 1 linked to the cell-penetrating transportan 10 (TP10), hereafter referred to as TP10-SRC1LXXLL, on proliferation and estrogen-mediated transcription of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our data show that TP10-SRC1LXXLL induced dose-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells, and that this effect was not affected by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Surprisingly TP10-SRC1LXXLL severely reduced the viability and proliferation of hormone-unresponsive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the regulation of the endogenous ERα direct target gene pS2 was not affected by TP10-SRC1LXXLL in estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells. Dermal fibroblasts were similarly affected by treatment with higher concentrations of TP10-SRC1LXXLL and this effect was significantly delayed. These results suggest that the TP10-SRC1LXXLL peptide may be an effective drug candidate in the treatment of cancers with minimal therapeutic options, for example ER-negative tumors.

  5. Dynamic collision-induced dissociation of peptides in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Collin, Olivier L; Beier, Matthias; Jackson, Glen P

    2007-07-15

    The fragmentation of natural peptides using dynamic collision-induced dissociation (DCID), a novel fragmentation method for quadrupole ion traps, is demonstrated. Using leucine enkephalin as a diagnostic molecule, the fragmentation efficiencies and energetics of DCID are compared with other methods of collisional activation in ion traps such as conventional on-resonance excitation and high-amplitude short-time excitation (HASTE). A typical fragmentation efficiency of approximately 20% is achieved for DCID, which is significantly lower than conventional CID (maximum near 80%). Tandem mass spectra of two other peptides, substance P and oxidized insulin alpha-chain, demonstrate that product ion spectra for DCID are comparable to conventional or HASTE CID. Because DCID achieves fragmentation during the standard mass acquisition scan, no extra time is necessary for on-resonance excitation or product ion collection, so analysis times are reduced by a minimum of 10-15% depending on the scanning conditions. DCID therefore offers more tandem mass spectra per second than conventional methods of collisional activation, which could be highly advantageous for bottom-up proteomics separations.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides and induced membrane curvature: geometry, coordination chemistry, and molecular engineering

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Short cationic, amphipathic antimicrobial peptides are multi-functional molecules that have roles in host defense as direct microbicides and modulators of the immune response. While a general mechanism of microbicidal activity involves the selective disruption and permeabilization of cell membranes, the relationships between peptide sequence and membrane activity are still under investigation. Here, we review the diverse functions that AMPs collectively have in host defense, and show that these functions can be multiplexed with a membrane mechanism of activity derived from the generation of negative Gaussian membrane curvature. As AMPs preferentially generate this curvature in model bacterial cell membranes, the selective generation of negative Gaussian curvature provides AMPs with a broad mechanism to target microbial membranes. The amino acid constraints placed on AMPs by the geometric requirement to induce negative Gaussian curvature are consistent with known AMP sequences. This ‘saddle-splay curvature selection rule’ is not strongly restrictive so AMPs have significant compositional freedom to multiplex membrane activity with other useful functions. The observation that certain proteins involved in cellular processes which require negative Gaussian curvature contain domains with similar motifs as AMPs, suggests this rule may be applicable to other curvature-generating proteins. Since our saddle-splay curvature design rule is based upon both a mechanism of activity and the existing motifs of natural AMPs, we believe it will assist the development of synthetic antimicrobials. PMID:24778573

  7. The insect peptide CopA3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo Jung; Oh, Ah Reum; Nam, Seung Taek; Kang, Jin Ku; Chang, Jong Soo; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ji Hye; Hwang, Jae Sam; Shong, Ko Eun; Park, Mi Jung; Seok, Heon; Kim, Ho

    2012-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that the insect peptide CopA3 (LLCIALRKK), a disulfide-linked dimeric peptide, exerts antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in a mouse colitis model. Here, we examined whether CopA3 inhibited activation of macrophages by LPS. Exposure of an unseparated mouse peritoneal cell population or isolated peritoneal macrophages to LPS markedly increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; these effects were significantly inhibited by CopA3 treatment. The inhibitory effect of CopA3 was also evident in murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Western blotting revealed that LPS-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT5 in macrophages was significantly inhibited by CopA3. Inhibition of JAK (STAT1/STAT5 kinase) with AG490 markedly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in macrophages. Collectively, these observations suggest that CopA3 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting activating phosphorylations of the transcription factors, STAT1 and STAT5, and blocking subsequent production of IL-6 and TNF-α and indicate that CopA3 may be useful as an immune-modulating agent.

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) induces malignant transformation of the human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Isabel Arenas, M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2010-12-18

    The carcinogenic potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was analyzed in non-tumor human prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and in vivo xenografts. VIP induced morphological changes and a migratory phenotype consistent with stimulation of expression/activity of metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, decreased E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, and increased cell motility. VIP increased cyclin D1 expression and cell proliferation that was blocked after VPAC(1)-receptor siRNA transfection. Similar effects were seen in RWPE-1 tumors developed by subcutaneous injection of VIP-treated cells in athymic nude mice. VIP acts as a cytokine in RWPE-1 cell transformation conceivably through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), reinforcing VIP role in prostate tumorigenesis.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of urea and thermal-induced denaturation of S-peptide analogue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Zhu, Y; Shi, Y

    2001-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the S-peptide analogue AETAAAKFLREHMDS in water at 278 and 358 K, and in 8 M urea at 278 K were performed. The results show agreement with experiments. The helix is stable at low temperature (278 K), while at 358 K, unfolding is observed. The effects of urea on protein stability have been studied. The data support a model in which urea denatures proteins by: (1) diminishing the hydrophobic effect by displacing water molecules from the solvent shell around nonpolar groups; and (2) binding directly to amide units (NH and CO groups) via hydrogen bonds. The results of cluster analysis and essential dynamics analysis suggest that the mechanism of urea and thermal-induced denaturation may not be the same.

  10. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Ilona; Marondedze, Claudius; Wheeler, Janet I.; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions. PMID:25505478

  11. Salivary Peptide Tyrosine–Tyrosine 3–36 Modulates Ingestive Behavior without Inducing Taste Aversion

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Maria D.; Sergeyev, Valeriy G.; Acosta, Andres; Spegele, Michael; La Sala, Michael; Waler, Nickolas J.; Chiriboga-Hurtado, Juan; Currlin, Seth W.; Herzog, Herbert; Dotson, Cedrick D.; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S.

    2013-01-01

    Hormone peptide tyrosine–tyrosine (PYY) is secreted into circulation from the gut L-endocrine cells in response to food intake, thus inducing satiation during interaction with its preferred receptor, Y2R. Clinical applications of systemically administered PYY for the purpose of reducing body weight were compromised as a result of the common side effect of visceral sickness. We describe here a novel approach of elevating PYY in saliva in mice, which, although reliably inducing strong anorexic responses, does not cause aversive reactions. The augmentation of salivary PYY activated forebrain areas known to mediate feeding, hunger, and satiation while minimally affecting brainstem chemoreceptor zones triggering nausea. By comparing neuronal pathways activated by systemic versus salivary PYY, we identified a metabolic circuit associated with Y2R-positive cells in the oral cavity and extending through brainstem nuclei into hypothalamic satiety centers. The discovery of this alternative circuit that regulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion may open the possibility of a therapeutic application of PYY for the treatment of obesity via direct oral application. PMID:24259562

  12. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  13. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  14. The antimicrobial peptide cecropin A induces caspase-independent cell death in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Cerón, José María; Contreras-Moreno, Judit; Puertollano, Elena; de Cienfuegos, Gerardo Álvarez; Puertollano, María A; de Pablo, Manuel A

    2010-08-01

    Most antimicrobial peptides have been shown to have antitumoral activity. Cecropin A, a linear 37-residue antimicrobial polypeptide produced by the cecropia moth, has exhibited cytotoxicity in various human cancer cell lines and inhibitory effects on tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis induced by cecropin A in the promyelocytic cell line HL-60. Treatment of cells with cecropin A was characterized by loss of viability in a dose-dependent manner, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and modest attenuation of lysosomal integrity measured by neutral red assay. An increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA fragmentation, and phosphatidylserine externalization were quantified following cecropin A exposure at a concentration of 30 microM, whereas cecropin A-induced apoptosis was independent of caspase family members, because the activity of caspase-8 and -9 were irrelevant. Nevertheless, caspase-3 activity showed a significant increase at concentrations of 20-40 microM, but a considerable reduction at 50 microM. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), and the accumulation of cells at sub-G1 phase measured by FACS analysis of propidium iodide (PI) stained nuclei suggested induction of apoptosis. Morphological changes measured by Hoechst 33342 or acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining showed nuclear condensation, corroborating the apoptotic action of cecropin A. Overall, these data indicate that cecropin A is able to induce apoptosis in HL-60 cells through a signaling mechanism mediated by ROS, but independently of caspase activation.

  15. Differential patterns of spinal cord pathology induced by MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, and PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Gruppe, Traugott L; Laurentius, Laura-Maria; Kirch, Christiane; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V; Addicks, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    In this study we demonstrate that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, or PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice, respectively, displays distinct features of CNS pathology. Major differences between the three models resided in (i) the region-/tract-specificity and disseminated nature of spinal cord degeneration, (ii) the extent and kinetics of demyelination, and (iii) the involvement of motoneurons in the disease. In contrast, axonal damage was present in all models and to a similar extent, proposing this feature as a possible morphological correlate for the comparable chronic clinical course of the disease induced by the three antigens. The data suggest that the antigen targeted in autoimmune encephalomyelitis is crucial to the induction of differential histopathological disease manifestations. The use of MP4-, MOG:35-55-, and PLP:178-191-induced EAE on the C57BL/6 background can be a valuable tool when it comes to reproducing and studying the structural-morphological diversity of multiple sclerosis.

  16. Collision induced dissociation-based characterization of nucleotide peptides: fragmentation patterns of microcin C7-C51, an antimicrobial peptide produced by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Petit, Vanessa W; Zirah, Séverine; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-08-01

    Covalent protein-nucleic acid conjugates form an original class of compounds that occur in nature or can be generated in vitro through cross-linking to investigate domains involved in protein/nucleic acid interactions. Their mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns are poorly characterized. We have used electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with collision-induced dissociation (CID) to characterize microcin C7-C51, an antimicrobial nucleotide peptide that targets aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and inhibits translation. The fragments of microcin C7-C51 were analyzed in positive- and negative-ion modes and compared with those of the corresponding unmodified heptapeptide and to the derived aspartyl-adenylate. The positive- and negative-ion mode fragments of microcin C7-C51 provided information on both the nucleotide and peptide moieties. Accurate mass measurement obtained using an LTQ Orbitrap instrument was a key factor for a comprehensive interpretation of the fragments. The experimental results obtained permitted the proposal of stepwise fragmentation pathways involving ion-dipole complexes. The data provide a better understanding of nucleotide peptide fragmentation in the gas phase.

  17. Nisin-induced expression of a recombinant antihypertensive peptide in dairy lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptides with antihypertensive activity have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. A 12-residue peptide (FFVAPFPEVFGK) shown to inhibit the angiotensin I-converting enzyme is released from the enzymatic breakdown of aS1-casein. A synthetic gene encoding this peptid...

  18. The impact of photo-induced molecular changes of dairy proteins on their ACE-inhibitory peptides and activity.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Shrestha, Kshitij; Van Camp, John; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Among all dietary proteins, dairy proteins are the most important source of bio-active peptides which can, however, be affected by modifications upon processing and storage. Since it is still unknown to which extent the biological activity of dairy proteins is altered by chemical reactions, this study focuses on the effect of photo-induced molecular changes on the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Milk proteins were dissolved in phosphate buffer containing riboflavin and stored under light at 4 °C for one month during which the molecular changes and the ACE-inhibitory activity were analysed. An increase in the total protein carbonyls and the N-formylkynurenine content was observed, besides a decrease in the free thiol, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine content. These changes were more severe in caseins compared with whey proteins and resulted moreover in the aggregation of caseins. Due to these photo-induced molecular changes, a significant loss of the ACE-inhibitory activity was observed for casein peptides. A peptide analysis moreover illustrated that the decreased activity was not attributed to a reduced digestibility but to losses of specific ACE-inhibitory peptides. The observed molecular changes, more specifically the degradation of specific amino acids and the casein aggregation, could be assigned as the cause of the altered peptide pattern and as such of the loss in ACE-inhibitory activity.

  19. HER-3 peptide vaccines/mimics: Combined therapy with IGF-1R, HER-2, and HER-1 peptides induces synergistic antitumor effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Megan Jo; Foy, Kevin C; Overholser, Jay P; Nahta, Rita; Kaumaya, Pravin TP

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER-3/ErbB3) is a unique member of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors, because it lacks intrinsic kinase activity and ability to heterodimerize with other members. HER-3 is frequently upregulated in cancers with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER-1/ErbB1) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/ErBB2) overexpression, and targeting HER-3 may provide a route for overcoming resistance to agents that target EGFR or HER-2. We have previously developed vaccines and peptide mimics for HER-1, HER-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, we extend our studies by identifying and evaluating novel HER-3 peptide epitopes encompassing residues 99–122, 140–162, 237–269 and 461–479 of the HER-3 extracellular domain as putative B-cell epitopes for active immunotherapy against HER-3 positive cancers. We show that the HER-3 vaccine antibodies and HER-3 peptide mimics induced antitumor responses: inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, inhibition of receptor phosphorylation, induction of apoptosis and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Two of the HER-3 epitopes 237–269 (domain II) and 461–479 (domain III) significantly inhibited growth of xenografts originating from both pancreatic (BxPC3) and breast (JIMT-1) cancers. Combined therapy of HER-3 (461–471) epitope with HER-2 (266–296), HER-2 (597–626), HER-1 (418–435) and insulin-like growth factor receptor type I (IGF-1R) (56–81) vaccine antibodies and peptide mimics show enhanced antitumor effects in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study establishes the hypothesis that combination immunotherapy targeting different signal transduction pathways can provide effective antitumor immunity and long-term control of HER-1 and HER-2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:25941588

  20. Collision-induced dissociation of Lys-Lys intramolecular crosslinked peptides.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Amadeu H; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C

    2009-04-01

    The use of chemical crosslinking is an attractive tool that presents many advantages in the application of mass spectrometry to structural biology. The correct assignment of crosslinked peptides, however, is still a challenge because of the lack of detailed fragmentation studies on resultant species. In this work, the fragmentation patterns of intramolecular crosslinked peptides with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) has been devised by using a set of versatile, model peptides that resemble species found in crosslinking experiments with proteins. These peptides contain an acetylated N-terminus followed by a random sequence of residues containing two lysine residues separated by an arginine. After the crosslinking reaction, controlled trypsin digestion yields both intra- and intermolecular crosslinked peptides. In the present study we analyzed the fragmentation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-generated peptides crosslinked with DSS in which both lysines are found in the same peptide. Fragmentation starts in the linear moiety of the peptide, yielding regular b and y ions. Once it reaches the cyclic portion of the molecule, fragmentation was observed to occur either at the following peptide bond or at the peptide crosslinker amide bond. If the peptide crosslinker bond is cleaved, it fragments as a regular modified peptide, in which the DSS backbone remains attached to the first lysine. This fragmentation pattern resembles the fragmentation of modified peptides and may be identified by common automated search engines using DSS as a modification. If, on the other hand, fragmentation happens at the peptide bond itself, rearrangement of the last crosslinked lysine is observed and a product ion containing the crosslinker backbone and lysine (m/z 222) is formed. The detailed identification of fragment ions can help the development of softwares devoted to the MS/MS data analysis of crosslinked peptides.

  1. Quantitative Peptidomics Study Reveals That a Wound-Induced Peptide from PR-1 Regulates Immune Signaling in Tomato[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Lan; Lee, Chi-Ying; Cheng, Kai-Tan; Chang, Wei-Hung; Huang, Rong-Nan; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many important cell-to-cell communication events in multicellular organisms are mediated by peptides, but only a few peptides have been identified in plants. In an attempt to address the difficulties in identifying plant signaling peptides, we developed a novel peptidomics approach and used this approach to discover defense signaling peptides in plants. In addition to the canonical peptide systemin, several novel peptides were confidently identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and quantified to be induced by both wounding and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). A wounding or wounding plus MeJA-induced peptide derived from the pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR-1) family was found to induce significant antipathogen and minor antiherbivore responses in tomato. This study highlights a role for PR-1 in immune signaling and suggests the potential application of plant endogenous peptides in efforts to defeat biological threats in crop production. As PR-1 is highly conserved across many organisms and the putative peptide from At-PR1 was also found to be bioactive in Arabidopsis thaliana, our results suggest that this peptide may be useful for enhancing resistance to stress in other plant species. PMID:25361956

  2. Atrial natriuretic peptide protects against Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junjie; Moldobaeva, Nurgul

    2011-01-01

    Lung inflammation and alterations in endothelial cell (EC) permeability are key events to development of acute lung injury (ALI). Protective effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been shown against inflammatory signaling and endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by gram-negative bacterial wall liposaccharide. We hypothesized that ANP may possess more general protective effects and attenuate lung inflammation and EC barrier dysfunction by suppressing inflammatory cascades and barrier-disruptive mechanisms shared by gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. C57BL/6J wild-type or ANP knockout mice (Nppa−/−) were treated with gram-positive bacterial cell wall compounds, Staphylococcus aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PepG) and/or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) (intratracheal, 2.5 mg/kg each), with or without ANP (intravenous, 2 μg/kg). In vitro, human pulmonary EC barrier properties were assessed by morphological analysis of gap formation and measurements of transendothelial electrical resistance. LTA and PepG markedly increased pulmonary EC permeability and activated p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, NF-κB, and Rho/Rho kinase signaling. EC barrier dysfunction was further elevated upon combined LTA and PepG treatment, but abolished by ANP pretreatment. In vivo, LTA and PepG-induced accumulation of protein and cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, tissue neutrophil infiltration, and increased Evans blue extravasation in the lungs was significantly attenuated by intravenous injection of ANP. Accumulation of bronchoalveolar lavage markers of LTA/PepG-induced lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction was further augmented in ANP−/− mice and attenuated by exogenous ANP injection. These results strongly suggest a protective role of ANP in the in vitro and in vivo models of ALI associated with gram-positive infection. Thus ANP may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and ALI-induced gram-positive bacterial

  3. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  4. Mucosal Tolerance Induced by an Immunodominant Peptide from Rat α3(IV)NC1 in Established Experimental Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John; Abbott, Danielle S.; Karegli, Julieta; Evans, David J.; Pusey, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis (EAG), an animal model of Goodpasture’s disease, can be induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats by immunization with the noncollagenous domain of the α 3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IV)NC1. Recent studies have identified an immunodominant peptide, pCol (24-38), from the N-terminus of rat α3(IV)NC1; this peptide contains the major B- and T-cell epitopes in EAG and can induce crescentic nephritis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of mucosal tolerance in EAG by examining the effects of the nasal administration of this peptide after the onset of disease. A dose-dependent effect was observed: a dose of 300 μg had no effect, a dose of 1000 μg resulted in a moderate reduction in EAG severity, and a dose of 3000 μg produced a marked reduction in EAG severity accompanied by diminished antigen-specific, T-cell proliferative responses. These results demonstrate that mucosal tolerance in EAG can be induced by nasal administration of an immunodominant peptide from the N-terminus of α3(IV)NC1 and should be of value in designing new therapeutic strategies for patients with Goodpasture’s disease and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:19406992

  5. Oral biodrug delivery using cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, the novel biotherapeutic agents such as peptides and proteins have been contributed to the treatment of several diseases. However, their oral absorption is significantly limited due to their poor delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the feasible approaches are needed for improving the oral bioavailability of biodrugs. Recently, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as HIV-1 Tat, penetratin and oligoarginine are considered as a useful tool for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules. Hence, it was expected that the ability of CPPs may be applicable to enhance the absorption of biodrugs through intestinal epithelial membrane. CPPs are likely to become powerful tools for overcoming the low permeability of therapeutic peptides and proteins through the intestinal membrane, the major barrier to their oral delivery. Further advantage of this promising strategy is that this successful intestinal absorption could be achieved by more convenient methodology, coadministration of CPP with drugs via intermolecular interaction among them. Hereafter, the further establishment of delivery system based on CPPs is required to realize the development of the oral forms of therapeutic peptides and proteins. The aim here is to introduce our vision focusing on oral biodrug delivery by the use of CPPs as potential peptide carrier in order to provide new information in the design and development of new oral delivery systems for novel biotherapeutics.

  6. LXXLL Peptide Converts Transportan 10 to a Potent Inducer of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tints, Kairit; Prink, Madis; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2014-01-01

    Degenerate expression of transcription coregulator proteins is observed in most human cancers. Therefore, in targeted anti-cancer therapy development, intervention at the level of cancer-specific transcription is of high interest. The steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) is highly expressed in breast, endometrial, and prostate cancer. It is present in various transcription complexes, including those containing nuclear hormone receptors. We examined the effects of a peptide that contains the LXXLL-motif of the human SRC-1 nuclear receptor box 1 linked to the cell-penetrating transportan 10 (TP10), hereafter referred to as TP10-SRC1LXXLL, on proliferation and estrogen-mediated transcription of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our data show that TP10-SRC1LXXLL induced dose-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells, and that this effect was not affected by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Surprisingly TP10-SRC1LXXLL severely reduced the viability and proliferation of hormone-unresponsive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the regulation of the endogenous ERα direct target gene pS2 was not affected by TP10-SRC1LXXLL in estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells. Dermal fibroblasts were similarly affected by treatment with higher concentrations of TP10-SRC1LXXLL and this effect was significantly delayed. These results suggest that the TP10-SRC1LXXLL peptide may be an effective drug candidate in the treatment of cancers with minimal therapeutic options, for example ER-negative tumors. PMID:24705462

  7. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling of cellular response induced by an insect cytokine paralytic peptide.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Wang, Fei; Dong, Zhaoming; Hua, Xiaoting; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-10

    Paralytic peptide (PP) participates in diverse physiological processes as an insect cytokine, such as immunity control, paralysis induction, regulation of cell morphology and proliferation. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying those physiological activities, we systematically investigated the global phosphorylation events in fat body of silkworm larvae induced by PP through label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics. 2534 phosphosites were finally identified, of which the phosphorylation level of 620 phosphosites on 244 proteins was significantly up-regulated and 67 phosphosites on 43 proteins was down-regulated. Among those proteins, 13 were protein kinases (PKs), 13 were transcription factors (TFs) across 10 families and 17 were metabolism related enzymes. Meanwhile, Motif-X analysis of the phosphorylation sites showed that 16 motifs are significantly enriched, including 8 novel phosphorylation motifs. In addition, KEGG and functional interacting network analysis revealed that phosphorylation cascades play the crucial regulation roles in PP-dependent signaling pathways, and highlighted the potential central position of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in them. These analyses provide direct insights into the molecule mechanisms of cellular response induced by PP.

  8. Amyloid-β peptide (1-42) aggregation induced by copper ions under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bin, Yannan; Li, Xia; He, Yonghui; Chen, Shu; Xiang, Juan

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) induced by Cu²⁺ is related to incubation time, solution pH, and temperature. In this work, the aggregation of Aβ₁₋₄₂ in the presence of Cu²⁺ under acidic conditions was studied at different incubation time and temperature (e.g. 25 and 37°C). Incubation temperature, pH, and the presence of Cu²⁺ in Aβ solution were confirmed to alter the morphology of aggregation (fibrils or amorphous aggregates), and the morphology is pivotal for Aβ neurotoxicity and Alzheimer disease (AD) development. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the formation of Aβ fibrous morphology is preferred at lower pH, but Cu²⁺ induced the formation of amorphous aggregates. The aggregation rate of Aβ was increased with the elevation of temperature. These results were further confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and it was found that the formation of β-sheet structure was inhibited by Cu²⁺ binding to Aβ. The result was consistent with AFM observation and the fibrillation process was restrained. We believe that the local charge state in hydrophilic domain of Aβ may play a dominant role in the aggregate morphology due to the strong steric hindrance. This research will be valuable for understanding of Aβ toxicity in AD.

  9. Uncoupling protein 2 negatively regulates glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiangying; Luo, Yun; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-04-01

    It is known that endogenous levels of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) can be enhanced by various secretagogues, but the mechanism underlying GLP1 secretion is still not fully understood. We assessed the possible effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) on GLP1 secretion in mouse intestinal tract and NCI-H716 cells, a well-characterized human enteroendocrine L cell model. Localization of UCP2 and GLP1 in the gastrointestinal tract was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Ucp2 mRNA levels in gut were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Human NCI-H716 cells were transiently transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. The plasma and ileum tissue levels of GLP1 (7-36) amide were measured using an ELISA kit. UCP2 was primarily expressed in the mucosal layer and colocalized with GLP1 in gastrointestinal mucosa. L cells secreting GLP1 also expressed UCP2. After glucose administration, UCP2-deficient mice showed increased glucose-induced GLP1 secretion compared with wild-type littermates. GLP1 secretion increased after NCI-H716 cells were transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. UCP2 was markedly upregulated in ileum tissue from ob/ob mice, and GLP1 secretion decreased compared with normal mice. Furthermore, GLP1 secretion increased after administration of genipin by oral gavage. Taken together, these results reveal an inhibitory role of UCP2 in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion.

  10. Loss of proteostasis induced by amyloid beta peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia F; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neurotoxic effects, Aβ also damages brain endothelial cells (ECs) and may thus contribute to the degeneration of cerebral vasculature, which has been proposed as an early pathogenic event in the course of AD and is able to trigger and/or potentiate the neurodegenerative process and cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced endothelial dysfunction are not completely understood. Here we hypothesized that Aβ impairs protein quality control mechanisms both in the secretory pathway and in the cytosol in brain ECs, leading cells to death. In rat brain RBE4 cells, we demonstrated that Aβ1-40 induces the failure of the ER stress-adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), deregulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) decreasing overall proteasome activity with accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and impairs the autophagic protein degradation pathway due to failure in the autophagic flux, which culminates in cell demise. In conclusion, Aβ deregulates proteostasis in brain ECs and, as a consequence, these cells die by apoptosis.

  11. Endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, provide antioxidant defense in the brain against free radical-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Yang, Ding-Jian; Cai, Wen-Qing; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Gao, Yan-Feng; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2003-11-20

    Oxidative stress has been considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. The brain appears to be more susceptible to oxidative damage than other organs. Therefore, the existence of antioxidants may be essential in brain protective systems. The antioxidative and free radical scavenging effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, have been investigated in vitro. The oxidative damage was initiated by a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrocholoride) (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The linoleic acid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides, by plasmid pBR 322 DNA nicking assay and single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Endomorphins can inhibit lipid peroxidation, DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation induced by free radical. Endomorphins also reacted with galvinoxyl radicals in homogeneous solution, and the pseudo-first-order rate constants were determined spectrophotometrically by following the disappearance of galvinoxyl radicals. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and GSH, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins are one of the protective systems against free radical-induced damage in the brain.

  12. Comparative study on the mechanism of bradykinin potentiation induced by bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a, enalaprilat and kinin-potentiating peptide.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M S; Schaffel, R; Assreuy, J

    1992-06-17

    The action of a kinin-potentiating peptide (KPP) obtained from tryptic digestion of human serum proteins was compared with that of bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a (BPP9a; obtained from snake venom) and enalaprilat (a synthetic inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme; ACE) as a means of understanding the mechanism of action of KPP on smooth muscle. KPP potentiated bradykinin-induced contractile effects in guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, but not the bradykinin-induced relaxation of pre-contracted ileum, whereas BPP9a and enalaprilat potentiated both bradykinin effects. The receptor mediating both the contraction and the relaxation elicited by bradykinin in the ileum was found to be of the B2 type. KPP retained its potentiating effect in the presence of enalaprilat in the guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, whereas the potentiation evoked by BPP9a was abolished. Enalaprilat inhibited the activity of purified ACE, whereas KPP was completely devoid of such an effect. The potentiating effect of KPP, but not that of BPP9a or enalaprilat, was blocked by compounds that inhibit phospholipase A2 and lipoxygenase activity but not by inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase or phosphodiesterases. The results suggest that the potentiating effect of KPP (i) does not involve inhibition of ACE; (ii) is not due to an increased affinity of the receptor for bradykinin, and (iii) probably involves post-receptor events linked to phospholipase A2 and to the lipoxygenase pathway.

  13. Thrombospondin-1 Mimetic Agonist Peptides Induce Selective Death in Tumor Cells: Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies.

    PubMed

    Denèfle, Thomas; Boullet, Héloise; Herbi, Linda; Newton, Clara; Martinez-Torres, Ana-Carolina; Guez, Alexandre; Pramil, Elodie; Quiney, Claire; Pourcelot, Marilyne; Levasseur, Mikail D; Lardé, Eva; Moumné, Roba; Ogi, François-Xavier; Grondin, Pascal; Merle-Beral, Hélène; Lequin, Olivier; Susin, Santos A; Karoyan, Philippe

    2016-09-22

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a glycoprotein considered as a key actor within the tumor microenvironment. Its binding to CD47, a cell surface receptor, triggers programmed cell death. Previous studies allowed the identification of 4N1K decapeptide derived from the TSP-1/CD47 binding epitope. Here, we demonstrate that this peptide is able to induce selective apoptosis of various cancer cell lines while sparing normal cells. A structure-activity relationship study led to the design of the first serum stable TSP-1 mimetic agonist peptide able to trigger selective programmed cell death (PCD) of at least lung, breast, and colorectal cancer cells. Altogether, these results will be of valuable interest for further investigation in the design of potent CD47 agonist peptides, opening new perspectives for the development of original anticancer therapies.

  14. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  15. Collision-induced dissociation fragmentation inside disulfide C-terminal loops of natural non-tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatiana Y; Vorontsov, Egor A; Gorshkov, Vladimir A; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Roman A; Ytterberg, Jimmy A; Lebedev, Albert T

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of long non-tryptic peptides are usually quite complicated and rather difficult to interpret. Disulfide bond formed by two cysteine residues at C-terminus of frog skin peptides precludes one to determine sequence inside the forming loop. Thereby, chemical modification of S-S bonds is often used in "bottom up" sequencing approach. However, low-energy CID spectra of natural non-tryptic peptides with C-terminal disulfide cycle demonstrate an unusual fragmentation route, which may be used to elucidate the "hidden" C-terminal sequence. Low charge state protonated molecules experience peptide bond cleavage at the N-terminus of C-terminal cysteine. The forming isomeric acyclic ions serve as precursors for a series of b-type ions revealing sequence inside former disulfide cycle. The reaction is preferable for peptides with basic lysine residues inside the cycle. It may also be activated by acidic protons of Asp and Glu residues neighboring the loop. The observed cleavages may be quite competitive, revealing the sequence inside disulfide cycle, although S-S bond rupture does not occur in this case.

  16. Detection and characterization of methionine oxidation in peptides by collision-induced dissociation and electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ziqiang; Yates, Nathan A; Bakhtiar, Ray

    2003-06-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), the two complementary fragmentation techniques, are demonstrated to be effective in the detection and localization of the methionine sulfoxide [Met(O)] residues in peptides using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. The presence of Met(O) can be easily recognized in the low-energy CID spectrum showing the characteristic loss of methanesulfenic acid (CH(3)SOH, 64 Da) from the side chain of Met(O). The position of Met(O) can then be localized by ECD which is capable of providing extensive peptide backbone fragmentation without detaching the labile Met(O) side chain. We studied CID and ECD of several Met(O)-containing peptides that included the 44-residue human growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and the human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). The distinction and complementarity of the two fragmentation techniques were particularly remarkable in their effects on ANP, a disulfide bond-containing peptide. While the predominant fragmentation pathway in CID of ANP was the loss of CH(3)SOH (64 Da) from the molecular ion, ECD of ANP resulted in many sequence-informative products, including those from cleavages within the disulfide-bonded cyclic structure, to allow for the direct localization of Met(O) without the typical procedures for disulfide bond reduction followed by [bond]SH alkylation.

  17. Improving fragmentation of poorly fragmenting peptides and phosphopeptides during collision-induced dissociation by malondialdehyde modification of arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Foettinger, Alexandra; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Despite significant technological and methodological advancements in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, analyzing peptides that exhibit only poor fragmentation upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) remains a challenge. A major cause for unfavorable fragmentation is insufficient proton 'mobility' due to charge localization at strongly basic sites, in particular, the guanidine group of arginine. We have recently demonstrated that the conversion of the guanidine group of the arginine side chain by malondialdehyde (MDA) is a convenient tool to reduce the basicity of arginine residues and can have beneficial effects for peptide fragmentation. In the present work, we have focused on peptides that typically yield incomplete sequence information in CID-MS/MS experiments. Energy-resolved tandem MS experiments were carried out on angiotensins and arginine-containing phosphopeptides to study in detail the influence of the modification step on the fragmentation process. MDA modification dramatically improved the fragmentation behavior of peptides that exhibited only one or two dominant cleavages in their unmodified form. Neutral loss of phosphoric acid from phosphopeptides carrying phosphoserine and threonine residues was significantly reduced in favor of a higher abundance of fragment ions. Complementary experiments were carried out on three different instrumental platforms (triple-quadrupole, 3D ion trap, quadrupole-linear ion trap hybrid) to ascertain that the observation is a general effect.

  18. A mucin-like peptide from Fasciola hepatica induces parasite-specific Th1-type cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Noya, Verónica; Brossard, Natalie; Berasaín, Patricia; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Chiale, Carolina; Mazal, Daniel; Carmona, Carlos; Freire, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Fasciolosis, caused by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, is a major parasitic disease of livestock that causes significant economic losses worldwide. Although drugs are effective against liver flukes, they do not prevent reinfection, and continuous treatment is costly. Moreover, resistant fluke strains are emerging. In this context, vaccination is a good alternative since it provides a cost-effective long-term prevention strategy to control fasciolosis. In this paper, we evaluate the Fhmuc peptide as a potential vaccine against fasciolosis. This peptide derives from a mucin-like protein highly expressed in the infective stage of Fasciola hepatica. Mucin-like molecules expressed by parasites can contribute to several infection processes by protecting the parasite from host proteases and recognition by the immune system. We show that the Fhmuc peptide induces Th1-like immune responses specific for F. hepatica excretion-secretion products (FhESP) with a high production of IFNγ. We also investigated whether this peptide could protect animals from infection, and present preliminary data indicating that animals treated with Fhmuc exhibited reduced liver damage compared to non-immunised animals and that this protection was associated with a recruitment of B and T lymphocytes in the peritoneum, as well as eosinophils and mature dendritic cells. These results suggest that the mucin-like peptide Fhmuc could constitute a potential vaccine candidate against fasciolosis and pave the way towards the development of vaccines against parasites.

  19. Reversible liposome association induced by LAH4: a peptide with potent antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection activities.

    PubMed

    Marquette, Arnaud; Lorber, Bernard; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2010-06-02

    We report on the reversible association of anionic liposomes induced by an antimicrobial peptide (LAH4). The process has been characterized for mixed membranes of POPC and POPS at molar ratios of 1:1, 3:1, and 9:1. Although the vesicles remain in suspension in the presence of excess amounts of peptide, the addition of more lipids results in surface charge neutralization, aggregation of the liposomes, and formation of micrometer-sized structures that coexist in equilibrium with vesicles in suspension. At low ratios of anionic lipids, vesicle aggregation is a reversible process, and vesicle disassembly is observed upon inversion of the surface charge by further supplementation with anionic vesicles. In contrast, a different process, membrane fusion, occurs in the presence of high phosphatidylserine concentrations. Upon binding to membranes containing low POPS concentrations, the peptide adopts an in-plane alpha-helical structure, a secondary structure that is conserved during vesicle association and dissociation. Our finding that peptides are essential for vesicle aggregation contributes to a better understanding of the activity of antimicrobial peptides, and suggests an additional layer of complexity in membrane-protein lipid interactions.

  20. Reversible Liposome Association Induced by LAH4: A Peptide with Potent Antimicrobial and Nucleic Acid Transfection Activities

    PubMed Central

    Marquette, Arnaud; Lorber, Bernard; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We report on the reversible association of anionic liposomes induced by an antimicrobial peptide (LAH4). The process has been characterized for mixed membranes of POPC and POPS at molar ratios of 1:1, 3:1, and 9:1. Although the vesicles remain in suspension in the presence of excess amounts of peptide, the addition of more lipids results in surface charge neutralization, aggregation of the liposomes, and formation of micrometer-sized structures that coexist in equilibrium with vesicles in suspension. At low ratios of anionic lipids, vesicle aggregation is a reversible process, and vesicle disassembly is observed upon inversion of the surface charge by further supplementation with anionic vesicles. In contrast, a different process, membrane fusion, occurs in the presence of high phosphatidylserine concentrations. Upon binding to membranes containing low POPS concentrations, the peptide adopts an in-plane α-helical structure, a secondary structure that is conserved during vesicle association and dissociation. Our finding that peptides are essential for vesicle aggregation contributes to a better understanding of the activity of antimicrobial peptides, and suggests an additional layer of complexity in membrane-protein lipid interactions. PMID:20513398

  1. Prophenoloxidase activation and antimicrobial peptide expression induced by the recombinant microbe binding protein of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2017-04-01

    Manduca sexta microbe binding protein (MBP) is a member of the β-1,3-glucanase-related protein superfamily that includes Gram-negative bacteria-binding proteins (GNBPs), β-1,3-glucan recognition proteins (βGRPs), and β-1,3-glucanases. Our previous and current studies showed that the purified MBP from baculovirus-infected insect cells had stimulated prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation in the hemolymph of naïve and immune challenged larvae and that supplementation of the exogenous MBP and peptidoglycans (PGs) had caused synergistic increases in PO activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, we separated by SDS-PAGE naïve and induced larval plasma treated with buffer or MBP and detected on immunoblots changes in intensity and/or mobility of hemolymph (serine) proteases [HP14, HP21, HP6, HP8, proPO-activating proteases (PAPs) 1-3] and their homologs (SPH1, SPH2). In a nickel pull-down assay, we observed association of MBP with proHP14 (slightly), βGRP2, PG recognition protein-1 (PGRP1, indirectly), SPH1, SPH2, and proPO2. Further experiments indicated that diaminopimelic acid (DAP) or Lys PG, MBP, PGRP1, and proHP14 together trigger the proPO activation system in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Injection of the recombinant MBP into the 5th instar naïve larvae significantly induced the expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes, revealing a possible link between HP14 and immune signal transduction. Together, these results suggest that the recognition of Gram-negative or -positive bacteria via their PGs induces the melanization and Toll pathways in M. sexta.

  2. Prostate-related antigen-derived new peptides having the capacity of inducing prostate cancer-reactive CTLs in HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Harada, Mamoru; Matsueda, Satoko; Yao, Akihisa; Ogata, Rika; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo

    2004-09-01

    Prostate-related antigens, including prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), can be targets in specific immunotherapy for prostate cancer. In this study, we attempted to newly identify epitope peptides from these 2 antigens, which are immunogenic in human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2+ prostate cancer patients. Twenty-nine peptides (PSMA with 15 and PAP with 14) were prepared based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. Based on our previous finding that antigenic peptides recognized by both cellular and humoral immune systems are useful for peptide-based immunotherapy, peptide candidates were screened first by their ability to be recognized by immunoglobulin G (IgG), and then by their ability to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). As a result, PSMA441-450 and PAP112-120 peptides were found to be frequently recognized by IgG in plasma from prostate cancer patients. These 2 candidates effectively induced HLA-A2-restricted and prostate cancer-reactive CTLs in HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients with several HLA-A2 subtypes. In addition, their cytotoxicity was mainly dependent on peptide-specific and CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that these PSMA441-450 and PAP112-120 peptides could be promising candidates for peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A2(+) prostate cancer.

  3. Effect of structural parameters on the electron capture dissociation and collision-induced dissociation pathways of copper(II)-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangfeng; Wang, Ze; Li, Wan; Wong, Y L Elaine; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase dissociation pathways of proteins/peptides are usually affected by the nature of the charge carrier and the sequence of amino acid residues. The effects of peptide structural parameters, including peptide composition, chain length and amide hydrogen, on the gas-phase dissociation of Cu(II)-model peptide complexes were explored in this study. Polyglycine peptides with flexible frames were used as probes to reduce the complexity of the system and illustrate the mechanism. Results revealed that the types of fragment ions generated in the electron capture dissociation (ECD) of Cu(II)-adducted peptides changed according to the basic amino acid residue composition. Charged or neutral tryptophan side-chain losses were observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Cu(II)-peptide complexes. Internal electron transfer between tryptophan and metal ion within the complex occurred during the CID reaction, leaving the charge-reduced Cu(+) as a closed d-shell stable electron configuration. The choice of the reaction channel was then determined by the gas-phase basicity of the peptide. Amide hydrogen was critical in the formation of metalated b-/y-ions in the ECD process as determined through mutation of the backbone amide group. Increasing the chain length suppressed the ECD of Cu-metalated peptide species. Our results indicate that the structural parameters of peptides play important roles in the gas-phase dissociation processes of Cu-peptide complexes.

  4. Short Peptide Vaccine Induces CD4+ T Helper Cells in Patients with Different Solid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Gross, Stefanie; Lennerz, Volker; Gallerani, Elisa; Mach, Nicolas; Böhm, Steffen; Hess, Dagmar; von Boehmer, Lotta; Knuth, Alexander; Ochsenbein, Adrian; Gnad-Vogt, Ulrike; Forssmann, Ulf; Woelfel, Thomas; Kaempgen, Eckhart

    2016-01-01

    Previous cancer vaccination trials often aimed to activate CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses with short (8-10mer) peptides and targeted CD4(+) helper T cells (TH) with HLA class II-binding longer peptides (12-16 mer) that were derived from tumor antigens. Accordingly, a study of immunomonitoring focused on the detection of CTL responses to the short, and TH responses to the long, peptides. The possible induction of concurrent TH responses to short peptides was widely neglected. In a recent phase I vaccination trial, 53 patients with different solid cancers were vaccinated with EMD640744, a cocktail of five survivin-derived short (9- or 10-mer) peptides in Montanide ISA 51VG. We monitored 49 patients and found strong CD8(+) T-cell responses in 63% of the patients. In addition, we unexpectedly found CD4(+) TH cell responses against at least two of the five short peptides in 61% (23/38) of the patients analyzed. The two peptides were recognized by HLA-DP4- and HLA-DR-restricted TH1 cells. Some short peptide-reactive (sp)CD4 T cells showed high functional avidity. Here, we show that a short peptide vaccine is able to activate a specific CD4(+) T-cell repertoire in many patients, facilitating a strong combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell response.

  5. Amyloidogenic amyloid-β-peptide variants induce microbial agglutination and exert antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Condic, Mateja; Herrmann, Martin; Oberstein, Timo Jan; Scharin-Mehlmann, Marina; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Friedrich, Oliver; Grömer, Teja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lang, Roland; Maler, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are the main components of the plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. However, Aβ peptides are also detectable in secretory compartments and peripheral blood contains a complex mixture of more than 40 different modified and/or N- and C-terminally truncated Aβ peptides. Recently, anti-infective properties of Aβ peptides have been reported. Here, we investigated the interaction of Aβ peptides of different lengths with various bacterial strains and the yeast Candida albicans. The amyloidogenic peptides Aβ1-42, Aβ2-42, and Aβ3p-42 but not the non-amyloidogenic peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ2-40 bound to microbial surfaces. As observed by immunocytochemistry, scanning electron microscopy and Gram staining, treatment of several bacterial strains and Candida albicans with Aβ peptide variants ending at position 42 (Aβx-42) caused the formation of large agglutinates. These aggregates were not detected after incubation with Aβx-40. Furthermore, Aβx-42 exerted an antimicrobial activity on all tested pathogens, killing up to 80% of microorganisms within 6 h. Aβ1-40 only had a moderate antimicrobial activity against C. albicans. Agglutination of Aβ1-42 was accelerated in the presence of microorganisms. These data demonstrate that the amyloidogenic Aβx-42 variants have antimicrobial activity and may therefore act as antimicrobial peptides in the immune system. PMID:27624303

  6. Involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the antinociception induced by the novel dermorphin tetrapeptide analog amidino-TAPA.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Moriyama, Kaori; Sato, Bunsei; Ohwada, Keiko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2007-04-10

    The antinociceptive effect of i.t. administered N(alpha)-amidino-Tyr-d-Arg-Phe-beta-Ala (amidino-TAPA), an N-terminal tetrapeptide analog of dermorphin, was characterized in ddY mice. In the opioid receptor ligand-binding assays using mouse brain membranes, amidino-TAPA showed a very high affinity for mu-opioid receptors, a low affinity to delta-opioid receptors and no affinity for kappa-opioid receptors. In the mouse tail-flick test, i.t. treatment with amidino-TAPA produced a potent antinociception. The antinociception induced by amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with the mu-opioid receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine, the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine and the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. Moreover, the antinociception induced by amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with antisera against the endogenous kappa-opioid peptides dynorphin A, dynorphin B and alpha-neo-endorphin; and the endogenous delta-opioid peptide [Leu(5)]enkephalin. In mice lacking prodynorphin, the precursor of the endogenous kappa-opioid peptides, the antinociceptive effect of amidino-TAPA was significantly attenuated compared to that in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. However, there was no difference in G-protein activation by amidino-TAPA in the spinal cord membranes from prodynorphin knockout mice and C57BL/6J mice. The present results suggest that the spinal antinociception induced by the mu-opioid receptor selective peptide amidino-TAPA is mediated in part by the release of endogenous opioid peptides in the spinal cord, which is caused by the direct stimulation of mu-opioid receptors.

  7. Tomato Juice Consumption Modifies the Urinary Peptide Profile in Sprague-Dawley Rats with Induced Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; González-Barrio, Rocío; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Albalat, Amaya; García-Alonso, Javier; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Periago, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in Western countries, with a high prevalence, and has been shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), etc. Tomato products contain several natural antioxidants, including lycopene—which has displayed a preventive effect on the development of steatosis and CVD. Accordingly, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of tomato juice consumption on the urinary peptide profile in rats with NAFLD induced by an atherogenic diet and to identify potential peptide biomarkers for diagnosis. Urine samples, collected weekly for four weeks, were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was carried out to explore the association between differential peptides and treatments. Among the 888 peptides initially identified, a total of 55 were obtained as potential biomarkers. Rats with steatosis after tomato juice intake showed a profile intermediate between that of healthy rats and that of rats with induced hepatic steatosis. Accordingly, tomato products could be considered as a dietary strategy for the impairment of NAFLD, although further research should be carried out to develop a specific biomarkers panel for NAFLD. PMID:27792191

  8. Tomato Juice Consumption Modifies the Urinary Peptide Profile in Sprague-Dawley Rats with Induced Hepatic Steatosis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pozuelo, Gala; González-Barrio, Rocío; Barberá, Gonzalo G; Albalat, Amaya; García-Alonso, Javier; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Periago, María Jesús

    2016-10-26

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in Western countries, with a high prevalence, and has been shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), etc. Tomato products contain several natural antioxidants, including lycopene-which has displayed a preventive effect on the development of steatosis and CVD. Accordingly, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of tomato juice consumption on the urinary peptide profile in rats with NAFLD induced by an atherogenic diet and to identify potential peptide biomarkers for diagnosis. Urine samples, collected weekly for four weeks, were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was carried out to explore the association between differential peptides and treatments. Among the 888 peptides initially identified, a total of 55 were obtained as potential biomarkers. Rats with steatosis after tomato juice intake showed a profile intermediate between that of healthy rats and that of rats with induced hepatic steatosis. Accordingly, tomato products could be considered as a dietary strategy for the impairment of NAFLD, although further research should be carried out to develop a specific biomarkers panel for NAFLD.

  9. Interactions of peptide triazole thiols with Env gp120 induce irreversible breakdown and inactivation of HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the underlying mechanism of action of the peptide triazole thiol, KR13 that has been shown previously to specifically bind gp120, block cell receptor site interactions and potently inhibit HIV-1 infectivity. Results KR13, the sulfhydryl blocked KR13b and its parent non-sulfhydryl peptide triazole, HNG156, induced gp120 shedding but only KR13 induced p24 capsid protein release. The resulting virion post virolysis had an altered morphology, contained no gp120, but retained gp41 that bound to neutralizing gp41 antibodies. Remarkably, HIV-1 p24 release by KR13 was inhibited by enfuvirtide, which blocks formation of the gp41 6-helix bundle during membrane fusion, while no inhibition of p24 release occurred for enfuvirtide-resistant virus. KR13 thus appears to induce structural changes in gp41 normally associated with membrane fusion and cell entry. The HIV-1 p24 release induced by KR13 was observed in several clades of HIV-1 as well as in fully infectious HIV-1 virions. Conclusions The antiviral activity of KR13 and its ability to inactivate virions prior to target cell engagement suggest that peptide triazole thiols could be highly effective in inhibiting HIV transmission across mucosal barriers and provide a novel probe to understand biochemical signals within envelope that are involved in membrane fusion. PMID:24330857

  10. Carbohydrate-induced secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Seino, Yusuke; Maekawa, Ryuya; Ogata, Hidetada; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the incretin hormones secreted from enteroendocrine K-cells and L-cells, respectively, by oral ingestion of various nutrients including glucose. K-cells, L-cells and pancreatic β-cells are glucose-responsive cells with similar glucose-sensing machinery including glucokinase and an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel comprising KIR6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor 1. However, the physiological role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP secretion in K-cells and GLP-1 secretion in L-cells is not elucidated. Recently, it was reported that GIP and GLP-1-producing cells are present also in pancreatic islets, and islet-derived GIP and GLP-1 contribute to glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. In this short review, we focus on GIP and GLP-1 secretion by monosaccharides, such as glucose or fructose, and the role of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+) channel in GIP and GLP-1 secretion.

  11. A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II attenuates the cardiac dysfunction induced by myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryo; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Wakayama, Kouji; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Shimamura, Munehisa; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morishita, Ryuichi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2017-01-01

    A peptide vaccine targeting angiotensin II (Ang II) was recently developed as a novel treatment for hypertension to resolve the problem of noncompliance with pharmacotherapy. Ang II plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI), which causes heart failure. In the present study, we examined whether the Ang II vaccine is effective in preventing heart failure. The injection of the Ang II vaccine in a rat model of MI attenuated cardiac dysfunction in association with an elevation in the serum anti-Ang II antibody titer. Furthermore, any detrimental effects of the Ang II vaccine were not observed in the rats that underwent sham operations. Treatment with immunized serum from Ang II vaccine-injected rats significantly suppressed post-MI cardiac dysfunction in MI rats and Ang II-induced remodeling-associated signaling in cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, our present study demonstrates that the Ang II vaccine may provide a promising novel therapeutic strategy for preventing heart failure. PMID:28266578

  12. Melittin peptide kills Trypanosoma cruzi parasites by inducing different cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Adade, Camila M; Oliveira, Isabelle R S; Pais, Joana A R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2013-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are components of the innate immune response that represent desirable alternatives to conventional pharmaceuticals, as they have a fast mode of action, a low likelihood of resistance development and can act in conjunction with existing drug regimens. AMPs exhibit strong inhibitory activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses, metazoans and other parasites, such as the protozoan Leishmania. Melittin is a naturally occurring AMP, which comprises 40-50% of the dry weight of Apis mellifera venom. Our group has recently shown that crude A. mellifera venom is lethal to Trypanosoma cruzi, the Chagas disease etiologic agent, and generates a variety of cell death phenotypes among treated parasites. Here, we demonstrate that the melittin affected all of T. cruzi developmental forms, including the intracellular amastigotes. The ultrastructural changes induced by melittin suggested the occurrence of different programmed cell death pathways, as was observed in A. mellifera-treated parasites. Autophagic cell death appeared to be the main death mechanism in epimastigotes. In contrast, melittin-treated trypomastigotes appeared to be dying via an apoptotic mechanism. Our findings confirm the great potential of AMPs, including melittin, as a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of neglected diseases, such as Chagas disease.

  13. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  14. Internal energy distribution of peptides in electrospray ionization : ESI and collision-induced dissociation spectra calculation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Alireza; Lesage, Denis; Gimbert, Yves; Vékey, Károly; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The internal energy of ions and the timescale play fundamental roles in mass spectrometry. The main objective of this study is to estimate and compare the internal energy distributions of different ions (different nature, degree of freedom 'DOF' and fragmentations) produced in an electrospray source (ESI) of a triple-quadrupole instrument (Quattro I Micromass). These measurements were performed using both the Survival Yield method (as proposed by De Pauw) and the MassKinetics software (kinetic model introduced by Vékey). The internal energy calibration is the preliminary step for ESI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra calculation. meta-Methyl-benzylpyridinium ion and four protonated peptides (YGGFL, LDIFSDF, LDIFSDFR and RLDIFSDF) were produced using an electrospray source. These ions were used as thermometer probe compounds. Cone voltages (V(c)) were linearly correlated with the mean internal energy values () carried by desolvated ions. These mean internal energy values seem to be slightly dependent on the size of the studied ion. ESI mass spectra and CID spectra were then simulated using the MassKinetics software to propose an empirical equation for the mean internal energy () versus cone voltage (V(c)) for different source temperatures (T): < E(int) > = [405 x 10(-6) - 480 x 10(-9) (DOF)] V(c)T + E(therm)(T). In this equation, the E(therm)(T) parameter is the mean internal energy due to the source temperature at 0 V(c).

  15. Mitochondrial Cholesterol Loading Exacerbates Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Inflammation and Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Anna; Llacuna, Laura; Fernández-Checa, José C.; Colell., Anna

    2009-01-01

    The role of cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease has been linked to the generation of toxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ). Using genetic mouse models of cholesterol loading, we examined whether mitochondrial cholesterol regulates Aβ neurotoxicity and AD pathology. Isolated mitochondria from brain or cortical neurons of transgenic mice overexpressing SREBP-2 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 2) or NPC1 (Niemann-Pick type C1) knockout mice exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation, mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) depletion and increased susceptibility to Aβ1-42-induced oxidative stress and release of apoptogenic proteins. Similar findings were observed in pharmacologically GSH-restricted rat brain mitochondria, while selective mGSH depletion sensitized human neuronal and glial cell lines to Aβ1-42-mediated cell death. Intracerebroventricular human Aβ delivery co-localized with mitochondria resulting in oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal damage that were enhanced in Tg-SREBP-2 mice and prevented upon mGSH recovery by GSH ethyl ester co-infusion, with a similar protection observed by i.p. administration of GSH ethyl ester. Finally, APP/PS1 mice, a transgenic AD mouse model, exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol loading and mGSH depletion. Thus, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation emerges as a novel pathogenic factor in AD by modulating Aβ toxicity via mGSH regulation; strategies boosting the particular pool of mGSH may be of relevance to slow down disease progression. PMID:19458211

  16. Synthetic multi-epitope peptides identified in silico induce protective immunity against multiple influenza serotypes.

    PubMed

    Stoloff, Gregory A; Caparros-Wanderley, Wilson

    2007-09-01

    Influenza causes yearly epidemics of mild disease and, occasionally, pandemics with millions of fatalities. Currently, no vaccine is effective against all influenza strains. Analysis of influenza sequences from animal and human isolates using CLUSTALW and a novel proprietary epitope prediction algorithm identified six conserved T cell-reactive regions in several proteins. Immunisation of transgenic mice with a preparation of these six regions as chemically synthesised peptides (FLU-v) induced a specific HLA-A*0201-mediated CD8(+) T cell response. This T cell population also reacted against human cells infected with three non-related influenza strains, confirming that the identified regions contain epitopes naturally presented by infected human cells and conserved amongst non-related viruses. Moreover, FLU-v immunisation significantly increased survival of transgenic mice against lethal challenge with influenza. Overall, FLU-v represents a promising influenza vaccine candidate, obviating the need for yearly vaccinations and allowing the stockpiling and initiation of a worldwide vaccination program in advance of a pandemic outbreak.

  17. Yeast β-d-glucans induced antimicrobial peptide expressions against Salmonella infection in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yujing; Wang, Zhong; Tian, Xiangyu; Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of yeast β-d-glucans (YG) on gene expression of endogenous β-defensins (AvBDs), cathelicidins (Cath) and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide-2 (LEAP-2) in broilers challenged with Salmonella enteritidis (SE). 240 day-old Cobb male broilers were randomly assigned to 2×2 factorial arrangements of treatments with two levels of dietary YG (0 or 200mg/kg in diet) and two levels of SE challenge (0 or 1×10(9) SE at 7-9 days of age). The results showed SE infection reduced growth performance,and increased salmonella cecal colonization and internal organs invasion, increased concentration of intestinal specific IgA and serum specific IgG antibody, as compared to uninfected birds. SE challenge differentially regulated AvBDs, Caths and LEAP-2 gene expression in the jejunum and spleen of broiler chickens during the infection period. However, YG supplementation inhibited the growth depression by SE challenge, and further increased level of serum specific IgG and intestinal specific IgA antibody. Higher level of salmonella colonization and internal organs invasion in the SE-infected birds were reduced by YG. SE-induced differentially expression patterns of AMPs genes was inhibited or changed by YG. Results indicated YG enhance chicken's resistance to salmonella infection.

  18. Fusion protein of CDR mimetic peptide with Fc inhibit TNF-alpha induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weisong; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Lin, Zhou; Shen, Beifen

    2006-02-01

    The variable regions of antibodies play central roles in the binding with antigens. Based on the model of a tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) neutralizing monoclonal antibody (named as Z12) with TNF-alpha, heavy chain CDR2 (HCDR2) and light chain CDR3 (LCDR3) of Z12 were found to be the most responsible to bind with TNF-alpha. A mimetic peptide (PT) was designed based on the sequence derived from HCDR2 and LCDR3. Fusion protein PT-Fc was constructed by linking PT with Fc of human IgG1 through a flexible linker (GGGGGS). The primary structural characteristics of Fc and PT-Fc were analyzed, including the flexibility, hydrophilicity and epitopes. It was demonstrated that PT and Fc in the fusion protein possessed bio-function properly and non-interfering with each other. Furthermore, PT-Fc was expressed in Escherichia coli by fusion with thioredoxin (Trx). After trx-PT-Fc was cleaved with recombinant enterokinase, PT-Fc was obtained. The results of in vitro cytotoxic assays showed that both PT and PT-Fc could efficiently inhibit TNF-alpha induced apoptosis on L929 cells. At the same micromole concentration, the inhibition activity of PT-Fc was significantly higher than PT.

  19. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  20. Antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L induce formation of tubular lipid protrusions from supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2006-12-15

    The binding of the antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L to supported lipid bilayer (SLB) model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (4:1, mol/mol) caused the formation of fibrillar protrusions, visible by fluorescent microscopy of both a fluorescent lipid analog and a labeled peptide. Multicolor imaging at low peptide-to-lipid ratios (P/L < approximately 1:5) revealed an initial in-plane segregation of membrane-bound peptide and partial exclusion of lipid from the peptide-enriched areas. Subsequently, at higher P/L numerous flexible lipid fibrils were seen growing from the areas enriched in lipid. The fibrils have diameters <250 nm and lengths of up to approximately 1 mm. Fibril formation reduces the in-plane heterogeneity and results in a relatively even redistribution of bound peptide over the planar bilayer and the fibrils. Physical properties of the lipid fibrils suggest that they have a tubular structure. Our data demonstrate that the peptide-lipid interactions alone can provide a driving force for the spontaneous membrane shape transformations leading to tubule outgrowth and elongation. Further experiments revealed the importance of positive curvature strain in the tubulation process as well as the sufficient positive charge on the peptide (>/=+2). The observed membrane transformations could provide a simplified in vitro model for morphogenesis of intracellular tubular structures and intercellular connections.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides Temporins B and L Induce Formation of Tubular Lipid Protrusions from Supported Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The binding of the antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L to supported lipid bilayer (SLB) model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (4:1, mol/mol) caused the formation of fibrillar protrusions, visible by fluorescent microscopy of both a fluorescent lipid analog and a labeled peptide. Multicolor imaging at low peptide-to-lipid ratios (P/L < ∼1:5) revealed an initial in-plane segregation of membrane-bound peptide and partial exclusion of lipid from the peptide-enriched areas. Subsequently, at higher P/L numerous flexible lipid fibrils were seen growing from the areas enriched in lipid. The fibrils have diameters <250 nm and lengths of up to ∼1 mm. Fibril formation reduces the in-plane heterogeneity and results in a relatively even redistribution of bound peptide over the planar bilayer and the fibrils. Physical properties of the lipid fibrils suggest that they have a tubular structure. Our data demonstrate that the peptide-lipid interactions alone can provide a driving force for the spontaneous membrane shape transformations leading to tubule outgrowth and elongation. Further experiments revealed the importance of positive curvature strain in the tubulation process as well as the sufficient positive charge on the peptide (≥+2). The observed membrane transformations could provide a simplified in vitro model for morphogenesis of intracellular tubular structures and intercellular connections. PMID:16997872

  2. Plant CLE peptides from two distinct functional classes synergistically induce division of vascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Ryan; Fernandez, Ana; De Groodt, Ruth; Ortega, Esther; Hilson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The Clavata3 (CLV3)/endosperm surrounding region (CLE) signaling peptides are encoded in large plant gene families. CLV3 and the other A-type CLE peptides promote cell differentiation in root and shoot apical meristems, whereas the B-type peptides (CLE41–CLE44) do not. Instead, CLE41 inhibits the differentiation of Zinnia elegans tracheary elements. To test whether CLE genes might code for antagonistic or synergistic functions, peptides from both types were combined through overexpression within or application onto Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The CLE41 peptide (CLE41p) promoted proliferation of vascular cells, although delaying differentiation into phloem and xylem cell lineages. Application of CLE41p or overexpression of CLE41 did not suppress the terminal differentiation of the root and shoot apices triggered by A-type CLE peptides. However, in combination, A-type peptides enhanced all of the phenotypes associated with CLE41 gain-of-function, leading to massive proliferation of vascular cells. This proliferation relied on auxin signaling because it was enhanced by exogenous application of a synthetic auxin, decreased by an auxin polar transport inhibitor, and abolished by a mutation in the Monopteros auxin response factor. These findings highlight that vascular patterning is a process controlled in time and space by different CLE peptides in conjunction with hormonal signaling. PMID:19011104

  3. Peptide YY ameliorates cerulein-induced pancreatic injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tito, J M; Rudnicki, M; Jones, D H; Alpern, H D; Gold, M S

    1993-06-01

    Peptide YY (PYY), a known inhibitor of both pancreatic secretion and the release of cholecystokinin (CCK), may play a role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP). Supramaximal stimulation of the pancreas with CCK, or its analogue cerulein, induces edematous AP. We previously documented significant decreases in plasma PYY in sodium taurocholate-induced AP in the anesthetized pig, with exogenous PYY suppressing plasma amylase activity. We hypothesized that PYY may ameliorate cerulein-induced pancreatic injury in a conscious animal model. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent chronic cannulation of the jugular vein and carotid artery for drug infusion and blood sampling. The animals were allowed to recover from anesthesia for a minimum of 16 hours, after which they were randomized to one of four (n = 8) treatment groups (cerulein 10 micrograms/kg/h, PYY 400 pmol/kg/h, cerulein+PYY, and control-saline 2 mL/kg/h). All treatments were administered by intravenous infusion over the first 6 hours of the experiment. Blood samples were taken prior to infusion and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 hours into the study; the rats were then killed and the pancreata removed for weighing and histologic examination. All pancreatic specimens were graded in a blinded fashion for vacuolization, edema, inflammation, and necrosis. The mean basal plasma amylase level for all animals was 1,171 +/- 100 U/L and was not significantly different between groups. Infusion of cerulein resulted in significant increases in plasma amylase levels at 3, 6, 9, and 24 hours (4,827 +/- 1,022 U/L at 24 hours). In the group receiving both cerulein and PYY, the hyperamylasemia was attenuated with a return to basal values at 24 hours (1,206 +/- 103 U/L). There was significant pancreatic weight gain (1.99 +/- 0.07 g versus 1.03 +/- 0.07 g) and a worsened histologic picture in cerulein-treated animals compared with control animals (worsened edema, necrosis, and vacuolization). The addition of PYY to

  4. Wild-type amyloid beta 1-40 peptide induces vascular smooth muscle cell death independently from matrix metalloprotease activity.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Rouxel, Clotilde; Zaccarini, François; Glorian, Martine; Béréziat, Gilbert; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of intracerebral hemorrhages in the elderly, characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulating in central nervous system blood vessels. Within the vessel walls, Aβ-peptide deposits [composed mainly of wild-type (WT) Aβ(1-40) peptide in sporadic forms] induce impaired adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with their degeneration. This process often results in a loss of blood vessel wall integrity and ultimately translates into cerebral ischemia and microhemorrhages, both clinical features of CAA. In this study, we decipher the molecular mechanism of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 activation in WT-Aβ(1-40) -treated VSMC and provide evidence that MMP activity, although playing a critical role in cell detachment disrupting ECM components, is not involved in the WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced degeneration of VSMCs. Indeed, whereas this peptide clearly induced VSMC apoptosis, neither preventing MMP-2 activity nor hampering the expression of membrane type1-MMP, or preventing tissue inhibitors of MMPs-2 (TIMP-2) recruitment (two proteins evidenced here as involved in MMP-2 activation), reduced the number of dead cells. Even the use of broad-range MMP inhibitors (GM6001 and Batimastat) did not affect WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced cell apoptosis. Our results, in contrast to those obtained using the Aβ(1-40) Dutch variant suggesting a link between MMP-2 activity, VSMC mortality and degradation of specific matrix components, indicate that the ontogenesis of the Dutch familial and sporadic forms of CAAs is different. ECM degradation and VSMC degeneration would be tightly connected in the Dutch familial form while being two independent processes in sporadic forms of CAA.

  5. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  6. Circulating advanced glycation peptides in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: evidence for preferential modification of IgG light chains.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, A; Menini, T

    1998-01-01

    As the glycation/glycoxidation hypothesis for the genesis of diabetic complications is achieving widespread acceptance, much attention is being paid to the role of low molecular weight advanced glycation (AGE) adducts, as second generation glycating agents. We set out a study with the objective of attesting the presence of increased amounts of AGE-peptides in the circulation of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and to determine the nature of the plasma proteins which are main targets for advanced glycation. AGE (Ex 370/Em 440 nm) and pentosidine fluorescence (Ex 335/Em 385 nm) were significantly higher in plasma from diabetic rats after only one month of hyperglycemia as compared to controls (35 +/- 7 vs 25 +/- 2 AU, p< 0.05 and 54 +/- 14 vs 27 +/- 3 AU, p< 0.01 respectively). AGE-peptides (<10 kDa) were more than two-fold higher in diabetic animals. Immunoblots after SDS-PAGE of plasma proteins showed that AGE-IgG displayed a selective predominant increment in the same animals. When native rat IgG was incubated in the presence of AGE-peptides isolated from diabetic animals, AGE modification was already apparent after only 24 h of incubation, and was particularly important for light chains. AGE-immunoreactive light chains displayed an apparent increase in molecular weight. Aminoguanidine prevented, while copper enhanced AGE binding to IgG light chains. Our data validate the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat as a model reproducing the presence of circulating AGE-peptides, give evidence that IgG are preferential targets for advanced glycation in plasma and suggest that this modification, mediated by AGE-peptides, can be prevented by aminoguanidine.

  7. Genetic differentiation of poly I:C from B:9-23 peptide induced experimental autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Paronen, Johanna; Liu, Edwin; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Devendra, Devasenan; Ide, Akane; Taylor, Robert; Yu, Liping; Miao, Dongmei; Melanitou, Evie; Eisenbarth, George S

    2004-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells of the adaptive immune system mediate beta cell destruction. Recently the innate immune system has been linked to etiopathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, as innate effector cells (e.g. dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages and NK cells) can prime and promote or regulate (auto)immune responses. We have previously developed an experimental autoimmune diabetes (EAD) model with insulin peptide B:9-23 immunization in transgenic H-2(d)mice expressing the costimulatory molecule B7.1 in their islets (under the Rat Insulin Promotor, RIP). We compared the induction of diabetes with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C), a mimic of double stranded viral RNA versus insulin B:9-23 peptide in mice following backcrossing of the B7.1 transgene on to BALB/c mice from original B7.1 C57Bl/6 mice. We find that diabetes induction by Poly I:C is C57Bl/6 associated, whereas B:9-23 peptide induced diabetes and induction of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) are dependent on BALB/c genes. This B:9-23 peptide induced diabetes is consistent with MHC class II H-2(d)being necessary for the response to this peptide. Of note Poly I:C induction of diabetes was lost while B:9-23 induction was retained with backcrossing to BALB/c mice. Interaction of genes and environment (antigenic epitope and viral mimic) can be important in the pathogenesis of immune mediated diabetes and activation of the innate immune system (e.g. Poly I:C) may be one key determinant.

  8. Identification of SART3-derived peptides having the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Matsueda, Satoko; Takedatsu, Hiroko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Noguchi, Masanori; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2007-05-01

    SART3-derived peptides applicable to prostate cancer patients with HLA-A3 supertype alleles were identified in order to expand the possibility of an anti-cancer vaccine, because the peptide vaccine candidates receiving the most attention thus far have been the HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 alleles. Twenty-nine SART3-derived peptides that were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A3 supertype alleles (HLA-A11, -A31, and -A33) were first screened for their recognizability by immunoglobulin G (IgG) of prostate cancer patients and subsequently for the potential to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from HLA-A3 supertype(+) prostate cancer patients. As a result, five SART3 peptides were frequently recognized by IgG, and two of them-SART3 (511-519) and SART3 (734-742)-efficiently induced peptide-specific and cancer-reactive CTLs. Their cytotoxicity toward prostate cancer cells was ascribed to peptide-specific and CD8(+) T cells. These results indicate that these two SART3 peptides could be promising candidates for peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A3 supertype(+) prostate cancer patients.

  9. STAT1, STAT3 and p38MAPK are involved in the apoptotic effect induced by a chimeric cyclic interferon-{alpha}2b peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Viviana C.; Pena, Clara; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2010-02-15

    In the search of mimetic peptides of the interferon-{alpha}2b molecule (IFN-{alpha}2b), we have previously designed and synthesized a chimeric cyclic peptide of the IFN-{alpha}2b that inhibits WISH cell proliferation by inducing an apoptotic response. Here, we first studied the ability of this peptide to activate intracellular signaling pathways and then evaluated the participation of some signals in the induction of apoptosis. Stimulation of WISH cells with the cyclic peptide showed tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and Tyk2 kinases, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors and activation of p38 MAPK pathway, although phosphorylation levels or kinetics were in some conditions different to those obtained under IFN-{alpha}2b stimulus. JNK and p44/42 pathways were not activated by the peptide in WISH cells. We also showed that STAT1 and STAT3 downregulation by RNA interference decreased the antiproliferative activity and the amount of apoptotic cells induced by the peptide. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK also reduced the peptide growth inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect. Thus, we demonstrated that the cyclic peptide regulates WISH cell proliferation through the activation of Jak/STAT signaling pathway. In addition, our results indicate that p38 MAPK may also be involved in cell growth regulation. This study suggests that STAT1, STAT3 and p38 MAPK would be mediating the antitumor and apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells.

  10. Peptide-Induced AIEgen Self-Assembly: A New Strategy to Realize Highly Sensitive Fluorescent Light-Up Probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Aitian; Wang, Huaimin; Kwok, Ryan T K; Ji, Shenglu; Li, Jun; Kong, Deling; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2016-04-05

    Fluorescent light-up probes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics have recently attracted great research interest due to their intelligent fluorescence activation mechanism and excellent photobleaching resistance. In this work, we report a new, simple, and generic strategy to design and prepare highly sensitive AIE fluorescent light-up bioprobe through facile incorporation of a self-assembling peptide sequence GFFY between the recognition element and the AIE luminogen (AIEgen). After the bioprobes respond to the targets, the peptide GFFY is capable of inducing the ordered self-assembly of AIEgens, yielding close and tight intermolecular steric interactions to restrict the intramolecular motions of AIEgens for excellent signal output. Using two proof-of-concepts, we have demonstrated that self-assembling peptide-incorporating AIE light-up probes show much higher sensitivity in sensing the corresponding targets in both solutions and cancer cells as compared to those without GFFY induced self-assembly. Taking the probe TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac), for example, a detection limit as low as 0.54 pM can be achieved for TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac) in caspase-3 detection, which is much lower than that of TPE-K(DVED-Ac) (3.50 pM). This study may inspire new insights into the design of advanced fluorescent molecular probes.

  11. Chemical dynamics simulations of energy transfer, surface-induced dissociation, soft-landing, and reactive-landing in collisions of protonated peptide ions with organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pratihar, Subha; Barnes, George L; Hase, William L

    2016-07-07

    There are two components to the review presented here regarding simulations of collisions of protonated peptide ions peptide-H(+) with organic surfaces. One is a detailed description of the classical trajectory chemical dynamics simulation methodology. Different simulation approaches are used, and identified as MM, QM + MM, and QM/MM dependent on the potential energy surface used to represent the peptide-H(+) + surface collision. The second are representative examples of the information that may be obtained from the simulations regarding energy transfer and peptide-H(+) surface-induced dissociation, soft-landing, and reactive-landing for the peptide-H(+) + surface collisions. Good agreement with experiment is obtained for each of these four collision properties. The simulations provide atomistic interpretations of the peptide-H(+) + surface collision dynamics.

  12. Anti-tumorigenic effect of nano formulated peptide pACC1 by diminishing de novo lipogenisis in DMBA induced mammary carcinoma rat model.

    PubMed

    Kaliaperumal, Jagatheesh; Padarthi, Pavankumar; Elangovan, Namasivayam; Hari, Natarajan

    2014-07-01

    At present, the majority of established treatments for breast cancer are based on clinical manifestations, some fundamental of molecular and cellular biology of cancer. In recent times, the therapy is moving towards personalized medicines. Nevertheless, both the methodologies have own demerits. In the present study, we proposed a novel idea of targeted therapy with twin pharmacological potential by a peptide pACC1. The peptide was formulated with chitosan and evaluated with DMBA induced mammary carcinoma. Results suggest that the peptide holds great control on tumor cell multiplication, fatty acid synthesis and lactate levels. In addition, peptide also brings normal metabolic signs in glycolytic and glycogenic pathways. Histological studies confirm the dual pharmacological actions. Further, it is also proven that the peptide controls membrane receptor levels of HER2 and EGFR. In conclusion, that the peptide pACC1 could be employed as greater therapeutic adjuvant with currently established drugs without considering the stage of the cancer.

  13. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G

    2012-11-23

    The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  14. Fragmentation of peptide negative molecular ions induced by resonance electron capture

    PubMed Central

    Vasil’ev, Yury V.; Figard, Benjamin J.; Morré, Jeff; Deinzer, Max L.

    2009-01-01

    A simple robust method to study resonance gas-phase reactions between neutral peptides of low volatility and free electrons has been designed and implemented. Resonance electron capture (REC) experiments were performed by several neutral model peptides and two naturally occurring peptides. The assignment of negative ions (NIs) formed in these gas-phase reactions was based on high mass-resolving power experiments. From these accurate mass measurements, it was concluded that fragment NIs formed by low (1–2 eV) energy REC are of the same types as those observed in electron capture∕transfer dissociation, where the positive charge is a factor. The main feature resulting from these REC experiments by peptides is the occurrence of zn−1 ions, which are invariably of the highest abundances in the negative ion mass spectra of larger peptides. [M–H]− NIs presumably the carboxylate anion structure dominate the REC spectra of smaller peptides. There was no evidence for the occurrence of the complementary reaction, i.e., the formations of cn+1 ions. Instead, cn ions arose without hydrogen∕proton transfer albeit with lower abundances than that observed for zn−1 ions. Only the amide forms of small peptides showed more abundant ion peaks for the cn ions than for the zn−1 ions. The mechanisms for the N–Cα bond cleavage are discussed. PMID:19655877

  15. Fragmentation of peptide negative molecular ions induced by resonance electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Yury V.; Figard, Benjamin J.; Morre, Jeff; Deinzer, Max L.

    2009-07-28

    A simple robust method to study resonance gas-phase reactions between neutral peptides of low volatility and free electrons has been designed and implemented. Resonance electron capture (REC) experiments were performed by several neutral model peptides and two naturally occurring peptides. The assignment of negative ions (NIs) formed in these gas-phase reactions was based on high mass-resolving power experiments. From these accurate mass measurements, it was concluded that fragment NIs formed by low (1-2 eV) energy REC are of the same types as those observed in electron capture/transfer dissociation, where the positive charge is a factor. The main feature resulting from these REC experiments by peptides is the occurrence of z{sub n}-1 ions, which are invariably of the highest abundances in the negative ion mass spectra of larger peptides. [M-H]{sup -} NIs presumably the carboxylate anion structure dominate the REC spectra of smaller peptides. There was no evidence for the occurrence of the complementary reaction, i.e., the formations of c{sub n}+1 ions. Instead, c{sub n} ions arose without hydrogen/proton transfer albeit with lower abundances than that observed for z{sub n}-1 ions. Only the amide forms of small peptides showed more abundant ion peaks for the c{sub n} ions than for the z{sub n}-1 ions. The mechanisms for the N-C{sub {alpha}} bond cleavage are discussed.

  16. Glucagon like peptide-2 induces intestinal restitution through VEGF release from subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Kerem; Pennartz, Christian; Felderbauer, Peter; Meier, Juris J; Banasch, Matthias; Bulut, Daniel; Schmitz, Frank; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Hoffmann, Peter

    2008-01-14

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) exerts intestinotrophic actions, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of the GLP-2 receptor on fibroblasts located in the subepithelial tissue, where it might induce the release of growth factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Therefore, in the present studies we sought to elucidate the downstream mechanisms involved in improved intestinal adaptation by GLP-2. Human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co), human colonic cancer cells (Caco-2 cells) and rat ileum IEC-18 cells were used. GLP-2 receptor mRNA expression was determined using real time RT-PCR. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells were obtained following incubation with GLP-2 (50-250 nM) for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by a 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay, and wound healing was determined with an established migration-assay. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta), VEGF and KGF mRNA levels were determined by RT-PCR. Protein levels of VEGF and TGF-beta in CCD-18Co cells following GLP-2 stimulation were determined using ELISA. Neutralizing TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies were utilized to assess the role of TGF-beta and VEGF-A in the process of wound healing. GLP-2 receptor expression was detected in CCD-18Co cells. Conditioned media from CCD-18Co cells dose-dependently induced proliferation in Caco-2 cells, but not in IEC-18 cells. Conditioned media also enhanced cell migration in IEC-18 cells (P<0.01), while migration was even inhibited in Caco-2 cells (P<0.0012). GLP-2 significantly stimulated mRNA expression of VEGF and TGF-beta, but not of KGF in CCD-18Co. The migratory effects of GLP-2 were completely abolished in the presence of TGF-beta and VEGF-A antibodies. GLP-2 exerts differential effects on the epithelium of the small intestine and the colon. Thus, in small intestinal cells GLP-2 stimulates wound

  17. The lactoferricin B-derived peptide, LfB17-34, induces melanogenesis in B16F10 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiu-Chin; Lin, Hsuan; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Lactoferricin B (LfcinB), a peptide of bovine lactoferrin (LfB), exhibits multiple biological functions, including antimicrobial, antiviral, antioxidant and immuno-modulatory activities. However, the role of LfcinB-related peptides in melanogenesis remains unclear. In this study, a set of five LfcinB-related peptides was examined. We found that LfB17-34, an 18-mer LfcinB-derived peptide, increased melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells without significantly affecting cell viability. LfB17-34 increased in vitro tyrosinase activity and melanin content in a dose-dependent manner. The results of RT-qPCR and western blot analyses showed that LfB17-34 increased the mRNA and protein expression of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Trp1). Moreover, LfB17-34 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, but not p38 and Akt, and constitutively active MEK was able to reverse the LfB17-34-enhanced pigmentation, melanin content, and tyrosinase activity, suggesting a role of Erk signaling in the process of LfB17-34-mediated pigmentation. Taken together, these results suggest that LfB17-34 induces melanogenesis in B16F10 cells primarily through increased tyrosinase expression and activity and that LfB17-34 could be further developed for the treatment of hypopigmentation disorders. PMID:28204812

  18. Thiosemicarbazone modification of 3-acetyl coumarin inhibits Aβ peptide aggregation and protect against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Dnyanesh S; Bapat, Archika M; Ramteke, Shefali N; Joshi, Bimba N; Roussel, Pascal; Tomas, Alain; Deschamps, Patrick; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2016-10-04

    Aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is an important event in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, among the available therapeutic approaches to fight with disease, inhibition of Aβ aggregation is widely studied and one of the promising approach for the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Thiosemicarbazone compounds are known for their variety of biological activities. However, the potential of thiosemicarbazone compounds towards inhibition of Aβ peptide aggregation and the subsequent toxicity is little explored. Herein, we report synthesis and x-ray crystal structure of novel compound 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone and its efficacy toward inhibition of Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation. Our results indicate that 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone inhibits Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation up to 80% compared to the parent 3-acetyl coumarin which inhibits 52%. Further, 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone provides neuroprotection against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cell line. These findings indicate that thiosemicarbazone modification renders 3-acetyl coumarin neuroprotective properties.

  19. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures.

  20. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures. PMID:25520600

  1. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  2. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  3. Enhanced performance of pulsed Q collision induced dissociation-based peptide identification on a dual-pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Lössner, Christopher; Blackstock, Walter; Gunaratne, Jayantha

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed Q collision induced dissociation (PQD) was introduced for isobaric tag quantification on linear ion traps to circumvent the problem of the low-mass cut-off for collision induced dissociation (CID). Unfortunately, fragmentation efficiency is compromised and PQD has found limited use for identification as well as quantification. We demonstrate that PQD has a comparable peptide identification performance to CID on dual-pressure linear ion traps, opening the potential for wider use of isobaric tag quantification on this new generation of linear ion traps.

  4. [The dose dependent effect of glycosaminoglycan peptide complex on corticosteroid-induced disordered metabolism in cartilage tissue of rats].

    PubMed

    Annefeld, M

    1989-01-01

    Systemic corticosteroid treatment induces morphological and functional changes in the articular cartilage similar to those in human osteoarthritis. In animal experiments the dexamethasone-induced inhibition of chondrocyte metabolism can be reduced in a dose-related manner by concomitant treatment with glycosaminoglycan-peptide complexes (GP-C)***). The metabolic changes in cartilage tissues of the joint and Processus Xiphoideus measured quantitatively by 35S-sulphate incorporation are comparable. The results indicate that GP-C could also have a dose-related effect on human osteoarthritic cartilage.

  5. Attenuation of systemic morphine-induced analgesia by central administration of ghrelin and related peptides in mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Chen, Jia-Xiang; Yang, Bei; Zhi, Xing; Guo, Fa-Xian; Sun, Meng-Li; Wang, Jing-Lei; Wei, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Ghrelin, an acylated 28-amino peptide secreted in the gastric endocrine cells, has been demonstrated to stimulate the release of growth hormone, increase food intake, and inhibit pro-inflammatory cascade, etc. Ghrelin mainly combines with its receptor (GHS-R1α) to play the role in physiological and pathological functions. It has been reported that ghrelin plays important roles in the control of pain through interaction with the opioid system in inflammatory pain and acute pain. However, very few studies show the effect of supraspinal ghrelin system on antinociception induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine. In the present study, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of ghrelin (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nmol/L) produced inhibition of systemic morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) analgesia in the tail withdrawal test. Similarly, i.c.v. injection GHRP-6 and GHRP-2 which are the agonists of GHS-R1α, also decreased analgesia effect induced by morphine injected intraperitoneally in mice. Furthermore, these anti-opioid activities of ghrelin and related peptides were not blocked by pretreatment with the GHS-R1α selective antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6 (100 nmol/L, i.c.v.). These results demonstrated that central ghrelin and related peptides could inhibit the analgesia effect induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine. The anti-opioid effects of ghrelin and related peptides do not interact with GHS-R1a. These findings may pave the way for a new strategy on investigating the interaction between ghrelin system and opioids on pain modulation.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Vegge, Andreas; Thymann, Thomas; Lund, Pernille; Stoll, Barbara; Bering, Stine B.; Hartmann, Bolette; Jelsing, Jacob; Qvist, Niels; Burrin, Douglas G.; Jeppesen, Palle B.; Holst, Jens J.

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following intestinal resection in preterm pigs. Preterm pigs were fed enterally for 48 h before undergoing resection of 50% of the small intestine and establishment of a jejunostomy. Following resection, pigs were maintained on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) without (SBS, n = 8) or with GLP-2 treatment (3.5 μg/kg body wt per h, SBS+GLP-2, n = 7) and compared with a group of unresected preterm pigs (control, n = 5). After 5 days of TPN, all piglets were fed enterally for 24 h, and a nutrient balance study was performed. Intestinal resection was associated with markedly reduced endogenous GLP-2 levels. GLP-2 increased the relative absorption of wet weight (46 vs. 22%), energy (79 vs. 64%), and all macronutrients (all parameters P < 0.05). These findings were supported by a 200% increase in sucrase and maltase activities, a 50% increase in small intestinal epithelial volume (P < 0.05), as well as increased DNA and protein contents and increased total protein synthesis rate in SBS+GLP-2 vs. SBS pigs (+100%, P < 0.05). Following intestinal resection in preterm pigs, GLP-2 induced structural and functional adaptation, resulting in a higher relative absorption of fluid and macronutrients. GLP-2 treatment may be a promising therapy to enhance intestinal adaptation and improve digestive function in preterm infants with jejunostomy following intestinal resection. PMID:23764891

  7. Functional Characterization of the Infection-Inducible Peptide Edin in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kaustio, Meri; Ulvila, Johanna; Wilke, Bettina; Hultmark, Dan; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila is a well-established model organism for studying innate immunity because of its high resistance against microbial infections and lack of adaptive immunity. In addition, the immune signaling cascades found in Drosophila are evolutionarily conserved. Upon infection, activation of the immune signaling pathways, Toll and Imd, leads to the expression of multiple immune response genes, such as the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Previously, we identified an uncharacterized gene edin among the genes, which were strongly induced upon stimulation with Escherichia coli in Drosophila S2 cells. Edin has been associated with resistance against Listeria monocytogenes, but its role in Drosophila immunity remains elusive. In this study, we examined the role of Edin in the immune response of Drosophila both in vitro and in vivo. We report that edin expression is dependent on the Imd-pathway NF-κB transcription factor Relish and that it is expressed upon infection both in vitro and in vivo. Edin encodes a pro-protein, which is further processed in S2 cells. In our experiments, Edin did not bind microbes, nor did it possess antimicrobial activity to tested microbial strains in vitro or in vivo. Furthermore, edin RNAi did not significantly affect the expression of AMPs in vitro or in vivo. However, edin RNAi flies showed modestly impaired resistance to E. faecalis infection. We conclude that Edin has no potent antimicrobial properties but it appears to be important for E. faecalis infection via an uncharacterized mechanism. Further studies are still required to elucidate the exact role of Edin in the Drosophila immune response. PMID:22606343

  8. Subpopulation-Specific Transcriptome Analysis of Competence-Stimulating-Peptide-Induced Streptococcus mutans▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lemme, André; Gröbe, Lothar; Reck, Michael; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Competence-stimulating-peptide (CSP)-mediated competence development in Streptococcus mutans is a transient and biphasic process, since only a subpopulation induces the expression of ComX in the presence of CSP, and the activation of the DNA uptake machinery in this fraction shuts down ∼3 to 4 h postinduction. Here, we combine for the first time, to our knowledge, the bacterial flow-cytometric sorting of cells and subpopulation-specific transcriptome analysis of both the competent and noncompetent fraction of CSP-treated S. mutans cells. Sorting was guided by a ComX-green fluorescent protein (ComX-GFP) reporter, and the transcriptome analysis demonstrated the successful combination of both methods, because a strong enrichment of transcripts for comX and its downstream genes was achieved. Three two-component systems were expressed in the competent fraction, and among them was ComDE. Moreover, the recently identified regulator system ComR/S was expressed exclusively in the competent fraction. In contrast, the expression of bacteriocin-related genes was at the same level in all cells. GFP reporter strains for ComE and CipB (mutacin V) confirmed this expression pattern on the single-cell level. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that some ComX-expressing cells committed autolysis in an early stage of competence initiation. In viable ComX-expressing cells, the uptake of DNA could be shown on the single-cell level. This study demonstrates that all cells in the population respond to CSP through the activation of bacteriocin-related genes. Some of these cells start to activate ComX expression but then segregate into two subpopulations, one becoming competent and another one that lyses, resulting in intrapopulation diversity. PMID:21317319

  9. Structural transformation of peptide amphiphile self-assembly induced by headgroup charge and size regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changrui; Bedzyk, Michael; Olvera, Monica; Kewalramani, Sumit; Palmer, Liam

    The ability to control the nano and the meso-scale architecture of molecular assemblies is one of the major challenges in nanoscience. Significantly, structural transformations of amphiphilic aggregates induced by variations in environmental conditions have attracted attention due to their biotechnological relevance. Here, we study the assembly in aqueous solution for a modular series of peptide amphiphiles with 3, 2 or 1 lysine groups conjugated to a C16 carbon tail (C16K3, C16K2 and C16K1) . This system design allow us to probe how the equilibrium structure of the self-assembly can be tuned by controlling the coupling between steric (via choice of headgroup: K3, K2, or K1) and electrostatic (via solution pH) interactions. Solution small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that depending on pH and number of lysines in the lipid headgroup, amphiphiles can assemble into a range of structures: spherical micelles, bilayer ribbons and vesicles. We also perform detailed phase space mapping of pH-and headgroup size dependency of the structures of assembly over 0.1-100 nm length scales via SAXS/WAXS. The experimental results in conjunction with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations deduce quantitative relations between pH-dependent molecular charges, steric constraints and self-assembly morphologies, which is significant for developing experimental routes to obtain assembly structures with specific nano- and meso-scale features through controlled external stimuli.

  10. Surface-induced dissociation of peptides and protein complexes in a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Galhena, Asiri S; Dagan, Shai; Jones, Christopher M; Beardsley, Richard L; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2008-03-01

    A novel in-line surface-induced dissociation (SID) device was designed and implemented in a commercial QTOF instrument (Waters/Micromass QTOF II). This new setup allows efficient SID for a broad range of molecules. It also allows direct comparison with conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID) on the same instrument, taking advantage of the characteristics of QTOF instrumentation, including extended mass range, improved sensitivity, and better resolution compared with quadrupole analyzers and ion traps. Various peptides and a noncovalent protein complex have been electrosprayed and analyzed with the new SID setup. Here we present SID of leucine enkephalin, fibrinopeptide A, melittin, insulin chain-B, and a noncovalent protein complex from wheat, heat shock protein 16.9. The SID spectra were also compared to CID spectra. With the SID setup installed, ion transmission proved to be efficient. SID fragmentation patterns of peptides are, in general, similar to CID, with differences in the relative intensities of some peaks such as immonium ions, backbone cleavage b- versus y-type ions, and y- versus y-NH3 ions, suggesting enhanced accessibility to high-energy/secondary fragmentation channels with SID. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the in-line SID setup is a valid substitute for CID, with potential advantages for activation of singly/multiply charged peptides and larger species such as noncovalent protein complexes.

  11. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 induces cell death and DAMP release by mitochondria distortion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Yang, Nannan; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are naturally occurring molecules found in most species, in which they play a significant role in the first line defense against intruding pathogens, and several HDPs have been shown to possess anticancer activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on the HDP bovine lactoferricin revealed a de novo design of a nonamer peptide LTX-315, with oncolytic properties. In the present study, we investigated the oncolytic activity of LTX-315 in human melanoma cells (A375). LTX-315 induced a rapid plasma membrane disruption and cell death within 2 hours. At a low concentration, fluorescence-labeled LTX-315 was internalized and accumulated in cytoplasmic vacuoles in close proximity to the mitochondria. The mitochondrial membrane potential was shown to depolarize as a consequence of LTX-315 treatment and at ultrastructural level, the mitochondria morphology was significantly altered. Release of danger signals (DAMPs) such as ATP, Cytochrome C and HMGB1 into the cell supernatant of cultured cells was evident minutes after peptide treatment. The oncolytic effect of LTX-315 involving perturbation of both the cell membrane and the mitochondria with subsequent release of DAMPs may highlight the ability of LTX-315 to induce complete regression and long-term protective immune responses as previously reported in experimental animal models. PMID:26472184

  12. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury: Anti-inflammatory effects☆

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Feifei; Sang, Feng; Zhou, Chunxiang; Ling, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloid-β peptide (25–35), as a model of Alzheimer’s disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3–10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloid-β peptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in the culture supernatant of activated BV-2 microglia. The effects of 10-3 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction were more significant. These results suggest that Lingguizhugan decoction can protect SH-SY5Y cells against amyloid-β peptide (25–35)-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner by inhibiting overexpression of inflammatory factors by activated microglia. PMID:25317138

  13. A possible role of atrial natriuretic peptide in ethanol-induced acute diuresis

    SciTech Connect

    Colantonio, D.; Casale, R.; Mammarella, M.; Pasqualetti, P. ); Desiati, P.; De Michele, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol on plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were investigated in 4 clinically healthy males, aged 24-26 years, consumed either 750 ml of water as a control study, or the same beverage with 1 ml/kg alcohol added, which increased the plasma alcohol concentration to 99.12{plus minus}15.10 mg/dl at 60 min. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher in the alcohol study compared to the control study at each time point, and with a peak at 10 min. Atrial natriuretic peptide levels showed a positive significant correlation with plasma antidiuretic hormone in the control group, while no relationship was found between the two peptides in the alcohol study. Moreover, a significant correlation exists between plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels and systolic arterial blood pressure, and heart rate, and between the variations in atrial natriuretic peptide values and the variations in plasma sodium, serum ethanol, and plasma osmolality in the alcohol study. Acute ethanol intake causes an increase in urinary volume, and a decrease in urinary potassium excretion and urinary osmolality, and no change in urinary sodium excretion.

  14. Rational optimization of conformational effects induced by hydrocarbon staples in peptides and their binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T; Verma, Chandra S; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W; Lane, David P; Brown, Christopher J

    2013-12-13

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  15. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  16. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  17. Fibulin1C peptide induces cell attachment and extracellular matrix deposition in lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Qi; Chen, Ling; Jaffar, Jade; Argraves, William Scott; Twal, Waleed O.; Hansbro, Phil; Black, Judith L.; Burgess, Janette K.; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Fibulin-1 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, levels of which are elevated in serum and lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis compared to healthy volunteers. Inhibition of fibulin-1C, one of four fibulin-1 isoforms, reduced proliferation and wound healing in human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. This study identified the bioactive region/s of fibulin-1C which promotes fibrosis. Seven fibulin-1C peptides were synthesized and used to pre-coat tissue culture plates before lung derived ASM cells and fibroblasts from patients with pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or neither disease (Control) were plated. Peptide effects on in vitro measures of fibrosis: cell attachment, proliferation and viability, and ECM deposition, were examined. Among these peptides, peptide 1C1 (FBLN1C1) enhanced ASM cell and fibroblast attachment. FBLN1C1 increased mitochondrial activity and proliferation in fibroblasts. In addition, FBLN1C1 stimulated fibulin1 deposition in PF and COPD fibroblasts, and augmented fibronectin and perlecan deposition in all three groups. Peptides FBLN1C2 to FBLN1C7 had no activity. The active fibulin-1C peptide identified in this study describes a useful tool for future studies. Ongoing investigation of the role of fibulin-1 may reveal the mechanisms underlying the pathphysiology of chronic lung diseases. PMID:25834989

  18. Oral and parenteral immunization with synthetic retro-inverso peptides induce antibodies that cross-react with native peptides and parent antigens.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Comis, Alfio; Tyler, Margaret; Howden, Merlin

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether certain retro-inverso peptides have the potential to act as synthetic vaccines in mice, when immunized by injection or orally. Immunization of mice parenterally with conjugates of three such retro-inverso peptides and orally with the unconjugated peptides elicited generally high titres of anti-peptide antibodies. Antibodies against the same three peptides cross-reacted by binding strongly in ELISA to the native peptides and vice versa, regardless of the mode of immunization. Antibodies against a retro-inverso diphtheria peptide also reacted strongly with diphtheria toxin. Seven of 8 mice, immunized by injection of the conjugate of a retro-inverso derivative of robustoxin [a lethal spider (Atrax robustus) venom toxin] were protected from challenge involving injection with twice the minimum lethal dose of A. robustus venom containing the toxin.

  19. The antimicrobial peptide sublancin ameliorates necrotic enteritis induced by Clostridium perfringens in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Zeng, X F; Wang, Q W; Zhu, J L; Peng, Q; Hou, C L; Thacker, P; Qiao, S Y

    2015-10-01

    Sublancin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by 168 containing 37 amino acids. The objective of this study was to investigate its inhibitory efficacy against both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, we determined that sublancin had a minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 μM against , which was much higher than the antibiotic lincomycin (0.281 μM). Scanning electron microscopy showed that sublancin damaged the morphology of . The in vivo study was conducted on broilers for a 28-d period using a completely randomized design. A total of 252 chickens at 1 d of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments including an uninfected control; an infected control; 3 infected groups supplemented with sublancin at 2.88, 5.76, or 11.52 mg activity/L of water; and an infected group supplemented with lincomycin at 75 mg activity/L of water (positive control). Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broilers by oral inoculation of on d 15 through 21. Thereafter, the sublancin or lincomycin were administered fresh daily for a period of 7 days. The challenge resulted in a significant decrease in ADG ( < 0.05) and a remarkable deterioration in G:F ( < 0.05) during d 15 to 21 of the experiment. There was a sharp increase of numbers in the cecum ( < 0.05). The addition of sublancin or lincomycin reduced caecal counts ( < 0.05). The counts had a tendency to decrease in the lincomycin treatment ( = 0.051) but were the highest in the sublancin treatment (5.76 mg activity/L of water). A higher villus height to crypt depth ratio in the duodenum and jejunum as well as a higher villus height in the duodenum were observed in broilers treated with sublancin or lincomycin ( < 0.05) compared with infected control broilers. It was observed that sublancin and lincomycin decreased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels ( < 0.05) in the ileum compared with the infected control. In conclusion, although sublancin's minimum inhibitory concentration is much higher than lincomycin

  20. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, protects against amyloid-β peptide-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Tao; Ye-Tian; Yuan-Li; Zhang, Ge-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Di, Zheng-Li; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yan; Song, Er-Fei; Qi, Jin-Shun; Pan, Yan-Fang

    2016-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share specific molecular mechanisms, and agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for T2DM treatment. Thus, this study was designed to characterize the effects of exendin-4 on the impairment of learning and memory induced by amyloid protein (Aβ) and its probable molecular underlying mechanisms. The results showed that (1) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 resulted in a significant decline of spatial learning and memory of rats in water maze tests; (2) pretreatment with exendin-4 effectively and dose-dependently protected against the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory; (3) exendin-4 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl2 in Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rats. The vision and swimming speed of the rats among all groups in the visible platform tests did not show any difference. These findings indicate that systemic pretreatment with exendin-4 can effectively prevent the behavioral impairment induced by neurotoxic Aβ1-42, and the underlying protective mechanism of exendin-4 may be involved in the Bcl2, Bax and caspase-3 pathways. Thus, the application of exendin-4 or the activation of its signaling pathways may be a promising strategy to ameliorate the degenerative processes observed in AD.

  1. An HLA-A3-binding prostate acid phosphatase-derived peptide can induce CTLs restricted to HLA-A2 and -A24 alleles.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Yasunobu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Niu, Yamei; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Noguchi, Masanori; Todo, Satoru; Itoh, Kyogo

    2009-11-01

    We previously reported peptide vaccine candidates for HLA-A3 supertype (-A3, -A11, -A31, -A33)-positive cancer patients. In the present study, we examined whether those peptides can also induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity restricted to HLA-A2, HLA-A24, and HLA-A26 alleles. Fourteen peptides were screened for their binding activity to HLA-A*0201, -A*0206, -A*0207, -A*2402, and -A*2601 molecules and then tested for their ability to induce CTL activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from prostate cancer patients. Among these peptides, one from the prostate acid phosphatase protein exhibited binding activity to HLA-A*0201, -A*0206, and -A*2402 molecules. In addition, PBMCs stimulated with this peptide showed that HLA-A2 or HLA-A24 restricted CTL activity. Their cytotoxicity toward cancer cells was ascribed to peptide-specific and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that this peptide could be widely applicable as a peptide vaccine for HLA-A3 supertype-, HLA-A2-, and -A24-positive cancer patients.

  2. Evaluation of the Influence of Amino Acid Composition on the Propensity for Collision-Induced Dissociation of Model Peptides Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Laskin, Julia

    2007-09-01

    The dynamical behavior of model peptides was evaluated with respect to their ability to form internal proton donor-acceptor pairs using molecular dynamics simulations. The proton donor-acceptor pairs are postulated to be prerequisites for peptide bond cleavage resulting in formation of b and y ions during low energy collision-induced dissociation in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The simulations for the polyalanine pentamer Ala5H+ were compared to experimental data from collision energy-resolved surface induced dissociation (SID) studies. The results of the simulation are insightful into the events that likely lead up to the fragmentation of peptides. 9-mer polyalanine-based model peptides were used to examine the dynamical effect of each of the 20 common amino acids on the probability to form donor-acceptor pairs at labile peptide bonds. A continuous range of probabilities was observed as a function of the substituted amino acid. However, the location of the peptide bond involved in the donor-acceptor pair plays a critical role in the dynamical behavior. This influence of position on the probability of forming a donor-acceptor pair would be hard to predict from statistical analyses on experimental spectra of aggregate, diverse peptides. In addition, the inclusion of basic side chains in the model peptides alters the probability of forming donor-acceptor pairs across the entire backbone. In this case there are still more ionizing protons than basic residues, but the side chains of the basic amino acids form stable hydrogen bond networks with the peptide carbonyl oxygens and thus act to prevent free access of “mobile protons” to labile peptide bonds. It is clear from the work that the identification of peptides from low-energy CID using automated computational methods should consider the location of the fragmenting bond as well as the amino acid composition.

  3. The interplay of T1- and T2-relaxation on T1-weighted MRI of hMSCs induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Li, Binbin; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Dai, Jianwu; Tan, Bo; Deng, Zongwu

    2014-04-01

    Three Gd-DOTA-peptide complexes with different peptide sequence are synthesized and used as T1 contrast agent to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for magnetic resonance imaging study. The peptides include a universal cell penetrating peptide TAT, a linear MSC-specific peptide EM7, and a cyclic MSC-specific peptide CC9. A significant difference in labeling efficacy is observed between the Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as a control Dotarem. All Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as Dotarem induce significant increase in T1 relaxation rate which is in favor of T1-weighted MR imaging. Gd-DOTA-CC9 yields the maximum labeling efficacy but poor T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-EM7 yields the minimum labeling efficacy but better T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-TAT yields a similar labeling efficacy as Gd-DOTA-CC9 and similar T1 contrast enhancement as Gd-DOTA-EM7. The underlying mechanism that governs T1 contrast enhancement effect is discussed. Our results suggest that T1 contrast enhancement induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides depends not only on the introduced cellular Gd content, but more importantly on the effect that Gd-DOTA-peptides exert on the T1-relaxation and T2-relaxation processes/rates. Both T1 and particularly T2 relaxation rate have to be taken into account to interpret T1 contrast enhancement. In addition, the interpretation has to be based on cellular instead of aqueous longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of Gd-DOTA-peptides.

  4. Genomic organization of the gene that encodes the precursor to EGF-related peptides, exogastrula-inducing peptides, of the sea urchin Anthocidaris crassispina.

    PubMed

    Haruguchi, Yoshiko; Horii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Gentaroh; Suyemitsu, Takashi; Ishihara, Katsutoshi; Yamasu, Kyo

    2002-04-12

    Exogastrula-inducing peptides (EGIPs) were identified in embryos of the sea urchin Anthocidaris crassispina as polypeptides with structural similarity to epidermal growth factor (EGF) that severely affect gastrulation of sea urchin embryos to induce exogastrulation. Here we have obtained genomic clones for the EGIP precursor gene (EGIP) and determined its genomic organization. The EGIP gene spans the length of 9 kb in the genome and is composed of seven exons and six introns. Each of the four EGF motifs in the precursor protein is encoded by a single exon, and all the exon boundaries are in phase 1, suggesting that EGIP have been generated during evolution by duplication of an exon encoding a single ancient EGIP sequence. The 5'-flanking sequence of EGIP from -4372 to +194 revealed the presence of multiple repeat sequences including direct and inverted repeats as well as two clusters of GGGG/CCCC elements. The function of the upstream flanking region of EGIP was examined by introducing the gene constructs into embryos in which different regions from the flanking DNA were placed upstream to the GFP reporter gene. Systematic deletion of the upstream DNA revealed the presence of potent enhancer activity between -372 and -210.

  5. Tuning the autophagy-inducing activity of lanthanide-based nanocrystals through specific surface-coating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunjiao; Zheng, Fang; Yang, Tianlong; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Yun; Man, Na; Zhang, Li; Jin, Nan; Dou, Qingqing; Zhang, Yong; Li, Zhengquan; Wen, Long-Ping

    2012-09-01

    The induction of autophagy on exposure of cells to a variety of nanoparticles represents both a safety concern and an application niche for engineered nanomaterials. Here, we show that a short synthetic peptide, RE-1, identified by means of phage display, binds to lanthanide (LN) oxide and upconversion nanocrystals (UCN), forms a stable coating layer on the nanoparticles’ surface, and effectively abrogates their autophagy-inducing activity. Furthermore, RE-1 peptide variants exhibit a differentially reduced binding capability, and correspondingly, a varied ability to reduce the autophagic response. We also show that the addition of an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif to RE-1 enhances autophagy for LN UCN through the interaction with integrins. RE-1 and its variants provide a versatile tool for tuning material-cell interactions to achieve the desired level of autophagy, and may prove useful for the various diagnostic and therapeutic applications of LN-based nanomaterials and nanodevices.

  6. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  7. The cell aggregating propensity of probiotic actinobacterial isolates: isolation and characterization of the aggregation inducing peptide pheromone.

    PubMed

    Muthu Selvam, Ramu; Vinothini, Gopal; Palliyarai Thaiyammal, Sethuramalingam; Latha, Selvanathan; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Ali Alharbi, Sulaiman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2016-01-01

    The auto-aggregating ability of a probiotic is a prerequisite for colonization and protection of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas co-aggregation provides a close interaction with pathogenic bacteria. Peptide pheromone mediated signaling has been studied in several systems. However, it has not yet been explored in prokaryotes, especially actinobacteria. Hence, in the present study, the diffusible aggregation promoting factor was purified from the culture supernatant of a potent actinobacterial probiont and characterized using 20 different actinobacterial cultures isolated from the gut region of chicken and goat. The results showed that the pheromone-like compound induces the aggregation propensity of treated isolates. The factor was found to be a heat stable, acidic pH resistant, low molecular weight peptide which enhances the biofilm forming ability of other actinobacterial isolates. The aggregation promoting factor represents a bacterial sex factor (pheromone) and its characterization confirms its usage in the probiotic formulation.

  8. Wheat peptides reduce oxidative stress and inhibit NO production through modulating μ-opioid receptor in a rat NSAID-induced stomach damage model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Cai, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Shao-Kang; Yang, Li-Gang; Sun, Gui-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of stomach damage. In the present study, the protective effects of wheat peptides were evaluated in a NSAID-induced stomach damage model in rats. Different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by gavage for 30 days before the rat stomach damage model was established by administration of NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) into the digestive tract twice. The treatment of wheat peptides decreased the NSAID-induced gastric epithelial cell degeneration and oxidative stress and NO levels in the rats. Wheat peptides significantly increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and decreased iNOS activity in stomach. The mRNA expression level of μ-opioid receptor was significantly decreased in wheat peptides-treated rats than that in in the control rats. The results suggest that NSAID drugs induced stomach damage in rats, wchih can be prevented by wheat peptides. The mechanisms for the protective effects were most likely through reducing NSAID-induced oxidative stress.

  9. Inhibition of retinal detachment-induced apoptosis in photoreceptors by a small peptide inhibitor of the fas receptor.

    PubMed

    Besirli, Cagri G; Chinskey, Nicholas D; Zheng, Qiong-Duan; Zacks, David N

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To test the effect of a small peptide inhibitor (Met12) of the Fas receptor on the activation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways after retinal detachment. Methods. Retinal-RPE separation was created in Brown Norway rats by subretinal injection of 1% hyaluronic acid. Met12, derived from the Fas-binding extracellular domain of the oncoprotein Met, was injected into the subretinal space at the time of separation. A mutant peptide and vehicle administered in a similar fashion acted as inactive controls. The extrinsic apoptotic pathway was induced in 661W cells using a Fas-activating antibody in the presence or absence of Met12. Caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 activities were measured with calorimetric and luminescent assays in retinal extracts and cell lysates. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) was performed in retinal sections 3 days after separation. Histology was performed in retinal sections 2 months after retinal detachment. Results. Met12 inhibited Fas-induced caspase 8 activation in 661W cells. Similarly, administration of Met12 into the subretinal space inhibited the activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 after retinal detachment. This corresponded to a decreased level of TUNEL-positive staining of photoreceptors after retinal-RPE separation in animals that received Met12, but not inactive mutant, peptide treatment. After 2 months, the outer nuclear layer was significantly thicker, and the photoreceptor count was higher in animals treated with subretinal Met12. Conclusions. The small peptide Met12 may serve as a photoreceptor-protective agent in the setting of retinal-RPE separation.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptide-induced Apoptotic Death of Leishmania Results from Calcium-de pend ent, Caspase-independent Mitochondrial Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha M.; Robert McMaster, W.; Kamysz, Wojciech; McGwire, Bradford S.

    2009-01-01

    α- and θ-defensin-, magainin-, and cathelicidin-type antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can kill the pathogenic protozoan Leishmania. Comparative studies of a panel of AMPs have defined two distinct groups: those that induce nonapoptotic (Class I) and apoptotic (Class II) parasite killing based on their differential ability to induce phosphatidyl serine exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ATP production, induction of caspase-3/7 and -12 activity, and DNA degradation. Class II AMPs cause rapid influx of the vital stain SYTOX and an increase in intracellular Ca2+, whereas Class I AMPs cause a slow accumulation of SYTOX and do not affect intracellular Ca2+ levels. Inhibitors of cysteine or caspase proteases diminished fast influx of SYTOX through the surface membrane and DNA degradation but do not ablate the annexin V staining or the induction of apoptosis by Class II AMPs. This suggests that the changes in surface permeability in AMP-mediated apoptosis are related to the downstream events of intracellular cysteine/caspase activation or the loss of ATP. The activation of caspase-12-like activity was Ca2+-dependent, and inhibitors of voltage-gated and nonspecific Ca2+ channels diminished this activity. Flufenamic acid, a nonspecific Ca2+ inhibitor, completely ablated AMP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death, indicating the importance of dysregulation of Ca2+ in antimicrobial peptide-induced apoptosis. PMID:19357081

  11. A β-tubulin 5-derived peptide induces cytotoxic T lymphocytes restricted to the HLA-A24 allele in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Nobukazu; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Noguchi, Masanori; Todo, Satoru; Itoh, Kyogo; Shichijo, Shigeki

    2010-09-01

    To facilitate the development of a peptide-based cancer vaccine for prostate cancer patients, we examined whether any of the 13 peptides previously reported to induce HLA-class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in HLA-A3 supertype (-A3, -A11, -A31 and -A33)-positive prostate cancer patients are also capable of inducing CTLs restricted to HLA-A2, HLA-A24 or HLA-A26 alleles. Among the 13 peptides tested, a peptide at positions 309 to 318 of β-tubulin 5 exhibited binding activity to the HLA-A(*)2402 molecule and induced HLA-A24-restricted CTL activity against prostate cancer cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer patients. The CTL activity was determined to be specific to this peptide and was mediated by CD8(+) T cells in an HLA-class I-restricted manner. These results suggest that this peptide could be applicable as a peptide vaccine, not only for HLA-A3 supertype-positive, but also for HLA-A24-positive prostate cancer patients.

  12. Alzheimer's and Danish dementia peptides induce cataract and perturb retinal architecture in rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Reddy, P Yadagiri; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2017-03-01

    Familial Danish dementias (FDDs) are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders that are associated with visual defects. In some aspects, FDD is similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD)- the amyloid deposits in FDD and AD are made of short peptides: amyloid β (Aβ) in AD and ADan in FDD. Previously, we demonstrated an interaction between the dementia peptides and α-crystallin leading to lens opacification in organ culture due to impaired chaperone activity of α-crystallin. Herein, we report the in vivo effects of ADan and Aβ on the eye. ADan [reduced (ADan-red) and oxidized (ADan-oxi)] and Aβ (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42) were injected intravitreally in rats. The onset of cataract was seen after injection of all the peptides, but the cataract matured by 2 weeks in the case of ADan-red, 5 weeks for ADan-oxi and 6 weeks for Aβ1-40, while Aβ1-42 had minimal effect on cataract progression. The severity of cataract is associated with insolubilization and alterations in crystallins and loss of chaperone activity of α-crystallin. Further, disruption of the architecture of the retina was evident from a loss of rhodopsin, increased gliosis, and the thinning of the retina. These results provide a basis for the dominant heredo-otoophthalmo-encephalopathy (HOOE)/FDD syndrome and indicate that ADan peptides are more potent than Aβpeptides in inflicting visual impairment.

  13. A Tubulin Binding Peptide Targets Glioma Cells Disrupting Their Microtubules, Blocking Migration, and Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Peterson, Alan C; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment regimes, glioma remains a largely fatal disease. Current treatment limitations are attributed to the precarious locations within the brain where such tumors grow, their highly infiltrative nature precluding complete resection and lack of specificity among agents capable of attenuating their growth. Here, we show that in vitro, glioma cells of diverse origins internalize a peptide encompassing a tubulin-binding site (TBS) on the neurofilament light protein. The internalized peptide disrupts the microtubule network, inhibits migration and proliferation, and leads to apoptosis. Using an intracerebral transplant model, we show that most, if not all, of these responses to peptide exposure also occur in vivo. Notably, a single intratumor injection significantly attenuates tumor growth, while neither peptide uptake nor downstream consequences are observed elsewhere in the host nervous system. Such preferential uptake suggests that the peptide may have potential as a primary or supplementary glioblastoma treatment modality by exploiting its autonomous microtubule-disrupting activity or engaging its capacity to selectively target glioma cells with other cell-disrupting cargos. PMID:22491214

  14. Covalently attached oligodeoxyribonucleotides induce RNase activity of a short peptide and modulate its base specificity

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Nadezhda L.; Pyshnyi, Dmytryi V.; Ivanova, Eugenya M.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2004-01-01

    New artificial ribonucleases, conjugates of short oligodeoxyribonucleotides with peptides containing alternating arginine and leucine, were synthesized and characterized in terms of their catalytic activity and specificity of RNA cleavage. The conjugates efficiently cleave different RNAs within single-stranded regions. Depending on the sequence and length of the oligonucleotide, the conjugates display either G–X>>Pyr–A or Pyr–A>>G–X cleavage specificity. Preferential RNA cleavage at G–X phosphodiester bonds was observed for conjugate NH2-Gly-[ArgLeu]4-CCAAACA. The conjugates function as true catalysts, exhibiting reaction turnover up to 175 for 24 h. Our data show that in the conjugate the oligonucleotide plays the role of a factor which provides an ‘active‘ conformation of the peptide via intramolecular interactions, and that it is the peptide residue itself which is responsible for substrate affinity and catalysis. PMID:15047859

  15. Inducible Expression of the De-Novo Designed Antimicrobial Peptide SP1-1 in Tomato Confers Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Diaz, Areli; Kovacs, Izabella; Lindermayr, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small peptides with less than 50 amino acids and are part of the innate immune response in almost all organisms, including bacteria, vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. AMPs are active against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The inducible expression of AMPs in plants is a promising approach to combat plant pathogens with minimal negative side effects, such as phytotoxicity or infertility. In this study, inducible expression of the de-novo designed AMP SP1-1 in Micro Tom tomato protected tomato fruits against bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The peptide SP1-1 was targeted to the apoplast which is the primary infection site for plant pathogens, by fusing SP1-1 peptide to the signal peptide RsAFP1 of radish (Raphanus sativus). The pathogen inducibility of the expression was enabled by using an optimized inducible 4XW2/4XS promoter. As a result, the tomato fruits of independently generated SP1-1 transgenic lines were significantly more resistant to X. campestris pv. vesicatoria than WT tomato fruits. In transgenic lines, bacterial infection was reduced up to 65% in comparison to the infection of WT plants. Our study demonstrates that the combination of the 4XW2/4XS cis-element from parsley with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide SP1-1 is a good alternative to protect tomato fruits against infections with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. PMID:27706237

  16. Secondary structure conversions of Alzheimer's Abeta(1-40) peptide induced by membrane-mimicking detergents.

    PubMed

    Wahlström, Anna; Hugonin, Loïc; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Jarvet, Jüri; Gräslund, Astrid

    2008-10-01

    The amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) with 39-42 residues is the major component of amyloid plaques found in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, and soluble oligomeric peptide aggregates mediate toxic effects on neurons. The Abeta aggregation involves a conformational change of the peptide structure to beta-sheet. In the present study, we report on the effect of detergents on the structure transitions of Abeta, to mimic the effects that biomembranes may have. In vitro, monomeric Abeta(1-40) in a dilute aqueous solution is weakly structured. By gradually adding small amounts of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or lithium dodecyl sulfate to a dilute aqueous solution, Abeta(1-40) is converted to beta-sheet, as observed by CD at 3 degrees C and 20 degrees C. The transition is mainly a two-state process, as revealed by approximately isodichroic points in the titrations. Abeta(1-40) loses almost all NMR signals at dodecyl sulfate concentrations giving rise to the optimal beta-sheet content (approximate detergent/peptide ratio = 20). Under these conditions, thioflavin T fluorescence measurements indicate a maximum of aggregated amyloid-like structures. The loss of NMR signals suggests that these are also involved in intermediate chemical exchange. Transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy NMR spectra indicate that the C-terminal residues are more dynamic than the others. By further addition of SDS or lithium dodecyl sulfate reaching concentrations close to the critical micellar concentration, CD, NMR and FTIR spectra show that the peptide rearranges to form a micelle-bound structure with alpha-helical segments, similar to the secondary structures formed when a high concentration of detergent is added directly to the peptide solution.

  17. Conservation of capa peptide-induced nitric oxide signalling in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Valerie P; McGettigan, James; Cabrero, Pablo; Maudlin, Ian M; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2004-11-01

    In D. melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubules, the capa peptides stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), resulting in increased fluid transport. The roles of NO synthase (NOS), NO and cGMP in capa peptide signalling were tested in several other insect species of medical relevance within the Diptera (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Glossina morsitans) and in one orthopteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria. NOS immunoreactivity was detectable by immunocytochemistry in tubules from all species studied. D. melanogaster, A. aegypti and A. stephensi express NOS in only principal cells, whereas G. morsitans and S. gregaria show more general NOS expression in the tubule. Measurement of associated NOS activity (NADPH diaphorase) shows that both D. melanogaster capa-1 and the two capa peptides encoded in the A. gambiae genome, QGLVPFPRVamide (AngCAPA-QGL) and GPTVGLFAFPRVamide (AngCAPA-GPT), all stimulate NOS activity in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but not in S. gregaria. Furthermore, capa-stimulated NOS activity in all the Diptera was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME. All capa peptides stimulate an increase in cGMP content across the dipteran species, but not in the orthopteran S. gregaria. Similarly, all capa peptides tested stimulate fluid secretion in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but are either without effect or are inhibitory on S. gregaria. Consistent with these results, the Drosophila capa receptor was shown to be expressed in Drosophila tubules, and its closest Anopheles homologue was shown to be expressed in Anopheles tubules. Thus, we provide the first demonstration of physiological roles for two putative A. gambiae neuropeptides. We also demonstrate neuropeptide modulation of fluid secretion in tsetse tubule for the first time. Finally, we show the generality of capa peptide action, to stimulate NO/cGMP signalling and

  18. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Stellrecht, K; Sercarz, E

    1996-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the initial encephalitogenic T cells recognize MBP Ac1-9 and predominantly use the TCR V beta 8.2 gene segment. In mice recovering from MBP-induced EAE, regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) specific for a single immunodominant TCR peptide B5 (76-101) from framework region 3 of the V beta 8.2 chain, become primed. We have earlier shown that cloned B5-reactive Treg can specifically downregulate responses to Ac1-9 and also protect mice from EAE. These CD4 Treg clones predominantly use the TCR V beta 14 or V beta 3 gene segments. Here we have directly tested whether deletion/blocking of the Treg from the peripheral repertoire affects the spontaneous recovery from EAE. Treatment of F1 mice with appropriate V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies resulted in an increase in the severity and duration of the disease; even relapses were seen in one-third to one-half of the Treg-deleted mice. Interestingly, chronic disease in treated mice appears to be due to the presence of Ac1-9-specific T cells. Thus, once self-tolerance to MBP is broken by immunization with the antigen in strong adjuvant, TCR peptide-specific CD4 Treg cells participate in reestablishing peripheral tolerance. Thus, a failure to generate Treg may be implicated in chronic autoimmune conditions.

  19. Large-scale production of soluble recombinant amyloid-β peptide 1-42 using cold-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Jeong Mi; Jeong, Min Seop; Oh, Choongseob; Ahn, Sung-Min; Yoo, Yung Joon; Jang, Ho Hee

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), the predominant form in senile plaques, plays important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Because Aβ(1-42) has aggregation-prone nature, it has been difficult to produce in a soluble state in bacterial expression systems. In this study, we modified our expression system to increase the soluble fraction of Aβ(1-42) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The expression level and solubility of recombinant Aβ(1-42) induced at the low temperature (16°C) is highly increased compared to that induced at 37°C. To optimize expression temperature, the coding region of Aβ(1-42) was constructed in a pCold vector, pCold-TF, which has a hexahistidine-tagged trigger factor (TF). Recombinant Aβ(1-42) was expressed primarily as a soluble protein using pCold vector system and purified with a nickel-chelating resin. When the toxic effect of recombinant Aβ(1-42) examined on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, the purified Aβ(1-42) induced cell toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, the system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of aggregation prone-peptide such as Aβ(1-42).

  20. Comparative effects of two potentiating peptides (KPP and BPP9a) on kinin-induced rat paw edema.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P D; Guimarães, J A; Assreuy, J

    1991-03-01

    We have previously shown that KPP, a kinin potentiating peptide generated by tryptic digestion of human plasma proteins potentiated kinin effects on isolated smooth muscle preparations like guinea-pig ileum with high potency and specificity. We also obtained evidence suggesting that, unlike other potentiating peptides, KPP exerts its effect by a mechanism different from the inhibition of kinin metabolism by angiotensin converting enzyme, neutral endopeptidase and kininase I. Here we show the potentiating effect of KPP and of BPP9a, a potentiator derived from snake venom, towards the rat paw edema induced by bradykinin (BK). Our results show that: a) KPP is 25-fold more active than BPP9a in potentiating rat paw edema elicited by BK: b) like BPP9a, KPP is specific in potentiating kinin-induced edema, being ineffective in potentiating edema induced by histamine or serotonin; and c) DesArg9-BK (DABK) elicits a small edematogenic response which can be potentiated by both KPP and BPP9a.

  1. The American cockroach peptide periplanetasin-2 blocks Clostridium Difficile toxin A-induced cell damage and inflammation in the gut.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Yoon, I Na; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kang, Jin Ku; Kim, Ho

    2017-02-07

    Clostridium difficile, which causes pseudomembranous colitis, releases toxin A and toxin B. These toxins are considered to be the main causative agents for the disease pathogenesis, and their expression is associated with a marked increase of apoptosis in mucosal epithelial cells. Colonic epithelial cells are believed to form a physical barrier between the lumen and the submucosa, and abnormally increased mucosal epithelial cell apoptosis is considered to be an initial step in gut inflammation responses. Therefore, one approach to treating pseudomembranous colitis would be to develop agents that block the mucosal epithelial cell apoptosis caused by toxin A, thus restoring barrier function and curing inflammatory responses in the gut. We recently isolated an antimicrobial peptide, Periplanetasin-2 (Peri-2, YPCKLNLKLGKVPFH) from the American cockroach, whose extracts have shown great potential for clinical use. Here, we assessed whether Peri-2 could inhibit the cell toxicities and inflammation caused by C. difficile toxin A. Indeed, in human colonocyte HT29 cells, Peri-2 inhibited the toxin A-induced decrease in cell proliferation and ameliorated the cell apoptosis induced by this toxin. Moreover, in the toxin A-induced mouse enteritis model, Peri-2 blocked the mucosal disruption and inflammatory response caused by toxin A. These results suggest that the American cockroach peptide, Peri-2, could be a possible drug candidate for addressing the pseudomembranous colitis caused by C. difficile toxin A.

  2. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-derived peptide (NAP) ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narendra K; Sethy, Niroj K; Meena, Ram Niwas; Ilavazhagan, Govindsamy; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2011-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia is a socio-economic problem affecting cognitive, memory and behavior functions. Severe oxidative stress caused by hypobaric hypoxia adversely affects brain areas like cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In the present study, we have investigated the antioxidant and memory protection efficacy of the synthetic NAP peptide (NAPVSIPQ) during long-term chronic hypobaric hypoxia (7, 14, 21 and 28 days, 25,000ft) in rats. Intranasal supplementation of NAP peptide (2μg/Kg body weight) improved antioxidant status of brain evaluated by biochemical assays for free radical estimation, lipid peroxidation, GSH and GSSG level. Analysis of expression levels of SOD revealed that NAP significantly activated antioxidant genes as compared to hypoxia exposed rats. We have also observed a significant increased expression of Nrf2, the master regulator of antioxidant defense system and its downstream targets such as HO-1, GST and SOD1 by NAP supplementation, suggesting activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense response. In corroboration, our results also demonstrate that NAP supplementation improved the memory function assessed with radial arm maze. These cumulative results suggest the therapeutic potential of NAP peptide for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress.

  3. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  5. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of Cu(2+)-induced oligomers of the Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy M; Kirby, Nigel; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Roberts, Blaine; Barnham, Kevin J; Cappai, Roberto; Pham, Chi Le Lan; Masters, Colin L; Curtain, Cyril C

    2015-03-01

    Research into causes of Alzheimer's disease and its treatment has produced a tantalising array of hypotheses about the role of transition metal dyshomeostasis, many of them on the interaction of these metals with the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Here, we have used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to study the effect of the molar ratio, Cu(2+)/Aβ, on the early three-dimensional structures of the Aβ1-40 and Cu(2+)/Aβ1-42 peptides in solution. We found that at molar ratios of 0.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 aggregated, while Aβ1-42 adopted a relatively monodisperse cylindrical shape, and at a ratio of 1.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 adopted a monodisperse cylindrical shape, while Aβ1-42 adopted the shape of an ellipsoid of rotation. We also found, via in-line rapid mixing SAXS analysis, that both peptides in the absence of copper were monodisperse at very short timeframes (<2 s). Kratky plots of these scattering profiles indicated that immediately after mixing both were intrinsically disordered. Ensemble optimisation modelling reflected this, indicating a wide range of structural conformers. These data reflect the ensembles from which the Cu(2+)-promoted oligomers were derived. Our results are discussed in the light of other studies that have shown that the Cu(2+)/Aβ has a marked effect on fibril and oligomer formation by this peptide, with a higher ratio favouring the formation of cytotoxic non-amyloid oligomers. Our results are relatively consistent with previous two-dimensional studies of the conformations of these Cu(2+)-induced entities, made on a much longer time-scale than SAXS, by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which showed that a range of oligomeric species are formed. We propose that SAXS carried out on a modern synchrotron beamline enables studies on initial events in disordered protein folding on physiologically-relevant time-scales, and will likely provide great insight into the initiating processes of the A

  6. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  7. CopA3 peptide prevents ultraviolet-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Han-Hyuk; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Jung, Hyun-Gug; Yu, Jae-Myo; Lee, Eun-Su; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Dong-In; An, Bong-Jeun

    2014-05-20

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3) was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging.

  8. Pathogen-induced expression of a cecropin A-melittin antimicrobial peptide gene confers antifungal resistance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, Dmytro P; Romero, Rafael; Forward, Benjamin S; Hancock, Robert E; Kay, William W; Misra, Santosh

    2005-06-01

    Expression of defensive genes from a promoter that is specifically activated in response to pathogen invasion is highly desirable for engineering disease-resistant plants. A plant transformation vector was constructed with transcriptional fusion between the pathogen-responsive win3.12T promoter from poplar and the gene encoding the novel cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide (CEMA) with strong antimicrobial activity. This promoter-transgene combination was evaluated in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) for enhanced plant resistance against a highly virulent pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani. Transgene expression in leaves was strongly increased after fungal infection or mechanical wounding, and the accumulation of CEMA transcripts was found to be systemic and positively correlated with the number of transgene insertions. A simple and efficient in vitro regeneration bioassay for preliminary screening of transgenic lines against pathogenic fungi was developed. CEMA had strong antifungal activity in vitro, inhibiting conidia germination at concentrations that were non-toxic to tobacco protoplasts. Most importantly, the expression level of the CEMA peptide in vivo, regulated by the win3.12T promoter, was sufficient to confer resistance against F. solani in transgenic tobacco. The antifungal resistance of plants with high CEMA expression was strong and reproducible. In addition, leaf tissue extracts from transgenic plants significantly reduced the number of fungal colonies arising from germinated conidia. Accumulation of CEMA peptide in transgenic tobacco had no deleterious effect on plant growth and development. This is the first report showing the application of a heterologous pathogen-inducible promoter to direct the expression of an antimicrobial peptide in plants, and the feasibility of this approach to provide disease resistance in tobacco and, possibly, other crops.

  9. Peptide-induced de novo bone formation after tooth extraction prevents alveolar bone loss in a murine tooth extraction model.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ono, Takashi; Murali, Ramachandran; Mise-Omata, Setsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-07-05

    Tooth extraction causes bone resorption of the alveolar bone volume. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) markedly promotes de novo bone formation after tooth extraction, the application of high-dose rhBMP-2 may induce side effects, such as swelling, seroma, and an increased cancer risk. Therefore, reduction of the necessary dose of rhBMP-2 which can still obtain sufficient bone mass is necessary by developing a new osteogenic reagent. Recently, we showed that the systemic administration of OP3-4 peptide, which was originally designed as a bone resorption inhibitor, had osteogenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. This study evaluated the ability of the local application of OP3-4 peptide to promote bone formation in a murine tooth extraction model with a very low-dose of BMP. The mandibular incisor was extracted from 10-week-old C57BL6/J male mice and a gelatin hydrogel containing rhBMP-2 with or without OP3-4 peptide (BMP/OP3-4) was applied to the socket of the incisor. Bone formation inside the socket was examined radiologically and histologically at 21 days after the extraction. The BMP/OP3-4-group showed significant bone formation inside the mandibular extraction socket compared to the gelatin-hydrogel-carrier-control group or rhBMP-2-applied group. The BMP/OP3-4-applied mice showed a lower reduction of alveolar bone and fewer osteoclast numbers, suggesting that the newly formed bone inside the socket may prevent resorption of the cortical bone around the extraction socket. Our data revealed that OP3-4 peptide promotes BMP-mediated bone formation inside the extraction socket of mandibular bone, resulting in preservation from the loss of alveolar bone.

  10. Hypothalamic Agouti-Related Peptide mRNA is Elevated During Natural and Stress-Induced Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Wilson, P W; D'Eath, R B; Boswell, T

    2015-09-01

    As part of their natural lives, animals can undergo periods of voluntarily reduced food intake and body weight (i.e. animal anorexias) that are beneficial for survival or breeding, such as during territorial behaviour, hibernation, migration and incubation of eggs. For incubation, a change in the defended level of body weight or 'sliding set point' appears to be involved, although the neural mechanisms reponsible for this are unknown. We investigated how neuropeptide gene expression in the arcuate nucleus of the domestic chicken responded to a 60-70% voluntary reduction in food intake measured both after incubation and after an environmental stressor involving transfer to unfamiliar housing. We hypothesised that gene expression would not change in these circumstances because the reduced food intake and body weight represented a defended level in birds with free access to food. Unexpectedly, we observed increased gene expression of the orexigenic peptide agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in both incubating and transferred animals compared to controls. Also pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA was higher in incubating hens and significantly increased 6 days after exposure to the stressor. Conversely expression of neuropeptide Y and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene was unchanged in both experimental situations. We conclude that AgRP expression remains sensitive to the level of energy stores during natural anorexias, which is of adaptive advantage, although its normal orexigenic effects are over-ridden by inhibitory signals. In the case of stress-induced anorexia, increased POMC may contribute to this inhibitory role, whereas, for incubation, reduced feeding may also be associated with increased expression in the hypothalamus of the anorexigenic peptide vasoactive intestinal peptide.

  11. SARS-CoV fusion peptides induce membrane surface ordering and curvature.

    PubMed

    Basso, Luis G M; Vicente, Eduardo F; Crusca, Edson; Cilli, Eduardo M; Costa-Filho, Antonio J

    2016-11-28

    Viral membrane fusion is an orchestrated process triggered by membrane-anchored viral fusion glycoproteins. The S2 subunit of the spike glycoprotein from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) contains internal domains called fusion peptides (FP) that play essential roles in virus entry. Although membrane fusion has been broadly studied, there are still major gaps in the molecular details of lipid rearrangements in the bilayer during fusion peptide-membrane interactions. Here we employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron spin resonance (ESR) to gather information on the membrane fusion mechanism promoted by two putative SARS FPs. DSC data showed the peptides strongly perturb the structural integrity of anionic vesicles and support the hypothesis that the peptides generate opposing curvature stresses on phosphatidylethanolamine membranes. ESR showed that both FPs increase lipid packing and head group ordering as well as reduce the intramembrane water content for anionic membranes. Therefore, bending moment in the bilayer could be generated, promoting negative curvature. The significance of the ordering effect, membrane dehydration, changes in the curvature properties and the possible role of negatively charged phospholipids in helping to overcome the high kinetic barrier involved in the different stages of the SARS-CoV-mediated membrane fusion are discussed.

  12. Immunologically active peptides capable of inducing immunization against malaria and genes encoding therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, J.B.; Williams, J.L.; McCutchan, T.F.; Schneider, I.

    1987-11-17

    An antimalarial immunogenic stimulant is described comprising an immunogenic carrier and a peptide sequence of between 2 and 1000 consecutive repeats of a sequence Asn-X-Y-Pro, wherein X is Ala or Val and Y is Asn or Asp.

  13. SARS-CoV fusion peptides induce membrane surface ordering and curvature

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luis G. M.; Vicente, Eduardo F.; Crusca Jr., Edson; Cilli, Eduardo M.; Costa-Filho, Antonio J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral membrane fusion is an orchestrated process triggered by membrane-anchored viral fusion glycoproteins. The S2 subunit of the spike glycoprotein from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) contains internal domains called fusion peptides (FP) that play essential roles in virus entry. Although membrane fusion has been broadly studied, there are still major gaps in the molecular details of lipid rearrangements in the bilayer during fusion peptide-membrane interactions. Here we employed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron spin resonance (ESR) to gather information on the membrane fusion mechanism promoted by two putative SARS FPs. DSC data showed the peptides strongly perturb the structural integrity of anionic vesicles and support the hypothesis that the peptides generate opposing curvature stresses on phosphatidylethanolamine membranes. ESR showed that both FPs increase lipid packing and head group ordering as well as reduce the intramembrane water content for anionic membranes. Therefore, bending moment in the bilayer could be generated, promoting negative curvature. The significance of the ordering effect, membrane dehydration, changes in the curvature properties and the possible role of negatively charged phospholipids in helping to overcome the high kinetic barrier involved in the different stages of the SARS-CoV-mediated membrane fusion are discussed. PMID:27892522

  14. Inducible Resistance of Fish Bacterial Pathogens to the Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cecropin B is a cationic antimicrobial peptide originally isolated from the diapausing pupae of the giant silk moth, Hylphora cecropia. Cecropin B elicits its antimicrobial effects through disruption of the anionic cell membranes of gram-negative bacteria. Previous work by our laboratory demonstra...

  15. Amyloid beta peptide 22-35 induces a negative inotropic effect on isolated rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yousefirad, Neda; Kaygısız, Ziya; Aydın, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that deposition of amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Aβs may influence cardiovascular system and ileum contractions. But the effect of amyloid beta peptide 22-35 (Aβ22-35) on cardiovascular functions and contractions of ileum has not been studied. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the possible effects of this peptide on isolated rat heart and ileum smooth muscle. Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparations were established. The hearts were perfused under constant pressure (60 mmHg) with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Aβ22-35 at doses of 1, 10 and 100 nM significantly decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; an index of cardiac contractility) and maximal rate of pressure development of left ventricle (+dP/dtmax; another index of cardiac contractility). This peptide at doses studied had no significant effect on heart rate, coronary flow, monophasic action potential amplitude (MAPamp), MAP duration at 90% repolarization (MAP90) and ileum contractions. We suggest that Aβ22-35 exerts a negative inotropism on isolated rat hearts with unchanged heart rate, coronary flow, MAPamp, MAP90 and smooth muscle contractility of ileum. PMID:28078053

  16. Butyrate enhances disease resistance of chickens by inducing antimicrobial host defense peptide gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. I...

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-2 induces rapid digestive adaptation following intestinal resection in preterm neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a frequent complication after intestinal resection in infants suffering from intestinal disease. We tested whether treatment with the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases intestinal volume and function in the period immediately following in...

  18. Inhibition of iron/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation by an N-terminal peptide of bovine lactoferrin and its acylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Hashimoto, K; Teraguchi, S; Takase, M; Hayasawa, H

    1999-05-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (LF) and lactoferricin B (LFcin B), an antimicrobial peptide derived from bovine LF, inhibited thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) formation in a iron/ascorbate-induced liposomal phospholipid peroxidation system. The inhibition of TBARS formation occurred with N-acylated 9-mer peptides with a core sequence of LFcin B and, compared to LFcin B, their antioxidant effect was clearly observed at a concentration almost 100 times lower.

  19. Consumption of peptide-included and free tryptophan induced by peroxyl radicals: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; López-Alarcón, C

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that tryptophan residues are efficiently oxidized by peroxyl radicals, generating kynurenine, and N-formyl kynurenine as well as hydroperoxide derivatives as products. In the present work we studied the kinetic of such reaction employing free and peptide-included tryptophan. Two azocompounds were used to produce peroxyl radicals: AAPH (2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride) and ABCVA (4,4'-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid)), which generate cationic and anionic peroxyl radicals, respectively. Tryptophan consumption was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the reactions were carried out in phosphate buffer (75mM, pH 7.4) at 45°C. Only a slight effect of the peroxyl radical charge was evidenced on the consumption of free tryptophan and the dipeptide Gly-Trp. Employing AAPH as peroxyl radical source, at low free tryptophan concentrations (1-10µM) near 0.3 mol of tryptophan were consumed per each mol of peroxyl radicals introduced into the system. However, at high free tryptophan concentrations (100µM-1mM) such stoichiometry increased in a tryptophan concentration-way. At 1mM three moles of tryptophan were consumed per mol of AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, evidencing the presence of chain reactions. A similar behavior was observed when di and tri-peptides (Gly-Trp, Trp-Gly, Gly-Trp-Gly, Trp-Ala, Ala-Trp-Ala) were studied. Nonetheless, at low initial concentration (5µM), the initial consumption rate of tryptophan included in the peptides was two times higher than free tryptophan. In contrast, at high concentration (1mM) free and peptide-included tryptophan showed similar initial consumption rates. These results could be explained considering a disproportionation process of tryptophanyl radicals at low free tryptophan concentrations, a process that would be inhibited when tryptophan is included in peptides.

  20. Leukotriene B4 induces release of antimicrobial peptides in lungs of virally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Gosselin, Jean

    2008-05-01

    Leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) is a lipid mediator of inflammation that was recently shown to exert antiviral activities. In this study, we demonstrate that the release of antimicrobial proteins by neutrophils contribute to an early host defense against influenza virus infection in vitro as well as in vivo. Daily i.v. treatments with LTB(4) lead to a significant decrease in lung viral loads at day 5 postinfection in mice infected with influenza A virus compared with the placebo-treated group. This reduction in viral load was not present in mice deficient in the high-affinity LTB(4) receptor. Viral clearance in lungs was associated with up-regulated presence of antimicrobial peptides such as beta-defensin-3, members of the mouse eosinophil-related RNase family, and the mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. Our results also indicate that neutrophils are important in the antiviral effect of LTB(4). Viral loads in neutrophil-depleted mice were not diminished by LTB(4) administration, and a substantial reduction in the presence of murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide and the murine eosinophil-related RNase family in lung tissue was observed. Moreover, in vitro treatment of human neutrophil cultures with LTB(4) led rapidly to the secretion of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, known as antiviral peptides. Pretreatment of cell cultures with specific LTB(4) receptor antagonists clearly demonstrate the implication of the high-affinity LTB(4) receptor in the LTB(4)-mediated activity. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of neutrophils and the secretion of antimicrobial peptides during the early immune response mediated by LTB(4) against a viral pathogen.

  1. Altered influenza virus haemagglutinin (HA)-derived peptide is potent therapy for CIA by inducing Th1 to Th2 shift.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Jia, Yuan; Li, Ru; Guo, Jianping; Sun, Xiaolin; Liu, Yanying; Li, Yingni; Yao, Haihong; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zhanguo

    2011-07-01

    There has been an increase in interest in the use of altered peptides as antigen-specific therapeutic agents in autoimmune diseases. Here we investigated the inhibitory effect and possible mechanism of an altered influenza virus haemagglutinin (HA)-derived peptide in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice by immunisation with type II collagen (CII). Altered HA308-317, wild-type HA308-317 or irrelevant peptide was administered intranasally beginning from arthritis onset. Clinical and histological scores were assessed, and cytokine levels in the serum or supernatants from splenocytes were determined. The percentages of Th1 and Th2 cells in response to different peptides were analysed by FACS both in vivo and in vitro. Our results showed that intranasal administration of altered HA308-317 peptide significantly ameliorated CIA. The therapeutic effect of altered HA308-317 peptide was associated with a substantial decrease in production of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, anti-CII IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and an markedly increase in production of IL-10 and IL-4 in serum or supernatants from splenocytes treated with altered HA308-317 peptide. The percentage of Th2 (CD4(+)IL-4(+)) cells was upregulated significantly by altered HA308-317 peptide with a decreased percentage of Th1 (T helper 1; CD4(+)INF-γ(+)) cells both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that altered HA308-317 peptide might be a promising candidate for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment.

  2. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide induces physical and morphological changes in membrane-mimetic lipid systems and cell membranes: implications for cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M S; Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Lorents, Annely; Morais, Catarina M; Gomes, Paula; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2012-03-01

    The present work aims to gain insights into the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cellular internalization and endosomal escape of the S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide, which has been successfully used in our laboratory as a nucleic acid delivery system. A S4(13)-PV analogue, S4(13)-PVscr, displaying a scrambled amino acid sequence, deficient cell internalization and drug delivery inability, was used in this study for comparative purposes. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence polarization and X-ray diffraction at small and wide angles techniques showed that both peptides interacted with anionic membranes composed of phosphatidylglycerol or a mixture of this lipid with phosphatidylethanolamine, increasing the lipid order, shifting the phase transition to higher temperatures and raising the correlation length between the bilayers. However, S4(13)-PVscr, in contrast to the wild-type peptide, did not promote lipid domain segregation and induced the formation of an inverted hexagonal lipid phase instead of a cubic phase in the lipid systems assayed. Electron microscopy showed that, as opposed to S4(13)-PVscr, the wild-type peptide induced the formation of a non-lamellar organization in membranes of HeLa cells. We concluded that lateral phase separation and destabilization of membrane lamellar structure without compromising membrane integrity are on the basis of the lipid-driven and receptor-independent mechanism of cell entry of S4(13)-PV peptide. Overall, our results can contribute to a better understanding of the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cell-penetrating peptide membrane translocation, helping in the future design of more efficient cell-penetrating peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  3. Effects of panax quinquefolium on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: role of C-peptide, nitric oxide and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kamal Adel; Awad, Ezzat Mohamed; Nagy, Mohammed Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are at high risk for vascular disorders as hypertension and nephropathy. Ginseng is one of the most widely used herbal medicines and is reported to have a wide range of therapeutic and pharmacological applications for antioxidant and vasorelaxation although the mechanism is not clear. This study, aimed to evaluate hypoglycemic, antioxidant and vasodilator effects of Panax quinquefolium aqueous ginseng extract (AGE) against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in male rats. Furthermore explore the role of AGE in C-peptide and nitric oxide (NO) and their relation in STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods: Thirty White male Sprague daw-ley rats weighing 150-200 gm, about 4 month old were equally divided into the following: a control group (normal, nondiabetic), a diabetic group induced by intraperitoneal (I/P) injection of STZ (non-AGE-treated) and an AGE-treated diabetic group (STZ+AGE) (for 8 days). Serum level of urea, creatinine, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and NO were analyzed. Activities of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), hepatic glycogen phosphorylase and the renal antioxidant enzyme, catalase were analyzed. Also renal oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured. Results: Data showed that STZ treated rats produced a significant increased level of serum urea, creatinine, glucose, NO and renal MDA. Also, induced significantly higher activities of hepatic G6Pase and glycogen phosphorylase compared with controls, while give significant lowered serum insulin, C-peptide level and renal catalase activity. Whereas treatment with AGE led to a significant amelioration in the hyperglycemia (lower the activity of G6Pase and glycogen phosphorylase), hyperinsulinemia and oxidative stress markers. Besides declining the higher level of renal function test and NO. Conclusions: STZ induced-diabetes (DM) associated with renal function disturbances, hypoinsulinemia, defective antioxidant stability and increased

  4. Human kallikrein 4 signal peptide induces cytotoxic T cell responses in healthy donors and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ray; Woods, Katherine; D'Rozario, Rachael; Prue, Rebecca; Vari, Frank; Hardy, Melinda Y; Dong, Ying; Clements, Judith A; Hart, Derek N J; Radford, Kristen J

    2012-02-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising new treatment for patients with advanced prostate and ovarian cancer, but its application is limited by the lack of suitable target antigens that are recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Human kallikrein 4 (KLK4) is a member of the kallikrein family of serine proteases that is significantly overexpressed in malignant versus healthy prostate and ovarian tissue, making it an attractive target for immunotherapy. We identified a naturally processed, HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide epitope within the signal sequence region of KLK4 that induced CTL responses in vitro in most healthy donors and prostate cancer patients tested. These CTL lysed HLA-A*0201+ KLK4 + cell lines and KLK4 mRNA-transfected monocyte-derived dendritic cells. CTL specific for the HLA-A*0201-restricted KLK4 peptide were more readily expanded to a higher frequency in vitro compared to the known HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes from prostate cancer antigens; prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). These data demonstrate that KLK4 is an immunogenic molecule capable of inducing CTL responses and identify it as an attractive target for prostate and ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  5. C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide fragments and vasopressin but not somatostatin-28 induce miosis in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Almegård, B; Bill, A

    1993-11-30

    The miotic effects of C-terminal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) fragments, somatostatin-28 and vasopressin have been evaluated with special attention being paid to possible interactions with cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors. The peptides were injected intracamerally to anesthetized monkeys pretreated with indomethacin and atropine. CGRP-(32-37) induced a miosis with a potency 1000 times lower than that previously found with sulphated CCK-8. Two other fragments, CGRP-(30-37) and CGRP-(31-37), also had miotic properties. The CGRP-(32-37)-induced miosis was antagonized by the CCKA receptor antagonist loxiglumide. No contractile effect was elicited by 67 pmol-7.4 nmol somatostatin-28. Vasopressin (360 pmol) caused a small reduction in pupil size. Loxiglumide pretreatment did not affect the reduction in pupil size but a vasopressin receptor antagonist partly inhibited the response. The results indicate that CGRP-(32-37) is a miotic with low potency but high efficacy in the monkey eye, probably interacting with CCKA receptors, and that vasopressin is a mitotic with low potency and efficacy, probably acting via vasopressin receptors.

  6. Increased Amyloid-β Peptide-Induced Memory Deficits in Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP) Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Desrumaux, Catherine; Pisoni, Amandine; Meunier, Johann; Deckert, Valérie; Athias, Anne; Perrier, Véronique; Villard, Vanessa; Lagrost, Laurent; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Maurice, Tangui

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is recognized as one of the earliest and most intense pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the antioxidant vitamin E has been shown to efficiently prevent amyloid plaque formation and neurodegeneration. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has a major role in vitamin E transfers in vivo, and PLTP deficiency in mice is associated with reduced brain vitamin E levels. To determine the impact of PLTP on amyloid pathology in vivo, we analyzed the vulnerability of PLTP-deficient (PLTP-KO) mice to the toxic effects induced by intracerebroventricular injection of oligomeric amyloid-β25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptide, a non-transgenic model of AD. Under basal conditions, PLTP-KO mice showed increased cerebral oxidative stress, increased brain Aβ1–42 levels, and a lower expression of the synaptic function marker synaptophysin, as compared with wild-type mice. This PLTP-KO phenotype was associated with increased memory impairment 1 week after Aβ25–35 peptide injection. Restoration of brain vitamin E levels in PLTP-KO mice through a chronic dietary supplementation prevented Aβ25–35-induced memory deficits and reduced cerebral oxidative stress and toxicity. We conclude that PLTP, through its ability to deliver vitamin E to the brain, constitutes an endogenous neuroprotective agent. Increasing PLTP activity may offer a new way to develop neuroprotective therapies. PMID:23303044

  7. Differential mechanism of G-protein activation induced by endogenous mu-opioid peptides, endomorphin and beta-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Tseng, Leon F; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sora, Ichiro; Narita, Minoru

    2002-07-01

    It is well documented that the mu-opioid receptor (MOP-R) is expressed by neurons in several central nervous system regions. Its occupancy with agonist drugs modulate a variety of physiological processes including pain, reward, stress, immune responses, neuroendocrine functions, and cardiovascular control. Based on the receptor binding assay, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 have the highest specificity and affinity for the MOP-R of any endogenous substance so far described in the mammalian nervous system. In contrast, beta-endorphin exhibits the strongest actions among endogenous opioid peptides mainly through the MOP-R; however, it also shows the distinct pharmacological actions. Recent cloning and expression studies have indicated that MOP-Rs are seven-transmembrane domain receptors whose actions are mediated through activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). The activation of G-proteins by MOP-Rs can be measured by assessing agonist-induced stimulation of membrane binding of guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS). The subject of the present review is to focus on the differential mechanism underlying G-protein activation induced by these mu-opioid peptides using the [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay.

  8. Electron-Induced Dissociation of Peptides in a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Retrofitted with an Electromagnetostatic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, Valery G.; Bennett, Samuel E.; Barofsky, Douglas F.

    2015-05-01

    Dissociation of peptides induced by interaction with (free) electrons (electron-induced dissociation, EID) at electron energies ranging from near 0 to >30 eV was carried out using a radio-frequency-free electromagnetostatic (EMS) cell retrofitted into a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The product-ion mass spectra exhibited EID originating from electronically excited even-electron precursor ions, reduced radical cations formed by capture of low-energy electrons, and oxidized radical cations produced by interaction with high-energy electrons. The spectra demonstrate, within the limits of the triple quadrupole's resolving power, that high-energy EID product-ion spectra produced with an EMS cell exhibit essentially the same qualitative structural information, i.e., amino acid side-chain (SC) losses and backbone cleavages, as observed in high-energy EID spectra produced with a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The levels of fragmentation efficiency evident in the product-ion spectra recorded in this study, as was the case for those recorded in earlier studies with FT ICR mass spectrometers, is currently at the margin of analytical utility. Given that this shortcoming can be remedied, EMS cells incorporated into QqQ or QqTOF mass spectrometers could make tandem high-energy EID mass spectrometry more widely accessible for analysis of peptides, small singly charged molecules, pharmaceuticals, and clinical samples.

  9. Preparation of corn (Zea mays) peptides and their protective effect against alcohol-induced acute hepatic injury in NH mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Mei; Guo, Ping; Hu, Xin; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xue-Zhong

    2007-07-01

    CPS [corn (Zea mays) peptides] were prepared from corn gluten meal by proteolysis with alcalase, an alkaline protease. The molecular-mass distribution of CPS is from 200 to 1000 Da as determined by MS. The amino acid composition of CPS was also analysed by HPLC. CPS contains almost no free amino acids. The protective effect of CPS against acute hepatic injuries induced by alcohol was verified in NH mice that were fed with different dosages of CPS for 30 days and subsequently given an acute dose of alcohol orally. As a result, CPS reduced both hepatic malondialdehyde and triacylglycerol levels, along with enhanced hepatic GSH (glutathione) levels, relative to the control. Hepatic histological changes were also observed. The result indicates that CPS is capable of attenuating ethanol-induced hepatic injury. The effect of CPS on removing superoxide anion in vitro was also studied as an additional proof that CPS is capable of abating hepatic superoxidant stress.

  10. CopA3 peptide from Copris tripartitus induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells via a caspase-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo Ram; Kim, Ho; Nam, Sung-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Seong-Ryul; Ahn, Mi-Young; Chang, Jong Soo; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2012-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that CopA3, a disulfide dimer of the coprisin peptide analogue (LLCIALRKK), has antibacterial activity. In this study, we assessed whether CopA3 caused cellular toxicity in various mammalian cell lines. CopA3 selectively caused a marked decrease in cell viability in Jurkat T, U937, and AML-2 cells (human leukemia cells), but was not cytotoxic to Caki or Hela cells. Fragmentation of DNA, a marker of apoptosis, was also confirmed in the leukemia cell lines, but not in the other cells. CopA3-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells was mediated by apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), indicating induction of a caspase-independent signaling pathway.

  11. Aromatic amino acids providing characteristic motifs in the Raman and SERS spectroscopy of peptides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Dongmao; Halas, Naomi J; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-07-31

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies (SERS) are potentially important tools in the characterization of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. In this work, SERS spectra of three cysteine-containing aromatic peptides: tryptophan-cysteine, tyrosine-cysteine, and phenylalanine-cysteine, bound to Au nanoshell substrates, were obtained, and compared to their respective normal Raman spectra. While the linewidths of the SERS peaks are significantly broadened (up to 70%), no significant spectral shifts (<6 cm (-1)) of the major Stokes modes were observed between the two modalities. We show that the Raman and SERS spectra of penetratin, a cell-penetrating peptide oligomer, can be comprised quite reliably from the spectra of its constituent aromatic amino acids except in the backbone regions where the spectral intensities are critically dependent on the length and conformations of the probed molecules. From this study we conclude that, together with protein backbone groups, aromatic amino acid residues provide the overwhelmingly dominant features in the Raman and SERS spectra of peptides and proteins when present. It follows that the Raman modes of these three small constructed peptides may likely apply to the assignment of Raman and SERS features in the spectra of other peptides and proteins.

  12. The appetite-inducing peptide, ghrelin, induces intracellular store-mediated rises in calcium in addiction and arousal-related laterodorsal tegmental neurons in mouse brain slices.

    PubMed

    Hauberg, Katrine; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2015-03-01

    Ghrelin, a gut and brain peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in motivated behavior and regulation of the sleep and wakefulness cycle. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is involved in appetitive behavior and control of the arousal state of an organism, and accordingly, behavioral actions of ghrelin could be mediated by direct cellular actions within this nucleus. Consistent with this interpretation, postsynaptically mediated depolarizing membrane actions of ghrelin on LDT neurons have been reported. Direct actions were ascribed solely to closure of a potassium conductance however this peptide has been shown in other cell types to lead to rises in calcium via release of calcium from intracellular stores. To determine whether ghrelin induced intracellular calcium rises in mouse LDT neurons, we conducted calcium imaging studies in LDT brain slices loaded with the calcium binding dye, Fura-2AM. Ghrelin elicited TTX-insensitive changes in dF/F indicative of rises in calcium, and a portion of these rises were independent of membrane depolarization, as they persisted in conditions of high extracellular potassium solutions and were found to involve SERCA-pump mediated intracellular calcium stores. Involvement of the ghrelin receptor (GHR-S) in these actions was confirmed. Taken together with other studies, our data suggest that ghrelin has multiple cellular actions on LDT cells. Ghrelin's induction of calcium via intracellular release in the LDT could play a role in behavioral actions of this peptide as the LDT governs processes involved in stimulation of motivated behavior and control of cortical arousal.

  13. Whey peptides prevent chronic ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin aging in melanin-possessing male hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins or peptides exhibit various actions, including an antioxidant action, an anticancer action, and a protective action against childhood asthma and atopic syndrome. The effects of orally administered whey peptides (WPs) on chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cutaneous changes, including changes in cutaneous thickness, elasticity, wrinkle formation, etc., have not been examined. In this study, we studied the preventive effects of WPs on cutaneous aging induced by chronic UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing male hairless mice (HRM). UVB (36-180 mJ/cm(2)) was irradiated to the dorsal area for 17 wk in HRM, and the measurements of cutaneous thickness and elasticity in UVB irradiated mice were performed every week. WPs (200 and 400 mg/kg, twice daily) were administered orally for 17 wk. WPs inhibited the increase in cutaneous thickness, wrinkle formation, and melanin granules and the reduction in cutaneous elasticity associated with photoaging. Furthermore, it has been reported that UVB irradiation-induced skin aging is closely associated with the increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells. WPs also prevented increases in the expression of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, VEGF, and Ki-67- and 8-OHdG-positive cells induced by chronic UVB irradiation. It was found that WPs prevent type IV collagen degradation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and DNA damage caused by UVB irradiation. Overall, these results demonstrate the considerable benefit of WPs for protection against solar UV-irradiated skin aging as a supplemental nutrient.

  14. Passage of delta sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Zlokovic, B.V.; Segal, M.B.; Davson, H.; Jankov, R.M.

    1988-05-01

    Unidirectional flux of /sup 125/I-labeled DSIP at the blood-tissue interface of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier was studied in the perfused in situ choroid plexuses of the lateral ventricles of the sheep. Arterio-venous loss of /sup 125/I-radioactivity suggested a low-to-moderate permeability of the choroid epithelium to the intact peptide from the blood side. A saturable mechanism with Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with high affinity and very low capacity (approximate values: Kt = 5.0 +/- 0.4 nM; Vmax = 272 +/- 10 fmol.min-1) was demonstrated at the blood-tissue interface of the choroid plexus. The clearance of DSIP from the ventricles during ventriculo-cisternal perfusion in the rabbit indicated no significant flux of the intact peptide out of the CSF. The results suggest that DSIP crosses the blood-CSF barrier, while the system lacks the specific mechanisms for removal from the CSF found with most, if not all, amino acids and several peptides.

  15. Ameliorative effect of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester against amyloid beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jung Choi, Soo; Kim, Mi Jeong; Jin Heo, Ho; Kim, Jae Kyeum; Jin Jun, Woo; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Eun-Ki; Ok Kim, Myeong; Yon Cho, Hong; Hwang, Han-Joon; Jun Kim, Young; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta)-induced oxidative stress may be linked to neurodegenerative disease. Ethanol extracts of Rosa laevigata protected PC12 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) reduction assays revealed a significant increase in cell viability when oxidatively stressed PC12 cells were treated with R. laevigata extract. The effect of R. laevigata on oxidative stress-induced cell death was further investigated by lactate dehydrogenase release assays and trypan blue exclusion assays. Administration of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract to mice infused with Abeta significantly reversed learning and memory impairment in behavioural tests. After behavioural testing, the mice were sacrificed and brains were collected for the examination of lipid peroxidation, catalase activity and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity. These results suggest that 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract may be able to reduce Abeta-induced neurotoxicity, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. Therefore, R. laevigata extract may be useful for the prevention of oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Enhanced mucosal immunoglobulin A response and solid protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus challenge induced by a novel dendrimeric peptide.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, Carolina; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Jakab, Annamaria; Clementi, Giorgia; Borrás, Eva; Bárcena, Juan; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco; Blanco, Esther

    2008-07-01

    The successful use of a dendrimeric peptide to protect pigs against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which causes the most devastating animal disease worldwide, is described. Animals were immunized intramuscularly with a peptide containing one copy of a FMDV T-cell epitope and branching out into four copies of a B-cell epitope. The four immunized pigs did not develop significant clinical signs upon FMDV challenge, neither systemic nor mucosal FMDV replication, nor was its transmission to contact control pigs observed. The dendrimeric construction specifically induced high titers of FMDV-neutralizing antibodies and activated FMDV-specific T cells. Interestingly, a potent anti-FMDV immunoglobulin A response (local and systemic) was observed, despite the parenteral administration of the peptide. On the other hand, peptide-immunized animals showed no antibodies specific of FMDV infection, which qualifies the peptide as a potential marker vaccine. Overall, the dendrimeric peptide used elicited an immune response comparable to that found for control FMDV-infected pigs that correlated with a solid protection against FMDV challenge. Dendrimeric designs of this type may hold substantial promise for peptide subunit vaccine development.

  17. Identification of cross-linked peptides after click-based enrichment using sequential collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Du, Xiuxia; Tolić, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Mayer, M Uljana; Smith, Richard D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2009-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can be a powerful approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions and for providing constraints on protein structures. However, enrichment of cross-linked peptides is crucial to reduce sample complexity before mass spectrometric analysis. In addition compact cross-linkers are often preferred to provide short spacer lengths, surface accessibility to the protein complexes, and must have reasonable solubility under conditions where the native complex structure is stable. In this study, we present a novel compact cross-linker that contains two distinct features: (1) an alkyne tag and (2) a small molecule detection tag (NO(2)) to maintain reasonable solubility in water. The alkyne tag enables enrichment of the cross-linked peptides after proteolytic cleavage and coupling of an affinity tag using alkyne-azido click chemistry. Neutral loss of the small NO(2) moiety provides a secondary means of detecting cross-linked peptides in MS/MS analyses, providing additional confidence in peptide identifications. We show the labeling efficiency of this cross-linker, which we termed CLIP (click-enabled linker for interacting proteins) using ubiquitin. The enrichment capability of CLIP is demonstrated for cross-linked ubiquitin in highly complex E. coli cell lysates. Sequential collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-MS/MS of intercross-linked peptides (two peptides connected with a cross-linker) are also demonstrated for improved automated identification of cross-linked peptides.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of peptides extracted from walnut (Juglans Sigilata Dode) proteins on Aβ25-35-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Juan; Cai, Pei-shan; Xiong, Chao-mei; Ruan, Jin-lan

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major neurodegenerative disorders of the elderly, which is characterized by the accumulation and deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in human brains. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by Aβ in brain are increasingly considered to be responsible for the pathogenesis of AD. The present study aimed to determine the protective effects of walnut peptides against the neurotoxicity induced by Aβ25-35 in vivo. Briefly, the AD model was induced by injecting Aβ25-35 into bilateral hippocampi of mice. The animals were treated with distilled water or walnut peptides (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) for five consecutive weeks. Spatial learning and memory abilities of mice were investigated by Morris water maze test and step-down avoidance test. To further explore the underlying mechanisms of the neuroprotectivity of walnut peptides, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine esterase (AChE), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the level of nitric oxide (NO) in the hippocampus of mice were measured by spectrophotometric method. In addition, the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 in the samples were determined using ELISA. The hippocampal expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The results showed that walnut peptides supplementation effectively ameliorated the cognitive deficits and memory impairment of mice. Meanwhile, our study also revealed effective restoration of levels of antioxidant enzymes as well as inflammatory mediators with supplementation of walnut peptides (400 or 800 mg/kg). All the above findings suggested that walnut peptides may have a protective effect on AD by reducing inflammatory responses and modulating antioxidant system.

  19. Therapeutic Effect of Ergotope Peptides on Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Downregulation of Inflammatory and Th1/Th17 Responses and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Deng, Shaohua; Li, Shan; Xi, Yebin; Li, Chengzhen; Wang, Li; He, Dongyi; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that results in a chronic and inflammatory disorder. Dynamic balance of helper T cells (Th) 1 and 17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) is broken in RA. Since there is no cure for RA at present, it is necessary to find a truly effective and convenient treatment. Several studies have intended to induce ergotopic regulation to treat autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to find potential ergotope peptides and investigate their effects in treating the animal model of RA and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. First, we selected functional ergotope peptides from 25 overlapping peptides derived from the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) α chain, and then used these peptides to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We showed ergotope peptides as immunomodulatory factors with great benefits at the clinical and pathologic levels. This effect was associated with inhibition of type II collagen (CII)-specific proliferation and autoantibody production as well as induction of antiergotypic immune response, downregulation of both Th1 and Th17 cells and their related components, and emergence of Treg cells that had suppressive action on autoreactive T cells. We also proved that cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 are two important mediators that are critical to Treg suppressive function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 in established CIA could be attributed to ergotope-induced Treg cells. Our findings reveal that ergotope peptides induce regulatory immune responses and restore immune tolerance, suggesting that treatment with ergotope peptides may be a novel approach to therapy for RA patients and has good application prospects, with cheap, effective, convenient, wide-spectrum features. PMID:27579476

  20. Formyl peptide-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes does not require either marked changes in cytosolic calcium or specific granule discharge. Role of formyl peptide receptor reexpression (or recycling).

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Elfman, F; Marder, S; Lobo, E; Ives, H E

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium on the ability of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to migrate chemotactically and reexpress (or recycle) formyl peptide receptors when challenged with the synthetic chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). Extracellular calcium was not required for either optimal chemotactic responses or receptor reexpression. Depletion and chelation of intracellular calcium resulted in significant diminution in the ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the specific granule constituents lactoferrin and vitamin B12-binding protein during the process of chemotaxis, but had no effect on the capability of these cells to respond chemotactically. Similarly, chelation of intracellular calcium did not affect the ability of these cells to reexpress a population of formyl peptide receptors. Inhibition of receptor reexpression, by a nonagglutinating derivative of wheat-germ agglutinin, was associated with inhibition of chemotactic responses to FMLP. Thus, it appears that large changes in cytosolic free calcium are not necessary for formyl peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis. In contrast, continuous reexpression (or recycling) of formyl peptide receptors is required for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic responses to FMLP, a process that appears to be independent from specific granule fusion with plasma membrane. PMID:2723068

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures and drug delivery tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Naser Ali

    conjugates although one limitation lies in the effort of controlling the rate of drug release. The encapsulated or complexed drugs tend to be released rapidly (before reaching the target site) and in the dendrimer--drug conjugates, it is the chemical linkage that controls the drug release. Thus, future studies in this field are urgently required to create more efficient and stable biomaterials. Peptides are considered as efficient vectors for achieving optimal cellular uptake. The potential use of peptides as drug delivery vectors received much attention by the discovery of several cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The first CPPs discovered in 1988, that were sequences from HIV-1 encoded TAT protein, TAT (48--60), and penetrated very efficiently through cell membranes of cultured mammalian cells. CPPs are a class of diverse peptides, typically with 8--25 amino acids, and unlike most peptides, they can cross the cellular membrane with more efficiency. CPPs have also shown to undergo self-assembly and generate nanostructures. The generation of self-assembled peptides and nanostructures occur through various types of interactions between functional groups of amino acid residues, such as electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonding. Appropriate design and functionalization of peptides are critical for generating nanostructures. Chemically CPPs are classified into two major groups: linear and cyclic peptides. It has been previously reported that linear peptides containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids could act as membrane protein stabilizers. These compounds are short hydrophilic or amphiphilic peptides that have positively charged amino acids, such as arginine, lysine or histidine, which can interact with the negative charge phospholipids layer on the cell membrane and translocate the cargo into the cells. Conjugation to cationic linear CPPs, such as TAT, penetratin, or oligoarginine efficiently improves the cellular uptake of large hydrophilic molecules, but the

  2. Protective effect of mitochondria‑targeted peptide MTP‑131 against oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis in RGC‑5 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Liu, Bingqian; Ma, Jian; Ge, Jian; Wang, Kaijun

    2017-04-01

    The retina of the human eye is extremely vulnerable to oxidative damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress is the predominant mechanism associated with the pathogenesis of age‑related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa. MTP‑131, a novel mitochondria‑targeted peptide, has been demonstrated to specifically concentrate in the inner mitochondria membrane and to exhibit remarkable antioxidant effects both in vitro and in animal models. In the present study, the protective effect of MTP‑131 was evaluated in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced oxidative damage in a retinal ganglion cell line, RGC‑5. Cell viability was measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, respectively. Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining was used for assessment of apoptosis. Release of cytochrome c was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Pretreatment of cells with MTP‑131 inhibited H2O2‑induced cytotoxicity and reduced LDH release in a dose‑dependent manner, compared with cells treated with H2O2 alone. Mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were also prevented by MTP‑131 pretreatment. In addition, MTP‑131 pretreatment inhibited cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm, and significantly reduced apoptosis in RGC‑5 cells, compared with cells treated with H2O2 alone. In conclusion, mitochondria‑targeted peptide MTP‑131 exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis in RGC‑5 cells, which may provide a novel approach for the treatment of age‑associated retinal diseases.

  3. TLQP-21, a VGF-derived peptide, increases energy expenditure and prevents the early phase of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, A.; La Corte, G.; Possenti, R.; Locatelli, V.; Rigamonti, A. E.; Torsello, A.; Bresciani, E.; Bulgarelli, I.; Rizzi, R.; Pavone, F.; D’Amato, F. R.; Severini, C.; Mignogna, G.; Giorgi, A.; Schininà, M. E.; Elia, G.; Brancia, C.; Ferri, G.-L.; Conti, R.; Ciani, B.; Pascucci, T.; Dell’Omo, G.; Muller, E. E.; Levi, A.; Moles, A.

    2006-01-01

    The vgf gene has been identified as an energy homeostasis regulator. Vgf encodes a 617-aa precursor protein that is processed to yield an incompletely characterized panel of neuropeptides. Until now, it was an unproved assumption that VGF-derived peptides could regulate metabolism. Here, a VGF peptide designated TLQP-21 was identified in rat brain extracts by means of immunoprecipitation, microcapillary liquid chromatography–tandem MS, and database searching algorithms. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of TLQP-21 (15 μg/day for 14 days) increased resting energy expenditure (EE) and rectal temperature in mice. These effects were paralleled by increased epinephrine and up-regulation of brown adipose tissue β2-AR (β2 adrenergic receptor) and white adipose tissue (WAT) PPAR-δ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ), β3-AR, and UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) mRNAs and were independent of locomotor activity and thyroid hormones. Hypothalamic gene expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides was unchanged. Furthermore, in mice that were fed a high-fat diet for 14 days, TLQP-21 prevented the increase in body and WAT weight as well as hormonal changes that are associated with a high-fat regimen. Biochemical and molecular analyses suggest that TLQP-21 exerts its effects by stimulating autonomic activation of adrenal medulla and adipose tissues. In conclusion, we present here the identification in the CNS of a previously uncharacterized VGF-derived peptide and prove that its chronic i.c.v. infusion effected an increase in EE and limited the early phase of diet-induced obesity. PMID:16983076

  4. Ethanol-induced effects on opioid peptides in adult male Wistar rats are dependent on early environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, L; Zhou, Q; Nylander, I

    2007-05-25

    The vulnerability to develop alcoholism is dependent on both genetic and environmental factors. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these factors are not fully understood but individual divergence in the endogenous opioid peptide system may contribute. We have previously reported that early-life experiences can affect endogenous opioids and also adult voluntary ethanol intake. In the present study, this line of research was continued and the effects of long-term voluntary ethanol drinking on the opioid system are described in animals reared in different environmental settings. Rat pups were subjected to 15 min (MS15) or 360 min (MS360) of daily maternal separation during postnatal days 1-21. At 10 weeks of age, male rats were exposed to voluntary ethanol drinking in a four-bottle paradigm with 5%, 10% and 20% ethanol solution in addition to water for 2 months. Age-matched controls received water during the same period. Immunoreactive (ir) Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP) and dynorphin B (DYNB) peptide levels were thereafter measured in the pituitary gland and several brain areas. In water-drinking animals, lower ir MEAP levels were observed in the MS360 rats in the hypothalamus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum and the periaqueductal gray, whereas no differences were seen in ir DYNB levels. Long-term ethanol drinking induced lower ir MEAP levels in MS15 rats in the medial prefrontal cortex and the periaqueductal gray, whereas higher levels were detected in MS360 rats in the hypothalamus, striatum and the substantia nigra. Chronic voluntary drinking affected ir DYNB levels in the pituitary gland, hypothalamus and the substantia nigra, with minor differences between MS15 and MS360. In conclusion, manipulation of the early environment caused changes in the opioid system and a subsequent altered response to ethanol. The altered sensitivity of the opioid peptides to ethanol may contribute to the previously reported differences in ethanol intake between MS15 and MS

  5. An oncofetal antigen, IMP-3-derived long peptides induce immune responses of both helper T cells and CTLs

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Masatoshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Senju, Satoru; Imamura, Yuya; Sayem, Mohammad Abu; Irie, Atsushi; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Fukuma, Daiki; Shinohara, Masanori; Hamada, Akinobu; Jono, Hirofumi; Yuba, Eiji; Kono, Kenji; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakayama, Hideki; Nishimura, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3), an oncofetal antigen identified using genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses, is overexpressed in several malignancies. IMP-3-derived cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have been used for peptide-based immunotherapies against various cancers. In addition to CTLs, induction of tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-specific helper T (Th) cells is crucial for establishment of effective antitumor immunity. In this study, we aimed to identify IMP-3-derived long peptides (IMP-3-LPs) carrying CTL and promiscuous Th-cell epitopes for use in cancer immunotherapy. IMP-3-derived Th-cell epitopes that bind to multiple HLA-class II molecules were predicted by in silico analysis, and their immunogenicity was determined by utilizing human T cells. We identified two highly immunogenic IMP-3-LPs presented by multiple HLA-class II molecules. One of the IMP-3-LPs encompassed two CTL epitopes that have been used for peptide-vaccine immunotherapy in ongoing clinical trials. IMP-3-LPs-specific Th cells responded to autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the recombinant IMP-3 proteins, suggesting that these s (LPs) can be naturally processed and presented. The IMP-3-LPs and specific Th cells augmented the expansion of IMP-3-specific CTLs, which was further enhanced by programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) blockade. In addition, IMP-3-LP encapsulated in liposomes was efficiently cross-presented in vitro, and this LP successfully cross-primed CTLs in HLA-A2 transgenic mice (Tgm) in vivo. Furthermore, one of the IMP-3-LPs induced IMP-3-specific Th cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of head-and-neck malignant tumor (HNMT) patients. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of IMP-3-LPs in propagating both Th cells and CTLs and may have implications for IMP-3-LPs-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27471607

  6. Agonist-induced internalisation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is mediated by the Gαq pathway.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Upon stimulation with agonist, the GLP-1R signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways to stimulate insulin secretion. The agonist-induced GLP-1R internalisation has recently been shown to be important for insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GLP-1R internalisation remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the role of GLP-1R downstream signalling pathways in its internalisation. Agonist-induced human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) internalisation and activity were examined using a number of techniques including immunoblotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays to determine cAMP production, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and ERK phosphorylation. Agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is dependent on caveolin-1 and dynamin. Inhibition of the Gαq pathway but not the Gαs pathway affected hGLP-1R internalisation. Consistent with this, hGLP-1R mutant T149M and small-molecule agonists (compound 2 and compound B), which activate only the Gαs pathway, failed to induce internalisation of the receptor. Chemical inhibitors of the Gαq pathway, PKC and ERK phosphorylation significantly reduced agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. These inhibitors also suppressed agonist-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation demonstrating that the phosphorylated ERK acts downstream of the Gαq pathway in the hGLP-1R internalisation. In summary, agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is mediated by the Gαq pathway. The internalised hGLP-1R stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, indicating the importance of GLP-1 internalisation for insulin secretion.

  7. Lipid II induces a transmembrane orientation of the pore-forming peptide lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, Hester Emilie; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2002-10-08

    Nisin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis and used as a food preservative in dairy products. The peptide kills Gram-positive bacteria via the permeabilization of the membrane, most probably via pore formation using the cell wall precursor Lipid II as its docking molecule. In this study, site-directed tryptophan spectroscopy was used to determine the topology of nisin in the Lipid II containing membrane, as a start to elucidate the mechanism of targeted pore formation. Three single tryptophan mutants were used, which are viable representatives of the wild-type peptide. The emission spectra of tryptophans located at the N-terminus, the center, and the C-terminus as well as quenching by acrylamide and spin-labeled lipids were investigated using model membrane vesicles composed of DOPC containing 1 mol % Lipid II. Nisin was shown to adopt an orientation where the most probable position of the N-terminus was found to be near the Lipid II headgroup at the bilayer surface, the position of the center of nisin was in the middle of the phospholipid bilayer, and the C-terminus was located near the interface between the headgroups and acyl chain region. These results were used to propose a model for the orientation of nisin in Lipid II containing membranes. Our findings demonstrated that Lipid II changes the overall orientation of nisin in membranes from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the membrane surface. The stable transmembrane orientation of nisin in the presence of Lipid II might allow us to determine the structure of the nisin-Lipid II pores in the lipid bilayer.

  8. Identification of erythropoietin receptor-derived peptides having the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A24(+) patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2014-05-01

    Molecular targeting therapy with anti-angiogenic agents, including sunitinib and sorafenib, has been proven to be the first- and second-line standard treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) worldwide. Despite their significant antitumor effects, most of the patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anti-cancer immunotherapy has been considered as a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells and molecules. Therefore, we previously conducted anti-cancer vaccine therapy with peptides derived from carbonic anhydrase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 as phase-I/II trials for mRCC patients and reported their clinical benefits. Alternatively, up-regulated expression of erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) in RCC has been reported, and their co-expression is involved in tumorigenesis. In order to increase options for peptide-based vaccination therapy, we searched for novel EpoR-peptides for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from EpoR, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24 allele, EpoR52-60 peptide had the potential to induce peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Cytotoxicity toward HLA-A24(+) and EpoR-expressing RCC cells was ascribed to peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells. These results indicate that the EpoR52-60 peptide could be a promising candidate for a peptide-based anti-cancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects hippocampal neurons against advanced glycation end product-induced tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; An, F-M; Yin, L; Liu, A-R; Yin, D-K; Yao, W-B; Gao, X-D

    2014-01-03

    We have previously demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist ameliorated neurodegenerative changes in rat models of diabetes-related Alzheimer's disease (AD), and protected neurons from glucose toxicity in vitro. Herein, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 receptor mediates on cell toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with glucose toxicity, and the molecular mechanism in PC12 cells and the primary hippocampal neurons. Our study demonstrated that the similar protection effects of GLP-1 existed in PC12 cells treated with glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in hyperglycemic conditions or with glycoaldehyde-BSA alone. Additionally, glucose-BSA alone did not induce significant cytotoxicity in PC12 cells, but resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons in 24h. And we found that GLP-1 could reduce cell tau phosphorylation induced by high glucose or glucose-BSA. Furthermore, our data in the present study suggested that GLP-1 regulated tau phosphorylation induced by AGEs through a signaling pathway involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), similarly to the GSK-3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Our findings suggest that GLP-1 can protect neurons from diabetes-associated AGE insults in vitro, and provide new evidence for a potential therapeutic value of GLP-1 receptor agonist in the treatment of AD especially diabetes-related AD.

  10. Lipid Polymorphism Induced by Surfactant Peptide SP-B1-25

    PubMed Central

    Farver, R. Suzanne; Mills, Frank D.; Antharam, Vijay C.; Chebukati, Janetricks N.; Fanucci, Gail E.; Long, Joanna R.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. SP-B1-25, a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 25 amino-acid residues of SP-B, is known to retain much of the biological activity of SP-B. Circular dichroism has shown that when SP-B1-25 interacts with negatively charged lipid vesicles, it contains significant helical structure for the lipid compositions and peptide/lipid ratios studied here. The effect of SP-B1-25 on lipid organization and polymorphisms was investigated via DSC, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. At 1-3 mol% peptide and physiologic temperature, SP-B1-25 partitions at the interface of negatively charged PC/PG lipid bilayers. In lipid mixtures containing 1-5 mol% peptide, the structure of SP-B1-25 remains constant, but 2H and 31P NMR spectra show the presence of an isotropic lipid phase in exchange with the lamellar phase below the Tm of the lipids. This behavior is observed for both DPPC/POPG and POPC/POPG lipid mixtures as well as for both the PC and PG components of the mixtures. For 1-3 mol% SP-B1-25, a return to a single lamellar phase above the lipid mixture Tm is observed, but for 5 mol% SP-B1-25 a significant isotropic component is observed at physiologic temperatures for DPPC and exchange broadening is observed in 2H and 31P NMR spectra of the other lipid components in the two mixtures. DLS and TEM rule out the formation of micellar structures and suggest that SP-B1-25 promotes the formation of a fluid isotropic phase. The ability of SP-B1-25 to fuse lipid lamellae via this mechanism, particularly those enriched in DPPC, suggests a specific role for the highly conserved N-terminus of SP-B in the packing of lipid lamellae into surfactant lamellar bodies or in stabilizing multilayer structures at the air-liquid interface. Importantly, this behavior has not been seen for the other SP-B fragments of SP-B8-25 and SP-B59

  11. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena.

  12. Heterologous Prime-Boost Oral Immunization with GK-1 Peptide from Taenia crassiceps Cysticerci Induces Protective Immunity▿

    PubMed Central

    Fragoso, Gladis; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Santana, M. Angélica; Bobes, Raul J.; Hernández, Beatriz; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Segura, René; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Sciutto, Edda; Rosas, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Oral immunization is a goal in vaccine development, particularly for pathogens that enter the host through the mucosal system. This study was designed to explore the immunogenic properties of the Taenia crassiceps protective peptide GK-1 administered orally. Mice were orally immunized with the synthetic GK-1 peptide in its linear form with or without the Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) protein adjuvant or as a chimera recombinantly bound to BLS (BLS-GK-1). Mice were boosted twice with GK-1 only at 15-day intervals. A significant rate of protection of 64.7% was achieved in GK-1-immunized mice, and that rate significantly increased to 91.8 and 96% when mice were primed with GK-1 coadministered with BLS as an adjuvant and BLS as a carrier, respectively. Specific antibodies and T cell activation and proliferation accompanied the protection induced, revealing the potent immunogenicity of GK-1. Through immunohistochemical studies, GK-1 was detected in T and B cell zones of the Peyer's patches (PP) and mesenteric lymph nodes. In the latter, abundant proliferating cells were detected by 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation. No proliferation was detected in PP. Altogether, these results portray the potent immunogenic properties of GK-1 administered orally and reinforce the usefulness of BLS as an adjuvant and adequate vaccine delivery system for oral vaccines. PMID:21593234

  13. Snakin-2, an Antimicrobial Peptide from Potato Whose Gene Is Locally Induced by Wounding and Responds to Pathogen Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Segura, Ana; Moreno, Manuel; López, Gemma; García-Olmedo, Francisco; Molina, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    The peptide snakin-2 (StSN2) has been isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Jaerla) tubers and found to be active (EC50 = 1–20 μm) against fungal and bacterial plant pathogens. It causes a rapid aggregation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The corresponding StSN2 cDNA encodes a signal sequence followed by a 15-residue acidic sequence that precedes the mature StSN2 peptide, which is basic (isoelectric point = 9.16) and 66 amino acid residues long (molecular weight of 7,025). The StSN2 gene is developmentally expressed in tubers, stems, flowers, shoot apex, and leaves, but not in roots, or stolons, and is locally up-regulated by wounding and by abscisic acid treatment. Expression of this gene is also up-regulated after infection of potato tubers with the compatible fungus Botritys cinerea and down-regulated by the virulent bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Erwinia chrysanthemi. These observations are congruent with the hypothesis that the StSN2 is a component of both constitutive and inducible defense barriers. PMID:11891250

  14. Sera from Children with Autism Induce Autistic Features Which Can Be Rescued with a CNTF Small Peptide Mimetic in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism. PMID:25769033

  15. Snakin-2, an antimicrobial peptide from potato whose gene is locally induced by wounding and responds to pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Segura, Ana; Moreno, Manuel; López, Gemma; García-Olmedo, Francisco; Molina, Antonio

    2002-03-01

    The peptide snakin-2 (StSN2) has been isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Jaerla) tubers and found to be active (EC(50) = 1-20 microM) against fungal and bacterial plant pathogens. It causes a rapid aggregation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The corresponding StSN2 cDNA encodes a signal sequence followed by a 15-residue acidic sequence that precedes the mature StSN2 peptide, which is basic (isoelectric point = 9.16) and 66 amino acid residues long (molecular weight of 7,025). The StSN2 gene is developmentally expressed in tubers, stems, flowers, shoot apex, and leaves, but not in roots, or stolons, and is locally up-regulated by wounding and by abscisic acid treatment. Expression of this gene is also up-regulated after infection of potato tubers with the compatible fungus Botritys cinerea and down-regulated by the virulent bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum and Erwinia chrysanthemi. These observations are congruent with the hypothesis that the StSN2 is a component of both constitutive and inducible defense barriers.

  16. Inhibition of the Electrostatic Interaction between β -amyloid Peptide and Membranes Prevents β -amyloid-induced Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, C.; Terzi, E.; Hauser, N.; Jakob-Rotne, R.; Seelig, J.; Kemp, J. A.

    1997-08-01

    The accumulation of β -amyloid peptides (Aβ ) into senile plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Aggregated Aβ is toxic to cells in culture and this has been considered to be the cause of neurodegeneration that occurs in the Alzheimer disease brain. The discovery of compounds that prevent Aβ toxicity may lead to a better understanding of the processes involved and ultimately to possible therapeutic drugs. Low nanomolar concentrations of Aβ 1-42 and the toxic fragment Aβ 25-35 have been demonstrated to render cells more sensitive to subsequent insults as manifested by an increased sensitivity to formazan crystals following MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction. Formation of the toxic β -sheet conformation by Aβ peptides is increased by negatively charged membranes. Here we demonstrate that phloretin and exifone, dipolar compounds that decrease the effective negative charge of membranes, prevent association of Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 25-35 to negatively charged lipid vesicles and Aβ induced cell toxicity. These results suggest that Aβ toxicity is mediated through a nonspecific physicochemical interaction with cell membranes.

  17. Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, István; Pivarcsi, Andor; Kis, Kornélia; Koreck, Andrea; Bodai, László; McDowell, Andrew; Seltmann, Holger; Patrick, Sheila; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kemény, Lajos

    2006-07-01

    Acne is a common skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. In addition to genetic, hormonal and environmental factors, abnormal colonization by Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the occurrence of acne via the induction of inflammatory mediators. To gain more insight into the role that sebocytes play in the innate immune response of the skin, particularly in acne, we compared the antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression at mRNA and protein levels, as well as the viability and differentiation of SZ95 sebocytes in response to co-culture with representative isolates of P. acnes type IA and type IB as well as Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that, in vitro, P. acnes type IA and IB isolates and LPS induced human beta-defensin-2 and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, and influenced sebocyte viability and differentiation. Our results provide evidence that sebocytes are capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and antimicrobial peptides, which may have a role in acne pathogenesis. Furthermore, since P. acnes types IA and IB differentially affect both the differentiation and viability of sebocytes, our data demonstrate that different strains of P. acnes vary in their capacity to stimulate an inflammatory response within the pilosebaceous follicle.

  18. Sera from children with autism induce autistic features which can be rescued with a CNTF small peptide mimetic in rats.

    PubMed

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Arif, Mohammad; Blanchard, Julie; Fayyaz, Fatima; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized clinically by impairments in social interaction and verbal and non-verbal communication skills as well as restricted interests and repetitive behavior. It has been hypothesized that altered brain environment including an imbalance in neurotrophic support during early development contributes to the pathophysiology of autism. Here we report that sera from children with autism which exhibited abnormal levels of various neurotrophic factors induced cell death and oxidative stress in mouse primary cultured cortical neurons. The effects of sera from autistic children were rescued by pre-treatment with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small peptide mimetic, Peptide 6 (P6), which was previously shown to exert its neuroprotective effect by modulating CNTF/JAK/STAT pathway and LIF signaling and by enhancing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Similar neurotoxic effects and neuroinflammation were observed in young Wistar rats injected intracerebroventricularly with autism sera within hours after birth. The autism sera injected rats demonstrated developmental delay and deficits in social communication, interaction, and novelty. Both the neurobiological changes and the behavioral autistic phenotype were ameliorated by P6 treatment. These findings implicate the involvement of neurotrophic imbalance during early brain development in the pathophysiology of autism and a proof of principle of P6 as a potential therapeutic strategy for autism.

  19. Charge-based separation of proteins and peptides by electrically induced dynamic pH profiles.

    PubMed

    Brod, E; S Ben-Yosef, V; Bandhakavi, S; Sivan, U

    2016-01-29

    A new method for generating complex, dynamic pH profiles in an ampholyte-free separation channel is presented together with the theory behind its operation. The pH is modulated by an array of proton and hydroxide ion injectors placed along the separation channel. The ions generated in-situ by electrically driven water splitting across a bipolar membrane are injected to the channel in the presence of a longitudinal electric field, leading to the formation of a multi-step pH profile. Real-time control over the pH profile along the channel facilitates new dynamic separation strategies as well as steering and harvesting of focused molecules, which are both impossible with conventional separation methods. These freedoms are particularly attractive for Lab-on-a-Chip applications. The pH step-like profile alleviates one of the main hurdles of conventional isoelectric separation methods, namely, the slowing down of focused molecules as they approach their focusing spot. As a result, separation is completed within minutes for both peptides and proteins, even with low applied electric fields. We demonstrate protein and peptide separation within minutes, and resolution of ΔpI=0.2. Novel separation strategies based on spatio-temporal pH control are demonstrated as well.

  20. Superior Cervical Ganglia Neurons Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells via Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide.

    PubMed

    Szklany, Kirsten; Ruiter, Evelyn; Mian, Firoz; Kunze, Wolfgang; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul; Karimi, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems communicate bidirectionally, utilizing diverse molecular signals including cytokines and neurotransmitters to provide an integrated response to changes in the body's internal and external environment. Although, neuro-immune interactions are becoming better understood under inflammatory circumstances and it has been evidenced that interaction between neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to T regulatory cells, relatively little is known about the communication between neurons and naïve T cells. Here, we demonstrate that following co-culture of naïve CD4+ T cells with superior cervical ganglion neurons, the percentage of Foxp3 expressing CD4+CD25+ cells significantly increased. This was mediated in part by immune-regulatory cytokines TGF-β and IL-10, as well as the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide while vasoactive intestinal peptide was shown to play no role in generation of T regulatory cells. Additionally, T cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ released upon in vitro stimulation. These findings suggest that the generation of Tregs may be promoted by naïve CD4+ T cell: neuron interaction through the release of neuropeptide CGRP.

  1. Binding of amyloid beta peptide to beta2 adrenergic receptor induces PKA-dependent AMPA receptor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Govindaiah, G; Liu, Ruijie; De Arcangelis, Vania; Cox, Charles L; Xiang, Yang K

    2010-09-01

    Progressive decrease in neuronal function is an established feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide induces acute increase in spontaneous synaptic activity accompanied by neurotoxicity, and Abeta induces excitotoxic neuronal death by increasing calcium influx mediated by hyperactive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors. An in vivo study has revealed subpopulations of hyperactive neurons near Abeta plaques in mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can be normalized by an AMPA receptor antagonist. In the present study, we aim to determine whether soluble Abeta acutely induces hyperactivity of AMPA receptors by a mechanism involving beta(2) adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR). We found that the soluble Abeta binds to beta(2)AR, and the extracellular N terminus of beta(2)AR is critical for the binding. The binding is required to induce G-protein/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, which controls PKA-dependent phosphorylation of GluR1 and beta(2)AR, and AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). beta(2)AR and GluR1 also form a complex comprising postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), PKA and its anchor AKAP150, and protein phosphotase 2A (PP2A). Both the third intracellular (i3) loop and C terminus of beta(2)AR are required for the beta(2)AR/AMPA receptor complex. Abeta acutely induces PKA phosphorylation of GluR1 in the complex without affecting the association between two receptors. The present study reveals that non-neurotransmitter Abeta has a binding capacity to beta(2)AR and induces PKA-dependent hyperactivity in AMPA receptors.

  2. Mechanisms of C-peptide-mediated rescue of low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer P; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Gordon, Weston R; Ellsworth, Mary L; Stephenson, Alan H; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-03-01

    The circulating erythrocyte, by virtue of the regulated release of ATP in response to reduced oxygen (O2) tension, plays a key role in maintaining appropriate perfusion distribution to meet tissue needs. Erythrocytes from individuals with Type 2 diabetes (DM2) fail to release ATP in response to this stimulus. However, the administration of C-peptide and insulin at a 1:1 ratio was shown to restore this important physiological response in humans with DM2. To begin to investigate the mechanisms by which C-peptide influences low O2-induced ATP release, erythrocytes from healthy humans and humans with DM2 were exposed to reduced O2 in a thin-film tonometer, and ATP release under these conditions was compared with release during normoxia. We determined that 1) low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes is rescued by C-peptide in the presence and absence of insulin, 2) the signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes involves PKC, as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and 3) inhibitors of cGMP degradation rescue low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes. These results provide support for the hypothesis that both PKC and sGC are components of a signaling pathway activated by C-peptide in human erythrocytes. In addition, since both C-peptide and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors rescue low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with DM2, their administration to humans with DM2 could aid in the treatment and/or prevention of the vascular disease associated with this condition.

  3. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  4. A Conserved Peptide Pattern from a Widespread Microbial Virulence Factor Triggers Pattern-Induced Immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Oome, Stan; Raaymakers, Tom M.; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Microbe- or host damage-derived patterns mediate activation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in plants. Microbial virulence factor (effector)-triggered immunity (ETI) constitutes a second layer of plant protection against microbial attack. Various necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1)-like proteins (NLPs) produced by bacterial, oomycete and fungal microbes are phytotoxic virulence factors that exert immunogenic activities through phytotoxin-induced host cell damage. We here show that multiple cytotoxic NLPs also carry a pattern of 20 amino acid residues (nlp20) that triggers immunity-associated plant defenses and immunity to microbial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana and related plant species with similar characteristics as the prototype pattern, bacterial flagellin. Characteristic differences in flagellin and nlp20 plant responses exist however, as nlp20s fail to trigger extracellular alkalinization in Arabidopsis cell suspensions and seedling growth inhibition. Immunogenic nlp20 peptide motifs are frequently found in bacterial, oomycete and fungal NLPs. Such an unusually broad taxonomic distribution within three phylogenetic kingdoms is unprecedented among microbe-derived triggers of immune responses in either metazoans or plants. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic NLPs carrying immunogenic nlp20 motifs trigger PTI in two ways as typical patterns and by inflicting host cell damage. We further propose that conserved structures within a microbial virulence factor might have driven the emergence of a plant pattern recognition system mediating PTI. As this is reminiscent of the evolution of immune receptors mediating ETI, our findings support the idea that there is a continuum between PTI and ETI. PMID:25375108

  5. Proteomic analysis of the palmitate-induced myotube secretome reveals involvement of the annexin A1-formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) pathway in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Dayea; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Ghim, Jaewang; Park, Soyeon; Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Jaeyoon; Hwang, Daehee; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Elevated levels of the free fatty acid palmitate are found in the plasma of obese patients and induce insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle secretes myokines as extracellular signaling mediators in response to pathophysiological conditions. Here, we identified and characterized the skeletal muscle secretome in response to palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified 36 secretory proteins modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that palmitate-induced insulin resistance induced cellular stress and modulated secretory events. We found that the decrease in the level of annexin A1, a secretory protein, depended on palmitate, and that annexin A1 and its receptor, formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist, played a protective role in the palmitate-induced insulin resistance of L6 myotubes through PKC-θ modulation. In mice fed with a high-fat diet, treatment with the formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist improved systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, we identified myokine candidates modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance and found that the annexin A1- formyl peptide receptor 2 pathway mediated the insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, as well as systemic insulin sensitivity.

  6. Application of MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation for the identification of disulfide-bonded peptides.

    PubMed

    Janecki, Dariusz J; Nemeth, Jennifer F

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a method for the fast identification and composition of disulfide-bonded peptides. A unique fragmentation signature of inter-disulfide-bonded peptides is detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). This fragmentation pattern identifies peptides with an interconnected disulfide bond and provides information regarding the composition of the peptides involved in the pairing. The distinctive signature produced using CID is a triplet of ions resulting from the cleavage of the disulfide bond to produce dehydroalanine, cysteine or thiocysteine product ions. This method is not applicable to intra-peptide disulfide bonds, as the cleavage mechanism is not the same and a triplet pattern is not observed. This method has been successfully applied to identifying disulfide-bonded peptides in a number of control digestions, as well as study samples where disulfide bond networks were postulated and/or unknown.

  7. Sequential on-line C-terminal sequencing of peptides based on carboxypeptidase Y digestion and optically gated capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xiaoxia; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2016-08-12

    We report a novel method for sequential on-line C-terminal sequencing of peptides, which combines carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) digestion with on-line derivatization and optically gated capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (OGCE-LIF). Various factors that may affect the C-terminal sequencing were investigated and optimized. High repeatability of on-line derivatization and the sequential OGCE-LIF assay of amino acids (AAs) was achieved with relative standard deviation (RSD) (n=20) less than 1.5% and 3.2% for migration time and peak height, respectively. A total of 13 AAs was efficiently separated in the present study, indicating that the method can be used for sequencing of peptides consisting of the 13 AAs studied. Using two synthesized N-terminally blocked peptides as test examples, we show that the present method can on-line monitor the released AAs with a temporal resolution of 50s during the entire CPY digestion process. The rates of AA release as a function of digestion time were easily measured; thus, the AA sequence of the peptide was determined with just one OGCE assay. Our study indicates the present approach is an effective, reliable, and convenient method for rapid analysis of the C-terminal sequence of peptides, with potential application in peptide analysis and proteome research.

  8. Inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 reduces the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy against carcinogen-induced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baracco, Elisa E.; Pietrocola, Federico; Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Senovilla, Laura; Zitvogel, Laurence; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The loss-of-function mutation of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) has a negative impact on the progression-free and overall survival of breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. This effect may be attributed to the fact that chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires FPR1 and that such anticancer immune responses are responsible for the long-term effects of chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the possible contribution of FPR1 to the efficacy of a combination of mitoxantrone (MTX) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) for the treatment of hormone-induced breast cancer. Breast cancer induced by a combination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) could be successfully treated with MTX plus CTX in thus far that tumor growth was retarded and overall survival was extended (as compared to vehicle-only treated controls). However, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination therapy was completely abolished when FPR1 receptors were blocked by means of cyclosporin H (CsH). Future genetic studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy-treated breast cancers are warranted to validate these findings at the clinical level. PMID:27471610

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  11. Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangfu; Yang, Bu; Teguh, Dian; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Jiake; Rong, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs), Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis. PMID:27735865

  12. Identifying drug metallation sites on peptides using electron transfer dissociation (ETD), collision induced dissociation (CID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS).

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan P; Brown, Jeffery M; Campuzano, Iain; Sadler, Peter J

    2010-08-14

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) have been used to locate the precise binding sites for platinum and ruthenium anticancer complexes on the peptide Substance P. We show that ETD combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry significantly reduces mass spectral complexity and improves the S/N of the product-ions formed.

  13. Richter's Syndrome with Hypercalcemia Induced by Tumor-Associated Production of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Naoki; Yasuda, Hajime; Morishita, Soji; Aota, Yasuo; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Tanaka, Masaru; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia due to parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) elevation is a well-known complication of various malignancies, but the situation is rare concerning hematological malignancies except for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. We report a case of Richter's syndrome with humoral hypercalcemia, and demonstrate by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that peripheral blood PTHrP levels were 2,500-fold higher compared to healthy controls. PTHrP production by tumor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Richter's syndrome has been previously demonstrated by nonquantitative methods such as immunohistochemistry and northern blot analysis, but this is the first report using the RT-PCR method. The presented case did not have hypercalcemia when initially diagnosed as small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), and as reported earlier, the development of hypercalcemia may be an indication of the transformation to Richter's syndrome in patients with CLL/SLL. PMID:28203174

  14. ``Cold Denaturation'' induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumyajit; Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    Using a combination of several experimental and computational techniques, we show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear conformation upon cooling, due to interaction with neighboring molecules in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure. This process is similar to the known ``cold denaturation'' in peptides, but here the SAM plays the role of the solvent. Our DFT-based first principles calculations show that the structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by an associated change in the spin channel that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules. This is also experimentally observed via a new solid state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  15. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain.

  16. Induced Bacterial Cross-Resistance toward Host Antimicrobial Peptides: A Worrying Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Fleitas, Osmel; Franco, Octávio L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, threatening to return to the pre-antibiotic era. Therefore, the search for new antimicrobial compounds that overcome the resistance phenomenon has become a priority. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as one of the most promising antibiotic medicines. However, in recent years several AMP-resistance mechanisms have been described. Moreover, the AMP-resistance phenomenon has become more complex due to its association with cross-resistance toward AMP effectors of the host innate immune system. In this context, the use of AMPs as a therapeutic option could be potentially hazardous, since bacteria could develop resistance toward our innate immune system. Here, we review the findings of major studies that deal with the AMP cross-resistance phenomenon. PMID:27047486

  17. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain. PMID:28127312

  18. Induced Bacterial Cross-Resistance toward Host Antimicrobial Peptides: A Worrying Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Fleitas, Osmel; Franco, Octávio L

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, threatening to return to the pre-antibiotic era. Therefore, the search for new antimicrobial compounds that overcome the resistance phenomenon has become a priority. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as one of the most promising antibiotic medicines. However, in recent years several AMP-resistance mechanisms have been described. Moreover, the AMP-resistance phenomenon has become more complex due to its association with cross-resistance toward AMP effectors of the host innate immune system. In this context, the use of AMPs as a therapeutic option could be potentially hazardous, since bacteria could develop resistance toward our innate immune system. Here, we review the findings of major studies that deal with the AMP cross-resistance phenomenon.

  19. Identification of Programmed Death Ligand 1-derived Peptides Capable of Inducing Cancer-reactive Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes From HLA-A24+ Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takafumi; Minami, Tomoko; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; De Velasco, Marco; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Harashima, Nanae; Harada, Mamoru; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2015-09-01

    Molecular therapy targeting tumor angiogenesis has been the standard treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, despite their significant antitumor effects, most of patients with mRCC have not been cured. Under such circumstances, anticancer immunotherapy has been considered a promising treatment modality for mRCC, and cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are the most powerful effectors among several immune cells. However, anticancer CTLs can be inhibited by several immune inhibitory mechanisms, including the interaction between programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1, on T cells and cancer cells, respectively. Alternatively, this also means that PD-L1 could be a promising target for anticancer immunotherapy. Therefore, we searched for PD-L1-derived peptides that are applicable for anticancer vaccine for HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Among 5 peptides derived from PD-L1, which were prepared based on the binding motif to the HLA-A24(+) allele, both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides induced peptide-specific CTLs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24(+) RCC patients. Such PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8 T cells showed cytotoxicity against HLA-A24(+) and PD-L1-expressing RCC cells. Although IFN-γ treatment increased PD-L1 expression on PD-L1(low) RCC cells, their sensitivity to cytotoxicity of PD-L1 peptide-stimulated CD8(+) T cells varied between patients. Altogether, these results indicate that both PD-L1(11-19) and PD-L1(41-50) peptides could be candidates for peptide-based anticancer vaccines for HLA-A24(+) mRCC patients.

  20. Blocking TNF-α by combination of TNF-α- and TNFR-binding cyclic peptide ameliorates the severity of TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bingjiao; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Liang, Huifang; Li, Xiaoyan; Niu, Nin; Li, Baihua; Jiang, Xiaodan; Li, Zhuoya

    2011-04-10

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. TNF antagonists are effectively used to treat these patients, although the efficiency of different antagonists varies. In the present study we combined TNF-α binding cyclic peptide (TBCP) and TNFR1 binding cyclic peptide (TRBCP) to treat TNBS-induced colitis in rats for one week. The symptoms of colitis including bloody diarrhea, rectal prolapse, and a profound and sustained weight loss were significantly ameliorated and the colon inflammatory damage, both macroscopic and histological scores, MPO activity, and NO production were markedly decreased in rats by neutralization of TNF-α and blocking TNFR1, as compared with those in rats treated with irrelevant peptide or normal saline (P<0.05). The transcripts of IL-1β and IL-8, and the protein expression of TNF-α in rats treated with both TBCP and TRBCP were also down-regulated (P<0.05), while these proinflammatory cytokines remained unchanged in rats treated with irrelevant peptide or normal saline. These findings suggest that the combination of TNF-α- and TNFR1-binding peptide effectively improves the symptoms of TNBS-induced colitis and alleviates colonic pathological damages in rats. This combination may be a potent candidate for clinical treatment of the inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, F.O. ); Issinger, O.G. ); McArdle, A.H. ); Shapiro, J.; Tomei, L.D. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy.

  2. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  3. Brain RVD-haemopressin, a haemoglobin-derived peptide, inhibits bombesin-induced central activation of adrenomedullary outflow in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Nakamura, Kumiko; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Yokotani, Kunihiko; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Haemopressin and RVD-haemopressin, derived from the haemoglobin α-chain, are bioactive peptides found in brain and are ligands for cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Activation of brain CB1 receptors inhibited the secretion of adrenal catecholamines (noradrenaline and adrenaline) induced by i.c.v. bombesin in the rat. Here, we investigated the effects of two haemoglobin-derived peptides on this bombesin-induced response EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Anaesthetised male Wistar rats were pretreated with either haemoglobin-derived peptide, given i.c.v., 30 min before i.c.v. bombesin and plasma catecholamines were subsequently measured electrochemically after HPLC. Direct effects of bombesin on secretion of adrenal catecholamines were examined using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Furthermore, activation of haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the rat hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, a regulatory centre of central adrenomedullary outflow) after i.c.v. bombesin was assessed by immunohistochemical techniques. KEY RESULTS Bombesin given i.c.v. dose-dependently elevated plasma catecholamines whereas incubation with bombesin had no effect on spontaneous and nicotine-induced secretion of catecholamines from chromaffin cells. The bombesin-induced increase in catecholamines was inhibited by pretreatment with i.c.v. RVD-haemopressin (CB1 receptor agonist) but not after pretreatment with haemopressin (CB1 receptor inverse agonist). Bombesin activated haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the PVN. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The haemoglobin-derived peptide RVD-haemopressin in the brain plays an inhibitory role in bombesin-induced activation of central adrenomedullary outflow via brain CB1 receptors in the rat. These findings provide basic information for the therapeutic use of haemoglobin-derived peptides in the modulation of central adrenomedullary outflow. PMID:24138638

  4. NOVEL MITOCHONDRIA-TARGETED ANTIOXIDANT PEPTIDE AMELIORATES BURN-INDUCED APOPTOSIS AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS IN THE SKELETAL MUSCLE OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-yul; Kaneki, Masao; Andreas, Jonathan; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that a novel mitochondria-targeted SS-31 peptide attenuates the burn injury-induced apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and improves insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle. Following 30% total body surface area burn or sham-burn, mice were injected daily with SS-31 peptide (5 mg/kg body weight) and the rectus abdominis muscles collected on post-burn days 1, 3, and 7. The tissues were subjected to various biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Treatment with SS-31 peptide prevented burn-induced increases in the caspase 3 activity (p < 0.05) and apoptosis (p < 0.01) on post-burn day 7. The SS-31 peptide treatment also prevented the increase in the expression levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) on post-burn days 3 and 7. Burn injury-induced increases in the levels of two ER stress markers, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), were significantly decreased by the SS-31 peptide treatments on post-burn day 7 and on day 3 for BiP as well (p < 0.05). The effects of SS-31 appear to be, in part, due to its ability to reduce oxidative stress in burned mice, evidenced by reduced expression of oxidized proteins that were clearly evident on post-burn day 7. Our results demonstrate a possible therapeutic potential of SS-31 peptide to ameliorate the adverse effects of burn injury in skeletal muscle. PMID:21937949

  5. Onset and Regression of Pregnancy-Induced Cardiac Alterations in Gestationally Hypertensive Mice: The Role of the Natriuretic Peptide System.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Li, Terry Y; Tse, M Yat; Andrew, R David; Tayade, Chandrakant; Jin, Albert Y; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy induces cardiovascular adaptations in response to increased volume overload. Aside from the hemodynamic changes that occur during pregnancy, the maternal heart also undergoes structural changes. However, cardiac modulation in pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension is incompletely understood. The objectives of the current investigation were to determine the role of the natriuretic peptide (NP) system in pregnancy and to assess alterations in pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy between gestationally hypertensive and normotensive dams. Previously we have shown that mice lacking the expression of atrial NP (ANP; ANP(-/-)) exhibit a gestational hypertensive phenotype. In the current study, female ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) mice were mated with ANP(+/+) males. Changes in cardiac size and weight were evaluated across pregnancy at Gestational Days 15.5 and 17.5 and Postnatal Days 7, 14, and 28. Nonpregnant mice were used as controls. Physical measurement recordings and histological analyses demonstrated peak cardiac hypertrophy occurring at 14 days postpartum in both ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) dams with little to no change during pregnancy. Additionally, left ventricular expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and NP system was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Up-regulation of Agt and AT(1a) genes was observed late in pregnancy, while Nppa and Nppb genes were significantly up-regulated postpartum. Our data suggest that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy may be influenced by the RAS throughout gestation and by the NP system postpartum. Further investigations are required to gain a complete understanding of the mechanistic aspects of pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Prevention of copper-induced calcium influx and cell death by prion-derived peptide in suspension-cultured tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kuse, Masaki; Isobe, Minoru; Bouteau, François; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    Impact of copper on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions leading to cell death in plant cells and the effects of the copper-binding peptide derived from the human prion protein (PrP) as a novel plant-protecting agent were assessed using a cell suspension culture of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals, and stimulation of calcium channel opening, allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. The former was proven by the action of specific ROS scavengers blocking the calcium responses and the latter was proven by an increase in aequorin luminescence and its inhibition by specific channel blockers. Following these early events completed within 10 min, the development of copper-induced cell death was observed during additional 1 h in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of a synthetic peptide (KTNMKHMA) corresponding to the neurotoxic sequence in human PrP, prior to the addition of copper, effectively blocked both calcium influx and cell death induced by copper. Lastly, a possible mechanism of peptide action and future applications of this peptide in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in favour of phytoremediation processes are discussed.

  7. CXCR1/2 ligands induce p38 MAPK-dependent translocation and release of opioid peptides from primary granules in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rittner, Heike L; Labuz, Dominika; Richter, Jan F; Brack, Alexander; Schäfer, Michael; Stein, Christoph; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2007-11-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) can release opioid peptides which bind to opioid receptors on sensory neurons and inhibit inflammatory pain. This release can be triggered by chemokine receptor 1/2 (CXCR1/2) ligands. Our aim was to identify the granule subpopulation containing opioid peptides and to assess whether MAPK mediate the CXCR1/2 ligand-induced release of these peptides. Using double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, we showed that beta-endorphin (END) and Met-enkephalin (ENK) were colocalized with the primary (azurophil) granule markers CD63 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) within PMN. END and ENK release triggered by a CXCR1/2 ligand in vitro was dependent on the presence of cytochalasin B (CyB) and on p38 MAPK, but not on p42/44 MAPK. In addition, translocation of END and ENK containing primary granules to submembranous regions of the cell was abolished by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. In vivo CXCL2/3 reduced pain in rats with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced hindpaw inflammation. This effect was attenuated by intraplantar (i.pl.) antibodies against END and ENK and by i.pl. p38 MAPK inhibitor treatment. Taken together, these findings indicate that END and ENK are contained in primary granules of PMN, and that CXCR1/2 ligands induce p38-dependent translocation and release of these opioid peptides to inhibit inflammatory pain.

  8. Resting and dobutamine stress test induced serum concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Spasojević Kosić, Ljubica; Trailović, Dragiša R; Matunović, Radomir

    2012-12-01

    Studies of clinical uses of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) represent one of the most important advances in cardiology since the introduction of echocardiography as a clinical diagnostic procedure. Defining the clinical potential of BNP in canine cardiology has not been completed yet. The aim of this study is to measure BNP concentrations in healthy German Shepherd dogs of different ages as a baseline in resting and when conventional protocol of the dobutamine stress test (DST) is applied to dogs. Concentrations of BNP were measured in blood serum by the radioimmunoassay method. The values of BNP concentrations were compared to cardiac parameters obtained by standard cardiac diagnostic procedures (radiology, electrocardiography and echocardiography). No significant differences in serum BNP concentrations existed in dogs of different ages. A statistically significant increase in BNP concentrations was registered after DST. These changes in BNP concentrations were related to ST/T electrocardiographic changes, and correlated to changes in the left ventricular internal diameter in systole (LVESD). These data suggest that BNP is not increased in aged dogs with normal cardiac systolic function and renal function, and that myocardial ischemia leads to a significant increase in BNP concentrations even in dogs with normal left ventricular function.

  9. Electrospun Scaffolds for Osteoblast Cells: Peptide-Induced Concentration-Dependent Improvements of Polycaprolactone

    PubMed Central

    Dettin, Monica; Zamuner, Annj; Roso, Martina; Gloria, Antonio; Iucci, Giovanna; Messina, Grazia M. L.; D'Amora, Ugo; Marletta, Giovanni; Modesti, Michele; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Brun, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The design of hybrid poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL)-self-assembling peptides (SAPs) matrices represents a simple method for the surface functionalization of synthetic scaffolds, which is essential for cell compatibility. This study investigates the influence of increasing concentrations (2.5%, 5%, 10% and 15% w/w SAP compared to PCL) of three different SAPs on the physico-chemical/mechanical and biological properties of PCL fibers. We demonstrated that physico-chemical surface characteristics were slightly improved at increasing SAP concentrations: the fiber diameter increased; surface wettability increased with the first SAP addition (2.5%) and slightly less for the following ones; SAP-surface density increased but no change in the conformation was registered. These results could allow engineering matrices with structural characteristics and desired wettability according to the needs and the cell system used. The biological and mechanical characteristics of these scaffolds showed a particular trend at increasing SAP concentrations suggesting a prevailing correlation between cell behavior and mechanical features of the matrices. As compared with bare PCL, SAP enrichment increased the number of metabolic active h-osteoblast cells, fostered the expression of specific osteoblast-related mRNA transcripts, and guided calcium deposition, revealing the potential application of PCL-SAP scaffolds for the maintenance of osteoblast phenotype. PMID:26361004

  10. Cytosolic amyloid-{beta} peptide 42 escaping from degradation induces cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Yong Wook; Shin, Dong Yeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Yoo, Yung Joon . E-mail: yjyoo@gist.ac.kr

    2006-06-02

    Accumulating evidence suggests that intracellular amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide triggers the early pathological events in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the consequence of cytosolic A{beta}. In this study, we ectopically expressed A{beta}42 in the cytoplasm of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by expressing a fusion protein of GFP-tagged ubiquitin and A{beta}42 (GFPUb-A{beta}42). Although GFPUb and A{beta}42 are stochastically produced with the same molar ratio in the cytoplasm, A{beta}42 was completely degraded in more than 50% of the GFPUb-expressing cells. However, if A{beta}42 was not degraded in their cytoplasm, then A{beta}42-expressing cells underwent apoptosis. The number of A{beta}42-expressing cells is significantly increased by the inhibition of proteasome with MG132. Cytosolic A{beta}42 which has escaped degradation inhibits proteasome and thereby may accelerate the accumulation of A{beta}42 and its detrimental effects. Our findings suggest that cells have the potential to degrade A{beta}42 in their cytoplasm but if A{beta}42 appears in the cytoplasm due to its incomplete degradation, it accumulates and may trigger the fatal cascade of pathology of AD.

  11. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  12. GH-releasing peptide (GHRP-6)-induced ACTH release in patients with addison's disease: effect of glucocorticoid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Martins, M R A; Pinto, A C A R; Brunner, E; Silva, M R D; Lengyel, A M J

    2003-02-01

    GH releasing peptide (GHRP-6) is a synthetic hexapeptide with potent GH releasing activity both in man and in animals. This peptide is also able to stimulate ACTH and cortisol (F) release. It has been suggested that the ACTH responsiveness to GHRP-6 is modulated by circulating glucocorticoid levels. To further clarify this hypothesis, we studied the effect of GHRP-6 (1 ug/kg, iv) on ACTH and F release in patients with Addison's disease (no.=6) during replacement therapy and after 72 h of glucocorticoid withdrawal. Seven controls were also submitted to a single GHRP-6 test. In control subjects, ACTH values (pmol/l; mean +/- SE) increased from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to 4.7 +/- 1.4 (peak). AUC (pmol.min/l) values were 170.3 +/- 48.8. F (nmol/l) values increased from 257.0 +/- 42.9 to 367.0 +/- 50.8. In patients with Addison's disease there was an increase in ACTH levels from 38.1 +/- 17.1 to 174.9 +/- 79.4 after GHRP-6 administration. AUC values were 5490.4 +/- 2269.1. After 72 h withdrawal of glucocorticoid, there was an increase in basal ACTH values (191.2 +/- 97.3), and a trend toward an increase in ACTH levels after GHRP-6 (p=0.053). Patients with Addison's disease on therapy showed a significantly higher ACTH response to GHRP-6 when compared to controls. Our results show that in patients with Addison's disease on replacement there is an increased ACTH release after GHRP-6 administration, compared to controls. After 72 h glucocorticoid withdrawal, this enhanced responsiveness is not maintained. Our data suggest that circulating glucocorticoids modulate GHRP-6-induced ACTH release and that multiple mechanisms may be involved in this process.

  13. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases.

  14. Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor Peptide Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Fibrogenesis is induced by repeated injury to the liver and reactive regeneration and leads eventually to liver cirrhosis. Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) has been shown to prevent liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). A 44 amino acid domain of PEDF (44-mer) was found to have a protective effect against various insults to several cell types. In this study, we investigated the capability of synthetic 44-mer to protect against liver injury in mice and in primary cultured hepatocytes. Acute liver injury, induced by CCl4, was evident from histological changes, such as cell necrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, and a concomitant reduction of glutathione (GSH) and GSH redox enzyme activities in the liver. Intraperitoneal injection of the 44-mer into CCl4-treated mice abolished the induction of AST and ALT and markedly reduced histological signs of liver injury. The 44-mer treatment can reduce hepatic oxidative stress as evident from lower levels of lipid hydroperoxide, and higher levels of GSH. CCl4 caused a reduction of Bcl-xL, PEDF and PPARγ, which was markedly restored by the 44-mer treatment. Consequently, the 44-mer suppressed liver fibrosis induced by repeated CCl4 injury. Furthermore, our observations in primary culture of rat hepatocytes showed that PEDF and the 44-mer protected primary rat hepatocytes against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and TGF-β1. PEDF/44-mer induced cell protective STAT3 phosphorylation. Pharmacological STAT3 inhibition prevented the antiapoptotic action of PEDF/44-mer. Among several PEDF receptor candidates that may be responsible for hepatocyte protection, we demonstrated that PNPLA2 was essential for PEDF/44-mer-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and antiapoptotic activity by using siRNA to selectively knockdown PNPLA2. In conclusion, the PEDF 44-mer protects hepatocytes from single and repeated CCl4 injury. This protective effect may stem from strengthening the counter oxidative stress capacity and

  15. The Positively Charged COOH-terminal Glycosaminoglycan-binding CXCL9(74-103) Peptide Inhibits CXCL8-induced Neutrophil Extravasation and Monosodium Urate Crystal-induced Gout in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vanheule, Vincent; Janssens, Rik; Boff, Daiane; Kitic, Nikola; Berghmans, Nele; Ronsse, Isabelle; Kungl, Andreas J; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Mortier, Anneleen

    2015-08-28

    The ELR(-)CXC chemokine CXCL9 is characterized by a long, highly positively charged COOH-terminal region, absent in most other chemokines. Several natural leukocyte- and fibroblast-derived COOH-terminally truncated CXCL9 forms missing up to 30 amino acids were identified. To investigate the role of the COOH-terminal region of CXCL9, several COOH-terminal peptides were chemically synthesized. These peptides display high affinity for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and compete with functional intact chemokines for GAG binding, the longest peptide (CXCL9(74-103)) being the most potent. The COOH-terminal peptide CXCL9(74-103) does not signal through or act as an antagonist for CXCR3, the G protein-coupled CXCL9 receptor, and does not influence neutrophil chemotactic activity of CXCL8 in vitro. Based on the GAG binding data, an anti-inflammatory role for CXCL9(74-103) was further evidenced in vivo. Simultaneous intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103) with CXCL8 injection in the joint diminished CXCL8-induced neutrophil extravasation. Analogously, monosodium urate crystal-induced neutrophil migration to the tibiofemural articulation, a murine model of gout, is highly reduced by intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103). These data show that chemokine-derived peptides with high affinity for GAGs may be used as anti-inflammatory peptides; by competing with active chemokines for binding and immobilization on GAGs, these peptides may lower chemokine presentation on the endothelium and disrupt the generation of a chemokine gradient, thereby preventing a chemokine from properly performing its chemotactic function. The CXCL9 peptide may serve as a lead molecule for further development of inhibitors of inflammation based on interference with chemokine-GAG interactions.

  16. Long-peptide therapeutic vaccination against CRPV-induced papillomas in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Balogh, Karla K.; Peng, Xuwen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Long peptide immunization is a promising strategy to clear established tumors. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of a naturally existing long peptide that contained two HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes (CRPVE1/149-157 and CRPVE1/161-169) from cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E1 using our CRPV/HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model. A universal Tetanus Toxin helper motif (TT helper) was tagged at either the N-terminus or the carboxyl-terminus of this long peptide and designated as TT-E1 peptide and E1 peptide-TT respectively. Four groups of HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits were infected with wild type CRPV DNA. Three weeks post-infection, the rabbits were immunized four times with TT-E1 peptide, E1peptide only, E1 peptide -TT or TT-control peptide with two-week intervals between immunizations. Tumor outgrowth was monitored and recorded weekly. After the third booster immunization, tumors on two of the four E1 peptide-TT immunized rabbits began to shrink. One animal from this group was free of tumors at the termination of the study. The mean papilloma size of E1 peptide-TT immunized rabbits was significantly smaller when compared with that of the three other groups (P<0.05, one way ANOVA analysis). It is interesting that E1 peptide-TT vaccination not only stimulated stronger T cell mediate immune responses but also stronger antibody generations. We conclude that the location of a TT helper motif tagged at the long peptide vaccine is critical for the outcome of therapeutic responses to persistent tumors in our HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model. PMID:25243025

  17. Soy peptide lunasin induces pten-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tumor suppressor PTEN inhibits the AKT signaling pathway whose unrestrained activity underlies many human malignancies. Previously we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) enhanced PTEN expression in mammary tissue of rats with lower NMU-induced mammary tumor incidence relative...

  18. Analysis of the immune response induced by a scorpion venom sub-fraction, a pure peptide and a recombinant peptide, against toxin Cn2 of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Consuelo; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Anguiano, Gerardo A V; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D

    2003-03-01

    Three different immunogens from the venom of the Mexican scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann were used to study protective antibody response in mice and rabbits, challenged with toxin Cn2, one of the most abundant toxic peptide of this venom. The immunogens were: Cn5, a crustacean specific toxin; a recombinant protein containing the peptide Cn5 linked to the maltose transporter and a sub-fraction (F.II.5) containing 25 distinct peptides, among which is Cn5. Mice immunized with these three preparations, when directly challenged with Cn2 presented no apparent protection, whereas anti-sera produced in rabbits with these three immunogens were capable of partially neutralizing the effect of Cn2, when injected into naive mice. Cn5 rabbit anti-serum showed a better protective effect on mice, than the rabbit sera obtained against the two other antigens. The subcutaneous route of challenging mice was shown to be better than intraperitoneal injections. Comparative structural analysis of Cn5 with other toxins of this venom showed that our results are important to be taken into consideration, when choosing appropriate immunogens aimed at the production of better anti-venoms or for the rational design of possible vaccines.

  19. Amide-I relaxation-induced hydrogen bond distortion: An intermediate in electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of alpha-helical peptides?

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent; Tsybin, Yury O

    2008-09-07

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) of peptides and proteins in the gas phase is a powerful tool in tandem mass spectrometry whose current description is not sufficient to explain many experimental observations. Here, we attempt to bridge the current understanding of the vibrational dynamics in alpha-helices with the recent experimental results on ECD of alpha-helical peptides through consideration of amide-I relaxation-induced hydrogen bond distortion. Based on a single spine of H-bonded peptide units, we assume that charge neutralization upon electron capture by a charged alpha-helix excites a nearby amide-I mode, which relaxes over a few picoseconds due to Fermi resonances with intramolecular normal modes. The amide-I population plays the role of an external force, which drives the displacements of each peptide unit. It induces a large immobile contraction of the H bonds surrounding the excited site whose lifetime is about the amide-I lifetime. In addition, it creates two lattice deformations describing H bond stretchings, which propagate from the excited region toward both termini of the alpha-helix, get reflected at the termini and yield H bond contractions which move back to the excited region. Consequently, we show that H bonds experience rather large contractions whose amplitude depends on general features such as the position of the amide-I mode, the peptide length and the H bond force constants. When an H bond contraction is sufficiently large, it may promote a hydrogen atom transfer between two neighboring peptide units leading to the formation of a radical at charge site remote carbonyl carbon which is known to be a precursor to the rupture of the corresponding N[Single Bond]C(alpha) bond. The introduced here way of excitation energy generation and transfer may significantly advance ECD understanding and complement existing ECD mechanisms.

  20. Inducible ASABF-type antimicrobial peptide from the sponge Suberites domuncula: microbicidal and hemolytic activity in vitro and toxic effect on molluscs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C; Korzhev, Michael; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Batel, Renato; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Since sponges, as typical filter-feeders, are exposed to a high load of attacking prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, they are armed with a wide arsenal of antimicrobial/cytostatic low-molecular-weight, non-proteinaceous bioactive compounds. Here we present the first sponge agent belonging to the group of ASABF-type antimicrobial peptides. The ASABF gene was identified and cloned from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. The mature peptide, with a length of 64 aa residues has a predicted pI of 9.24, and comprises the characteristic CSα β structural motif. Consequently, the S. domuncula ASABF shares high similarity with the nematode ASABFs; it is distantly related to the defensins. The recombinant peptide was found to display besides microbicidal activity, anti-fungal activity. In addition, the peptide lyses human erythrocytes. The expression of ASABF is upregulated after exposure to the apoptosis-inducing agent 2,2'-dipyridyl. During the process of apoptosis of surface tissue of S. domuncula, grazing gastropods (Bittium sp.) are attracted by quinolinic acid which is synthesized through the kynurenine pathway by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAD). Finally, the gastropods are repelled from the sponge tissue by the ASABF. It is shown that the effector peptide ASABF is sequentially expressed after the induction of the HAD gene and a caspase, as a central enzyme executing apoptosis.

  1. Cardiac natriuretic peptides act via p38 MAPK to induce the brown fat thermogenic program in mouse and human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bordicchia, Marica; Liu, Dianxin; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ailhaud, Gerard; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Zhang, Chaoying; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sarzani, Riccardo; Collins, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    The ability of mammals to resist body fat accumulation is linked to their ability to expand the number and activity of “brown adipocytes” within white fat depots. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) can induce a functional “brown-like” adipocyte phenotype. As cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) and β-AR agonists are similarly potent at stimulating lipolysis in human adipocytes, we investigated whether NPs could induce human and mouse adipocytes to acquire brown adipocyte features, including a capacity for thermogenic energy expenditure mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). In human adipocytes, atrial NP (ANP) and ventricular NP (BNP) activated PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and UCP1 expression, induced mitochondriogenesis, and increased uncoupled and total respiration. At low concentrations, ANP and β-AR agonists additively enhanced expression of brown fat and mitochondrial markers in a p38 MAPK–dependent manner. Mice exposed to cold temperatures had increased levels of circulating NPs as well as higher expression of NP signaling receptor and lower expression of the NP clearance receptor (Nprc) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT). NPR-C–/– mice had markedly smaller WAT and BAT depots but higher expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1. Infusion of BNP into mice robustly increased Ucp1 and Pgc-1α expression in WAT and BAT, with corresponding elevation of respiration and energy expenditure. These results suggest that NPs promote “browning” of white adipocytes to increase energy expenditure, defining the heart as a central regulator of adipose tissue biology. PMID:22307324

  2. Inhibition of new vessel growth in mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by adiponectin peptide II

    PubMed Central

    Lyzogubov, Valeriy V.; Tytarenko, Ruslana G.; Thotakura, Sushma; Viswanathan, Tito; Bora, Nalini S.; Bora, Puran S.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of adiponectin (APN) peptide II on new vessel growth in mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or wet type age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with APN peptide II, control peptide, or PBS on day 1–7 or day 5–14. APN, AdipoR1, PCNA, and VEGF localization was investigated using confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. APN peptide II decreased the relative area of FITC-dextran perfused vessels by 4-fold, PCNA expression by 3-fold, and the number of PCNA stained HUVEC and MAVEC cells by 38 and 46%, respectively. We concluded that APN peptide II inhibits CNV size on days 7 and 14 by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. APN peptide II may have therapeutic potential to inhibit CNV or wet AMD. PMID:19422927

  3. Strong thermo-induced single and two-photon green luminescence in self-organized peptide microtubes.

    PubMed

    Semin, S; van Etteger, A; Cattaneo, L; Amdursky, N; Kulyuk, L; Lavrov, S; Sigov, A; Mishina, E; Rosenman, G; Rasing, Th

    2015-03-01

    Diphenylalanine peptide nano- and microtubes formed by self-assembly demonstrate strongly enhanced and tunable single-photon and two-photon luminescence in the visible range, which appears after heat- or laser treatment of these self-organized peptide microtubes. This process significantly extends the functionality of these microstructures and can trigger a new interest in the optical properties of structures based on short peptides.

  4. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661197

  5. Estrogen receptors regulate the estrous behavior induced by progestins, peptides, and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Lima-Hernández, F J; Gómora-Arrati, P; García-Juárez, M; Blaustein, J D; Etgen, A M; Beyer, C; González-Flores, O

    2014-07-01

    The role of classical estrogen receptors (ERs) in priming female reproductive behavior has been studied previously; however, the participation of this receptor during activation of estrous behavior has not been extensively studied. The purpose of this work was to test the possibility that the facilitation of lordosis behavior in estrogen-primed rats by progesterone (P) and its 5α- and 5β-reduced metabolites, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), leptin, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and vagino-cervical stimulation (VCS) involves interactions with classical ERs by using the selective ER modulator, tamoxifen. To further assess the role of ERs, we also explored the effects of the pure ER antagonist, ICI182780 (ICI), on estrous behavior induced by P and GnRH. Ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats (5μg estradiol benzoate 40h earlier) were injected intraventricularly with the above-mentioned compounds, or they received VCS. All compounds and VCS effectively facilitated estrous behavior when tested at 60, 120 or 240min after infusion or application of VCS. Intraventricular infusion of tamoxifen (5μg), 30min before, significantly attenuated estrous behaviors induced in estradiol-primed rats by P, most of its 5α- and 5β-reduced metabolites, GnRH, and PGE2, but not by VCS. Although there was a trend for reduction, tamoxifen did not significantly decrease lordosis in females treated with 5β-pregnan-3,20-dione. ICI also inhibited lordosis behavior induced by P and GnRH at some testing intervals. These results suggest that activation of classical ERs participates in the triggering effects on estrous behavior induced by agents with different chemical structures that do not bind directly to ERs.

  6. Role of Krev Interaction Trapped-1 in Prostacyclin-Induced Protection against Lung Vascular Permeability Induced by Excessive Mechanical Forces and Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide 6

    PubMed Central

    Meliton, Angelo; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Shah, Alok A.; Birukova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier regulation during acute lung injury (ALI) or other pathologies associated with increased vascular leakiness are an active area of research. Adaptor protein krev interaction trapped-1 (KRIT1) participates in angiogenesis, lumen formation, and stabilization of EC adherens junctions (AJs) in mature vasculature. We tested a role of KRIT1 in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling induced by mechanical stimulation and barrier dysfunction relevant to ventilator-induced lung injury and investigated KRIT1 involvement in EC barrier protection by prostacyclin (PC). PC stimulated Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1)–dependent association of KRIT1 with vascular endothelial cadherin at AJs, with KRIT1-dependent cortical cytoskeletal remodeling leading to EC barrier enhancement. KRIT1 knockdown exacerbated Rho-GTPase activation and EC barrier disruption induced by pathologic 18% cyclic stretch and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) 6 and attenuated the protective effects of PC. In the two-hit model of ALI caused by high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation and TRAP6 injection, KRIT1 functional deficiency in KRIT1+/− mice increased basal lung vascular leak and augmented vascular leak and lung injury caused by exposure to HTV and TRAP6. Down-regulation of KRIT1 also diminished the protective effects of PC against TRAP6/HTV-induced lung injury. These results demonstrate a KRIT1-dependent mechanism of vascular EC barrier control in basal conditions and in the two-hit model of ALI caused by excessive mechanical forces and TRAP6 via negative regulation of Rho activity and enhancement of cell junctions. We also conclude that the stimulation of the Rap1-KRIT1 signaling module is a major mechanism of vascular endothelial barrier protection by PC in the injured lung. PMID:25923142

  7. Remote Control of the Planar Chirality in Peptide-Bound Metallomacrocycles and Dynamic-to-Static Planar Chirality Control Triggered by Solvent-Induced 3(10)-to-α-Helix Transitions.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Fumihiko; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji

    2015-11-23

    The dynamic planar chirality in a peptide-bound Ni(II)-salphen-based macrocycle can be remotely controlled. First, a right-handed (P)-3(10)-helix is induced in the dynamic helical oligopeptides by a chiral amino acid residue far from the macrocyclic framework. The induced planar chirality remains dynamic in chloroform and acetonitrile, but is almost completely locked in fluoroalcohols as a result of the solvent-induced transition of the peptide chains from a 3(10)-helix to a wider α-helix, which freezes the rotation of the pendant peptide units around the macrocycle.

  8. Peptide vaccination in Montanide adjuvant induces and GM-CSF increases CXCR3 and cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression by tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; King, Laura K; Nunnley, Lenora D; Mullins, Irene M; Slingluff, Craig L; Mullins, David W

    2013-11-01

    T cell infiltration of melanoma is associated with enhanced clinical efficacy and is a desirable endpoint of immunotherapeutic vaccination. Infiltration is regulated, in part, by chemokine receptors and selectin ligands on the surface of tumor-specific lymphocytes. Therefore, we investigated the expression of two homing molecules--CXCR3 and CLA - on vaccine-induced CD8 T cells, in the context of a clinical trial of a melanoma-specific peptide vaccine. Both CXCR3 and CLA have been associated with T cell infiltration of melanoma. We demonstrate that a single subcutaneous/intradermal administration of peptide vaccine in Montanide adjuvant induces tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are predominantly positive for CXCR3, with a subpopulation of CXCR3(+)CLA(+) cells. Addition of GM-CSF significantly enhances CXCR3 expression and increases the proportion of CLA-expressing cells. Concurrent with CXCR3 and CLA expression, vaccine-induced CD8 cells express high levels of Tbet, IFN-γ, and IL-12Rβ1. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that peptide vaccination in adjuvant induces CD8 T cells with a phenotype that may support infiltration of melanoma.

  9. Inhibition of phosphate-induced apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes by thrombin peptide 508.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Carney, Darrell H; Ryaby, James T; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2009-01-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes are susceptible to apoptosis. Terminally differentiated chondrocytes are deleted via apoptosis, which primes the growth plate to vascular invasion and subsequent bone formation. Whether less differentiated resting zone chondrocytes are subject to the same mechanism that governs the apoptotic pathway of more differentiated growth zone chondrocytes is not known. In our current study, we demonstrated that inorganic phosphate, a key inducer of growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, also causes apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes, via a pathway similar to the one in growth zone chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that the conditions that cause growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis lie in the external environment, instead of the differences in differentiation state.

  10. A Small Peptide (CEL-1000) Derived from the Beta-Chain of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecule Induces Complete Protection Against Malaria in an Antigen-Independent Manner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    mice by conjugates of HGP -30 (peptide analog of HIV-1SF2 p17) and peptide seg- ments of human -2-microglobulin or MHC II chain. Vaccine 19:4750– 4759. VOL. 48, 2004 CEL-1000-INDUCED PROTECTION AGAINST MALARIA 2463

  11. Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) as a new chiral triacid scaffold capable of inducing triple helix formation of collagen peptides containing either a native sequence or Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats.

    PubMed

    Rump, Erik T; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Hilbers, Hans W; de Groot, Philip G; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-10-18

    A new triacid scaffold is described based on the cone-shaped cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) molecule that facilitates the triple helical folding of peptides containing either a unique blood platelet binding collagen sequence or collagen peptides composed of Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats. The latter were synthesized by segment condensation using Fmoc-Pro-Hyp-Gly-OH. Peptides were coupled to this CTV scaffold and also coupled to the Kemp's triacid (KTA) scaffold. After assembly of peptide H-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu(OAll)-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu (OAll)-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2 (13) by an orthogonal synthesis strategy to both triacid scaffolds, followed by deprotection of the allyl groups, the molecular constructs spontaneously folded into a triple helical structure. In contrast, the non-assembled peptides did not. The melting temperature (Tm) of (+/-) CTV[CH2C(O)N(H)Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (14) is 19 degrees C, whereas KTA[Gly-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (15) has a Tm of 20 degrees C. Thus, it was shown for the first time that scaffolds were also effective in stabilizing the triple helix of native collagen sequences. The different stabilizing properties of the two CTV enantiomers could be measured after coupling of racemic CTV triacid to the collagen peptide, and subsequent chromatographic separation of the diastereomers. After assembly of the two chiral CTV scaffolds to the model peptide H-Gly-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5-NH2 (24), the (+)-enantiomer of CTV 28b was found to serve as a better triple helix-inducing scaffold than the (-)-enantiomer 28a. In addition to an effect of the chirality of the CTV scaffold, a certain degree of flexibility between the CTV cone and the folded peptide was also shown to be of importance. Restricting the flexibility from two to one glycine residues resulted in a significant difference between the two collagen mimics 20a and 20b, whereas the difference was

  12. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapson, Andrew C.; Gee, Michelle L.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2016-12-01

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  13. Berberine promotes glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shou-Si; Yu, Yun-Li; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Li; Liu, Yao-Wu; Wang, Ping; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2009-02-01

    Berberine (BBR), a hypoglycemic agent, has shown beneficial metabolic effects for anti-diabetes, but its precise mechanism was unclear. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is considered to be an important incretin that can decrease hyperglycemia in the gastrointestinal tract after meals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BBR exerts its anti-diabetic effects via modulating GCG secretion. Diabetes-like rats induced by streptozotocin received BBR (120 mg/kg per day, i.g) for 5 weeks. Two hours following the last dose, the rats were anaesthetized and received 2.5 g/kg glucose by gavage. At 15-minute and 30-minute after glucose load, blood samples, pancreas, and intestines were obtained to measure insulin and GCG using ELISA kit. The number of L cells in the ileum and beta-cells in the pancreas were identified using immunohistology. The expression of proglucagon mRNA in the ileum was measured by RT-PCR. The results indicated that BBR treatment significantly increased GCG levels in plasma and intestine (P<0.05) accompanied with the increase of proglucagon mRNA expression and the number of L-cell compared with the controls (P<0.05). Furthermore, BBR increased insulin levels in plasma and pancreas as well as beta-cell number in pancreas. The data support the hypothesis that the anti-diabetic effects of BBR may partly result from enhancing GCG secretion.

  14. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rapson, Andrew C; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A; Smith, Trevor A

    2016-09-28

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  15. A novel subtilisin-like serine protease of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is induced by thyroid hormone and degrades antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, Jose C; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; San Francisco, Susan K; San Francisco, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (B. dendrobatidis), a chytrid fungus, is one of the major contributors to the global amphibian decline. The fungus infects both tadpoles and adult amphibians. Tadpoles are infected in their keratinized mouthparts, and infected adults exhibit hyperkeratosis and loss of righting reflex. Infections of adults may result in death from cardiac arrest in susceptible species. Thyroid hormone plays a key role in amphibian metamorphosis. The occurrence of B. dendrobatidis in tadpoles during metamorphosis may result in exposure of the fungus to host morphogens including TH. This exposure may induce gene expression in the fungus contributing to invasion and colonization of the host. Here, we demonstrate movement of fungal zoospores toward TH. Additionally, expression of a subtilisin-like serine protease is up-regulated in B. dendrobatidis cells exposed to TH. A gene encoding this protease was cloned from B. dendrobatidis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was partially purified and characterized. The similarity between subtilases of human dermatophytes and the B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests the importance of this enzyme in B. dendrobatidis pathogenicity. Cleavage of frog skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) by this B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests a role for this enzyme in fungal survival and colonization.

  16. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects. PMID:27764084

  17. Serine effects on collision-induced dissociation and photodissociation of peptide cation radicals of the z(+•) -type.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong T H; Shaffer, Christopher J; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Tureček, František

    2015-02-15

    The serine residue displays specific effects on the dissociations of peptide fragment cation-radicals of the z(+•) type which are produced by electron transfer dissociation. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID), time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD), and single-photon UV photodissociation at 355 nm revealed several competitive dissociation pathways consisting of loss of OH radical, water, and backbone cleavages occurring at N-terminal and C-terminal positions relative to the serine residue. The activation modes using slow-heating and UV photon absorption resulted in different relative intensities of fragment ions. This indicated that the dissociations proceeded through several channels with different energy-dependent kinetics. The experimental data were interpreted with the help of electron structure calculations that provided fully optimized structures and relative energies for cis and trans amide isomers of the z4(+•) ions as well as isomerization, dissociation, and transition state energies. UV photon absorption by the z4(+•) ions was due to Cα-radical amide groups created by ETD that provided a new chromophore absorbing at 355 nm.

  18. Serine effects on collision-induced dissociation and photodissociation of peptide cation radicals of the z+•-type

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The serine residue displays specific effects on the dissociations of peptide fragment cation-radicals of the z+• type which are produced by electron transfer dissociation. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (ER-CID), time-resolved infrared multiphoton dissociation (TR-IRMPD), and single-photon UV photodissociation at 355 nm revealed several competitive dissociation pathways consisting of loss of OH radical, water, and backbone cleavages occurring at N-terminal and C-terminal positions relative to the serine residue. The activation modes using slow-heating and UV photon absorption resulted in different relative intensities of fragment ions. This indicated that the dissociations proceeded through several channels with different energy-dependent kinetics. The experimental data were interpreted with the help of electron structure calculations that provided fully optimized structures and relative energies for cis and trans amide isomers of the z4+• ions as well as isomerization, dissociation, and transition state energies. UV photon absorption by the z4+• ions was due to Cα-radical amide groups created by ETD that provided a new chromophore absorbing at 355 nm. PMID:26005367

  19. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  20. Intracerebroventricular Injection of Amyloid-β Peptides in Normal Mice to Acutely Induce Alzheimer-like Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yun; Lee, Dongkeun K; Chung, Bo-Ryehn; Kim, Hyunjin V; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-03-16

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a major pathological mediator of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the brains of AD patients, progressive accumulation of Aβ oligomers and plaques is observed. Such Aβ abnormalities are believed to block long-term potentiation, impair synaptic function, and induce cognitive deficits. Clinical and experimental evidences have revealed that the acute increase of Aβ levels in the brain allows development of Alzheimer-like phenotypes. Hence, a detailed protocol describing how to acutely generate an AD mouse model via the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ is necessary in many cases. In this protocol, the steps of the experiment with an Aβ-injected mouse are included, from the preparation of peptides to the testing of behavioral abnormalities. The process of preparing the tools and animal subjects before the injection, of injecting the Aβ into the mouse brain via ICV injection, and of assessing the degree of cognitive impairment are easily explained throughout the protocol, with an emphasis on tips for effective ICV injection of Aβ. By mimicking certain aspects of AD with a designated injection of Aβ, researchers can bypass the aging process and focus on the downstream pathology of Aβ abnormalities.

  1. Rational design of thermostable vaccines by engineered peptide-induced virus self-biomineralization under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangchuan; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Chen, Rong; Mo, Lijuan; Han, Jian-Feng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xurong; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Lyu, Ke; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Tang, Ruikang; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The development of vaccines against infectious diseases represents one of the most important contributions to medical science. However, vaccine-preventable diseases still cause millions of deaths each year due to the thermal instability and poor efficacy of vaccines. Using the human enterovirus type 71 vaccine strain as a model, we suggest a combined, rational design approach to improve the thermostability and immunogenicity of live vaccines by self-biomineralization. The biomimetic nucleating peptides are rationally integrated onto the capsid of enterovirus type 71 by reverse genetics so that calcium phosphate mineralization can be biologically induced onto vaccine surfaces under physiological conditions, generating a mineral exterior. This engineered self-biomineralized virus was characterized in detail for its unique structural, virological, and chemical properties. Analogous to many exteriors, the mineral coating confers some new properties on enclosed vaccines. The self-biomineralized vaccine can be stored at 26 °C for more than 9 d and at 37 °C for approximately 1 wk. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that this engineered vaccine can be used efficiently after heat treatment or ambient temperature storage, which reduces the dependence on a cold chain. Such a combination of genetic technology and biomineralization provides an economic solution for current vaccination programs, especially in developing countries that lack expensive refrigeration infrastructures. PMID:23589862

  2. Glutinous rice amylopectin can adjust the plasma gut-regulated peptide levels in rhubarb-induced spleen deficiency rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Sun, Baoguo

    2016-02-01

    The pharmacological effects of glutinous rice (GR) and GR amylopectin (GRA) on the gastrointestine were investigated in rhubarb-induced spleen deficiency rats by determining the levels of gastrointestinal hormones such as the peptides serum gastrin, amylase motilin, and somatostatin. GR and GRA were given by gavage at various doses of GR (7.5, 15, and 30 g per kg body weight) and GRA (3.8, 7.6, and 15 g per kg body weight) every day for 4 weeks, respectively. The results indicated that the final body weight of rats in the highest-dose GR (GRH) group and all the GRA groups significantly (P < 0.05) increased (7.2-12.1%) compared with the model control (MC) group. All the GR and GRA treated groups had significantly (P < 0.05) higher gastrin contents (32.8-51.2%), motilin levels (13.8-39.2%), and amylase contents (22.5-39.4%) and the GRH and highest-dose GRA (GRAH) groups had significantly (P < 0.05) lower somatostatin contents compared with the MC group. Meanwhile, the somatostatin contents were negatively correlated with the motilin levels (r = -0.964, P < 0.01) and amylase contents (r = -0.981, P < 0.01). The GRAH treatment group had the highest final body weight, gastrin contents, motilin levels, and amylase contents and the lowest somatostatin contents, which demonstrated that GRA might play the most important role in the spleen-regulating activities of GR.

  3. Interplay of histidine residues of the Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide governs its Zn-induced oligomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kechko, Olga I.; Pastore, Annalisa; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational changes of Aβ peptide result in its transformation from native monomeric state to the toxic soluble dimers, oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interactions of zinc ions with Aβ are mediated by the N-terminal Aβ1–16 domain and appear to play a key role in AD progression. There is a range of results indicating that these interactions trigger the Aβ plaque formation. We have determined structure and functional characteristics of the metal binding domains derived from several Aβ variants and found that their zinc-induced oligomerization is governed by conformational changes in the minimal zinc binding site 6HDSGYEVHH14. The residue H6 and segment 11EVHH14, which are part of this site are crucial for formation of the two zinc-mediated interaction interfaces in Aβ. These structural determinants can be considered as promising targets for rational design of the AD-modifying drugs aimed at blocking pathological Aβ aggregation.

  4. Online immunoaffinity liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry determination of a type II collagen peptide biomarker in rat urine: Investigation of the impact of collision-induced dissociation fluctuation on peptide quantitation.

    PubMed

    Berna, Michael; Schmalz, Chris; Duffin, Kevin; Mitchell, Peter; Chambers, Mark; Ackermann, Brad

    2006-09-15

    Proteolytic fragments of type II collagen, a major component of joint tissue, have recently been identified as biomarkers for osteoarthritis, a progressive disease associated with cartilage degeneration. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assay that utilizes online immunoaffinity chromatography and column switching was developed in our laboratory for the neoepitope of type II collagen (NET2C). During method development, peptide collision-induced dissociation (CID) was found to be a significant source of assay variation, which exceeded 10% CV, despite the fact that a stable-isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standard was used to minimize imprecision. This phenomenon was studied in detail using peptides and associated SIL internal standards of varying lengths and amino acid compositions. Variability in peptide CID necessitated the monitoring of multiple MS/MS transitions to obtain acceptable assay precision. The assay was subsequently validated to measure NET2C concentrations in rat urine over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng/mL. The interday accuracy and precision ranged from 3.9 to 13.1 (%CV) and 10.7 to 5.3 (%RE), respectively, across the range of validated concentrations. A specific application of the assay is presented in which the role of estrogen deficiency in the development and progression of osteoarthritis was investigated. In this study, the effect of estrogen on lowering NET2C concentrations in urine in ovariectomized rats was demonstrated.

  5. Egg white-derived peptides prevent male reproductive dysfunction induced by mercury in rats.

    PubMed

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Escobar, Alyne Goulart; da Silva, Taiz Martins; Uranga-Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Castro, Marta Miguel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress in known to contribute to the male reproductive dysfunction induced by mercury (Hg). Our study tested the hypothesis that the egg white hydrolysate (EWH), a potent antioxidant in vitro, is able to prevent the effects of prolonged Hg exposure on male reproductive system in rats. For this, rats were treated for 60 days with: a) Untreated - saline solution (i.m.); b) Hydrolysate - EWH (1 g/kg/day, gavage); c) Mercury - HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6 μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07 μg/kg/day, i.m.); d) Hydrolysate-Mercury. At the end of the treatment, sperm motility, count and morphological studies were performed; Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant capacity, histological and immunohistochemical assays on testis and epididymis were also carried out. As results, HgCl2-treatment decreased sperm number, increased sperm transit time in epididymis and impaired sperm morphology. However, these harmful effects were prevented by EWH. HgCl2-treatment also increased ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in testis and epididymis as well as promoted testicular inflammation and histological changes in epididymis. EWH improved histological and immunohistochemical alterations, probably due to its antioxidant property. In conclusion, the EWH could represent a powerful natural alternative to protect the male reproductive system against Hg-induced sperm toxicity.

  6. Novel Regenerative Peptide TP508 Mitigates Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Damage By Activating Stem Cells and Preserving Crypt Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M.; Houchen, Courtney W.; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L.; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post-exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin®) 24h after lethal radiation exposure (9Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post-exposure prevents the disintegration of gastrointestinal crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also up-regulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24h post-exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment. PMID:26280221

  7. Novel regenerative peptide TP508 mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by activating stem cells and preserving crypt integrity.

    PubMed

    Kantara, Carla; Moya, Stephanie M; Houchen, Courtney W; Umar, Shahid; Ullrich, Robert L; Singh, Pomila; Carney, Darrell H

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, increasing threats of radiation exposure and nuclear disasters have become a significant concern for the United States and countries worldwide. Exposure to high doses of radiation triggers a number of potentially lethal effects. Among the most severe is the gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity syndrome caused by the destruction of the intestinal barrier, resulting in bacterial translocation, systemic bacteremia, sepsis, and death. The lack of effective radioprotective agents capable of mitigating radiation-induced damage has prompted a search for novel countermeasures that can mitigate the effects of radiation post exposure, accelerate tissue repair in radiation-exposed individuals, and prevent mortality. We report that a single injection of regenerative peptide TP508 (rusalatide acetate, Chrysalin) 24 h after lethal radiation exposure (9 Gy, LD100/15) appears to significantly increase survival and delay mortality by mitigating radiation-induced intestinal and colonic toxicity. TP508 treatment post exposure prevents the disintegration of GI crypts, stimulates the expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin, activates crypt cell proliferation, and decreases apoptosis. TP508 post-exposure treatment also upregulates the expression of DCLK1 and LGR5 markers of stem cells that have been shown to be responsible for maintaining and regenerating intestinal crypts. Thus, TP508 appears to mitigate the effects of GI toxicity by activating radioresistant stem cells and increasing the stemness potential of crypts to maintain and restore intestinal integrity. These results suggest that TP508 may be an effective emergency nuclear countermeasure that could be delivered within 24 h post exposure to increase survival and delay mortality, giving victims time to reach clinical sites for advanced medical treatment.

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces CD14+HLA-DR‑/low myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wu, Ke; Tao, Kaixiong; Lu, Xiaoming; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Zhengqiang; Li, Hang; Shi, Liang; Li, Jing; Niu, Yanfeng; Xiang, Fan; Wang, Guobin

    2015-07-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous group of cells, which have been revealed to inhibit T-cell responses in tumor-bearing mice. In addition, a number of immune suppressive mechanisms have linked MDSCs and the development of human cancer. However, the role of MDSCs in human gastric cancer tissue remains to be elucidated as specific markers are lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency and immune suppressive function of MDSCs denoted in the present study as cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14)+human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-/low in gastric cancer patients. In the present study, MDSCs were directly isolated and characterized from the tumor and adjacent normal tissue of gastric cancer patients. Functional analysis of the CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSCs co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T cells were performed and compared with controls. In addition, the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 production was compared in order to investigate the capacity of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to induce CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) MDSC-mediated CD4+ T-cell dysfunction and whether IL-10 secretion is involved in this mechanism. As a result, the quantity of CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) cells in tumor tissue from gastric cancer patients was significantly higher than that in the adjacent normal tissue. In addition, CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSCs isolated from tumor tissue were observed to inhibit the CD4+ T-cells' immune responses in comparison with those from the adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, VIP was able to induce the differentiation of CD14+ mononuclear cells isolated from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells into activated MDSC cells. Of note, the immunosuppressive effect of VIP-induced CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) MDSCs on CD4+ T cells was mediated by IL-10 secretion, which was demonstrated in the subsequent decrease of IFN-γ and IL-2 production. In conclusion, CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) cells were significantly increased in gastric

  9. Membrane negative curvature induced by a hybrid peptide from pediocin PA-1 and plantaricin 149 as revealed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    da Hora, G C A; Archilha, N L; Lopes, J L S; Müller, D M; Coutinho, K; Itri, R; Soares, T A

    2016-11-04

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cationic peptides that kill bacteria with a broad spectrum of action, low toxicity to mammalian cells and exceptionally low rates of bacterial resistance. These features have led to considerable efforts in developing AMPs as an alternative antibacterial therapy. In vitro studies have shown that AMPs interfere with membrane bilayer integrity via several possible mechanisms, which are not entirely understood. We have performed the synthesis, membrane lysis measurements, and biophysical characterization of a novel hybrid peptide. These measurements show that PA-Pln149 does not form nanopores, but instead promotes membrane rupture. It causes fast rupture of the bacterial model membrane (POPG-rich) at concentrations 100-fold lower than that required for the disruption of mammalian model membranes (POPC-rich). Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for single and multiple copies of PA-Pln149 in the presence of mixed and pure POPC/POPG bilayers to investigate the concentration-dependent membrane disruption by the hybrid peptide. These simulations reproduced the experimental trend and provided a potential mechanism of action for PA-Pln149. It shows that the PA-Pln149 does not form nanopores, but instead promotes membrane destabilization through peptide aggregation and induction of membrane negative curvature with the collapse of the lamellar arrangement. The sequence of events depicted for PA-Pln149 may offer insights into the mechanism of action of AMPs previously shown to induce negative deformation of membrane curvature and often associated with peptide translocation via non-bilayer intermediate structures.

  10. Antitumor activity of adenoviral vector containing T42 and 4xT42 peptide gene through inducing apoptosis of tumor cells and suppressing angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Qi, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Sui, Guang-Yu; Hao, Xue-Wei; Sun, Shouli; Song, Xue; Chen, Ying-Li

    2015-03-01

    The T42 peptide, generated from two active fragments of tumstatin, has been shown to have anti‑tumor activity. The adenoviral vector is the most frequently used vector in research and clinical trials for gene therapy. In the present study, the anti‑tumor activity of the T42 peptide and quadruple T42 (4xT42) peptide adenoviral vectors were elucidated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were infected with plasmid adenovirus (pAd)‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑T42 or pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 and the expression of the T42 and 4xT42 genes was confirmed by the identification of GFP expression and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments. The anti‑cancer effects of pAd‑EGFP‑T42 and pAd‑EGFP‑4xT42 on breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro were subsequently investigated. The results indicated that the packaging of the recombinant adenoviruses with the viral titer was successful, following purification at 5x109 plaque forming units/ml. The results also revealed that the recombinant adenoviruses promoted apoptosis in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells and inhibited cancer growth. Through the analysis of caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein expression, it was demonstrated that the T42/4xT42 peptide may induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. In addition, mouse xenograft experiments confirmed that the T42 peptide inhibited tumor growth and reduced angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the T42 and 4xT42 peptide genes, transfected by a recombinant adenovirus, may provide a potential novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Cortistatin, a modulatory peptide of sleep and memory, induces analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Guevara-Martínez, Marcela; Alquicira, Cynthia R; Guzmán Vásquez, Khalil; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2004-01-16

    Cortistatin is a neuropeptide structurally related to somatostatin that induces sleep and interferes with the memory process. Very likely affecting other neurotransmission systems, such as: acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and noradrenaline. For example, cortistatin inhibits acetylcholine excitatory actions in the hippocampus. It is known that acetylcholine is involved in the regulation of several processes, such as pain, temperature, sleep, and memory. Since cortistatin seems to interact with acetylcholine, we decided to explore whether cortistatin participates in the system that modulates the noxious stimulus-evoked behavior. The intracerebroventricular administration of cortistatin increased the threshold to evoke a defensive behavior by a nociceptive stimulus. These observations suggest that cortistatin is part of the system that regulates pain perception.

  12. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides; adsorption-induced secondary structural transition on hydrophilic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Abiko, Souhei; Himeiwa, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of sequential amphiphilic peptides on solid substrates triggered the spontaneous construction of nanoscaled architecture. An amphiphilic peptide designed with a cationic amino acid as a hydrophilic residue turned an anionic mica substrate into a water-repellent surface, simply by adsorbing it on the substrate surface. In contrast, an amphiphilic peptide designed with an anionic amino-acid residue formed a precisely controlled fiber array comprising a β-sheet fiber monolayer at the anionic substrate/water interface. This phenomenon was based on the secondary structural transition from random-coil to β-sheet, which occurred specifically when amphiphilic peptide adsorbed on the substrate surface. Such surface-specific nonorder/order transition was implemented by exploiting the strength of adsorption between the peptide and the substrate. A strategic design exploiting weak bonding such as hydrophobic interactions is essential for constructing precisely controlled nano-architectures in two dimensions.

  13. C-Mannosylated peptides derived from the thrombospondin type 1 repeat enhance lipopolysaccharide-induced signaling in macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Eiji; Manabe, Shino; Ikezaki, Midori; Urata, Yoshishige; Sato, Shinichi; Kondo, Takahito; Ito, Yukishige; Ihara, Yoshito

    2007-09-01

    C-Mannosylation is a unique type of glycosylation occurring at the first Trp (W) in the WXXW motif, which is found in the thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR) of proteins. However, the biological function of C-mannosylation is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-mannosylated TSR-derived peptides on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling in macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The cells were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of chemically synthesized peptides with or without C-mannose (e.g., (C-Man)-Trp-Ser-Pro-Trp [C-Man-WSPW], C-Man-W, WSPW, etc.), then the effects of the peptides on cellular viability and signaling were examined. We found a cytotoxic effect in the cells treated with LPS and C-Man-WSPW, but not in the cells solely treated with LPS or C-Man-WSPW. We also found that production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was upregulated more in response to LPS plus C-Man-WSPW, than in response to LPS plus WSPW or LPS alone. Among the LPS-induced signaling pathways that induce production of TNF-alpha, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was greatly enhanced by LPS and C-Man-WSPW, and the production of TNF-alpha was suppressed by an inhibitor for JNK. Together, these results demonstrate a novel function of the C-mannosylated TSR-derived peptide motif, to promote LPS-induced JNK signaling, and this leads to an enhancement of cytotoxicity via the upregulation of TNF-alpha production.

  14. Corn Silk Extract and Its Bioactive Peptide Ameliorated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Mice via the Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tin-Yun; Li, Chia-Cheng; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2017-02-01

    Bioactive peptides derived from foods have shown beneficial anti-inflammatory potential. Inhibitory κB kinase-β (IKKβ) plays a crucial role in the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a transcription factor involved in inflammation. Here we applied proteomic and bioinformatics approaches to identify anti-inflammatory peptides that target IKKβ from corn silk. Corn silk extract significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-κB activities [(1.7 ± 0.2)-fold vs (3.0 ± 0.6)-fold, p < 0.05] in cells. Trypsin hydrolysate of corn silk also suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activities [(1.1 ± 0.3)-fold vs 3.3 ± 0.5 fold, p < 0.01]. In addition, both corn silk extract and trypsin hydrolysate significantly inhibited LPS-induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by 58.3 ± 4.5 and 55.1 ± 7.4%, respectively. A novel peptide, FK2, docked into the ATP-binding pocket of IKKβ, was further identified from trypsin hydrolysis of corn silk. FK2 inhibited IKKβ activities, IκB phosphorylation, and subsequent NF-κB activation [(2.3 ± 0.4)-fold vs (5.5 ± 0.4)-fold, p < 0.001]. Moreover, FK2 significantly reduced NF-κB-driven luminescent signals in organs by 5-11-fold and suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activities and IL-β production in tissues. In conclusion, our findings indicated that corn silk displayed anti-inflammatory abilities. In addition, we first identified an anti-inflammatory peptide FK2 from corn silk. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect of FK2 might be through IKKβ-NF-κB signaling pathways.

  15. Purification and genetic characterization of plantaricin NC8, a novel coculture-inducible two-peptide bacteriocin from Lactobacillus plantarum NC8.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Antonio; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino

    2003-01-01

    A new, coculture-inducible two-peptide bacteriocin named plantaricin NC8 (PLNC8) was isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 cultures which had been induced with Lactococcus lactis MG1363 or Pediococcus pentosaceus FBB63. This bacteriocin consists of two distinct peptides, named alpha and beta, which were separated by C(2)-C(18) reverse-phase chromatography and whose complementary action is necessary for full plantaricin NC8 activity. N-terminal sequencing of both purified peptides showed 28 and 34 amino acids residues for PLNC8 alpha and PLNC8 beta, respectively, which showed no sequence similarity to other known bacteriocins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed molecular masses of 3,587 Da (alpha) and 4,000 Da (beta). The corresponding genes, designated plNC8A and plNC8B, were sequenced, and their nucleotide sequences revealed that both peptides are produced as bacteriocin precursors of 47 and 55 amino acids, respectively, which include N-terminal leader sequences of the double-glycine type. The mature alpha and beta peptides contain 29 and 34 amino acids, respectively. An open reading frame, orfC, which encodes a putative immunity protein was found downstream of plNC8B and overlapping plNC8A. Upstream of the putative -35 region of plNC8B, two direct repeats of 9 bp were identified, which agrees with the consensus sequence and structure of promoters of class II bacteriocin operons whose expression is dependent on an autoinduction mechanism.

  16. Purification and Genetic Characterization of Plantaricin NC8, a Novel Coculture-Inducible Two-Peptide Bacteriocin from Lactobacillus plantarum NC8

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Antonio; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino

    2003-01-01

    A new, coculture-inducible two-peptide bacteriocin named plantaricin NC8 (PLNC8) was isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 cultures which had been induced with Lactococcus lactis MG1363 or Pediococcus pentosaceus FBB63. This bacteriocin consists of two distinct peptides, named α and β, which were separated by C2-C18 reverse-phase chromatography and whose complementary action is necessary for full plantaricin NC8 activity. N-terminal sequencing of both purified peptides showed 28 and 34 amino acids residues for PLNC8α and PLNC8β, respectively, which showed no sequence similarity to other known bacteriocins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed molecular masses of 3,587 Da (α) and 4,000 Da (β). The corresponding genes, designated plNC8A and plNC8B, were sequenced, and their nucleotide sequences revealed that both peptides are produced as bacteriocin precursors of 47 and 55 amino acids, respectively, which include N-terminal leader sequences of the double-glycine type. The mature α and β peptides contain 29 and 34 amino acids, respectively. An open reading frame, orfC, which encodes a putative immunity protein was found downstream of plNC8B and overlapping plNC8A. Upstream of the putative −35 region of plNC8B, two direct repeats of 9 bp were identified, which agrees with the consensus sequence and structure of promoters of class II bacteriocin operons whose expression is dependent on an autoinduction mechanism. PMID:12514019

  17. New peptides of the polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 with the potential to induce cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in human leukocyte antigen-A2+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukoh; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Minami, Takafumi; Saito, Koujiro; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2007-11-01

    The polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is linked to aggressive prostate cancer and could be an appropriate target in specific immunotherapy. In this study, we attempted to identify EZH2-derived peptides that have the potential to generate cancer-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2+ prostate cancer patients. Twelve EZH2-derived peptides were prepared based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptide candidates were screened first by their ability to be recognized by immunoglobulin G (IgG), and then by their ability to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). As a result, five EZH2 peptides recognized by IgG (EZH2 120-128, EZH2 165-174, EZH2 569-577, EZH2 665-674, and EZH2 699-708) were frequently detected in the plasma of prostate cancer patients. Among them, the EZH2 120-128 and EZH2 165-174 peptides effectively induced HLA-A2-restricted and cancer-reactive CTLs from prostate cancer patients. The cytotoxicity was mainly dependent on EZH2 peptide-specific and HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that these EZH2 120-128 and EZH2 165-174 peptides could be promising candidates in peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients.

  18. Zoledronic acid induces dose-dependent increase of antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses in combination with peptide/poly-IC vaccine.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Mi; Cho, Hyun-Il; Shin, Chang-Ae; Shon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2016-03-04

    Zoledronic acid (ZA) is used for treating osteoporosis and for preventing skeletal fractures in cancer patients suffering from myeloma and prostate cancer. It is also reported to directly induce cancer cell apoptosis and indirectly modulate T-cell immune response as an antitumor agent. In this study, the effect of ZA following peptide/polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) vaccination was investigated in a murine tumor model. The combination of ZA with peptide/poly-IC vaccine showed a synergistic effect on the induction of antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response. Three consecutive intravenous administrations of ZA was defined to induce the highest CD8 T-cell response. Further, total splenocyte counts and antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response gradually increased depending on the dose of ZA. In tumor-bearing mice, ZA showed a dose-dependent decrease of growth and prolonged survival. Treatment with ZA only decreased the number of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells in blood. Our results demonstrate that the use of ZA could improve antitumor immune responses induced by the peptide/poly-IC vaccine.

  19. Functional and phenotypic characterization of peptide-vaccine-induced HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in healthy individuals and chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Schlaphoff, Verena; Klade, Christoph S; Jilma, Bernd; Jelovcan, Sandra B; Cornberg, Markus; Tauber, Erich; Manns, Michael P; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2007-09-17

    Only very limited information on phenotype and function of vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells is available for humans. We investigated hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T cells after vaccination with the HCV peptide-vaccine IC41 which includes 5 MHC-class I and 3 MHC class-II-restricted epitopes. In healthy subjects, IC41 induced both HCV-specific central memory as well as effector CD8+ T cells which rapidly expanded upon antigen exposure in vitro. IFNgamma production was dependent on formulation of the synthetic peptides with the adjuvant poly-l-arginine. In chronic HCV patients, the frequency of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells increased after vaccination with a decline of CD45RA-positive effector memory cells in some but not all patients. Thus, this study suggests that HCV-specific memory cells can be induced by peptide vaccination and that a reversion of functional impaired phenotypes by therapeutic vaccination is possible in chronic HCV infection.

  20. Autophagy-inducing peptides from mammalian VSV and fish VHSV rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) as models for the development of new therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Martínez-López, Alicia; Medina-Gali, Regla; Pérez, Luis; Mackenzie, Simon; Figueras, Antonio; Coll, Julio M; Estepa, Amparo

    2014-09-01

    It has not been elucidated whether or not autophagy is induced by rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) in vertebrate organisms for which rhabdovirus infection is lethal. Our work provides the first evidence that both mammalian (vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV) and fish (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV, and spring viremia carp virus, SVCV) rhabdoviral Gs induce an autophagic antiviral program in vertebrate cell lines. The transcriptomic profiles obtained from zebrafish genetically immunized with either Gsvcv or Gvhsv suggest that autophagy is induced shortly after immunization and therefore, it may be an important component of the strong antiviral immune responses elicited by these viral proteins. Pepscan mapping of autophagy-inducing linear determinants of Gvhsv and Gvsv showed that peptides located in their fusion domains induce autophagy. Altogether these results suggest that strategies aimed at modulating autophagy could be used for the prevention and treatment of rhabdoviral infections such as rabies, which causes thousands of human deaths every year.

  1. Autophagy-inducing peptides from mammalian VSV and fish VHSV rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) as models for the development of new therapeutic molecules

    PubMed Central

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizán, María del Mar; Martínez-López, Alicia; Medina-Gali, Regla; Pérez, Luis; Mackenzie, Simon; Figueras, Antonio; Coll, Julio M; Estepa, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    It has not been elucidated whether or not autophagy is induced by rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) in vertebrate organisms for which rhabdovirus infection is lethal. Our work provides the first evidence that both mammalian (vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV) and fish (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV, and spring viremia carp virus, SVCV) rhabdoviral Gs induce an autophagic antiviral program in vertebrate cell lines. The transcriptomic profiles obtained from zebrafish genetically immunized with either Gsvcv or Gvhsv suggest that autophagy is induced shortly after immunization and therefore, it may be an important component of the strong antiviral immune responses elicited by these viral proteins. Pepscan mapping of autophagy-inducing linear determinants of Gvhsv and Gvsv showed that peptides located in their fusion domains induce autophagy. Altogether these results suggest that strategies aimed at modulating autophagy could be used for the prevention and treatment of rhabdoviral infections such as rabies, which causes thousands of human deaths every year. PMID:25046110

  2. Evaluation of a novel approach for peptide sequencing: laser-induced acoustic desorption combined with P(OCH(3))(2)(+) chemical ionization and collision-activated dissociation in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Somuramasami, Jayalakshmi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2007-03-01

    A novel mass spectrometric method has been developed for obtaining sequence information on small peptides. The peptides are desorbed as intact neutral molecules into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD). Reactions of the neutral peptides with the dimethoxyphosphenium ion, P(OCH(3))(2)(+), occur predominantly by addition of the peptide to P(OCH(3))(2)(+) followed by the loss of two methanol molecules, thus yielding product ions with the composition (peptide + P - 2H)(+). Upon sustained off-resonance irradiation for collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), the (peptide + P - 2H)(+) ions undergo successive losses of CO and NHCHR or H(2)O, CO, and NHCHR to yield sequence-related fragment ions in addition to the regular a(n)- and b(n)-type ions. Under the same conditions, SORI-CAD of the analogous protonated peptides predominantly yields the regular a(n)- and b(n)-type ions. The mechanisms of the reactions of peptides with P(OCH(3))(2)(+) and the dissociation of the (peptide + P - 2H)(+) ions were examined by using model peptides and molecular orbital calculations.

  3. Evaluation of a Novel Approach for Peptide Sequencing: Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption Combined with P(OCH3)2+ Chemical Ionization and Collision-activated Dissociation in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Somuramasami, Jayalakshmi; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2007-01-01

    A novel mass spectrometric method has been developed for obtaining sequence information on small peptides. The peptides are desorbed as intact neutral molecules into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD). Reactions of the neutral peptides with the dimethoxyphosphenium ion, P(OCH3)2+, occur predominantly by addition of the peptide to P(OCH3)2+ followed by the loss of two methanol molecules, thus yielding product ions with the composition (peptide + P − 2H)+. Upon sustained off-resonance irradiation for collision-activated dissociation (SORI-CAD), the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions undergo successive losses of CO and NH = CHR or H2O, CO, and NH = CHR to yield sequence-related fragment ions in addition to the regular an- and bn-type ions. Under the same conditions, SORI-CAD of the analogous protonated peptides predominantly yields the regular an- and bn-type ions. The mechanisms of the reactions of peptides with P(OCH3)2+ and the dissociation of the (peptide + P − 2H)+ ions were examined by using model peptides and molecular orbital calculations. PMID:17157527

  4. Endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, induce apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Chen, Qiang; Xue, Li-Ying; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Rui

    2004-11-01

    Opioids play a role in the apoptosis machinery. We studied the induction of apoptosis in endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), 2 newly isolated endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists. These endomorphins were able to reduce the viability of cultured HL-60 cells. The antiproliferative properties of endomorphins appeared to be attributable to their induction of apoptotic cell death as determined by ultrastructural change, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and increased proportion of the subdiploid cell population. To elucidate molecular events in the apoptosis, protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas, and FasL were measured by western blotting using specific antibodies in HL-60 cells. The level of Bcl-2 indicated down-regulation, but the Bax, Fas, and FasL expression showed up-regulation as compared with the untreated control cells. These data support the idea that endomorphins induce apoptosis in HL-60 cells through the activation of the Bcl-2-Bax and the Fas-FasL pathway. We suggest that endomorphins may play an important role in the regulation of tumor cell death.

  5. PAI-1-Derived Peptide EEIIMD Prevents Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Aggravation of Endothelin- and Thromboxane-Induced Cerebrovasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Riley, John; Cines, Douglas B.; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2015-01-01

    Background Babies are frequently exposed to cerebral hypoxia and ischemia (H/I) during the perinatal period as a result of stroke, problems with delivery or post delivery respiratory management. The sole FDA approved treatment for acute stroke is tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Endogenous tPA is upregulated and potentiates impairment of pial artery dilation in response to hypotension after H/I in pigs. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), a family of at least 3 kinases, ERK, p38 and JNK, is also upregulated after H/I, with ERK contributing to impaired vasodilation. This study examined the hypothesis that H/I aggravates the vascular response to two important procontractile mediators released during CNS ischemia, endothelin-1 (ET-1) and thromboxane, which is further enhanced by tPA and ERK MAPK. Methods Cerebral hypoxia (pO2 35 mmHg for 10 min via inhalation of N2) followed immediately by ischemia (global intracranial pressure elevation for 20 min) was produced in chloralose anesthetized piglets equipped with a closed cranial window. Results H/I aggravated pial artery vasconstriction induced by ET-1 and the thromboxane mimetic U 46619. Potentiated vasoconstrictor responses were blocked by EEIIMD, an inhibitor of tPA’s signaling and vascular activities, but unchanged by its inactive analogue EEIIMR. The cerebrospinal fluid concentration of ERK MAPK determined by ELISA was increased by H/I, potentiated by tPA, but blocked by EEIIMD. The ERK MAPK antagonist U 0126 blocked H/I augmented enhancement of ET-1 and U 46619 vasoconstriction. Conclusions These data indicate that H/I aggravates ET-1 and thromboxane mediated cerebral vasoconstriction by upregulating endogenous tPA and ERK MAPK. PMID:24248736

  6. Combined electron transfer dissociation-collision-induced dissociation fragmentation in the mass spectrometric distinction of leucine, isoleucine, and hydroxyproline residues in Peptide natural products.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kallol; Kumar, Mukesh; Chandrashekara, Krishnappa; Krishnan, Kozhalmannom S; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2012-02-03

    Distinctions between isobaric residues have been a major challenge in mass spectrometric peptide sequencing. Here, we propose a methodology for distinction among isobaric leucine, isoleucine, and hydroxyproline, a commonly found post-translationally modified amino acid with a nominal mass of 113 Da, through a combined electron transfer dissociation-collision-induced dissociation approach. While the absence of c and z(•) ions, corresponding to the Yyy-Xxx (Xxx = Leu, Ile, or Hyp) segment, is indicative of the presence of hydroxyproline, loss of isopropyl (Δm = 43 Da) or ethyl radicals (Δm = 29 Da), through collisional activation of z radical ions, are characteristic of leucine or isoleucine, respectively. Radical migration processes permit distinctions even in cases where the specific z(•) ions, corresponding to the Yyy-Leu or -Ile segments, are absent or of low intensity. This tandem mass spectrometric (MS(n)) method has been successfully implemented in a liquid chromatography-MS(n) platform to determine the identity of 23 different isobaric residues from a mixture of five different