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Sample records for peptide yy levels

  1. Peptide YY Levels across Pubertal Stages and Associations with Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Benjamin; Ravi, Praful; Mendes, Nara; Klibanski, Anne; Misra, Madhusmita

    2010-01-01

    Context: Changes in appetite-regulating peptides may impact food intake during puberty and facilitate the pubertal growth spurt. Peptide YY (PYY) is an anorexigenic hormone that is high in anorexia nervosa and low in obesity, inhibits GnRH secretion, and is suppressed by GH administration. The relationship between PYY and GH has not been examined across puberty. Objectives: We hypothesized that PYY would be inversely associated with GH in adolescents and would be lowest when GH is highest. Design and Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional study at a Clinical Research Center. Subjects: We studied 87 children, 46 boys and 41 girls ages 9–17 yr at Tanner stages 1–5 of puberty (10th–90th percentiles for body mass index). Outcome Measures: We measured fasting PYY and nadir GH levels after administration of an oral glucose load. Leptin levels were also measured. Results: Fasting PYY was lowest and nadir GH highest in boys in Tanner stages 3–4 (P = 0.02) and in girls in Tanner stages 2–3 (P = 0.02). Leptin levels were highest in early pubertal boys and late pubertal girls. For the group as a whole and within genders, even after controlling for body mass index, log nadir GH correlated inversely with log PYY (P = 0.003, 0.07, and 0.02). PYY levels did not correlate with leptin levels. Conclusions: During mid-puberty, at a time when GH levels are the highest, PYY is at a nadir, and these low PYY levels may facilitate pubertal progression and growth. PMID:20375207

  2. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  3. Influence of resistance and aerobic exercise on hunger, circulating levels of acylated ghrelin, and peptide YY in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Broom, David R; Batterham, Rachel L; King, James A; Stensel, David J

    2009-01-01

    Resistance (muscle strengthening) exercise is a key component of exercise recommendations for weight control, yet very little is known about the effects of resistance exercise on appetite. We investigated the effects of resistance and aerobic exercise on hunger and circulating levels of the gut hormones acylated ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY). Eleven healthy male students: age 21.1 +/- 0.3 yr, body mass index 23.1 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2), maximum oxygen uptake 62.1 +/- 1.8 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (means +/- SE) undertook three, 8-h trials, 1) resistance exercise: a 90-min free weight lifting session followed by a 6.5-h rest period, 2) aerobic exercise: a 60-min run followed by a 7-h rest period, 3) control: an 8-h rest, in a randomized crossover design. Meals were provided 2 and 5 h into each trial. Hunger ratings and plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin and PYY were measured throughout. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant (P < 0.05) interaction effects for hunger, acylated ghrelin, and PYY, indicating suppressed hunger and acylated ghrelin during aerobic and resistance exercise and increased PYY during aerobic exercise. A significant trial effect was observed for PYY, indicating higher concentrations on the aerobic exercise trial than the other trials (8 h area under the curve: control 1,411 +/- 110, resistance 1,381 +/- 97, aerobic 1,750 +/- 170 pg/ml 8 h). These findings suggest ghrelin and PYY may regulate appetite during and after exercise, but further research is required to establish whether exercise-induced changes in ghrelin and PYY influence subsequent food intake.

  4. Effect of Weight Loss by Diet or Gastric Bypass Surgery on Peptide YY3–36 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Blanca; Teixeira, Julio; Bose, Mousumi; Bawa, Baani; Chang, Tangel; Summe, Heather; Lee, Hongchan; Laferrère, Blandine

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of an equivalent weight loss, by gastric bypass surgery (GBP) or by diet, on peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36), ghrelin, and leptin levels and to determine the effect of diabetes status on PYY3–36 levels. Summary Background Data The increased PYY3–36 levels after GBP may be involved in the magnitude and the sustainability of weight loss after surgery. Methods Of the 30 morbidly obese women who participated in the study, 21 had type 2 diabetes mellitus, and were studied before and after equivalent weight loss of 10 kg by either GBP (n = 11) or by diet (n = 10). Results PYY3–36 levels were higher in obese diabetic as compared with nondiabetic individuals (64.1 ± 34.4 pg/mL vs. 39.9 ± 21.1 pg/mL; P < 0.05). PYY3–36 levels increased markedly in response to oral glucose after GBP (peak: 72.3 ± 20.5 pg/mL–132.7 ± 49.7 pg/mL; P < 0.001; AUC0–180: 51.5 ± 23.3 pg/mL.min−1–91.1 ± 32.2 pg/mL.min−1 P < 0.001), but not after diet (peak: 85.5 ± 51.9 pg/mL–84.8 ± 41.13 pg/mL; P = NS; AUC0–180: 68.3 ± 38.5 pg/mL.min−1–61.1 ± 42.2 pg/mL.min−1 P = NS). Fasting ghrelin levels increased after diet (425 ± 91 pg/mL–519 ± 105 pg/mL; P < 0.05), but did not change after GBP (506 ± 121 pg/mL–482 ± 196 pg/mL; P = NS). Conclusions Diabetes status seems to be a determinant of PYY3–36 levels. GBP, but not diet-induced weight loss, resulted in markedly increased glucose-stimulated PYY3–36 levels. The increase in stimulated PYY3–36 levels after GBP is likely a result of the surgery rather than a secondary outcome of weight loss. Changes in PYY3–36 levels and ghrelin could contribute to the success of GBP in sustaining weight loss. PMID:19474685

  5. Effects of miglitol, vildagliptin, or their combination on serum insulin and peptide YY levels and plasma glucose, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, and obestatin levels.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kiyomi; Kamiko, Kazunari; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Tajima, Kazuki; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that combination therapy with an α-glucosidase inhibitor (αGI) and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels and decreased total glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) levels, compared with monotherapy, in non-diabetic men. However, the peptide YY (PYY), cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, and obestatin levels in patients receiving a combination of αGIs and DPP-4 inhibitors have not been previously reported. We evaluated the effect of miglitol, vildagliptin, or their combination on these parameters. Miglitol and/or vildagliptin were administered according to four different intake schedules in eleven non-diabetic men (C: no drug, M: miglitol; V: vildagliptin, M+V: miglitol+vildagliptin). Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after the start of breakfast. The plasma glucose, serum insulin, serum total PYY (PYY1-36 and PYY3-36), plasma CCK, plasma active ghrelin, and plasma obestatin levels were measured. The area under the curve (AUC) of the serum total PYY level in the M group was significantly greater than that in the C group, and the AUC of the serum total PYY level in the M+V group was significantly lower than that in the M group. The combination therapy did not change the AUC of the plasma CCK, plasma active ghrelin, plasma obestatin, and ghrelin/obestatin levels, compared with the control. The results of our study suggested that combination therapy with miglitol and vildagliptin had no effect on appetite regulation hormones, such as total PYY, CCK, active ghrelin, and obestatin, compared with the levels in the control group.

  6. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    La Sala, Michael S.; Hurtado, Maria D.; Brown, Alicia R.; Bohórquez, Diego V.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.—La Sala, M. S., Hurtado, M. D., Brown, A. R., Bohórquez, D. V., Liddle, R. A., Herzog, H., Zolotukhin, S., Dotson, C. D. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY. PMID:24043261

  7. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma peptide-YY levels are elevated in critical illness and associated with feed intolerance: an observational, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert JL; Chapman, Marianne; Bryant, Laura K; Wishart, Judith; Holloway, Richard H; Horowitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Delayed gastric emptying and feed intolerance occur frequently in the critically ill. In these patients, gastric motor responses to nutrients are disturbed. Peptide YY (PYY) slows gastric emptying. The aim of this study was to determine fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations and their relationship to cholecystokinin (CCK) in critically ill patients. Methods Studies were performed in 19 unselected mechanically ventilated critically ill patients (12 males; 48 ± 7 years old) in a randomised, single-blind fashion. Subjects received a 60-minute duodenal infusion of Ensure® at either 1 or 2 kcal/minute. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 20, 40, 60, and 180 minutes following commencement of the nutrient infusion for the measurement of plasma PYY and CCK concentrations (using radioimmunoassay). Patient data were compared to 24 healthy subjects (17 males; 43 ± 2 years old). Results Fasting PYY concentration was higher in patients (P < 0.05), particularly in those with feed intolerance (P < 0.05). Plasma PYY concentrations were higher in patients during nutrient infusion (area under the curve [AUC] at 1 kcal/minute: 2,265 ± 718 versus 1,125 ± 138 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05; at 2 kcal/minute: 2,276 ± 303 versus 1,378 ± 210 pmol/l.min, P = 0.01) compared to healthy subjects. The magnitude of PYY elevation was greater in patients during the 1 kcal/minute infusion (AUC: 441 ± 153 versus 186 ± 58 pmol/l.min, P < 0.05), but not the 2 kcal/minute infusion. Fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma CCK concentrations were higher in patients (P < 0.05). There was a relationship between plasma PYY and CCK concentrations during fasting (r = 0.52, P < 0.05) and nutrient infusion (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Conclusion In critical illness, both fasting and nutrient-stimulated plasma PYY concentrations are elevated, particularly in patients with feed intolerance, in conjunction with increased CCK concentrations. PMID:17173662

  8. Differential effects of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic gastric bypass on appetite, circulating acyl-ghrelin, peptide YY3-36 and active GLP-1 levels in non-diabetic humans.

    PubMed

    Yousseif, Ahmed; Emmanuel, Julian; Karra, Efthimia; Millet, Queensta; Elkalaawy, Mohamed; Jenkinson, Andrew D; Hashemi, Majid; Adamo, Marco; Finer, Nicholas; Fiennes, Alberic G; Withers, Dominic J; Batterham, Rachel L

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) reduces appetite and induces significant and sustainable weight loss. Circulating gut hormones changes engendered by LRYGBP are implicated in mediating these beneficial effects. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is advocated as an alternative to LRYGBP, with comparable short-term weight loss and metabolic outcomes. LRYGBP and LSG are anatomically distinct procedures causing differential entero-endocrine cell nutrient exposure and thus potentially different gut hormone changes. Studies reporting the comparative effects of LRYGBP and LSG on appetite and circulating gut hormones are controversial, with no data to date on the effects of LSG on circulating peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) levels, the specific PYY anorectic isoform. In this study, we prospectively investigated appetite and gut hormone changes in response to LRYGBP and LSG in adiposity-matched non-diabetic patients. Anthropometric indices, leptin, fasted and nutrient-stimulated acyl-ghrelin, active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), PYY3-36 levels and appetite were determined pre-operatively and at 6 and 12 weeks post-operatively in obese, non-diabetic females, with ten undergoing LRYGBP and eight adiposity-matched females undergoing LSG. LRYGBP and LSG comparably reduced adiposity. LSG decreased fasting and post-prandial plasma acyl-ghrelin compared to pre-surgery and to LRYGBP. Nutrient-stimulated PYY3-36 and active GLP-1 concentrations increased post-operatively in both groups. However, LRYGBP induced greater, more sustained PYY3-36 and active GLP-1 increments compared to LSG. LRYGBP suppressed fasting hunger compared to LSG. A similar increase in post-prandial fullness was observed post-surgery following both procedures. LRYGBP and LSG produced comparable enhanced satiety and weight loss. However, LSG and LRYGBP differentially altered gut hormone profiles.

  9. Critical role for peptide YY in protein-mediated satiation and body-weight regulation.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Rachel L; Heffron, Helen; Kapoor, Saloni; Chivers, Joanna E; Chandarana, Keval; Herzog, Herbert; Le Roux, Carel W; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Withers, Dominic J

    2006-09-01

    Dietary protein enhances satiety and promotes weight loss, but the mechanisms by which appetite is affected remain unclear. We investigated the role of gut hormones, key regulators of ingestive behavior, in mediating the satiating effects of different macronutrients. In normal-weight and obese human subjects, high-protein intake induced the greatest release of the anorectic hormone peptide YY (PYY) and the most pronounced satiety. Long-term augmentation of dietary protein in mice increased plasma PYY levels, decreased food intake, and reduced adiposity. To directly determine the role of PYY in mediating the satiating effects of protein, we generated Pyy null mice, which were selectively resistant to the satiating and weight-reducing effects of protein and developed marked obesity that was reversed by exogenous PYY treatment. Our findings suggest that modulating the release of endogenous satiety factors, such as PYY, through alteration of specific diet constituents could provide a rational therapy for obesity.

  10. Short-term effect of gastric resection on circulating levels of ghrelin, peptide YY3-36 and obestatin in patients with early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, T Y; Lee, S Y; Kim, H H; Cho, Y H; Cho, A R

    2015-04-01

    The short-term responses of gut hormones and the compensative interaction during a one-week period after subtotal gastrectomy in early gastric cancer (EGC) patients were assessed. Previous studies have reported gut hormonal changes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with EGC preoperatively, at 1 h after gastric resection, and on postoperative day (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Levels of active ghrelin, total ghrelin, obestatin, and PYY3-36 were measured. Total ghrelin level rapidly reached a nadir of 69.1%, while active ghrelin level had increased to 135.5% at 1 h after resection. Then, both returned to preoperative level. On the contrary, active/total ghrelin reached its nadir quickly at 1 h after resection and had returned to the preoperative level by POD 3. The nadir PYY3-36 level was 71.4% on POD 1, followed by a gradual recovery, and had increased to 116.5% by POD 7. The same pattern was observed for obestatin. Active ghrelin/obestatin showed an increase on POD 1 while total ghrelin/obestatin showed a decrease on POD 3. Then, both returned to preoperative level. These results suggest that a rapid interactive compensatory mechanism of gut hormones does exist in the remnant gastrointestinal tract after abrupt changes in the production reservoir in nonobese people.

  11. Visceral hyperalgesia caused by peptide YY deletion and Y2 receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed M.; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Reichmann, Florian; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Altered levels of colonic peptide YY (PYY) have been reported in patients suffering from functional and inflammatory bowel disorders. While the involvement of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Y receptors in the regulation of nociception is well established, the physiological role of PYY in somatic and visceral pain is poorly understood. In this work, the role of PYY in pain sensitivity was evaluated using PYY knockout (PYY(−/−)) mice and Y2 receptor ligands. PYY(−/−) mice were more sensitive to somatic thermal pain compared to wild type (WT) mice. Visceral pain was assessed by evaluating pain-related behaviors, mouse grimace scale (MGS) and referred hyperalgesia after intrarectal administration of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 1 or 2%) or its vehicle, peanut oil. The pain-related behaviors induced by AITC were significantly exaggerated by PYY deletion, whereas the MGS readout and the referred hyperalgesia were not significantly affected. The Y2 receptor antagonist, BII0246, increased pain-related behaviors in response to intrarectal AITC compared to vehicle treatment while the Y2 receptor agonist, PYY(3–36), did not have a significant effect. These results indicate that endogenous PYY has a hypoalgesic effect on somatic thermal and visceral chemical pain. The effect on visceral pain seems to be mediated by peripheral Y2 receptors. PMID:28106168

  12. Peptide YY ameliorates cerulein-induced pancreatic injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tito, J M; Rudnicki, M; Jones, D H; Alpern, H D; Gold, M S

    1993-06-01

    Peptide YY (PYY), a known inhibitor of both pancreatic secretion and the release of cholecystokinin (CCK), may play a role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP). Supramaximal stimulation of the pancreas with CCK, or its analogue cerulein, induces edematous AP. We previously documented significant decreases in plasma PYY in sodium taurocholate-induced AP in the anesthetized pig, with exogenous PYY suppressing plasma amylase activity. We hypothesized that PYY may ameliorate cerulein-induced pancreatic injury in a conscious animal model. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent chronic cannulation of the jugular vein and carotid artery for drug infusion and blood sampling. The animals were allowed to recover from anesthesia for a minimum of 16 hours, after which they were randomized to one of four (n = 8) treatment groups (cerulein 10 micrograms/kg/h, PYY 400 pmol/kg/h, cerulein+PYY, and control-saline 2 mL/kg/h). All treatments were administered by intravenous infusion over the first 6 hours of the experiment. Blood samples were taken prior to infusion and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 hours into the study; the rats were then killed and the pancreata removed for weighing and histologic examination. All pancreatic specimens were graded in a blinded fashion for vacuolization, edema, inflammation, and necrosis. The mean basal plasma amylase level for all animals was 1,171 +/- 100 U/L and was not significantly different between groups. Infusion of cerulein resulted in significant increases in plasma amylase levels at 3, 6, 9, and 24 hours (4,827 +/- 1,022 U/L at 24 hours). In the group receiving both cerulein and PYY, the hyperamylasemia was attenuated with a return to basal values at 24 hours (1,206 +/- 103 U/L). There was significant pancreatic weight gain (1.99 +/- 0.07 g versus 1.03 +/- 0.07 g) and a worsened histologic picture in cerulein-treated animals compared with control animals (worsened edema, necrosis, and vacuolization). The addition of PYY to

  13. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  14. Effects of Endurance Running and Dietary Fat on Circulating Ghrelin and Peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ryan D.; Willis, Kentz S.; Ravussin, Eric; Larson-Meyer, Enette D.

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) are newly recognized gut peptides involved in appetite regulation. Plasma ghrelin concentrations are elevated in fasting and suppressed following a meal, while PYY concentrations are suppressed in fasting and elevated postprandially. We determine whether ghrelin and PYY are altered by a low-fat, high-carbohydrate (10% fat, 75% carbohydrate) or moderate-fat, moderate-carbohydrate (35% fat, 50% carbohydrate) diet and; whether these peptides are affected by intense endurance running (which is likely to temporarily suppress appetite). Twenty-one endurance-trained runners followed a controlled diet (25% fat) and training regimen for 3 days before consuming the low-fat or isoenergetic moderate-fat diet for another 3 days in random cross-over fashion. On day 7 runners underwent glycogen restoration and then completed a 90-minute pre-loaded 10-km time trial on day 8, following a control breakfast. Blood samples were obtained on days 4 and 7 (fasting), and day 8 (non-fasting) before and after exercise for analysis of ghrelin, PYY, insulin and growth hormone (GH). Insulin, GH, Ghrelin and PYY changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001) but were not influenced by diet. Ghrelin was elevated during fasting (days 4 and 7), while insulin and PYY were suppressed. Following the pre-exercise meal, ghrelin was suppressed ~17% and insulin and PYY were elevated ~157 and ~40%, respectively, relative to fasting (day 7). Following exercise, PYY, ghrelin, and GH were significantly (p < 0.0001) increased by ~11, ~16 and ~813%, respectively. The noted disruption in the typical inverse relationship between ghrelin and PYY following exercise suggests that interaction of these peptides may be at least partially responsible for post-exercise appetite suppression. These peptides do not appear to be influenced by dietary fat intake. Key points The study presents novel findings which address whether the appetite-stimulating gut peptide ghrelin and the appetite

  15. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  16. Hormonal response to enteral feeding and the possible role of peptide YY in pathogenesis of enteral feeding-related diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Bowling, T E; Silk, D B

    1996-12-01

    Diarrhoea is a common complication of enteral feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated a secretion of water and electrolytes in the ascending colon during intragastric but not intraduodenal enteral feeding. The cause of this secretion is likely to be neurohumoral in origin. This study was designed to examine the hormonal responses to enteral feeding. In vivo segmental colonic perfusion studies were undertaken. Before and at hourly intervals during these studies serum was taken for estimations of neurotensin (NT), pancreatic glucagon (PG), peptide YY (PYY) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). During fasting there was a median ascending colonic absorption of water in all groups. During feeding there was a net secretion in the ascending colon in both gastric groups and in the high load duodenal group, but not in the low load duodenal group. During these studies the PYY levels remained unchanged from fasting in the low and high load gastric groups. In the low and high load duodenal groups the PYY levels increased. The NT levels increased only in the high load duodenal group. There were no other changes in NT or in PG or VIP levels either between fasting and feeding, or between the gastric and duodenal groups. PYY is known to stimulate intestinal absorption. The absence of a rise during intragastric feeding may be important in the underlying mechanisms of enteral feeding-induced colonic secretion and hence enteral feeding-related diarrhoea.

  17. GSK2374697, a long duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, reduces postprandial circulating endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Hodge, R J; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Nunez, D J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a long-duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, GSK2374697, on postprandial endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Two cohorts of healthy subjects, one normal/overweight and one obese, were randomized to receive GSK2374697 2 mg (n = 8 each) or placebo (n = 4 and n = 2) subcutaneously on days 1, 4 and 7. Samples for plasma endogenous GLP-1 and PYY were collected after breakfast on days -1 and 12. Weighted mean area under the curve (0-4 h) of total GLP-1 and PYY in treated subjects was reduced compared with placebo. The least squares mean difference for change from baseline was -1.24 pmol/l [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.33, -0.16] and -4.47 pmol/l (95% CI -8.74, -0.20) for total GLP-1 and PYY, respectively, in normal/overweight subjects (p < 0.05 for both), and -1.56 (95% CI -2.95, -0.16) and -3.02 (95% CI -8.58, 2.55), respectively, in obese subjects (p < 0.05 for GLP-1). In healthy subjects, GSK2374697 reduced postprandial total GLP-1 and PYY levels, suggesting feedback suppression of enteroendocrine L-cell secretion of these peptides.

  18. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K. )

    1990-12-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ({sup 125}I-BH-NPY) and {sup 125}I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and {sup 125}I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system.

  19. Peptide YY3–36 and 5-Hydroxytryptamine Mediate Emesis Induction by Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium sp. that frequently occurs in cereal grains, has been associated with human and animal food poisoning. Although a common hallmark of DON-induced toxicity is the rapid onset of emesis, the mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. Recently, our laboratory has demonstrated that the mink (Neovison vison) is a suitable small animal model for investigating trichothecene-induced emesis. The goal of this study was to use this model to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36) and cholecystokinin (CCK), and the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in DON-induced emesis. Following ip exposure to DON at 0.1 and 0.25mg/kg bw, emesis induction ensued within 15–30min and then persisted up to 120min. Plasma DON measurement revealed that this emesis period correlated with the rapid distribution and clearance of the toxin. Significant elevations in both plasma PYY3–36 (30–60min) and 5-HT (60min) but not CCK were observed during emesis. Pretreatment with the neuropeptide Y2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 attenuated DON- and PYY-induced emesis, whereas the CCK1 receptor antagonist devezapide did not alter DON’s emetic effects. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron completely suppressed induction of vomiting by DON and the 5-HT inducer cisplatin. Granisetron pretreatment also partially blocked PYY3–36-induced emesis, suggesting a potential upstream role for this gut satiety hormone in 5-HT release. Taken together, the results suggest that both PYY3–36 and 5-HT play contributory roles in DON-induced emesis. PMID:23457120

  20. Effects of Meals High in Carbohydrate, Protein, and Fat on Ghrelin and Peptide YY Secretion in Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Lomenick, Jefferson P.; Melguizo, Maria S.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Summar, Marshall L.; Anderson, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) are two hormones produced by the gastrointestinal tract that have effects on appetite. However, little is known about their secretion in response to meals high in individual macronutrients in prepubertal children. Objective: We sought to understand how meals high in carbohydrate, protein, and fat affect serum concentrations of total ghrelin and total PYY, hypothesizing that these macronutrients would exert differential effects on their secretion. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study at one tertiary care center. Subjects: Subjects were 7- to 11-yr-old healthy normal-weight (NW) and obese (OB) volunteers recruited from local advertisements. Interventions: After an overnight fast, the subjects were given a breakfast high in carbohydrate, protein, or fat at 0800 h. Blood samples for total ghrelin and total PYY were taken at baseline, 30 min, and hourly from 0900 to 1200 h. Main Outcome Measure: We assessed postprandial ghrelin suppression and PYY elevation, as well as changes in reported hunger and satiety, after the three test meals. Results: After the high-protein meal, ghrelin declined gradually in both groups over the study period without subsequent increase, whereas ghrelin suppressed more rapidly to a nadir at 60 min after the high-carbohydrate meal in both NW and OB children, followed by rebound in ghrelin levels. Similarly, after the high-protein meal, PYY concentrations increased steadily over the course of the morning in both groups without decline, whereas PYY levels peaked 30 min after the high-carbohydrate meal in both NW and OB subjects with significant decline thereafter. Ghrelin and PYY responses to the high-fat meal were somewhat intermediate between that observed with high carbohydrate and high protein. The OB children reported higher hunger and lower satiety after the high-carbohydrate meal compared to the NW subjects, whereas appetite ratings were similar between the groups after the high

  1. Anorexia induction by the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) is mediated by the release of the gut satiety hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; Clark, Erica S; Pestka, James J

    2012-12-01

    Consumption of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin known to commonly contaminate grain-based foods, suppresses growth of experimental animals, thus raising concerns over its potential to adversely affect young children. Although this growth impairment is believed to result from anorexia, the initiating mechanisms for appetite suppression remain unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON induces the release of satiety hormones and that this response corresponds to the toxin's anorectic action. Acute ip exposure to DON had no effect on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide, gastric inhibitory peptide, or ghrelin; however, the toxin was found to robustly elevate peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK). Specifically, ip exposure to DON at 1 and 5mg/kg bw induced PYY by up to 2.5-fold and CCK by up to 4.1-fold. These responses peaked within 15-120 min and lasted up to 120 min (CCK) and 240 min (PPY), corresponding with depressed rates of food intake. Direct administration of exogenous PYY or CCK similarly caused reduced food intake. Food intake experiments using the NPY2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 and the CCK1A receptor antagonist devazepide, individually, suggested that PYY mediated DON-induced anorexia but CCK did not. Orolingual exposure to DON induced plasma PYY and CCK elevation and anorexia comparable with that observed for ip exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that PYY might be one critical mediator of DON-induced anorexia and, ultimately, growth suppression.

  2. Role of peptide YY(3-36) in the satiety produced by gastric delivery of macronutrients in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2013-05-01

    Peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] is postulated to act as a hormonal signal from gut to brain to inhibit food intake. PYY(3-36) potently reduces food intake when administered systemically or into the brain. If action of endogenous PYY(3-36) is necessary for normal satiation to occur, then pharmacological blockade of its receptors should increase food intake. Here, we determined the effects of iv infusion of Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptor antagonists (BIBP 3226, BIIE 0246, CGP 71683) during the first 3 h of the dark period on food intake in non-food-deprived rats. Our results showed that 1) Y2 receptor blockade reversed the anorexic response to iv infusion of PYY(3-36) but did not increase food intake when administered alone; 2) Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists neither attenuated PYY(3-36)-induced anorexia nor altered food intake when given alone; and 3) Y2 receptor blockade attenuated anorexic responses to gastric infusions of casein hydrolysate and long-chain triglycerides, but not maltodextrin. Previous work showed that Y2 antagonist BIIE 0246 does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Together, these results support the hypothesis that gut PYY(3-36) action at Y2 receptors peripheral to the blood brain barrier plays an essential role in mediating satiety responses to gastric delivery of protein and long-chain triglycerides, but not polysaccharide.

  3. Weight loss during oligofructose supplementation is associated with decreased ghrelin and increased peptide YY in overweight and obese adults2

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Jill A; Reimer, Raylene A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rodent studies show that oligofructose promotes weight loss, stimulates satiety hormone secretion, reduces energy intake, and improves lipid profiles. Objective Our objective was to examine the effects of oligofructose supplementation on body weight and satiety hormone concentrations in overweight and obese adults. Design This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-eight otherwise healthy adults with a body mass index (in kg/m2) > 25 were randomly assigned to receive 21 g oligo-fructose/d or a placebo (maltodextrin) for 12 wk. Body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); meal tolerance tests, including satiety hormone response; food intake; and subjective appetite ratings were determined. Results There was a reduction in body weight of 1.03 ±0.43 kg with oligofructose supplementation, whereas the control group experienced an increase in body weight of 0.45 ± 0.31 kg over 12 wk (P = 0.01). A lower area under the curve (AUC) for ghrelin (P = 0.004) and a higher AUC for peptide YY (PYY) with oligofructose (P = 0.03) coincided with a reduction in self-reported caloric intake (P ≤ 0.05). Glucose decreased in the oligofructose group and increased in the control group between initial and final tests (P ≤ 0.05). Insulin concentrations mirrored this pattern (P ≤ 0.05). Oligofructose supplementation did not affect plasma active glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion. According to a visual analog scale designed to assess side effects, oligofructose was well tolerated. Conclusions Independent of other lifestyle changes, oligofructose supplementation has the potential to promote weight loss and improve glucose regulation in overweight adults. Suppressed ghrelin and enhanced PYY may contribute in part to the reduction in energy intake. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00522353. PMID:19386741

  4. Fat digestion is required for suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide secretion by intraduodenal lipid.

    PubMed

    Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Patterson, Michael; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Horowitz, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Stimulation of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion by fat is mediated by the products of fat digestion. Ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) appear to play an important role in appetite regulation, and their release is modulated by food ingestion, including fat. It is unknown whether fat digestion is a prerequisite for their suppression (ghrelin) or release (PYY, PP). Moreover, it is not known whether small intestinal exposure to fat is sufficient to suppress ghrelin secretion. Our study aimed to resolve these issues. Sixteen healthy young males received, on two separate occasions, 120-min intraduodenal infusions of a long-chain triglyceride emulsion (2.8 kcal/min) 1) without (condition FAT) or 2) with (FAT-THL) 120 mg of tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, lipase inhibitor), followed by a standard buffet-style meal. Blood samples for ghrelin, PYY, and PP were taken throughout. FAT infusion was associated with a marked, and progressive, suppression of plasma ghrelin from t = 60 min (P < 0.001) and stimulation of PYY from t = 30 min (P < 0.01). FAT infusion also stimulated plasma PP (P < or = 0.01), and the release was immediate. FAT-THL completely abolished the FAT-induced changes in ghrelin, PYY, and PP. In response to the meal, plasma ghrelin was further suppressed, and PYY and PP stimulated, during both FAT and FAT-THL infusions. In conclusion, in healthy humans, 1) the presence of fat in the small intestine suppresses ghrelin secretion, and 2) fat-induced suppression of ghrelin and stimulation of PYY and PP is dependent on fat digestion.

  5. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor is Expressed in Enteroendocrine L Cells and Regulates the Release of Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Brandon L.; Tough, Iain R.; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Matthews, Robert T.; Digby, Gregory J.; Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Svendsen, Berit; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J.; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Cox, Helen M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves, and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly expressed GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide one (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent anti-secretory response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance for MC4R in L cells, and indicates a previously unrecognized peripheral role for the MC4R, complementing vagal and central receptor functions. PMID:25453189

  6. YY1 binding association with sex-biased transcription revealed through X-linked transcript levels and allelic binding analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-yu; Shi, Wenqiang; Balaton, Bradley P.; Matthews, Allison M.; Li, Yifeng; Arenillas, David J.; Mathelier, Anthony; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Brown, Carolyn J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in susceptibility and progression have been reported in numerous diseases. Female cells have two copies of the X chromosome with X-chromosome inactivation imparting mono-allelic gene silencing for dosage compensation. However, a subset of genes, named escapees, escape silencing and are transcribed bi-allelically resulting in sexual dimorphism. Here we conducted in silico analyses of the sexes using human datasets to gain perspectives into such regulation. We identified transcription start sites of escapees (escTSSs) based on higher transcription levels in female cells using FANTOM5 CAGE data. Significant over-representations of YY1 transcription factor binding motif and ChIP-seq peaks around escTSSs highlighted its positive association with escapees. Furthermore, YY1 occupancy is significantly biased towards the inactive X (Xi) at long non-coding RNA loci that are frequent contacts of Xi-specific superloops. Our study suggests a role for YY1 in transcriptional activity on Xi in general through sequence-specific binding, and its involvement at superloop anchors. PMID:27857184

  7. Structural characterization of Y1 and Y2 receptors for neuropeptide Y and peptide YY by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, S.P.; Williams, J.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Pharmacological studies indicate that peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y interact with multiple binding sites, categorized as Y1 and Y2 subtypes. In order to identify and structurally characterize the Y1 and Y2 receptors we covalently cross-linked (125I-Tyr36)PYY to its receptors. The Y2 receptor in rat hippocampus and rabbit kidney membranes was affinity labeled using different homo- and heterobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography resulted in a major labeled protein band of Mr = 50,000 in both hippocampal and kidney membranes, which was unaffected by reducing agents. The Y1 receptor was analyzed in membranes from the MC-IXC human neuroblastoma cell line. Autoradiography revealed two labeled bands at Mr = 70,000 and 45,000. As the intensity of the Mr = 45,000 band was reduced by protease inhibitors, it is likely that this band is a degradation product of the larger band. Labeling of these proteins was obtained only when N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide was employed for cross-linking followed by exposure to UV light. Labeling of the two cross-linked bands was unaffected by reducing agents. The binding of radiolabeled PYY and the intensity of the cross-linked bands, for both the Y1 and Y2 receptors, were inhibited similarly in a dose-dependent manner by increasing concentrations of unlabeled PYY. When exposed to agarose-coupled lectins, the detergent-solubilized Y1 receptor-hormone complex was completely adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin and partially by ricin communis II. The cross-linked Y2 receptor was almost totally adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and partially adsorbed by concanavalin A. The adsorptions were in all cases blocked by the appropriate hapten sugar.

  8. Peptide YY signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus increases food intake through the Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Danielle; Hayes, Matthew R.; Grill, Harvey J.

    2015-01-01

    Although central PYY delivery potently increases food intake, the sites of action and mechanisms mediating these hyperphagic effects are not fully understood. The present studies investigate the contribution of lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) PYY-Y receptor signaling to food intake control, as lPBN neurons express Y receptors and receive PYY fibers and are known to integrate circulating and visceral sensory signals to regulate energy balance. Immunohistochemical results identified a subpopulation of gigantocellular reticular nucleus PYY-producing neurons that project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing an endogenous source of PYY to the lPBN. lPBN microinjection of PYY-(1–36) or PYY-(3–36) markedly increased food intake by increasing meal size. To determine which receptors mediate these behavioral results, we first performed quantitative real-time PCR to examine the relative levels of Y receptor expression in lPBN tissue. Gene expression analyses revealed that, while Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptors are each expressed in lPBN tissue, Y1 receptor mRNA is expressed at fivefold higher levels than the others. Furthermore, behavioral/pharmacological results demonstrated that the hyperphagic effects of PYY-(3–36) were eliminated by lPBN pretreatment with a selective Y1 receptor antagonist. Together, these results highlight the lPBN as a novel site of action for the intake-stimulatory effects of central PYY-Y1 receptor signaling. PMID:26330345

  9. Effects of Glycine-Extended and Serine13-Phosphorylated Forms of Peptide YY on Food Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Chelikani, Prasanth; Keire, David A.; Reeve, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    The gut hormone peptide YY(3–36)-amide [PYY(3–36)-NH2] is significantly more potent than PYY(1–36)-NH2 in reducing food intake in rats and humans. Other Gly-extended and Ser13-phosphorylated PYY forms have been detected or predicted based upon known cellular processes of PYY synthesis and modification. Here we compared the effects of 3-h IV infusion of PYY(1–36)-NH2, PYY(3–36)-NH2, PYY(1–36)-Gly-OH, PYY(3–36)-Gly-OH, Ser13(PO3)-PYY(1–36)-NH2, Ser13(PO3)-PYY(3–36)-NH2, Ser13(PO3)-PYY(1–36)-Gly-OH, and Ser13(PO3)-PYY(3–36)-Gly-OH during the early dark period on food intake in freely-feeding rats. PYY(3–36)-NH2 and Ser13(PO3)-PYY(3–36)-NH2 reduced food intake similarly at 50 pmol/kg/min, while only PYY(3–36)-NH2 reduced food intake at 15 pmol/kg/min. PYY(1–36)-NH2 and Ser13(PO3)-PYY(1–36)-NH2 reduced food intake similarly at 50 and 150 pmol/kg/min. In contrast, PYY(1–36)-Gly-OH, PYY(3–36)-Gly-OH, Ser13(PO3)-PYY(3–36)-Gly-OH, and Ser13(PO3)-PYY(1–36)-Gly-OH had no effect on food intake at doses of 50 or 150 pmol/kg/min. Taken together, these results indicate that i) PYY(3–36)-NH2 is significantly more potent than PYY(1–36)-NH2 in reducing food intake, ii) Gly-extended forms of PYY are significantly less potent than non-extended forms, and iii) Ser13-phosphorylation of PYY(3–36)-NH2 decreases the anorexigenic potency PYY(3–36)-NH2, but not PYY(1–36)-NH2. Thus, PYY(3–36)-NH2 appears to be the most potent PYY form for reducing food intake in rats. PMID:21262301

  10. Effects of oligofructose on appetite profile, glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY3-36 concentrations and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Meyer, Diederick; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2011-12-01

    In rats, oligofructose has been shown to stimulate satiety hormone secretion, reduce energy intake and promote weight loss. The present study aimed to examine the effect of oligofructose supplementation on appetite profiles, satiety hormone concentrations and energy intake in human subjects. A total of thirty-one healthy subjects (ten men and twenty-one women) aged 28 (SEM 3) years with a BMI of 24·8 (SEM 0·3) kg/m(2) were included in a randomised double-blind, cross-over study. The subjects received 10 g oligofructose, 16 g oligofructose or 16 g placebo (maltodextrin) daily for 13 d, with a 2-week washout period between treatments. Appetite profile, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY) concentrations and energy intake were assessed on days 0 and 13 of the treatment period. Time × treatment interaction revealed a trend of reduction in energy intake over days 0-13 by oligofructose (P = 0·068). Energy intake was significantly reduced (11 %) over time on day 13 compared with day 0 with 16 g/d oligofructose (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3217 (SEM 320) kJ, P < 0·05). Moreover, energy intake was significantly lower with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose on day 13 (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3177 (SEM 276) kJ, P < 0·05). Area under the curve (AUC) for GLP-1 on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose (45 (SEM 4) v. 41 (SEM 3) pmol/l × h, P < 0·05). In the morning until lunch, AUC(0-230 min) for PYY on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose and placebo (409 (SEM 35) v. 222 (SEM 19) and 211 (SEM 20) pg/ml × h, P < 0·01). In conclusion, 16 g/d and not 10 g/d oligofructose may be an effective dose to reduce energy intake, possibly supported by higher GLP-1 and PYY concentrations.

  11. Hyperglycemia abolishes meal-induced satiety by a dysregulation of ghrelin and peptide YY3-36 in healthy overweight/obese humans.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2014-01-15

    Satiety and satiety-regulating gut hormone levels are abnormal in hyperglycemic individuals. We aimed to determine whether these abnormalities are secondary to hyperglycemia. Ten healthy overweight/obese subjects (age: 56 ± 3 yr; BMI: 30.3 ± 1.2 kg/m(2)) received three equicaloric meals at t = 0, 4, and 8 h in the absence (control trial) and presence of experimental hyperglycemia (hyperglycemia trial; 5.4 mM above basal). Circulating levels of glucose, insulin, ghrelin, and peptide YY (PYY)3-36 and visual analog scale ratings of satiety were measured throughout each trial. In the control trial, glucose, insulin, PYY3-36, and the feeling of fullness were increased in the postprandial periods, whereas ghrelin was decreased. In the hyperglycemia trial, in which plasma glucose was increased to 11.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l, postprandial meal responses (AUC: 0-2, 4-6, and 8-10 h) of PYY3-36 were lower (meal 1, P < 0.0001; meal 2, P < 0.001; meal 3, P < 0.05), whereas insulin (meal 1, P < 0.01; meal 2, P < 0.001; meal 3, P < 0.05) and ghrelin (meal 1, P < 0.05; meal 2, P > 0.05; meal 3, P > 0.05) were higher compared with the control trial. Furthermore, the incremental (Δ0-0.5, 4-4.5, and 8-8.5 h) ghrelin response to the first and third meals was higher in the hyperglycemia trial in contrast to control (Δ: 2.3 ± 8.0, P = 0.05; Δ: 14.4 ± 2.5, P < 0.05). Also, meal-induced fullness was prevented (meal 1, P = 0.06; meal 2, P = 0.01; meal 3, P = 0.08) by experimental hyperglycemia. Furthermore, trends in ghrelin, PYY3-36, and fullness were described by different polynomial functions between the trials. In conclusion, hyperglycemia abolishes meal-induced satiety and dysregulates postprandial responses of the gut hormones PYY3-36 and ghrelin in overweight/obese healthy humans.

  12. Age-related effect of peptide YY (PYY) on paw edema in the rat: the function of Y1 receptors on inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Stanojević, Stanislava; Vujić, Vesna; Kovacević-Jovanović, Vesna; Mitić, Katarina; Kosec, Dusko; Hörsten, Stephan von; Dimitrijević, Mirjana

    2006-08-01

    It is well documented that neuropeptides participate in local inflammatory reaction and modulate functions of inflammatory cells. The aim of the study was to determine a link between in vivo and in vitro effects of NPY-related peptides on inflammatory response with respect to ageing. Peptide YY (PYY) intraplantarly applied decreases concanavalin A-induced paw edema in 3 and 8 months, but not in 24 months old male rats of Albino Oxford strain. The use of NPY-related receptor-specific peptides and Y1 receptor antagonist revealed that anti-inflammatory effect of PYY is mediated via NPY Y1 receptors. PYY in vitro decreases adherence of macrophages from 8 months, but not from 3 and 24 months old rats and this effect is also mediated via NPY Y1 receptor. Additionally, PYY (10(-6)M) decreases NBT reduction in macrophages from 3 and 8 months old rats, and suppresses NO production in cells from 24 months old rats, albeit regardless of absence of in vivo effect of PYY on inflammation in aged rats. It is concluded that aged rats are less responsive to anti-inflammatory action of PYY compared to adult and young rats, and that ageing is associated with altered NPY Y1 receptor functioning.

  13. Expression of YY1 in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Jéssica; Castellví, Josep; Marcos, Ricard; Zafón, Carles; Velázquez, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) has an important regulatory role in tumorigenesis, but its implication in thyroid cancer has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer and assessed the association of YY1 expression with clinical features. Expression of YY1 was evaluated in human thyroid cancer cell lines, a series of matched normal/tumor thyroid tissues and in a thyroid cancer tissue microarray, using real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. YY1 was overexpressed in thyroid cancer cells, at transcription and protein levels. A significant increase of YY1 mRNA was also observed in tumor thyroid tissues. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the thyroid cancer tissue microarray revealed that both papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) present increased YY1 protein levels (48 and 19%, respectively). After stratification by the level of YY1 protein, positive YY1 expression identifies 88% of patients with PTC. The association of YY1 expression with clinicopathological features in PTC and FTC showed that YY1 expression was related with age at diagnosis. Our data indicates for the first time overexpression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer, with YY1 being more frequently overexpressed in the PTC subtype.

  14. Combination of Peptide YY3–36 with GLP-17–36 amide Causes an Increase in First-Phase Insulin Secretion after IV Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tricia M.; Salem, Victoria; Troke, Rachel C.; Alsafi, Ali; Field, Benjamin C. T.; De Silva, Akila; Misra, Shivani; Baynes, Kevin C. R.; Donaldson, Mandy; Minnion, James; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Godsland, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The combination of peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed as a potential treatment for diabetes and obesity. However, the combined effects of these hormones, PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, on glucose homeostasis are unknown. Objective: This study sought to investigate the acute effects of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, individually and in combination, on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Setting and Design: Using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and minimal modeling, this study measured the effects of PYY3–36 alone, GLP-17–36 amide alone, and a combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) and insulin sensitivity index (SI) in 14 overweight human volunteers, studied in a clinical research facility. Results: PYY3–36 alone caused a small but nonsignificant increase in AIRg. GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide did increase AIRg significantly. No significant differences in SI were observed with any intervention. Conclusions: PYY3–36 lacks any significant acute effects on first-phase insulin secretion or SI when tested using an FSIVGTT. Both GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide increase first-phase insulin secretion. There does not seem to be any additive or synergistic effect between PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on first-phase insulin secretion. Neither hormone alone nor the combination had any significant effects on SI. PMID:25144632

  15. Effects of exendin-4 alone and with peptide YY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger D; Haver, Alvin C; Apenteng, Bettye A; Anders, Krista L; Steenson, Sharalyn M

    2011-01-01

    Significant weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) in obese humans correlates with enhanced secretion of anorexigenic gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)). Our aim here was to identify a dosing strategy for intraperitoneal (IP) infusion of GLP-1 homologue exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) that produces a sustained reduction in daily food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. We tested 12 exendin-4 strategies over 10 weeks. Exendin-4 infused during the first and last 3 h of the dark period at 15-20 pmol/h (0.15 nmol/kg/day) produced a sustained 24 ± 1% reduction in daily food intake for 17 days, and decreased body weight by 7%. In a separate group of DIO rats, none of seven dosing strategies combining exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) produced a similar reduction in daily food intake for >10 days. The subsequent decline in efficacies of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in each experiment suggested possible receptor downregulation and tolerance to treatments. However, when treatments were discontinued for 1 day following losses in efficacies, daily food intake significantly increased. Together, these results demonstrate that (i) intermittent IP infusion of a low dose of exendin-4 can produce a relatively prolonged reduction in daily food intake and body weight in DIO rats, (ii) co-infusion of exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) does not further prolong this response, and (iii) activation of an orexigenic mechanism gradually occurs to counteract the inhibitory effects of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight.

  16. Vitamin B12 conjugation of peptide-YY(3-36) decreases food intake compared to native peptide-YY(3-36) upon subcutaneous administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelly E; Elfers, Clinton T; Burke, Rachael M; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Blevins, James E; Roth, Christian L; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-05-01

    Challenges to peptide-based therapies include rapid clearance, ready degradation by hydrolysis/proteolysis, and poor intestinal uptake and/or a need for blood brain barrier transport. This work evaluates the efficacy of conjugation of vitamin B12 (B12) on sc administered peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)(3-36) function. In the current experiments, a B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate was tested against native PYY(3-36), and an inactive conjugate B12-PYYC36 (null control) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments demonstrated similar agonism for the neuropeptide Y2 receptor by the B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate (EC50 26.5 nM) compared with native PYY(3-36) (EC50 16.0 nM), with the null control having an EC50 of 1.8 μM. In vivo experiments were performed in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats (9 wk). Daily treatments were delivered sc in five 1-hour pulses, each pulse delivering 5-10 nmol/kg, by implanted microinfusion pumps. Increases in hindbrain Fos expression were comparable 90 minutes after B12-PYY(3-36) or PYY3-36 injection relative to saline or B12-PYYC36. Food intake was reduced during a 5-day treatment for both B12-PYY(3-36)- (24%, P = .001) and PYY(3-36)-(13%, P = .008) treated groups relative to baseline. In addition, reduction of food intake after the three dark cycle treatment pulses was more consistent with B12-PYY(3-36) treatment (-26%, -29%, -27%) compared with the PYY(3-36) treatment (-3%, -21%, -16%), and B12-PYY(3-36) generated a significantly longer inhibition of food intake vs. PYY(3-36) treatment after the first two pulses (P = .041 and P = .036, respectively). These findings demonstrate a stronger, more consistent, and longer inhibition of food intake after the pulses of B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate compared with the native PYY(3-36).

  17. Effects of different intermittent peptide YY (3-36) dosing strategies on food intake, body weight, and adiposity in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger D; Haver, Alvin C; Chelikani, Prasanth K; Buescher, James L

    2008-08-01

    Chronic administration of anorexigenic substances to experimental animals by injections or continuous infusion typically produces either no effect or a transient reduction in food intake and body weight. Our aim here was to identify an intermittent dosing strategy for intraperitoneal infusion of peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] that produces a sustained reduction in daily food intake and adiposity in diet-induced obese rats. Rats (665+/-10 g body wt, 166+/-7 g body fat) with intraperitoneal catheters tethered to infusion swivels had free access to a high-fat diet. Vehicle-treated rats (n=23) had relatively stable food intake, body weight, and adiposity during the 9-wk test period. None of 15 PYY(3-36) dosing regimens administered in succession to a second group of rats (n=22) produced a sustained 15-25% reduction in daily food intake for >5 days, although body weight and adiposity were reduced across the 9-wk period by 12% (594+/-15 vs. 672+/-15 g) and 43% (96+/-7 vs. 169+/-9 g), respectively. The declining inhibitory effect of PYY(3-36) on daily food intake when the interinfusion interval was >or=3 h appeared to be due in part to an increase in food intake between infusions. The declining inhibitory effect of PYY(3-36) on daily food intake when the interinfusion interval was <3 h suggested possible receptor downregulation and tolerance to frequent PYY(3-36) administration; however, food intake significantly increased when PYY(3-36) treatments were discontinued for 1 day following apparent loss in treatment efficacies. Together, these results demonstrate the development of a potent homeostatic response to increase food intake when PYY(3-36) reduces food intake and energy reserves in diet-induced obese rats.

  18. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  19. YY1 Control of AID-Dependent Lymphomagenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0171 TITLE: YY1 Control of AID -Dependent Lymphomagenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Atchison, Ph.D CONTRACTING...W81XWH-14-1-0171 YY1 Control of AID -Dependent Lymphomagenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We hypothesize that YY1 levels control AID nuclear accumulation, AID mutation rates, and subsequent AID - mediated B cell

  20. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  1. Plant-rich mixed meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles have a dramatic impact on incretin, peptide YY and satiety response, but show little effect on glucose and insulin homeostasis: an acute-effects randomised study.

    PubMed

    Bligh, H Frances J; Godsland, Ian F; Frost, Gary; Hunter, Karl J; Murray, Peter; MacAulay, Katrina; Hyliands, Della; Talbot, Duncan C S; Casey, John; Mulder, Theo P J; Berry, Mark J

    2015-02-28

    There is evidence for health benefits from 'Palaeolithic' diets; however, there are a few data on the acute effects of rationally designed Palaeolithic-type meals. In the present study, we used Palaeolithic diet principles to construct meals comprising readily available ingredients: fish and a variety of plants, selected to be rich in fibre and phyto-nutrients. We investigated the acute effects of two Palaeolithic-type meals (PAL 1 and PAL 2) and a reference meal based on WHO guidelines (REF), on blood glucose control, gut hormone responses and appetite regulation. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, healthy subjects were given three meals on separate occasions. PAL2 and REF were matched for energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates; PAL1 contained more protein and energy. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were measured over a period of 180 min. Satiation was assessed using electronic visual analogue scale (EVAS) scores. GLP-1 and PYY concentrations were significantly increased across 180 min for both PAL1 (P= 0·001 and P< 0·001) and PAL2 (P= 0·011 and P= 0·003) compared with the REF. Concomitant EVAS scores showed increased satiety. By contrast, GIP concentration was significantly suppressed. Positive incremental AUC over 120 min for glucose and insulin did not differ between the meals. Consumption of meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles resulted in significant increases in incretin and anorectic gut hormones and increased perceived satiety. Surprisingly, this was independent of the energy or protein content of the meal and therefore suggests potential benefits for reduced risk of obesity.

  2. CtBP Levels Control Intergenic Transcripts, PHO/YY1 DNA Binding, and PcG Recruitment to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arindam; Atchison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a well-known corepressor of several DNA binding transcription factors in Drosophila as well as in mammals. CtBP is implicated in Polycomb Group (PcG) complex-mediated transcriptional repression because it can bind to some PcG proteins, and mutation of the ctbp gene in flies results in lost PcG protein recruitment to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and lost PcG repression. However, the mechanism of reduced PcG DNA binding in CtBP mutant backgrounds is unknown. We show here that in a Drosophila CtBP mutant background, intergenic transcripts are induced across several PRE sequences and this corresponds to reduced DNA binding by PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (PHO) and Polycomb (Pc), and reduced trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27, a hallmark of PcG repression. Restoration of CtBP levels by expression of a CtBP transgene results in repression of intergenic transcripts, restored PcG binding, and elevated trimethylation of H3 on lysine 27. Our results support a model in which CtBP regulates expression of intergenic transcripts that controls DNA binding by PcG proteins and subsequent histone modifications and transcriptional activity. PMID:20082324

  3. Rapid evolution of a recently retroposed transcription factor YY2 in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, C; Lu, X; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2005-11-11

    YY2 was originally identified due to its unusual similarity to the evolutionarily well conserved, zinc-finger gene YY1. In this study, we have determined the evolutionary origin and conservation of YY2 using comparative genomic approaches. Our results indicate that YY2 is a retroposed copy of YY1 that has been inserted into another gene locus named Mbtps2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2). This retroposition is estimated to have occurred after the divergence of placental mammals from other vertebrates based on the detection of YY2 only in the placental mammals. The N-terminal and C-terminal regions of YY2 have evolved under different selection pressures. The N-terminal region has evolved at a very fast pace with very limited functional constraints whereas the DNA-binding, C-terminal region still maintains very similar sequence structure as YY1 and is also well conserved among placental mammals. In situ hybridizations using different adult mouse tissues indicate that mouse YY2 is expressed at relatively low levels in Purkinje and granular cells of cerebellum, and neuronal cells of cerebrum, but at very high levels in testis. The expression levels of YY2 is much lower than YY1, but the overall spatial expression patterns are similar to those of Mbtps2, suggesting a possible shared transcriptional control between YY2 and Mbtps2. Taken together, the formation and evolution of YY2 represent a very unusual case where a transcription factor was first retroposed into another gene locus encoding a protease and survived with different selection schemes and expression patterns.

  4. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing.

  5. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Funahashi, Nobuaki; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Okano, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K{sub 1}) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K{sub 2}). Menadione (vitamin K{sub 3}) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1

  6. A RAPID Method for Blood Processing to Increase the Yield of Plasma Peptide Levels in Human Blood.

    PubMed

    Teuffel, Pauline; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Hofmann, Tobias; Prinz, Philip; Scharner, Sophie; Körner, Jan L; Grötzinger, Carsten; Rose, Matthias; Klapp, Burghard F; Stengel, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    Research in the field of food intake regulation is gaining importance. This often includes the measurement of peptides regulating food intake. For the correct determination of a peptide's concentration, it should be stable during blood processing. However, this is not the case for several peptides which are quickly degraded by endogenous peptidases. Recently, we developed a blood processing method employing Reduced temperatures, Acidification, Protease inhibition, Isotopic exogenous controls and Dilution (RAPID) for the use in rats. Here, we have established this technique for the use in humans and investigated recovery, molecular form and circulating concentration of food intake regulatory hormones. The RAPID method significantly improved the recovery for (125)I-labeled somatostatin-28 (+39%), glucagon-like peptide-1 (+35%), acyl ghrelin and glucagon (+32%), insulin and kisspeptin (+29%), nesfatin-1 (+28%), leptin (+21%) and peptide YY3-36 (+19%) compared to standard processing (EDTA blood on ice, p <0.001). High performance liquid chromatography showed the elution of endogenous acyl ghrelin at the expected position after RAPID processing, while after standard processing 62% of acyl ghrelin were degraded resulting in an earlier peak likely representing desacyl ghrelin. After RAPID processing the acyl/desacyl ghrelin ratio in blood of normal weight subjects was 1:3 compared to 1:23 following standard processing (p = 0.03). Also endogenous kisspeptin levels were higher after RAPID compared to standard processing (+99%, p = 0.02). The RAPID blood processing method can be used in humans, yields higher peptide levels and allows for assessment of the correct molecular form.

  7. Appetite regulating peptides in red-bellied piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri: cloning, tissue distribution and effect of fasting on mRNA expression levels.

    PubMed

    Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-06-01

    cDNAs encoding the appetite regulating peptides apelin, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY) and orexin were isolated in red-bellied piranha and their mRNA tissue and brain distributions examined. When compared to other fish, the sequences obtained for all peptides were most similar to that of other Characiforme fish, as well as to Cypriniformes. All peptides were widely expressed within the brain and in several peripheral tissues, including gastrointestinal tract. In order to assess the role of these peptides in the regulation of feeding of red-bellied piranha, we compared the brain mRNA expression levels of these peptides, as well as the gut mRNA expression of CCK and PYY, between fed and 7-day fasted fish. Within the brain, fasting induced a significant increase in both apelin and orexin mRNA expressions and a decrease in CART mRNA expression, but there where were no significant differences for either PYY or CCK brain mRNA expressions between fed and fasted fish. Within the intestine, PYY mRNA expression was lower in fasted fish compared to fed fish but there was no significant difference for CCK intestine mRNA expression between fed and fasted fish. Our results suggest that these peptides, perhaps with the exception of CCK, play a major role in the regulation of feeding of red-bellied piranha.

  8. The Yin Yang-1 (YY1) protein undergoes a DNA-replication-associated switch in localization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the onset of S phase.

    PubMed

    Palko, Linda; Bass, Hank W; Beyrouthy, Maroun J; Hurt, Myra M

    2004-01-26

    The essential Yin Yang-1 gene (YY1) encodes a ubiquitous, conserved, multifunctional zinc-finger transcription factor in animals. The YY1 protein regulates initiation, activation, or repression of transcription from a variety of genes required for cell growth, development, differentiation, or tumor suppression, as well as from genes in some retroviruses and DNA viruses. Among the specific functions attributed to YY1 is a role in cell-cycle-specific upregulation of the replication-dependent histone genes. The YY1 protein binds to the histone alpha element, a regulatory sequence found in all replication-dependent histone genes. We therefore examined the abundance, DNA-binding activity and localization of the YY1 protein throughout the cell cycle in unperturbed, shake-off-synchronized Chinese hamster ovary and HeLa cells. We found that, whereas the DNA-binding activity of YY1 increased dramatically early in S phase, the YY1 mRNA and protein levels did not. YY1 changed subcellular distribution patterns during the cell cycle, from mainly cytoplasmic at G1 to mainly nuclear at early and middle S phase, then back to primarily cytoplasmic later in S phase. Nuclear accumulation of YY1 near the G1/S boundary coincided with both an increase in YY1 DNA-binding activity and the coordinate up-regulation of the replication-dependent histone genes. The DNA synthesis inhibitor aphidicolin caused a nearly complete loss of nuclear YY1, whereas addition of caffeine or 2-aminopurine to aphidicolin-treated cells restored both DNA synthesis and YY1 localization in the nucleus. These findings reveal a mechanism by which YY1 localization is coupled to DNA synthesis and responsive to cell-cycle signaling pathways. Taken together, our results provide insight into how YY1 might participate in the cell-cycle control over a variety of nuclear events required for cell division and proliferation.

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes and Signaling Pathways between XY and YY Testis in Yellow Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjie; Xiong, Shuting; Jing, Jing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Weimin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Mei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    YY super-males have rarely been detected in nature and only been artificially created in some fish species including tilapia and yellow catfish (Pelteobagrusfulvidraco), which provides a promising model for testis development and spermatogenesis. In our previous study, significant differences in morphology and miRNA expression were detected between XY and YY testis of yellow catfish. Here, solexa sequencing technology was further performed to compare mRNA expression between XY and YY testis. Compared with unigenes expressed in XY testis, 1146 and 1235 unigenes have significantly higher and lower expression in YY testis, respectively. 605 differentially expressed unigenes were annotated to 1604 GO terms with 319 and 286 genes having relative higher expression in XY and YY testis. KEGG analysis suggested different levels of PI3K-AKT and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways between XY and YY testis. Down-regulation of miR-141/429 in YY testis was speculated to promote testis development and maturation, and several factors in PI3K-AKT and GPCR signaling pathways were found as predicted targets of miR-141/429, several of which were confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assays. Our study provides a comparative transcriptome analysis between XY and YY testis, and reveals interactions between miRNAs and their target genes that are possibly involved in regulating testis development and spermatogenesis. PMID:26241040

  10. Expression of metastasis suppressor gene AES driven by a Yin Yang (YY) element in a CpG island promoter and transcription factor YY2.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Yoshiro; Ito, Shinji; Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-11-01

    We recently found that the product of the AES gene functions as a metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) in both humans and mice. Expression of amino-terminal enhancer of split (AES) protein is significantly decreased in liver metastatic lesions compared with primary colon tumors. To investigate its downregulation mechanism in metastases, we searched for transcriptional regulators of AES in human CRC and found that its expression is reduced mainly by transcriptional dysregulation and, in some cases, by additional haploidization of its coding gene. The AES promoter-enhancer is in a typical CpG island, and contains a Yin-Yang transcription factor recognition sequence (YY element). In human epithelial cells of normal colon and primary tumors, transcription factor YY2, a member of the YY family, binds directly to the YY element, and stimulates expression of AES. In a transplantation mouse model of liver metastases, however, expression of Yy2 (and therefore of Aes) is downregulated. In human CRC metastases to the liver, the levels of AES protein are correlated with those of YY2. In addition, we noticed copy-number reduction for the AES coding gene in chromosome 19p13.3 in 12% (5/42) of human CRC cell lines. We excluded other mechanisms such as point or indel mutations in the coding or regulatory regions of the AES gene, CpG methylation in the AES promoter enhancer, expression of microRNAs, and chromatin histone modifications. These results indicate that Aes may belong to a novel family of metastasis suppressors with a CpG-island promoter enhancer, and it is regulated transcriptionally.

  11. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  12. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anupam; Sindhava, Vishal; Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction.

  13. Gastrointestinal peptide levels in obese and anorexic females

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J.N.; Rice, R.L.; McCullough, S.S.; McKay, D.W.; Rayford, P.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal peptides in eating disorders has yet to be determined. Methods: In this study we examined plasma levels of gastrin (G), cholecystokinin (CCK), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) in adolescent anorexic, and obese female subjects hospitalized for feeding behavior disorders. Six anorexic, six obese and six control young females (ages 13-26) were studied after an overnight fast and after consuming a liquid test meal. The liquid test meal (Ensure, Ross Laboratories; Columbus OH) consisted of 14% calories as protein, 31.5% calories as fat and 54.5% calories as carbohydrate in a 240ml volume. Plasma levels of gastrointestinal peptides, G, CCK and PP were determined by specific radioimmunoassay. The data were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and the Student's t-test. Results: show that fasting levels of G were greater in control and obese groups than the anorexic subjects. Postprandial G levels for controls were higher than the anorexic, and obese groups respectively. When fasting and postprandial G levels were compared among the same groups only the controls increased after eating. Fasting CCK levels were lower in control and anorexic groups than the obese group. Postprandial CCK levels were higher among control patients compared to anorexic and obese subjects. When fasting and postprandial CCK levels were compared among groups, only control levels increased after eating. Fasting and postprandial PP levels were not different between groups. Postprandial PP levels increased over fasting PP levels only in controls.

  14. Anticipatory and consummatory effects of (hedonic) chocolate intake are associated with increased circulating levels of the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and endocannabinoids in obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, Antonello E.; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Aveta, Teresa; Agosti, Fiorenza; De Col, Alessandra; Bini, Silvia; Cella, Silvano G.; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sartorio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Hedonic hunger refers to consumption of food just for pleasure and not to maintain energy homeostasis. Recently, consumption of food for pleasure was reported to be associated with increased circulating levels of both the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) in normal-weight subjects. To date, the effects of hedonic hunger, and in particular of chocolate craving, on these mediators in obese subjects are still unknown. Methods To explore the role of some gastrointestinal orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides and endocannabinoids (and some related congeners) in chocolate consumption, we measured changes in circulating levels of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), anandamide (AEA), 2-AG, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in 10 satiated severely obese subjects after consumption of chocolate and, on a separate day, of a non-palatable isocaloric food with the same bromatologic composition. Evaluation of hunger and satiety was also performed by visual analogic scale. Results The anticipatory phase and the consumption of food for pleasure were associated with increased circulating levels of ghrelin, AEA, 2-AG, and OEA. In contrast, the levels of GLP-1, PYY, and PEA did not differ before and after the exposure/ingestion of either chocolate or non-palatable foods. Hunger and satiety were higher and lower, respectively, in the hedonic session than in the non-palatable one. Conclusions When motivation to eat is generated by exposure to, and consumption of, chocolate a peripheral activation of specific endogenous rewarding chemical signals, including ghrelin, AEA, and 2-AG, is observed in obese subjects. Although preliminary, these findings predict the effectiveness of ghrelin and endocannabinoid antagonists in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26546790

  15. Epithelial inactivation of Yy1 abrogates lung branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Landry-Truchon, Kim; Bérubé-Simard, Félix-Antoine; Houde, Nicolas; Beuret, Laurent; Lezmi, Guillaume; Foulkes, William D; Delacourt, Christophe; Charron, Jean; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2015-09-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional zinc-finger-containing transcription factor that plays crucial roles in numerous biological processes by selectively activating or repressing transcription, depending upon promoter contextual differences and specific protein interactions. In mice, Yy1 null mutants die early in gestation whereas Yy1 hypomorphs die at birth from lung defects. We studied how the epithelial-specific inactivation of Yy1 impacts on lung development. The Yy1 mutation in lung epithelium resulted in neonatal death due to respiratory failure. It impaired tracheal cartilage formation, altered cell differentiation, abrogated lung branching and caused airway dilation similar to that seen in human congenital cystic lung diseases. The cystic lung phenotype in Yy1 mutants can be partly explained by the reduced expression of Shh, a transcriptional target of YY1, in lung endoderm, and the subsequent derepression of mesenchymal Fgf10 expression. Accordingly, SHH supplementation partially rescued the lung phenotype in vitro. Analysis of human lung tissues revealed decreased YY1 expression in children with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), a rare pediatric lung tumor arising during fetal development and associated with DICER1 mutations. No evidence for a potential genetic interplay between murine Dicer and Yy1 genes during lung morphogenesis was observed. However, the cystic lung phenotype resulting from the epithelial inactivation of Dicer function mimics the Yy1 lung malformations with similar changes in Shh and Fgf10 expression. Together, our data demonstrate the crucial requirement for YY1 in lung morphogenesis and identify Yy1 mutant mice as a potential model for studying the genetic basis of PPB.

  16. Loss-of-Function Mutations in YY1AP1 Lead to Grange Syndrome and a Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Like Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Duan, Xue-Yan; Regalado, Ellen S; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Kwartler, Callie S; Kim, Dong; Lieberman, Kenneth; de Vries, Bert B A; Pfundt, Rolph; Schinzel, Albert; Kotzot, Dieter; Shen, Xuetong; Yang, Min-Lee; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Gornik, Heather L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Braverman, Alan C; Grange, Dorothy K; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2017-01-05

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a heterogeneous group of non-atherosclerotic and non-inflammatory arterial diseases that primarily involves the renal and cerebrovascular arteries. Grange syndrome is an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by severe and early-onset vascular disease similar to FMD and variable penetrance of brachydactyly, syndactyly, bone fragility, and learning disabilities. Exome-sequencing analysis of DNA from three affected siblings with Grange syndrome identified compound heterozygous nonsense variants in YY1AP1, and homozygous nonsense or frameshift YY1AP1 variants were subsequently identified in additional unrelated probands with Grange syndrome. YY1AP1 encodes yin yang 1 (YY1)-associated protein 1 and is an activator of the YY1 transcription factor. We determined that YY1AP1 localizes to the nucleus and is a component of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is responsible for transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and replication. Molecular studies revealed that loss of YY1AP1 in vascular smooth muscle cells leads to cell cycle arrest with decreased proliferation and increased levels of the cell cycle regulator p21/WAF/CDKN1A and disrupts TGF-β-driven differentiation of smooth muscle cells. Identification of YY1AP1 mutations as a cause of FMD indicates that this condition can result from underlying genetic variants that significantly alter the phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells.

  17. Upregulation of miR-146a by YY1 depletion correlates with delayed progression of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yeqing; Tao, Tao; Liu, Chunhui; Guan, Han; Zhang, Guangyuan; Ling, Zhixin; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Kai; Chen, Shuqiu; Xu, Bin; Chen, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Previously published studies explained that the excessive expression of miR-146a influences the prostate cancer (PCa) cells in terms of apoptosis, progression, and viability. Although miR-146a acts as a tumor suppressor, current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that controls its expression in PCa is limited. In this study, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed negatively enriched expression of miR-146a target gene sets and positively enriched expression of gene sets suppressed by the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) after YY1 depletion in PCa cells. The current results demonstrated that the miR-146a levels in PCa tissues with high Gleason scores (>7) are significantly lower than those in PCa tissues with low Gleason scores (≤7), which were initially observed in the clinical specimens. An inverse relationship between YY1 and miR-146a expression was also observed. Experiments indicated the decrease in cell viability, proliferation, and promoting apoptosis after YY1 depletion, while through inhibiting miR-146a could alleviate the negative effect brought by YY1 depletion. We detected the reversed adjustment of YY1 to accommodate miR-146a transcriptions. On the basis of YY1 depletion, we determined that the expression of miR-146a increased after EZH2 knockdown. We validated the combination of YY1 and its interaction with EZH2 at the miR-146a promoter binding site, thereby prohibiting the transcriptional activity of miR-146a in PCa cells. Our results suggested that YY1 depletion repressed PCa cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis at least in a miR-146a-assisted manner. PMID:28101571

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases in plasma and colon tissue prior to estrus and circulating levels change with increasing age in reproductively competent Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle L; Saffrey, M Jill; Taylor, Victoria J

    2017-02-22

    There is a well-documented association between cyclic changes to food intake and the changing ovarian hormone levels of the reproductive cycle in female mammals. Limited research on appetite-controlling gastrointestinal peptides has taken place in females, simply because regular reproductive changes in steroid hormones present additional experimental factors to account for. This study focussed directly on the roles that gastrointestinal-secreted peptides may have in these reported, naturally occurring, changes to food intake during the rodent estrous cycle and aimed to determine whether peripheral changes occurred in the anorexigenic (appetite-reducing) hormones peptide-YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in female Wistar rats (32-44 weeks of age). Total forms of each peptide were measured in matched fed and fasted plasma and descending colon tissue samples for each animal during the dark (feeding) phase. PYY concentrations did not significantly change between defined cycle stages, in either plasma or tissue samples. GLP-1 concentrations in fed plasma and descending colon tissue were significantly increased during proestrus, just prior to a significant reduction in fasted stomach contents at estrus, suggesting increased satiety and reduced food intake at this stage of the cycle. Increased proestrus GLP-1 concentrations could contribute to the reported reduction in food intake during estrus and may also have biological importance in providing the optimal nutritional and metabolic environment for gametes at the potential point of conception. Additional analysis of the findings demonstrated significant interactions of ovarian cycle stage and fed/fasted status with age on GLP-1, but not PYY plasma concentrations. Slightly older females had reduced fed plasma GLP-1 suggesting that a relaxation of regulatory control of this incretin hormone may also take place with increasing age in reproductively competent females.

  19. Human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex transcriptionally regulates the BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein (BCCIP) in cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaming; Sui, Yi; Ding, Jian; Li, Fuqiang; Shen, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Lu, Zeming; Wang, Fei; Cao, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoxia; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The BCCIP (BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein) is an important cofactor for BRCA2 in tumor suppression. Although the low expression of BCCIP is observed in multiple clinically diagnosed primary tumor tissues such as ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma, the mechanism of how BCCIP is regulated in cells is still unclear. The human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex composed of 15 subunits catalyzes ATP-dependent sliding of nucleosomes along DNA. Here, we first report that BCCIP is a novel target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex by presenting a series of experimental evidence. Gene expression studies combined with siRNA knockdown data locked candidate genes including BCCIP of the INO80/YY1 complex. Silencing or over-expressing the subunits of the INO80/YY1 complex regulates the expression level of BCCIP both in mRNA and proteins in cells. Also, the functions of INO80/YY1 complex in regulating the transactivation of BCCIP were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments clarify the enrichment of INO80 and YY1 at +0.17 kb downstream of the BCCIP transcriptional start site. However, this enrichment is significantly inhibited by either knocking down INO80 or YY1, suggesting the existence of both INO80 and YY1 is required for recruiting the INO80/YY1 complex to BCCIP promoter region. Our findings strongly indicate that BCCIP is a potential target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex.

  20. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  1. NF-kappaB regulation of YY1 inhibits skeletal myogenesis through transcriptional silencing of myofibrillar genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huating; Hertlein, Erin; Bakkar, Nadine; Sun, Hao; Acharyya, Swarnali; Wang, Jingxin; Carathers, Micheal; Davuluri, Ramana; Guttridge, Denis C

    2007-06-01

    NF-kappaB signaling is implicated as an important regulator of skeletal muscle homeostasis, but the mechanisms by which this transcription factor contributes to muscle maturation and turnover remain unclear. To gain insight into these mechanisms, gene expression profiling was examined in C2C12 myoblasts devoid of NF-kappaB activity. Interestingly, even in proliferating myoblasts, the absence of NF-kappaB caused the pronounced induction of several myofibrillar genes, suggesting that NF-kappaB functions as a negative regulator of late-stage muscle differentiation. Although several myofibrillar promoters contain predicted NF-kappaB binding sites, functional analysis using the troponin-I2 gene as a model revealed that NF-kappaB-mediated repression does not occur through direct DNA binding. In the search for an indirect mediator, the transcriptional repressor YinYang1 (YY1) was identified. While inducers of NF-kappaB stimulated YY1 expression in multiple cell types, genetic ablation of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB in both cultured cells and adult skeletal muscle correlated with reduced YY1 transcripts and protein. NF-kappaB regulation of YY1 occurred at the transcriptional level, mediated by direct binding of the p50/p65 heterodimer complex to the YY1 promoter. Furthermore, YY1 was found associated with multiple myofibrillar promoters in C2C12 myoblasts containing NF-kappaB activity. Based on these results, we propose that NF-kappaB regulation of YY1 and transcriptional silencing of myofibrillar genes represent a new mechanism by which NF-kappaB functions in myoblasts to modulate skeletal muscle differentiation.

  2. NF-κB Regulation of YY1 Inhibits Skeletal Myogenesis through Transcriptional Silencing of Myofibrillar Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huating; Hertlein, Erin; Bakkar, Nadine; Sun, Hao; Acharyya, Swarnali; Wang, Jingxin; Carathers, Micheal; Davuluri, Ramana; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2007-01-01

    NF-κB signaling is implicated as an important regulator of skeletal muscle homeostasis, but the mechanisms by which this transcription factor contributes to muscle maturation and turnover remain unclear. To gain insight into these mechanisms, gene expression profiling was examined in C2C12 myoblasts devoid of NF-κB activity. Interestingly, even in proliferating myoblasts, the absence of NF-κB caused the pronounced induction of several myofibrillar genes, suggesting that NF-κB functions as a negative regulator of late-stage muscle differentiation. Although several myofibrillar promoters contain predicted NF-κB binding sites, functional analysis using the troponin-I2 gene as a model revealed that NF-κB-mediated repression does not occur through direct DNA binding. In the search for an indirect mediator, the transcriptional repressor YinYang1 (YY1) was identified. While inducers of NF-κB stimulated YY1 expression in multiple cell types, genetic ablation of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB in both cultured cells and adult skeletal muscle correlated with reduced YY1 transcripts and protein. NF-κB regulation of YY1 occurred at the transcriptional level, mediated by direct binding of the p50/p65 heterodimer complex to the YY1 promoter. Furthermore, YY1 was found associated with multiple myofibrillar promoters in C2C12 myoblasts containing NF-κB activity. Based on these results, we propose that NF-κB regulation of YY1 and transcriptional silencing of myofibrillar genes represent a new mechanism by which NF-κB functions in myoblasts to modulate skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:17438126

  3. Are the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test levels 1 and 2 both useful? Reliability, responsiveness and interchangeability in young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Fanchini, Maurizio; Castagna, Carlo; Coutts, Aaron J; Schena, Federico; McCall, Alan; Impellizzeri, Franco M

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the reliability, internal responsiveness and interchangeability of the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YY1), level 2 (YY2) and submaximal YY1 (YY1-sub). Twenty-four young soccer players (age 17 ± 1 years; height 177 ± 7 cm; body mass 68 ± 6 kg) completed each test five times within pre- and in-season; distances covered and heart rates (HRs) were measured. Reliability was expressed as typical error of measurement (TEM) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Internal responsiveness was determined as effect size (ES) and signal-to-noise ratio (ESTEM). Interchangeability was determined with correlation between training-induced changes. The TEM and ICC for distances in the YY1 and YY2 and for HR in YY1-sub were 7.3% and 0.78, 7.1% and 0.93 and 2.2% and 0.78, respectively. The ESs and ESTEMs were 0.9 and 1.9 for YY1, 0.4 and 1.2 for YY2 and -0.3 and -0.3 for YY1-sub. Correlations between YY1 vs. YY2 and YY1-sub were 0.56 to 0.84 and -0.36 to -0.81, respectively. Correlations between change scores in YY1 vs. YY2 were 0.29 and -0.21 vs. YY1-sub. Peak HR was higher in YY1 vs. YY2. The YY1 and YY2 showed similar reliability; however, they were not interchangeable. The YY1 was more responsive to training compared to YY2 and YY1-sub.

  4. Insulin-like peptide 5 is an orexigenic gastrointestinal hormone

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Johannes; Heffron, Helen; Burling, Keith; Akhter Hossain, Mohammed; Habib, Abdella M.; Rogers, Gareth J.; Richards, Paul; Larder, Rachel; Rimmington, Debra; Adriaenssens, Alice A.; Parton, Laura; Powell, Justin; Binda, Matteo; Colledge, William H.; Doran, Joanne; Toyoda, Yukio; Wade, John D.; Aparicio, Samuel; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Coll, Anthony P.; Reimann, Frank; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Gribble, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The gut endocrine system is emerging as a central player in the control of appetite and glucose homeostasis, and as a rich source of peptides with therapeutic potential in the field of diabetes and obesity. In this study we have explored the physiology of insulin-like peptide 5 (Insl5), which we identified as a product of colonic enteroendocrine L-cells, better known for their secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptideYY. i.p. Insl5 increased food intake in wild-type mice but not mice lacking the cognate receptor Rxfp4. Plasma Insl5 levels were elevated by fasting or prolonged calorie restriction, and declined with feeding. We conclude that Insl5 is an orexigenic hormone released from colonic L-cells, which promotes appetite during conditions of energy deprivation. PMID:25028498

  5. Acute gastric pH changes alter intraluminal but not plasma peptide levels.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C R; Ure, T; O'Dorisio, T M; Barrie, R J; Woltering, E A

    1991-12-01

    Gastric acidity is influenced by systemic and local peptide effects. Previous work by others has shown that intraluminally secreted peptides may have a role in local control of gastric acidity; however, the response of these peptides to acute changes in gastric pH is unknown. To determine the effects of acute changes in pH on systemic and intraluminal peptide levels, 14 normal volunteers underwent placement of a nasogastric tube after an overnight fast. Blood and gastric fluid were analyzed on a control day, 2 hours after completion of 24 hours of aluminum-magnesium antacid therapy and after 24 hours of H2 blockade. Plasma and acid-alcohol-extracted gastric peptide levels were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. Specimens were subdivided into two groups: 28 gastric fluid specimens with a pH less than 4 and 10 specimens with a pH greater than 4. In the patients with a pH greater than 4, the luminal peptides, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, substance P, and gastrin, were decreased by 50% to 90% and gastrin-releasing peptide was decreased by 36% compared with specimens with a pH less than 4. Conversely, intraluminal vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and calcitonin levels were elevated by 60% and 27%, respectively, in the samples with a pH greater than 4. Intraluminal peptide concentrations are responsive to changes in intragastric pH; however, this response was not seen in plasma peptide levels.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of the Astrocytic Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 1 (EAAT1) via NF-κB and Yin Yang 1 (YY1)*

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Kim, Clifford; Smith, Keisha; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 1, also known as glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, is one of two glial glutamate transporters that are responsible for removing excess glutamate from synaptic clefts to prevent excitotoxic neuronal death. Despite its important role in neurophysiological functions, the molecular mechanisms of EAAT1 regulation at the transcriptional level remain to be established. Here, we report that NF-κB is a main positive transcription factor for EAAT1, supported by the following: 1) EAAT1 contains two consensus sites for NF-κB, 2) mutation of NF-κB binding sites decreased EAAT1 promoter activity, and 3) activation of NF-κB increased, whereas inhibition of NF-κB decreased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels. EGF increased EAAT1 mRNA/protein levels and glutamate uptake via NF-κB. The transcription factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a role as a critical negative regulator of EAAT1, supported by the following: 1) the EAAT1 promoter contains multiple consensus sites for YY1, 2) overexpression of YY1 decreased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels, and 3) knockdown of YY1 increased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels. Manganese decreased EAAT1 expression via YY1. Epigenetic modifiers histone deacetylases (HDACs) served as co-repressors of YY1 to further decrease EAAT1 promoter activity, whereas inhibition of HDACs reversed manganese-induced decrease of EAAT1 expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that NF-κB is a critical positive regulator of EAAT1, mediating the stimulatory effects of EGF, whereas YY1 is a negative regulator of EAAT1 with HDACs as co-repressors, mediating the inhibitory effects of manganese on EAAT1 regulation. PMID:26269591

  7. The prevalence of a YY synaptonemal complex over XY synapsis in an XYY man with exclusive XYY spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A J; Rey Valzacchi, G

    1997-11-01

    An infertile XYY man was studied by synaptonemal complex analysis of microspread spermatocytes and by quantitation of germ cells in semithin sections. All the 74 spermatocytes micrographed have an XYY constitution, and the biopsy shows a homogeneous arrest of spermatogenesis at the spermatocyte/young spermatid stages. The overwhelming majority (86%) of spermatocytes showed a Y-Y bivalent plus a univalent X. The Y-Y bivalent is totally synapsed in 48% of the cells. In the remaining cells, the YY bivalent has an average synaptic segment covering 43% of its length that always includes Yp. Another 9% of the spermatocytes showed an XYY trivalent and 4% of the spermatocytes showed univalence of the three gonosomes. Progression through all the pachytene substages was observed in cells with the two main synaptic configurations, but a high level of germ cell death was observed at or immediately after the meiotic divisions. The prevalence of Y-Y synapsis arises from the longer homologous region and the higher speed of pairing between the two Y chromosomes. Germ cell death is probably related to the univalence of the X chromosome. Synaptic competition between three gonosomes seems to be similar to that found in triploid birds but is somewhat different from that of XYY mice.

  8. Associations of plasma natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, and homocysteine levels with alterations in arterial stiffness: The Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental studies suggest that the natriuretic peptides influence lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Although it has been shown that obese individuals have reduced natriuretic peptide levels, conflicting data exist on the relation of natriuretic peptide levels to other metabolic risk factors. We ex...

  9. YY1 tethers Xist RNA to the inactive X nucleation center

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yesu; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The long noncoding Xist RNA inactivates one X-chromosome in the female mammal. Current models posit that Xist induces silencing as it spreads along X and recruits Polycomb complexes. However, the mechanisms for Xist loading and spreading are currently unknown. Here, we define the nucleation center for Xist RNA and show that YY1 docks Xist particles onto the X chromosome. YY1 is a ‘bivalent’ protein, capable of binding both RNA and DNA through different sequence motifs. Xist’s exclusive attachment to the inactive X is determined by an epigenetically regulated trio of YY1 sites as well as allelic origin. Specific YY1-to-RNA and YY1-to-DNA contacts are required to load Xist particles onto X. YY1 interacts with Xist RNA through Repeat C. We propose that YY1 acts as adaptor between regulatory RNA and chromatin targets. PMID:21729784

  10. Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Identification through Quantitative Proteomics at Both the Protein and Peptide Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kimberly A.; Hammerle, Lisa P.; Andrews, Paul S.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Mustelin, Tomas; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Black, Roy A.; Doedens, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a key regulatory process essential to life at a cellular level; significant efforts have been made to identify ubiquitinated proteins through proteomics studies, but the level of success has not reached that of heavily studied post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. HRD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis, but no disease-relevant substrates have been identified. To identify these substrates, we have taken both peptide and protein level approaches to enrich for ubiquitinated proteins in the presence and absence of HRD1. At the protein level, a two-step strategy was taken using cells expressing His6-tagged ubiquitin, enriching proteins first based on their ubiquitination and second based on the His tag with protein identification by LC-MS/MS. Application of this method resulted in identification and quantification of more than 400 ubiquitinated proteins, a fraction of which were found to be sensitive to HRD1 and were therefore deemed candidate substrates. In a second approach, ubiquitinated peptides were enriched after tryptic digestion by peptide immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for the diglycine-labeled internal lysine residue indicative of protein ubiquitination, with peptides and ubiquitination sites identified by LC-MS/MS. Peptide immunoprecipitation resulted in identification of over 1800 ubiquitinated peptides on over 900 proteins in each study, with several proteins emerging as sensitive to HRD1 levels. Notably, significant overlap exists between the HRD1 substrates identified by the protein-based and the peptide-based strategies, with clear cross-validation apparent both qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating the effectiveness of both strategies and furthering our understanding of HRD1 biology. PMID:21987572

  11. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  12. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents.

  13. The Yin and Yang of YY1 in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    He, Ye; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia

    2008-08-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional protein that can activate or repress gene expression depending on the cellular context. YY1 is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved between species. However, its role varies in diverse cell types and includes proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. This review will focus on the function of YY1 in the nervous system including its role in neural development, neuronal function, developmental myelination, and neurological disease. The multiple functions of YY1 in distinct cell types are reviewed and the possible mechanisms underlying the cell specificity for these functions are discussed.

  14. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  15. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven C L; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing.

  16. A Dynamic Noise Level Algorithm for Spectral Screening of Peptide MS/MS Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High-throughput shotgun proteomics data contain a significant number of spectra from non-peptide ions or spectra of too poor quality to obtain highly confident peptide identifications. These spectra cannot be identified with any positive peptide matches in some database search programs or are identified with false positives in others. Removing these spectra can improve the database search results and lower computational expense. Results A new algorithm has been developed to filter tandem mass spectra of poor quality from shotgun proteomic experiments. The algorithm determines the noise level dynamically and independently for each spectrum in a tandem mass spectrometric data set. Spectra are filtered based on a minimum number of required signal peaks with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2. The algorithm was tested with 23 sample data sets containing 62,117 total spectra. Conclusions The spectral screening removed 89.0% of the tandem mass spectra that did not yield a peptide match when searched with the MassMatrix database search software. Only 6.0% of tandem mass spectra that yielded peptide matches considered to be true positive matches were lost after spectral screening. The algorithm was found to be very effective at removal of unidentified spectra in other database search programs including Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem (75.93%-91.00%) with a small loss (3.59%-9.40%) of true positive matches. PMID:20731867

  17. The Role of YY1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    activator protein 1. Cancer Res 2007;67:4816-26. 54. Delehouzee S, Yoshikawa T, Sawa C, et al. GABP, HCF-1 and YY1 are involved in Rb gene...expression during myogenesis. Genes Cells 2005;10:717-31. 55. Santiago FS, Ishii H, Shafi S, et al. Yin Yang-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth... Ishii H, Shafi S, Khurana R, Kanellakis P, Bhindi R, et al. Yin Yang-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth and intimal thickening by

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide level in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd; Hollman, Jay

    2006-12-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis who had a B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level of 129 pg/dl despite a left ventricular end diastolic pressure of 35 mmHg. We discuss a possible explanation for the relatively low BNP level given this patient's markedly elevated intracavitary pressures in the setting of constrictive pericarditis.

  19. Stereospecific effects of morphine on plasma opioid peptide levels and nociception in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.; Morris, D.L.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    ..beta..-endorphin, (met)enkephalin, and (leu)enkephalin were quantitated in canine plasma by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after extraction of the peptides on Sep Pak C18 cartridges. Plasma samples were taken one hour after a 10 mg/kg s.c. injection of (-)-morphine SO/sub 4/ or (+)-morphine HBr. Antinociception, measured by a dog tail-flick test, and morphine-induced emesis, salivation, diarrhea, and ataxia were quantitated before sampling. Control levels for each dog were taken one week earlier at the same time of day after saline injections. Antinociception, morphine signs, and opioid peptide levels in plasma were significantly increased by (-)-morphine. Antinociception increased from zero to 83.54 +/- 11.0%. The number of morphine signs increased from zero to 2.9 +/- 0.28 per dog. ..beta..-endorphin levels increased from 44.52 +/- 4.25 to 90.6 +/- 7.38 pg/ml; (met)enkephalin levels increased from 253.56 +/- 22.04 to 497.1 +/- 58.12 pg/ml; (leu)-enkephalin increased from 141.65 +/- 12.9 to 313.24 +/- 35.95 pg/ml. None of these effects were observed in the dogs that received (+)-morphine. The conclude that morphine stereospecifically inhibits nociception, induces observable signs, and increases plasma opioid peptide levels in dogs.

  20. IL-13 Induces YY1 through the AKT Pathway in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Yao, Hongwei; Lin, Xin; Xu, Haodong; Dean, David; Zhu, Zhou; Liu, Gang; Sime, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of lung fibrosis is the accumulation of myofibroblasts. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a pro-fibrotic mediator that directly and indirectly influences the activation of myofibroblasts. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) promotes the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, and can be regulated by IL-13. However, IL-13’s downstream signaling pathways are not completely understood. We previously reported that the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is upregulated in fibroblasts treated with TGF-β and in the lungs of mice and patients with pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, YY1 directly regulates collagen and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in fibroblasts. However, it is not known if IL-13 regulates fibroblast activation through YY1 expression. We hypothesize that IL-13 up-regulates YY1 expression through regulation of AKT activation, leading to fibroblast activation. In this study we found that YY1 was upregulated by IL-13 in lung fibroblasts in a dose- and time-dependent manner, resulting in increased α-SMA. Conversely, knockdown of YY1 blocked IL-13-induced α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. Furthermore, AKT phosphorylation was increased in fibroblasts treated with IL-13, and AKT overexpression upregulated YY1, whereas blockade of AKT phosphorylation suppressed the induction of YY1 by IL-13 in vitro. In vivo YY1 was upregulated in fibrotic lungs from CC10-IL-13 transgenic mice compared to that from wild-type littermates, which was associated with increased AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that IL-13 is a potent stimulator and activator of fibroblasts, at least in part, through AKT-mediated YY1 activation. PMID:25775215

  1. Proteasome Inhibitors Alter Levels of Intracellular Peptides in HEK293T and SH-SY5Y Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sayani; Castro, Leandro M.; Dulman, Russell; Yang, Ciyu; Schmidt, Marion; Ferro, Emer S.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome cleaves intracellular proteins into peptides. Earlier studies found that treatment of human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells with epoxomicin (an irreversible proteasome inhibitor) generally caused a decrease in levels of intracellular peptides. However, bortezomib (an antitumor drug and proteasome inhibitor) caused an unexpected increase in the levels of most intracellular peptides in HEK293T and SH-SY5Y cells. To address this apparent paradox, quantitative peptidomics was used to study the effect of a variety of other proteasome inhibitors on peptide levels in HEK293T and SH-SY5Y cells. Inhibitors tested included carfilzomib, MG132, MG262, MLN2238, AM114, and clasto-Lactacystin β-lactone. Only MG262 caused a substantial elevation in peptide levels that was comparable to the effect of bortezomib, although carfilzomib and MLN2238 elevated the levels of some peptides. To explore off-target effects, the proteosome inhibitors were tested with various cellular peptidases. Bortezomib did not inhibit tripeptidyl peptidase 2 and only weakly inhibited cellular aminopeptidase activity, as did some of the other proteasome inhibitors. However, potent inhibitors of tripeptidyl peptidase 2 (butabindide) and cellular aminopeptidases (bestatin) did not substantially alter the peptidome, indicating that the increase in peptide levels due to proteasome inhibitors is not a result of peptidase inhibition. Although we cannot exclude other possibilities, we presume that the paradoxical increase in peptide levels upon treatment with bortezomib and other inhibitors is the result of allosteric effects of these compounds on the proteasome. Because intracellular peptides are likely to be functional, it is possible that some of the physiologic effects of bortezomib and carfilzomib arise from the perturbation of peptide levels inside the cell. PMID:25079948

  2. The MeCP2/YY1 interaction regulates ANT1 expression at 4q35: novel hints for Rett syndrome pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Greta; Giarda, Elisa; Ala, Ugo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Salani, Monica; Tupler, Rossella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2010-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the transcriptional regulator MeCP2. Although there is no effective therapy for Rett syndrome, the recently discovered disease reversibility in mice suggests that there are therapeutic possibilities. Identification of MeCP2 targets or modifiers of the phenotype can facilitate the design of curative strategies. To identify possible novel MeCP2 interactors, we exploited a bioinformatic approach and selected Ying Yang 1 (YY1) as an interesting candidate. We demonstrate that MeCP2 interacts in vitro and in vivo with YY1, a ubiquitous zinc-finger epigenetic factor regulating the expression of several genes. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with YY1 in repressing the ANT1 gene encoding a mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase. Importantly, ANT1 mRNA levels are increased in human and mouse cell lines devoid of MeCP2, in Rett patient fibroblasts and in the brain of Mecp2-null mice. We further demonstrate that ANT1 protein levels are upregulated in Mecp2-null mice. Finally, the identified MeCP2-YY1 interaction, together with the well-known involvement of YY1 in the regulation of D4Z4-associated genes at 4q35, led us to discover the anomalous depression of FRG2, a subtelomeric gene of unknown function, in Rett fibroblasts. Collectively, our data indicate that mutations in MeCP2 might cause the aberrant overexpression of genes located at a specific locus, thus providing new candidates for the pathogenesis of Rett syndrome. As both ANT1 mutations and overexpression have been associated with human diseases, we consider it highly relevant to address the consequences of ANT1 deregulation in Rett syndrome.

  3. C-Peptide Levels Predict the Effectiveness of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Sevin; Sargin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Our aim was to define the conditions that affect therapeutic success when dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor is added to metformin monotherapy. Materials and Methods. We reviewed the medical records of 56 patients who had received DPP-4 inhibitor as an add-on to metformin monotherapy and evaluated their response in the first year of therapy. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), HbA1c, C-peptide, and weight of the patients were recorded at 3-month intervals during the first year of treatment. Results. Patients who added DPP-4 inhibitor to metformin monotherapy had significant weight loss (P = 0.004) and FBG and HbA1c levels were significantly lowered during the first 6 months (both P < 0.001). Baseline levels of C-peptide were predictive for success of the treatment (P = 0.02), even after correction for confounding factors, for example, age, gender, or BMI (P = 0.03). Duration of diabetes was not a predictor of response to treatment (P = 0.60). Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that in patients having inadequate glycemic control, the addition of a DPP-4 inhibitor as a second oral agent to metformin monotherapy provides better glycemic control, protects β-cell reserves, and does not cause weight gain. These effects depend on baseline C-peptide levels. PMID:27882332

  4. Repression of PDGF-R-α after cellular injury involves TNF-α, formation of a c-Fos-YY1 complex, and negative regulation by HDAC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chan, Cecilia W S; Sanchez-Guerrero, Estella; Khachigian, Levon M

    2012-06-01

    Wound healing is a complex dynamic process involving a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts that express and respond to cytokines and growth factors in the local microenvironment. The mechanisms controlling gene expression after injury at a transcriptional level are poorly understood. Here we show that decreased expression of a key receptor, PDGF-receptor (R)-α, after fibroblast injury is due to the release and paracrine activity of TNF-α. TNF-α inhibits PDGF-R-α expression and this involves formation of a c-Fos-Yin Yang 1 (YY1) complex and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. c-Fos, induced by TNF-α, negatively regulates PDGF-R-α transcription. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting c-Fos or the zinc finger transcription factor YY1 inhibits TNF-α suppression of PDGF-R-α expression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies show that TNF-α stimulates the formation of a complex between c-Fos with YY1. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis reveals the enrichment of c-Fos, YY1, and HDAC-1 at the PDGF-R-α promoter in cells exposed to TNF-α. With suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and HDAC-1 siRNA, we demonstrate that HDAC mediates TNF-α repression of PDGF-R-α. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional repression of PDGF-R-α after fibroblast injury involves paracrine activity of endogenous TNF-α, the formation of a c-Fos-YY1 complex, and negative regulatory activity by HDAC.

  5. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  6. The zinc fingers of YY1 bind single-stranded RNA with low sequence specificity.

    PubMed

    Wai, Dorothy C C; Shihab, Manar; Low, Jason K K; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-11-02

    Classical zinc fingers (ZFs) are traditionally considered to act as sequence-specific DNA-binding domains. More recently, classical ZFs have been recognised as potential RNA-binding modules, raising the intriguing possibility that classical-ZF transcription factors are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation via direct RNA binding. To date, however, only one classical ZF-RNA complex, that involving TFIIIA, has been structurally characterised. Yin Yang-1 (YY1) is a multi-functional transcription factor involved in many regulatory processes, and binds DNA via four classical ZFs. Recent evidence suggests that YY1 also interacts with RNA, but the molecular nature of the interaction remains unknown. In the present work, we directly assess the ability of YY1 to bind RNA using in vitro assays. Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) was used to identify preferred RNA sequences bound by the YY1 ZFs from a randomised library over multiple rounds of selection. However, a strong motif was not consistently recovered, suggesting that the RNA sequence selectivity of these domains is modest. YY1 ZF residues involved in binding to single-stranded RNA were identified by NMR spectroscopy and found to be largely distinct from the set of residues involved in DNA binding, suggesting that interactions between YY1 and ssRNA constitute a separate mode of nucleic acid binding. Our data are consistent with recent reports that YY1 can bind to RNA in a low-specificity, yet physiologically relevant manner.

  7. The zinc fingers of YY1 bind single-stranded RNA with low sequence specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Dorothy C.C.; Shihab, Manar; Low, Jason K.K.; Mackay, Joel P.

    2016-01-01

    Classical zinc fingers (ZFs) are traditionally considered to act as sequence-specific DNA-binding domains. More recently, classical ZFs have been recognised as potential RNA-binding modules, raising the intriguing possibility that classical-ZF transcription factors are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation via direct RNA binding. To date, however, only one classical ZF-RNA complex, that involving TFIIIA, has been structurally characterised. Yin Yang-1 (YY1) is a multi-functional transcription factor involved in many regulatory processes, and binds DNA via four classical ZFs. Recent evidence suggests that YY1 also interacts with RNA, but the molecular nature of the interaction remains unknown. In the present work, we directly assess the ability of YY1 to bind RNA using in vitro assays. Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) was used to identify preferred RNA sequences bound by the YY1 ZFs from a randomised library over multiple rounds of selection. However, a strong motif was not consistently recovered, suggesting that the RNA sequence selectivity of these domains is modest. YY1 ZF residues involved in binding to single-stranded RNA were identified by NMR spectroscopy and found to be largely distinct from the set of residues involved in DNA binding, suggesting that interactions between YY1 and ssRNA constitute a separate mode of nucleic acid binding. Our data are consistent with recent reports that YY1 can bind to RNA in a low-specificity, yet physiologically relevant manner. PMID:27369384

  8. Molecular-level understanding of the adsorption mechanism of a graphite-binding peptide at the water/graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Penna, M J; Mijajlovic, M; Tamerler, C; Biggs, M J

    2015-07-14

    The association of proteins and peptides with inorganic material has vast technological potential. An understanding of the adsorption of peptides at liquid/solid interfaces on a molecular-level is fundamental to fully realising this potential. Combining our prior work along with the statistical analysis of 100+ molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption of an experimentally identified graphite binding peptide, GrBP5, at the water/graphite interface has been used here to propose a model for the adsorption of a peptide at a liquid/solid interface. This bottom-up model splits the adsorption process into three reversible phases: biased diffusion, anchoring and lockdown. Statistical analysis highlighted the distinct roles played by regions of the peptide studied here throughout the adsorption process: the hydrophobic domain plays a significant role in the biased diffusion and anchoring phases suggesting that the initial impetus for association between the peptide and the interface may be hydrophobic in origin; aromatic residues dominate the interaction between the peptide and the surface in the adsorbed state and the polar region in the middle of the peptide affords a high conformational flexibility allowing strongly interacting residues to maximise favourable interactions with the surface. Reversible adsorption was observed here, unlike in our prior work focused on a more strongly interacting surface. However, this reversibility is unlikely to be seen once the peptide-surface interaction exceeds 10 kcal mol(-1).

  9. Elapid snake venom analyses show the specificity of the peptide composition at the level of genera Naja and Notechis.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Hildebrand, Diana; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Behnken, Henning; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir; Spencer, Patrick; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2014-02-28

    Elapid snake venom is a highly valuable, but till now mainly unexplored, source of pharmacologically important peptides. We analyzed the peptide fractions with molecular masses up to 10 kDa of two elapid snake venoms-that of the African cobra, N. m. mossambica (genus Naja), and the Peninsula tiger snake, N. scutatus, from Kangaroo Island (genus Notechis). A combination of chromatographic methods was used to isolate the peptides, which were characterized by combining complimentary mass spectrometric techniques. Comparative analysis of the peptide compositions of two venoms showed specificity at the genus level. Three-finger (3-F) cytotoxins, bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) and a bradykinin inhibitor were isolated from the Naja venom. 3-F neurotoxins, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors and a natriuretic peptide were identified in the N. venom. The inhibiting activity of the peptides was confirmed in vitro with a selected array of proteases. Cytotoxin 1 (P01467) from the Naja venom might be involved in the disturbance of cellular processes by inhibiting the cell 20S-proteasome. A high degree of similarity between BPPs from elapid and viperid snake venoms was observed, suggesting that these molecules play a key role in snake venoms and also indicating that these peptides were recruited into the snake venom prior to the evolutionary divergence of the snakes.

  10. Engineered glucagon-like peptide-1-producing hepatocytes lower plasma glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Michael J; Lee, Corinna Wai Kwan; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2009-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 is an incretin hormone with well-characterized antidiabetic properties, including glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and enhancement of beta-cell mass. GLP-1 agonists have recently been developed and are now in clinical use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Rapid degradation of GLP-1 by enzymes including dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)-IV and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11, along with renal clearance, contribute to a short biological half-life, necessitating frequent injections to maintain therapeutic efficacy. Gene therapy may represent a promising alternative approach for achieving long-term increases in endogenous release of GLP-1. We have developed a novel strategy for glucose-regulated production of GLP-1 in hepatocytes by expressing a DPP-IV-resistant GLP-1 peptide in hepatocytes under control of the liver-type pyruvate kinase promoter. Adenoviral delivery of this construct to hepatocytes in vitro resulted in production and secretion of bioactive GLP-1 as measured by a luciferase-based bioassay developed to detect the NH2-terminally modified GLP-1 peptide engineered for this study. Transplantation of encapsulated hepatocytes into CD-1 mice resulted in an increase in plasma GLP-1 levels that was accompanied by a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose levels. The results from this study demonstrate that a gene therapy approach designed to induce GLP-1 production in hepatocytes may represent a novel strategy for long-term secretion of bioactive GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. A prominent and conserved role for YY1 in Xist transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pablo; Neuillet, Damien; Rougeulle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of the non-coding RNA Xist on one X chromosome in female cells is a hallmark of X-chromosome inactivation in eutherians. Here, we uncovered an essential function for the ubiquitous autosomal transcription factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) in the transcriptional activation of Xist in both human and mouse. We show that loss of YY1 prevents Xist up-regulation during the initiation and maintenance of X-inactivation, and that YY1 binds directly the Xist 5′ region to trigger the activity of the Xist promoter. Binding of YY1 to the Xist 5′ region prior to X-chromosome inactivation competes with the Xist repressor REX1 while DNA methylation controls mono-allelic fixation of YY1 to Xist at the onset of X-chromosome inactivation. YY1 is thus the first autosomal activating factor involved in a fundamental and conserved pathway of Xist regulation that ensures the asymmetric transcriptional up-regulation of the master regulator of X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25209548

  12. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  13. Ghrelin-related peptides do not modulate vasodilator nitric oxide production or superoxide levels in mouse systemic arteries.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Sleeman, Mark W; Sobey, Christopher G; Andrews, Zane B; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-04-01

    The ghrelin gene is expressed in the stomach where it ultimately encodes up to three peptides, namely, acylated ghrelin, des-acylated ghrelin and obestatin, which all have neuroendocrine roles. Recently, the authors' reported that these peptides have important physiological roles in positively regulating vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) production in the cerebral circulation, and may normally suppress superoxide production by the pro-oxidant enzyme, Nox2-NADPH oxidase. To date, the majority of studies using exogenous peptides infer that they may have similar roles in the systemic circulation. Therefore, this study examined whether exogenous and endogenous ghrelin-related peptides modulate NO production and superoxide levels in mouse mesenteric arteries and/or thoracic aorta. Using wire myography, it was found that application of exogenous acylated ghrelin, des-acylated ghrelin or obestatin to mouse thoracic aorta or mesenteric arteries failed to elicit a vasorelaxation response, whereas all three peptides elicited vasorelaxation responses of rat thoracic aorta. Also, none of the peptides modulated mouse aortic superoxide levels as measured by L-012-enhanced chemiluminescence. Next, it was found that NO bioactivity and superoxide levels were unaffected in the thoracic aorta from ghrelin-deficient mice when compared with wild-type mice. Lastly, using novel GHSR-eGFP reporter mice in combination with double-labelled immunofluorescence, no evidence was found for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) in the throracic aorta, which is the only functional ghrelin receptor identified to date. Collectively these findings demonstrate that, in contrast to systemic vessels of other species (e.g. rat and human) and mouse cerebral vessels, ghrelin-related peptides do not modulate vasodilator NO production or superoxide levels in mouse systemic arteries.

  14. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  15. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  16. Blood levels and renal effects of atrial natriuretic peptide in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, P; Hasler, L; Gnädinger, M P; Lang, R E; Uehlinger, D E; Shaw, S; Rascher, W; Reubi, F C

    1986-01-01

    Since mammalian atria were recently found to contain vasoactive and natriuretic peptides, we investigated the following in normal humans: plasma human atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations, effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary water and electrolyte excretion, blood pressure (BP), and catecholamine, antidiuretic hormone (ADH), angiotensin II, and aldosterone levels before, during, and after intravenous administration of the newly synthetized alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP). In 10 subjects alpha hANP given as an initial bolus of 50 micrograms followed by a 45-min maintenance infusion at 6.25 micrograms/min increased plasma alpha hANP from 58 +/- 12 to 625 +/- 87 (mean +/- SEM) pg/ml; caused an acute fall in diastolic BP (-12%, P less than 0.001) and a hemoconcentration (hematocrit +7%, P less than 0.01) not fully explained by a negative body fluid balance; increased GFR (+15%, P less than 0.05) despite unchanged or decreased ERPF (filtration fraction +37%, P less than 0.001); augmented (P less than 0.05- less than 0.001) urinary chloride (+317%), sodium (+224%), calcium (+158%), magnesium (+110%), phosphate excretion (+88%), and free water clearance (from -0.76 to +2.23 ml/min, P less than 0.001) with only little change in potassium excretion; and increased plasma norepinephrine (P less than 0.001) while plasma and urinary epinephrine and dopamine, and plasma ADH, angiotensin II, and aldosterone levels were unchanged. The magnitude and pattern of electrolyte and water excretion during alpha hANP infusion could not be accounted for by increased GFR alone. Therefore, in normal man, endogenous alpha hANP seems to circulate in blood. alpha hANP can cause a BP reduction and hemoconcentration which occur, at least in part, independently of diuresis and are accompanied by sympathetic activation. An increase in GFR that occurs in the presence of unchanged or even decreased total renal blood flow is an important

  17. Identification and characterization of four novel peptide motifs that recognize distinct regions of the transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chung, Bo Mee; Chae, Ji Hyung; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chan Gil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-03-01

    Although ubiquitously expressed, the transcriptional factor CP2 also exhibits some tissue- or stage-specific activation toward certain genes such as globin in red blood cells and interleukin-4 in T helper cells. Because this specificity may be achieved by interaction with other proteins, we screened a peptide display library and identified four consensus motifs in numerous CP2-binding peptides: HXPR, PHL, ASR and PXHXH. Protein-database searching revealed that RE-1 silencing factor (REST), Yin-Yang1 (YY1) and five other proteins have one or two of these CP2-binding motifs. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that two HXPR motif-containing proteins REST and YY1 indeed were able to bind CP2. Importantly, this binding to CP2 was almost abolished when a double amino acid substitution was made on the HXPR sequence of REST and YY1 proteins. The suppressing effect of YY1 on CP2's transcriptional activity was lost by this point mutation on the HXPR sequence of YY1 and reduced by an HXPR-containing peptide, further supporting the interaction between CP2 and YY1 via the HXPR sequence. Mapping the sites on CP2 for interaction with the four distinct CP2-binding motifs revealed at least three different regions on CP2. This suggests that CP2 recognizes several distinct binding motifs by virtue of employing different regions, thus being able to interact with and regulate many cellular partners.

  18. Effects of posture and ageing on circulating atrial natriuretic peptide levels in man.

    PubMed

    Haller, B G; Züst, H; Shaw, S; Gnädinger, M P; Uehlinger, D E; Weidmann, P

    1987-10-01

    Possible influences of posture or age on plasma immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (irANP) levels and potential correlates were assessed in 12 young (age +/- s.e.m. 24 +/- 1 year) and 12 elderly (63 +/- 8 year) healthy subjects on a liberal sodium intake. The groups did not differ significantly in their basal 24-h urinary sodium excretion (210 +/- 23 versus 180 +/- 15 mmol/l). However, plasma irANP was five- to ninefold higher in the elderly (P less than 0.05-0.01). Plasma irANP averaged 167 +/- 31 and 24 +/- 3 pg/ml in the elderly and young, respectively, during recumbency, fell (P less than 0.05) to 101 +/- 21 and 11 +/- 1 pg/ml, respectively, with upright posture, and rose (P less than 0.01) to 250 +/- 51 and 50 +/- 9 pg/ml, respectively, after intravenous (i.v.) loading with 0.9% saline (2.14 l in 3 h). Supine blood pressure (BP) and plasma norepinephrine tended to be higher while renin and aldosterone levels were lower (P less than 0.01) in the elderly; the three latter variables rose (P less than 0.001) with upright posture. These findings demonstrate that in normal humans, circulating irANP levels vary with posture and ageing. These changes may have potential physiological relevance and should be considered when interpreting plasma irANP levels in pathological conditions.

  19. Serum Levels of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide as a Prognostic Marker in Early Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana M.; Juarranz, Yasmina; Lamana, Amalia; Seoane, Iria V.; Leceta, Javier; García-Vicuña, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Objective Suitable biomarkers are essential for the design of therapeutic strategies in personalized medicine. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has demonstrated immunomodulatory properties in autoimmune murine and ex vivo human models. Our aim was to study serum levels of VIP during the follow-up of an early arthritis (EA) cohort and to analyze its value as a biomarker predicting severity and therapeutic requirements. Methods Data from 91 patients on an EA register were analyzed (76% rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 24% undifferentiated arthritis, 73% women, and median age 54 years; median disease duration at entry, 5.4 months). We collected per protocol sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data. VIP levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay in sera harvested from the 91 patients (353 visits; 3.9 visit/patient) and from 100 healthy controls. VIP values below the 25th percentile of those assessed in healthy population were considered low. To determine the effect of independent variables on VIP levels, we performed a longitudinal multivariate analysis nested by patient and visit. A multivariate ordered logistic regression was modeled to determine the effect of low VIP serum levels on disease activity at the end of follow-up. Results VIP concentrations varied considerably across EA patients. Those fulfilling the criteria for RA had the lowest values in the whole sample, although no significant differences were observed compared with healthy donors. Disease activity, which was assessed using DAS28, inversely correlated with VIP levels. After a two-year follow-up, those patients with low baseline levels of VIP displayed higher disease activity and received more intensive treatment. Conclusion Patients who are unable to up-regulate VIP seem to have a worse clinical course despite receiving more intense treatment. Therefore, measurement of VIP levels may be suitable as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:24409325

  20. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  1. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past.

  2. Fully Blind Docking at the Atomic Level for Protein-Peptide Complex Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-04

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. In silico prediction of protein-peptide complex structure is highly desirable for mechanistic investigation of these processes and for therapeutic design. However, predicting all-atom structures of protein-peptide complexes without any knowledge about the peptide binding site and the bound peptide conformation remains a big challenge. Here, we present a docking-based method for predicting protein-peptide complex structures, referred to as MDockPeP, which starts with the peptide sequence and globally docks the all-atom, flexible peptide onto the protein structure. MDockPeP was tested on the peptiDB benchmarking database using both bound and unbound protein structures. The results show that MDockPeP successfully generated near-native peptide binding modes in 95.0% of the bound docking cases and in 92.2% of the unbound docking cases. The performance is significantly better than other existing docking methods. MDockPeP is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications.

  3. Effect of C-peptide Alone or in Combination with Nicotinamide on Insulin Levels from Pancreatic Islets in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Ali Akbari, Fatemeh Ramezani; Moghadam, Hadi Fathi

    2016-01-01

    Background Both c-peptide and nicotinamide are known to increase blood insulin in diabetes. In the present study, we examined the effect of c-peptide alone or in combination with nicotinamide on insulin levels in pancreatic islets in mice. Methods This study was conducted with 60 adult male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMARI) mice weighing 25 to 30 g. Pancreatic islets from normal mice were isolated by the collagenase digestion method. Mice were divided into ten groups of six (n = 6): control, glyburide (1 and 10 μM), C-peptide (50 and 100 nM), nicotinamide (10, 25, and 100 mM), nicotinamide + C-peptide (100 mM and 100 nM), and buffer in different glucose concentrations (2.8, 5.6, and 16.7 mM). Insulin secretion was measured using insulin radioimmunoassay method. Results Insulin secretion significantly increased at 16.7 mM glucose concentration compared with 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations. Incubation of islets at 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations and nicotinamide + C-peptide, nicotinamide 25 and 100 mM, and C-peptide 100 nM significantly increased insulin secretion compared with the control group. In addition, incubation of islets at 16.7 mM glucose with nicotinamide + C-peptide significantly increased insulin secretion. Glyburide at 10 μM concentration was more effective than nicotinamide at 10 and 100 mM, C-peptide 50 and 100 nM in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose concentration. However, the combination of nicotinamide + C-peptide was more effective than glyburide at a concentration of 10 μM in the presence of a 16.7 mM glucose concentration. Conclusions This paper suggests that c-peptide, nicotinamide, and the combination of c-peptide and nicotinamide in-creases insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. PMID:27540321

  4. Effect of a 4-week weight maintenance diet on circulating hormone levels: implications for clinical weight loss trials.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, A; Evans, I R; Wood, R E; Seimon, R V; King, N A; Hills, A P; Byrne, N M

    2015-04-01

    The majority of weight loss studies fail to standardize conditions such as diet and exercise via a weight maintenance period prior to commencement of the trial. This study aimed to determine whether a weight stabilization period is necessary to establish stable baseline hormone concentrations. Fifty-one obese male participants with a body mass index of 30-40 kg m(-2) and aged 25-54 years underwent 4 weeks on an energy balance diet that was designed to achieve weight stability. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state at commencement and completion of the 4-week period, and circulating concentrations of 18 commonly measured hormones were determined. During the 4-week weight maintenance period, participants achieved weight stability within -1.5 ± 0.2 kg (-1.4 ± 0.2%) of their initial body weight. Significant reductions in serum insulin (by 18 ± 6.5%) and leptin (by 21 ± 6.0%) levels occurred, but no significant changes were observed for gut-derived appetite-regulating hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY), nor thyroid, adrenal, gonadal or somatotropic hormones. There were no significant correlations between the change in body weight and the change in circulating concentrations of insulin or leptin over the 4-week period, indicating that the observed changes were not due to weight loss, albeit significant negative correlations were observed between the changes in body weight and plasma ghrelin and peptide YY levels. This study demonstrates the need for baseline weight maintenance periods to stabilize serum levels of insulin and leptin in studies specifically investigating effects on these parameters in the obese. However, this does not apply to circulating levels of gut-derived appetite-regulating hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY), nor thyroid, adrenal, gonadal or somatotropic hormones.

  5. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Aaron J; Stuart, Ronald C; Attard, Courtney A; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A; Low, Malcolm J

    2014-04-15

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24-48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis.

  6. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Attard, Courtney A.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24–48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis. PMID:24518677

  7. MAXI/GSC detection of a possible X-ray flare from an dMe binary system YY Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2015-09-01

    MAXI/GSC observed a possible X-ray flare from a dMe binary system YY Gem. The MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on the flare-like event from the position consistent with the active binary system YY Gem during a scan transit at 01:29:00 UT on September 24th 2015.

  8. Lateralized Response of Dynorphin A Peptide Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zubair Muhammad; Fitting, Sylvia; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Usynin, Ivan; Yakovleva, Tatjana; Knapp, Pamela E.; Scheff, Stephen W.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a cascade of primary and secondary events resulting in impairment of neuronal networks that eventually determines clinical outcome. The dynorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, have been implicated in secondary injury and neurodegeneration in rodent and human brain. To gain insight into the role of dynorphins in the brain's response to trauma, we analyzed short-term (1-day) and long-term (7-day) changes in dynorphin A (Dyn A) levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, induced by unilateral left-side or right-side cortical TBI in mice. The effects of TBI were significantly different from those of sham surgery (Sham), while the sham surgery also produced noticeable effects. Both sham and TBI induced short-term changes and long-term changes in all three regions. Two types of responses were generally observed. In the hippocampus, Dyn A levels were predominantly altered ipsilateral to the injury. In the striatum and frontal cortex, injury to the right (R) hemisphere affected Dyn A levels to a greater extent than that seen in the left (L) hemisphere. The R-TBI but not L-TBI produced Dyn A changes in the striatum and frontal cortex at 7 days after injury. Effects of the R-side injury were similar in the two hemispheres. In naive animals, Dyn A was symmetrically distributed between the two hemispheres. Thus, trauma may reveal a lateralization in the mechanism mediating the response of Dyn A-expressing neuronal networks in the brain. These networks may differentially mediate effects of left and right brain injury on lateralized brain functions. PMID:22468884

  9. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Managing Pediatric Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bernus, Anna; Wagner, Brandie D.; Accurso, Frank; Doran, Aimee; Kaess, Heidi; Ivy, D. Dunbar

    2009-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an important determinant of morbidity and mortality in children. In this study we aimed to investigate the value of Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) in a cohort of children with PAH, with respect to monitoring disease severity as assessed by hemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters. Methods We performed a prospective study to determine if BNP varies over time in this population and if these changes track with hemodynamic or echocardiographic parameters. The population included a group of 78 pediatric patients from January 2005 until April 2008. All patients were diagnosed with PAH and had serum BNP, catheterization and echocardiographic variables collected longitudinally. Results The median BNP level, for all observations, was 36.0pg/ml (interquartile range [IQR], 18.0 to 76pg/ml). There was no strong correlation found between commonly used echocardiographic or hemodynamic data and BNP. However, using a bivariate model, the change in BNP measurements over time significantly correlated with the change in the hemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters. Patients with a BNP value greater than 180pg/ml had a decreased survival rate. Conclusions There is indication that BNP could be a useful marker to monitor disease severity in pediatric pulmonary hypertension. We show that simple correlations between variables and BNP are not likely to illustrate its usefulness due to variations in the normative levels. Instead, we propose that patient’s BNP levels should be monitored over time, as changes in BNP within a patient are likely to be more informative. PMID:18849405

  10. Transgenic over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brian L.; Dockstader, Karen; Russell, Gloria; Hijmans, Jamie; Walker, Lisa; Cecil, Mackenzie; Demos-Davies, Kimberly; Medway, Allen; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Sucharov, Carmen C.

    2015-01-01

    YY1 can activate or repress transcription of various genes. In cardiac myocytes in culture YY1 has been shown to regulate expression of several genes involved in myocyte pathology. YY1 can also acutely protect the heart against detrimental changes in gene expression. In this study we show that cardiac over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in male mice, measured by changes in gene expression and lower ejection fraction/fractional shortening. In contrast, female animals are protected against pathologic gene expression changes and cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, we show that YY1 regulates, in a sex-specific manner, the expression of mammalian enable (Mena), a factor that regulates cytoskeletal actin dynamics and whose expression is increased in several models of cardiac pathology, and that Mena expression in humans with heart failure is sex-dependent. Finally, we show that sex differences in YY1 expression are also observed in human heart failure. In summary, this is the first work to show that YY1 has a sex-specific effect in the regulation of cardiac pathology. PMID:25935483

  11. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Martina M; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E; Sachs, Matthew S; Atkins, John F

    2015-07-17

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3' end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5' and 3' of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5' of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5' part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3' part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3' of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting.

  12. Changes in mRNA expression of arcuate nucleus appetite-regulating peptides during lactation in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Nakahara, Keiko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Okame, Rieko; Ensho, Takuya; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Noboru

    2014-04-01

    The contribution of hypothalamic appetite-regulating peptides to further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation in rats was investigated by using PCR array and real-time PCR. Furthermore, changes in the mRNA expression for appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) were analyzed at all stages of pregnancy and lactation, and also after weaning. Food intake was significantly higher during pregnancy, lactation, and after weaning than during non-lactation periods. During lactation, ARC expression of mRNAs for agouti-related protein (AgRP) and peptide YY was increased, whereas that of mRNAs for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cholecystokinin (CCK) was decreased, in comparison with non-lactation periods. The increase in AgRP mRNA expression during lactation was especially marked. The plasma level of leptin was significantly decreased during the course of lactation, whereas that of acyl-ghrelin was unchanged. In addition, food intake was negatively correlated with the plasma leptin level during lactation. This study has clarified synchronous changes in the expression of many appetite-regulating peptides in ARC of rats during lactation. Our results suggest that hyperphagia during lactation in rats is caused by decreases in POMC and CCK expression and increases in AgRP expression in ARC, the latter being most notable. Together with the decrease in the blood leptin level, such changes in mRNA expression may explain the further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation.

  13. YY v TURKEY: INFERTILITY AS A PRE-CONDITION FOR GENDER CONFIRMATION SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In YY v Turkey, the Second Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held that Turkey's refusal, over a period of many years, to authorise gender confirmation surgery because the applicant remained capable of procreating was a violation of the right to private life under Art. 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Second Chamber's judgment acknowledges, and gives practical effect to, the 'physical and moral security' of transgender persons. YY has the potential to revolutionise gender confirming health care in Europe and will hopefully ensure that, where individuals do seek to medically transition, they need only access to treatments that are both necessary and desired. The ECtHR's decision may also impact upon the legal recognition of transgender identities. While not the direct focus of the Second Chamber's assessment, legal gender recognition is a constant theme throughout the judgment, and many of the Court's arguments are equally applicable to legal schemes for acknowledging preferred gender.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YY Cet UBV differential light curves (Williamon+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamon, R. M.; Sowell, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Our photometric observations of YY Cet (BD-18 349, SAO 148148) were obtained with the 90cm Cassegrain reflector at the Fernbank Science Center (Atlanta, Georgia) during 1973-1977. More than 540 measurements were made in each UBV bandpass with an unrefrigerated EMI 6256s photomultiplier. A second set of unpublished UBV data were given to us by Carlson Chamblis when he retired. His 152 measurements in each bandpass were obtained in 1972-1973 with the 0.6m telescope at Mount John University Observatory in New Zealand. The improved ephemeris for the primary eclipse of YY Cet is minimum light (HJD)=2442658.94694+/-0.00006+0.790458487+/-0.000000052E (2 data files).

  15. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-09-03

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression.

  16. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression. PMID:27598153

  17. Phosphorylated C/EBPβ Influences a Complex Network Involving YY1 and USF2 in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viart, Victoria; Varilh, Jessica; Lopez, Estelle; René, Céline; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan-Cadars, Magali

    2013-01-01

    The promoter of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene CFTR is tightly controlled by regulators including CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs). We previously reported that the transcription factors YY1 and USF2 affect CFTR expression. We can now demonstrate that C/EBPβ, a member of the CCAAT family, binds to the CFTR promoter and contributes to its transcriptional activity. Our data reveal that C/EBPβ cooperates with USF2 and acts antagonistically to YY1 in the control of CFTR expression. Interestingly, YY1, a strong repressor, fails to repress the CFTR activation induced by USF2 through DNA binding competition. Collectively, the data strongly suggest a model by which USF2 functionally interacts with YY1 blocking its inhibitory activity, in favour of C/EBPβ transactivation. Further investigation into the interactions between these three proteins revealed that phosphorylation of C/EBPβ influences the DNA occupancy of YY1 and favours the interaction between USF2 and YY1. This phosphorylation process has several implications in the CFTR transcriptional process, thus evoking an additional layer of complexity to the mechanisms influencing CFTR gene regulation. PMID:23560079

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riz, Michela; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP)-channels) to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP) current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP)-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release. PMID:26630068

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Riz, Michela; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP)-channels) to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP) current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP)-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release.

  20. Molecular forms of peptide histidine isoleucine-like immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract. Nonequimolar levels of peptide histidine isoleucine and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach explained by the presence of a big peptide histidine isoleucine-like molecule.

    PubMed

    Yiangou, Y; Christofides, N D; Blank, M A; Yanaihara, N; Tatemoto, K; Bishop, A E; Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1985-09-01

    Regional specific antibodies and chromatography were used to analyze the distributions and molecular forms of peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the porcine intestine. Both peptides were present along the entire length of the intestine, the highest concentrations occurring in the colon. Concentrations of PHI immunoreactivity, measured with three different antisera, and VIP immunoreactivity were approximately equal in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract except in the stomach. In the stomach, the concentration of PHI immunoreactivity, measured with the N-terminally directed antibody R8403, although equal to the corresponding VIP concentration, was two to four times higher than the PHI immunoreactivity detected with the two C-terminally directed PHI antisera T33 and T41. Chromatographic analysis on Sephadex G-50 superfine of gastric extracts revealed only one VIP immunoreactive peak that eluted in the same position as the porcine VIP standard, at Kav 0.53. A PHI immunoreactive peak was also detected with the C-terminally directed PHI antisera in the same position as porcine PHI standard. However, with the N-terminally directed PHI antiserum R8403, an additional PHI immunoreactive peak was detected in gastric extracts constituting the predominant form present, and this peak eluted earlier at Kav 0.37. The PHI immunoreactive material that eluted earlier was present in the rest of the intestine in only small amounts. As VIP and PHI are believed to be derived from a common precursor, it is suggested that in the stomach the posttranslational enzymic processing of the precursor is different from that in the other parts of the intestine.

  1. Fast voxel-level dosimetry for (177)Lu labelled peptide treatments.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, E; Tenhunen, M; Sohlberg, A

    2015-09-07

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), voxel-level radiation absorbed dose calculations can be performed using several different methods. Each method has it strengths and weaknesses; however, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is presently considered the most accurate method at providing absorbed dose distributions. Unfortunately MC simulation is time-consuming and often impractical to carry out in a clinical practice. In this work, a fast semi-Monte Carlo (sMC) absorbed dose calculation method for (177)Lu PRRT dosimetry is presented. The sMC method is based on a local electron absorption assumption and fast photon MC simulations. The sMC method is compared against full MC simulation code built on PENELOPE (vxlPen) using digital phantoms to assess the accuracy of these assumptions.Due to the local electron absorption assumption of sMC, the potential errors in cross-fire dose from electrons and photons emitted by (177)Lu were first evaluated using an ellipsoidal kidney model by comparing vxlPen and sMC. The photon cross-fire dose from background to kidney and kidney to background with varying kidney-to-background activity concentration ratios were calculated. In addition, kidney to kidney photon and electron cross-dose with different kidney to kidney distances were studied. Second, extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were created with liver lesions and with realistic activity distributions and tissue densities. The XCAT phantoms were used to simulate SPECT projections and 3D activity distribution images were reconstructed using an OSEM algorithm. Image-based dose rate distributions were calculated using vxlPen and sMC. Total doses and dose rate volume histograms (DrVH) produced by the two methods were compared.The photon cross-fire dose from the kidney increased the background's absorbed dose by 5% or more up to 5.8 cm distance with 20 : 1 kidney to background activity concentration ratio. On the other hand, the photon cross-fire dose from the background to

  2. Fast voxel-level dosimetry for 177Lu labelled peptide treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippeläinen, E.; Tenhunen, M.; Sohlberg, A.

    2015-09-01

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), voxel-level radiation absorbed dose calculations can be performed using several different methods. Each method has it strengths and weaknesses; however, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is presently considered the most accurate method at providing absorbed dose distributions. Unfortunately MC simulation is time-consuming and often impractical to carry out in a clinical practice. In this work, a fast semi-Monte Carlo (sMC) absorbed dose calculation method for 177Lu PRRT dosimetry is presented. The sMC method is based on a local electron absorption assumption and fast photon MC simulations. The sMC method is compared against full MC simulation code built on PENELOPE (vxlPen) using digital phantoms to assess the accuracy of these assumptions. Due to the local electron absorption assumption of sMC, the potential errors in cross-fire dose from electrons and photons emitted by 177Lu were first evaluated using an ellipsoidal kidney model by comparing vxlPen and sMC. The photon cross-fire dose from background to kidney and kidney to background with varying kidney-to-background activity concentration ratios were calculated. In addition, kidney to kidney photon and electron cross-dose with different kidney to kidney distances were studied. Second, extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were created with liver lesions and with realistic activity distributions and tissue densities. The XCAT phantoms were used to simulate SPECT projections and 3D activity distribution images were reconstructed using an OSEM algorithm. Image-based dose rate distributions were calculated using vxlPen and sMC. Total doses and dose rate volume histograms (DrVH) produced by the two methods were compared. The photon cross-fire dose from the kidney increased the background’s absorbed dose by 5% or more up to 5.8 cm distance with 20 : 1 kidney to background activity concentration ratio. On the other hand, the photon cross-fire dose from the background to

  3. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Emmanuelle; Arnaudguilhem, Carine; Bouyssiere, Brice; Hagège, Agnès; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Cantel, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC) associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP)/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se) was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully validated and

  4. Synthetic peptides for efficient discrimination of anti-enterovirus antibodies at the serotype level.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Mavrouli, Maria D; Antonaki, Georgia; Spanakis, Nikolaos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-08-01

    Enteroviruses are important human pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases from minor common colds to fatal myocarditis. However, certain disease syndromes are caused by one or few serotypes. Serotype identification is difficult due to the laborious neutralization tests that lack of sensitivity, while in commercial ELISAs homotypic antibodies' activities are largely masked by the recognition of genera-specific epitopes by heterotypic antibodies. In the present study homotypic assays were developed with the ability to discriminate different enterovirus serotypes. Seventy-three children sera, positive for IgM antibodies against enterovirus genus and 49 healthy children were examined for the presence of antibodies against 14 synthetic peptides derived from a non-conserved region of the VP1 protein of coxsackieviruses B2, B3, B4, B5, A9, A16, A24, echoviruses 6, 7, 9, 11, 30, enterovirus 71 and parechovirus 1. 50% of the anti-enterovirus IgM positive sera (>150 BU) reacted with the peptides with the majority of them to preferentially recognize one of them, supporting the homotypic nature of our assay. Inhibition studies yielded homologous inhibition rates 67-95% suggesting that specific peptide recognition actually occurred. The diagnostic value of our assay was tested in blood samples drawn over a 1.5-year period from a 5-year old patient. The anti-enterovirus reactivity was clearly attributed to echovirus serotype 11. The IgM/IgG antibody ratio was reversed 4 months later and subsequently IgM antibodies dropped below the cutoff point. In this paper we demonstrate that our assay can be used to discriminate between antibodies targeting different enterovirus serotypes.

  5. A Casein Kinase II Phosphorylation Site in AtYY1 Affects Its Activity, Stability, and Function in the ABA Response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiu-Yun; Li, Tian

    2017-01-01

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins are crucial in the regulation of protein activity and stability in various signaling pathways. In this study, we identified an ABA repressor, Arabidopsis Ying Yang 1 (AtYY1) as a potential target of casein kinase II (CKII). AtYY1 physically interacts with two regulatory subunits of CKII, CKB3, and CKB4. Moreover, AtYY1 can be phosphorylated by CKII in vitro, and the S284 site is the major CKII phosphorylation site. Further analyses indicated that S284 phosphorylation can enhance the transcriptional activity and protein stability of AtYY1 and hence strengthen the effect of AtYY1 as a negative regulator in the ABA response. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of AtYY1 mediated by CKII phosphorylation. PMID:28348572

  6. Memantine Lowers Amyloid-beta Peptide Levels in Neuronal Cultures and in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alley, George M.; Bailey, Jason A; Chen, DeMao; Ray, Balmiki; Puli, Lakshman K.; Tanila, Heikki; Banerjee, Pradeep K; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2009-01-01

    Memantine is a moderate-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that stabilizes cognitive, functional, and behavioral decline in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In AD, the extracellular deposition of fibrillogenic amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) occurs due to aberrant processing of the full-length Aβ precursor protein (APP). Memantine protects neurons from the neurotoxic effects of Aβ and improves cognition in transgenic mice with high brain levels of Aβ. However, it is unknown how memantine protects cells against neurodegeneration and affects APP processing and Aβ production. We report the effects of memantine in three different systems. In human neuroblastoma cells, memantine, at therapeutically relevant concentrations (1-4 μM), decreased levels of secreted APP and Aβ1-40. Levels of the potentially amylodogenic Aβ1-42 were undetectable in these cells. In primary rat cortical neuronal cultures, memantine treatment lowered Aβ1-42 secretion. At the concentrations used, memantine treatment was not toxic to neuroblastoma or primary cultures and increased cell viability and/or metabolic activity under certain conditions. In APP/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice exhibiting high brain levels of Aβ1-42, oral dosing of memantine (20 mg/kg/day for 8 days) produced plasma drug concentration of 0.96 μM and significantly reduced the cortical levels of soluble Aβ1-42. The ratio of Aβ1-40/Aβ1-42 increased in treated mice, suggesting effects on the γ-secretase complex. Thus, memantine reduces the levels of Aβ peptides at therapeutic concentrations and may inhibit the accumulation of fibrillogenic Aβ in mammalian brains. Memantine’s ability to preserve neuronal cells against neurodegeneration, increase metabolic activity, and lower Aβ level has therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19642202

  7. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Marković, Jelena; Grdović, Nevena; Dinić, Svetlana; Karan-Djurašević, Teodora; Uskoković, Aleksandra; Arambašić, Jelena; Mihailović, Mirjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Poznanović, Goran; Vidaković, Melita

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12) transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the functional

  8. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  9. The transcription factor YY1 is a novel substrate for Aurora B kinase at G2/M transition of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kassardjian, Ari; Rizkallah, Raed; Riman, Sarah; Renfro, Samuel H; Alexander, Karen E; Hurt, Myra M

    2012-01-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved multifunctional transcription factor that is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Many YY1-regulated genes have crucial roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. Numerous mechanisms have been shown to regulate the function of YY1, such as DNA binding affinity, subcellular localization, and posttranslational modification including phosphorylation. Polo-like kinase 1(Plk1) and Casein kinase 2α (CK2 α) were the first two kinases identified to phosphorylate YY1. In this study, we identify a third kinase. We report that YY1 is a novel substrate of the Aurora B kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Serine 184 phosphorylation of YY1 by Aurora B is cell cycle regulated and peaks at G2/M and is rapidly dephosphorylated, likely by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as the cells enter G1. Aurora A and Aurora C can also phosphorylate YY1 in vitro, but at serine/threonine residues other than serine 184. We present evidence that phosphorylation of YY1 in the central glycine/alanine (G/A)-rich region is important for DNA binding activity, with a potential phosphorylation/acetylation interplay regulating YY1 function. Given their importance in mitosis and overexpression in human cancers, Aurora kinases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets. Increasing our understanding of Aurora substrates will add to the understanding of their signaling pathways.

  10. Amyloid Beta Peptides Affect Pregnenolone and Pregnenolone Sulfate Levels in PC-12 and SH-SY5Y Cells Depending on Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Calan, Ozlem Gursoy; Akan, Pinar; Cataler, Aysenur; Dogan, Cumhur; Kocturk, Semra

    2016-07-01

    Increased amyloid beta (AB) peptide concentration is one of the initiating factors in the neurodegeneration process. It has been suggested that cholesterol induces the synthesis of AB peptide from amyloid precursor protein or facilitates the formation of amyloid plaque by lowering the aggregation threshold of the peptide. It is also shown that AB peptides may affect cholesterol metabolism and the synthesis of steroid hormones such as progesterone and estradiol. Pregnenolone (P) and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are the major steroids produced from cholesterol in neural tissue. In toxicity conditions, the effect of AB peptides on P and PS levels has not yet been determined. Furthermore, it has not been clearly defined how changes in cellular P and PS levels affect neuronal cell survival. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of AB peptides on cellular changes in P and PS levels depending on the level of their main precursor, cholesterol. Cholesterol and toxic concentrations of AB fragments (AB 25-35, AB 1-40 and AB 1-42) were applied to PC-12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Changes in cellular cholesterol, P and PS levels were determined simultaneously in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The cell viability and cell death types were also evaluated. AB peptides affected both cell viability and P/PS levels. Steroid levels were altered depending on AB fragment type and the cholesterol content of the cells. Treatment with each of the AB fragments alone increased P levels by twofold. However, combined treatment with AB peptides and cholesterol increased P levels by approximately sixfold, while PS levels were increased only about 2.5 fold in both cell lines. P levels in the groups treated with AB 25-35 were higher than those in AB 1-40 and AB 1-42 groups. The cell viabilities were significantly low in the group treated by AB and cholesterol (9 mM). The effect of AB peptides on P levels might be a result of cellular self-defense. On the other hand, the rate of P increase

  11. High environmental salinity induces memory enhancement and increases levels of brain angiotensin-like peptides in the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus.

    PubMed

    Delorenzi, A; Dimant, B; Frenkel, L; Nahmod, V E; Nässel, D R; Maldonado, H

    2000-11-01

    Previous work on the brackish-water crab Chasmagnathus granulatus demonstrated that an endogenous peptide similar to angiotensin II plays a significant role in enhancing long-term memory that involves an association between context and an iterative danger stimulus (context-signal memory). The present results show that this memory enhancement could be produced by moving crabs from brackish water to sea water (33.0%) and keeping them there for at least 4 days. The possibility that such a facilitatory effect is due to osmotic stress is ruled out. Coincidentally, the level of angiotensin-II-like peptides in crab brain, measured by radioimmunoassay, increases with the length of exposure to sea water, reaching a significantly different level at the fourth day. The presence of angiotensin-II-like immunoreactive material in neural structures of the supraoesophageal and eyestalk ganglia was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. The results are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that exposure to water of high salinity is an external cue triggering a process mediated by angiotensins that leads to enhanced memory in these crabs.

  12. The role of the stomach in the control of appetite and the secretion of satiation peptides.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Robert E; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne C; Beglinger, Christoph

    2012-03-15

    It is widely accepted that gastric parameters such as gastric distention provide a direct negative feedback signal to inhibit eating; moreover, gastric and intestinal signals have been reported to synergize to promote satiation. However, there are few human data exploring the potential interaction effects of gastric and intestinal signals in the short-term control of appetite and the secretion of satiation peptides. We performed experiments in healthy subjects receiving either a rapid intragastric load or a continuous intraduodenal infusion of glucose or a mixed liquid meal. Intraduodenal infusions (3 kcal/min) were at rates comparable with the duodenal delivery of these nutrients under physiological conditions. Intraduodenal infusions of glucose elicited only weak effects on appetite and the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY). In contrast, identical amounts of glucose delivered intragastrically markedly suppressed appetite (P < 0.05) paralleled by greatly increased plasma levels of GLP-1 and PYY (≤3-fold, P < 0.05). Administration of the mixed liquid meal showed a comparable phenomenon. In contrast to GLP-1 and PYY, plasma ghrelin was suppressed to a similar degree with both intragastric and intraduodenal nutrients. Our data confirm that the stomach is an important element in the short-term control of appetite and suggest that gastric and intestinal signals interact to mediate early fullness and satiation potentially by increased GLP-1 and PYY secretions.

  13. Protein C and procollagen III peptide levels in patients with hepatic dysfunction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pihusch, M; Wegner, H; Goehring, P; Salat, C; Pihusch, V; Andreesen, R; Kolb, H-J; Holler, E; Pihusch, R

    2005-10-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is one of the most serious complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with a high mortality. We conducted a large trial on the clinical significance of protein C (PC) and procollagen III peptide (PNPIII) levels, which have been described as possible diagnostic markers of VOD. In total, 350 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were included. PC and PNPIII levels were analyzed prior to conditioning and weekly until 8 weeks after the HSCT. Signs of VOD and other transplantation-related complications (graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), toxicity, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, infection) were recorded weekly throughout the trial. Patients showed a significant drop of the PC levels in VOD (70.3 vs 96.3%, P<0.001) and with increasing severity of aGVHD. Steroids increased the PC levels (69.4% vs 109.4%, P<0.001). The highest PNPIII levels were registered in patients with VOD (mean 6.3 IU/ml). Patients with aGVHD showed an elevation of PNPIII, especially patients with hepatic aGVHD. PC levels during conditioning do not predict VOD (98.5 vs 76.5%, NS). Although PC and PNPIII may play a role in the pathogenesis of VOD they cannot discriminate between complications with jaundice and are only of limited help in the differential diagnosis of VOD.

  14. Preliminary Examination of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Levels in Women with Purging Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Bodell, Lindsay P.; Williams, Diana L.; Eckel, Lisa A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined pre- and post-prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels in women with bulimia nervosa (BN), purging disorder (PD), and non-eating disorder control women to better understand whether alterations in satiation-related hormones in BN may be linked to binge-eating episodes or other altered ingestive behaviors. Method Participants included women with BN (n = 19), PD (n = 14), or controls (n = 14). Participants provided subjective ratings for hunger and fullness and plasma samples before and after consumption of a standardized test meal. Results As expected, GLP-1 levels increased significantly following test meal consumption; however, participants with BN displayed significantly lower GLP-1 levels compared to PD and control participants both before and after consumption of the test meal. There were no significant differences between PD and control participants in GLP-1 levels, but individuals with PD displayed significantly higher levels of fullness throughout the test meal as compared to both control and BN participants. Discussion Our findings provide preliminary evidence that reduced GLP-1 levels in individuals with BN may be associated with binge-eating episodes. Additionally, increased fullness in individuals with PD does not appear to be accounted for by exaggerated post-prandial GLP-1 release. PMID:24590464

  15. A PTP4A3 peptide PIMAP39 modulates TNF-alpha levels and endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoren; Woodward, Timothy; Amar, Salomon

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of macrophages initiates intracellular signaling pathways leading to activation of MAPK and its subsequent influence on cytokine production. We recently identified a LITAF-STAT6(B) complex regulated by p38 MAPK in response to LPS stimulation. However, the LPS-induced cascade in the p38/LITAF/TNF signaling pathway remains unclear. Here, we identified PTP4A3, a protein tyrosine phosphotase, as a novel negative regulator of LPS-induced LITAF/TNF-alpha production. PTP4A3 exerts its negative role by dephosphorylating p38 alpha MAPK in response to LPS stimulation of primary macrophages. PTP4A3 expression is upregulated in primary macrophages. Further structure-function analysis revealed that a unique short peptide (PIMAP39) derived from PTP4A3 is capable of mimicking the functionality of full-length PTP4A3 to selectively dephosphorylate p38 alpha and indirectly suppress LPS-induced LITAF-STAT6B complex when it is translocated from the cytoplasmic region to the nucleus of the cell. Treatment of mice with PIMAP39 significantly attenuates the severity of adverse host responses to LPS stimulation, and in some cases provides complete resistance to a lethal dose of LPS due to suppression of TNF-alpha production. All together, these results reveal a previously unrecognized role for the PTP4A3 pathway in response to LPS.

  16. Complete genome sequence and transcriptomics analyses reveal pigment biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms in an industrial strain, Monascus purpureus YY-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Liu, Bin; Du, Xinjun; Li, Ping; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Xiaozhen; Du, Liangcheng; Huang, Di; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shuo

    2015-02-09

    Monascus has been used to produce natural colorants and food supplements for more than one thousand years, and approximately more than one billion people eat Monascus-fermented products during their daily life. In this study, using next-generation sequencing and optical mapping approaches, a 24.1-Mb complete genome of an industrial strain, Monascus purpureus YY-1, was obtained. This genome consists of eight chromosomes and 7,491 genes. Phylogenetic analysis at the genome level provides convincing evidence for the evolutionary position of M. purpureus. We provide the first comprehensive prediction of the biosynthetic pathway for Monascus pigment. Comparative genomic analyses show that the genome of M. purpureus is 13.6-40% smaller than those of closely related filamentous fungi and has undergone significant gene losses, most of which likely occurred during its specialized adaptation to starch-based foods. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals that carbon starvation stress, resulting from the use of relatively low-quality carbon sources, contributes to the high yield of pigments by repressing central carbon metabolism and augmenting the acetyl-CoA pool. Our work provides important insights into the evolution of this economically important fungus and lays a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of this strain.

  17. Expression levels of antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin I in transgenic Ornithogalum lines affect the resistance to Pectobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Alexander; Joshi, Janak Raj; Carmi, Nir; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-11-20

    The genus Ornithogalum includes several ornamental species that suffer substantial losses from bacterial soft rot caused by Pectobacteria. The absence of effective control measures for use against soft rot bacteria led to the initiation of a project in which a small antimicrobial peptide from an Asian horseshoe crab, tachyplesin (tpnI), was introduced into two commercial cultivars: O. dubium and O. thyrsoides. Disease severity and bacterial colonization were examined in transgenic lines expressing this peptide. Disease resistance was evaluated in six lines of each species by measuring bacterial proliferation in the plant tissue. Three transgenic lines of each species were subjected to further analysis in which the expression level of the transgene was evaluated using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. The development of disease symptoms and bacterial colonization of the plant tissue were also examined using GFP-expressing strain of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Pcb3. Confocal-microscopy imaging revealed significantly reduced quantities of bacterial cells in the transgenic plant lines that had been challenged with the bacterium. The results clearly demonstrate that tpnI expression reduces bacterial proliferation, colonization and disease symptom (reduced by 95-100%) in the transgenic plant tissues. The quantity of tpnI transcripts, as measured by qRT-PCR, was negatively correlated with the protection afforded to the plants, as measured by the reduced severity of disease symptoms in the tissue.

  18. Promoter-region hypermethylation and expression downregulation of Yy1 (Yin yang 1) in preneoplastic liver lesions in a thioacetamide rat hepatocarcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hajime; Ogawa, Takashi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Morita, Reiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA) has been used to develop a rodent model for hepatocarcinogenesis. To determine the genes with epigenetic modifications in early hepatocarcinogenesis, we did a genome-wide scan for hypermethylated promoter regions using CpG island microarrays in TAA-promoted rat liver tissue. Eight genes were selected based on the microarray profile; of these, Yy1 and Wdr45b were confirmed to be hypermethylated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing and downregulated by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Non-neoplastic liver cells had nuclear Yy1 immunoreactivity, while preneoplastic foci with glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) immunoreactivity had decreased Yy1 immunoreactivity. The incidence of these foci was proportional to the dose of TAA administered. Co-expression analysis of gene products downstream of Yy1 revealed increased nuclear phospho-c-Myc{sup +} foci as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic p21{sup Cip1+} foci in Yy1{sup −} or GST-P{sup +} foci in response to TAA-promotion dose. Although the absolute number of cells was low, the incidence of death receptor 5{sup −} foci was increased in Yy1{sup −} foci in proportion to the TAA dose. Yy1{sup −}/GST-P{sup +} foci revealed a higher number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunoreactive cells than Yy1{sup +}/GST-P{sup +} foci, while cleaved caspase-3{sup +} cells were unchanged between Yy1{sup –}/GST-P{sup +} and Yy1{sup +}/GST-P{sup +} foci. In the case of Wdr45b, most GST-P{sup +} foci were Wdr45b{sup –} and were not increased by TAA promotion. These results suggest involvement of Yy1 in the epigenetic gene regulation at the early stages of TAA promoted cell proliferation and concomitant cell cycle arrest in preneoplastic lesions. - Highlights: • Epigenetically downregulated genes were searched in TAA-promnoted rat livers. • Yy1 and Wdr45b showed promoter-region hypermethylation and mRNA downregulation. • TAA promoted

  19. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SERUM BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE LEVELS AFTER THE FONTAN PROCEDURE

    PubMed Central

    Atz, Andrew M.; Zak, Victor; Breitbart, Roger E.; Colan, Steven D.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hsu, Daphne T.; Lu, Minmin; Mahony, Lynn; Paridon, Stephen M.; Puchalski, Michael D.; Geva, Tal; McCrindle, Brian W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although a useful marker of heart failure in adults, the utility of brain natriuretic peptide concentration (BNP) for children after the Fontan procedure is not well studied. Design BNP was measured in 510 patients aged 6–18 years in the Pediatric Heart Network Fontan cross-sectional study at a median of 8.2 years after Fontan. Patients underwent echocardiography, exercise testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional health status questionnaires. Associations of BNP with baseline patient characteristics, medical history and cross-sectional assessment were examined with multivariable linear regression analyses. Results The distribution of BNP was highly skewed, median 13.0 pg/mL (inter-quartile range: 7.1, 25.9), and was normalized with logarithmic transformation (logBNP). Among medical history variables, logBNP was greater in females (p=0.02) and older patients (p<0.001). Presence of pre-Fontan systolic ventricular dysfunction, greater number of post-Fontan complications, and thrombosis after Fontan were independently associated with higher logBNP (R2=0.16). Age-adjusted logBNP was significantly related to Fontan connection type, (lower with extracardiac conduits, higher with atriopulmonary connection; p<0.001). Lower physical functioning health status (R2=0.05), lower chronotropic index during exercise (R2=0.17), indices of diastolic dysfunction measured by echocardiography (R2=0.15), and higher total ventricular mass on MRI (R2=0.33) were related to higher logBNP. Conclusions Despite a markedly abnormal circulation, BNP was variable but within a normal range in the majority of Fontan patients in this large outpatient cohort. Higher BNP was associated with several markers of suboptimal outcome, although associations were weak. The routine use of BNP as an outpatient surveillance tool in asymptomatic Fontan patients is not warranted. PMID:21435188

  20. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  1. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, K.; Tan, P.K. )

    1990-02-01

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des(gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22) ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation.

  2. Differences in basal and ethanol-induced levels of opioid peptides in Wistar rats from five different suppliers.

    PubMed

    Palm, Sara; Roman, Erika; Nylander, Ingrid

    2012-07-01

    One major cause for discrepancies in results from animal experimental studies is the use of different animal strains and suppliers. We have previously reported that Wistar rats from five different suppliers display profound differences in ethanol intake and behavior. One of the neurobiological processes that could be underlying these differences is the endogenous opioid system, which has been implicated in the rewarding and reinforcing effects of alcohol. We therefore hypothesized that the differences between the supplier groups would also be evident in the endogenous opioid system. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine the levels of the opioid peptides Met-enkephalin-Arg(6)Phe(7) and dynorphin B in several brain areas of ethanol-drinking and ethanol naïve Wistar rats from five different suppliers. In the ethanol naïve animals, differences between the supplier groups were found in the pituitary gland, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, dorsal striatum and hippocampus. In the ethanol-drinking rats, differences were found in the same structures, with the addition of medial prefrontal cortex and substantia nigra. Correlations between ethanol intake and peptide levels were also found in several of the areas examined. The structures in which differences were found have all been implicated in the transition from drug use to addiction and these differences may lead to different propensities and vulnerability to this transition. Because the endogenous opioids have been suggested to be involved in a number of neurobiological disorders the results do not only have implications for research on alcohol or drug addiction, but many other fields as well.

  3. A prospective study of brain natriuretic peptide levels in three subgroups: Stroke with hypertension, stroke without hypertension, and hypertension alone

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Zeynep; Saritas, Ayhan; Emet, Mucahit; Aslan, Sahin; Akoz, Ayhan; Gundogdu, Fuat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To study brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in three subgroups: patients having stroke with hypertension (HT), those having stroke without HT, and those with HT alone. We also tried to identify whether BNP levels predict the length of stay in hospital and mortality. Materials and Methods: The groups were formed by patients who had been admitted to the emergency department in the first 4–12 h after the onset of symptoms. There were 30 stroke patients with a history of HT (group I), 30 stroke patients without a history of HT (group II), and 20 HT patients without stroke (group III). Patients with congestive heart failure, chronic cor pulmonale, severe valvular heart disease, chronic renal failure, liver insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and those with a history of stroke were excluded from the study since these diseases can affect the plasma BNP levels. Results: The demographic characteristics, except the age distribution, were similar among the groups. The mean BNP levels in the three groups were 168.8 ± 223.9 pg/ml, 85.0 ± 75.1 pg/ml, and 84.8 ± 178.3 pg/ml, respectively. The differences between the groups were statistically significant. Conclusion: The mean BNP levels were affected by HT and/or stroke. The simultaneous presence of HT and stroke results in a more significant increase BNP than the presence of either stroke or HT alone. When diseases that can affect the plasma BNP levels are excluded, the BNP levels in stroke patients without a history of HT are similar to the levels seen in patients with only HT. PMID:20436747

  4. YY1 and GATA-1 interaction modulate the chicken 3'-side alpha-globin enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Guerrero, Georgina; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2005-06-24

    Studying the chicken alpha-globin domain as a model system of gene regulation, we have previously identified contiguous silencer-enhancer elements located on the 3'-side of the domain. To better characterize the enhancer we performed a systematic functional analysis to define its expression influence range and the ubiquitous and stage-specific transcriptional regulators interacting with this control element. In contrast to previous reports, we found that, in addition to a core element that includes three GATA-1 binding sites, the enhancer incorporates a 120 base-pair DNA fragment where EKLF, NF-E2 and a fourth GATA-1 factor could interact. Functional experiments demonstrate that the enhancer activity over the adult alpha(D) promoter is differentially regulated. We found that the transcriptional factor Ying Yang 1 (YY1) binds to the 120 base-pair DNA fragment and its effect over the enhancer activity is GATA-1-dependent. In addition, we characterize a novel physical interaction between GATA-1 and YY1 that influences the enhancer function. Experiments using a histone deacetylation inhibitor indicate that, in pre-erythroblasts, the enhancer down-regulation could be influenced by a closed chromatin conformation. Our observations show that the originally defined enhancer possesses a more complex composition than previously assumed. We propose that its activity is modulated through differential nuclear factor interactions and chromatin modifications at distinct erythroid stages.

  5. AZTECA, a y-y diagram oriented interactive computer program for optical system design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo

    1995-09-01

    The Centro de Investigaciones en Optica is developing the AZTECA optical design program to exploit the full synthesis capabilities intrinsic to Delano's y-y method. Both the y- y diagram and its dual the (omega) -(omega) diagram, are manipulated in real time to introduce changes at any point or line in those diagrams. These changes result in altered new versions of the optical system by means of a specialized subroutine that incorporates the fundamental synthesis equations for those diagrams. To display results on the computer's screen as the optimization process progress, AZTECA makes wide use of the fact that the y-y and the (omega) -(omega) diagrams display graphically all the first order attributes of an optical system. This program adjoins to these features the calculation of Buchdahl's 3rd, 5th, and 7th order aberration coefficients to the output. This results in a real time display of the system's paraxial and aberrational behavior. Efficient graphic displays, the program's modular structure and an interactive mode of operation, also contribute to make the AZTECA a versatile platform. It will be further developed as a new tool for efficient optical system design.

  6. Events at the transition between cell cycle exit and oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation: the role of HDAC and YY1.

    PubMed

    He, Ye; Sandoval, Juan; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia

    2007-08-01

    The complexity of the adult brain is the result of an integrated series of developmental events that depends on appropriate timing of differentiation. The importance of transcriptional regulatory networks and epigenetic mechanisms of regulation of gene expression is becoming increasingly evident. Among these mechanisms, previous work has revealed the importance of histone deacetylation in oligodendrocyte differentiation. In this manuscript we define the region of interaction between transcription factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) and histone deacetylase 1, and characterize the functional consequences of YY1 overexpression on the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors.

  7. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels are independently associated with procollagen III N-terminal peptide in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Maeda, Sayaka; Fukami, Kei; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Nakahara, Takashi; Kimura, Yuki; Ishitobi, Tomokazu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Although impaired synthesis and/or bioavailability of nitric oxide are considered to contribute to insulin resistance and the progression of liver disease in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, role of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, has not been examined. We examined retrospectively which anthropometric and metabolic parameters were independently associated with serum levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A total of 194 consecutive biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with or without type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients were significantly higher, irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, than those in healthy control. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that decreased total protein and procollagen N-terminal peptide levels, markers of advanced liver disease and hepatic fibrosis, respectively, were independently associated with asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease subjects without diabetes, whereas soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products and density ratio of liver to spleen in computed tomography were independent correlates of asymmetric dimethylarginine in diabetic patients. The present study suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine may be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, especially subjects without diabetes.

  8. Glutinous rice amylopectin can adjust the plasma gut-regulated peptide levels in rhubarb-induced spleen deficiency rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Sun, Baoguo

    2016-02-01

    The pharmacological effects of glutinous rice (GR) and GR amylopectin (GRA) on the gastrointestine were investigated in rhubarb-induced spleen deficiency rats by determining the levels of gastrointestinal hormones such as the peptides serum gastrin, amylase motilin, and somatostatin. GR and GRA were given by gavage at various doses of GR (7.5, 15, and 30 g per kg body weight) and GRA (3.8, 7.6, and 15 g per kg body weight) every day for 4 weeks, respectively. The results indicated that the final body weight of rats in the highest-dose GR (GRH) group and all the GRA groups significantly (P < 0.05) increased (7.2-12.1%) compared with the model control (MC) group. All the GR and GRA treated groups had significantly (P < 0.05) higher gastrin contents (32.8-51.2%), motilin levels (13.8-39.2%), and amylase contents (22.5-39.4%) and the GRH and highest-dose GRA (GRAH) groups had significantly (P < 0.05) lower somatostatin contents compared with the MC group. Meanwhile, the somatostatin contents were negatively correlated with the motilin levels (r = -0.964, P < 0.01) and amylase contents (r = -0.981, P < 0.01). The GRAH treatment group had the highest final body weight, gastrin contents, motilin levels, and amylase contents and the lowest somatostatin contents, which demonstrated that GRA might play the most important role in the spleen-regulating activities of GR.

  9. Interactions of gastrointestinal peptides: ghrelin and its anorexigenic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  10. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite. PMID:20798884

  11. Relationship of serum elastin peptide level to single breath transfer factor for carbon monoxide in French coal miners

    PubMed Central

    Frette, C.; Jacob, M. P.; Wei, S. M.; Bertrand, J. P.; Laurent, P.; Kauffmann, F.; Pham, Q. T.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical and epidemiological studies have given discordant results on the usefulness of the level of circulating elastin peptide (EP), a potential marker of both elastin destruction (a key phenomenon in pulmonary emphysema) and neosynthesis, for assessing structural changes in the lung extracellular matrix. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between levels of EP and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and single breath transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TLCO and KCO) in coal miners. METHODS: The study population comprised 227 working coal miners aged 34-50 years consisting of 75 miners heavily exposed to underground coal dust with pulmonary radiographs classified as 0/1 or 1/0 by the International Labour Office classification, 75 exposed miners with radiographs classified as normal (0/0), and 77 miners slightly exposed to coal dust with normal radiographs. The subjects answered a standardised questionnaire and performed spirometric tests and a carbon monoxide (CO) transfer test. RESULTS: No association was observed between EP levels and % predicted FEV1 (or FEV1/FVC). The level of EP increased significantly with decreased % predicted TLCO (r = -0.20). Miners in the lowest % predicted KCO quintile had higher EP levels than the rest (3.28 (1.37) vs 2.47 (1.16)). A significantly lower EP level was observed in miners with radiographs classified as 1/0 or 0/1, especially in those with round opacities, compared with miners with a normal radiograph, and in current smokers compared with the rest. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the level of EP may reflect some remodelling activity in emphysema and lung fibrosis. 


 PMID:9516897

  12. One-year prognosis and the role of brain natriuretic peptide levels in patients with chronic cor pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Lee, Chang Youl; Kim, Changhwan; Jang, Seung Hun; Park, Yong Bum; Park, Sunghoon; Hwang, Yong Il; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Kim, Dong-Gyu

    2015-04-01

    Data on the clinical outcomes and role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in patients with chronic cor pulmonale are limited. A total of 69 patients with chronic cor pulmonale, admitted for dyspnea (January 2007 to September 2011) to three university hospitals, were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had right ventricular (RV) dysfunction on echocardiography. The median age was 70.0 yr, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (40.6%) and tuberculosis-destroyed lung (TDL, 27.5%) were the leading causes of chronic cor pulmonale. At the 1-yr follow-up, the mortality rate was 15.9%, and the readmission rate was 53.7%; patients with TDL had higher mortality (31.6% vs. 10.0%; P=0.059) and readmission rates (78.9% vs. 43.8%; P=0.009) than those with non-TDL diseases. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for admission BNP levels to predict readmission was 0.788 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.673-0.904), and the sensitivity and specificity of the cut-off value were 80.6% and 77.4%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, high admission BNP levels were a significant risk factor for subsequent readmission (hazard ratio, 1.049; 95% CI, 1.005-1.094). Additionally, admission BNP levels were well correlated with cardiac troponin I (r=0.558), and delta BNP also correlated with delta RV systolic pressure (n=25; r=0.562). In conclusion, among hospitalized patients with chronic cor pulmonale, admission high BNP levels are a significant risk factor for subsequent readmission. Therefore, more intensive monitoring and treatment are needed in patients with higher BNP levels.

  13. A study of low level selenium determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in water soluble protein and peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Stibilj, V; Mazej, D; Falnoga, I

    2003-12-01

    Development of a method for very low level selenium determination in water soluble protein and peptide fractions, obtained after various separation procedures, is presented. A hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) detection system was optimised and the influence of Cu(II), Sb(V), As(III) and HNO3 interferences in the measurement of Se by HG-AFS was investigated. A destruction procedure using HNO3 and H2O2 was also optimised and the average recovery of the digestion of a solution of selenomethioneine was 92 +/- 4% (n=14). Combination of this digestion with the detection system gave reliable results. Accuracy was tested by comparison with two independent methods. A very low detection limit (DL) of 0.2 ng/g of measuring solution was achieved. The whole procedure from weighing to measuring was performed in the same Teflon tube. The addition of HNO3 to the fractions before long term storage at -20 degrees C was necessary to prevent adsorption on the test tubes. Selenium was measured in water soluble protein and peptide fractions obtained after extraction, and Sephadex G-75 chromatography performed on liver samples from: i) hens exposed to As2O3, ii) hens fed with a high fat feed and iii) the certified reference material dogfish liver (CRM DOLT-2). Because of the very low DL we were able to observe the Se distribution in chromatographic fractions of samples of organisms which were not exposed to excess amounts of Se. The presence of selenium associated with metallothioneins was observed.

  14. Short-term treatment with rivastigmine and plasma levels of Abeta peptides in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sobow, Tomasz; Kloszewska, Iwona

    2005-01-01

    Deregulation of APP metabolism is considered to be a key pathogenic event in Alzheimer's disease. Data from cell cultures indicate that the secretion of Abeta1-42 might be inhibited by cholinesterase inhibitors, possibly via M1 receptors stimulation. Treatment with tacrine, a dual acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor, had no significant effect on mean plasma Abeta species concentrations. However, a correlation was observed between higher drug concentrations and lower Abeta levels that might indicate an effect on APP metabolism with an increased alpha-cleavage. Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 levels were measured in the plasma of 28 AD subjects by means of a commercially available ELISA before rivastigmine treatment and at week 2 after the first dose of the drug (3 mg/day) had been administered. Treatment with rivastigmine exhibited a significant effect on mean plasma concentrations of Abeta1-42 (mean difference 7.8+/-8.4, t=-4.9, pmean difference 7.8+/-8.4, t=-4.9, p<0.001) with a negative correlation with the patients age (Pearson's R=-0.40, p=0.035). No significant effect on plasma Abeta1-40 was observed. The observed increase of mean levels of plasma Abeta1-42 after rivastigmine treatment might indicate an effect of the drug on Abeta metabolism, mobilization of Abeta1-42 from deposits in the affected brain areas and a consecutive Ab1-42 brain-to-plasma efflux. The negative correlation between Abeta1-42 plasma levels changes and age may be a sign of impairment of this process in the older patients. A large individual variation of the observed response, however, excludes drawing definite conclusions. Whether those subjects who respond to rivastigmine in terms of Abeta1-42 plasma levels changes also respond clinically needs to be established.

  15. High levels of the proNGF peptides LIP1 and LIP2 in the serum and synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients: evidence for two new cytokines.

    PubMed

    Dicou, Eleni

    2008-02-01

    The proNGF peptides LIP1 and LIP2 display multiple biological and physiological properties several of which share common features with the nerve growth factor (NGF). The objective of this study was firstly to demonstrate the presence of these peptides in the human sera and secondly to provide evidence for their involvement in inflammatory diseases. Their levels measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were found to be more than 10-fold higher in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as compared to healthy controls. High levels of LIP1 and LIP2 were also detected in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients. These results provide first evidence for a cytokine-like role of the LIP1 and LIP2 peptides.

  16. N-Terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in dichorionic diamniotic twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Mizobuchi, Masami; Sakai, Hitomi; Iwatani, Sota; Wada, Keiko; Yoshimoto, Seiji; Nakao, Hideto

    2014-03-04

    Monochorionic diamniotic (MD) twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) have known associations with cardiac complications. However, the cardiac load of dichorionic diamniotic (DD) twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR) remains unclear. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) is a convenient marker of cardiac dysfunction in neonates, and is elevated in MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR). However, there are no reports assessing serum NT-pro BNP levels in DD-sIUGR. Here, we aimed to clarify serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD-sIUGR, and to compare them with those of MD-sIUGR. Forty-one DD twin pairs admitted to our center between October 2007 and January 2013 were enrolled in this study and separated into two groups: nine twins with sIUGR (DD-sIUGR group) and 32 twins without sIUGR (DD without sIUGR group). Sixteen MD twins with sIUGR (MD-sIUGR group) served as positive controls. Serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD-sIUGR [median 2,115 pg/ml (range, 443-6,590 pg/ml)] were significantly higher than in DD without sIUGR [1,080 pg/ml (range, 313-3,470 pg/ml); p=0.001], and significantly lower than in MD twins with sIUGR [4,520 pg/ml (range, 529-62,400 pg/ml); p=0.04]. Serum NT-pro BNP levels between larger and smaller DD co-twins were significantly correlated (r = 0.582; p<0.0001). In conclusion, serum NT-pro BNP levels at birth in DD twins with sIUGR were higher than those without, and lower than in MD twins with sIUGR.

  17. Regulation of the microRNA processor DGCR8 by hepatitis B virus proteins via the transcription factor YY1.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xuefeng; Ren, Min; Chen, Ke; Huang, Ailong; Tang, Hua

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of well-conserved small noncoding RNAs that mediate posttranscriptional gene regulation. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes various liver diseases, including chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. Recent data have indicated HBV alters miRNAs expression patterns, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully established so far. Here, we provide a hypothesis that HBV alters the expressions of miRNAs by playing a role in the microRNA production process. In this study, we demonstrate that HBV downregulates miRNAs processor DGCR8 mRNA and protein expression in stable and transient HBV-expressing cells. HBV downregulates DGCR8 expression by inhibiting its promoter activity, and HBs and HBx may be involved in this process. Ectopic expression and knockdown of YY1 revealed that YY1 suppresses the activity of the DGCR8 promoter, while YY1 expression is significantly upregulated by HBV. In conclusion, our data show that HBV proteins repress DGCR8 promoter activity by upregulating the expression of transcription factor YY1. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of HBV-induced miRNA dysregulation.

  18. Brown Adipose YY1 Deficiency Activates Expression of Secreted Proteins Linked to Energy Expenditure and Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Soustek, Meghan S.; Hatting, Maximilian; Blättler, Sharon M.; McDonald, Devin; Barrow, Joeva J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative and thermogenic functions in brown and beige adipose tissues modulate rates of energy expenditure. It is unclear, however, how beige or white adipose tissue contributes to brown fat thermogenic function or compensates for partial deficiencies in this tissue and protects against obesity. Here, we show that the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in brown adipose tissue activates the canonical thermogenic and uncoupling gene expression program. In contrast, YY1 represses a series of secreted proteins, including fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), bone morphogenetic protein 8b (BMP8b), growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), angiopoietin-like 6 (Angptl6), neuromedin B, and nesfatin, linked to energy expenditure. Despite substantial decreases in mitochondrial thermogenic proteins in brown fat, mice lacking YY1 in this tissue are strongly protected against diet-induced obesity and exhibit increased energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in beige and white fat depots. The increased expression of secreted proteins correlates with elevation of energy expenditure and promotion of beige and white fat activation. These results indicate that YY1 in brown adipose tissue controls antagonistic gene expression programs associated with energy balance and maintenance of body weight. PMID:26503783

  19. Peptidomics of Cpe fat/fat mouse hypothalamus: effect of food deprivation and exercise on peptide levels.

    PubMed

    Che, Fa-Yun; Yuan, Quan; Kalinina, Elena; Fricker, Lloyd D

    2005-02-11

    Carboxypeptidase E is a major enzyme in the biosynthesis of numerous neuroendocrine peptides. Previously, we developed a technique for the isolation of neuropeptide-processing intermediates from mice that lack carboxypeptidase E activity (Cpe fat/fat mice) due to a naturally occurring point mutation. In the present study, we used a differential labeling procedure with stable isotopic tags and mass spectrometry to quantitate the relative changes in a number of hypothalamic peptides in Cpe fat/fat mice in two different paradigms that each cause an approximately 10% decrease in body mass. One paradigm involved a 2-day fast under normal sedentary conditions (i.e. standard mouse cages); the other involved giving mice access to an exercise wheel for 4 weeks with free access to food. Approximately 50 peptides were detected in both studies, and over 80 peptides were detected in at least one of the two studies. Twenty-eight peptides were increased >50% by food deprivation, and some of these were increased by 2- to 3-fold. In contrast, only three peptides were increased >50% in the group with exercise wheels, and many peptides showed a slight 15-30% decrease upon exercise. Approximately one-half of the peptides detected in both studies were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Peptides found to be elevated by food deprivation but not exercise included a number of fragments of proenkephalin, prothyrotropin-releasing hormone, secretogranin II, chromogranin B, and pro-SAAS. Taken together, the differential regulation of these peptides in the two paradigms suggests that the regulation is not due to the lower body weight but to the manner in which the paradigms achieved this lower body weight.

  20. Non-linear Equation using Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels to Predict Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Suwa, Hideaki; Nakano, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Mari; Imazu, Miki; Hasegawa, Takuya; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa; Mochizuki, Naoki; Ishii, Akira; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Washio, Takashi; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is the most effective predictor of outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). This study sought to determine the qualitative relationship between the BNP levels at discharge and on the day of cardiovascular events in CHF patients. We devised a mathematical probabilistic model between the BNP levels at discharge (y) and on the day (t) of cardiovascular events after discharge for 113 CHF patients (Protocol I). We then prospectively evaluated this model on another set of 60 CHF patients who were readmitted (Protocol II). P(t|y) was the probability of cardiovascular events occurring after >t, the probability on t was given as p(t|y) = −dP(t|y)/dt, and p(t|y) = pP(t|y) = αyβP(t|y), along with p = αyβ (α and β were constant); the solution was p(t|y) = αyβ exp(−αyβt). We fitted this equation to the data set of Protocol I using the maximum likelihood principle, and we obtained the model p(t|y) = 0.000485y0.24788 exp(−0.000485y0.24788t). The cardiovascular event-free rate was computed as P(t) = 1/60Σi=1,…,60 exp(−0.000485yi0.24788t), based on this model and the BNP levels yi in a data set of Protocol II. We confirmed no difference between this model-based result and the actual event-free rate. In conclusion, the BNP levels showed a non-linear relationship with the day of occurrence of cardiovascular events in CHF patients. PMID:27845390

  1. Non-linear Equation using Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels to Predict Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Suwa, Hideaki; Nakano, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Mari; Imazu, Miki; Hasegawa, Takuya; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa; Mochizuki, Naoki; Ishii, Akira; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Washio, Takashi; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is the most effective predictor of outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). This study sought to determine the qualitative relationship between the BNP levels at discharge and on the day of cardiovascular events in CHF patients. We devised a mathematical probabilistic model between the BNP levels at discharge (y) and on the day (t) of cardiovascular events after discharge for 113 CHF patients (Protocol I). We then prospectively evaluated this model on another set of 60 CHF patients who were readmitted (Protocol II). P(t|y) was the probability of cardiovascular events occurring after >t, the probability on t was given as p(t|y) = ‑dP(t|y)/dt, and p(t|y) = pP(t|y) = αyβP(t|y), along with p = αyβ (α and β were constant); the solution was p(t|y) = αyβ exp(‑αyβt). We fitted this equation to the data set of Protocol I using the maximum likelihood principle, and we obtained the model p(t|y) = 0.000485y0.24788 exp(‑0.000485y0.24788t). The cardiovascular event-free rate was computed as P(t) = 1/60Σi=1,…,60 exp(‑0.000485yi0.24788t), based on this model and the BNP levels yi in a data set of Protocol II. We confirmed no difference between this model-based result and the actual event-free rate. In conclusion, the BNP levels showed a non-linear relationship with the day of occurrence of cardiovascular events in CHF patients.

  2. Control of Food Intake by Gastrointestinal Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Possible Modulation in the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Stengel, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the control of appetite by food intake-regulatory peptides secreted from the gastrointestinal tract, namely cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide YY, ghrelin, and the recently discovered nesfatin-1 via the gut-brain axis. Additionally, we describe the impact of external factors such as intake of different nutrients or stress on the secretion of gastrointestinal peptides. Finally, we highlight possible conservative—physical activity and pharmacotherapy—treatment strategies for obesity as well as surgical techniques such as deep brain stimulation and bariatric surgery also altering these peptidergic pathways. PMID:28096522

  3. The role of ranitidine infusion on glucose, insulin and C-peptide serum levels induced by oral glucose tolerance test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Orlando, C; D'Alessandro, R; De Bellis, G; Porcellini, M; Coltorti, M

    1986-01-01

    In 9 healthy subjects we evaluated the effect of a constant ranitidine infusion (100 mg) on glucose (mg/dl), insulin (microU/ml) and C-peptide (ng/ml) serum levels promoted by oral glucose tolerance test (75 g). Ranitidine significantly increased the area under concentration/time curves for glucose and insulin but not that of C-peptide. Our data indicate that ranitidine does not affect pancreatic insulin release nor peripheral glucose utilization and are consistent with the hypothesis that ranitidine influences the hepatic clearance of glucose and insulin both of which undergo high first-pass liver extraction.

  4. Interaction of the Transcription Start Site Core Region and Transcription Factor YY1 Determine Ascorbate Transporter SVCT2 Exon 1a Promoter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Huan; May, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the ascorbate transporter, SVCT2, is driven by two distinct promoters in exon 1 of the transporter sequence. The exon 1a promoter lacks a classical transcription start site and little is known about regulation of promoter activity in the transcription start site core (TSSC) region. Here we present evidence that the TSSC binds the multifunctional initiator-binding protein YY1. Electrophoresis shift assays using YY1 antibody showed that YY1 is present as one of two major complexes that specifically bind to the TSSC. The other complex contains the transcription factor NF-Y. Mutations in the TSSC that decreased YY1 binding also impaired the exon 1a promoter activity despite the presence of an upstream activating NF-Y/USF complex, suggesting that YY1 is involved in the regulation of the exon 1a transcription. Furthermore, YY1 interaction with NF-Y and/or USF synergistically enhanced the exon 1a promoter activity in transient transfections and co-activator p300 enhanced their synergistic activation. We propose that the TSSC plays a vital role in the exon 1a transcription and that this function is partially carried out by the transcription factor YY1. Moreover, co-activator p300 might be able to synergistically enhance the TSSC function via a “bridge” mechanism with upstream sequences. PMID:22532872

  5. Genetic manipulation of sex ratio for the large-scale breeding of YY super-male and XY all-male yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco (Richardson)).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanqin; Guan, Bo; Xu, Jiang; Hou, Changchun; Tian, Hua; Chen, Hongxi

    2013-06-01

    Yellow catfish has become one of the most important freshwater aquaculture species in China. The mono-sex male yellow catfish has important application value in aquaculture because the male grows generally faster than the sibling females under the same conditions. This study has screened YY super-male and YY physiological female yellow catfish by sex reversal, gynogenesis, and progeny testing, which can help to achieve the large-scale production of YY super-male and XY all-male. From 2008 to 2010, about 123,000 YY super-male were produced, and about 81 million XY all-male fry were produced with 100% male rate by random sampling. Therefore, these results indicate that YY super-male and YY physiological female yellow catfish can be viable and fertile. We conclude that the mono-sex breeding technique by YY super-male yellow catfish is stable and reliable, which has great potential for application in yellow catfish aquaculture.

  6. Serum C peptide and IRI levels after administration of glucagon and glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jayyab, A K; Heding, L G; Czyzyk, A; Malczewski, B; Królewski, A S

    1982-03-01

    A comparative study was carried out on B cell response to alternative intravenous glucagon (1.0 mg) and intravenous glucose (0.33 g per kg body weight) in healthy non-obese persons (c-NOb), healthy obese persons (C-Ob), non-obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (NIDD-NOb) and obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (NIDD-Ob). Each group comprised ten subjects. C-peptide (CP immunoassay using antiserum M 1230) and IRI in the serum were measured for each test. After glucose load in B-cell responses were significantly lower in both the diabetic groups than in the normal groups. After glucagon injection there were no significant differences in IRI and CP levels between NIDD-NOb and C-NOb, however, significantly lower levels of serum CP were noted among NIDD-Ob in comparison to C-Ob with a lack of these differences in IRI levels. This phenomenon is well reflected by the molar IRI/CP ratio expressed as a percentage. In the fasting state IRI accounted in C-Ob for 8.8 +/- 3.5 per cent of CP, while in NIDD-Ob for up to 25. +/- 10.4 percent of CP (P = 0.0004). In the latter group of patients, the IRI/CP ratio after glucagon reached the highest values (over 30 per cent) observed in this study. These data suggest the important role in insulin disposal played by the liver in non-insulin-dependent diabetes associated with obesity. Another explanation for these data is that more proinsulin is secreted in this group of patients as compared to other groups.

  7. Alterations in the neuropeptide galanin system in major depressive disorder involve levels of transcripts, methylation, and peptide

    PubMed Central

    Barde, Swapnali; Rüegg, Joelle; Prud’homme, Josée; Ekström, Tomas J.; Palkovits, Miklos; Turecki, Gustavo; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Ihnatko, Robert; Theodorsson, Elvar; Juhasz, Gabriella; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Mechawar, Naguib; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a substantial burden to patients, families, and society, but many patients cannot be treated adequately. Rodent experiments suggest that the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) and its three G protein-coupled receptors, GAL1–3, are involved in mood regulation. To explore the translational potential of these results, we assessed the transcript levels (by quantitative PCR), DNA methylation status (by bisulfite pyrosequencing), and GAL peptide by RIA of the GAL system in postmortem brains from depressed persons who had committed suicide and controls. Transcripts for all four members were detected and showed marked regional variations, GAL and galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) being most abundant. Striking increases in GAL and GALR3 mRNA levels, especially in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, in parallel with decreased DNA methylation, were found in both male and female suicide subjects as compared with controls. In contrast, GAL and GALR3 transcript levels were decreased, GALR1 was increased, and DNA methylation was increased in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of male suicide subjects, however, there were no changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Thus, GAL and its receptor GALR3 are differentially methylated and expressed in brains of MDD subjects in a region- and sex-specific manner. Such an epigenetic modification in GALR3, a hyperpolarizing receptor, might contribute to the dysregulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD. Thus, one may speculate that a GAL3 antagonist could have antidepressant properties by disinhibiting the firing of these neurons, resulting in increased release of noradrenaline and serotonin in forebrain areas involved in mood regulation. PMID:27940914

  8. Identifying the Atomic-Level Effects of Metal Composition on the Structure and Catalytic Activity of Peptide-Templated Materials.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Nicholas A; McKee, Erik M; Merino, Kyle C; Drummy, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Naik, Rajesh R; Bedford, Nicholas M; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-12-22

    Bioinspired approaches for the formation of metallic nanomaterials have been extensively employed for a diverse range of applications including diagnostics and catalysis. These materials can often be used under sustainable conditions; however, it is challenging to control the material size, morphology, and composition simultaneously. Here we have employed the R5 peptide, which forms a 3D scaffold to direct the size and linear shape of bimetallic PdAu nanomaterials for catalysis. The materials were prepared at varying Pd:Au ratios to probe optimal compositions to achieve maximal catalytic efficiency. These materials were extensively characterized at the atomic level using transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and atomic pair distribution function analysis derived from high-energy X-ray diffraction patterns to provide highly resolved structural information. The results confirmed PdAu alloy formation, but also demonstrated that significant surface structural disorder was present. The catalytic activity of the materials was studied for olefin hydrogenation, which demonstrated enhanced reactivity from the bimetallic structures. These results present a pathway to the bioinspired production of multimetallic materials with enhanced properties, which can be assessed via a suite of characterization methods to fully ascertain structure/function relationships.

  9. Cationic Membrane Peptides: Atomic-Level Insight of Structure-Activity Relationships from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Li, Shenhui; Hong, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane-active peptides, such as cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), conduct their biological functions by interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions of charged residues with lipids and water facilitate membrane insertion, translocation or disruption of these highly hydrophobic species. In this mini-review we will summarize high-resolution structural and dynamic findings towards the understanding of the structure-activity relationship of lipid membrane-bound CPPs and AMPs, as examples of the current development of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for studying membrane peptides. We will present the most recent atomic-resolution structure of the guanidinium-phosphate complex, as constrained from experimentally measured site-specific distances. These SSNMR results will be valuable specifically for understanding the intracellular translocation pathway of CPPs and antimicrobial mechanism of AMPs, and more generally broaden our insight into how cationic macromolecules interact with and cross the lipid membrane. PMID:23108593

  10. Elevated levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in upper spinal cord promotes sensitization of primary trigeminal nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Lauren E; Hawkins, Jordan L; Durham, Paul L

    2016-12-17

    Orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and migraine are characterized by peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in promoting bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system to mediate sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intercisternally with CGRP or co-injected with the receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 or KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nocifensive head withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation was investigated using von Frey filaments. Expression of PKA, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) in the spinal cord and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) in the ganglion was studied using immunohistochemistry. Some animals were co-injected with CGRP and Fast Blue dye and the ganglion was imaged using fluorescent microscopy. CGRP increased nocifensive responses to mechanical stimulation when compared to control. Co-injection of CGRP8-37 or KT 5720 with CGRP inhibited the nocifensive response. CGRP stimulated PKA and GFAP expression in the spinal cord, and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Seven days post injection, Fast Blue was observed in ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of CGRP in the upper spinal cord promote sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons via a mechanism that involves activation of PKA centrally and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Our findings provide evidence of bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system that facilitate increased neuron-glia communication within the ganglion associated with trigeminal sensitization.

  11. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C K

    2015-09-23

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology.

  12. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  13. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology. PMID:26395646

  14. Reciprocal localization of transcription factors YY1 and CP2c in spermatogonial stem cells and their putative roles during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Sook; Chae, Ji Hyung; Cheon, Yong-Pil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2016-09-01

    Maintaining stemness and permitting differentiation mediated by combinations of transcription factors (TFs) are key aspects of mammalian spermatogenesis. It has been established that yin yang 1 (YY1), a target factor of mammalian polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and a regulator of stemness, is involved in the stable maintenance of prophase stage spermatocytes. Recently, we have demonstrated that the TF CP2c partners with YY1 in some cells to antagonistically regulate the other protein's function. To date, the functional roles of YY1 and CP2c in spermatogonial stem cells and their derived germ cells remain unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of YY1 and CP2c in mouse gonocytes and germ cells using tissue immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses. At E14.5, both YY1 and CP2c were stained in gonocytes and Sertoli cells in testicular cords, showing different proportion and density of immunoreactivity. However, in adult testes, YY1 was localized in the nuclei of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatocytes, but not in spermatozoa. It was also detected in spermatogonia and spermatids in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenic cycle. CP2c could be detected mostly in the cytoplasm of spermatocytes but not at all in spermatogonial stem cells, indicating mutually exclusive expression of CP2c and YY1. Interestingly, however, CP2c was stained in the cytoplasm and nucleus of spermatogonia at elongation and release stages, and co-localized with YY1 in the nucleus at grouping, maturation, and releasing stages. Neither YY1 nor CP2c was expressed in spermatozoa. Our data indicate that YY1 strongly localizes in the spermatogonial stem cells and co-localizes heterogeneously with CP2c to permit spermatogenesis, and also suggest that YY1 is essential for stemness of spermatogonial stem cells (SCs) whereas CP2c is critical for the commitment of spermatogonia and during the progression of spermatogonia to spermatids. This evaluation expands our understanding of

  15. [Reference the YY/T 0841-2011 standard to improve preventive maintenance of medical electrical equipment and experience].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Ge, Bin; Liu, Jinchu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we interpret the new YY/T 0841-2011 standard and contrast the difference between it and GB9706.1-2007 standard. Then, we improved the current preventive maintenance work. After the improvement, we not only have more effective detection of the electrical safety performance of all kinds of medical electrical equipment, but also reduce the workload of clinical engineers, improve efficiency, and reduce the risk of electrical shock.

  16. Cilostazol Upregulates Autophagy via SIRT1 Activation: Reducing Amyloid-β Peptide and APP-CTFβ Levels in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a vital pathway for the removal of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the aggregated proteins that cause Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously found that cilostazol induced SIRT1 expression and its activity in neuronal cells, and thus, we hypothesized that cilostazol might stimulate clearances of Aβ and C-terminal APP fragment β subunit (APP-CTFβ) by up-regulating autophagy.When N2a cells were exposed to soluble Aβ1–42, protein levels of beclin-1, autophagy-related protein5 (Atg5), and SIRT1 decreased significantly. Pretreatment with cilostazol (10–30 μM) or resveratrol (20 μM) prevented these Aβ1–42 evoked suppressions. LC3-II (a marker of mammalian autophagy) levels were significantly increased by cilostazol, and this increase was reduced by 3-methyladenine. To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, N2aSwe cells (N2a cells stably expressing human APP containing the Swedish mutation) were cultured in medium with or without tetracycline (Tet+ for 48 h and then placed in Tet- condition). Aβ and APP-CTFβ expressions were increased after 12~24 h in Tet- condition, and these increased expressions were significantly reduced by pretreating cilostazol. Cilostazol-induced reductions in the expressions of Aβ and APP-CTFβ were blocked by bafilomycin A1 (a blocker of autophagosome to lysosome fusion). After knockdown of the SIRT1 gene (to ~40% in SIRT1 protein), cilostazol failed to elevate the expressions of beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3-II, indicating that cilostazol increases these expressions by up-regulating SIRT1. Further, decreased cell viability induced by Aβ was prevented by cilostazol, and this inhibition was reversed by 3-methyladenine, indicating that the protective effect of cilostazol against Aβ induced neurotoxicity is, in part, ascribable to the induction of autophagy. In conclusion, cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing the activation of SIRT1, and thereby enhances Aβ clearance and increases cell viability. PMID:26244661

  17. A ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist attenuates the rewarding properties of morphine and increases opioid peptide levels in reward areas in mice.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jörgen A; Nylander, Ingrid; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2015-12-01

    Gut-brain hormones such as ghrelin have recently been suggested to have a role in reward regulation. Ghrelin was traditionally known to regulate food intake and body weight homoeostasis. In addition, recent work has pin-pointed that this peptide has a novel role in drug-induced reward, including morphine-induced increase in the extracellular levels of accumbal dopamine in rats. Herein the effect of the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist, JMV2959, on morphine-induced activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system was investigated in mice. In addition, the effects of JMV2959 administration on opioid peptide levels in reward related areas were investigated. In the present series of experiment we showed that peripheral JMV2959 administration, at a dose with no effect per se, attenuates the ability of morphine to cause locomotor stimulation, increase the extracellular levels of accumbal dopamine and to condition a place preference in mice. JMV2959 administration significantly increased tissue levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg(6)Phe(7) in the ventral tegmental area, dynorphin B in hippocampus and Leu-enkephalin-Arg(6) in striatum. We therefore hypothesise that JMV2959 prevents morphine-induced reward via stimulation of delta receptor active peptides in striatum and ventral tegmental areas. In addition, hippocampal peptides that activate kappa receptor may be involved in JMV2959׳s ability to regulate memory formation of reward. Given that development of drug addiction depends, at least in part, of the effects of addictive drugs on the mesolimbic dopamine system the present data suggest that GHS-R1A antagonists deserve to be elucidated as novel treatment strategies of opioid addiction.

  18. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  19. Candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Luchsinger, José A.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the contribution of candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on Chromosome 21 and other chromosomes to differences in Aβ peptide levels in a cohort of adults with DS, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30–78 years of age. Genomic DNA was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race/ethnicity and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a SNP on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence APP processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). PMID:26166206

  20. Mice deficient in Endothelin-Converting Enzyme-2 exhibit abnormal responses to morphine and altered peptide levels in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L.K.; Hou, X.; Rodriguiz, R.M.; Gagnidze, K.; Sweedler, J. V.; Wetsel, W.C.; Devi, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that Endothelin-converting enzyme-2 (ECE-2) is a non-classical neuropeptide processing enzyme. Similar to other neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits restricted neuroendocrine distribution, intracellular localization, and an acidic pH optimum. However, unlike classical neuropeptide processing enzymes, ECE-2 exhibits a non-classical cleavage site preference for aliphatic and aromatic residues. We previously reported that ECE-2 cleaves a number of neuropeptides at non-classical sites in vitro; however its role in peptide processing in vivo is poorly understood. Given the recognized roles of neuropeptides in pain and opiate responses, we hypothesized that ECE-2 knockout (KO) mice might show altered pain and morphine responses compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We find that ECE-2 KO mice show decreased response to a single injection of morphine in hot-plate and tail-flick tests. ECE-2 KO mice also show more rapid development of tolerance with prolonged morphine treatment and fewer signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Peptidomic analyses revealed changes in the levels of a number of spinal cord peptides in ECE-2 KO as compared to WT mice. Taken together, our findings suggest a role for ECE-2 in the non-classical processing of spinal cord peptides and morphine responses; however, the precise mechanisms through which ECE-2 influences morphine tolerance and withdrawal remain unclear. PMID:21972895

  1. Free Enthalpy Differences between α-, π-, and 310-Helices of an Atomic Level Fine-Grained Alanine Deca-Peptide Solvated in Supramolecular Coarse-Grained Water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; Riniker, Sereina; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-03-12

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of peptides or proteins in aqueous solution are still limited to the multi-nanosecond time scale and multi-nanometer range by computational cost. Combining atomic solutes with a supramolecular solvent model in hybrid fine-grained/coarse-grained (FG/CG) simulations allows atomic detail in the region of interest while being computationally more efficient. We used enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to calculate the free enthalpy differences between different helical conformations, i.e., α-, π-, and 310-helices, of an atomic level FG alanine deca-peptide solvated in a supramolecular CG water solvent. The free enthalpy differences obtained show that by replacing the FG solvent by the CG solvent, the π-helix is destabilized with respect to the α-helix by about 2.5 kJ mol(-1), and the 310-helix is stabilized with respect to the α-helix by about 9 kJ mol(-1). In addition, the dynamics of the peptide becomes faster. By introducing a FG water layer of 0.8 nm around the peptide, both thermodynamic and dynamic properties are recovered, while the hybrid FG/CG simulations are still four times more efficient than the atomistic simulations, even when the cutoff radius for the nonbonded interactions is increased from 1.4 to 2.0 nm. Hence, the hybrid FG/CG model, which yields an appropriate balance between reduced accuracy and enhanced computational speed, is very suitable for molecular dynamics simulation investigations of biomolecules.

  2. Isotopologue Distributions of Peptide Product Ions by Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Quantitation of Low Levels of Deuterium Incorporation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Anderson, David R.; Jia, Minghong; Previs, Stephen; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated molecular peptide ions and their product ions generated by tandem mass spectrometry appear as isotopologue clusters due to the natural isotopic variations of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. Quantitation of the isotopic composition of peptides can be employed in experiments involving isotope effects, isotope exchange, isotopic labeling by chemical reactions, and studies of metabolism by stable isotope incorporation. Both ion trap and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry are shown to be capable of determining the isotopic composition of peptide product ions obtained by tandem mass spectrometry with both precision and accuracy. Tandem mass spectra obtained in profile-mode of clusters of isotopologue ions are fit by non-linear least squares to a series of Gaussian peaks (described in the accompanying manuscript) which quantify the Mn/M0 values which define the isotopologue distribution (ID). To determine the isotopic composition of product ions from their ID, a new algorithm that predicts the Mn/M0 ratios is developed which obviates the need to determine the intensity of all of the ions of an ID. Consequently a precise and accurate determination of the isotopic composition a product ion may be obtained from only the initial values of the ID, however the entire isotopologue cluster must be isolated prior to fragmentation. Following optimization of the molecular ion isolation width, fragmentation energy and detector sensitivity, the presence of isotopic excess (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) is readily determined within 1%. The ability to determine the isotopic composition of sequential product ions permits the isotopic composition of individual amino acid residues in the precursor ion to be determined. PMID:17559791

  3. Biochemical studies in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) patients: change in CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and phospho-tau.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Reyes, Patricio F; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-04-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the causes of dementia of the elderly characterized by impaired mental function, gait difficulties and urinary incontinence. Previously, it was proposed that some of the NPH patients may develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathology. Aim of this study was to compare levels of different CSF biomarkers, including total secreted β-amyloid precursor protein (sAPP), sAPP-alpha form (sAPPα), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, total-tau protein and hyperphosphorylated-tau protein in subjects from NPH and Non-NPH Control (NNC). CSF was collected from 23 NPH patients and 13 Non-NPH controls by lumber puncture. Western blot analysis was performed to measure levels of sAPP-total. ELISA was used separately to determine levels of sAPPα, Aβ peptide, total-tau and phospho-tau proteins. We found a significant decrease in levels of total secreted APP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) in the CSF sample of NPH patients vs. NNC. We did not observe any change in levels of total-tau or phospho-tau in NPH vs. NNC subjects. Notably, phospho-tau level was significantly increased in the NPH patients, who were suffering from the disease for more than one year, vs. NNC. Among five biomarkers studied, decreased sAPP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) levels in CSF can be molecular markers to distinguish NPH cases from NNC. Disease severity can also be assessed by increased levels of CSF phospho-tau protein and the ratio of phospho-tau to Aβ (1-42), which might be a useful tool for predicting conversion of NPH individuals to other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  4. Analysis of the genome sequence of the pathogenic Muscovy duck parvovirus strain YY reveals a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the inverted terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Genomic information about Muscovy duck parvovirus is still limited. In this study, the genome of the pathogenic MDPV strain YY was sequenced. The full-length genome of YY is 5075 nucleotides (nt) long, 57 nt shorter than that of strain FM. Sequence alignment indicates that the 5' and 3' inverted terminal repeats (ITR) of strain YY contain a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the stem of the palindromic hairpin structure in comparison to strain FM and FZ91-30. The deleted region contains one "E-box" site and one repeated motif with the sequence "TTCCGGT" or "ACCGGAA". Phylogenetic trees constructed based the protein coding genes concordantly showed that YY, together with nine other MDPV isolates from various places, clustered in a separate branch, distinct from the branch formed by goose parvovirus (GPV) strains. These results demonstrate that, despite the distinctive deletion, the YY strain still belongs to the classical MDPV group. Moreover, the deletion of ITR may contribute to the genome evolution of MDPV under immunization pressure.

  5. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  6. Analysis of Different Fragmentation Strategies on a Variety of Large Peptides: Implementation of a Low Level of Theory in Fragment-Based Methods Can Be a Crucial Factor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-05-12

    We have investigated the performance of two classes of fragmentation methods developed in our group (Molecules-in-Molecules (MIM) and Many-Overlapping-Body (MOB) expansion), to reproduce the unfragmented MP2 energies on a test set composed of 10 small to large biomolecules. They have also been assessed to recover the relative energies of different motifs of the acetyl(ala)18NH2 system. Performance of different bond-cutting environments and the use of Hartree-Fock and different density functionals (as a low level of theory) in conjunction with the fragmentation strategies have been analyzed. Our investigation shows that while a low level of theory (for recovering long-range interactions) may not be necessary for small peptides, it provides a very effective strategy to accurately reproduce the total and relative energies of larger peptides such as the different motifs of the acetyl(ala)18NH2 system. Employing M06-2X as the low level of theory, the calculated mean total energy deviation (maximum deviation) in the total MP2 energies for the 10 molecules in the test set at MIM(d=3.5Å), MIM(η=9), and MOB(d=5Å) are 1.16 (2.31), 0.72 (1.87), and 0.43 (2.02) kcal/mol, respectively. The excellent performance suggests that such fragment-based methods should be of general use for the computation of accurate energies of large biomolecular systems.

  7. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christina A.; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. PMID:26002894

  8. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications.

  9. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed

    Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m(2)). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration.

  10. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Meyer, D. Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J.; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m2). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration. PMID:27313876

  11. Cardiac tamponade as an independent condition affecting the relationship between the plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Minai, Kosuke; Komukai, Kimiaki; Arase, Satoshi; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Ogawa, Kazuo; Kayama, Yosuke; Inada, Keiichi; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Takemoto, Tomoyuki; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Date, Taro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2013-07-01

    Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is finely regulated by the cardiac function and several extracardiac factors. Therefore, the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and the severity of heart failure sometimes seems inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the plasma BNP levels in patients with cardiac tamponade and their changes after pericardial drainage. This study included 14 patients with cardiac tamponade who underwent pericardiocentesis. The cardiac tamponade was due to malignant diseases in 13 patients and uremia in 1 patient. The plasma BNP levels were measured before and 24-48 h after drainage. Although the patients reported severe symptoms of heart failure, their plasma BNP levels were only 71.2 ± 11.1 pg/ml before drainage. After appropriate drainage, the plasma BNP levels increased to 186.0 ± 22.5 pg/ml, which was significantly higher than that before drainage (P = 0.0002). In patients with cardiac tamponade, the plasma BNP levels were low, probably because of impaired ventricular stretching, and the levels significantly increased in response to the primary condition after drainage. This study demonstrates an additional condition that affects the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and cardiac function. If inconsistency is seen in the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and clinical signs of heart failure, the presence of cardiac tamponade should therefore be considered.

  12. Increased extracellular water measured by bioimpedance and by increased serum levels of atrial natriuretic peptide in RA patients-signs of volume overload.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Ehrenstein, Boris; Günther, Florian; Rauch, Luise; Trendafilova, Nadezhda; Boschiero, Dario; Grifka, Joachim; Fleck, Martin

    2016-04-26

    The aim of the study is to investigate water compartments in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Acute inflammatory episodes such as infection stimulate water retention, chiefly implemented by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This is an important compensatory mechanism due to expected water loss (sweating etc.). Since SNS and HPA axis are activated in RA, inflammation might be accompanied by water retention. Using bioimpedance analysis, body composition was investigated in 429 controls and 156 treatment-naïve RA patients between January 2008 and December 2014. A group of 34 RA patients was tested before and after 10 days of intensified therapy. Levels of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) and expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in synovial tissue were investigated in 15 controls and 14 RA patients. Extracellular water was higher in RA patients than controls (mean ± SEM: 49.5 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.1, % of total body water, p < 0.0001). Plasma levels of proANP were higher in RA than controls. RA patients expressed ANP in synovial tissue, but synovial fluid levels and synovial tissue superfusate levels were much lower than plasma levels indicating systemic origin. Systolic/diastolic blood pressure was higher in RA patients than controls. Extracellular water levels did not change in RA patients despite 10 days of intensified treatment. This study demonstrates signs of intravascular overload in RA patients. Short-term intensification of anti-inflammatory therapy induced no change of a longer-lasting imprinting of water retention indicating the requirement of additional treatment. The study can direct attention to the area of volume overload.

  13. Timosaponin derivative YY-23 acts as a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist and exerts a rapid antidepressant-like effect in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Guo, Fei; Fu, Zhi-wen; Zhang, Bing; Huang, Cheng-gang; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor modulators have shown promising results as potential antidepressant agents, whereas timosaponins extracted from the Chinese herb Rhizoma Anemarrhenae exhibit antidepressant activities. In the present study we examined whether YY-23, a modified metabolite of timosaponin B-III, could affect NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons in vitro, and evaluated its antidepressant-like effects in stressed mice. Methods: NMDA-induced currents were recorded in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons using a whole-cell recording technique. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a 6-week chronic mild stress (CMS) or a 10-d chronic social defeat stress (CSDS). The stressed mice were treated with YY-23 (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) or a positive-control drug, fluoxetine (10 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 3 weeks. Behavioral assessments were carried out every week. Results: In acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, YY-23 selectively and reversibly inhibited NMDA-induced currents with an EC50 value of 2.8 μmol/L. This inhibition of NMDA-induced currents by YY-23 was non-competitive, and had no features of voltage-dependency or use-dependency. Treatment of the stressed mice with YY-23 not only reversed CMS-induced deficiency of sucrose preference and immobility time, and CSDS-induced reduction of social interaction, but also had faster onset as compared to fluoxetine. Conclusion: YY-23 is a novel non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors with promising rapid antidepressant-like effects in mouse models of CMS and CSDS depression. PMID:26687936

  14. Low Levels of IgM Antibodies against an Advanced Glycation Endproduct-Modified Apolipoprotein B100 Peptide Predict Cardiovascular Events in Nondiabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Vallejo, Jenifer; Quách, Tâm Dan; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Alm, Ragnar; Hedblad, Bo; Björkbacka, Harry; Rothstein, Thomas L; Nilsson, Jan; Bengtsson, Eva

    2015-10-01

    Increased glucose levels are associated with the generation of advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) modifications. Interaction between AGE-modified plaque components and immune cells is believed to have an important role in the development of vascular complications in diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO) is one type of reactive aldehyde that gives rise to AGE modification. The present study analyzed whether autoantibodies against MGO-modified epitopes of the low-density lipoprotein apolipoprotein B (apoB) 100 predict cardiovascular events. A library consisting of 302 peptides comprising the complete apoB100 molecule was screened to identify peptides targeted by MGO-specific autoantibodies. Peptide (p) 220 (apoB amino acids 3286-3305) was identified as a major target. Baseline IgM and IgG against MGO-peptide 220 (p220) were measured in 700 individuals from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort. A total of 139 cardiovascular events were registered during the 15-y follow-up period. Controlling for major cardiovascular risk factors demonstrated that subjects in the lowest tertile of MGO-p220 IgM had an increased risk for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.07 [1.22-3.50]; p(trend) = 0.004). Interestingly, the association between MGO-p220 IgM and cardiovascular events remained and even tended to become stronger when subjects with prevalent diabetes were excluded from the analysis (2.51 [1.37-4.61]; p(trend) = 0.002). MGO-p220 IgM was inversely associated with blood glucose, but not with oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Finally, we demonstrate that anti-MGO-p220 IgM is produced by B1 cells. These data show that subjects with low levels of IgM recognizing MGO-modified p220 in apoB have an increased risk to develop cardiovascular events and that this association is present in nondiabetic subjects.

  15. Intermedin in rat uterus: changes in gene expression and peptide levels across the estrous cycle and its effects on uterine contraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study demonstrates the expression of intermedin (IMD) and its receptor components in the uterus of the female rat during the estrous cycle and its effect on uterine contraction. Methods The gene expression level of intermedin and its receptor components and the peptide level of intermedin were studied by real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) respectively. The separation of precursor and mature IMD was studied by gel filtration chromatography and EIA. The localization of IMD in the uterus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. The effect of IMD on in vitro uterine contraction was studied by organ bath technique. Results Uterine mRNAs of Imd and its receptor components and IMD levels displayed cyclic changes across the estrous cycle. Imd mRNA level was the highest at proestrus while the IMD level was the highest at diestrus. IMD was found in the luminal and glandular epithelia and IMD treatment significantly reduced the amplitude and frequency of uterine contraction but not the basal tone. Both calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist hCGRP8-37 and adrenomedullin (ADM) receptor antagonist hADM22-52 partially abolished the inhibitory effect of IMD on uterine contraction while the specific IMD receptor antagonist hIMD17-47 completely blocked the actions. The enzyme inhibitors of NO (L-NAME) and PI3K (Wortmannin) pathways diminished the IMD effects on uterine contraction while the cAMP/PKA blocker, KT5720, had no effect, indicating an involvement of NO and PI3K/Akt but not PKA. Conclusions IMD and the gene expression of its receptor components are differentially regulated in the uterus during the estrous cycle and IMD inhibits uterine contraction by decreasing the amplitude and frequency. PMID:23442365

  16. Variation of plasma levels of endothelin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y B; Wang, Y Z; Yue, Y H; Zhao, W C; Feng, G X

    2015-05-25

    We examined the variation in plasma levels of endothelin (ET), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in acute myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a rabbit model. Seventy rabbits were randomly assigned into 3 groups. Open-chest surgery (OCS) was performed for all rabbits. Group A (N = 20) received sham-surgery, group B (N = 25) was the reperfusion group, and group C (N = 25) was the infarction group. At 12 h after chest clo-sure, plasma ET levels in groups B and C were clearly increased, while CGRP levels were clearly decreased, particularly in group B. At 24 h after chest closure, ET levels were higher than before OCS, while there was no significant difference between groups B and C. ET in group B was decreased, while that in group C was increased at 12 h. No significant difference in CGRP was observed between 12 and 24 h after chest closure. NO levels in groups B and C at 12 h after chest closure were significantly decreased compared to those before OCS. NO levels in group B at 24, 48, and 72 h were significantly lower than those at 12 h, while those of group C were not significantly changed after 12 h. Dynamic monitoring and comparison of plasma levels of ET, CGRP, NO, and MDA as well as SOD activity revealed that appropriate intervention of these factors may reduce reperfusion injury.

  17. The effect of bariatric surgery on gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Meek, Claire L; Lewis, Hannah B; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Park, Adrian J

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has proved to be an extremely effective method of promoting long-term weight reduction with additional beneficial metabolic effects, such as improved glucose tolerance and remission of type 2 diabetes. A range of bariatric procedures are in common use, including gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Although the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of bariatric surgery are unclear, gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides are thought to play an important role. The aim of this review is to summarise the effects of different bariatric surgery procedures upon gastrointestinal and pancreatic peptides, including ghrelin, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic hormone (GIP), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, insulin, glucagon and somatostatin.

  18. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide and troponin levels in severe sepsis and septic shock: relationships with systolic myocardial dysfunction and intensive care unit mortality.

    PubMed

    Klouche, Kada; Pommet, Stephane; Amigues, Laurent; Bargnoux, Anne Sophie; Dupuy, Anne Marie; Machado, Sonia; Serveaux-Delous, Marianne; Morena, Marion; Jonquet, Olivier; Cristol, Jean Paul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels as mortality prognosticator and predictor for myocardial dysfunction in severe sepsis and septic shock. Baseline clinical and biological variables were collected from 47 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Ventricular systolic function assessed by echocardiography was measured over a 5-day period. Both cTnI and BNP plasmatic levels were determined at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and during the following 15 days. At admission, cTnI and BNP levels were compared to those of 12 control critically ill nonseptic patients. The plasma levels of BNP and cTnI in patients with sepsis were elevated at admission and significantly higher than in the controls. Among patients with sepsis, BNP levels were significantly more elevated in nonsurvivors compared to survivors at admission and 1 day later. The cTnI levels were also significantly more elevated in nonsurvivors compared to survivors, but only at admission. From admission to day 5, patients with sepsis with left ventricular systolic dysfunction had higher BNP plasmatic concentrations than those without; differences were significant at days 3 and 4. In contrast, plasma cTnI levels were similar between the 2 groups. In critically ill patients, sepsis induces significant increase in BNP and cTnI levels. High BNP and cTnI plasma levels during ICU admission appear to be associated with poor outcome of sepsis. Time course of BNP levels seems helpful to discriminate between surviving and nonsurviving patients with sepsis and to detect myocardial dysfunction where troponin levels fail to do so.

  19. Diagnostic utility of plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein levels in differential diagnosis of pericardial constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Karaahmet, Tansu; Yilmaz, Fatih; Tigen, Kursat; Mutlu, Bulent; Cevik, Cihan; Basaran, Yelda

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the diagnostic utility of plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT proBNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the differential diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis (CP) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RC). Twenty-five patients with high clinical suspicion of either CP or RC were enrolled. Mean plasma NT proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients with RC compared to those with CP (2641 +/- 2902 pg/mL vs 628 +/- 678 pg/mL; P=.003). The NT proBNP level that provided the best sensitivity and specificity for the differentiation of CP and RC was 800 pg/mL. Mean CRP levels were higher in patients with CP than with RC (1.41 +/- 1.73 mg/dL vs 0.38 +/- 0.21 mg/dL; P=.03). The CRP level that provided the best sensitivity and specificity for the differentiation of CP and RC was 0.57 mg/dL. Plasma NT proBNP and CRP levels can be useful in the differential diagnosis of RC and CP.

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide elevates cyclic AMP levels in chick skeletal muscle: possible neurotrophic role for a coexisting neuronal messenger.

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, R; Changeux, J P

    1987-01-01

    Recent immunocytochemical studies have shown that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) coexists with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in spinal motoneurons of the chick. Moreover, CGRP causes an increase in the number of acetylcholine receptors on the surface of cultured chick myotubes. CGRP might thus serve as one of the signals by which motoneurons regulate endplate development. In a search for the second messengers involved, we now demonstrate that CGRP stimulates accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cultured chick myotubes. This effect is, at least in part, mediated by an increase in cAMP synthesis, as the peptide also activates adenylate cyclase in chick muscle membranes. Nanomolar concentrations of CGRP elicit significant increases in both cellular cAMP levels and acetylcholine receptor numbers. The present findings suggest that cAMP is one of the second messengers which mediate the increase in acetylcholine receptor number elicited by CGRP. Furthermore, CGRP might be implicated in other trophic actions mediated by cAMP in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:3036493

  1. High-level secretion and very efficient isotopic labeling of tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP) expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Y; Storme, V; De Meutter, J; Messens, J; Lauwereys, M

    1994-11-01

    Tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP) is a potent and specific inhibitor of the blood coagulation protease Factor Xa. We designed and assembled a synthetic TAP-encoding gene (tapo) based on codons preferentially observed in the highly expressed Pichia pastoris alcohol oxidase 1 gene (AOX1), and fused it to a novel hybrid secretory prepro leader sequence. Expression from this gene yielded biologically active rTAP, which was correctly processed at the amino-terminal fusion site, and accumulated in the medium to approximately 1.7 g/l. This corresponds to a molar concentration of 0.24 mM, and is the highest yet described for a recombinant product secreted from P. pastoris. It also represents a seven-fold improvement in productivity compared to rTAP secretion from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making P. pastoris an attractive host for the industrial-scale production of this potential therapeutic agent. This system was also used to prepare 21 mg 15N-rTAP, 11 mg 13C-rTAP and 27 mg 15N/13C-rTAP, with isotope incorporation levels higher than 98%, and purities sufficient to allow their use in determining the solution structure of the tick anticoagulant peptide using high field NMR.

  2. The importance of the olfactory rosettes in maintaining pituitary prolactin and prolactin-releasing peptide levels during hyposmotic acclimation in silver sea bream (Sparus sarba).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Anna K Y; Woo, Norman Y S

    2012-04-01

    A potential role of the olfactory rosettes in maintaining prolactin (PRL) and prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) levels was examined in the euryhaline silver sea bream (Sparus sarba). The olfactory rosettes were surgically removed in silver sea bream adapted to hypo- (6 ppt) and hyper-osmotic (33 ppt) salinities and the mRNA expression of the two previously identified freshwater-adapting factors, prolactin (PRL) and prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), in silver sea bream was measured. The elevation of pituitary PRL and PrRP mRNA expression levels as seen in 6 ppt-adapted fish was abolished by surgical removal of the olfactory rosettes. The PRL and PrRP expression levels in fish adapted to 6 ppt were significantly lowered following olfactory rosette removal. On the other hand, hypothalamic PrRP mRNA expression in 6 ppt-adapted fish did not change. Specific signals for Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase but not CFTR mRNA expression were detected in the surface layers of olfactory epithelial cells by in situ hybridization. The mRNA abundance of CFTR and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α and β subunits remained unchanged in the olfactory rosette of silver sea bream adapted to 0, 6, 12, 33 and 50 ppt for 4 weeks and in fish abruptly transferred from 33 ppt to 6 ppt. Data obtained from the olfactory rosette removal experiments suggest a possible role of the olfactory system for maintaining PRL and PrRP expression during hyposmotic acclimation in sea bream.

  3. Amelioration of Cardiac Function and Activation of Anti-Inflammatory Vasoactive Peptides Expression in the Rat Myocardium by Low Level Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  4. Amino-Terminal proB-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in the Umbilical Cord Blood of Neonates Differ According to the Type of Prenatally Diagnosed Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin Young; Cha, Hyun-Hwa; Seong, Won Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in amino-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in the cord blood of neonates according to the type of congenital heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the usefulness of NT-proBNP as a prognostic marker. We included 76 neonates with prenatally diagnosed CHD and 45 controls without CHD. Neonates were classified into five groups based on echocardiographic findings. The levels of NT-proBNP in the cord blood were examined and analyzed according to the neonatal outcomes. The levels of NT-proBNP were significantly elevated in the cord blood of neonates with CHD compared with that in the cord blood of controls. The levels of NT-proBNP in the group with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction without a ventricular septal defect were significantly increased compared to that in the other groups. The neonates that required acute surgical correction had higher levels of NT-proBNP in the cord blood, though they were not statistically significant. Meanwhile, NT-proBNP levels in the cord blood of neonates with functional single ventricle were significantly higher than that in the cord blood of those with functional biventricles. Significant differences in the levels of NT-proBNP between survivors and nonsurvivors were observed within 1 year of birth. In this study, we found that the levels of NT-proBNP in the cord blood of neonates with CHD were higher than the levels in controls. This finding was striking in the group with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and it was associated with surgery for functional single ventricle and 1-year survival.

  5. What Does f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] Greater than 0 "Really" Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartin, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This note presents geometric and physical interpretations of the sufficient condition for a critical point to be a strict relative extremum: f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] greater than 0. The role of the double derivative f[subscript xy] in this inequality will be highlighted in these interpretations. (Contains 14…

  6. Differential effects of the peptides Stomagen, EPF1 and EPF2 on activation of MAP kinase MPK6 and the SPCH protein level.

    PubMed

    Jewaria, Pawan Kumar; Hara, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Sawa, Shinichiro; Sakagami, Youji; Aimoto, Saburo; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2013-08-01

    The positioning and density of leaf stomata are regulated by three secretory peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 1 (EPF1), EPF2 and stomagen. Several lines of published evidence have suggested a regulatory pathway as follows. EPF1 and EPF2 are perceived by receptor complexes consisting of a receptor-like protein, TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), and receptor kinases, ERECTA (ER), ERECTA-LIKE (ERL) 1 and ERL2. These receptors activate a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase module. MAP kinases phosphorylate and destabilize the transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH), resulting in a decrease in the number of stomatal lineage cells. Stomagen acts antagonistically to EPF1 and EPF2. However, there is no direct evidence that EPF1 and EPF2 activate or that stomagen inactivates the MAP kinase cascade, through which they might regulate the SPCH level. Experimental modulation of these peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana would change the number of stomatal lineage cells in developing leaves, which in turn would change the expression of SPCH, making the interpretation difficult. Here we reconstructed this signaling pathway in differentiated leaf cells of Nicotiana benthamiana to examine signaling without the confounding effect of cell type change. We show that EPF1 and EPF2 are able to activate the MAP kinase MPK6, and that both EPF1 and EPF2 are able to decrease the SPCH level, whereas stomagen is able to increase it. Our data also suggest that EPF1 can be recognized by TMM together with any ER family receptor kinase, whereas EPF2 can be recognized by TMM together with ERL1 or ERL2, but not by TMM together with ER.

  7. Usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels to predict success of weaning from intra-aortic balloon pumping.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yukichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Sato, Naoki; Hosokawa, Yusuke; Munakata, Ryo; Akutsu, Koichi; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-09-15

    There is currently no reliable method of predicting the success of weaning from intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP). The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level to predict the success of weaning from IABP. Consecutive patients scheduled for weaning from IABP were prospectively enrolled. NT-proBNP levels were measured at baseline (before the start of weaning) and cessation (just before cessation of IABP). Changes in NT-proBNP level between baseline and cessation were analyzed in 2 groups of patients: those who were successfully weaned and those who were not successfully weaned for any reason, including a decision to discontinue weaning, worsening of pulmonary edema after cessation of IABP, or unstable hemodynamics after cessation of IABP. A total of 30 patients were enrolled (mean age 66 ± 12 years, 16 men, 16 with acute myocardial infarctions, and 14 with acute exacerbation of chronic heart failure). Median (interquartile range) baseline NT-proBNP levels were not significantly different between the successful and unsuccessful weaning groups (4,200 [1,400 to 8,752] pg/ml vs (5,620 [2,035 to 13,950] pg/ml, p = 0.30). In the unsuccessful weaning group, the median NT-proBNP level was significantly higher at cessation (9,995 [2,920 to 15,100] pg/ml) than at baseline (p = 0.008). All patients with decreases in NT-proBNP level between baseline and cessation were successfully weaned from IABP. In conclusion, these results show that NT-proBNP levels were useful for predicting the success of weaning from IABP. If the NT-proBNP level increases during weaning from IABP, more intense management should be considered.

  8. An improved method for high-level soluble expression and purification of recombinant amyloid-beta peptide for in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Pandey, Tripti; Chinta, Ramesh; Kumar, Awanish; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide mediates several neurodegenerative diseases. The 42 amino acid (Aβ1-42) is the predominant form of peptide found in the neuritic plaques and has been demonstrated to be neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro. The availability of large quantities of Aβ peptide will help in several biochemical and biophysical studies that may help in exploring the aggregation mechanism and toxicity of Aβ peptide. We report a convenient and economical method to obtain such a peptide biologically. Synthetic oligonucleotides encoding Aβ1-42 were constructed and amplified through the polymerase cycling assembly (also known as assembly PCR), followed by the amplification PCR. Aβ1-42 gene was cloned into pET41a(+) vector for expression. Interestingly, the addition of 3% (v/v) ethanol to the culture medium resulted in the production of large amounts of soluble Aβ fusion protein. The Aβ fusion protein was subjected to a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography followed by enterokinase digestion, and the Aβ peptide was purified using glutathione Sepharose affinity chromatography. The peptide yield was ∼15mg/L culture, indicating the utility of this method for high-yield production of soluble Aβ peptide. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting with anti-His antibody confirmed the identity of purified Aβ fusion protein and Aβ peptide. In addition, this method provides an advantage over the chemical synthesis and other conventional methods used for large-scale production of recombinant Aβ peptide.

  9. The developmental regulator protein Gon4l associates with protein YY1, co-repressor Sin3a, and histone deacetylase 1 and mediates transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Hankel, Isaiah L; Hostager, Bruce S; Swartzendruber, Julie A; Friedman, Ann D; Brenton, Janet L; Rothman, Paul B; Colgan, John D

    2011-05-20

    Genetic studies involving zebrafish and mice have demonstrated that the protein Gon4l (Gon4-like) is essential for hematopoiesis. These studies also suggested that Gon4l regulates gene expression during hematopoietic development, yet the biochemical function of Gon4l has not been defined. Here, we describe the identification of factors that interact with Gon4l and may cooperate with this protein to regulate gene expression. As predicted by polypeptide sequence conservation, Gon4l interacted and co-localized with the DNA-binding protein YY1 (Yin Yang 1). Density gradient sedimentation analysis of protein lysates from mouse M12 B cells showed that Gon4l and YY1 co-sediment with the transcriptional co-repressor Sin3a and its functional partner histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1. Consistent with these results, immunoprecipitation studies showed that Gon4l associates with Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 as a part of complexes that form in M12 cells. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that Gon4l, YY1, Sin3a, and HDAC1 could all associate as components of a single complex and that a conserved domain spanning the central portion of Gon4l was required for formation of this complex. When targeted to DNA, Gon4l repressed the activity of a nearby promoter, which correlated with the ability to interact with Sin3a and HDAC1. Our data suggest that Sin3a, HDAC1, and YY1 are co-factors for Gon4l and that Gon4l may function as a platform for the assembly of complexes that regulate gene expression.

  10. Interleukin-7 Plasma Levels in Human Differentiate Anorexia Nervosa, Constitutional Thinness and Healthy Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Natacha; Viltart, Odile; Loyens, Anne; Bruchet, Céline; Nadin, Katia; Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine involved in energy homeostasis as demonstrated in rodents. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrained eating behavior despite adaptive orexigenic regulation profile including high ghrelin plasma levels. Constitutional thinness is a physiological condition of resistance to weight gain with physiological anorexigenic profile including high Peptide YY plasma level. Healthy obesity can be considered as a physiological state of resistance to weight loss with opposite appetite regulating profile to constitutional thinness including low Peptide YY plasma level. No studies in IL-7 are yet available in those populations. Therefore we evaluated circadian plasma levels of IL-7 in anorexia nervosa compared to constitutional thinness, healthy obese and control females. Materials and Methods 10 restrictive-type anorexia nervosa women, 5 bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa woman, 5 recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa women, 4 bulimic females, 10 constitutional thinness women, 7 healthy obese females, and 10 normal weight women controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, performed in endocrinology unit and academic laboratory. Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma IL-7 levels were measured in each subject. Results 24h mean IL-7 plasma levels (pg/ml, mean±SEM) were decreased in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (123.4±14.4, p<0.0037), bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa (24.2±5.6, p<0.001), recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa (64.2±16.1, p = 0.01) and healthy obese patients (51±3.2, p<0.001) compared to controls (187.7±28.6). Bulimic patients (197.4±42.7) and constitutional thinness patients (264.3±35.8) were similar to controls. Conclusions Low IL-7 is part of the adaptive profile in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa, confirming its difference with constitutional thinness. Healthy obesity, with low IL-7, is once again in mirror image of constitutional thinness with normal high IL-7. PMID:27611669

  11. Can signal peptide-CUB-EGF domain-containing protein (SCUBE) levels be a marker of angiogenesis in patients with psoriasis?

    PubMed

    Capkin, Arzu Aydın; Demir, Selim; Mentese, Ahmet; Bulut, Çağlar; Ayar, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    Angiogenesis is an important process being involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and promises new potential parameter for diagnosis and screening of treatment. This study investigated the levels of signal peptide-CUB-EGF (epidermal growth factor-like protein) family domain-containing protein (SCUBE) 1 and 3. Potential value as a novel marker of angiogenesis in patients with psoriasis is also evaluated by assessing possible relation of SCUBE-1 and 3 with disease activity in conjunction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, as an established marker of angiogenesis. Forty-eight patients with psoriasis (aged >18 years) and 48 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included. Detailed information was obtained through history and physical examination. Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) scores were calculated. Blood SCUBE 1 and 3, and VEGF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean PASI score of the patients was 6.7 ± 4.1. Patients' serum SCUBE 1 and 3 and VEGF levels were significantly higher than those of the controls (P = 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity were calculated as 83 and 62% for the 0.67 ng/ml cut-off level of SCUBE 1, and 63 and 71% for the 2.57 ng/ml cut-off level of SCUBE 3, respectively. A cut-off VEGF level of 310 ng/mL predicted the presence of psoriasis with a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 77%. The results of this pioneering study indicate that SCUBE protein family appears to have a probable role in the pathogenesis and angiogenesis development in psoriasis and SCUBE 1 and 3 may be novel markers of angiogenesis in psoriasis.

  12. Polymorphisms of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) genes in children with low-level lead exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sobin, Christina; Gutierrez, Marisela; Alterio, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Low-level lead exposure during early childhood has long been associated with altered neurocognitive development and diminished cognitive functions. Over nine thousand U.S. industrial facilities annually emit significant amounts of lead, creating exposure risk particularly for minority children. The mechanisms by which low-level lead exerts neurotoxic effects are poorly understood. Once absorbed, the only intervention is source removal, thus primary prevention is key. Genetic biomarkers could provide an efficient means of identifying children at greatest risk. Common functional variants of genes that alter lead's neurotoxic potential have been identified and include delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD2) and peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2*2). These polymorphisms have not been examined previously in Hispanic minority samples, or with regard to lowest level lead exposure. In 116 children of Mexican-American/Hispanic descent residing in zip codes previously designated as “high risk” for lead exposure (mean age = 8.1, S.D. = 1.9), blood lead level was measured at three time points over a 3-month period and averaged. DNA extraction was completed using buccal swab samples. The frequencies of the ALAD2 and PEPT2*2 polymorphisms observed in this sample closely approximated those previously reported for Anglo, European and Asian samples. As compared to children heterozygous for the PEPT2*2 polymorphism, and without the PEPT2*2 polymorphism, the geometric mean blood lead level of children homozygous for the PEPT2*2 polymorphism was significantly higher. In contrast to past studies, mean blood lead level of children heterozygous and homozygous for the ALAD2 polymorphism in this sample did not differ from that of children without the ALAD2 polymorphism. Higher blood lead burden in children with the PEPT2*2 mutation may suggest that this common genetic variant is a biomarker of increased vulnerability to the neurotoxic effects of lowest level lead exposure. PMID

  13. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  14. N-Terminal pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels are Linked with Modified Child-Pugh Classification in Patients with Nonalcoholic Cirrhosis [NT-ProBNP and Liver Cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Kumbasar, Abdulbaki; Navdar, Mehtap; Ataoglu, Esra; Uzunhasan, Isil; Ergen, Kadir; Poturoglu, Sule; Basinoglu, Filiz; Yilmaz, Fatih; Yenigun, Mustafa; Sar, Fuat; Tanriverdi, Ozgur

    2017-03-01

    Excess N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide secretion has been linked to cirrhosis in previously studies. The relationship of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels and cardiac dysfunction determined by echocardiography were investigated in patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis and a control group of chronic hepatitis. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. Thirty-two men and thirty-three women who gave informed consent who were followed-up for chronic liver failure were enrolled. All patients gave clinical history, physical examination was carried out and information about ongoing medication has been obtained. Serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level was measured in all patients. The same cardiologist determined ejection fraction, end-diastolic left ventricular diameter, interventricular septum, and posterior wall on transthoracic echocardiography. Patients with extensive liver disease according to Child-Pugh classification from A to C had increasing N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in association (P < .001). According to the Child-Pugh classification there were no significant difference between groups for echocardiographic measurements (P > .05). N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide may be an important marker for cardiac dysfunction in patients with chronic liver failure in accordance with Child-Pugh stage.

  15. Influence of the amount of co-infused amino acids on post-therapeutic potassium levels in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is routinely used for advanced or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours (NET). To prevent nephrotoxicity, positively charged amino acids (AA) are co-infused. The aim of this study was to correlate the risk for therapy-related hyperkalaemia with the total amount of AA infused. Methods Twenty-two patients undergoing PRRT with standard activities of 177Lu-DOTATATE/-TOC were monitored during two following treatment cycles with co-infusion of 75 and 50 g of AA (l-arginine and l-lysine), respectively. Mean serum levels of potassium and other parameters (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine, blood urea nitrogen [BUN], phosphate, chloride, lactate dehydrogenase) prior to, 4 h and 24 h after AA infusion were compared. Results Self-limiting hyperkalaemia (>5.0 mmol/l) resolving after 24 h occurred in 91% (20/22) of patients in both protocols. Potassium levels, BUN, creatinine, GFR, phosphate, chloride and LDH showed a similar range at 4 h after co-infusion of 75 or 50 g of AA, respectively (p?>?0.05). Only GFR and creatinine levels at 24 h varied significantly between the two co-infusion protocols (p?

  16. Expression of human uncoupling protein-3 in Drosophila insulin-producing cells increases insulin-like peptide (DILP) levels and shortens lifespan.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Dickon M; Toivonen, Janne M; Giannakou, Maria; Partridge, Linda; Brand, Martin D

    2009-05-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can dissipate mitochondrial protonmotive force by increasing the proton conductance of the inner membrane and through this effect could decrease ROS production, ameliorate oxidative stress and extend lifespan. We investigated whether ubiquitous, pan-neuronal or neurosecretory cell-specific expression of human UCP3 (hUCP3) in adult Drosophila melanogaster affected lifespan. Low, ubiquitous expression of hUCP3 at levels found in rodent skeletal muscle mitochondria did not affect proton conductance in mitochondria isolated from whole flies, but high pan-neuronal expression of hUCP3 increased the proton conductance of mitochondria isolated from fly heads. Expression of hUCP3 at moderate levels in adult neurons led to a marginal lifespan-extension in males. However, high expression of hUCP3 in neuronal tissue shortened lifespan. The life-shortening effect was replicated when hUCP3 was expressed specifically in median neurosecretory cells (mNSC), which express three of the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs). Expression of hUCP3 in the mNSC did not alter expression of dilp2, dilp3 or dilp5 mRNA, but led to increased amounts of DILP2 in fly heads. These data suggest that lowering mitochondrial coupling by high expression of hUCP3 alters mNSC function in a way that appears to increase DILP-levels in fly heads and lead to a concomitant decrease in lifespan.

  17. Sardine protein diet increases plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 levels and prevents tissue oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Madani, Zohra; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J; Dalila, Ait Yahia

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether sardine protein mitigates the adverse effects of fructose on plasma glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and oxidative stress in rats. Rats were fed casein (C) or sardine protein (S) with or without high‑fructose (HF) for 2 months. Plasma glucose, insulin, GLP‑1, lipid and protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes were assayed. HF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and oxidative stress despite reduced energy and food intakes. High plasma creatinine and uric acid levels, in addition to albuminuria were observed in the HF groups. The S‑HF diet reduced plasma glucose, insulin, creatinine, uric acid and homeostasis model assessment‑insulin resistance index levels, however increased GLP‑1 levels compared with the C‑HF diet. Hydroperoxides were reduced in the liver, kidney, heart and muscle of S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. A reduction in liver, kidney and heart carbonyls was observed in S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. Reduced levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected in the liver, kidney and heart of the S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. The S diet compared with the C diet reduced levels of liver hydroperoxides, heart carbonyls and kidney NO. The S‑HF diet compared with the C‑HF diet increased the levels of liver and kidney superoxide dismutase, liver and muscle catalase, liver, heart and muscle glutathione peroxidase and liver ascorbic acid. The S diet prevented and reversed insulin resistance and oxidative stress, and may have benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  18. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  19. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  20. High Serum Levels of Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide (pro BNP) Identify Cardioembolic Origin in Undetermined Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Sobrino, Tomás; Blanco, Miguel; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Brea, David; Rodríguez-González, Raquel; Leira, Rogelio; Dávalos, Antonio; Castillo, José

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stroke subtype diagnosis leads to specific therapies to reduce recurrences. Because nearly one third of patients remain with unknown etiology after a complete screening workup, we aim to investigate whether molecular markers of myocardial damage were associated with cardioembolic stroke and if they were useful to reclassify strokes of undetermined etiology. Methods: We included 262 patients with first ischemic stroke within the first 12 hours. Stroke subtype was evaluated by TOAST criteria. Stroke of undetermined origin were reclassified into likely atherothrombotic or likely cardioembolic according to a predefined non-validated algorithm. Blood samples were obtained on admission to determine serum levels of molecular markers (pro-BNP, pro-ANP and CK-MB) of myocardial damage. Results: Patients with cardioembolic infarct showed higher levels of pro-BNP, pro-ANP and CK-MB. Pro-BNP > 360 pg/mL was independently associated with cardioembolic stroke (OR: 28.51, CI95%: 5.90–136.75, p < 0.0001). Stroke etiology was undetermined in 82 patients (31%); 34 were reclassified as likely cardioembolic, 22 as likely atherothrombotic, and 26 remained as undetermined. Pro-BNP > 360 pg/mL was the only factor independently associated with likely cardioembolic stroke. Conclusions: Pro-BNP levels higher than 360 pg/mL are associated with cardioembolic stroke and may be useful to reclassify undetermined strokes as of cardioembolic origin. PMID:19729800

  1. Urinary C-peptide levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) are related to party size and rank but not to mate competition.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Martin; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2015-05-01

    Within- and between-species variation in male mating strategies has been attributed to a multitude of factors including male competitive ability and the distribution of fertile females across space and time. Differences in energy balance across and within males allow for the identification of some of the trade-offs associated with certain social and mating strategies. Bonobos live in groups with a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, there is co-dominance between the sexes and a linear dominance hierarchy among males. Males compete over access to females, breeding is aseasonal, and females exhibit sexual swellings over extended time periods. In this study we use urinary C-peptide (UCP) levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) obtained from 260 urine samples from a wild bonobo community, to quantify male energy balance during mate competition and levels of gregariousness in the species. Although high ranking males are more aggressive, spend more time in proximity to maximally tumescent females, and have higher mating frequencies, we found no indication that mate guarding or mate competition affected male energy balance. Our results showed a positive correlation between monthly mean UCP levels and mean party size. When traveling in large parties, high ranking males had higher UCP levels than those of the low ranking males. These results support the hypothesis that patterns of fission-fusion dynamics in bonobos are either linked to energy availability in the environment or to the energetic costs of foraging. The finding of a rank-bias in UCP levels in larger parties could also reflect an increase in contest competition among males over access to food.

  2. Mosapride citrate, a 5-HT₄ receptor agonist, increased the plasma active and total glucagon-like peptide-1 levels in non-diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kiyomi; Togashi, Yu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Mosapride citrate, a selective agonist of the 5-hydroxytryptaine (5-HT)₄ receptor, is typically used to treat heartburn, nausea, and vomiting associated with chronic gastritis or to prepare for a barium enema X-ray examination. Mosapride citrate reportedly improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. As mosapride citrate activates the motility of the gastrointestinal tract, we hypothesized that mosapride citrate affects incretin secretion. We examined the effect of the administration of mosapride citrate on the plasma glucose, serum insulin, plasma glucagon, and plasma incretin levels before breakfast and at 60, 120, and 180 min after breakfast in men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to exclude gastropathy. Mosapride citrate was administered according to two different intake schedules (C: control (no drug), M: mosapride citrate 20 mg) in each of the subject groups. The area under the curve (AUC) of the plasma glucose levels was smaller in the M group than in the C group. The time profiles for the serum insulin levels at 60 and 120 min after treatment with mosapride citrate tended to be higher, although the difference was not statistically significant. The AUCs of the plasma active and total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels were significantly larger in the M group than in the C group. No significant difference in the AUC of the plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) level was observed between the two groups. Our results suggest that mosapride citrate may have an antidiabetic effect by increasing GLP-1 secretion.

  3. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  4. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as electronic materials: An evaluation from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akdim, Brahim E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-05-04

    In this letter, we report on the evaluation of diphenylalanine (FF), dityrosine (YY), and phenylalanine-tryptophan (FW) self-assembled peptide nanotube structures for electronics and photonics applications. Realistic bulk peptide nanotube material models were used in density functional theory calculations to mimic the well-ordered tubular nanostructures. Importantly, validated functionals were applied, specifically by using a London dispersion correction to model intertube interactions and a range-separated hybrid functional for accurate bandgap calculations. Bandgaps were found consistent with available experimental data for FF, and also corroborate the higher conductance reported for FW in comparison to FF peptide nanotubes. Interestingly, the predicted bandgap for the YY tubular nanostructure was found to be slightly higher than that of FW, suggesting higher conductance as well. In addition, the band structure calculations along the high symmetry line of nanotube axis revealed a direct bandgap for FF. The results enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of these material systems and will pave the way into their application in devices.

  5. Impact of decreased serum albumin levels on acute kidney injury in patients with acute decompensated heart failure: a potential association of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Goto, Yoichi; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kawano, Yuhei; Kangawa, Kenji

    2017-02-07

    Although hypoalbuminemia at admission is a risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the clinical significance of decreased serum albumin levels (DAL) during ADHF therapy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether DAL was associated with AKI, and whether intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) administration, which provides an effective treatment for ADHF but promotes albumin extravasation, was associated with DAL and AKI. A total of 231 consecutive patients with ADHF were enrolled. AKI was defined as ≥0.3 mg/dl absolute or 1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine levels within 48 h. AKI occurred in 73 (32%) of the 231 patients during ADHF therapy. The median value of decreases in serum albumin levels was 0.3 g/dl at 7 days after admission. When DAL was defined as ≥0.3 g/dl decrease in serum albumin levels, DAL occurred in 113 patients, and was independently associated with AKI. Of the 231 patients, 73 (32%) were treated with intravenous ANP. DAL occurred more frequently in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (77 vs. 36%, p < 0.001), and ANP was independently associated with DAL. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (48 vs. 24%, p < 0.001). ANP was independently associated with AKI. In conclusion, DAL is associated with AKI. Intravenous ANP administration may be one of the promoting factors of DAL, which leads to AKI, indicating a possible novel mechanism of AKI.

  6. Treatment of hypertension with perindopril reduces plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels, left ventricular mass, and improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Aksoy, F. G.; Muderrisoglu, H.; Sabah, I.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for cardiac deaths, and diastolic dysfunction is a usual finding during the course of this disease. HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic therapy with perindopril on left ventricular (LV) mass, left atrial size, diastolic function, and plasma level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with hypertension. METHODS: Twenty four patients who had not been previously taking any antihypertensive medication and without prior history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmias, valvular heart disease, or systemic illnesses received 4-8 mg/day of perindopril orally. Echocardiographic studies were acquired at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of therapy. RESULTS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 174 +/- 19.7 and 107.5 +/- 7.8 mmHg to 134 +/- 10.6 and 82 +/- 6.7 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Left ventricular mass decreased from 252.4 +/- 8.3 to 205.7 +/- 7.08 g and left atrial volume from 20.4 +/- 5.1 to 17.6 +/- 5.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Transmitral Doppler early and atrial filling velocity ratio (E/A) increased from 0.69 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.05 m/s and plasma ANP level decreased from 71.9 +/- 11.7 to 35.3 +/- 7.8 pg/ml (p < 0.001). Reduction of LV mass correlated positively with a reduction in ANP levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Perindopril caused a significant reduction of LV mass, left atrial volume, and plasma ANP levels, as well as improvement in Doppler parameters of LV filling in this group of patients with hypertension.

  7. Impact of restraint and disinhibition on PYY plasma levels and subjective feelings of appetite.

    PubMed

    Martins, C; Robertson, M D; Morgan, L M

    2010-10-01

    The impact of eating behaviours on circulating levels of appetite-regulating hormones remains largely unknown. The aims of this study were to assess the role of restraint and disinhibition on fasting/postprandial peptide YY (PYY) plasma levels and subjective feelings of appetite in normal-weight individuals and to determine whether the effect was energy load dependent. 33 participants (12 men) were classified as restrained/unrestrained and low/high in disinhibition based on Three Factor Eating Questionnaire-18R and Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. The impact of restraint/disinhibition on PYY plasma levels and feelings of appetite was measured, after a 500kcal and 1000kcal breakfast, using a randomised crossover design. Restraint did not impact on either fasting or postprandial PYY plasma levels, but participants with high disinhibition had a tendency towards a blunted postprandial PYY response. Moreover, restrained eaters reported lower ratings of prospective food consumption postprandially, and a tendency towards higher fullness/lower hunger. In conclusion, circulating PYY is unaffected by restrained eating behaviour, despite being associated with increased fullness and reduced hunger in the fed state. High levels of disinhibition tend to be associated with a blunted PYY response and this may contribute towards the susceptibility to overconsumption and increased risk of weight gain characteristic of this trait.

  8. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  9. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels are poorly related to the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during symptom-limited exercise in low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Andreu; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Agulló, Luis; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; de León, Gustavo; Figueras, Jaume; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The usefulness of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) as a marker of ischemia is controversial. BNP levels have predicted arrhythmias in various settings, but it is unknown whether they are related to exercise-induced ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. Material and methods We analyzed in 63 patients (64 ±14 years, 65% male, 62% with known coronary disease) undergoing exercise stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the association between plasma BNP values (before and 15 min after exercise) and the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during the test. Results Exercise test (8.1 ±2.7 min, 7.4 ±8.1 metabolic equivalents, 82 ±12% of maximal predicted heart rate) induced reversible perfusion defects in 23 (36%) patients. Eight (13%) patients presented significant arrhythmias (≥ 7 ventricular premature complexes/min, couplets, or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia during exercise or in the first minute of recovery). Median baseline BNP levels were 17.5 (12.4–66.4) pg/ml in patients developing scintigraphic ischemia and 45.6 (13.2–107.4) pg/ml in those without ischemia (p = 0.137). The BNP levels increased after exercise (34.4 (15.3–65.4)% increment over baseline, p < 0.001), but the magnitude of this increase was not related to SPECT positivity (35.7 (18.8–65.4)% vs. 27.9 (5.6–64.0)% in patients with and without ischemia, respectively, p = 0.304). No significant association was found between BNP values (at baseline or their change during the test) and ventricular arrhythmias. Conclusions Plasma BNP values – at baseline or after exercise – were not associated with myocardial ischemia or with ventricular arrhythmia during exercise SPECT. These results highlight the limited usefulness of this biomarker to assess acute ischemia. PMID:27186178

  10. Relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Matsumoto, T; Fukazawa, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria for 3 years. The subjects were 100 Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatients with microalbuminuria. Associations between metabolic parameters at baseline [HbA1c, systolic blood pressure (SBP), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and BNP] and the progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy were examined for 3 years. A total of 83 patients were examined at the end of the 3-year period, including 17 with remission to normoalbuminuria, 47 with continuing microalbuminuria, and 19 with progression to macroalbuminuria. HbA1c, ACR, and BNP differed significantly among the 3 groups (p=0.024, p<0.001, p=0.002, respectively). Among baseline factors, HbA1c and BNP were significant predictors of the percentage increase in ACR for 3 years in multiple linear regression analysis (β=0.259, p=0.02; β=0.299, p=0.007, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, HbA1c and ACR were independently associated with progression of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.008, p=0.023, respectively), and ACR and BNP were independently associated with remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.029, p=0.012, respectively). ROC curve analysis gave a cutoff value for BNP of 14.9 pg/ml for prediction of remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.016). The BNP level has a relationship with diabetic nephropathy and a low BNP level predicts remission of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, monitoring of BNP can play an important role in management of diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Nutrient-intake-level-dependent regulation of intestinal development in newborn intrauterine growth-restricted piglets via glucagon-like peptide-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, Z; Gao, L; Chen, L; Zhang, H

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the intestinal development of newborn intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) piglets subjected to normal nutrient intake (NNI) or restricted nutrient intake (RNI). Newborn normal birth weight (NBW) and IUGR piglets were allotted to NNI or RNI levels for 4 weeks from day 8 postnatal. IUGR piglets receiving NNI had similar growth performance compared with that of NBW piglets. Small intestine length and villous height were greater in IUGR piglets fed the NNI than that of piglets fed the RNI. Lactase activity was increased in piglets fed the NNI compared with piglets fed the RNI. Absorptive function, represented by active glucose transport by the Ussing chamber method and messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of two main intestinal glucose transporters, Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), were greater in IUGR piglets fed the NNI compared with piglets fed the RNI regimen. The apoptotic process, characterized by caspase-3 activity (a sign of activated apoptotic cells) and mRNA expressions of p53 (pro-apoptotic), bcl-2-like protein 4 (Bax) (pro-apoptotic) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) (anti-apoptotic), were improved in IUGR piglets fed the NNI regimen. To test the hypothesis that improvements in intestinal development of IUGR piglets fed NNI might be mediated through circulating glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), GLP-2 was injected subcutaneously to IUGR piglets fed the RNI from day 8 to day 15 postnatal. Although the intestinal development of IUGR piglets fed the RNI regimen was suppressed compared with those fed the NNI regimen, an exogenous injection of GLP-2 was able to bring intestinal development to similar levels as NNI-fed IUGR piglets. Collectively, our results demonstrate that IUGR neonates that have NNI levels could improve intestinal function via the regulation of GLP-2.

  12. Effects of super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran on amyloid β peptide production and abrupt increase in postprandial blood glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Hara, Takashi; Joh, Toshio; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Akira; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are very serious diseases with the latter having been suggested to cause the former. We prepared super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran (SRBBB), which contained a high amount of resistant starch that showed strong inhibitory activities against β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase even after heating. Black rice bran showed greater β-secretase inhibitory activity (3.6-fold) than Koshihikari rice. The bran contained more oleic acid and anthocyanin, meaning that it is potentially a biofunctional food with a high antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, aged mice, which were fed a SRBBB diet for four weeks, showed lower amyloid β 40 peptide in the blood than mice fed a commercial diet (p < 0.01). Additionally, their initial blood glucose levels (BGLs) after 12 weeks of being fed SRBBB were significantly lower than those in the control group. Taken together, our results indicate SRBBB shows promise for inhibiting not only amyloid β production, but also abrupt increases in postprandial BGLs.

  13. Association between serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels and characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Feng, Cong; Liu, Chunlei; Tian, Shuping; Song, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the association between the levels of serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) and the characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in patients with unstable angina (UA). A total of 202 patients (age range, 47–82 years) were divided into the following three groups: Non-cardiac disease group (57 patients); stable angina pectoris (SAP) group (62 patients); and UA group (83 patients). There were significant differences between the serum NT-pro BNP levels among the three groups (P=0.007). However, in multivariant diagnoses, NT-pro BNP level was not an independent risk factor for UA. The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were observed to be positively correlated with the number of vessels involved (r=0.462; P<0.001), SIS (r=0.475; P<0.001), segment-stenosis score (r=0.453; P<0.001), coronary calcification score (r=0.412; P=0.001), number of obstructive diseases (r=0.346; P<0.001), and the number of segments with non-calcified plaque (r=0.235; P=0.017), mixed plaque (r=0.234; P=0.017) and calcified plaque (r=0.431; P<0.001). The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were significantly higher in patients with UA and left main-left anterior descending (LM-LAD) disease, compared with UA patients without LM-LAD disease (P<0.001). In addition, serum NT-pro BNP was significantly higher in patients with obstructive disease and UA than in those without obstructive disease (P<0.001). The area under the curve of log(NT-pro BNP) was 0.656 (P=0.006; optimal cut-off value, 1.74; sensitivity, 77.6%; specificity, 51.9%). In conclusion, the levels of serum NT-pro BNP are associated with the burden and severity of coronary artery atherosclerotic disease in patients with UA, and may be helpful in risk stratification of patients with UA. PMID:27446259

  14. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, Maria P.; Grimaldi, Luca; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Tramacere, Francesco; Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto; Pili, Giorgio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  15. Increased Epicardial Fat Thickness Correlates with Aortic Stiffness and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Yasemin; Basaran, Ozcan; Akin, Fatih; Emir, Gulser Karadaban; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial fat, a metabolically active tissue, has emerged as a risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated epicardial fat thickness in patients who had sustained an acute ischemic stroke, and we evaluated the relationship of epicardial fat thickness with other prognostic factors. We enrolled 61 consecutive patients (age, ≥18 yr) who had sustained a first acute ischemic stroke and had been admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. The control group comprised 82 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients free of past or current stroke who had been admitted to our cardiology clinics. Blood samples were taken for measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices and epicardial fat thickness were measured by means of transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 hours. In comparison with the control group, the patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly higher epicardial fat thickness (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.7 mm; P <0.001), lower aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.8 vs 3.4 ± 0.9 cm2·dyn−1; P <0.001) and lower aortic strain (5.5% ± 1.9% vs 6.4% ± 1.8%; P=0.003). We found a significant association between epicardial fat thickness, NT-proBNP levels, and arterial dysfunction in patients who had sustained acute ischemic stroke. Increased epicardial fat thickness might be a novel risk factor and might enable evaluation of subclinical target-organ damage in these patients. PMID:27303237

  16. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  17. Usefulness of early diastolic mitral annular velocity to predict plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide and transient heart failure development after device closure of atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Satoshi; Taketazu, Mio; Mihara, Chihiro; Mimura, Yuko; Ishido, Hirotaka; Matsunaga, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2009-12-15

    Device closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) is sometimes followed by elevation of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of heart failure, and progression to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that the underlying diastolic dysfunction, assessed on tissue Doppler images (TDI) before device closure, can predict BNP level after ASD closure. The study subjects were 39 consecutive patients (age 27.5 +/- 16.3 years, range 5 to 63) who underwent device closure for ASD. Echocardiographic evaluation using TDI and 2-dimensional and pulse wave Doppler were performed, together with plasma BNP measurement 1 day before and 2 days after ASD closure. Before ASD closure, an age-dependent decrease was noted in left ventricular relaxation, assessed by early diastolic mitral annular velocity. ASD closure resulted in a decrease in early diastolic mitral annular velocity (from 14.7 to 12.3 cm/s, p <0.05) despite an increase in the left ventricular dimension (84% to 92% vs normal, p <0.05). These changes were associated with a parallel increase in BNP (17.9 to 48.4 pg/ml, p <0.05). Stepwise multivariate linear regression identified early diastolic mitral annular velocity before ASD closure and age as independent predictors of BNP levels after ASD closure (p <0.05). Consistent with this result, 2 patients with the lowest early diastolic mitral annular velocity developed exertional dyspnea after the procedure. In conclusion, our results indicate that TDI measurements could be useful to detect underlying diastolic dysfunction that can potentially cause heart failure after ASD closure and emphasize the importance of ASD closure at a young age before impairment of left ventricular relaxation.

  18. MCG101-induced cancer anorexia-cachexia features altered expression of hypothalamic Nucb2 and Cartpt and increased plasma levels of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptides.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore central and peripheral host responses to an anorexia-cachexia producing tumor. We focused on neuroendocrine anorexigenic signals in the hypothalamus, brainstem, pituitary and from the tumor per se. Expression of mRNA for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), nesfatin-1, thyrotropin (TSH) and the TSH receptor were explored. In addition, we examined changes in plasma TSH, CART peptides (CARTp) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MCG101 tumors or sham-treated. A sham-implanted, pair‑fed (PF) group was included to delineate between primary tumor and secondary effects from reduced feeding. Food intake and body weight were measured daily. mRNA levels from microdissected mouse brain samples were assayed using qPCR, and plasma levels were determined using ELISA. MCG101 tumors expectedly induced anorexia and loss of body weight. Tumor-bearing (TB) mice exhibited an increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA as well as a decrease in CART mRNA in the paraventricular area (PVN). The CART mRNA response was secondary to reduced caloric intake whereas nesfatin-1 mRNA appeared to be tumor-specifically induced. In the pituitary, CART and TSH mRNA were upregulated in the TB and PF animals compared to the freely fed controls. Plasma levels for CARTp were significantly elevated in TB but not PF mice whereas levels of TSH were unaffected. The plasma CARTp response was correlated to the degree of inflammation represented by SAP. The increase in nesfatin-1 mRNA in the PVN highlights nesfatin-1 as a plausible candidate for causing tumor-induced anorexia. CART mRNA expression in the PVN is likely an adaptation to reduced caloric intake secondary to a cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS)‑inducing tumor. The MCG101 tumor did not express CART mRNA, thus the elevation of plasma CARTp is host derived and likely driven by inflammation.

  19. Diverse peptide presentation of rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I Mamu-A 02 revealed by two peptide complex structures and insights into immune escape of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Dai, Lianpan; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Feng, Youjun; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2011-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)-restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses play a pivotal role in anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity and the control of viremia. The rhesus macaque is an important animal model for HIV-related research. Among the MHC I alleles of the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A 02 is prevalent, presenting in ≥20% of macaques. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of Mamu-A 02, the second structure-determined MHC I from the rhesus macaque after Mamu-A 01. The peptide presentation characteristics of Mamu-A 02 are exhibited in complex structures with two typical Mamu-A 02-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, YY9 (Nef159 to -167; YTSGPGIRY) and GY9 (Gag71 to -79; GSENLKSLY), derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These two peptides utilize similar primary anchor residues (Ser or Thr) at position 2 and Tyr at position 9. However, the central region of YY9 is different from that of GY9, a difference that may correlate with the immunogenic variance of these peptides. Further analysis indicated that the distinct conformations of these two peptides are modulated by four flexible residues in the Mamu-A 02 peptide-binding groove. The rare combination of these four residues in Mamu-A 02 leads to a variant presentation for peptides with different residues in their central regions. Additionally, in the two structures of the Mamu-A 02 complex, we compared the binding of rhesus and human β(2) microglobulin (β(2)m) to Mamu-A 02. We found that the peptide presentation of Mamu-A 02 is not affected by the interspecies interaction with human β(2)m. Our work broadens the understanding of CD8(+) T-cell-specific immunity against SIV in the rhesus macaque.

  20. Diverse Peptide Presentation of Rhesus Macaque Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Mamu-A*02 Revealed by Two Peptide Complex Structures and Insights into Immune Escape of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Dai, Lianpan; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, Feng; Feng, Youjun; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)-restricted CD8+ T-cell responses play a pivotal role in anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity and the control of viremia. The rhesus macaque is an important animal model for HIV-related research. Among the MHC I alleles of the rhesus macaque, Mamu-A*02 is prevalent, presenting in ≥20% of macaques. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of Mamu-A*02, the second structure-determined MHC I from the rhesus macaque after Mamu-A*01. The peptide presentation characteristics of Mamu-A*02 are exhibited in complex structures with two typical Mamu-A*02-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes, YY9 (Nef159 to -167; YTSGPGIRY) and GY9 (Gag71 to -79; GSENLKSLY), derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These two peptides utilize similar primary anchor residues (Ser or Thr) at position 2 and Tyr at position 9. However, the central region of YY9 is different from that of GY9, a difference that may correlate with the immunogenic variance of these peptides. Further analysis indicated that the distinct conformations of these two peptides are modulated by four flexible residues in the Mamu-A*02 peptide-binding groove. The rare combination of these four residues in Mamu-A*02 leads to a variant presentation for peptides with different residues in their central regions. Additionally, in the two structures of the Mamu-A*02 complex, we compared the binding of rhesus and human β2 microglobulin (β2m) to Mamu-A*02. We found that the peptide presentation of Mamu-A*02 is not affected by the interspecies interaction with human β2m. Our work broadens the understanding of CD8+ T-cell-specific immunity against SIV in the rhesus macaque. PMID:21561910

  1. Cloning and tissue distribution of appetite-regulating peptides in pirapitinga (Piaractus brachypomus).

    PubMed

    Volkoff, H

    2015-10-01

    Pirapitinga (or red-bellied pacu, Piaractus brachypomus, Characiforme, Serrasalmidae) is an economically important South American fish for which the endocrine mechanism of the regulation of feeding has never been examined. To better understand these mechanisms, cDNAs encoding the appetite-regulating peptides orexin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), apelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), leptin and ghrelin were isolated in pirapitinga and their mRNA distributions examined in peripheral tissues and brain. When compared to other fish, the sequences obtained for all peptides were most similar to those of other Characiforme fish (i.e. Mexican cavefish) and Siluriformes (catfish) as well as Cypriniformes (i.e. goldfish, zebrafish). All peptides were widely expressed within the brain. With the exception of CART, which was only expressed in brain, the mRNAs of all peptides were present in several peripheral tissues, including gastrointestinal tract, kidneys and gills. The widespread and peptide-specific distributions suggest that each peptide might have distinct physiological actions in the brain and on peripheral tissues, in particular on the gastrointestinal tract, which include feeding regulation. This preliminary study opens new avenues for further functional studies on the endocrine regulation of feeding in Serrasalmidae fish, including pirapitinga.

  2. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Is Associated with Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction and Elevated Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shu-ichi; Tanaka, Suguru; Maeda, Daichi; Morita, Hideaki; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Ito, Takahide; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a biomarker of subclinical levels of inflammation, is significantly correlated with cardiovascular events. Purpose We investigated the association between suPAR and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) among cardiac inpatients. Methods and Results In total, 242 patients (mean age 71.3 ± 9.8 years; 70 women) admitted to the cardiology department were enrolled in the study. suPAR was significantly correlated with LVEF (R = -0.24, P<0.001), LVMI (R = 0.16, P = 0.014) and BNP (R = 0.46, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, the highest suPAR tertile (> 3236 pg/mL) was associated with low LVEF (< 50%) and elevated BNP (> 300 pg/mL) with an odds ratio of 3.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–12.1) and 5.36 (95% CI, 1.32–21.8), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, log-transformed estimated glomerular filtration rate (log(eGFR)), C-reactive protein, and diuretic use. The association between suPAR and LVMI was not statistically significant. In multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis, addition of log(suPAR) to the combination of age, sex, log(eGFR) and CRP incrementally improved the prediction of low LVEF (area under the curve [AUC], 0.827 to 0.852, P = 0.046) and BNP ≥ 300 pg/mL (AUC, 0.869 to 0.906; P = 0.029). Conclusions suPAR was associated with low LVEF and elevated BNP, but not with left ventricular hypertrophy, independent of CRP, renal function, and diuretic use among cardiac inpatients who were not undergoing chronic hemodialysis. PMID:28135310

  3. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, n-Terminal Fragment of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcidiol Are Independently Associated with the Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Reyes, Roberto; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Pello, Ana María; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Martínez-Milla, Juan; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Piñero, Antonio; Navarro, Felipe; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the relationship of the Syntax Score (SS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC), with plasma levels of biomarkers related to cardiovascular damage and mineral metabolism, as there is sparse information in this field. Methods We studied 270 patients with coronary disease that had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) six months before. Calcidiol, fibroblast growth factor-23, parathormone, phosphate and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, galectin-3, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP] levels, among other biomarkers, were determined. CAC was assessed by coronary angiogram as low-grade (0–1) and high-grade (2–3) calcification, measured with a semiquantitative scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (severe). For the SS study patients were divided in SS<14 and SS≥14. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results MCP-1 predicted independently the SS (RC = 1.73 [95%CI = 0.08–3.39]; p = 0.040), along with NT-proBNP (RC = 0.17 [95%CI = 0.05–0.28]; p = 0.004), male sex (RC = 4.15 [95%CI = 1.47–6.83]; p = 0.003), age (RC = 0.13 [95%CI = 0.02–0.24]; p = 0.020), hypertension (RC = 3.64, [95%CI = 0.77–6.50]; p = 0.013), hyperlipidemia (RC = 2.78, [95%CI = 0.28–5.29]; p = 0.030), and statins (RC = 6.12 [95%CI = 1.28–10.96]; p = 0.013). Low calcidiol predicted high-grade calcification independently (OR = 0.57 [95% CI = 0.36–0.90]; p = 0.013) along with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR = 0.38 [95%CI = 0.19–0.78]; p = 0.006), diabetes (OR = 2.35 [95%CI = 1.11–4.98]; p = 0.028) and age (OR = 1.37 [95%CI = 1.18–1.59]; p<0.001). During follow-up (1.79 [0.94–2.86] years), 27 patients developed ACS, stroke, or transient ischemic attack. A combined score using SS and CAC predicted independently the development of the outcome. Conclusions MCP-1 and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of SS, while low calcidiol plasma levels

  4. Swedish mutant APP-based BACE1 binding site peptide reduces APP β-cleavage and cerebral Aβ levels in Alzheimer's mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Hou, Huayan; Mori, Takashi; Sawmiller, Darrell; Smith, Adam; Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanjiang; Giunta, Brian; Sanberg, Paul R; Zhang, Sheqing; Tan, Jun

    2015-06-19

    BACE1 initiates amyloid-β (Aβ) generation and the resultant cerebral amyloidosis, as a characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, inhibition of BACE1 has been the focus of a large body of research. The most recent clinical trials highlight the difficulty involved in this type of anti-AD therapy as evidenced by side effects likely due to the ubiquitous nature of BACE1, which cleaves multiple substrates. The human Swedish mutant form of amyloid protein precursor (APPswe) has been shown to possess a higher affinity for BACE1 compared to wild-type APP (APPwt). We pursued a new approach wherein harnessing this greater affinity to modulate BACE1 APP processing activity. We found that one peptide derived from APPswe, containing the β-cleavage site, strongly inhibits BACE1 activity and thereby reduces Aβ production. This peptide, termed APPswe BACE1 binding site peptide (APPsweBBP), was further conjugated to the fusion domain of the HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) at the C-terminus to facilitate its biomembrane-penetrating activity. APPwt and APPswe over-expressing CHO cells treated with this TAT-conjugated peptide resulted in a marked reduction of Aβ and a significant increase of soluble APPα. Intraperitoneal administration of this peptide to 5XFAD mice markedly reduced β-amyloid deposits as well as improved hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  5. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  6. Galanin-like peptide (GALP) neurone-specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling regulates GALP mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of males and luteinising hormone levels in both sexes.

    PubMed

    Aziz, R; Beymer, M; Negrón, A L; Newshan, A; Yu, G; Rosati, B; McKinnon, D; Fukuda, M; Lin, R Z; Mayer, C; Boehm, U; Acosta-Martínez, M

    2014-07-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) neurones participate in the metabolic control of reproduction and are targets of insulin and leptin regulation. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is common to the signalling pathways utilised by both insulin and leptin. Therefore, we investigated whether PI3K signalling in neurones expressing GALP plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of the GALP gene and in the metabolic control of luteinising hormone (LH) release. Accordingly, we deleted PI3K catalytic subunits p110α and p110β via conditional gene targeting (cKO) in mice (GALP-p110α/β cKO). To monitor PI3K signalling in GALP neurones, these animals were also crossed with Cre-dependent FoxO1GFP reporter mice. Compared to insulin-infused control animals, the PI3K-Akt-dependent FoxO1GFP nuclear exclusion in GALP neurones was abolished in GALP-p110α/β cKO mice. We next used food deprivation to investigate whether the GALP-neurone specific ablation of PI3K activity affected the susceptibility of the gonadotrophic axis to negative energy balance. Treatment did not affect LH levels in either sex. However, a significant genotype effect on LH levels was observed in females. By contrast, no genotype effect on LH levels was observed in males. A sex-specific genotype effect on hypothalamic GALP mRNA was observed, with fed and fasted GALP-p110α/β cKO males having lower GALP mRNA expression compared to wild-type fed males. Finally, the effects of gonadectomy and steroid hormone replacement on GALP mRNA levels were investigated. Compared to vehicle-treated mice, steroid hormone replacement reduced mediobasal hypothalamus GALP expression in wild-type and GALP-p110α/β cKO animals. In addition, within the castrated and vehicle-treated group and compared to wild-type mice, LH levels were lower in GALP-p110α/β cKO males. Double immunofluorescence using GALP-Cre/R26-YFP mice showed androgen and oestrogen receptor co-localisation within GALP neurones. Our data demonstrate that GALP

  7. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Ab initio computational study of reaction mechanism of peptide bond formation on HF/6-31G(d,p) level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, P.; Lalita, M. N. T.; Cahyono, B.; Laksitorini, M. D.; Hildayani, S. Z.

    2017-02-01

    Peptide plays an important role in modulation of various cell functions. Therefore, formation reaction of the peptide is important for chemical reactions. One way to probe the reaction of peptide synthesis is a computational method. The purpose of this research is to determine the reaction mechanism for peptide bond formation on Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine by ab initio computational approach. The calculations were carried out by theory and basis set HF/6-31G(d,p) for four mechanisms (path 1 to 4) that proposed in this research. The results show that the highest of the rate determining step between reactant and transition state (TS) for path 1, 2, 3, and 4 are 163.06 kJ.mol-1, 1868 kJ.mol-1, 5685 kJ.mol-1, and 1837 kJ.mol-1. The calculation shows that the most preferred reaction of Ac-PV-NH2 and Ac-VP-NH2 synthesis from amino acid proline and valine are on the path 1 (initiated with the termination of H+ in proline amino acid) that produce Ac-PV-NH2.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  10. Safety and preliminary efficacy data of a novel Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) peptide inhibitor administered intralesionally at four dose levels in patients with cervical malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is now considered the second leading cause of death among women worldwide, and its incidence has reached alarming levels, especially in developing countries. Similarly, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), the precursor stage for cervical cancer, represents a growing health problem among younger women as the HSIL management regimes that have been developed are not fully effective. From the etiological point of view, the presence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role for developing cervical malignancies, and viral DNA has been detected in 99.7% of cervical tumors at the later stages. CIGB-300 is a novel cyclic synthetic peptide that induces apoptosis in malignant cells and elicits antitumor activity in cancer animal models. CIGB-300 impairs the Casein Kinase (CK2) phosphorylation, by targeting the substrate's phosphoaceptor domain. Based on the perspectives of CIGB-300 to treat cancer, this "first-in-human" study investigated its safety and tolerability in patients with cervical malignancies. Methods Thirty-one women with colposcopically and histologically diagnosed microinvasive or pre-invasive cervical cancer were enrolled in a dose escalating study. CIGB-300 was administered sequentially at 14, 70, 245 and 490 mg by intralesional injections during 5 consecutive days to groups of 7 – 10 patients. Toxicity was monitored daily until fifteen days after the end of treatment, when patients underwent conization. Digital colposcopy, histology, and HPV status were also evaluated. Results No maximum-tolerated dose or dose-limiting toxicity was achieved. The most frequent local events were pain, bleeding, hematoma and erythema at the injection site. The systemic adverse events were rash, facial edema, itching, hot flashes, and localized cramps. 75% of the patients experienced a significant lesion reduction at colposcopy and 19% exhibited full histological regression. HPV DNA was negative in 48

  11. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  12. Comparison of Plasma Glucose and Gut Hormone Levels Between Drinking Enteral Formula Over a Period of 5 and 20 Minutes in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamiko, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Taguri, Masataka; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Background A fast eating speed is reportedly associated with obesity, fatty liver, and metabolic syndrome. As a comparison of postprandial glucose levels after eating quickly or slowly has not been previously reported for Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, we evaluated the impact of the fast or slow ingestion of an enteral formula (liquid meal) on glucose metabolism. Methods Ten Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who had been hospitalized at our hospital were enrolled. All the subjects received an enteral formula for breakfast. The study was performed over a 2-day period in each subject (day 1: enteral formula was consumed over a 5-minute period; day 2: enteral formula was consumed over a 20-minute period). The subjects were requested to fast for at least 12 hours before eating breakfast, and blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after the start of breakfast. Results The areas under the curve (AUCs) of the plasma glucose, serum insulin, plasma active ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), plasma total glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and serum total peptide YY (PYY) levels were not significantly changed by intake over a 5-minute or 20-minute period. Conclusions Eating quickly per se probably does not affect postprandial glucose excursions, but the increased energy intake resulting from eating quickly may increase the body weight and increase insulin resistance. Eating quickly may increase energy intake and worsen long-term metabolic parameters. PMID:27635181

  13. Challenges in mass spectrometry-based quantification of bioactive peptides: a case study exploring the neuropeptide Y family.

    PubMed

    Xi, Li; Jin, Yaping; Parker, Edward A; Josh, Peter; Jones, Alun; Wijffels, Gene; Colgrave, Michelle L

    2012-01-01

    The study of biologically active peptides is critical to the understanding of physiological pathways, especially those involved in the development of disease. Historically, the measurement of biologically active endogenous peptides has been undertaken by radioimmunoassay, a highly sensitive and robust technique that permits the detection of physiological concentrations in different biofluid and tissue extracts. Over recent years, a range of mass spectrometric approaches have been applied to peptide quantification with limited degrees of success. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) belong to the NPY family exhibiting regulatory effects on appetite and feeding behavior. The physiological significance of these peptides depends on their molecular forms and in vivo concentrations systemically and at local sites within tissues. In this report, we describe an approach for quantification of individual peptides within mixtures using high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the NPY family peptides. Aspects of quantification including sample preparation, the use of matrix-matched calibration curves, and internal standards will be discussed. This method for the simultaneous determination of NPY, PYY, and PP was accurate and reproducible but lacks the sensitivity required for measurement of their endogenous concentration in plasma. The advantages of mass spectrometric quantification will be discussed alongside the current obstacles and challenges.

  14. Comparison of in-gel and on-membrane digestion methods at low to sub-pmol level for subsequent peptide and fragment-ion mass analysis using matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Courchesne, P L; Luethy, R; Patterson, S D

    1997-01-01

    The success of the mass spectrometric-based approaches for the identification of gel-separated proteins relies upon recovery of peptides, without high levels of ionization-suppressing contaminants, in solvents compatible with the mass spectrometer being employed. We sought to determine whether in-gel or on-membrane digestion provided a significant advantage when low to sub-pmol quantities of gel-separated proteins were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) with respect to the number and size of released peptides. Serial dilutions of five standard proteins of M(r) 17,000 to 97,000 (from 16 pmol to 125 fmol) were electrophoresed and subjected to in-gel digestion (using a microcolumn clean-up protocol, Courchesne, P.L. and Patterson, S. D., BioTechniques, 1997, in press) or on-membrane digestion following blotting to the PVDF-based membranes, Immobilon-P and Immobilon-CD. Peptide maps were able to be obtained for all proteins at the detection limit of each method (Immobilon-P and Immobilon-CD, 0.5 pmol; and in-gel, 125 fmol), and searches of Swiss-Prot or a non-redundant database (> 193000 entries) successfully identified all of the proteins, except beta-casein. Fragment-ion spectra using a curved-field reflector MALDI-MS were obtained from more than one peptide per protein at loads down to 250 fmol (except beta-casein). Using the uninterpreted data, a search of the nonredundant database and a six-way translation of GenBank dbEST (> 2,208,000 entries total) was able to identify myoglobin, carbonic anhydrase II, and phosphorylase b.

  15. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  16. New Cross-Talk Layer between Ultraconserved Non-Coding RNAs, MicroRNAs and Polycomb Protein YY1 in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Colonna, Vincenza; Romanelli, Alessandra; Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Perdonà, Sisto; Castaldo, Luigi; Febbraio, Ferdinando; de Nigris, Filomena; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved elements in mammals, and exert key regulatory functions. Growing evidence shows that miRNAs can interact with another class of non-coding RNAs, so-called transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs), which take part in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation processes. We report here the interaction of miRNAs and T-UCRs as a network modulating the availability of these non-coding RNAs in bladder cancer cells. In our cell system, antagomiR-596 increased the expression of T-UCR 201+. Moreover, T-UCR 8+ silencing increased miR-596 expression, which in turn reduced total T-UCR 283+, showing that the perturbation of one element in this network changes the expression of other interactors. In addition, we identify the polycomb protein Yin Yang 1 (YY1) as mediator of binding between miR-596 and T-UCR 8+. These new findings describe for the first time a network between T-UCRs, miRNAs and YY1 protein, highlighting the existence of an additional layer of gene expression regulation. PMID:27983635

  17. Leveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    Geodetic leveling by the U.S. Geological Survey provides a framework of accurate elevations for topographic mapping. Elevations are referred to the Sea Level Datum of 1929. Lines of leveling may be run either with automatic or with precise spirit levels, by either the center-wire or the three-wire method. For future use, the surveys are monumented with bench marks, using standard metal tablets or other marking devices. The elevations are adjusted by least squares or other suitable method and are published in lists of control.

  18. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  19. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  20. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  1. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  2. IP3R2 levels dictate the apoptotic sensitivity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to an IP3R-derived peptide targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Akl, H; Monaco, G; La Rovere, R; Welkenhuyzen, K; Kiviluoto, S; Vervliet, T; Molgó, J; Distelhorst, C W; Missiaen, L; Mikoshiba, K; Parys, J B; De Smedt, H; Bultynck, G

    2013-05-16

    Disrupting inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R)/B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) complexes using a cell-permeable peptide (stabilized TAT-fused IP3R-derived peptide (TAT-IDP(S))) that selectively targets the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 but not that of B-cell lymphoma 2-extra large (Bcl-Xl) potentiated pro-apoptotic Ca(2+) signaling in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. However, the molecular mechanisms rendering cancer cells but not normal cells particularly sensitive to disrupting IP3R/Bcl-2 complexes are poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of TAT-IDP(S) in a more heterogeneous Bcl-2-dependent cancer model using a set of 'primed to death' diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DL-BCL) cell lines containing elevated Bcl-2 levels. We discovered a large heterogeneity in the apoptotic responses of these cells to TAT-IDP(S) with SU-DHL-4 being most sensitive and OCI-LY-1 being most resistant. This sensitivity strongly correlated with the ability of TAT-IDP(S) to promote IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. Although total IP3R-expression levels were very similar among SU-DHL-4 and OCI-LY-1, we discovered that the IP3R2-protein level was the highest for SU-DHL-4 and the lowest for OCI-LY-1. Strikingly, TAT-IDP(S)-induced Ca(2+) rise and apoptosis in the different DL-BCL cell lines strongly correlated with their IP3R2-protein level, but not with IP3R1-, IP3R3- or total IP3R-expression levels. Inhibiting or knocking down IP3R2 activity in SU-DHL-4-reduced TAT-IDP(S)-induced apoptosis, which is compatible with its ability to dissociate Bcl-2 from IP3R2 and to promote IP3-induced pro-apoptotic Ca(2+) signaling. Thus, certain chronically activated B-cell lymphoma cells are addicted to high Bcl-2 levels for their survival not only to neutralize pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family members but also to suppress IP3R hyperactivity. In particular, cancer cells expressing high levels of IP3R2 are addicted to IP3R/Bcl-2 complex formation and disruption of these complexes using peptide tools

  3. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  4. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  5. Structural and intrinsic Josephson properties of Bi2Sr2Ca1-yYyCu2O8+δ single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, K.; Murata, K.; Irie, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, Bi2Sr2Ca1-yYyCu2O8+δ (BSCYCO) single crystals with yttrium doping content of y = 0-0.30 were synthesized by a self-flux method. The critical temperature and c-axis lattice constant of BSCYCO were controlled by the substitution of yttrium at the calcium site. A 290 × 90 × 0.4 μm3 mesa structure was fabricated using photolithography and argon-ion milling. A multibranch structure in current-voltage characteristics was successfully observed for mesas of BSCYCO (y = 0-0.10). The critical current of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) in BSCYCO mesas was systematically investigated.

  6. A novel NF-κB/YY1/microRNA-10a regulatory circuit in fibroblast-like synoviocytes regulates inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Nan; Gu, Jintao; Huang, Tonglie; Zhang, Cun; Shu, Zhen; Li, Meng; Hao, Qiang; Li, Weina; Zhang, Wangqian; Zhao, Jinkang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Luyu; Wang, Shuning; Jin, Xiaohang; Xue, Xiaochang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2016-01-01

    The main etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is overexpressed inflammatory cytokines and tissue injury mediated by persistent NF-κB activation. MicroRNAs widely participate in the regulation of target gene expression and play important roles in various diseases. Here, we explored the mechanisms of microRNAs in RA. We found that microRNA (miR)-10a was downregulated in the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) of RA patients compared with osteoarthritis (OA) controls, and this downregulation could be triggered by TNF-α and IL-1β in an NF-κB-dependent manner through promoting the expression of the YingYang 1 (YY1) transcription factor. Downregulated miR-10a could accelerate IκB degradation and NF-κB activation by targeting IRAK4, TAK1 and BTRC. This miR-10a-mediated NF-κB activation then significantly promoted the production of various inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-13. In addition, transfection of a miR-10a inhibitor accelerated the proliferation and migration of FLSs. Collectively, our data demonstrates the existence of a novel NF-κB/YY1/miR-10a/NF-κB regulatory circuit that promotes the excessive secretion of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory cytokines and the proliferation and migration of RA FLSs. Thus, miR-10a acts as a switch to control this regulatory circuit and may serve as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for RA treatment. PMID:26821827

  7. B-type natriuretic peptide modulates ghrelin, hunger, and satiety in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Grimm, Gabriele; Resl, Michael; Heinisch, Birgit; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Clodi, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is accompanied by anorexia and increased release of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking heart failure and appetite regulation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of intravenous BNP administration on appetite-regulating hormones and subjective ratings of hunger and satiety in 10 healthy volunteers. Participants received in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, single-blinded study (subject) placebo once and 3.0 pmol/kg/min human BNP-32 once administered as a continuous infusion during 4 h. Circulating concentrations of appetite-regulating peptides were measured hourly. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. BNP inhibited the fasting-induced increase in total and acylated ghrelin concentrations over time (P = 0.043 and P = 0.038, respectively). In addition, BNP decreased the subjective rating of hunger (P = 0.009) and increased the feeling of satiety (P = 0.012) when compared with placebo. There were no significant changes in circulating peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide, leptin, and adiponectin concentrations. In summary, our results demonstrate that BNP exerts anorectic effects and reduces ghrelin concentrations in men. These data, taken together with the known cardiovascular properties of ghrelin, support the existence of a heart-gut-brain axis, which could be therapeutically targeted in patients with heart failure and obesity.

  8. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  9. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  10. Determinants of recombinant production of antimicrobial cationic peptides and creation of peptide variants in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Falla, T; Wu, M; Fidai, S; Burian, J; Kay, W; Hancock, R E

    1998-06-29

    Cationic peptides possessing antibacterial activity are virtually ubiquitous in nature, and offer exciting prospects as new therapeutic agents. We had previously demonstrated that such peptides could be produced by fusion protein technology in bacteria and several carrier proteins had been tested as fusion partners including glutathione-S-transferase, S. aureus protein A, IgG binding protein and P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprF. However these fusion partners, while successfully employed in peptide expression, were not optimized for high level production of cationic peptides (Piers, K., Brow, M. L., and Hancock, R. E. W. 1993, Gene 137, 7-13). In this paper we took advantage of a small replication protein RepA from E. coli and used its truncated version to construct fusion partners. The minimal elements required for high level expression of cationic peptide were defined as a DNA sequence encoding a fusion protein comprising, from the N-terminus, a 68 amino acid carrier region, an anionic prepro domain, a single methionine and the peptide of interest. The 68 amino acid carrier region was a block of three polypeptides consisting of a truncated RepA, a synthetic cellulose binding domain and a hexa histidine domain. The improved system showed high level expression and simplified downstream purification. The active peptide could be yielded by CNBr cleavage of the fusion protein. This novel vector was used to express three classes of cationic peptides including the alpha-helical peptide CEMA, the looped peptide bactenecin and the extended peptide indolicidin. In addition, mutagenesis of the peptide gene to produce peptide variants of CEMA and indolicidin using the improved vector system was shown to be successful.

  11. Humoral responses in Rhodnius prolixus: bacterial feeding induces differential patterns of antibacterial activity and enhances mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides in the midgut

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a major vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. It has a strictly blood-sucking habit in all life stages, ingesting large amounts of blood from vertebrate hosts from which it can acquire pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the midgut of the insect is vital to control possible infection, and to maintain the microbiota already present in the digestive tract. Methods In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut in vitro against the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. We also analysed the abundance of mRNAs encoding for defensins, prolixicin and lysozymes in the midgut of insects orally infected by these bacteria at 1 and 7 days after feeding. Results Our results showed that the anterior midgut contents contain a higher inducible antibacterial activity than those of the posterior midgut. We observed that the main AMP encoding mRNAs in the anterior midgut, 7 days after a blood meal, were for lysozyme A, B, defensin C and prolixicin while in the posterior midgut lysozyme B and prolixicin transcripts predominated. Conclusion Our findings suggest that R. prolixus modulates AMP gene expression upon ingestion of bacteria with patterns that are distinct and dependent upon the species of bacteria responsible for infection. PMID:24885969

  12. Haemophilus ducreyi is resistant to human antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mount, Kristy L B; Townsend, Carisa A; Bauer, Margaret E

    2007-09-01

    We examined the susceptibility of Haemophilus ducreyi to antimicrobial peptides likely to be encountered in vivo during human infection. H. ducreyi was significantly more resistant than Escherichia coli to the bactericidal effects of all peptides tested. Class I and II H. ducreyi strains exhibited similar levels of resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Administration of Myelin Basic Protein Peptides Encapsulated in Mannosylated Liposomes Normalizes Level of Serum TNF-α and IL-2 and Chemoattractants CCL2 and CCL4 in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Lomakin, Yakov; Belogurov, Alexey; Glagoleva, Irina; Stepanov, Alexey; Zakharov, Konstantin; Okunola, John; Smirnov, Ivan; Genkin, Dmitry; Gabibov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that immunodominant MBP peptides encapsulated in mannosylated liposomes (Xemys) effectively suppressed experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Within the frames of the successfully completed phase I clinical trial, we investigated changes in the serum cytokine profile after Xemys administration in MS patients. We observed a statistically significant decrease of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1β/CCL4, IL-7, and IL-2 at the time of study completion. In contrast, the serum levels of TNF-α were remarkably elevated. Our data suggest that the administration of Xemys leads to a normalization of cytokine status in MS patients to values commonly reported for healthy subjects. These data are an important contribution for the upcoming Xemys clinical trials.

  14. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  16. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  17. Serum levels of N-terminal fragment of precursor protein brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Koyama, Takahiro; Furuta, Itsuko; Takeda, Masamitsu; Nishida, Ryutaro; Yamada, Takahiro; Morikawa, Mamoru; Minakami, Hisanori

    2013-01-16

    Twin pregnancy differs considerably from singleton pregnancy in many aspects and it is unknown how serum NT-proBNP level behaves in women with twin pregnancies. Serum NT-proBNP levels were determined longitudinally at gestational weeks (GW) 24 and 35 in normotensive women with 13 twin and 99 singleton pregnancies. The effects of maternal demographic characteristics on NT-proBNP levels were also analyzed. The serum NT-proBNP levels (pg/ml) in twin pregnancies, which were not different from those in singleton pregnancies at 24 GW (26±15 vs. 40±27, respectively, P=0.0718), increased significantly (P=0.0038) and were significantly higher than those in singleton pregnancies at 35 GW (72±49 vs. 34±24, P<0.0001). In the analysis including women with singleton pregnancies, the serum levels of NT-proBNP at 35 GW were significantly inversely correlated with pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and were significantly higher in nulliparous than multiparous women. Thus, women with twin pregnancy were likely to exhibit an increase in serum NT-proBNP levels in the late stage of pregnancy, especially in lean and nulliparous women. The relative greater blood volume expansion occurring in twin than in singleton pregnancies was considered to be responsible for this phenomenon.

  18. A new stable GIP-Oxyntomodulin hybrid peptide improved bone strength both at the organ and tissue levels in genetically-inherited type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Sity Aishah; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Flatt, Peter R; Bouvard, Beatrice; Chappard, Daniel; Irwin, Nigel; Mabilleau, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progress worldwide with detrimental effects on several physiological systems including bone tissue mainly by affecting bone quality. Several gut hormones analogues have been proven potent in ameliorating bone quality. In the present study, we used the leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice as a model of obesity and severe T2DM to assess the extent of bone quality alterations at the organ and tissue levels. We also examined the beneficial effects of gut hormone therapy in this model by using a new triple agonist ([d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm) active at the GIP, GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. As expected, db/db mice presented with dramatic alterations of bone strength at the organ level associated with deterioration of trabecular and cortical microarchitectures and an augmentation in osteoclast numbers. At the tissue level, these animals presented also with alterations of bone strength (reduced hardness, indentation modulus and dissipated energy) with modifications of tissue mineral distribution, collagen glycation and collagen maturity. The use of [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm considerably improved bone strength at the organ level with modest effects on trabecular microarchitecture. At the tissue level, [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm ameliorated bone strength reductions with positive effects on collagen glycation and collagen maturity. This study provides support for including gut hormone analogues as possible new therapeutic strategies for improving bone quality in bone complications associated to T2DM.

  19. [Usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 1, MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1, hyaluronic acid and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and patients with arthritic complaints].

    PubMed

    Czeczuga, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disease that can affect skin, nervous system, heart and joints. Lyme arthritis can develope in about 60% of "not treated" Lyme disease patients, 10% of patients may develope chronic arthritis. Lyme arhritis symptoms (especially chronic arthritis) is similar to rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to establish the usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), hialuronic acid (HA) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with arthritic complaints. Plasma levels of MMP-3, HA and anti-CCP were significantly higher in RA group than in Lyme arthritis group and patients with arthritic complaints. There were no significant differences in serum levels of MMP-3, MMP-9, TIMP-1, HA, anti-CCP between Lyme arthritis patients and patients with arthritic complaints and these parameters are not usefull in differential diagnoses of Lyme arthritis.

  20. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  1. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system.

  2. Peptides and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.

    2016-01-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25805003

  3. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  4. Investigation of changes in brain natriuretic peptide serum levels and its diagnostic value in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in patients referred to emergency department of Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Azizkhani, Reza; Keshavarz, Es’haq

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head trauma is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) care. Over the past decade, initial management strategies in mild and moderate head trauma have become focused on selective computed tomography (CT) use based upon presence or absence of specific aspects of patient history and/or clinical examination which has received more attention following reports of increased cancer risk from CT scans. Recently changes in serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels following head trauma have been studied. We investigated the changes in serum levels of BNP in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in whom the first brain CT scanning was normal. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional, descriptive research. It was performed in patients with mild and moderate head trauma. Forty-one patients with isolated mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale = 9–15) were included. First brain CT scans were obtained during 2 h after ED arrival and the second one after 24 h. Plasma BNP levels were determined using a specific immunoassay system. Results: Twenty-three patients were in Group A (with normal first and second brain CT) and 18 patients in Group B (with normal first and abnormal second brain CT). With P = 0.001, serum BNP level = 9.04 was determined for differentiating two groups. Conclusion: We concluded that serum BNP level is higher in patients with mild and moderate head trauma with delayed pathologic changes in second brain CT relative to patients with mild and moderate head trauma and with normal delayed brain CT. PMID:28217629

  5. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  6. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-09-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer's disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F i and the nonspecific force F 0 between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F i between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  7. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  9. Investigation of the Sequence and Length Dependence for Cell-Penetrating Prenylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Barany, George; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful delivery tools for introducing molecules of interest into cells. A new class of cell penetrating molecules has been recently reported--cell penetrating, prenylated peptides. In this study a series of such peptides was synthesized to examine the relationship between peptide sequence and level of peptide internalization and to probe their mechanism of internalization. This study revealed that prenylated peptides internalize via a non-endocytotic pathway regardless of sequence. Sequence length and identity was found to play a role in peptide uptake but prenylated sequences as short as two amino acids were found to exhibit significant cell penetrating properties. PMID:20004573

  10. Heterologous production of peptides in plants: fusion proteins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Viana, Juliane Flávia Cançado; Dias, Simoni Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Lacorte, Cristiano

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the ectopic production of proteins and peptides of different organisms leading to biopharmaceutical production in large cultures of bacterial, yeasts and mammalian cells. Otherwise, the expression of recombinant proteins and peptides in plants is an attractive alternative presenting several advantages over the commonly used expression systems including reduced production costs, easy scale-up and reduced risks of pathogen contamination. Different types of proteins and peptides have been expressed in plants, including antibodies, antigens, and proteins and peptides of medical, veterinary and industrial applications. However, apart from providing a proof of concept, the use of plants as platforms for heterologous protein and peptide production still depends on key steps towards optimization including the enhancement of expression levels, manipulation of post-transcriptional modifications and improvements in purification methods. In this review, strategies to increase heterologous protein and peptide stability and accumulation are discussed, focusing on the expression of peptides through the use of gene fusions.

  11. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  12. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  13. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  15. The production of S-equol from daidzein is associated with a cluster of three genes in Eggerthella sp. YY7918

    PubMed Central

    KAWADA, Yuika; YOKOYAMA, Shinichiro; YANASE, Emiko; NIWA, Toshio; SUZUKI, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Daidzein (DZN) is converted to equol (EQL) by intestinal bacteria. We previously reported that Eggerthella sp. YY7918, which is found in human feces, is an EQL-producing bacterium and analyzed its whole genomic sequence. We found three coding sequences (CDSs) in this bacterium that showed 99% similarity to the EQL-producing enzymes of Lactococcus sp. 20-92. These identified CDSs were designated eqlA, eqlB, and eqlC and thought to encode daidzein reductase (DZNR), dihydrodaidzein reductase (DHDR), and tetrahydrodaidzein reductase (THDR), respectively. These genes were cloned into pColdII. Recombinant plasmids were then introduced into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and DZNR, DHDR, and THDR were expressed and purified by 6×His-Tag chromatography. We confirmed that these three enzymes were involved in the conversion of DZN to EQL. Purified DZNR converted DZN to dihydrodaizein (DHD) in the presence of NADPH. DHDR converted DHD to tetrahydrodaizein (THD) in the presence of NADPH. Neither enzyme showed activities with NADH. THDR converted THD in the absence of cofactors, NAD(P)H, and also produced DHD as a by-product. Thus, we propose that THDR is not a reductase but a new type of dismutase. The GC content of these clusters was 64%, similar to the overall genomic GC content for Eggerthella and Coriobacteriaceae (56–60%), and higher than that for Lactococcus garvieae (39%), even though the gene cluster showed 99% similarity to that in Lactococcus sp. 20-92. Taken together, our results indicate that the gene cluster associated with EQL production evolved in high-GC bacteria including Coriobacteriaceae and was then laterally transferred to Lactococcus sp. 20-92. PMID:27508112

  16. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  17. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment.

  18. Tool developments for structure-function studies of host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, or host defense peptides, are universal signaling and effector molecules in host defense and innate immunity. This article highlights various tools developed for cathelicidins and defensins, ranging from peptide identification, production, and structural biology, including the eight databases for antimicrobial peptides. Novel peptides can be identified from natural sources at both gene and protein levels. Solid-phase synthesis and bacterial expression are the two important methods for peptide production. Three-dimensional structures of antimicrobial peptides, primarily determined by solution NMR techniques, are essential for an in-depth understanding of the mode of action. The introduction of octanoyl phosphatidylglycerol as a bacterial membrane-mimetic model provides new insights into peptide-lipid interactions. The incorporation of structure and activity data into the antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.html) will lead to an integrated understanding of these peptides via structural bioinformatics.

  19. Ghrelin and PYY levels in adolescents with severe obesity: effects of weight loss induced by long-term exercise training and modified food habits.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Carine; Mougin, Fabienne; Nguyen, Nhu Uyen; Bouhaddi, Malika; Nicolet-Guénat, Marie; Dumoulin, Gilles

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated (a) changes in ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations during a weight reduction programme and (b) baseline ghrelin and PYY levels as predictors of weight loss in 32 severely obese adolescents (BMI z score = 4.1). Subjects spent an academic year in an institution for childhood obesity. Fasting ghrelin and PYY, leptin, insulin levels and insulin resistance were measured at baseline (month 0) and during the programme (months 3, 6, 9). In addition, 15 normal-weight teenagers served as reference for the baseline assessments. At baseline, obese teenagers had lower ghrelin and PYY concentrations than normal-weight adolescents (P < 0.05). Moreover, they showed significantly higher leptin, insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) (P < 0.0001). During the lifestyle modification, there was a significant decrease in body weight among obese teenagers, associated with an increase in ghrelin (apparent from month 6; P < 0.05), a decrease in leptin (from month 3; P < 0.05) and a decrease in insulin and HOMA (from month 3; P < 0.0001), without any significant change in PYY. Anthropometrical changes were correlated neither with baseline ghrelin levels nor with changes in ghrelin and PYY after the lifestyle modification. However, higher baseline PYY tended to correlate with greater anthropometrical changes (P < 0.1). In adolescents with severe obesity, a long-term combination of supervised aerobic exercises and a balanced diet led to weight reduction and increased ghrelin concentrations, without any change in PYY concentrations. Moreover, baseline PYY concentrations might be considered as predictors of weight loss.

  20. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavinson, V. Kh.; Polyakova, V. O.; Linkova, N. S.; Dudkov, A. V.; Kvetnoy, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells. PMID:22312461

  1. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  2. Mcl-1 and YY1 inhibition and induction of DR5 by the BH3-mimetic Obatoclax (GX15-070) contribute in the sensitization of B-NHL cells to TRAIL apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Paniagua, Melisa A; Baritaki, Stavroula; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney F; González-Bonilla, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The pan Bcl-2 family antagonist Obatoclax (GX15-070), currently in clinical trials, was shown to sensitize TRAIL-resistant tumors to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via the release of Bak and Bim from Mcl-1 or Bcl-2/Bcl-XL complexes or by the activation of Bax, though other mechanisms were not examined. Herein, we hypothesize that Obatoclax-mediated sensitization to TRAIL apoptosis may also result from alterations of the apoptotic pathways. The TRAIL-resistant B-cell line Ramos was used as a model for investigation. Treatment of Ramos cells with obatoclax significantly inhibited the expression of several members of the Bcl-2 family, dissociated Bak from Mcl-1 and inhibited the NFκB activity. Cells treated with Mcl-1 siRNA were sensitized to TRAIL apoptosis. We examined whether the sensitization of Ramos to TRAIL by Obatoclax resulted from signaling of the DR4 and/or DR5. Transfection with DR5 siRNA, but not with DR4 siRNA, sensitized the cells to apoptosis following treatment with Obatoclax and TRAIL. The signaling via DR5 correlated with Obatoclax-induced inhibition of the DR5 repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Transfection with YY1 siRNA sensitized the cells to TRAIL apoptosis following treatment with Obatoclax and TRAIL. Overall, the present findings reveal a new mechanism of Obatoclax-induced sensitization to TRAIL apoptosis and the involvement of the inhibition of NFκB activity and downstream Mcl-1 and YY1 expressions and activities. PMID:21822052

  3. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  4. Ubiquitin fusion technology: bioprocessing of peptides.

    PubMed

    Pilon, A; Yost, P; Chase, T E; Lohnas, G; Burkett, T; Roberts, S; Bentley, W E

    1997-01-01

    Ubiquitin fusion technology represents an emerging method for economically producing peptides and small proteins in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our focus is on peptide production where the need for cost-effective, scaleable processes has recently been highlighted by Kelley (1996). There are two principal features: (1) the expression system consists of a suitable E. coli host strain paired with a plasmid that encodes the ubiquitin fusion and (2) an ubiquitin-specific protease, UCH-L3, which cleaves only C-terminal extensions from ubiquitin. In this work, multigram yields were obtained of four ubiquitin fusions derived from cell paste generated in single 10-L fermentations. All were expressed intracellularly and remained soluble at extremely high levels of expression. Bacterial freeze--thaw lysates contained over 95% pure ubiquitin fusion protein. All four fusions were efficiently cleaved to ubiquitin and the peptide products. In one case, the final yield of peptide was 1.08 g from 3 L of low cell density bacterial culture. The combination of exceptional overexpression of the ubiquitin--peptide fusion proteins and a robust and specific protease are unique advantages contributing to a cost-effective, scaleable, and generic bioprocess for peptide production.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  6. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  7. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  8. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. BIOACTIVE PROTEINS, PEPTIDES, AND AMINO ACIDS FROM MACROALGAE(1).

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Pádraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2011-04-01

    Macroalgae are a diverse group of marine organisms that have developed complex and unique metabolic pathways to ensure survival in highly competitive marine environments. As a result, these organisms have been targeted for mining of natural biologically active components. The exploration of marine organisms has revealed numerous bioactive compounds that are proteinaceous in nature. These include proteins, linear peptides, cyclic peptides and depsipeptides, peptide derivatives, amino acids, and amino acid-like components. Furthermore, some species of macroalgae have been shown to contain significant levels of protein. While some protein-derived bioactive peptides have been characterized from macroalgae, macroalgal proteins currently still represent good candidate raw materials for biofunctional peptide mining. This review will provide an overview of the important bioactive amino-acid-containing compounds that have been identified in macroalgae. Moreover, the potential of macroalgal proteins as substrates for the generation of biofunctional peptides for utilization as functional foods to provide specific health benefits will be discussed.

  10. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  11. Characterization of reducible peptide oligomers as carriers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton; Egorova, Anna; Laukkanen, Antti; Baranov, Vladislav; Urtti, Arto

    2013-01-30

    The stability of DNA-polyplexes and intracellular DNA release are important features of gene delivery systems. To study these features, we have evaluated reducible cysteine-flanked linear lysine and arginine-rich peptides, modified with histidine residues. The reducible disulfide bonds in cysteine flanked peptides and histidine residues should augment DNA release from the peptide-DNA complexes upon disintegration of the reducible bonds. Template polymerization and oxidative polycondensation were applied to obtain peptide oligomers used for DNA-polyplex preparation. The peptides and DNA-peptide complexes were investigated with physical, chemical and transfection measurements. Physicochemical and transfection properties of DNA-polyplexes depended on the amino acid sequence of the peptidic polymers and type of the polymerization. MALDI-TOF analysis of oxidatively polycondensed products revealed several forms of peptide oligomers corresponding to 5-8 amino acid monomers. DNA-peptide particles based on template-polymerized complexes were more resistant to relaxation by negatively charged heparan sulfate than polyplexes formed with oxidatively condensed peptides. Complexes of DNA with the polycations prepared by oxidative polycondensation exhibited a 100-1000-fold higher level of gene expression compared to DNA/template-polymerized peptide complexes. The most efficient transgene expression was shown with arginine-rich polyplexes. Transfection efficacy of the arginine-rich polyplexes was even 10-fold better than that of DNA/PEI complexes. On average, polyplexes based on cysteine-flanked peptide oligomers showed lower cytotoxicity than non-reducible high molecular weight polylysine/DNA particles. We conclude that reducible peptide oligomers provide efficient DNA transfection and have the potential as vehicles for gene delivery.

  12. Antimicrobial activity and interactions of cationic peptides derived from Galleria mellonella cecropin D-like peptide with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Oñate-Garzón, José; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Trier, Steven; Leidy, Chad; Torres, Rodrigo; Patiño, Edwin

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system against invading pathogens. The cationic charge in their structures has a strong correlation with antimicrobial activity, being responsible for the initial electrostatic interaction between peptides and the anionic microbial surface. This paper contains evidence that charge modification in the neutral peptide Gm cecropin D-like (WT) improved the antimicrobial activity of the modified peptides. Two cationic peptides derived from WT sequence named as ΔM1 and ΔM2, with net charge of +5 and +9, respectively, showed at least an eightfold increase in their antimicrobial activity in comparison to WT. The mechanism of action of these peptides was investigated using small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) as model membranes. To study permeabilization effects of the peptides on cell membranes, entrapped calcein liposomes were used and the results showed that all peptides induced calcein release from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) SUVs, whereas in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), POPC/POPG and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE)/POPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 induced a notable permeabilization. In addition, interactions of these peptides with phospholipids at the level of the glycerol backbone and hydrophobic domain were studied through observed changes in generalized polarization and fluorescence anisotropy using probes such as Laurdan and DPH, respectively. The results suggest that peptides slightly ordered the bilayer structure at the level of glycerol backbone and on the hydrophobic core in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) SUVs, whereas in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/DMPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 peptides increased the order of bilayers. Thus, peptides would be inducing clustering of phospholipids creating phospholipid domains with a higher phase transition temperature.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  14. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  15. Peptides and aging: Their role in anorexia and memory.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2015-10-01

    The rapid aging of the world's population has led to a need to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of the factors leading to frailty and cognitive decline. Peptides have been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of frailty and cognitive decline. Weight loss is a major component of frailty. In this review, we demonstrate a central role for both peripheral peptides (e.g., cholecystokinin and ghrelin) and neuropeptides (e.g., dynorphin and alpha-MSH) in the pathophysiology of the anorexia of aging. Similarly, peripheral peptides (e.g., ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and cholecystokinin) are modulators of memory. A number of centrally acting neuropeptides have also been shown to modulate cognitive processes. Amyloid-beta peptide in physiological levels is a memory enhancer, while in high (pathological) levels, it plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions.

  17. BDNF pro-peptide regulates dendritic spines via caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J; Ji, Y; Ding, Y; Jiang, W; Sun, Y; Lu, B; Nagappan, G

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (proBDNF) is enzymatically cleaved, by either intracellular (furin/PC1) or extracellular proteases (tPA/plasmin/MMP), to generate mature BDNF (mBDNF) and its pro-peptide (BDNF pro-peptide). Little is known about the function of BDNF pro-peptide. We have developed an antibody that specifically detects cleaved BDNF pro-peptide, but not proBDNF or mBDNF. Neuronal depolarization elicited a marked increase in extracellular BDNF pro-peptide, suggesting activity-dependent regulation of its extracellular levels. Exposure of BDNF pro-peptide to mature hippocampal neurons in culture dramatically reduced dendritic spine density. This effect was mediated by caspase-3, as revealed by studies with pharmacological inhibitors and genetic knockdown. BDNF pro-peptide also increased the number of ‘elongated' mitochondria and cytosolic cytochrome c, suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-3 pathway. These results, along with BDNF pro-peptide effects recently reported on growth cones and long-term depression (LTD), suggest that BDNF pro-peptide is a negative regulator of neuronal structure and function. PMID:27310873

  18. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  19. The dynamic action mechanism of small cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Lopez Cascales, J J; Garro, A; Porasso, R D; Enriz, R D

    2014-10-21

    Antimicrobial peptides form part of the immune system as protection against the action of external pathogens. The differences that exist between mammalian and microbial cell membrane architectures are key aspects of the ability of these peptides to discriminate between pathogens and host cells. Given that the pathogen membrane is the non-specific target of these cationic peptides, different molecular mechanisms have been suggested to describe the rules that permit them to distinguish between pathogens and mammalian cells. In this context, and setting aside the old fashion idea that cationic peptides act through one mechanism alone, this work will provide insight into the molecular action mechanism of small antimicrobial peptides, based on molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipid bilayers that mimic different cell membrane architectures. After measuring different properties of these lipid bilayers, in the absence and presence of peptides, a four-step action mechanism was suggested on the basis of the formation of phospholipid rafts induced by the presence of these cationic peptides. Thus, this work shows how differences in the bending modulus (k(b)) of these lipid rafts and differences in the free energy profiles (ΔG(z)) associated with the insertion of these peptides into these lipid rafts are key aspects for explaining the action mechanism of these cationic peptides at the molecular level.

  20. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A.; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf. PMID:27096600

  1. Modulation for antigen presentation in tuberculosis by using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Jiménez-Zamudio, L

    1991-01-01

    Competition assay technology has been a very useful tool in the study of parasite antigens and has been inferred but never proven that this approach can be applied to select T-cell epitopes by using another microorganisms. In this study, HLA-restricted T-cell clones specific to synthetic peptides derived from the 65 kDa mycobacterial protein were used to investigate whether these peptides are able to compete with each other at the level of MHC-binding sites in tuberculosis. Fixed APCs were pulsed with suboptimal concentration of stimulator peptide in the presence of various concentrations of competitor peptide. The results showed that two peptides from this protein were able to compete with each other inducing a significant inhibition in the proliferation assays while there was no competition by using a control peptide. The amount of cross-reactivity was influenced by the peptide concentrations. More important was the observation that these peptides were able to bind to the same HLA-class II molecules therefore blocking the binding of each other. The fact that these peptides have not an identical amino acid sequence support the idea that the MHC-peptide interaction must have a broad specificity to be able to bind a large number of peptides. These results demonstrate that it is possible to modulate the antigen presentation by blocking the peptide MHC-class II interaction in tuberculosis and support the idea that this approach facilitates the selection of appropriate T-cell epitopes to be incorporated in a vaccine.

  2. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  3. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  4. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  5. Identification of antimicrobial peptides by using eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial peptides are subject to broad research due to their potential application and the benefit they can provide for a wide range of diseases. In this work, a mathematical-computational method, called the Polarity Vector Method, is introduced that has a high discriminative level (>70%) to identify peptides associated with Gram (-) bacteria, Gram (+) bacteria, cancer cells, fungi, insects, mammalian cells, parasites, and viruses, taken from the Antimicrobial Peptides Database. This supervised method uses only eigenvectors from the incident polar matrix of the group studied. It was verified with a comparative study with another extensively verified method developed previously by our team, the Polarity Index Method. The number of positive hits of both methods was up to 98% in all the tests conducted.

  6. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  7. Ribosomal synthesis of dehydroalanine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Florian P; Szostak, Jack W

    2006-06-07

    Dehydroalanine is a nonproteinogenic amino acid, but it is a component of a wide variety of natural products with therapeutic activities. Indeed, this alpha,beta-unsaturated residue is a highly versatile building block due to its rigidifying effect on peptide backbones and its electrophilicity which allows site-specific thiol ligations of peptides with small molecules or proteins. To harness such versatility in genetically encoded, combinatorial peptide libraries, we report a simple and robust method for the ribosomal synthesis of dehydroalanine-containing peptides. Selenalysine, a selenium-containing lysine analogue, was recruited as a masked dehydroalanine equivalent. This residue is efficiently incorporated by a reconstituted Escherichia coli translation system at high fidelity and efficiency despite the presence of low levels of lysine. Mild oxidative conditions were used to convert selenalysine into dehydroalanine post-translationally. Using this method, we demonstrate the preparation of polyunsaturated and highly decorated peptides. This report is an important step toward the preparation and selection of large libraries of protein-reactive compounds with potential use as novel drugs or as analytical tools.

  8. Stability of amyloid-β peptides in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Bibl, Mirko; Welge, Volker; Esselmann, Hermann; Wiltfang, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Plasma amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) levels have been suggested as a biomarker candidate for detecting incipient AD. Aβ peptides are known to be sensitive to distinct preanalytical sample handling, which calls for standardised preanalytical procedures. We investigated serum and plasma samples of 19 patients with no clinical signs of dementia for different preanalytical sample handlings. Both serum and plasma were analysed by the one-dimensional Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot, either immediately or after storage at room temperature for 24 and 48 h, respectively. The panel of Aβ1-37/38/39/40/42 and Aβ2-40 was evaluated. In both analytical matrices, sample storage led to a significant loss of measurable peptide levels. This effect was most pronounced during the first 24 h of storage and stronger in serum than in plasma. There were no significant differences between the distinct analysed Aβ peptide species regarding these results. The ratios of peptides (e.g. Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-38) displayed a higher stability under the influence of storage than each single peptide. In conclusion, plasma may be more appropriate than serum for analysing Aβ peptides for routine application. At least, the analysis should be done within 24 h and peptide ratios should be created to minimise artificial results.

  9. Maximin H5 is an anticancer peptide.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sarah R; Harris, Frederick; Phoenix, David A

    2017-02-26

    Here we report the first major example of anionic amphibian host defence peptides (HDPs) with anticancer activity. Maximin H5 is a C-terminally amidated, anionic host defence peptide (MH5N) from toads of the Bombina genus, which was shown to possess activity against the glioma cell line, T98G (EC50 = 125 μM). The peptide adopted high levels of α-helical structure (57.3%) in the presence of model cancer membranes (DMPC:DMPS in a molar ratio of 10:1). MH5N also showed a strong ability to penetrate these model membranes (Π = 10.5 mN m(-1)), which correlated with levels of DMPS (R(2) > 0.98). Taken with the high ability of the peptide to lyse these membranes (65.7%), it is proposed that maximin H5 kills cancer cells via membranolytic mechanisms that are promoted by anionic lipid. It was also found that C-terminally deaminated maximin H5 (MH5C) exhibited lower levels of α-helical structure in the presence of cancer membrane mimics (44.8%) along with a reduced ability to penetrate these membranes (Π = 8.1 mN m(-1)) and induce their lysis (56.6%). These data suggested that the two terminal amide groups of native maximin H5 are required for its optimal membranolytic and anticancer activity.

  10. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  11. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  12. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  13. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  14. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  15. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  16. Roles of Hydrophobicity and Charge Distribution of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Peptide-Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lois M.; Edwards, Michelle A.; Li, Jessica; Yip, Christopher M.; Deber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) occur as important innate immunity agents in many organisms, including humans, and offer a viable alternative to conventional antibiotics, as they physically disrupt the bacterial membranes, leading to membrane lysis and eventually cell death. In this work, we studied the biophysical and microbiological characteristics of designed CAPs varying in hydrophobicity levels and charge distributions by a variety of biophysical and biochemical approaches, including in-tandem atomic force microscopy, attenuated total reflection-FTIR, CD spectroscopy, and SDS-PAGE. Peptide structural properties were correlated with their membrane-disruptive abilities and antimicrobial activities. In bacterial lipid model membranes, a time-dependent increase in aggregated β-strand-type structure in CAPs with relatively high hydrophobicity (such as KKKKKKALFALWLAFLA-NH2) was essentially absent in CAPs with lower hydrophobicity (such as KKKKKKAAFAAWAAFAA-NH2). Redistribution of positive charges by placing three Lys residues at both termini while maintaining identical sequences minimized self-aggregation above the dimer level. Peptides containing four Leu residues were destructive to mammalian model membranes, whereas those with corresponding Ala residues were not. This finding was mirrored in hemolysis studies in human erythrocytes, where Ala-only peptides displayed virtually no hemolysis up to 320 μm, but the four-Leu peptides induced 40–80% hemolysis at the same concentration range. All peptides studied displayed strong antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 4–32 μm). The overall findings suggest optimum routes to balancing peptide hydrophobicity and charge distribution that allow efficient penetration and disruption of the bacterial membranes without damage to mammalian (host) membranes. PMID:22253439

  17. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting toward intracellular targets, which increases their success compartively to one-target specific drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials. PMID:28271058

  18. Multifunctional hybrid networks based on self assembling peptide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Sameer

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to achieve a comprehensive correlation between the molecular level changes in primary amino acid sequences of amphiphilic beta-hairpin peptides and their consequent solution-assembly properties and bulk network hydrogel behavior. This has been accomplished using two broad approaches. In the first approach, amino acid substitutions were made to peptide sequence MAX1 such that the hydrophobic surfaces of the folded beta-hairpins from the peptides demonstrate shape specificity in hydrophobic interactions with other beta-hairpins during the assembly process, thereby causing changes to the peptide nanostructure and bulk rheological properties of hydrogels formed from the peptides. Steric lock and key complementary hydrophobic interactions were designed to occur between two beta-hairpin molecules of a single molecule, LNK1 during beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of LNK1. Experimental results from circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology collectively indicate that the molecular design of the LNK1 peptide can be assigned the cause of the drastically different behavior of the networks relative to MAX1. The results indicate elimination or significant reduction of fibrillar branching due to steric complementarity in LNK1 that does not exist in MAX1, thus supporting the original hypothesis. As an extension of the designed steric lock and key complementarity between two beta-hairpin molecules of the same peptide molecule. LNK1, three new pairs of peptide molecules LP1-KP1, LP2-KP2 and LP3-KP3 that resemble complementary 'wedge' and 'trough' shapes when folded into beta-hairpins were designed and studied. All six peptides individually and when blended with their corresponding shape complement formed fibrillar nanostructures with non-uniform thickness values. Loose packing in the assembled structures was observed in all the new peptides as compared to the uniform tight packing in MAX1 by SANS analysis. This

  19. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  20. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  1. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  2. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Pasquinelli, R.; Ataai, M.; Koepsel, R.R.; Kortes, R.A.; Shepherd, R.E.

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His){sub 6} (HHHHHH) to [Pd{sup II}(mida)(D{sub 2}O)] (mida{sup 2{minus}} = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by {sup 1}H NMR as model reactions for Cu{sup II}(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H{sub 1}, H{sub 3}, and H{sub 4} of (His){sub 6} and H{sub 3} and H{sub 4} of SPHHGG was detected by {sup 1}H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [Cu{sup II}(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] complex are representative: g{sub zz} = 2.31; g{sub yy} = 2.086; g{sub xx} = 2.053; A{sub {vert_bar}{vert_bar}} = 161 G; A{sub N} = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida{sup 2{minus}} in the order 19 G (H{sub 2}O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5--7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7--8 in agreement with the [Pd{sup II}(mida)L] derivatives which form the two

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  4. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics. 2. A computational study of the conformational ramifications of peptide bond replacement.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brian E; Urban, Joseph J

    2010-01-21

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to examine the conformational ramifications of replacing peptide bonds with fluoroalkene moieties, thus generating peptidomimetics. The alanine dipeptide analogue (ADA) was chosen as a model compound. Three peptidomimetic systems were investigated including one generated by replacement of both peptide bonds of ADA, designated as DFA, and those generated by the single replacement of the C-terminal peptide bond and N-terminal peptide bond, designated as CFA and NFA, respectively. Conformations for all three systems were generated by exhaustive Monte Carlo searching. Relative conformational energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ/MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ (for DFA), MP2/-aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-311+G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(d)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d), and MMFF levels of theory. Aqueous phase conformational preferences were determined through calculations making use of continuum hydration models. The results indicate that replacement of both peptide bonds of ADA generates a peptidomimetic with conformational preferences where extended conformations are favored and the conformational profile is relatively insensitive to the nature of the surrounding medium. This is in contrast to ADA where the conformational preferences depend highly on the surrounding medium and where folded conformations with intramolecular hydrogen bonds are important in the absence of an interacting solvent. CFA and NFA are found to exhibit conformational preferences that do in some ways more closely resemble those of the alanine dipeptide analogue. This is particularly true in the case of NFA where interactions between the NH and CF groups are reminiscent of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding possible in ADA.

  5. A potential peptide pathway from viruses to oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta

    2015-06-01

    Oral lichen planus is an idiopathic inflammatory disease of oral mucous membranes, characterized by an autoimmune epidermis attack by T cells. It remains unknown, however, how such aggressive T cells are activated in vivo to cause epidermal damage. This study analyzes the relationship at the peptide level between viruses and oral lichen planus disease. Four potentially immunogenic peptides (SSSSSSS, QEQLEKA, LLLLLLA, and MLSGNAG) are found to be shared between HCV, EBV, HHV-7, HSV-1, and CMV and three human proteins (namely pinin, desmoglein-3, and plectin). The described peptide sharing might be of help in deciphering the still unexplained immunopathogenic pathway that leads to oral lichen planus.

  6. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients.

  7. Coarse-grained simulations of hemolytic peptide δ-lysin interacting with a POPC bilayer.

    PubMed

    King, Mariah J; Bennett, Ashley L; Almeida, Paulo F; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2016-12-01

    δ-lysin, secreted by a Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, is a 26-residue membrane active peptide that shares many common features with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). However, it possesses a few unique features that differentiate itself from typical AMPs. In particular, δ-lysin has zero net charge, even though it has many charged residues, and it preferentially lyses eukaryotic cells over bacterial cells. Here, we present the results of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of δ-lysin interacting with a zwitterionic membrane over a wide range of peptide concentrations. When the peptides concentration is low, spontaneous dimerization of peptides is observed on the membrane surface, but deep insertion of peptides or pore formation was not observed. However, the calculated free energy of peptide insertion suggests that a small fraction of peptides is likely to be present inside the membrane at the peptide concentrations typically seen in dye efflux experiments. When the simulations with multiple peptides are carried out with a single pre-inserted transmembrane peptide, spontaneous pore formation occurs with a peptide-to-lipid ratio (P/L) as low as P/L=1:42. Inter-peptide salt bridges among the transmembrane peptides seem to play a role in creating compact pores with very low level of hydration. More importantly, the transmembrane peptides making up the pore are constantly pushed to the opposite side of the membrane when the mass imbalance between the two sides of membrane is significant. Thus, the pore is very dynamic, allowing multiple peptides to translocate across the membrane simultaneously.

  8. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  9. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2012-08-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondira often rely on disruption of protein--protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion.

  10. Targeting malignant mitochondria with therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E; Lim, Carol S

    2013-01-01

    The current status of peptides that target the mitochondria in the context of cancer is the focus of this review. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy used to kill tumor cells are principally mediated by the process of apoptosis that is governed by the mitochondria. The failure of anticancer therapy often resides at the level of the mitochondria. Therefore, the mitochondrion is a key pharmacological target in cancer due to many of the differences that arise between malignant and healthy cells at the level of this ubiquitous organelle. Additionally, targeting the characteristics of malignant mitochondria often rely on disruption of protein–protein interactions that are not generally amenable to small molecules. We discuss anticancer peptides that intersect with pathological changes in the mitochondrion. PMID:22946430

  11. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  12. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  13. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  14. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  15. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  16. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  17. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  18. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  19. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  20. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  1. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  2. BT cationic peptides: small peptides that modulate innate immune responses of chicken heterophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yi Wei

    2012-01-15

    Neonatal poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to infectious diseases during the first week of life that stems from inefficient host defense mechanisms. Yet, the initial host immune response to pathogens is a critical determinant of disease resistance and susceptibility. With this context in mind, novel ways to stimulate or modulate the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers including the poultry industry. Specifically, we have been investigating new modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system, and particularly rapid acting innate immunity, as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens. One such approach that we have been investigating is the use of a group of cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus (BT peptides). We have previously shown that, provided as a feed additive, BT peptides significantly induced a concentration-dependent protection against cecal colonization and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). This protection is not the result of direct antibacterial activity of the BT peptides on the SE since the concentrations used were below the minimum inhibitory concentration for SE. We also found that BT are not absorbed in the intestine, but still induce a significant up-regulation in the functional efficiency of peripheral blood heterophils and monocytes. The mechanisms of this immune modulation are unknown. Here, using in vitro models for measuring: (1) leukocyte oxidative burst, (2) changes in leukocyte cytokine and chemokines gene expression profiles, and (3) phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in leukocytes, we evaluated the role of BT peptides as priming mediators for heterophil and monocyte responses at the level of cell function, gene transcription/expression, and cell phosphorylation following stimulation

  3. Injectable polymer microspheres enhance immunogenicity of a contraceptive peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chengji; Stevens, Vernon C; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2007-01-05

    Advanced contraceptive peptide vaccines suffer from the unavailability of adjuvants capable of enhancing the antibody response with acceptable safety. We sought to overcome this limitation by employing two novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere formulations to deliver a synthetic human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) peptide antigen co-synthesized with a T-cell epitope from tetanus toxoid (TT), C-TT2-CTP35: surface-conjugated immunogen to induce phagocytosis; and encapsulated peptide to provide a depot effect, with MgCO(3) co-encapsulated in the polymer to neutralize acidity from the biodegrading PLGA polyester. A single immunization of encapsulated peptide in rabbits elicited a stronger antibody response with equivalent duration relative to a positive control--three injections of the peptide administered in a squalene-based water-in-oil emulsion. Surface-conjugated peptide was less effective but enhanced antibody levels at 1/5 the dose, relative to soluble antigen. Most remarkable and unexpected was the finding that co-encapsulation of base was essential to attain the powerful adjuvant effect of the PLGA-MgCO(3) system, as the MgCO(3)-free microspheres were completely ineffective. A promising contraceptive hCG peptide vaccine with acceptable side effects (i.e., local tissue reactions) was achieved by minimizing PLGA and MgCO(3) doses, without significantly affecting antibody response.

  4. Design of cocktail peptide vaccine against Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Samira; Mashkani, Baratali; Esmaili, Arezoo; Karimi, Reza; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a major morbidity and mortality cause in immuno suppressed patients. Therefore, significant effort has been made towards the development of a vaccine. In this study, the expression of the pp65 and gB fusion peptides and Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel delivery system for selective uptake of antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in Pichia pastoris yeast system were studied. Materials and Method: In this study, four immune dominant sequences in pp65 protein and 3 immuno dominant sequences in gB protein were selected according to literature review. Peptide linker -GGGGS- was used for construction of fusion peptide. This fusion peptide was cloned in the pPICZαA expression vector and transfected into P. pastoris host cells. Results: Dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques showed that a high level of pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide was expressed. Conclusion: This CMV pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide could be a promising candidate for the development of a novel peptide vaccine. PMID:27279990

  5. Responses of python gastrointestinal regulatory peptides to feeding.

    PubMed

    Secor, S M; Fehsenfeld, D; Diamond, J; Adrian, T E

    2001-11-20

    In the Burmese python (Python molurus), the rapid up-regulation of gastrointestinal (GI) function and morphology after feeding, and subsequent down-regulation on completing digestion, are expected to be mediated by GI hormones and neuropeptides. Hence, we examined postfeeding changes in plasma and tissue concentrations of 11 GI hormones and neuropeptides in the python. Circulating levels of cholecystokinin (CCK), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon, and neurotensin increase by respective factors of 25-, 6-, 6-, and 3.3-fold within 24 h after feeding. In digesting pythons, the regulatory peptides neurotensin, somatostatin, motilin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide occur largely in the stomach, GIP and glucagon in the pancreas, and CCK and substance P in the small intestine. Tissue concentrations of CCK, GIP, and neurotensin decline with feeding. Tissue distributions and molecular forms (as determined by gel-permeation chromatography) of many python GI peptides are similar or identical to those of their mammalian counterparts. The postfeeding release of GI peptides from tissues, and their concurrent rise in plasma concentrations, suggests that they play a role in regulating python-digestive responses. These large postfeeding responses, and similarities of peptide structure with mammals, make pythons an attractive model for studying GI peptides.

  6. Peptidomic analysis of HEK293T cells: Effect of the proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin on intracellular peptides

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Lloyd D.; Gelman, Julia S.; Castro, Leandro M.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Ferro, Emer S.

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear proteins have been detected in extracts of animal tissues and cell lines. To test whether the proteasome is involved in their formation, HEK293T cells were treated with epoxomicin (0.2 μM or 2 μM) for 1 hour and quantitative peptidomics analysis was performed. Altogether, 147 unique peptides were identified by mass spectrometry sequence analysis. Epoxomicin treatment decreased the levels of the majority of intracellular peptides, consistent with inhibition of the proteasome beta-2 and beta-5 subunits. Treatment with the higher concentration of epoxomicin elevated the levels of some peptides. Most of the elevated peptides resulted from cleavages at acidic residues, suggesting that epoxomicin increased the processing of proteins through the beta-1 subunit. Interestingly, some of the peptides that were elevated by the epoxomicin treatment had hydrophobic residues in P1 cleavage sites. Taken together, these findings suggest that while the proteasome is the major source of intracellular peptides, other peptide-generating mechanisms exist. Because intracellular peptides are likely to perform intracellular functions, studies using proteasome inhibitors need to be interpreted with caution as it is possible that the effects of these inhibitors are due to a change in the peptide levels rather than inhibition of protein degradation. PMID:22304392

  7. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  8. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  9. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  10. Effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha.

    PubMed

    Lorenzón, E N; Cespedes, G F; Vicente, E F; Nogueira, L G; Bauab, T M; Castro, M S; Cilli, E M

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are potential microbicidal agents for the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance. However, the physicochemical properties of each peptide need to be optimized for clinical use. To evaluate the effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of the antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha, we have synthesized the monomeric and three dimeric (Lys-branched) forms of the Ctx-Ha peptide by solid-phase peptide synthesis using a combination of 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) and t-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) chemical approaches. The antimicrobial activity assay showed that dimerization decreases the ability of the peptide to inhibit growth of bacteria or fungi; however, the dimeric analogs displayed a higher level of bactericidal activity. In addition, a dramatic increase (50 times) in hemolytic activity was achieved with these analogs. Permeabilization studies showed that the rate of carboxyfluorescein release was higher for the dimeric peptides than for the monomeric peptide, especially in vesicles that contained sphingomyelin. Despite different biological activities, the secondary structure and pore diameter were not significantly altered by dimerization. In contrast to the case for other dimeric cAMPs, we have shown that dimerization selectively decreases the antimicrobial activity of this peptide and increases the hemolytic activity. The results also show that the interaction between dimeric peptides and the cell wall could be responsible for the decrease of the antimicrobial activity of these peptides.

  11. Preferential labeling of alpha-amino N-terminal groups in peptides by biotin: application to the detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies by enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sélo, I; Négroni, L; Créminon, C; Grassi, J; Wal, J M

    1996-12-15

    Experimental conditions (pH 6.5, 24 h reaction, peptide:biotin ratio 1:5) were defined for preferential incorporation of the biotin molecule in the N-terminal alpha-amino group of peptides. This strategy could be helpful in numerous applications when an entire peptide chain must remain accessible for antibody or receptor binding. We illustrate this advantage in a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay designed to detect antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin present in rabbit or human sera. This test involves synthetic peptides biotinylated in different positions and immobilized on a solid phase. The use of biotin/streptavidin interactions permitted more efficient detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies than solid phases prepared using conventional passive-adsorption techniques. The highest levels of antibody binding were measured when biotinylation occurred at the N-terminal extremity of immobilized peptides.

  12. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  13. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  14. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here.

  15. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  16. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese.

  17. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  18. Bidirectional macrocyclization of peptides by double multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Manuel G; Morales, Fidel E; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Vasilev, Dimitar; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Rivera, Daniel G

    2015-01-14

    Increasing the diversity of peptide cyclization methods is an effective way of accessing new types of macrocyclic chemotypes featuring a wide variety of ring sizes and topologies. Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) are processes capable of generating great levels of molecular diversity and complexity at low synthetic cost. In an attempt to further exploit MCRs in the field of cyclopeptides, we describe a bidirectional multicomponent approach for the synthesis of N-alkylated macrocyclic peptides of varied sequences and cross-linking positions. The process relies on the execution of two Ugi reactions between peptide diacids and diisocyanides. Varying the amino component enabled the installation of exocyclic elements of diversity, while skeletal diversity was created through different side chain and backbone cyclizations. This procedure shows prospects for the rapid scanning of the chemical space of macrocyclic peptides for applications in chemical biology and drug discovery.

  19. Imaging the action of antimicrobial peptides on living bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Michelle L.; Burton, Matthew; Grevis-James, Alistair; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; McArthur, Sally; Palombo, Enzo A.; Wade, John D.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise as broad-spectrum alternatives to conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of action of this class of peptide is a topical area of research focused predominantly on their interaction with artificial membranes. Here we compare the interaction mechanism of a model antimicrobial peptide with single artificial membranes and live bacterial cells. The interaction kinetics was imaged using time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging of a fluorescently-tagged melittin derivative. Interaction with the synthetic membranes resulted in membrane pore formation. In contrast, the interaction with bacteria led to transient membrane disruption and corresponding leakage of the cytoplasm, but surprisingly with a much reduced level of pore formation. The discovery that pore formation is a less significant part of lipid-peptide interaction in live bacteria highlights the mechanistic complexity of these interactions in living cells compared to simple artificial systems. PMID:23532056

  20. Natriuretic peptides buffer renin-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Demerath, Theo; Staffel, Janina; Schreiber, Andrea; Valletta, Daniela; Schweda, Frank

    2014-06-15

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac natriuretic peptides [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)] are opposing control mechanisms for arterial blood pressure. Accordingly, an inverse relationship between plasma renin concentration (PRC) and ANP exists in most circumstances. However, PRC and ANP levels are both elevated in renovascular hypertension. Because ANP can directly suppress renin release, we used ANP knockout (ANP(-/-)) mice to investigate whether high ANP levels attenuate the increase in PRC in response to renal hypoperfusion, thus buffering renovascular hypertension. ANP(-/-) mice were hypertensive and had reduced PRC compared with that in wild-type ANP(+/+) mice under control conditions. Unilateral renal artery stenosis (2-kidney, 1-clip) for 1 wk induced similar increases in blood pressure and PRC in both genotypes. Unexpectedly, plasma BNP concentrations in ANP(-/-) mice significantly increased in response to two-kidney, one-clip treatment, potentially compensating for the lack of ANP. In fact, in mice lacking guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A(-/-) mice), which is the common receptor for both ANP and BNP, renovascular hypertension was markedly augmented compared with that in wild-type GC-A(+/+) mice. However, the higher blood pressure in GC-A(-/-) mice was not caused by disinhibition of the renin system because PRC and renal renin synthesis were significantly lower in GC-A(-/-) mice than in GC-A(+/+) mice. Thus, natriuretic peptides buffer renal vascular hypertension via renin-independent effects, such as vasorelaxation. The latter possibility is supported by experiments in isolated perfused mouse kidneys, in which physiological concentrations of ANP and BNP elicited renal vasodilatation and attenuated renal vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II.

  1. Effects of branched O-glycosylation on a semiflexible peptide linker.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Raval, Sherin R; Dobbs, Jeremy S; Nellas, Ricky B; Shen, Tongye

    2014-02-27

    Glycosylation is an essential modification of proteins and lipids by the addition of carbohydrate residues. These attached carbohydrates range from single monomers to elaborate branched glycans. Here, we examine how the level of glycosylation affects the conformation of a semiflexible peptide linker using the example of the hinge peptide from immunoglobulin A. Three sets of atomistic models of this hinge peptide with varying degrees of glycosylation are constructed to probe how glycosylation affects the physical properties of the linker. We found that glycosylation greatly altered the predominant conformations of the peptide, causing it to become elongated in reference to the unglycosylated form. Furthermore, glycosylation restricts the conformational exploration of the peptide. At the residue level, glycans are found to introduce a bias for the formation of more extended secondary structural elements for glycosylated serines. Additionally, the flexibility of this semiflexible proline-rich peptide is significantly reduced by glycosylation.

  2. C-peptide ameliorates kidney injury following hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Chima, Ranjit S; Maltese, Giuseppe; Lamontagne, Timberly; Piraino, Giovanna; Denenberg, Alvin; O'Connor, Michael; Zingarelli, Basilia

    2011-05-01

    Reperfusion injury following hemorrhagic shock is accompanied by the development of a systemic inflammatory state that may lead to organ failure. Insulin connecting peptide (C-peptide) has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in sepsis and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and to ameliorate renal dysfunction in diabetic animals. Hence, we investigated the effect of C-peptide on kidney injury after hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that C-peptide would exert renoprotective effects by blunting inflammation. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in male rats (3-4 months old) by withdrawing blood from the femoral artery to a mean arterial pressure of 50 mmHg. Animals were kept in shock for 3 h, at which time they were rapidly resuscitated by returning their shed blood. At the time of resuscitation and every hour thereafter, one group of animals received C-peptide (280 nmol/kg), whereas another group received vehicle. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in significant rise in plasma levels of creatinine and elevated kidney neutrophil infiltration as evaluated by myeloperoxidase activity in vehicle-treated rats in comparison with sham rats, thus suggesting kidney injury. Treatment with C-peptide significantly attenuated the rise in creatinine and kidney myeloperoxidase activity when compared with vehicle group. At a molecular level, these effects of C-peptide were associated with reduced expression of the c-Fos subunit and reduced activation of the proinflammatory kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and subsequently reduced DNA binding of activator protein 1 in the kidney. Thus, our data suggest that C-peptide may exert renoprotective effects after hemorrhagic shock by modulating activator protein 1 signaling.

  3. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  4. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  5. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P < 0.01) and more vascular smooth muscle cells (4.8 ± 0.6% versus 2.4 ± 0.3% positive area; P < 0.01). Finally, lipid deposition measured by Oil-red-O staining in the aortic arch was significantly higher in the C-peptide group compared with controls. Our results demonstrate that elevated C-peptide levels promote inflammatory cell infiltration and lesion development in ApoE-deficient mice without having metabolic effects. These data obtained in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  6. VGF Changes during the Estrous Cycle: A Novel Endocrine Role for TLQP Peptides?

    PubMed Central

    Noli, Barbara; Brancia, Carla; D’Amato, Filomena; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Although the VGF derived peptide TLQP-21 stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin secretion, available data on VGF peptides and reproduction are limited. We used antibodies specific for the two ends of the VGF precursor, and for two VGF derived peptides namely TLQP and PGH, to be used in immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay complemented with gel chromatography. In cycling female rats, VGF C-/N-terminus and PGH peptide antibodies selectively labelled neurones containing either GnRH, or kisspeptin (VGF N-terminus only), pituitary gonadotrophs and lactotrophs, or oocytes (PGH peptides only). Conversely, TLQP peptides were restricted to somatostatin neurones, gonadotrophs, and ovarian granulosa, interstitial and theca cells. TLQP levels were highest, especially in plasma and ovary, with several molecular forms shown in chromatography including one compatible with TLQP-21. Among the cycle phases, TLQP levels were higher during metestrus-diestrus in median eminence and pituitary, while increased in the ovary and decreased in plasma during proestrus. VGF N- and C-terminus peptides also showed modulations over the estrous cycle, in median eminence, pituitary and plasma, while PGH peptides did not. In ovariectomised rats, plasmatic TLQP peptide levels showed distinct reduction suggestive of a major origin from the ovary, while the estrogen-progesterone treatment modulated VGF C-terminus and TLQP peptides in the hypothalamus-pituitary complex. In in vitro hypothalamus, TLQP-21 stimulated release of growth hormone releasing hormone but not of somatostatin. In conclusion, various VGF peptides may regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary complex via specific neuroendocrine mechanisms while TLQP peptides may act at further, multiple levels via endocrine mechanisms involving the ovary. PMID:25280008

  7. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  8. Noninvasive molecular imaging of MYC mRNA expression in human breast cancer xenografts with a [99mTc]peptide-peptide nucleic acid-peptide chimera.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaobing; Aruva, Mohan R; Qin, Wenyi; Zhu, Weizhu; Sauter, Edward R; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells typically display elevated levels of Myc protein due to overexpression of MYC mRNA, and elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) due to overexpression of IGF1R mRNA. We hypothesized that scintigraphic detection of MYC peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes with an IGF1 peptide loop on the C-terminus, and a [99mTc]chelator peptide on the N-terminus, could measure levels of MYC mRNA noninvasively in human IGF1R-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. We prepared the chelator-MYC PNA-IGF1 peptide, as well as a 4-nt mismatch PNA control, by solid-phase synthesis. We imaged MCF7 xenografts scintigraphically and measured the distribution of [99mTc]probes by scintillation counting of dissected tissues. MCF7 xenografts in nude mice were visualized at 4 and 24 h after tail vein administration of the [99mTc]PNA probe specific for MYC mRNA, but not with the mismatch control. The [99mTc]probes distributed normally to the kidneys, livers, tumors, and other tissues. Molecular imaging of oncogene mRNAs in solid tumors with radiolabel-PNA-peptide chimeras might provide additional genetic characterization of preinvasive and invasive breast cancers.

  9. The influence of inhibiting or stimulating the expression of the α3 subunit of the nicotinic receptor in SH-SY5Y cells on levels of amyloid-β peptide and β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Xue-Ling; Ou-Yang, Kai; Shan, Ke-Ren; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the α3 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) on the expression of β-secretase and the concomitant level of amyloid-β (Aβ), SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were either transfected with small interference RNAs (siRNAs) specifically targeting this subunit or exposed to nicotine. The levels of α3 nAChR mRNA and protein, as well as the corresponding levels of BACE1 (which cleaves the β-site of APP) and BACE2 (cleaving in the Aβ domain) were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The levels of Aβ(1-42) in culture media were determined by an Elisa procedure. In SH-SY5Y cells transfected with siRNA, the levels of α3 nAChR mRNA and protein were reduced by 96% and 88%, respectively; the levels of BACE1 mRNA and protein were significantly enhanced, while those of BACE2 were reduced; and the level of Aβ in the culture medium was elevated. In contrast, when untransfected SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to nicotine, the levels of both α3 nAChR mRNA and protein were enhanced; while the levels of BACE1 mRNA and protein were diminished and the corresponding levels of BACE2 enhanced; and the level of Aβ in the culture medium was attenuated. These results indicate that the α3 subunit of nAChR inhibits the production of Aβ by reducing the expression of BACE1 and elevating the expression of BACE2, suggesting that this subunit might play an important neuroprotective role in connection with the pathogenesis of AD.

  10. Properties of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cadmium-binding peptide(s). Unique non-metallothionein cadmium ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, R N; Wagner, G J

    1987-01-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of Cd-binding peptides isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and suspension-cultured tobacco cells were determined and compared with properties of rat liver Cd,Zn-thionein. Some emphasis was placed on metal-binding and specificity properties. Cd-peptides of apparent Mr 6000 and 2000 were induced in tobacco leaves by growth of plants with 90 microM-Cd. Only the apparent-Mr-2000 Cd-peptide was induced in the leaves of tobacco plants grown in the presence of 3 microM-Cd. In cultured tobacco cells exposed to a wide range of Cd levels (3-180 microM), a peptide of apparent Mr 2000 was observed. Under denaturing conditions [6 M-guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) with or without 100 mM-2-mercaptoethanol], all of the above forms were shown to have an Mr of approx. 1300, compared with an Mr of 6000 for Cd,Zn-thionein. The apparent disaggregation of the Mr-6000 form by GdmCl to what appears to be the unit Cd-binding peptide was reversible. Tobacco-derived Cd-peptide contained approx. 40, 35 and 15 residues of glutamate/glutamine, cysteine and glycine respectively, with serine, lysine, and aromatic residues being absent. Tobacco Cd-peptide had an isoelectric point (pI) of 3.15, which is lower than the pI greater than or equal to 4 reported for metallothionein. A 50% dissociation of Cd occurred at pH 5 and 3.5 for the tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein respectively, and GdmCl was shown to cause Cd dissociation from tobacco peptide, but not from metallothionein. No evidence was obtained for Zn induction in vivo of, or Zn binding in vitro to, tobacco Cd-peptide. Copper induced a low-Mr metal-binding component in cultured tobacco cells which did not appear to be identical with the peptide induced by Cd. Properties of tobacco Cd-peptide and Cd,Zn-thionein, including metal affinity and selectivity, are greatly different, except for the common presence of 30 residues of cysteine/100 residues. PMID:3593213

  11. Characterization of magnetic phase in yttrium-doped polycrystalline La 1 - x - yYyCaxMnO3 with x = 0.05 , 0.33 and y=0.07 using dielectric and optical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, T. N.; Nandi, U. N.; Jana, D.; Paramanik, Tapas

    2017-02-01

    The dielectric permittivity of yttrium-doped polycrystalline samples La 1 - x - yYyCaxMnO3 with x = 0.05 , 0.33 and y=0.07 has been measured at frequencies f from 20 Hz to 2 MHz and at temperatures T from 80 K to 350 K . These samples were prepared in the form of bulk polycrystals(ceramics) by solid state reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffraction technique. With the decrease in temperature, this system exhibits a phase transition from paramagnetic insulating to ferromagnetic metallic at a temperature TMI = 225 K for x=0.05 and at 170 K for x=0.33. In this report, it is shown that such phase transition can be characterized by the exponents obtained from the scaling analysis of the variation of the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity ɛ1 and ɛ2 and the loss factor tanδ as a function of frequency and temperature. Results are analyzed systematically from the existing theoretical models and the scaling formalism.

  12. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  13. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  14. Stapled peptides for intracellular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Gregory L; Hilinski, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that engage in intracellular interactions with other proteins are widely considered among the most biologically appealing yet chemically intractable targets for drug discovery. The critical interaction surfaces of these proteins typically lack the deep hydrophobic involutions that enable potent, selective targeting by small organic molecules, and their localization within the cell puts them beyond the reach of protein therapeutics. Considerable interest has therefore arisen in next-generation targeting molecules that combine the broad target recognition capabilities of protein therapeutics with the robust cell-penetrating ability of small molecules. One type that has shown promise in early-stage studies is hydrocarbon-stapled α-helical peptides, a novel class of synthetic miniproteins locked into their bioactive α-helical fold through the site-specific introduction of a chemical brace, an all-hydrocarbon staple. Stapling can greatly improve the pharmacologic performance of peptides, increasing their target affinity, proteolytic resistance, and serum half-life while conferring on them high levels of cell penetration through endocytic vesicle trafficking. Here, we discuss considerations crucial to the successful design and evaluation of potent stapled peptide interactions, our intention being to facilitate the broad application of this technology to intractable targets of both basic biologic interest and potential therapeutic value.

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-09-01

    Anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) were originally thought to exert protecting actions against bacterial infection by disintegrating bacterial membranes. Upon identification of internal bacterial targets, the view changed and moved toward inhibition of prokaryote-specific biochemical processes. However, the level of none of these activities can explain the robust efficacy of some of these peptides in animal models of systemic and cutaneous infections. A rapidly growing panel of reports suggests that AMPs, now called host-defense peptides (HDPs), act through activating the immune system of the host. This includes recruitment and activation of macrophages and mast cells, inducing chemokine production and altering NF-κB signaling processes. As a result, both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses are elevated together with activation of innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms, wound healing, and apoptosis. HDPs sterilize the systemic circulation and local injury sites significantly more efficiently than pure single-endpoint in vitro microbiological or biochemical data would suggest and actively aid recovering from tissue damage after or even without bacterial infections. However, the multiple and, often opposing, immunomodulatory functions of HDPs require exceptional care in therapeutic considerations.

  16. Hierarchical organization of ferrocene-peptides.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Samaneh; Martić, Sanela; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2012-07-16

    Hierarchical self-assembly of disubstituted ferrocene (Fc)-peptide conjugates that possess Gly-Val-Phe and Gly-Val-Phe-Phe peptide substituents leads to the formation of nano- and micro-sized assemblies. Hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions provide directionality to the assembly patterns. The self-assembling behavior of these compounds was studied in solution by using (1)H NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. In the solid state, attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods were used. Spontaneous self-assembly of Fc-peptides through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions induces supramolecular assemblies, which further associate and give rise to fibers, large fibrous crystals, and twisted ropes. In the case of Fc[CO-Gly-Val-Phe-OMe](2) (1), molecules initially interact to form pleated sheets that undergo association into long fibers that form bundles and rectangular crystalline cuboids. Molecular offsets and defects, such as screw dislocations and solvent effects that occur during crystal growth, induce the formation of helical arrangements, ultimately leading to large twisted ropes. By contrast, the Fc-tetrapeptide conjugate Fc[CO-Gly-Val-Phe-Phe-OMe](2) (2) forms a network of nanofibers at the supramolecular level, presumably due to the additional hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions that stem from the additional Phe residues.

  17. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  18. Small Peptides Derived from Penetratin as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Somlai, Csaba; Andujar, Sebastián A; Garro, Adriana D; Lima, Beatriz; Tapia, Alejandro; Feresin, Gabriela; Perczel, Andras; Tóth, Gabor; Cascales, Javier López; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation and conformational study of several small-size peptides acting as antibacterial agents are reported. Among the compounds evaluated, the peptides Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Trp-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2 , Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Arg-NH2 , and Arg-Gln-Ile-Trp-Trp-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity. These were found to be very active antibacterial compounds, considering their small molecular size. In order to better understand the antibacterial activity obtained for these peptides, an exhaustive conformational analysis was performed, using both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations using two different media (water and trifluoroethanol/water) were employed. The results of these theoretical calculations were corroborated by experimental circular dichroism measurements. A brief discussion on the possible mechanism of action of these peptides at molecular level is also presented. Some of the peptides reported here constitute very interesting structures to be used as starting compounds for the design of new small-size peptides possessing antibacterial activity.

  19. Molecular biology of the peptide hormone families.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R K; Anderson, B; Dixon, J E

    1993-12-01

    The application of recombinant molecular biology has lead to remarkable advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of cell function in general and of the polarized GI endocrine cell in particular. This article focuses on some of the advances made towards determining the contribution of peptide hormone gene regulation to the regulation of physiological events in the GI tract. Application of these techniques to other subcellular processes involved in peptide hormone physiology such as subcellular trafficing in the regulated secretory pathway and post-translational processing have been equally impressive. For example, many of the key enzymes in the peptide hormone processing cascade have been cloned and are being studied at a molecular level. We have focused this article on the SS and gastrin peptides because of their known physiologic importance and interactions, and the depth of analysis accomplished to date. Studies using SS and gastrin as models have established principals that cover the spectrum of luminal regulation of gene activity to the identification of a single amino acid residue responsible for cAMP induction of SS gene expression. Many genes in the GI endocrine system have been cloned and the article by Dr. Habener (elsewhere in this issue) discusses progress made in understanding the complex regulation of the glucagon gene. We anticipate similar advances in studies of cholecystokinin, secretin, motilin, VIP, pancreatic polypeptide, and neuropeptide Y, whose genes have been cloned and initially characterized. Finally, as outlined in this article, the mechanisms of regulation of a specific gene often differ between sites of expression, even within the GI tract. Direct studies of the subcellular mechanisms regulating gene expression and other processes in GI endocrine cells await novel methods to maintain and propagate these cells. These studies will almost certainly involve new and creative uses of recombinant molecular biology.

  20. Valproate and copper accelerate TRH-like peptide synthesis in male rat pancreas and reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Pekary, A E; Stevens, S A; Sattin, A

    2006-11-01

    Treatment with valproate (Valp) facilitates the synthesis of TRH-like peptides (pGlu-X-Pro-NH(2)) in rat brain where "X" can be any amino acid residue. Because high levels of TRH-like peptides occur in the pancreas and pGlu-Glu-Pro-NH(2) (Glu-TRH) has been shown to be a fertilization promoting peptide, we hypothesized that these peptides mediate some of the metabolic and reproductive side effects of Valp. Male WKY rats were treated with Valp acutely (AC), chronically (CHR) or chronically followed by a 2 day withdrawal (WD). AC, CHR and WD treatments significantly altered TRH and/or TRH-like peptide levels in pancreas and reproductive tissues. Glu-TRH was the predominant TRH-like peptide in epididymis, consistent with its fertilization promoting activity. Glu-TRH levels in the epididymis increased 3-fold with AC Valp. Phe-TRH, the most abundant TRH-like peptide in the pancreas, increased 4-fold with AC Valp. Phe-TRH inhibits both basal and TRH-stimulated insulin release. Large dense core vesicles (LDCV's) contain a copper-dependent enzyme responsible for the post-translational processing of precursors of TRH and TRH-like peptides. Copper (500 microM) increased the in vitro C-terminal amidation of TRH-like peptides by 8- and 4-fold during 24 degrees C incubation of homogenates of pancreas and testis, respectively. Valp (7 microM) accelerated 3-fold the processing of TRH and TRH-like peptide precursors in pancreatic LDCV's incubated at 24 degrees C. We conclude that copper, an essential cofactor for TRH and TRH-like peptide biosynthesis that is chelated by Valp, mediates some of the metabolic and reproductive effects of Valp treatment via acceleration of intravesicular synthesis and altered release of these peptides.

  1. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  2. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  3. [Amphibian skin as a source of therapeutic peptides].

    PubMed

    Amiche, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The search for new bioactive molecules that could be used in therapeutics is a major public health issue, particularly in the treatment of certain diseases such as cancer. In this context the exploration of the venom of animals (snakes, amphibians, cones, scorpions, insects...) that produce molecules of various structures and biological activities, is a very promising direction. Research in this area led to the discovery of neuropeptides, hormones, toxins, antimicrobial peptides and other extremely potent mediators. These are now used in many areas both in fundamental research and in translational research, respectively, to understand biochemical and physiological mechanisms, or to use as medical diagnostic tools and for therapeutic purposes. Pr. V. Erspamer is the first researcher to have shown, in the 1930s, that in addition to biogenic amines and alkaloids, granular glands from the skin of amphibians also produced huge amounts of peptides with various structures and biological activities. He also showed that these peptides had their counterparts, most often in the form of identical or similar peptides, in the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. These observations are summarized in the form of a triangle concept of "brain-gut-skin" that states that any peptide found in a compartment should be present in the other two. In addition, abundance, ease of extraction and identification of peptides from amphibian skin make this model a means to search for their counterparts in mammals where they are present in minute quantities. This approach has two advantages: (i) at the fundamental level, the large peptide diversity, ubiquity and multiplicity of functions to which they participate, constitute a true chemical library to understand the mechanisms of recognition and signal transduction and study the physicochemical basic of the specificity; and (ii) in terms of applications, the relative simplicity of these peptides and the rise of the

  4. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  5. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  6. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  7. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  8. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  9. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  11. Hierarchical assembly of branched supramolecular polymers from (cyclic Peptide)-polymer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Liang; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Perrier, Sébastien

    2014-11-10

    We report the synthesis and assembly of (N-methylated cyclic peptide)-polymer conjugates for which the cyclic peptide is attached to either the α- or both α- and ω- end groups of a polymer. A combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques reveals that the assembly of the conjugates follows a two-level hierarchy, initially driven by H-bond formation between two N-methylated cyclic peptides, followed by unspecific, noncovalent aggregation of this peptide into small domains that behave as branching points and lead to the formation of branched supramolecular polymers.

  12. The quantitative relationship of urinary peptide hydroxyproline excretion to collagen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Phillip H.; Klein, LeRoy

    1969-01-01

    To determine the quantitative relationship of urinary hydroxyproline peptide excretion to collagen breakdown, known quantities of radioactive hydroxyproline peptides were administered to unlabeled animals and excertion of radioactivity in respiratory carbon dioxide, urine, and feces was measured. The major routes of excretion of collagen peptide metabolites were respiratory carbon dioxide (75%) and urine, as hydroxyproline-containing peptides (25%). Since the predominant urine hydroxyproline peptide linkage is proly-hydroxyproline, L-prolyl-L-hydroxyproline-3H was administered to unlabeled animals. Greater than 80% of the administered dipeptide was excreted in urine, suggesting that this peptide linkage is not hydrolyzed to a significant extent in vivo. These data suggest that urinary hydroxyproline excretion is a “fairly” sensitive indicator of collagen breakdown and can be used at the clinical level to quantitate changes in collagen breakdown. PMID:5765022

  13. Comparative studies of adhesion peptides based on l- or d-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Sergey; Palmer, Daniel; Meldal, Morten; Diness, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Detailed studies comparing solid-supported l- or d-amino acid adhesion peptides based on the sequence KLHRIRA were performed. Stability towards proteases and levels of cellular adhesion to the otherwise inert surface of PEGA resin were compared by using fluorescently labelled peptides. A clear difference in the peptide stability towards cleavage by subtilisin, trypsin, or papain was observed. However, all of the on-bead peptides provided an optimal surface for cell adhesion and proliferation. In long-term experiments, these properties were still found to be similar on the resins modified either with l- or with d-amino acids and unaffected by the nature of their fluorescence labelling at either terminus. These results support that the more accessible l-amino acids can be utilized for cell adhesion experiments and confirm the nonspecific interaction mechanism of cell binding to these peptides on the bead surface. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A simple and low-cost platform technology for producing pexiganan antimicrobial peptide in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia; Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; Yu, Alice Lei; Wu, Yang; Fang, Sheng; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, as a new class of antibiotics, have generated tremendous interest as potential alternatives to classical antibiotics. However, the large-scale production of antimicrobial peptides remains a significant challenge. This paper reports a simple and low-cost chromatography-free platform technology for producing antimicrobial peptides in Escherichia coli (E. coli). A fusion protein comprising a variant of the helical biosurfactant protein DAMP4 and the known antimicrobial peptide pexiganan is designed by joining the two polypeptides, at the DNA level, via an acid-sensitive cleavage site. The resulting DAMP4(var)-pexiganan fusion protein expresses at high level and solubility in recombinant E. coli, and a simple heat-purification method was applied to disrupt cells and deliver high-purity DAMP4(var)-pexiganan protein. Simple acid cleavage successfully separated the DAMP4 variant protein and the antimicrobial peptide. Antimicrobial activity tests confirmed that the bio-produced antimicrobial peptide has the same antimicrobial activity as the equivalent product made by conventional chemical peptide synthesis. This simple and low-cost platform technology can be easily adapted to produce other valuable peptide products, and opens a new manufacturing approach for producing antimicrobial peptides at large scale using the tools and approaches of biochemical engineering.

  15. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  16. Expression profiles of seven channel catfish antimicrobial peptides in response to Edwardsiella ictaluri infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using quantitative PCR technique, the relative transcriptional levels of seven channel catfish antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes [NK-lysin type 1, NK-lysin type 2, NK-lysin type 3, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), cathepsin D, hepcidin, and liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 ...

  17. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5) corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18) primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706) of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2)O(2)-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated.

  18. [Anti-atherosclerotic effects of peptidic geroprotector].

    PubMed

    Ryzhak, A P; Kuznik, B I; Putkovskaia, V N; Ryzhak, G A

    2012-01-01

    The study of peptide geroprotector's biological activity was conducted on basis of calf aorta extract Slavinorm in experimental models of hiperlypidemia and acute myocardial infarction. The study results show that Slavinorm possesses the evident antiatherogenic effect. It appears in blood lipid spectrum parameters optimization, including atherogenic coefficient normalization at the expense of high density lipids level increase and other cholesterol fractions decrease. Slavinorm manifested antiischemic effects in the model of acute myocardial infarction, which was expressed in significant decrease of necrotic zone after 4-hours coronary artery occlusion in comparison with parameters in control animals and in low frequency of postobstructive arythmia.

  19. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Macias-Reyes, Héctor; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Nuñez-Atahualpa, María Alejandra; Andrade-Garduño, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC) were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP), and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P < 0.001). Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P < 0.01), and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 0.02). The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r = 0.513, P = 0.001), CRP (r = 0.799, P < 0.001), TNFα (r = 0.642, P = 0.001), and IL-6 (r = 0.751, P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P < 0.001) and anti-CCP levels (P = 0.03). Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:25821796

  20. C-peptide exhibits a late induction effect on matrix metallopeptidase-9 in high glucose-stimulated rat mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junxia; Li, Yanning; Xu, Mingzhi; Li, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Qi, Jinsheng; He, Kunyu

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 is considered to be a contributor of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy (DN). C-peptide can reverse fibrosis, thus exerting a beneficial effect on DN. Whether C-peptide induces MMP-9 and MMP-2 to reverse ECM accumulation is not clear. In the present study, in order to determine ECM metabolism, rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (HG) and C-peptide intervention, then the early and late effects of C-peptide on HG-affected MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated. Firstly, it was confirmed that HG mainly suppressed MMP-9 expression levels. Furthermore, C-peptide treatment induced MMP-9 expression at 6 h and suppressed it at 24 h, revealing the early dual effects of C-peptide on MMP-9 expression. Subsequently, significant increase in MMP-9 expression at 72, 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment was observed. These changes in MMP-9 protein content confirmed its expression changes following late C-peptide treatment. Furthermore, at 96 and 120 h C-peptide treatment reversed the HG-inhibited MMP-9 secretion, further indicating the late induction effect of C-peptide on MMP-9. The present results demonstrated that C-peptide exerted a late induction effect on MMP-9 in HG-stimulated rat mesangial cells, which may be associated with the underlying mechanism of C-peptide's reversal effects on DN. PMID:28101192

  1. Comparative gene expression of gonadotropins (FSH and LH) and peptide levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) in the pituitary of wild and cultured Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) broodstocks.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, J M; Rubio, M; Ortiz-Delgado, J B; Klenke, U; Kight, K; Cross, I; Sánchez-Ramos, I; Riaza, A; Rebordinos, L; Sarasquete, C; Zohar, Y; Mañanós, E L

    2009-07-01

    The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a valuable flatfish for aquaculture, but it presents important reproductive problems in captivity. Spawning is achieved by wild-caught breeders but cultured broodstocks fail to spawn spontaneously and, when they do, eggs are unfertilized. To gain knowledge on the physiological basis underlying this reproductive dysfunction, this study aimed at analyzing comparative hormone levels between wild and cultured broodstocks at the spawning season. The Senegalese sole gonadotropin (GTH) subunits, FSHbeta, LHbeta and GPalpha, were cloned and qualitative (in situ hybridization) and quantitative (real-time PCR) assays developed to analyze pituitary GTH gene expression. In females, FSHbeta and GPalpha mRNA levels were higher in wild than in cultured broodstocks, whereas in males all three subunits were highest in cultured. By ELISA, three GnRH forms were detected in the pituitary, displaying a relative abundance of GnRH2>GnRH1>GnRH3. All GnRHs were slightly more abundant in wild than cultured females, whereas no differences were observed in males. Plasma levels of vitellogenin and sex steroids were also analyzed. Results showed endocrine differences between wild and cultured broodstocks at the spawning period, which could be related to the endocrine failure of the reproductive axis in cultured breeders.

  2. Peptide Mimetics of Apolipoproteins Improve HDL Function

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Buga, Georgette M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade evidence has accumulated that suggests that the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL may be at least as important as the levels of HDL-cholesterol. The recent failure of the torcetrapib clinical trails has highlighted the potential differences between HDL-cholesterol levels and HDL function. Agents to improve HDL function including HDL anti-inflammatory properties provide a new therapeutic strategy for ameliorating atherosclerosis and other chronic inflammatory conditions related to dyslipidemia. Seeking guidance from the structure of the apolipoproteins of the plasma lipoproteins has allowed the creation of a series of polypeptides that have interesting functionality with therapeutic implications. In animal models of atherosclerosis, peptide mimetics of apolipoproteins have been shown to improve the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL, significantly reduce lesions and improve vascular inflammation and function without necessarily altering HDL-cholesterol levels. Some of these are now entering the clinical arena as interventions in pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic studies. PMID:18449337

  3. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  4. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  5. C-peptide, Na+,K+-ATPase, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coste, T. C.; Jannot, M. F.; Raccah, D.; Tsimaratos, M.

    2004-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase is an ubiquitous membrane enzyme that allows the extrusion of three sodium ions from the cell and two potassium ions from the extracellular fluid. Its activity is decreased in many tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. This impairment could be at least partly responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Na+,K+-ATPase activity is decreased in the red blood cell membranes of type 1 diabetic individuals, irrespective of the degree of diabetic control. It is less impaired or even normal in those of type 2 diabetic patients. The authors have shown that in the red blood cells of type 2 diabetic patients, Na+,K+-ATPase activity was strongly related to blood C-peptide levels in non–insulin-treated patients (in whom C-peptide concentration reflects that of insulin) as well as in insulin-treated patients. Furthermore, a gene-environment relationship has been observed. The alpha-1 isoform of the enzyme predominant in red blood cells and nerve tissue is encoded by the ATP1A1 gene.Apolymorphism in the intron 1 of this gene is associated with lower enzyme activity in patients with C-peptide deficiency either with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but not in normal individuals. There are several lines of evidence for a low C-peptide level being responsible for low Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the red blood cells. Short-term C-peptide infusion to type 1 diabetic patients restores normal Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Islet transplantation, which restores endogenous C-peptide secretion, enhances Na+,K+-ATPase activity proportionally to the rise in C-peptide. This C-peptide effect is not indirect. In fact, incubation of diabetic red blood cells with C-peptide at physiological concentration leads to an increase of Na+,K+-ATPase activity. In isolated proximal tubules of rats or in the medullary thick ascending limb of the kidney, C-peptide stimulates in a dose-dependent manner Na+,K+-ATPase activity. This impairment in Na+,K+-ATPase activity, mainly

  6. Structural studies of the superconducting La 3.5- x- yY yCa 2 xBa 3.5- xCu 7O z system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbarao, M. V.; Rajagopal, H.; Sequeira, A.; Kulkarni, R. G.

    1999-06-01

    We have investigated the influence of incorporation of Ca and Y ions on the structural and superconducting properties of La 3.5- x- yY yCa 2 xBa 3.5- xCu 7O z (0.0≤ x= y≤0.7) system by Rietveld refinement using the neutron diffraction data on five samples viz. x= y=0.0 (#1), 0.20 (#2), 0.40 (#3), 0.50 (#4) and 0.70 (#5) along with X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistivity, AC susceptibility and oxygen-content measurements. Samples with 0.20≤ x= y≤0.70 are superconducting and TcR=0 is between 56 and 79 K. Neutron data confirms (i) the occurrence of a single phase tetragonal structure with space group P4/ mmm for all the five samples, (ii) Ca and Y ions substitute onto the La sites, with concomitant displacement of La on to Ba sites, and (iii) increasing x= y from 0.0 to 0.50 decreases La-O(3) bond length from 2.516 to 2.446 Å and increases Cu(2)-O(2) bond length from 2.200 to 2.292 Å with corresponding increase in Tc from 0 to 79 K due to increasing occupancy of Y/Ca at La site. A correlation exists between the Cu(2)-O(2) and La-O(3) bond lengths and the measured Tc values of five samples. Rietveld analysis of XRD data for x= y=0.50 (#4) sample clearly shows the occupancy of Ca ions in the La sites and to small extent 0.03 in Ba sites. Such cation disordering between Ca and La,Ba may give different oxygen contents obtained from neutron data and iodometry.

  7. Basal and postprandial plasma levels of PYY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, gastrin and insulin in women with moderate and morbid obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zwirska-Korczala, K; Konturek, S J; Sodowski, M; Wylezol, M; Kuka, D; Sowa, P; Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Kukla, M; Berdowska, A; Rehfeld, J F; Bielanski, W; Brzozowski, T

    2007-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS), defined as central obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance, has been associated with inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular diseases. This study was carried out on three groups of women; lean controls, moderately obese with MS (OB-MS) and morbidly obese with MS (MOB-MS). The main objectives were: 1. to analyze the plasma levels of total and acylated ghrelin, peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)), cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin and insulin levels under basal conditions and in response to a standard mixed meal, and 2. to elucidate the relationship between the plasma levels of these gut peptides and metabolic syndrome parameters. Plasma levels of the gut hormones were measured by radioimmunoassays at time 0 just before the meal and at 30, 60 and 120 min after a meal ingestion. Traditional lipid profile and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), the strongest biomarker of inflammation were also determined in OB-MS and MOB-MS. When compared to OB-MS, MOB-MS exhibited much higher anthropometric parameters such as waist circumference, higher fat mass and higher plasma levels of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and hs-CRP. Both these obese groups revealed significantly higher values of body mass index (BMI), fat mass, total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin resistance (IR) calculated from homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) and hs-CRP compared to the values recorded in lean subjects. Fasting PYY(3-36) level was lower, while fasting acylated ghrelin was higher in MOB-MS than in OB-MS. Plasma total and acylated ghrelin levels were significantly lower in OB-MS compared to lean women. In MOB-MS women the fasting PYY(3-36) levels were lower compared to lean controls and OB-MS, whilst postprandially in both OB-MS and MOB-MS, it was much lower than in lean women. The fasting plasma levels of total and acylated ghrelin and their postprandial decrease

  8. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  9. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  11. Repetitive peptide boosting progressively enhances functional memory CTLs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction of functional memory CTLs holds promise for fighting critical infectious diseases through vaccination, but so far, no effective regime has been identified. We show here that memory CTLs can be enhanced progressively to high levels by repetitive intravenous boosting with peptide and adjuvan...

  12. Design and expression of a short peptide as an HIV detection probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, Jamie A.; Yu, Zhiqiang; Dedkova, Larisa M.; Chen, Shengxi

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We designed a short fusion peptide (FP-50) for in vivo expression. •This peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein. •The detectable level is about 20–200 times lower than previously published methods. •It is a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 during early stages of HIV infection. -- Abstract: To explore a low-cost novel probe for HIV detection, we designed and prepared a 50-amino acid-length short fusion peptide (FP-50) via Escherichia coli in vivo expression. It was employed as a novel probe to detect HIV-1 gp120 protein. The detectable level of gp120 protein using the FP-50 peptide was approximately 20–200 times lower than previously published methods that used a pair of monoclonal antibodies. Thus, this short peptide is a very promising component for detection of gp120 protein during early stages of HIV infection.

  13. Natriuretic peptide metabolism, clearance and degradation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide constitute a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, and then specifically discusses the tissue-specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and natriuretic peptide receptor-C.

  14. Marine-Derived Bioactive Peptides for Biomedical Sectors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruiz, Federico; Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2017-01-01

    Marine-based resources such as algae and other marine by-products have been recognized as rich sources of structurally diverse bioactive peptides. Evidently, their structural characteristics including unique amino acid residues are responsible for their biological activity. Several of the above-mentioned marine-origin species show multi-functional bioactivities that are useful for a new discovery and/or reinvention of biologically active ingredients, nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals. Therefore, in recent years, marine-derived bioactive peptides have gained a considerable attention with high-value biomedical and/or pharmaceutical potentials. Furthermore, a wider spectrum of bioactive peptides can be produced through proteolytic-assisted hydrolysis of various marine resources under controlled physicochemical (pH and temperature of the reaction media) environment. Owing to their numerous health-related beneficial effects and therapeutic potential in the treatment and/or prevention of many diseases, such marine-derived bioactive peptides exhibit a wider spectrum of biological activities such as anti-cancerous, anti-proliferative, anti-coagulant, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-tumor activities among many others. Based on emerging evidence of marine-derived peptide mining, the above-mentioned marine resources contain noteworthy levels of high-value protein. The present review article mainly summarizes the marine-derived bioactive peptides and emphasizing their potential applications in biomedical and/or pharmaceutical sectors of the modern world. In conclusion, recent literature has provided evidence that marine-derived bioactive peptides play a critical role in human health along with many possibilities of designing new functional nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals to clarify potent mechanisms of action for a wider spectrum of diseases.

  15. A strategy for efficient cross-presentation of CTL-epitope peptides leading to enhanced induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akira; Wakita, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Mayumi, Tadanori; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2007-01-22

    The activation of antitumor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) depends on how efficiently the relevant tumor antigen peptides are delivered into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway in antigen presenting cells (APCs). An elegant approach to promote the peptide-MHC class I association has been described for enhanced peptide transportation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by adding an ER insertion signal sequence (Eriss). Nevertheless, this approach does not appear potent enough to induce in vivo tumor protective immunity. Herein, we present a novel peptide-vaccine strategy based on the combined utilization of Eriss and fusogenic liposomes (FLs) capable of directly introducing encapsulated CTL-epitope peptides into the MHC class I pathway of APCs. APCs pulsed with free peptides, FL-encapsulated peptides, or FL-encapsulated Eriss-conjugated peptides exhibited comparable levels of antigen-presenting activity at early phases after pulsing. Interestingly, whereas in the first two methods the APC ability began to decline 40 to 60 h after pulsing, FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides allowed APCs to retain peptide-presentation activity for at least 140 h. This advantage of FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides correlated with the induction of more potent antitumor immunity compared with soluble Eriss(+) or Eriss(-) peptides or FL-encapsulated Eriss(-) peptides when they were administered in vivo. Thus, Eriss-conjugated CTL-epitope peptides encapsulated in FLs provide a highly efficient tumor-vaccine to enhance the induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

  16. Gram-positive bacterial cell envelopes: The impact on the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, effectors of innate immunity, are supposed to act at the cytoplasmic membrane leading to permeabilization and eventually membrane disruption. Thereby, interaction of antimicrobial peptides with anionic membrane phospholipids is considered to be a key factor in killing of bacteria. Recently, evidence was provided that killing takes place only when bacterial cell membranes are completely saturated with peptides. This adds to an ongoing debate, which role cell wall components such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide may play in the killing event, i.e. if they rather entrap or facilitate antimicrobial peptides access to the cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, in this review we focused on the impact of Gram-positive cell wall components for the mode of action and activity of antimicrobial peptides as well as in innate immunity. This led us to conclude that interaction of antimicrobial peptides with peptidoglycan may not contribute to a reduction of their antimicrobial activity, whereas interaction with anionic lipoteichoic acids may reduce the local concentration of antimicrobial peptides on the cytoplasmic membrane necessary for sufficient destabilization of the membranes and bacterial killing. Further affinity studies of antimicrobial peptides toward the different cell wall as well as membrane components will be needed to address this problem on a quantitative level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  17. Maximizing Peptide Identification Events in Proteomic Workflows Using Data-Dependent Acquisition (DDA)*

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Scott P.; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Gadok, Avinash K.; Szumlinski, Karen K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Wu, Christine C.

    2014-01-01

    Current analytical strategies for collecting proteomic data using data-dependent acquisition (DDA) are limited by the low analytical reproducibility of the method. Proteomic discovery efforts that exploit the benefits of DDA, such as providing peptide sequence information, but that enable improved analytical reproducibility, represent an ideal scenario for maximizing measureable peptide identifications in “shotgun”-type proteomic studies. Therefore, we propose an analytical workflow combining DDA with retention time aligned extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) areas obtained from high mass accuracy MS1 data acquired in parallel. We applied this workflow to the analyses of sample matrixes prepared from mouse blood plasma and brain tissues and observed increases in peptide detection of up to 30.5% due to the comparison of peptide MS1 XIC areas following retention time alignment of co-identified peptides. Furthermore, we show that the approach is quantitative using peptide standards diluted into a complex matrix. These data revealed that peptide MS1 XIC areas provide linear response of over three orders of magnitude down to low femtomole (fmol) levels. These findings argue that augmenting “shotgun” proteomic workflows with retention time alignment of peptide identifications and comparative analyses of corresponding peptide MS1 XIC areas improve the analytical performance of global proteomic discovery methods using DDA. PMID:23820513

  18. Elucidation of peptide-directed palladium surface structure for biologically tunable nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M; Briggs, Beverly D; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-05-26

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then elucidated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences.

  19. Elucidation of Peptide-Directed Palladium Surface Structure for Biologically Tunable Nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Slocik, Joseph M.; Briggs, Beverly D.; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Petkov, Valeri; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Mark R.

    2015-05-01

    Peptide-enabled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures represents an avenue to access catalytic materials with tunable and optimized properties. This is achieved via peptide complexity and programmability that is missing in traditional ligands for catalytic nanomaterials. Unfortunately, there is limited information available to correlate peptide sequence to particle structure and catalytic activity to date. As such, the application of peptide-enabled nanocatalysts remains limited to trial and error approaches. In this paper, a hybrid experimental and computational approach is introduced to systematically elucidate biomolecule-dependent structure/function relationships for peptide-capped Pd nanocatalysts. Synchrotron X-ray techniques were used to uncover substantial particle surface structural disorder, which was dependent upon the amino acid sequence of the peptide capping ligand. Nanocatalyst configurations were then determined directly from experimental data using reverse Monte Carlo methods and further refined using molecular dynamics simulation, obtaining thermodynamically stable peptide-Pd nanoparticle configurations. Sequence-dependent catalytic property differences for C-C coupling and olefin hydrogenation were then eluddated by identification of the catalytic active sites at the atomic level and quantitative prediction of relative reaction rates. This hybrid methodology provides a clear route to determine peptide-dependent structure/function relationships, enabling the generation of guidelines for catalyst design through rational tailoring of peptide sequences

  20. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.