Science.gov

Sample records for peptide yy levels

  1. Factors affecting circulating levels of peptide YY in humans: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jamie A

    2014-06-01

    As obesity continues to be a global epidemic, research into the mechanisms of hunger and satiety and how those signals act to regulate energy homeostasis persists. Peptide YY (PYY) is an acute satiety signal released upon nutrient ingestion and has been shown to decrease food intake when administered exogenously. More recently, investigators have studied how different factors influence PYY release and circulating levels in humans. Some of these factors include exercise, macronutrient composition of the diet, body-weight status, adiposity levels, sex, race and ageing. The present article provides a succinct and comprehensive review of the recent literature published on the different factors that influence PYY release and circulating levels in humans. Where human data are insufficient, evidence in animal or cell models is summarised. Additionally, the present review explores the recent findings on PYY responses to different dietary fatty acids and how this new line of research will make an impact on future studies on PYY. Human demographics, such as sex and age, do not appear to influence PYY levels. Conversely, adiposity or BMI, race and acute exercise all influence circulating PYY levels. Both dietary fat and protein strongly stimulate PYY release. Furthermore, MUFA appear to result in a smaller PYY response compared with SFA and PUFA. PYY levels appear to be affected by acute exercise, macronutrient composition, adiposity, race and the composition of fatty acids from dietary fat.

  2. Expression of peptide YY by human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holler, Julia Pia Natascha; Schmitz, Jessica; Roehrig, Rainer; Wilker, Sigrid; Hecker, Andreas; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika

    2014-08-01

    Peptide YY is produced by L cells in the mucosa of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum and may have systemic and paracrine functions. We hypothesized that peptide YY is expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peptide YY mRNA and peptide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated THP-1 cells after lipopolysaccharide treatment as an in vitro model of inflammation. Blood was drawn by venipuncture from 18- to 63-year-old healthy male blood donors (n=63); peptide YY mRNA expression levels were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all healthy male subjects. In 3 subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured for 3 and 24h and peptide YY was detected in the cell culture supernatant. In human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate to induce differentiation to macrophages, treatment with lipopolysaccharide caused down-regulation of peptide YY mRNA levels. In summary, freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans expressed peptide YY. In vitro data suggested that peptide YY expression is down-regulated by differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and proinflammatory stimuli.

  3. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  4. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for measurement of circulating peptide YY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.H.; Balasubramanian, A.; Murphy, R.F.; Tabata, K.; Fischer, J.E.; Chen, I.W.; Joffe, S.N.

    1984-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay with sufficient sensitivity to detect the recently discovered, circulating peptide YY in the majority of healthy adults has been developed. The antiserum to synthetic peptide YY raised in rabbits essentially showed no cross-reactivity with bovine or porcine synthetic pancreatic polypeptide, neurotensin, or neuropeptide Y, but cross-reacted to the extent of 0.03% with synthetic peptide HI. The minimum detectable limit of the assay for plasma peptide YY was 20 pg/ml with coefficients of variation less than 16%. The immunoreactivity of peptide YY isolated from healthy adult plasma had a gel-filtration chromatographic profile similar to that of synthetic peptide YY. Fasting levels of peptide YY in plasma from 127 of 137 (92.7%) ostensibly healthy adults were measurable and showed a log-normal distribution. Using the maximum-likelihood estimation method, the normal range was calculated to be 13-178 pg/ml with a geometric mean value of 49 pg/ml. The fasting plasma peptide YY levels showed no significant age or sex dependency.

  5. Effect of Weight Loss by Diet or Gastric Bypass Surgery on Peptide YY3–36 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Blanca; Teixeira, Julio; Bose, Mousumi; Bawa, Baani; Chang, Tangel; Summe, Heather; Lee, Hongchan; Laferrère, Blandine

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of an equivalent weight loss, by gastric bypass surgery (GBP) or by diet, on peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36), ghrelin, and leptin levels and to determine the effect of diabetes status on PYY3–36 levels. Summary Background Data The increased PYY3–36 levels after GBP may be involved in the magnitude and the sustainability of weight loss after surgery. Methods Of the 30 morbidly obese women who participated in the study, 21 had type 2 diabetes mellitus, and were studied before and after equivalent weight loss of 10 kg by either GBP (n = 11) or by diet (n = 10). Results PYY3–36 levels were higher in obese diabetic as compared with nondiabetic individuals (64.1 ± 34.4 pg/mL vs. 39.9 ± 21.1 pg/mL; P < 0.05). PYY3–36 levels increased markedly in response to oral glucose after GBP (peak: 72.3 ± 20.5 pg/mL–132.7 ± 49.7 pg/mL; P < 0.001; AUC0–180: 51.5 ± 23.3 pg/mL.min−1–91.1 ± 32.2 pg/mL.min−1 P < 0.001), but not after diet (peak: 85.5 ± 51.9 pg/mL–84.8 ± 41.13 pg/mL; P = NS; AUC0–180: 68.3 ± 38.5 pg/mL.min−1–61.1 ± 42.2 pg/mL.min−1 P = NS). Fasting ghrelin levels increased after diet (425 ± 91 pg/mL–519 ± 105 pg/mL; P < 0.05), but did not change after GBP (506 ± 121 pg/mL–482 ± 196 pg/mL; P = NS). Conclusions Diabetes status seems to be a determinant of PYY3–36 levels. GBP, but not diet-induced weight loss, resulted in markedly increased glucose-stimulated PYY3–36 levels. The increase in stimulated PYY3–36 levels after GBP is likely a result of the surgery rather than a secondary outcome of weight loss. Changes in PYY3–36 levels and ghrelin could contribute to the success of GBP in sustaining weight loss. PMID:19474685

  6. Effects of peptide YY on gallbladder motility

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, R.L.; Roslyn, J.J.; Taylor, I.L.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of peptide YY (PYY) on cholecystokinin-stimulated gallbladder contraction were investigated in the prairie dog model. Twelve animals underwent laparotomy with catheter placement into the gallbladder and common bile duct (vent). The gallbladder was continuously perfused with (/sup 14/C)polyethylene glycol-labeled lactated Ringer at 0.03 ml/min, and vent effluent was collected at 2.5-min intervals. All animals received 20 min of intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP), 2.5 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/, immediately followed by 60-min infusions of either lactated Ringer (LR) or synthetic PYY, 10 or 50 ng x kg/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/. When LR was infused after CCK-OP, gallbladder filling increased by 15.4 +/- 10.5% with minimal changes in gallbladder pressure. Infusion of PYY/sub 10/ resulted in a significant increase in gallbladder volume and filling with a significant decrease in intragallbladder pressure. Similar findings were noted with PYY/sub 50/. These data indicate that synthetic PYY significantly augments gallbladder filling after CCK-OP-stimulated gallbladder contraction. These finding, coupled with the observation that PYY inhibits pancreatic secretion, suggest that this peptide may be the anti-CCK hormone and may have an important role in regulating biliary activity postprandially.

  7. Distinct changes in peptide YY binding to, and mRNA levels of, Y1 and Y2 receptors in the rat hippocampus associated with kindling epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, M; Gariboldi, M; Piwko, C; Hoyer, D; Sperk, G; Vezzani, A

    1998-04-01

    Electrical kindling of the rat dorsal hippocampus induced significant changes in the binding of 125I-peptide YY to Y1 and Y2 subtypes of neuropeptide Y receptors and in their mRNA levels in the area dentata as assessed by quantitative receptor autoradiography and in situ hybridization histochemistry. Binding to Y1 receptor sites decreased by 50% (p < 0.05) in the molecular layer of the stimulated dentate gyrus, 2 days after preconvulsive stage 2 and 1 week or 1 month after generalized stage 5 seizures compared with sham-stimulated rats. Binding to Y2 receptor sites increased bilaterally by 36-87% (p < 0.05) in the hilus at stage 2 and 1 week or 1 month after stage 5. No significant changes were observed after one afterdischarge or in the other hippocampal subfields or in the cortex. Y1 receptor mRNA signal decreased bilaterally by 50-64% (p < 0.01) in the granule cell layer, 6 h but not 24 h after stages 2 and 5. The Y2 receptor mRNA signal was enhanced by 283% (p < 0.01) in the stimulated granule cell layer 24 h after stage 2. At 6 and 24 h after stage 5, mRNA levels were increased both ipsilaterally (283 and 360%, respectively; p < 0.01) and contralaterally (190 and 260%, respectively; p < 0.05). No significant changes in level of either mRNA was found following one afterdischarge. These modifications, and the enhanced neuropeptide Y release previously shown in the hippocampus, suggest that kindling is associated with lasting changes in neuropeptide Y-mediated neurotransmission.

  8. The amino-acid sequences of sculpin islet somatostatin-28 and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Cutfield, J F

    1987-04-01

    Two pancreatic peptides, somatostatin-28 and peptide YY, have been isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin). Following purification by reverse-phase HPLC, each peptide was sequenced completely through to the carboxyl-terminus by gas-phase Edman degradation. Somatostatin-28 was the major form of somatostatin detected and is similar to the gene II product from anglerfish. Peptide YY (36 amino acids) more closely resembles porcine neuropeptide YY and intestinal peptide YY than it does the pancreatic polypeptides. PMID:2883025

  9. Modulation of taste responsiveness by the satiation hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Michael S; Hurtado, Maria D; Brown, Alicia R; Bohórquez, Diego V; Liddle, Rodger A; Herzog, Herbert; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Dotson, Cedrick D

    2013-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the peripheral taste system may be modulated in the context of an animal's metabolic state. One purported mechanism for this phenomenon is that circulating gastrointestinal peptides modulate the functioning of the peripheral gustatory system. Recent evidence suggests endocrine signaling in the oral cavity can influence food intake (FI) and satiety. We hypothesized that these hormones may be affecting FI by influencing taste perception. We used immunohistochemistry along with genetic knockout models and the specific reconstitution of peptide YY (PYY) in saliva using gene therapy protocols to identify a role for PYY signaling in taste. We show that PYY is expressed in subsets of taste cells in murine taste buds. We also show, using brief-access testing with PYY knockouts, that PYY signaling modulates responsiveness to bitter-tasting stimuli, as well as to lipid emulsions. We show that salivary PYY augmentation, via viral vector therapy, rescues behavioral responsiveness to a lipid emulsion but not to bitter stimuli and that this response is likely mediated via activation of Y2 receptors localized apically in taste cells. Our findings suggest distinct functions for PYY produced locally in taste cells vs. that circulating systemically.

  10. Case of peptide-YY-producing strumal carcinoid of the ovary: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Miura, Jiyu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Yoshizaki, Akira; Sugiyama, Toru

    2012-10-01

    Ovarian carcinoid is a rare tumor accounting for approximately 0.1% of all ovarian malignancies. We describe a case of peptide-YY-producing strumal carcinoid of the ovary associated with severe constipation. A 48-year-old woman was found to have a pelvic mass on ultrasonography when she visited her primary doctor for a health check-up. She was thus referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid right ovarian tumor 60 × 50 mm in size. The patient underwent a right adnexectomy and was histopathologically diagnosed as having strumal carcinoid of the ovary. On immunohistochemical examination, the tumor cells were positive for peptide YY. The patient's constipation resolved rapidly after surgery. Based on her clinical course, her constipation was considered to have been caused by the strumal carcinoid of the ovary. The clinical course of this case supports the previously recognized correlation between peptide-YY-producing ovarian carcinoid and constipation.

  11. Peptide YY and ghrelin predict craving and risk for relapse in abstinent smokers.

    PubMed

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Lemieux, Andrine; Nakajima, Motohiro

    2014-11-01

    Appetite hormones are directly involved in regulating satiety, energy expenditure, and food intake, and accumulating evidence suggests their involvement in regulating reward and craving for drugs. This study investigated the ability of peptide YY (PYY) and ghrelin during the initial 24-48 h of a smoking cessation attempt to predict smoking relapse at 4 weeks. Multiple regression analysis indicated that increased PYY was associated with decreased reported craving and increased positive affect. Cox proportional hazard models showed that higher ghrelin levels predicted increased risk of smoking relapse (hazard ratio=2.06, 95% CI=1.30-3.27). These results indicate that circulating PYY may have buffering effects during the early stages of cessation while ghrelin may confer increased risk of smoking relapse. Further investigation of the links between these hormones and nicotine dependence is warranted.

  12. YY-39, a tick anti-thrombosis peptide containing RGD domain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Fang, Yaqun; Han, Yajun; Bai, Xuewei; Yan, Xiuwen; Zhang, Yun; Lai, Ren; Zhang, Zhiye

    2015-06-01

    Ticks are obligatory blood feeding ectoparasites, which continuously attach to their hosts for 1-2 weeks. There are many biologically active compounds in tick salivary glands interfering host haemostatic system and to successfully obtain blood meal. Several platelet aggregation inhibitors have been identified from ticks. A family of conserved peptides, which were identified from transcriptome analysis of many tick salivary glands, were found to contain unique primary structure including predicted mature peptides of 39-47 amino acid residues in length and a Pro/Glu(P/E)-Pro/His(P/H)-Lys-Gly-Asp(RGD) domain. Given their unique structure and RGD domain, they are considered a novel family of disintegrins that inhibit platelet aggregation. One of them (YY-39) was tested for its effects on platelets and thrombosis in vivo. YY-39 was found effectively to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Furthermore, YY-39 blocked platelet adhesion to soluble collagen and bound to purified GPIIb/IIIa in a dose-dependent manner. In in vivo experiments, YY-39 reduced thrombus weight effectively in a rat arteriovenous shunt model and inhibited thrombosis in a carrageenan-induced mouse tail thrombosis model. Combined with their prevalence in ticks and platelet inhibitory functions, this family of peptides might be conserved tick anti-haemostatic molecules.

  13. The anorexic hormone Peptide YY3-36 is rapidly metabolized to inactive Peptide YY3-34 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Toräng, Signe; Veedfald, Simon; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-07-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a 36 amino acid peptide hormone released from enteroendocrine cells. An N-terminally degraded metabolite, PYY3-36, has anorexigenic effects, which makes the PYY system a target for obesity treatment. However, little is known about the kinetics and degradation products of PYY. A related peptide, Neuropeptide Y (NPY), may be degraded from the C-terminus. We therefore investigated PYY degradation after in vitro incubations in porcine plasma and blood and in vivo by infusing PYY3-36 into multicatheterized pigs (n = 7) (2 pmol/kg/min). Plasma samples were analyzed by region-specific radioimmunoassays (RIA) and HPLC analysis. A metabolite, corresponding to PYY3-34 was formed after incubation in plasma and blood and during the infusion study. When taking the C-terminal degradation into account, the half-life (T½) of PYY in blood and plasma amounted to 3.4 ± 0.2 and 6.2 ± 0.2 h, respectively. After PYY3-36 infusion in pigs, the peptide was degraded with a T½ of 3.6 ± 0.5 min. Significant extraction (20.5 ± 8.0%) compatible with glomerular filtration was observed across the kidneys and significant C-terminal degradation (26.5 ± 4.8%) was observed across the liver. Net balances across the hind limb, splanchnic bed, and lungs were not significantly different from zero. PYY3-34 was unable to activate the Y2 receptor in a transfected cell line. In conclusion, PYY3-36 is extensively degraded to PYY3-34 in the pig, a degradation that renders the peptide inactive on the Y2 receptor. Currently used assays are unlikely to be able to detect this degradation and therefore measure falsely elevated levels of PYY3-36, leading to underestimation of its physiological effects.

  14. Peptide YY antagonizes beta-adrenergic-stimulated release of insulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley, G.H. Jr.; Lluis, F.; Gomex, G.; Ishizuka, J.; Holland, B.; Thompson, J.C. )

    1988-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are peptides of 36 amino acids that share structural homologies with pancreatic polypeptide (PP). PP is predominantly found in the endocrine pancreas. PYY is primarily found in mucosal endocrine cells of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum, whereas NPY is found in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Previous studies indicate that these peptides can interact with the autonomic nervous system. The objective of the present experiments was to study the effect of PYY on neurally stimulated insulin release in conscious dogs. Intravenous administration of PYY (100, 200, and 400 pmol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1} {center dot}h{sup {minus}1}) reduced 2-DG-stimulated insulin release in a dose-dependent manner (P <0.05) without affecting plasma glucose levels. Administration of NPY, but not PP, reduced 2-DG-stimulated release of insulin. The inhibitory action of PYY on 2-DG-stimulated insulin release persisted in the presence of atropine or phentolamine treatment; however, hexamethonium alone or phentolamine plus propranolol treatment blocked the inhibitory action of PYY. Release of insulin stimulated by the {beta}-agonist isoproterenol was also inhibited by PYY. These results indicate that PYY can inhibit autonomic neurotransmission by a mechanism that may involve ganglionic or postganglionic inhibition of {beta}-adrenergic stimulation. The findings suggest a role for PYY and NPY in the autonomic regulation of insulin release.

  15. Short-term effect of gastric resection on circulating levels of ghrelin, peptide YY3-36 and obestatin in patients with early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, T Y; Lee, S Y; Kim, H H; Cho, Y H; Cho, A R

    2015-04-01

    The short-term responses of gut hormones and the compensative interaction during a one-week period after subtotal gastrectomy in early gastric cancer (EGC) patients were assessed. Previous studies have reported gut hormonal changes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with EGC preoperatively, at 1 h after gastric resection, and on postoperative day (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Levels of active ghrelin, total ghrelin, obestatin, and PYY3-36 were measured. Total ghrelin level rapidly reached a nadir of 69.1%, while active ghrelin level had increased to 135.5% at 1 h after resection. Then, both returned to preoperative level. On the contrary, active/total ghrelin reached its nadir quickly at 1 h after resection and had returned to the preoperative level by POD 3. The nadir PYY3-36 level was 71.4% on POD 1, followed by a gradual recovery, and had increased to 116.5% by POD 7. The same pattern was observed for obestatin. Active ghrelin/obestatin showed an increase on POD 1 while total ghrelin/obestatin showed a decrease on POD 3. Then, both returned to preoperative level. These results suggest that a rapid interactive compensatory mechanism of gut hormones does exist in the remnant gastrointestinal tract after abrupt changes in the production reservoir in nonobese people.

  16. Vitamin D receptor activation induces peptide YY transcription in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mihwa; Ozeki, Jun; Hashizume, Masami; Kato, Shigeaki; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Makishima, Makoto

    2012-11-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a peptide hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine after food intake and regulates appetite and intestinal function. PYY is also expressed in the pancreas, but the mechanisms of regulation of pancreatic PYY expression have not been elucidated. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear receptor for the active form of vitamin D(3) and regulates numerous physiological processes. Because VDR is expressed in the pancreas, we investigated the role of pancreatic VDR activation and found that Pyy is a VDR target gene in the mouse pancreas. Treatment of mice with 1α-hydroxyvitamin D(3) increased plasma PYY levels. VDR activation increased mRNA and protein expression of PYY in the pancreatic islets of mice and pancreatic endocrine cell lines but did not change intestinal PYY expression. 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D(3)-dependent induction of pancreatic and plasma PYY was abolished in VDR-null mice. We identified a functional vitamin D-responsive element in the mouse Pyy promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, EMSA, and luciferase promoter assay. Thus, Pyy is a tissue-specific VDR target gene. The pancreatic VDR-PYY pathway may mediate a regulatory function of vitamin D in the neuroendocrine system.

  17. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut–brain axis

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-01-01

    The gut–brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut–brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut–brain and brain–gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut–brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. PMID:22979996

  18. Molecular cloning, expression analysis, and appetite regulatory effect of peptide YY in Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Xin; Hao, Jin; Chen, Defang; Liu, Ju; Gao, Yundi; Zhu, Jieyao; Wu, Hongwei; Lin, Fangjun; Pu, Yundan; Yuan, Dengyue; Wei, Rongbin; Zhou, Chaowei; Wang, Tao; Li, Zhiqiong

    2015-06-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is an anorectic brain-gut peptide involved in feeding regulation and well characterized in mammals. However, the functional role of PYY in the appetite regulatory of fish is not clear. In this study, we characterized a high conservation of PYY cDNA and found high expression levels of PYY mRNA in the brain and digestive tract of Siberian sturgeon. Then, we examined preprandial (pre- and post-feeding) changes of PYY mRNA expression in the brain that showed a significantly increased in 3h post-feeding, suggesting an anorectic possible function of PYY in Siberian sturgeon. Next, we examined the expression of PYY mRNA during 15 days fasting and refeed after fasting. The SsPYY mRNA expression of unfed fish had a significant 2.4, 1.7, 2.0, 2.2, and 2.1-fold decrease compared to 1-, 3-, 6-, 10- and 15-day ad libitum fed animals, respectively. After refeed, SsPYY mRNA significantly increased 1.9 and 4.1-fold above that of the 15-day fed and unfed fish control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, a single intraperitoneal injection of 10, 100 and 200 ng/g BW SsPYY1-36 caused a reduction in the next feeding and no significant reduction in food intake was observed in fish injected with a 1 ng/g BW. Overall, PYY has a potentially role in food intake attenuation of Siberian sturgeon.

  19. Jejunal overexpression of peptide YY in celiac disease complicated with pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Gurrado, Angela; Giungato, Simone; Catacchio, Ivana; Piscitelli, Domenico; Arborea, Graziana; Piccinni, Giuseppe; Testini, Mario; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year old man with coeliac disease and chronic lack of appetite, malabsorption and weight loss, despite the gluten-free diet, was operated because of a sub-diaphragmatic free air due to a small-bowel pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI). The jejunum showed granulomatous lesions with a honeycombed appearance of air cysts in the submucosa/subserosa. We found overexpression of peptide YY (PYY) into only the jejunum with PCI, while the expression was very weak or absent in the tissue without cysts. One year after surgery, he had no abdominal pain or PCI recurrence. The above chronic symptoms were plausibly attributable to the PYY.

  20. In vivo and in vitro degradation of peptide YY3-36 to inactive peptide YY3-34 in humans.

    PubMed

    Toräng, Signe; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine Nyvold; Svane, Maria Saur; Hartmann, Bolette; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-05-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a 36-amino-acid peptide released from enteroendocrine cells upon food intake. The NH2 terminally truncated metabolite, PYY3-36, exerts anorexic effects and has received considerable attention as a possible antiobesity drug target. The kinetics and degradation products of PYY metabolism are not well described. A related peptide, neuropeptide Y, may be degraded from the COOH terminus, and in vivo studies in pigs revealed significant COOH-terminal degradation of PYY. We therefore investigated PYY metabolism in vitro after incubation in human blood and plasma and in vivo after infusion of PYY1-36 and PYY3-36 in eight young, healthy men. A metabolite, corresponding to PYY3-34, was formed after incubation in plasma and blood and during the infusion of PYY. PYY3-34 exhibited no agonistic or antagonistic effects on the Y2 receptor. PYY1-36 infused with and without coadministration of sitagliptin was eliminated with half-lives of 10.1 ± 0.5 and 9.4 ± 0.8 min (means ± SE) and metabolic clearance rates of 15.7 ± 1.5 and 14.1 ± 1.1 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) after infusion, whereas PYY3-36 was eliminated with a significantly longer half-life of 14.9 ± 1.3 min and a metabolic clearance rate of 9.4 ± 0.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) We conclude that, upon intravenous infusion in healthy men, PYY is inactivated by cleavage of the two COOH-terminal amino acids. In healthy men, PYY3-36 has a longer half-life than PYY1-36. PMID:26818056

  1. Gastrointestinal hormones (anorexigenic peptide YY and orexigenic ghrelin) influence neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Hideki; Inui, Akio; Asakawa, Akihiro; Ueno, Naohiko; Kasuga, Masato; Meguid, Michael M; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Ninomiya, Maiko; Herzog, Herbert; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2007-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) hormones play an important role in GI secretion, motility, and eating behaviors. It was recently suggested that GI hormones may have a trophic role in GI tract. Here we demonstrate that two principal GI hormones, anorexigenic peptide YY (PYY) and orexigenic ghrelin, affect neural tube development. Chronic administration into the pregnant mice or transgenic overexpression of PYY led to a neural tube defect (NTD) in the embryos that was blocked by ghrelin. PYY Y1 receptor antagonist prevented the occurrence of NTD induced not only by PYY but also by vitamin A, a well-known teratogen in humans and animals. Y1 receptor deficiency also engendered NTDs, indicating the need to maintain normal Y1 receptor signaling. The present study is the first linking GI hormones to the leading cause of infant mortality and provides a novel insight for neurogenesis in which materno-fetal communication through GI hormones appears to be important. PMID:17400914

  2. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  3. The role of gut hormone peptide YY in energy and glucose homeostasis: twelve years on.

    PubMed

    Manning, Sean; Batterham, Rachel L

    2014-01-01

    Although the role of peptide YY (PYY) as a regulator of energy homeostasis was first highlighted only in 2002, our understanding of the physiological role of PYY has since rapidly advanced. In recent years, insights from mechanistic studies in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, from pancreatic islet research, from functional neuroimaging studies, and from exercise research have greatly added to the field, and these areas provide the focus of discussion for this narrative review. We critically discuss recent findings relating to the role of PYY in mediating the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery, the role of PYY in glucose homeostasis, the role of hepatoportal PYY in mediating its central physiological effects, the specific modulation of brain regions by PYY, and the exercise-induced PYY response.

  4. The role of peptide YY in gastrointestinal diseases and disorders (review).

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Mazzawi, Tarek; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2013-02-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is affected in several gastrointestinal diseases and disorders. Changes in PYY appear to be an adaptive response to alterations in pathophysiological conditions caused by the disease. This applies to gastrointestinal diseases/disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, systemic sclerosis, and post-intestinal resection. By contrast, the changes in PYY in chronic idiopathic slow transit constipation (CST) seem to be of a primary nature, and may be one etiological factor of the disease. Abnormalities in PYY seem to contribute to the development of symptoms present in irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, gastroenteropathy in long-standing diabetes and CST. The changes in PYY could, however, be favorable in some gastrointestinal disorders such as celiac disease, systemic sclerosis and post-intestinal resection state. Investigating changes in PYY in gastrointestinal diseases/disorders could be beneficial in clinical practice, where a receptor agonist or an antagonist can be used as a drug, depending on the condition. Similar to other neuroendocrine peptides/amines of the gut, PYY has broad physiological/pharmacological effects: it can bind to and activate several receptors with independent actions. Thus, in order to use PYY as a drug, receptor-specific agonists or antagonists need to be developed.

  5. Deoxycholate is an important releaser of peptide YY and enteroglucagon from the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, T E; Ballantyne, G H; Longo, W E; Bilchik, A J; Graham, S; Basson, M D; Tierney, R P; Modlin, I M

    1993-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and enteroglucagon are hormonal peptides found in endocrine cells of the distal intestinal mucosa. Although it is known that plasma concentrations of both peptides increase in response to feeding, the mechanism by which ingested food causes release of colonic hormones is not understood. The release of PYY and enteroglucagon was measured in response to intraluminal stimuli in 176 patients having investigative colonoscopy. Introduction of air, saline (isotonic and hypertonic), glucose (isotonic and hypertonic), oleic acid (without bile salts), and casein hydrolysate all failed to release PYY but glucose caused a small but significant increase in enteroglucagon concentrations. In contrast with the lack of effect of nutrients, infusion of deoxycholic acid produced a rapid and marked dose responsive increase in plasma PYY concentrations when introduced into the sigmoid colon. PYY release was statistically significant at doses between 3.3 mM to 30 mM; for example 10 mM deoxycholate caused a sixfold increase in plasma PYY concentrations. Infusion of 10 mM deoxycholate into the transverse colon or caecum produced an increase of PYY that was similar to the responses in the sigmoid colon. There was also a significant release of enteroglucagon in response to infusion of this bile salt into the sigmoid colon at doses between 3.3 mM and 30 mM. The enteroglucagon response to 10 mM deoxycholate was similar in all three colonic regions. When oleic acid was added to deoxycholate as an emulsion, the release of PYY and enteroglucagon was similar to that seen with the bile salt alone. These findings suggest that bile salts may play an important part in the control of colonic endocrine function and may explain the increased circulating concentrations of colonic regulatory peptides that are seen in malabsorption states and after small bowel resection in humans. PMID:8406158

  6. Enhanced transcription of pancreatic peptide YY by 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 administration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Jun; Choi, Mihwa; Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao; Makishima, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a peptide hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake that regulates appetite and gastrointestinal function. PYY is also produced in the pancreatic islets. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear receptor for the active form of vitamin D3 that regulates numerous physiological processes. VDR is expressed in the pancreatic islets and pharmacological VDR activation increases PYY expression in mouse peripheral islet cells. Although VDR is present in insulin-producing β cells as well as non-β cells, the role of β cell VDR in Pyy transcription remains unknown. We treated mice with streptozotocin to ablate β cells in the pancreas. Pancreatic Vdr mRNA expression was decreased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Interestingly, streptozotocin-treated mice exhibited increased basal Pyy expression and 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 treatment further increased expression. Moreover, 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 increased mRNA expression of pancreatic polypeptide and decreased that of neuropeptide Y in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice but not in control mice. 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D3 slightly increased mRNA expression of insulin but transcript levels were nearly undetectable in the pancreas of streptozotocin-treated mice. Thus, VDR in non-β islet cells is involved in Pyy expression in the mouse pancreas. The findings from this β cell ablation study suggest a hormone transcription regulatory network composed of β cells and non-β cells.

  7. Ovarian strumal carcinoid producing peptide YY associated with severe constipation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muller, Kristen E; Tafe, Laura J; Gonzalez, Jorge L; West, Loyd A; Schned, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors are rare neoplasms of the ovary. Of the 4 histologic subtypes, ovarian carcinoid tumors with insular patterns produce carcinoid syndrome in approximately one third of cases, versus strumal and trabecular carcinoids which very rarely cause typical carcinoid syndrome. A unique presentation of ovarian carcinoid tumors with concurrent severe constipation has been reported, which is thought to represent a new carcinoid syndrome. The proposed mechanism is the production of peptide YY by the tumor, a gastrointestinal hormone responsible for decreasing gut motility. We report a case of a 34-yr-old white woman who presented with constipation and weight loss for 1 yr, and was found to have a unilateral ovarian strumal carcinoid, which produced peptide YY as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The 13 previous case reports of ovarian carcinoids with constipation are reviewed and the clinicopathologic features are discussed. This report and literature review further solidifies this entity as a new type of carcinoid syndrome.

  8. Nesfatin-1 stimulates cholecystokinin and suppresses peptide YY expression and secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Naresh; Mortazavi, Sima; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-25

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82 amino acid secreted peptide encoded in the precursor, nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2). It is an insulinotropic anorexigen abundantly expressed in the stomach and hypothalamus. Post-prandial insulin secretion is predominantly regulated by incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). Nesfatin-1 was previously reported to modulate GLP-1 and GIP secretion in vitro in an enteroendocrine (STC-1) cell line. Intestine is a source of additional hormones including cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) that regulate metabolism. We hypothesized that nesfatin-1 modulates CCK and PYY secretion. Immunofluorescence histochemistry showed NUCB2/nesfatin-1 co-localizing CCK and PYY in the intestinal mucosa of mice. Static incubation of STC-1 cells with nesfatin-1 upregulated both CCK mRNA expression (1 and 10 nM) and secretion (0.1, 1 and 10 nM) at 1 h post-incubation. In contrast, nesfatin-1 treatment for 1 h downregulated PYY mRNA expression (all doses tested) and secretion (0.01 and 0.1 nM) in STC-1 cells. Continuous infusion of nesfatin-1 using osmotic mini-pumps for 12 h upregulated CCK mRNA expression in large intestine, and downregulated PYY mRNA expression in both large and small intestines of male C57BL/6J mice. In these tissues, Western blot analysis found a corresponding increase in CCK and a decrease in PYY content. Collectively, we provide new information on the cell specific localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the intestinal mucosa, and a novel function for nesfatin-1 in modulating intestinal CCK and PYY expression and secretion in mice.

  9. Role of Peptide YY in blood vessel function and atherosclerosis in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee M; Klein, Rudi; Kruzliak, Peter; Zulli, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a burden for Westernized countries. Peptide YY (PYY) raises blood pressure, yet its role has not yet been determined in diseased arteries. This study aimed at identifying PYY and eNOS in diseased blood vessels and to determine which blood vessels respond to PYY. New Zealand White rabbits were fed an atherogenic diet (n = 6, 0.5% cholesterol + 1% methionine + 5% peanut oil) and control animals fed a normal diet (n = 6) for 4 weeks. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the localization of PYY and eNOS in the aorta. The aorta, carotid, renal, iliac, inferior mesenteric, and renal interlobular arteries were removed, mounted in organ baths, and subjected to doses of PYY (10(-9) -10(-7) mol/L) and then acetylcholine (10(-6) mol/L). Immunohistochemistry of the aorta shows PYY staining in plaque macrophages, smooth muscle cells and endothelium, and these cells co-expressed eNOS. PYY caused a minor vasoconstrictive response in all blood vessels studied but was blunted in arteries from control animals. Acetylcholine caused relaxation of PYY constricted blood vessels. This data clearly shows that PYY is present in atherosclerotic plaque and is a minor constrictor of the vasculature tree. Further studies aimed at understanding the role of PYY in cardiovascular disease are warranted.

  10. Molecular characterization, appetite regulatory effects and feeding related changes of peptide YY in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ronald; Unniappan, Suraj

    2010-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a 36 amino acid multifunctional gut-brain hormone in mammals. PYY has recently raised great interest as it was shown to reduce food intake and body weight of mammals. While PYY and its receptors have been sequenced from many non-mammalian vertebrates, its functional role, especially in the regulation of food intake in lower vertebrates remain unknown. In this study, we identified the gene organization of goldfish PYY (gfPYY) and found abundant expression of PYY mRNA in the brain and digestive tract of goldfish. A 2.5-fold increase at 3h post-feeding and a 1.5-fold decrease in fasted animals was observed of PYY mRNA expression in the brain, suggesting an anorectic role for PYY in goldfish. A single intraperitoneal injection of 10 ng/g body weight gfPYY(1-36) or an intracerebroventricular injection of 5 ng/g body weight gfPYY(1-36) caused a 27% or 30% reduction in food intake in goldfish, respectively. Overall, our results, for the first time provide molecular and functional evidence for anorectic actions of PYY in goldfish.

  11. Long-term exercise training in overweight adolescents improves plasma peptide YY and resistin.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry E; Basilio, J L; Brophy, P M; McCammon, M R; Hickner, R C

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term exercise training on concentrations of five hormones related to appetite and insulin resistance in overweight adolescents. In addition, we were interested in the relationships of these hormones with each other and with anthropometric and/or cardiovascular disease marker changes. Participants were >or=the 85th percentile for BMI for age and sex and participated in an 8-month supervised aerobic training program. Anthropometrics, cardiovascular fitness assessment, and fasting blood samples were taken pre- and post-training. Glucose, insulin, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, active ghrelin, total peptide YY (PYY), adiponectin, and resistin concentrations were measured. The participants increased their time to exhaustion on an incremental treadmill test and decreased both percent body fat and blood triglyceride concentrations. Total PYY concentration increased and resistin concentration decreased after long-term exercise training, which are favorable outcomes. Leptin concentrations were related to weight, percent body fat, waist circumference, and triglyceride concentrations pre- and post-training. The changes in resistin concentrations were related to the changes in triglyceride concentrations. We conclude that long-term exercise training has beneficial effects for overweight adolescents with respect to PYY and resistin, hormones related to appetite and insulin sensitivity.

  12. GSK2374697, a long duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, reduces postprandial circulating endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Hodge, R J; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Nunez, D J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a long-duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, GSK2374697, on postprandial endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Two cohorts of healthy subjects, one normal/overweight and one obese, were randomized to receive GSK2374697 2 mg (n = 8 each) or placebo (n = 4 and n = 2) subcutaneously on days 1, 4 and 7. Samples for plasma endogenous GLP-1 and PYY were collected after breakfast on days -1 and 12. Weighted mean area under the curve (0-4 h) of total GLP-1 and PYY in treated subjects was reduced compared with placebo. The least squares mean difference for change from baseline was -1.24 pmol/l [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.33, -0.16] and -4.47 pmol/l (95% CI -8.74, -0.20) for total GLP-1 and PYY, respectively, in normal/overweight subjects (p < 0.05 for both), and -1.56 (95% CI -2.95, -0.16) and -3.02 (95% CI -8.58, 2.55), respectively, in obese subjects (p < 0.05 for GLP-1). In healthy subjects, GSK2374697 reduced postprandial total GLP-1 and PYY levels, suggesting feedback suppression of enteroendocrine L-cell secretion of these peptides.

  13. Electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive determination of the anorexigen peptide YY at grafted reduced graphene oxide electrode platforms.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, S; Martínez-García, G; Serafín, V; Agüí, L; Yáñez-Sedeño, P; Pingarrón, J M

    2015-11-21

    The first electrochemical immunosensor for the determination of peptide YY is reported in this paper. A novel electrochemical platform, prepared by the electrochemical grafting of the diazonium salt of 4-aminobenzoic acid onto a reduced graphene oxide-modified glassy carbon electrode, was used, on which the covalent immobilization of specific anti-PYY antibodies was accomplished. The HOOC-Phe-rGO/GCEs were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The different variables affecting the preparation of the modified electrodes and the performance of the immunosensor were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, a calibration plot for PYY showing a linear range extending between 10(-4) and 10(2) ng mL(-1) was found. This range is adequate for the determination of this protein in real samples, since the expected concentration in human serum is around 100 pg mL(-1). The limit of detection was 0.01 pg mL(-1) of PYY. The immunosensor exhibited good reproducibility of the PYY measurements, excellent storage stability and selectivity, as well as a shorter assay time than those of ELISA kits. The usefulness of the immunosensor for the analysis of real samples was demonstrated by analyzing human serum samples spiked with PYY at three concentration levels.

  14. Peptide YY3–36 and 5-Hydroxytryptamine Mediate Emesis Induction by Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium sp. that frequently occurs in cereal grains, has been associated with human and animal food poisoning. Although a common hallmark of DON-induced toxicity is the rapid onset of emesis, the mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. Recently, our laboratory has demonstrated that the mink (Neovison vison) is a suitable small animal model for investigating trichothecene-induced emesis. The goal of this study was to use this model to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36) and cholecystokinin (CCK), and the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in DON-induced emesis. Following ip exposure to DON at 0.1 and 0.25mg/kg bw, emesis induction ensued within 15–30min and then persisted up to 120min. Plasma DON measurement revealed that this emesis period correlated with the rapid distribution and clearance of the toxin. Significant elevations in both plasma PYY3–36 (30–60min) and 5-HT (60min) but not CCK were observed during emesis. Pretreatment with the neuropeptide Y2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 attenuated DON- and PYY-induced emesis, whereas the CCK1 receptor antagonist devezapide did not alter DON’s emetic effects. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron completely suppressed induction of vomiting by DON and the 5-HT inducer cisplatin. Granisetron pretreatment also partially blocked PYY3–36-induced emesis, suggesting a potential upstream role for this gut satiety hormone in 5-HT release. Taken together, the results suggest that both PYY3–36 and 5-HT play contributory roles in DON-induced emesis. PMID:23457120

  15. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  16. Postprandial peptide YY is lower in young college-aged women with high dietary cognitive restraint.

    PubMed

    Scheid, J L; Birch, L L; Williams, N I; Rolls, B J; De Souza, M J

    2013-08-15

    Acylated ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY3-36) are involved in appetite-regulation and energy homeostasis. These gastrointestinal hormones provide peripheral signals to the central nervous system to regulate appetite and short term food intake, and interact with leptin and insulin to regulate energy balance. Dietary restraint is an eating behavior phenotype that manifests as a conscious cognitive control of food intake in order to achieve or sustain a desired body weight. The purpose of the current study was to determine if college-aged women (18 to 25 years) with different eating behavior phenotypes, i.e., high vs normal dietary restraint, differ with respect to circulating concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones during and following a test meal. We hypothesized that women with high dietary cognitive restraint [High CR (score ≥ 13, n=13)] would have elevated active ghrelin and PYY3-36 concentrations after a test meal compared to women with normal dietary cognitive restraint [Normal CR (score < 13, n=30)]. Gastrointestinal hormones were assessed before (-15 and 0 min) and after (10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min) the consumption of a mixed composition meal (5.0 kcal per kg/body weight). In contrast to our hypothesis, mean PYY3-36 concentrations (p=0.042), peak PYY3-36 concentrations (p=0.047), and PYY3-36 area under the curve (p=0.035) were lower in the High CR group compared to the Normal CR group after controlling for body mass index. No group differences were observed with respect to acylated ghrelin before or after the meal. In conclusion, PYY3-36 concentrations were suppressed in the women with High CR compared to the women with Normal CR. While the current study is cross-sectional and cause/effect of high dietary restraint and suppressed PYY3-36 concentrations cannot be determined, we speculate that these women with high cognitive restraint may be prone to weight gain or weight re-gain related to the suppressed circulating PYY after a meal. Further

  17. Lactation and appetite-regulating hormones: increased maternal plasma peptide YY concentrations 3-6 months postpartum.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Hopfgartner, Judith; Grimm, Gabriele; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Clodi, Martin; Luger, Anton

    2015-10-28

    Breast-feeding is associated with maternal hormonal and metabolic changes ensuring adequate milk production. In this study, we investigate the impact of breast-feeding on the profile of changes in maternal appetite-regulating hormones 3-6 months postpartum. Study participants were age- and BMI-matched lactating mothers (n 10), non-lactating mothers (n 9) and women without any history of pregnancy or breast-feeding in the previous 12 months (control group, n 10). During study sessions, young mothers breast-fed or bottle-fed their babies, and maternal blood samples were collected at five time points during 90 min: before, during and after feeding the babies. Outcome parameters were plasma concentrations of ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), leptin, adiponectin, prolactin, cortisol, insulin, glucose and lipid values. At baseline, circulating PYY concentrations were significantly increased in lactating mothers (100·3 (se 6·7) pg/ml) v. non-lactating mothers (73·6 (se 4·9) pg/ml, P=0·008) and v. the control group (70·2 (se 9) pg/ml, P=0·021). We found no differences in ghrelin, leptin and adiponectin values. Baseline prolactin concentrations were over 4-fold higher in lactating mothers (P<0·001). Lactating women had reduced TAG levels and LDL-cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio, but increased waist circumference, when compared with non-lactating women. Breast-feeding sessions further elevated circulating prolactin (P<0·001), but induced no acute effects on appetite-regulating hormones. In summary, one single breast-feeding session did not acutely modulate circulating appetite-regulating hormones, but increased baseline PYY concentrations are associated with prolonged lactation. PYY might play a role in the coordination of energy balance during lactation, increasing fat mobilisation from maternal depots and ensuring adequate milk production for the demands of the growing infant.

  18. Lactation and appetite-regulating hormones: increased maternal plasma peptide YY concentrations 3-6 months postpartum.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Hopfgartner, Judith; Grimm, Gabriele; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Clodi, Martin; Luger, Anton

    2015-10-28

    Breast-feeding is associated with maternal hormonal and metabolic changes ensuring adequate milk production. In this study, we investigate the impact of breast-feeding on the profile of changes in maternal appetite-regulating hormones 3-6 months postpartum. Study participants were age- and BMI-matched lactating mothers (n 10), non-lactating mothers (n 9) and women without any history of pregnancy or breast-feeding in the previous 12 months (control group, n 10). During study sessions, young mothers breast-fed or bottle-fed their babies, and maternal blood samples were collected at five time points during 90 min: before, during and after feeding the babies. Outcome parameters were plasma concentrations of ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), leptin, adiponectin, prolactin, cortisol, insulin, glucose and lipid values. At baseline, circulating PYY concentrations were significantly increased in lactating mothers (100·3 (se 6·7) pg/ml) v. non-lactating mothers (73·6 (se 4·9) pg/ml, P=0·008) and v. the control group (70·2 (se 9) pg/ml, P=0·021). We found no differences in ghrelin, leptin and adiponectin values. Baseline prolactin concentrations were over 4-fold higher in lactating mothers (P<0·001). Lactating women had reduced TAG levels and LDL-cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio, but increased waist circumference, when compared with non-lactating women. Breast-feeding sessions further elevated circulating prolactin (P<0·001), but induced no acute effects on appetite-regulating hormones. In summary, one single breast-feeding session did not acutely modulate circulating appetite-regulating hormones, but increased baseline PYY concentrations are associated with prolonged lactation. PYY might play a role in the coordination of energy balance during lactation, increasing fat mobilisation from maternal depots and ensuring adequate milk production for the demands of the growing infant. PMID:26299586

  19. Anorexia Induction by the Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin) Is Mediated by the Release of the Gut Satiety Hormone Peptide YY

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin known to commonly contaminate grain-based foods, suppresses growth of experimental animals, thus raising concerns over its potential to adversely affect young children. Although this growth impairment is believed to result from anorexia, the initiating mechanisms for appetite suppression remain unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON induces the release of satiety hormones and that this response corresponds to the toxin’s anorectic action. Acute ip exposure to DON had no effect on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide, gastric inhibitory peptide, or ghrelin; however, the toxin was found to robustly elevate peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK). Specifically, ip exposure to DON at 1 and 5mg/kg bw induced PYY by up to 2.5-fold and CCK by up to 4.1-fold. These responses peaked within 15–120min and lasted up to 120min (CCK) and 240min (PPY), corresponding with depressed rates of food intake. Direct administration of exogenous PYY or CCK similarly caused reduced food intake. Food intake experiments using the NPY2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 and the CCK1A receptor antagonist devazepide, individually, suggested that PYY mediated DON-induced anorexia but CCK did not. Orolingual exposure to DON induced plasma PYY and CCK elevation and anorexia comparable with that observed for ip exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that PYY might be one critical mediator of DON-induced anorexia and, ultimately, growth suppression. PMID:22903826

  20. Anorexia induction by the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) is mediated by the release of the gut satiety hormone peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; Clark, Erica S; Pestka, James J

    2012-12-01

    Consumption of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin known to commonly contaminate grain-based foods, suppresses growth of experimental animals, thus raising concerns over its potential to adversely affect young children. Although this growth impairment is believed to result from anorexia, the initiating mechanisms for appetite suppression remain unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON induces the release of satiety hormones and that this response corresponds to the toxin's anorectic action. Acute ip exposure to DON had no effect on plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, amylin, pancreatic polypeptide, gastric inhibitory peptide, or ghrelin; however, the toxin was found to robustly elevate peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK). Specifically, ip exposure to DON at 1 and 5mg/kg bw induced PYY by up to 2.5-fold and CCK by up to 4.1-fold. These responses peaked within 15-120 min and lasted up to 120 min (CCK) and 240 min (PPY), corresponding with depressed rates of food intake. Direct administration of exogenous PYY or CCK similarly caused reduced food intake. Food intake experiments using the NPY2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 and the CCK1A receptor antagonist devazepide, individually, suggested that PYY mediated DON-induced anorexia but CCK did not. Orolingual exposure to DON induced plasma PYY and CCK elevation and anorexia comparable with that observed for ip exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that PYY might be one critical mediator of DON-induced anorexia and, ultimately, growth suppression.

  1. Circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, peptide YY, and insulin in client-owned lean, overweight, and diabetic cats.

    PubMed

    McMillan, C J; Zapata, R C; Chelikani, P K; Snead, E C R; Cosford, K

    2016-01-01

    Our objectives were to measure plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) in client-owned newly diagnosed diabetic cats and nondiabetic lean or overweight cats and to determine whether circulating concentrations of these hormones differed between study groups and if they increased postprandially as seen in other species. A total of 31 cats were recruited and placed into 1 of 3 study groups: lean (body condition score 4-5 on a scale of 1-9; n = 10), overweight (body condition score 6-8; n = 11), or diabetic (n = 10). Diabetics were newly diagnosed and had not had prior insulin therapy. Preprandial (fasting) and postprandial (60 min after meal) plasma hormone and glucose concentrations were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 wk. All cats were exclusively fed a commercially available high-protein and low-carbohydrate diet commonly prescribed to feline diabetic patients for 2 wk before the 2-wk assessment and continued through the 4-wk assessment. Results showed that plasma concentrations of GLP-1, GIP, PYY, and insulin increased in general after a meal in all study groups. Plasma PYY concentrations did not differ (P > 0.10) between study groups. Diabetics had greater plasma concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP compared with the other study groups at baseline (P < 0.05), and greater preprandial and postprandial GLP-1 concentrations than lean cats at 2 and 4 wk (P < 0.05). Preprandial plasma GIP concentrations were greater in diabetics than obese and lean (P < 0.05) cats at week 4. Postprandial plasma GIP concentrations in diabetics were greater than lean (P < 0.05) at week 2 and obese and lean cats (P < 0.05) at week 4. Together, our findings suggest that diabetic status is an important determinant of circulating concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP, but not PYY, in cats. The role of GLP-1, GIP, and PYY in the pathophysiology of feline obesity and diabetes remains to be determined.

  2. Mass spectrometry-assisted confirmation of the inability of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 to cleave goldfish peptide YY(1-36) and the lack of anorexigenic effects of peptide YY(3-36) in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R; Unniappan, S

    2016-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a serine protease of great interest because it has been shown to modulate the activity of several peptidergic factors including peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1/2. While PYY(1-36) is orexigenic in mammals, PYY(3-36) recently garnered interest as a potent anorexigen. In silico phylogenetic analysis found that the DPP4 cleavage sites are absent in fish PYY sequences. However, no studies were conducted to show that indeed PYY(3-36) is not produced by DPP4 in fish. If DPP4 does not cleave PYY(1-36), is PYY(3-36) an anorexigen in fish? The objectives of this research were to (1) test whether DPP4 cleaves goldfish PYY(1-36) and (2) determine whether PYY(3-36) is an anorexigen in goldfish. First, we identified the highly conserved catalytic region of DPP4 in goldfish. Abundant expression of DPP4 mRNA was found within the gastrointestinal tract. We also report the first MALDI-MS cleavage analysis of DPP4 effects on PYY(1-36) in a non-mammalian vertebrate. Our novel results indicate that DPP4 is unable to cleave goldfish PYY(1-36) to PYY(3-36) in vitro. It also confirms a previously held hypothesis that DPP4 is unable to cleave fish PYY(1-36) that contains N-terminal proline-proline residues. PYY(3-36) had no effects on food intake of goldfish. The appetite inhibitory effects of intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections of 10 ng/g body weight gfPYY(1-36) were abolished by coinjections of BIBP3226, a Y1 receptor antagonist. These results are significant because it shows the lack of generation of endogenous PYY(3-36) and its anorectic effects in goldfish. PMID:26676513

  3. Mass spectrometry-assisted confirmation of the inability of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 to cleave goldfish peptide YY(1-36) and the lack of anorexigenic effects of peptide YY(3-36) in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R; Unniappan, S

    2016-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a serine protease of great interest because it has been shown to modulate the activity of several peptidergic factors including peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1/2. While PYY(1-36) is orexigenic in mammals, PYY(3-36) recently garnered interest as a potent anorexigen. In silico phylogenetic analysis found that the DPP4 cleavage sites are absent in fish PYY sequences. However, no studies were conducted to show that indeed PYY(3-36) is not produced by DPP4 in fish. If DPP4 does not cleave PYY(1-36), is PYY(3-36) an anorexigen in fish? The objectives of this research were to (1) test whether DPP4 cleaves goldfish PYY(1-36) and (2) determine whether PYY(3-36) is an anorexigen in goldfish. First, we identified the highly conserved catalytic region of DPP4 in goldfish. Abundant expression of DPP4 mRNA was found within the gastrointestinal tract. We also report the first MALDI-MS cleavage analysis of DPP4 effects on PYY(1-36) in a non-mammalian vertebrate. Our novel results indicate that DPP4 is unable to cleave goldfish PYY(1-36) to PYY(3-36) in vitro. It also confirms a previously held hypothesis that DPP4 is unable to cleave fish PYY(1-36) that contains N-terminal proline-proline residues. PYY(3-36) had no effects on food intake of goldfish. The appetite inhibitory effects of intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections of 10 ng/g body weight gfPYY(1-36) were abolished by coinjections of BIBP3226, a Y1 receptor antagonist. These results are significant because it shows the lack of generation of endogenous PYY(3-36) and its anorectic effects in goldfish.

  4. Immunohistochemical distribution of neuropeptide Y, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreactivity and their receptors in the epidermal skin of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Yvan; Bastianetto, Stéphane; Duranton, Albert; Breton, Lionel; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in skin functions. However, the expression of NPY, the related peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and their receptors have not been investigated in human skin. Using specific antisera directed against NPY, PYY, PP and the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor subtypes, we investigated here the expression of these markers. NPY-like immunoreactivity (ir) in the epidermal skin could not be detected. For the first time we report the presence of positive PP-like ir immunofluorescent signals in epidermal cells, i.e. keratinocytes of skin from three areas (abdomen, breast and face) obtained as surgical left-overs. The immunofluorescent signal of PP-like ir varies from very low to high level in all three areas. In contrast, PYY-like ir is only expressed in some cells and with varied level of intensity. Furthermore and for the first time we observed specific Y1 and Y4 receptor-like ir in all epidermal layers, while the Y2 and Y5 subtypes were absent. Interestingly, as seen in human epidermis, in Episkin, a reconstituted human epidermal layer, we detected the presence of PP-like as well as Y1-like and Y4-like ir. These data have shown the presence and distribution of PYY, PP and Y1 and Y4 receptors in the human skin and Episkin, suggesting possible novel roles of NPY related peptides and their receptors in skin homeostasis. PMID:26002416

  5. Immunohistochemical distribution of neuropeptide Y, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreactivity and their receptors in the epidermal skin of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Yvan; Bastianetto, Stéphane; Duranton, Albert; Breton, Lionel; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in skin functions. However, the expression of NPY, the related peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and their receptors have not been investigated in human skin. Using specific antisera directed against NPY, PYY, PP and the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor subtypes, we investigated here the expression of these markers. NPY-like immunoreactivity (ir) in the epidermal skin could not be detected. For the first time we report the presence of positive PP-like ir immunofluorescent signals in epidermal cells, i.e. keratinocytes of skin from three areas (abdomen, breast and face) obtained as surgical left-overs. The immunofluorescent signal of PP-like ir varies from very low to high level in all three areas. In contrast, PYY-like ir is only expressed in some cells and with varied level of intensity. Furthermore and for the first time we observed specific Y1 and Y4 receptor-like ir in all epidermal layers, while the Y2 and Y5 subtypes were absent. Interestingly, as seen in human epidermis, in Episkin, a reconstituted human epidermal layer, we detected the presence of PP-like as well as Y1-like and Y4-like ir. These data have shown the presence and distribution of PYY, PP and Y1 and Y4 receptors in the human skin and Episkin, suggesting possible novel roles of NPY related peptides and their receptors in skin homeostasis.

  6. The effect of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY on pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic exocrine secretion in the anesthetized dog

    SciTech Connect

    DeMar, A.R.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and peptide YY (PYY) are inhibitors of pancreatic exocrine secretion in vivo but not in vitro, which suggests intermediate mechanisms of action. To examine the role of pancreatic blood flow in these inhibitory effects, xenon-133 gas clearance was used to measure pancreatic blood flow while simultaneously measuring pancreatic exocrine secretion. PP or PYY (400 pmol/kg/h) was administered during the intermediate hour of a 3-h secretin (125 ng/kg/h)/cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) (50 ng/kg/h) infusion. Exocrine secretion and pancreatic blood flow during the PP or PYY hours were compared with that observed in the first and third hours of the secretin/CCK-8 infusion. PP and PYY significantly inhibited secretin/CCK-8-induced pancreatic exocrine secretion. In addition, PYY (but not PP) significantly reduced pancreatic blood flow during secretin/CCK-8 stimulation. Nevertheless, there was no correlation between pancreatic blood flow and bicarbonate or protein outputs. It is concluded that changes in pancreatic blood flow do not mediate the inhibitory effects of PP or PYY on the exocrine pancreas.

  7. Evidence for tachykinin NK3 receptors-triggered peptide YY release from isolated guinea-pig distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shu-ichi; Tohei, Atsushi; Kojima, Ken; Anzai, Naohiko

    2014-10-01

    The anorectic gut hormone, peptide YY (PYY), is released from colonic mucosal endocrine cells, but little is known about the role for tachykinin NK3 receptor in the control of PYY release from the colonic mucosa. We investigated the functional role for NK3 receptors in the control of PYY release from isolated guinea-pig distal colon, and the role for NK3 receptors-triggered PYY release in the control of colonic motility. Isolated colonic preparations were mounted in organ baths for measurement of PYY release and mechanical activity. The release of PYY from these preparations was determined by enzyme immunoassays. The NK3 receptor agonist senktide produced a tetrodotoxin/atropine-sensitive sustained increase in the release of PYY from the colonic preparations. Basal PYY release was transiently inhibited by the NK3 receptor antagonist SB222200. The neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO3304 produced a leftward shift of the concentration-response curves for senktide-evoked neurogenic contraction, but neither the neuropeptide Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 nor the neuropeptide Y5 receptor antagonist CGP71683 affected the senktide concentration-response curves. NK3 receptors appear to play an important role in the control of PYY release from colonic mucosa, and NK3 receptor-triggered PYY release can exert Y1 receptor-mediated inhibition of tachykinergic neuromuscular transmission. This indicates a pathophysiological role for the NK3 receptor-triggered PYY release in the control of colonic motility.

  8. Role of peptide YY(3-36) in the satiety produced by gastric delivery of macronutrients in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2013-05-01

    Peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] is postulated to act as a hormonal signal from gut to brain to inhibit food intake. PYY(3-36) potently reduces food intake when administered systemically or into the brain. If action of endogenous PYY(3-36) is necessary for normal satiation to occur, then pharmacological blockade of its receptors should increase food intake. Here, we determined the effects of iv infusion of Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptor antagonists (BIBP 3226, BIIE 0246, CGP 71683) during the first 3 h of the dark period on food intake in non-food-deprived rats. Our results showed that 1) Y2 receptor blockade reversed the anorexic response to iv infusion of PYY(3-36) but did not increase food intake when administered alone; 2) Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists neither attenuated PYY(3-36)-induced anorexia nor altered food intake when given alone; and 3) Y2 receptor blockade attenuated anorexic responses to gastric infusions of casein hydrolysate and long-chain triglycerides, but not maltodextrin. Previous work showed that Y2 antagonist BIIE 0246 does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Together, these results support the hypothesis that gut PYY(3-36) action at Y2 receptors peripheral to the blood brain barrier plays an essential role in mediating satiety responses to gastric delivery of protein and long-chain triglycerides, but not polysaccharide.

  9. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor is Expressed in Enteroendocrine L Cells and Regulates the Release of Peptide YY and Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Brandon L.; Tough, Iain R.; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Matthews, Robert T.; Digby, Gregory J.; Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Svendsen, Berit; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J.; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.; Cox, Helen M.; Cone, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves, and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon. Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly expressed GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide one (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent anti-secretory response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance for MC4R in L cells, and indicates a previously unrecognized peripheral role for the MC4R, complementing vagal and central receptor functions. PMID:25453189

  10. Weight loss during oligofructose supplementation is associated with decreased ghrelin and increased peptide YY in overweight and obese adults2

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Jill A; Reimer, Raylene A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rodent studies show that oligofructose promotes weight loss, stimulates satiety hormone secretion, reduces energy intake, and improves lipid profiles. Objective Our objective was to examine the effects of oligofructose supplementation on body weight and satiety hormone concentrations in overweight and obese adults. Design This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-eight otherwise healthy adults with a body mass index (in kg/m2) > 25 were randomly assigned to receive 21 g oligo-fructose/d or a placebo (maltodextrin) for 12 wk. Body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); meal tolerance tests, including satiety hormone response; food intake; and subjective appetite ratings were determined. Results There was a reduction in body weight of 1.03 ±0.43 kg with oligofructose supplementation, whereas the control group experienced an increase in body weight of 0.45 ± 0.31 kg over 12 wk (P = 0.01). A lower area under the curve (AUC) for ghrelin (P = 0.004) and a higher AUC for peptide YY (PYY) with oligofructose (P = 0.03) coincided with a reduction in self-reported caloric intake (P ≤ 0.05). Glucose decreased in the oligofructose group and increased in the control group between initial and final tests (P ≤ 0.05). Insulin concentrations mirrored this pattern (P ≤ 0.05). Oligofructose supplementation did not affect plasma active glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion. According to a visual analog scale designed to assess side effects, oligofructose was well tolerated. Conclusions Independent of other lifestyle changes, oligofructose supplementation has the potential to promote weight loss and improve glucose regulation in overweight adults. Suppressed ghrelin and enhanced PYY may contribute in part to the reduction in energy intake. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00522353. PMID:19386741

  11. Intermittent intraperitoneal infusion of peptide YY(3-36) reduces daily food intake and adiposity in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Chelikani, Prasanth K; Haver, Alvin C; Reidelberger, Roger D

    2007-07-01

    Peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] is a gut-brain peptide that decreases food intake when administered by intravenous infusion to lean and obese humans and rats. However, chronic administration of PYY(3-36) by osmotic minipump to lean and obese rodents produces only a transient reduction in daily food intake and weight gain. It has recently been shown that 1-h intravenous infusions of PYY(3-36) every other hour for 10 days produced a sustained reduction in daily food intake, body weight, and adiposity in lean rats. Here, we determined whether intermittent delivery of PYY(3-36) can produce a similar response in diet-induced obese rats. During a 21-day period, obese rats (body fat >25%) received twice daily intraperitoneal infusion of vehicle (n = 18) or PYY(3-36) (n = 24) during hours 1-3 and 7-9 of the dark period. Rats had free access to both a 45% fat solid diet and a 29% fat liquid diet; intakes were determined from continuous computer recording of changes in food container weights. To sustain a 15-25% reduction in daily caloric intake, the initial PYY(3-36) dose of 30 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) was reduced to 10 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) on day 10 and then increased to 17 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) on day 13. This dosing strategy produced a sustained reduction in daily caloric intake of 11-32% and prevented body weight gain (8 +/- 6 vs. 51 +/- 11 g) and fat deposition (4.4 +/- 7.6 vs. 41.0 +/- 12.8 g). These results indicate that intermittent intraperitoneal infusion of PYY(3-36) can produce a sustained reduction in food intake and adiposity in diet-induced obese rodents consuming palatable high-fat foods.

  12. The effect of hypothalamic peptide YY on hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo: implications for limbic function in binge-eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Hagan, M M; Castañeda, E; Sumaya, I C; Fleming, S M; Galloway, J; Moss, D E

    1998-09-14

    Central injection of peptide YY (PYY) in sated rats produces the most powerful stimulating effect of food intake known to date. The neural mechanisms by which PYY regulates appetite are not clear but may be important because abnormal levels of PYY have been implicated in the neurobiology of bulimia nervosa. Interactions between brain acetylcholine (ACh) and PYY had not been studied. Therefore, the present experiments were designed to explore the in vivo release of ACh from the hippocampus (HPC) of rats in response to hypothalamic infusion of PYY. Hippocampal ACh release was found to increase 400% in response to 10 microg PYY. In a separate experiment, blockade of the same area of the HPC with bilateral intracerebral injections of 3.5 microg scopolamine did not affect intake stimulated by intrahypothalamic injection of 4 microg PYY. Furthermore, a third experiment showed, for the first time, that PYY (2.5-10.0 microg) can elicit robust feeding when infused directly into the HPC. The significance of these findings to the activation of limbic functions such as memory, reinforcement, and obsessional processes that accompany human binge-eating syndromes is discussed.

  13. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, suppresses food intake and gastric emptying with the elevation of plasma peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 in a dietary fat-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hata, Takahiro; Mera, Yasuko; Ishii, Yukihito; Tadaki, Hironobu; Tomimoto, Daisuke; Kuroki, Yukiharu; Kawai, Takashi; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakutani, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) takes part in the mobilization and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from enterocytes and hepatocytes. In this study, we investigated the effects of diethyl-2-({3-dimethylcarbamoyl-4-[(4'-trifluoromethylbiphenyl-2-carbonyl) amino] phenyl}acetyloxymethyl)-2-phenylmalonate (JTT-130), a novel intestine-specific MTP inhibitor, on food intake, gastric emptying, and gut peptides using Sprague-Dawley rats fed 3.1% fat, 13% fat, or 35% fat diets. JTT-130 treatment suppressed cumulative food intake and gastric emptying in rats fed a 35% fat diet, but not a 3.1% fat diet. In rats fed a 13% fat diet, JTT-130 treatment decreased cumulative food intake but not gastric emptying. In addition, treatment with orlistat, a lipase inhibitor, completely abolished the reduction of food intake and gastric emptying by JTT-130 in rats fed a 35% fat diet. On the other hand, JTT-130 treatment increased the plasma concentrations of gut peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) but not cholecystokinin, in the portal vein in rats fed a 35% fat diet. These elevations in PYY and GLP-1 were also abolished by treatment with orlistat. Furthermore, JTT-130 treatment in rats fed a 35% fat diet increased the contents of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the intestinal lumen, which might contribute to the elevation of PYY and GLP-1 levels. The present findings indicate that JTT-130 causes satiety responses, decreased food intake, and gastric emptying in a dietary fat-dependent manner, with enhanced production of gut peptides such as PYY and GLP-1 from the intestine.

  14. Peptide YY signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus increases food intake through the Y1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Golub, Danielle; Hayes, Matthew R; Grill, Harvey J

    2015-10-15

    Although central PYY delivery potently increases food intake, the sites of action and mechanisms mediating these hyperphagic effects are not fully understood. The present studies investigate the contribution of lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) PYY-Y receptor signaling to food intake control, as lPBN neurons express Y receptors and receive PYY fibers and are known to integrate circulating and visceral sensory signals to regulate energy balance. Immunohistochemical results identified a subpopulation of gigantocellular reticular nucleus PYY-producing neurons that project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing an endogenous source of PYY to the lPBN. lPBN microinjection of PYY-(1-36) or PYY-(3-36) markedly increased food intake by increasing meal size. To determine which receptors mediate these behavioral results, we first performed quantitative real-time PCR to examine the relative levels of Y receptor expression in lPBN tissue. Gene expression analyses revealed that, while Y1, Y2, and Y5 receptors are each expressed in lPBN tissue, Y1 receptor mRNA is expressed at fivefold higher levels than the others. Furthermore, behavioral/pharmacological results demonstrated that the hyperphagic effects of PYY-(3-36) were eliminated by lPBN pretreatment with a selective Y1 receptor antagonist. Together, these results highlight the lPBN as a novel site of action for the intake-stimulatory effects of central PYY-Y1 receptor signaling.

  15. Emetic responses to T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin and emetine correspond to plasma elevations of peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Bursian, Steven J; Link, Jane E; Pestka, James J

    2016-04-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are a family of potent translational inhibitors that are associated with foodborne outbreaks of human and animal gastroenteritis in which vomiting is a clinical hallmark. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and other Type B trichothecenes have been previously demonstrated to cause emesis in the mink (Neovison vison), and this response has been directly linked to secretion of both the satiety hormone peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) and neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Here, we characterized the emetic responses in the mink to T-2 toxin (T-2) and HT-2 toxin (HT-2), two highly toxic Type A trichothecenes that contaminate cereals, and further compared these effects to those of emetine, a natural alkaloid that is used medicinally and also well known to block translation and cause vomiting. Following intraperitoneal (IP) and oral exposure, all three agents caused vomiting with evident dose-dependent increases in both duration and number of emetic events as well as decreases in latency to emesis. T-2 and HT-2 doses causing emesis in 50 % of treated animals (ED50s) were 0.05 and 0.02 mg/kg BW following IP and oral administration, respectively, whereas the ED50s for emetine were 2.0 and 1.0 mg/kg BW for IP and oral exposure, respectively. Importantly, oral administration of all three toxins elicited marked elevations in plasma concentrations of PYY3-36 and 5-HT that corresponded to emesis. Taken together, the results suggest that T-2 and HT-2 were much more potent than emetine and that emesis induction by all three translational inhibitors co-occurred with increases in circulating levels of PYY3-36 and 5-HT.

  16. Distribution of peripherally injected peptide YY ([125I] PYY (3-36)) and pancreatic polypeptide ([125I] hPP) in the CNS: enrichment in the area postrema.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Yvan; Moyse, Emmanuel; Fournier, Alain; Quirion, Rémi

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which blood-borne peptide YY (3-36) (PYY(3-36)) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) inhibit food intake is not clear and could implicate peripheral (vagal afferent pathways) and/or central (direct action on specific brain nuclei) mechanisms. To identify the primary brain structure(s) that could be activated after a peripheral injection of neuropeptide Y-related peptides, we investigated the distribution of radioactive materials using whole body autoradiography and coronal brain sections. Rats were injected with [125I] porcine (p) PYY(3-36) (i.p., 10 microCi) and killed after 30 min, 1, 2, or 4 h. After i.p. administration, significant amounts of radioactive materials were rapidly (<30 min) detected in the blood circulation and various tissues including the kidneys, liver, lung, heart, bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, and thyroid gland, whereas in the brain, low but significant amounts of radioactive materials were detected at the level of the area postrema. Next, we investigated the distribution of radioactive labeling in the brain after i.v. injections of [125I]pPYY(3-36) (Y2 and Y5 subtypes), [125I] human (h) PP (Y4 and Y5 receptors), and [125I][Leu(31), Pro(34)] pPYY (Y1, Y4 and Y5 classes) in the rat brain. Fifteen minutes post injection, autoradiograms revealed positive signals only in the area postrema after the injection of [125I]-hPP and [125I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]pPYY. Whereas the presence of [125I]pPYY(3-36)-related labeling was detected in the area postrema, subfornical organ, and median eminence. In all other brain structures, including all hypothalamic nuclei and other circumventricular organs, near background level signals were detected. These data suggest that the inhibition of food intake observed after peripheral injections of pPYY(3-36) and hPP could involve receptor activation preferentially located at the level of the area postrema, a structure well-known to be involved in the modulation of food intake. PMID:17952639

  17. Gene duplication of the human peptide YY gene (PYY) generated the pancreatic polypeptide gene (PPY) on chromosome 17q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hort, Y.; Shine, J.; Herzog, H.

    1995-03-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) are structurally related but functionally diverse peptides, encoded by separate genes and expressed in different tissues. Although the human NPY gene has been mapped to chromosome 7, the authors demonstrate here that the genes for human PYY and PP (PPY) are localized only 10 kb apart from each another on chromosome 17q21.1. The high degree of homology between the members of this gene family, both in primary sequence and exon/intron structure, suggests that the NYP and the PYY genes arose from an initial gene duplication event, with a subsequent tandem duplication of the PYY gene being responsible for the creation of the PPY gene. A second weaker hybridization signal also found on chromosome 17q11 and results obtained by Southern blot analysis suggest that the entire PYY-PPY region has undergone a further duplication event. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Effects of oligofructose on appetite profile, glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY3-36 concentrations and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Meyer, Diederick; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2011-12-01

    In rats, oligofructose has been shown to stimulate satiety hormone secretion, reduce energy intake and promote weight loss. The present study aimed to examine the effect of oligofructose supplementation on appetite profiles, satiety hormone concentrations and energy intake in human subjects. A total of thirty-one healthy subjects (ten men and twenty-one women) aged 28 (SEM 3) years with a BMI of 24·8 (SEM 0·3) kg/m(2) were included in a randomised double-blind, cross-over study. The subjects received 10 g oligofructose, 16 g oligofructose or 16 g placebo (maltodextrin) daily for 13 d, with a 2-week washout period between treatments. Appetite profile, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY) concentrations and energy intake were assessed on days 0 and 13 of the treatment period. Time × treatment interaction revealed a trend of reduction in energy intake over days 0-13 by oligofructose (P = 0·068). Energy intake was significantly reduced (11 %) over time on day 13 compared with day 0 with 16 g/d oligofructose (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3217 (SEM 320) kJ, P < 0·05). Moreover, energy intake was significantly lower with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose on day 13 (2801 (SEM 301) v. 3177 (SEM 276) kJ, P < 0·05). Area under the curve (AUC) for GLP-1 on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose (45 (SEM 4) v. 41 (SEM 3) pmol/l × h, P < 0·05). In the morning until lunch, AUC(0-230 min) for PYY on day 13 was significantly higher with 16 g/d oligofructose compared with 10 g/d oligofructose and placebo (409 (SEM 35) v. 222 (SEM 19) and 211 (SEM 20) pg/ml × h, P < 0·01). In conclusion, 16 g/d and not 10 g/d oligofructose may be an effective dose to reduce energy intake, possibly supported by higher GLP-1 and PYY concentrations.

  19. Hyperglycemia abolishes meal-induced satiety by a dysregulation of ghrelin and peptide YY3-36 in healthy overweight/obese humans.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Sine H; Karstoft, Kristian; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2014-01-15

    Satiety and satiety-regulating gut hormone levels are abnormal in hyperglycemic individuals. We aimed to determine whether these abnormalities are secondary to hyperglycemia. Ten healthy overweight/obese subjects (age: 56 ± 3 yr; BMI: 30.3 ± 1.2 kg/m(2)) received three equicaloric meals at t = 0, 4, and 8 h in the absence (control trial) and presence of experimental hyperglycemia (hyperglycemia trial; 5.4 mM above basal). Circulating levels of glucose, insulin, ghrelin, and peptide YY (PYY)3-36 and visual analog scale ratings of satiety were measured throughout each trial. In the control trial, glucose, insulin, PYY3-36, and the feeling of fullness were increased in the postprandial periods, whereas ghrelin was decreased. In the hyperglycemia trial, in which plasma glucose was increased to 11.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l, postprandial meal responses (AUC: 0-2, 4-6, and 8-10 h) of PYY3-36 were lower (meal 1, P < 0.0001; meal 2, P < 0.001; meal 3, P < 0.05), whereas insulin (meal 1, P < 0.01; meal 2, P < 0.001; meal 3, P < 0.05) and ghrelin (meal 1, P < 0.05; meal 2, P > 0.05; meal 3, P > 0.05) were higher compared with the control trial. Furthermore, the incremental (Δ0-0.5, 4-4.5, and 8-8.5 h) ghrelin response to the first and third meals was higher in the hyperglycemia trial in contrast to control (Δ: 2.3 ± 8.0, P = 0.05; Δ: 14.4 ± 2.5, P < 0.05). Also, meal-induced fullness was prevented (meal 1, P = 0.06; meal 2, P = 0.01; meal 3, P = 0.08) by experimental hyperglycemia. Furthermore, trends in ghrelin, PYY3-36, and fullness were described by different polynomial functions between the trials. In conclusion, hyperglycemia abolishes meal-induced satiety and dysregulates postprandial responses of the gut hormones PYY3-36 and ghrelin in overweight/obese healthy humans.

  20. Expression of YY1 in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Jéssica; Castellví, Josep; Marcos, Ricard; Zafón, Carles; Velázquez, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) has an important regulatory role in tumorigenesis, but its implication in thyroid cancer has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer and assessed the association of YY1 expression with clinical features. Expression of YY1 was evaluated in human thyroid cancer cell lines, a series of matched normal/tumor thyroid tissues and in a thyroid cancer tissue microarray, using real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. YY1 was overexpressed in thyroid cancer cells, at transcription and protein levels. A significant increase of YY1 mRNA was also observed in tumor thyroid tissues. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the thyroid cancer tissue microarray revealed that both papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) present increased YY1 protein levels (48 and 19%, respectively). After stratification by the level of YY1 protein, positive YY1 expression identifies 88% of patients with PTC. The association of YY1 expression with clinicopathological features in PTC and FTC showed that YY1 expression was related with age at diagnosis. Our data indicates for the first time overexpression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer, with YY1 being more frequently overexpressed in the PTC subtype.

  1. Effects of exendin-4 alone and with peptide YY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger D; Haver, Alvin C; Apenteng, Bettye A; Anders, Krista L; Steenson, Sharalyn M

    2011-01-01

    Significant weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) in obese humans correlates with enhanced secretion of anorexigenic gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)). Our aim here was to identify a dosing strategy for intraperitoneal (IP) infusion of GLP-1 homologue exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) that produces a sustained reduction in daily food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. We tested 12 exendin-4 strategies over 10 weeks. Exendin-4 infused during the first and last 3 h of the dark period at 15-20 pmol/h (0.15 nmol/kg/day) produced a sustained 24 ± 1% reduction in daily food intake for 17 days, and decreased body weight by 7%. In a separate group of DIO rats, none of seven dosing strategies combining exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) produced a similar reduction in daily food intake for >10 days. The subsequent decline in efficacies of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in each experiment suggested possible receptor downregulation and tolerance to treatments. However, when treatments were discontinued for 1 day following losses in efficacies, daily food intake significantly increased. Together, these results demonstrate that (i) intermittent IP infusion of a low dose of exendin-4 can produce a relatively prolonged reduction in daily food intake and body weight in DIO rats, (ii) co-infusion of exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) does not further prolong this response, and (iii) activation of an orexigenic mechanism gradually occurs to counteract the inhibitory effects of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight.

  2. Combination of Peptide YY3–36 with GLP-17–36 amide Causes an Increase in First-Phase Insulin Secretion after IV Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tricia M.; Salem, Victoria; Troke, Rachel C.; Alsafi, Ali; Field, Benjamin C. T.; De Silva, Akila; Misra, Shivani; Baynes, Kevin C. R.; Donaldson, Mandy; Minnion, James; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Godsland, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The combination of peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed as a potential treatment for diabetes and obesity. However, the combined effects of these hormones, PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, on glucose homeostasis are unknown. Objective: This study sought to investigate the acute effects of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide, individually and in combination, on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Setting and Design: Using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and minimal modeling, this study measured the effects of PYY3–36 alone, GLP-17–36 amide alone, and a combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) and insulin sensitivity index (SI) in 14 overweight human volunteers, studied in a clinical research facility. Results: PYY3–36 alone caused a small but nonsignificant increase in AIRg. GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide did increase AIRg significantly. No significant differences in SI were observed with any intervention. Conclusions: PYY3–36 lacks any significant acute effects on first-phase insulin secretion or SI when tested using an FSIVGTT. Both GLP-17–36 amide alone and the combination of PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide increase first-phase insulin secretion. There does not seem to be any additive or synergistic effect between PYY3–36 and GLP-17–36 amide on first-phase insulin secretion. Neither hormone alone nor the combination had any significant effects on SI. PMID:25144632

  3. Vitamin B12 conjugation of peptide-YY(3-36) decreases food intake compared to native peptide-YY(3-36) upon subcutaneous administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelly E; Elfers, Clinton T; Burke, Rachael M; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Blevins, James E; Roth, Christian L; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-05-01

    Challenges to peptide-based therapies include rapid clearance, ready degradation by hydrolysis/proteolysis, and poor intestinal uptake and/or a need for blood brain barrier transport. This work evaluates the efficacy of conjugation of vitamin B12 (B12) on sc administered peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)(3-36) function. In the current experiments, a B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate was tested against native PYY(3-36), and an inactive conjugate B12-PYYC36 (null control) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments demonstrated similar agonism for the neuropeptide Y2 receptor by the B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate (EC50 26.5 nM) compared with native PYY(3-36) (EC50 16.0 nM), with the null control having an EC50 of 1.8 μM. In vivo experiments were performed in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats (9 wk). Daily treatments were delivered sc in five 1-hour pulses, each pulse delivering 5-10 nmol/kg, by implanted microinfusion pumps. Increases in hindbrain Fos expression were comparable 90 minutes after B12-PYY(3-36) or PYY3-36 injection relative to saline or B12-PYYC36. Food intake was reduced during a 5-day treatment for both B12-PYY(3-36)- (24%, P = .001) and PYY(3-36)-(13%, P = .008) treated groups relative to baseline. In addition, reduction of food intake after the three dark cycle treatment pulses was more consistent with B12-PYY(3-36) treatment (-26%, -29%, -27%) compared with the PYY(3-36) treatment (-3%, -21%, -16%), and B12-PYY(3-36) generated a significantly longer inhibition of food intake vs. PYY(3-36) treatment after the first two pulses (P = .041 and P = .036, respectively). These findings demonstrate a stronger, more consistent, and longer inhibition of food intake after the pulses of B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate compared with the native PYY(3-36).

  4. Ghrelin and peptide YY increase with weight loss during a 12-month intervention to reduce dietary energy density in obese women.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brenna R; Rolls, Barbara J; Roe, Liane S; De Souza, Mary Jane; Williams, Nancy I

    2013-11-01

    Reducing dietary energy density (ED) promotes weight loss; however, underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if low-ED diets facilitate weight loss through actions on ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY), independent of influences of psychosocial measures. Seventy-one obese women (BMI 30-40 kg/m(2)) ages 22-60 years received counseling to reduce ED. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for total ghrelin and total PYY by radioimmunoassay at months 0, 3, 6, and 12. Restraint, disinhibition, and hunger were assessed by the Eating Inventory. Body weight (-7.8 ± 0.5 kg), BMI (-2.9 ± 0.2 kg/m(2)), body fat (-3.0 ± 0.3%), and ED (-0.47 ± 0.05 kcal/g or -1.97 ± 0.21 kJ/g) decreased from months 0 to 6 (p<0.05) after which no change occurred from months 6 to 12. Ghrelin increased in a curvilinear fashion (month 0: 973 ± 39, month 3: 1024 ± 37, month 6: 1109 ± 44, and month 12: 1063 ± 45 pg/ml, p<0.001) and PYY increased linearly (month 0: 74.2 ± 3.1, month 3: 76.4 ± 3.2, month 6: 77.2 ± 3.0, month 12: 82.8 ± 3.2 pg/ml, p<0.001). ED, body weight, and hunger predicted ghrelin, with ED being the strongest predictor (ghrelin = 2674.8+291.6 × ED-19.2 × BW-15 × H; p<0.05). There was a trend toward a significant association between ED and PYY (PYY = 115.0-43.1 × ED; p = 0.05). Reductions in ED may promote weight loss and weight loss maintenance by opposing increases in ghrelin and promoting increases in PYY.

  5. Retroposition and evolution of the DNA-binding motifs of YY1, YY2 and REX1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Do; Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Joomyeong

    2007-01-01

    YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Database searches identified 62 YY1 related sequences from all the available genome sequences ranging from flying insects to human. These sequences are characterized by high levels of sequence conservation, ranging from 66% to 100% similarity, in the zinc finger DNA-binding domain of the predicted proteins. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered duplication events of YY1 in several different lineages, including flies, fish and mammals. Retroposition is responsible for generating one duplicate in flies, PHOL from PHO, and two duplicates in placental mammals, YY2 and Reduced Expression 1 (REX1) from YY1. DNA-binding motif studies have demonstrated that YY2 still binds to the same consensus sequence as YY1 but with much lower affinity. In contrast, REX1 binds to DNA motifs divergent from YY1, but the binding motifs of REX1 and YY1 share some similarity at their core regions (5'-CCAT-3'). This suggests that the two duplicates, YY2 and REX1, although generated through similar retroposition events have undergone different selection schemes to adapt to new roles in placental mammals. Overall, the conservation of YY2 and REX1 in all placental mammals predicts that each duplicate has co-evolved with some unique features of eutherian mammals. PMID:17478514

  6. Islet distribution of Peptide YY and its regulatory role in primary mouse islets and immortalised rodent and human beta-cell function and survival.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-11-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the classic gut peptide, Peptide YY (PYY), could play a fundamental role in endocrine pancreatic function. In the present study expression of PYY and its NPY receptors on mouse islets and immortalised rodent and human beta-cells was examined together with the effects of both major circulating forms of PYY, namely PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36), on beta-cell function, murine islet adaptions to insulin deficiency/resistance, as well as direct effects on cultured beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In vivo administration of PYY(3-36), but not PYY(1-36), markedly (p < 0.05) decreased food intake in overnight fasted mice. Neither form of PYY affected glucose disposal or insulin secretion following an i.p. glucose challenge. However, in vitro, PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36) inhibited (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) glucose, alanine and GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion from immortalised rodent and human beta-cells, as well as isolated mouse islets, by impeding alterations in membrane potential, [Ca(2+)]i and elevations of cAMP. Mice treated with multiple low dose streptozotocin presented with severe (p < 0.01) loss of beta-cell mass accompanied by notable increases (p < 0.001) in alpha and PP cell numbers. In contrast, hydrocortisone-induced insulin resistance increased islet number (p < 0.01) and beta-cell mass (p < 0.001). PYY expression was consistently observed in alpha-, PP- and delta-, but not beta-cells. Streptozotocin decreased islet PYY co-localisation with PP (p < 0.05) and somatostatin (p < 0.001), whilst hydrocortisone increased PYY co-localisation with glucagon (p < 0.05) in mice. More detailed in vitro investigations revealed that both forms of PYY augmented (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01) immortalised human and rodent beta-cell proliferation and protected against streptozotocin-induced cytotoxicity, to a similar or superior extent as the well characterised beta-cell proliferative and anti-apoptotic agent GLP-1. Taken together

  7. The impact of weight loss on the 24-h profile of circulating peptide YY and its association with 24-h ghrelin in normal weight premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brenna R; De Souza, Mary Jane; Wagstaff, David A; Williams, Nancy I

    2013-11-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) and ghrelin exhibit a reciprocal association and antagonistic physiological effects in the peripheral circulation. Research has yet to clarify the effect of weight loss on the 24h profile of PYY or its association to 24h ghrelin. We sought to determine if diet- and exercise-induced weight loss affects the 24h profile of PYY and its association with 24h ghrelin in normal weight, premenopausal women. Participants (n = 13) were assessed at baseline (BL) and after a 3-month diet and exercise intervention (post). Blood samples obtained q10 min for 24h were assayed for total PYY and total ghrelin q60 min from 0800 to 1000 h and 2000 to 0800 h and q20 min from 1000 to 2000 h. The ghrelin/PYY ratio was used as an index of hormonal exposure. Statistical analyses included paired t-tests and linear mixed effects modeling. Body weight (-1.85 ± 0.67 kg; p = 0.02), and body fat (-2.53 ± 0.83%; p = 0.01) decreased from BL to post. Ghrelin AUC (5252 ± 2177 pg/ml/24h; p=0.03), 24h mean (216 ± 90 pg/ml; p = 0.03) and peak (300 ± 134 pg/ml; p = 0.047) increased from BL to post. No change occurred in PYY AUC (88.2 ± 163.7 pg/ml; p = 0.60), 24h mean (4.8 ± 6.9 pg/ml; p = 0.50) or peak (3.6 ± 6.4 pg/ml; p = 0.58). The 24h association between PYY and ghrelin at baseline (p = 0.04) was weakened at post (p = 0.14); however, the ghrelin/PYY lunch ratio increased (p = 0.01) indicating the potential for ghrelin predominance over PYY in the circulation. PYY and ghrelin are reciprocally associated during a period of weight stability, but not following weight loss. An "uncoupling" may have occurred, particularly at lunch, due to factors that modulate ghrelin in response to weight loss.

  8. Effects of prepartum fat supplementation on plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, adropin, insulin, and leptin in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Rizaldy C; Salehi, Reza; Ambrose, Divakar J; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2015-10-01

    Dietary fat supplementation during the periparturient period is one strategy to increase energy intake and attenuate the degree of negative energy balance during early lactation; however, little is known of the underlying hormonal and metabolic adaptations. We evaluated the effects of prepartum fat supplementation on energy-balance parameters and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), adropin, insulin, leptin, glucose, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid in dairy cows. Twenty-four pregnant dairy cows were randomized to diets containing either rolled canola or sunflower seed at 8% of dry matter, or no oilseed supplementation, during the last 5 wk of gestation and then assigned to a common lactation diet postpartum. Blood samples were collected at -2, +2, and +14 h relative to feeding, at 2 wk after the initiation of the diets, and at 2 wk postpartum. Dietary canola and sunflower supplementation alone did not affect energy balance, body weight, and plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1, PYY, adropin, insulin, leptin, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid; however, canola decreased and sunflower tended to decrease dry matter intake. We also observed that the physiological stage had a significant, but divergent, effect on circulating hormones and metabolite concentrations. Plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, PYY, adropin, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations were greater postpartum than prepartum, whereas glucose, insulin, leptin, body weight, and energy balance were greater prepartum than postpartum. Furthermore, the interaction of treatment and stage was significant for leptin and adropin, and tended toward significance for PYY and insulin; only insulin exhibited an apparent postprandial increase. Postpartum PYY concentrations exhibited a strong negative correlation with body weight, suggesting that PYY may be associated with body weight regulation during

  9. Role of capsaicin-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons in anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of cholecystokinin, peptide YY-(3-36), and glucagon-like peptide-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye

    2014-10-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced suppression of feeding is mediated by vagal sensory neurons that are destroyed by the neurotoxin capsaicin (CAP). Here we determined whether CAP-sensitive neurons mediate anorexic responses to intravenous infusions of gut hormones peptide YY-(3-36) [PYY-(3-36)] and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Rats received three intraperitoneal injections of CAP or vehicle (VEH) in 24 h. After recovery, non-food-deprived rats received at dark onset a 3-h intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (5, 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), PYY-(3-36) (5, 17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹), or GLP-1 (17, 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). CCK-8 was much less effective in reducing food intake in CAP vs. VEH rats. CCK-8 at 5 and 17 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 39 and 71% in VEH rats and 7 and 18% in CAP rats. In contrast, PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 were similarly effective in reducing food intake in VEH and CAP rats. PYY-(3-36) at 5, 17, and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 15, 33, and 70% in VEH rats and 13, 30, and 33% in CAP rats. GLP-1 at 17 and 50 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ reduced food intake during the 3-h infusion period by 48 and 60% in VEH rats and 30 and 52% in CAP rats. These results suggest that anorexic responses to PYY-(3-36) and GLP-1 are not primarily mediated by the CAP-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons (presumably vagal) that mediate CCK-8-induced anorexia.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of YY2 versus YY1 target genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Shioda, Toshi; Coser, Kathryn R.; Lynch, Mary C.; Yang, Chuanwei; Schmidt, Emmett V.

    2010-01-01

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a critical transcription factor controlling cell proliferation, development and DNA damage responses. Retrotranspositions have independently generated additional YY family members in multiple species. Although Drosophila YY1 [pleiohomeotic (Pho)] and its homolog [pleiohomeotic-like (Phol)] redundantly control homeotic gene expression, the regulatory contributions of YY1-homologs have not yet been examined in other species. Indeed, targets for the mammalian YY1 homolog YY2 are completely unknown. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we found that lentiviral constructs containing short hairpin loop inhibitory RNAs for human YY1 (shYY1) and its homolog YY2 (shYY2) caused significant changes in both shared and distinguishable gene sets in human cells. Ribosomal protein genes were the most significant gene set upregulated by both shYY1 and shYY2, although combined shYY1/2 knock downs were not additive. In contrast, shYY2 reversed the anti-proliferative effects of shYY1, and shYY2 particularly altered UV damage response, platelet-specific and mitochondrial function genes. We found that decreases in YY1 or YY2 caused inverse changes in UV sensitivity, and that their combined loss reversed their respective individual effects. Our studies show that human YY2 is not redundant to YY1, and YY2 is a significant regulator of genes previously identified as uniquely responding to YY1. PMID:20215434

  11. The YY1/MMP2 axis promotes trophoblast invasion at the maternal-fetal interface.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fu-Ju; Cheng, Yan-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Cui; Wang, Fa; Qin, Chuan-Mei; Ma, Xiao-Ling; Yang, Jing; Lin, Yi

    2016-05-01

    YY1 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factor that has many important biological roles. However, its function in trophoblasts at the maternal-fetal interface remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used an mRNA microarray and reverse transcription qPCR and compared the YY1 mRNA expression level in trophoblasts between patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that YY1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the trophoblasts of the RM group compared with the healthy control group. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical data showed that YY1 was highly expressed in human placental villi during early pregnancy, especially in cytotrophoblast cells and invasive extravillous trophoblasts, and it was expressed at a much lower level in the placental villi of term pregnancy. YY1 overexpression enhanced, and knockdown repressed, the invasion and proliferation of trophoblasts. Antibody array screening revealed that YY1 significantly promoted MMP2 expression in trophoblasts. Bioinformatics analysis identified three YY1-binding sites in the MMP2 promoter region, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis verified that YY1 binds directly to its promoter region. Importantly, inhibition of YY1 by siRNA clearly decreased trophoblast invasion in an ex vivo explant culture model. Overall, our findings revealed a new regulatory pathway of YY1/MMP2 in trophoblast cell invasion during early pregnancy and indicated that YY1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of RM. PMID:27071480

  12. Plant-rich mixed meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles have a dramatic impact on incretin, peptide YY and satiety response, but show little effect on glucose and insulin homeostasis: an acute-effects randomised study.

    PubMed

    Bligh, H Frances J; Godsland, Ian F; Frost, Gary; Hunter, Karl J; Murray, Peter; MacAulay, Katrina; Hyliands, Della; Talbot, Duncan C S; Casey, John; Mulder, Theo P J; Berry, Mark J

    2015-02-28

    There is evidence for health benefits from 'Palaeolithic' diets; however, there are a few data on the acute effects of rationally designed Palaeolithic-type meals. In the present study, we used Palaeolithic diet principles to construct meals comprising readily available ingredients: fish and a variety of plants, selected to be rich in fibre and phyto-nutrients. We investigated the acute effects of two Palaeolithic-type meals (PAL 1 and PAL 2) and a reference meal based on WHO guidelines (REF), on blood glucose control, gut hormone responses and appetite regulation. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, healthy subjects were given three meals on separate occasions. PAL2 and REF were matched for energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates; PAL1 contained more protein and energy. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were measured over a period of 180 min. Satiation was assessed using electronic visual analogue scale (EVAS) scores. GLP-1 and PYY concentrations were significantly increased across 180 min for both PAL1 (P= 0·001 and P< 0·001) and PAL2 (P= 0·011 and P= 0·003) compared with the REF. Concomitant EVAS scores showed increased satiety. By contrast, GIP concentration was significantly suppressed. Positive incremental AUC over 120 min for glucose and insulin did not differ between the meals. Consumption of meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles resulted in significant increases in incretin and anorectic gut hormones and increased perceived satiety. Surprisingly, this was independent of the energy or protein content of the meal and therefore suggests potential benefits for reduced risk of obesity. PMID:25661189

  13. Plant-rich mixed meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles have a dramatic impact on incretin, peptide YY and satiety response, but show little effect on glucose and insulin homeostasis: an acute-effects randomised study.

    PubMed

    Bligh, H Frances J; Godsland, Ian F; Frost, Gary; Hunter, Karl J; Murray, Peter; MacAulay, Katrina; Hyliands, Della; Talbot, Duncan C S; Casey, John; Mulder, Theo P J; Berry, Mark J

    2015-02-28

    There is evidence for health benefits from 'Palaeolithic' diets; however, there are a few data on the acute effects of rationally designed Palaeolithic-type meals. In the present study, we used Palaeolithic diet principles to construct meals comprising readily available ingredients: fish and a variety of plants, selected to be rich in fibre and phyto-nutrients. We investigated the acute effects of two Palaeolithic-type meals (PAL 1 and PAL 2) and a reference meal based on WHO guidelines (REF), on blood glucose control, gut hormone responses and appetite regulation. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, healthy subjects were given three meals on separate occasions. PAL2 and REF were matched for energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates; PAL1 contained more protein and energy. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were measured over a period of 180 min. Satiation was assessed using electronic visual analogue scale (EVAS) scores. GLP-1 and PYY concentrations were significantly increased across 180 min for both PAL1 (P= 0·001 and P< 0·001) and PAL2 (P= 0·011 and P= 0·003) compared with the REF. Concomitant EVAS scores showed increased satiety. By contrast, GIP concentration was significantly suppressed. Positive incremental AUC over 120 min for glucose and insulin did not differ between the meals. Consumption of meals based on Palaeolithic diet principles resulted in significant increases in incretin and anorectic gut hormones and increased perceived satiety. Surprisingly, this was independent of the energy or protein content of the meal and therefore suggests potential benefits for reduced risk of obesity.

  14. Rapid evolution of a recently retroposed transcription factor YY2 in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, C; Lu, X; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2005-11-11

    YY2 was originally identified due to its unusual similarity to the evolutionarily well conserved, zinc-finger gene YY1. In this study, we have determined the evolutionary origin and conservation of YY2 using comparative genomic approaches. Our results indicate that YY2 is a retroposed copy of YY1 that has been inserted into another gene locus named Mbtps2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2). This retroposition is estimated to have occurred after the divergence of placental mammals from other vertebrates based on the detection of YY2 only in the placental mammals. The N-terminal and C-terminal regions of YY2 have evolved under different selection pressures. The N-terminal region has evolved at a very fast pace with very limited functional constraints whereas the DNA-binding, C-terminal region still maintains very similar sequence structure as YY1 and is also well conserved among placental mammals. In situ hybridizations using different adult mouse tissues indicate that mouse YY2 is expressed at relatively low levels in Purkinje and granular cells of cerebellum, and neuronal cells of cerebrum, but at very high levels in testis. The expression levels of YY2 is much lower than YY1, but the overall spatial expression patterns are similar to those of Mbtps2, suggesting a possible shared transcriptional control between YY2 and Mbtps2. Taken together, the formation and evolution of YY2 represent a very unusual case where a transcription factor was first retroposed into another gene locus encoding a protease and survived with different selection schemes and expression patterns.

  15. The YY1/MMP2 axis promotes trophoblast invasion at the maternal–fetal interface

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fu‐Ju; Cheng, Yan‐Xiang; Li, Xiao‐Cui; Wang, Fa; Qin, Chuan‐Mei; Ma, Xiao‐Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract YY1 is a sequence‐specific DNA‐binding transcription factor that has many important biological roles. However, its function in trophoblasts at the maternal–fetal interface remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used an mRNA microarray and reverse transcription qPCR and compared the YY1 mRNA expression level in trophoblasts between patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and healthy control subjects. Our results revealed that YY1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the trophoblasts of the RM group compared with the healthy control group. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical data showed that YY1 was highly expressed in human placental villi during early pregnancy, especially in cytotrophoblast cells and invasive extravillous trophoblasts, and it was expressed at a much lower level in the placental villi of term pregnancy. YY1 overexpression enhanced, and knockdown repressed, the invasion and proliferation of trophoblasts. Antibody array screening revealed that YY1 significantly promoted MMP2 expression in trophoblasts. Bioinformatics analysis identified three YY1‐binding sites in the MMP2 promoter region, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis verified that YY1 binds directly to its promoter region. Importantly, inhibition of YY1 by siRNA clearly decreased trophoblast invasion in an ex vivo explant culture model. Overall, our findings revealed a new regulatory pathway of YY1/MMP2 in trophoblast cell invasion during early pregnancy and indicated that YY1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of RM. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:27071480

  16. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing. PMID:27264721

  17. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing.

  18. YY1 positively regulates human UBIAD1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Funahashi, Nobuaki; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natumi; Watanabe, Masato; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Okano, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin K is involved in bone formation and blood coagulation. Natural vitamin K compounds are composed of the plant form phylloquinone (vitamin K{sub 1}) and a series of bacterial menaquionones (MK-n; vitamin K{sub 2}). Menadione (vitamin K{sub 3}) is an artificial vitamin K compound. MK-4 contains 4-isoprenyl as a side group in the 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone common structure and has various bioactivities. UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1 or TERE1) is the menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme. UBIAD1 transcript expression significantly decreases in patients with prostate carcinoma and overexpressing UBIAD1 inhibits proliferation of a tumour cell line. UBIAD1 mRNA expression is ubiquitous in mouse tissues, and higher UBIAD1 mRNA expression levels are detected in the brain, heart, kidneys and pancreas. Several functions of UBIAD1 have been reported; however, regulation of the human UBIAD1 gene has not been elucidated. Here we report cloning and characterisation of the human UBIAD1 promoter. A 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis revealed that the main transcriptional start site was 306 nucleotides upstream of the translation initiation codon. Deletion and mutation analyses revealed the functional importance of the YY1 consensus motif. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YY1 small interfering RNA decreased endogenous UBIAD1 mRNA expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity. These results suggest that YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 expression and UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1 promoter. - Highlights: • We cloned the human UBIAD1 promoter. • The functional importance of the YY1 motif was identified in the UBIAD1 promoter. • YY1 binds the UBIAD1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. • Knockdown of YY1 significantly decreased UBIAD1 expression. • YY1 up-regulates UBIAD1 conversion activity through the UBIAD1

  19. A quark model calculation of yy->pipi including final-state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    H.G. Blundell; S. Godfrey; G. Hay; Eric Swanson

    2000-02-01

    A quark model calculation of the processes yy->pi+pi- and yy->pipi is performed. At tree level, only charged pions couple to the initial state photons and neutral pions are not exceeded in the final state. However a small but significant cross section is observed. We demonstrate that this may be accounted for by a rotation in isospin space induced by final-state interactions.

  20. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes and Signaling Pathways between XY and YY Testis in Yellow Catfish.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjie; Xiong, Shuting; Jing, Jing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Weimin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Mei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    YY super-males have rarely been detected in nature and only been artificially created in some fish species including tilapia and yellow catfish (Pelteobagrusfulvidraco), which provides a promising model for testis development and spermatogenesis. In our previous study, significant differences in morphology and miRNA expression were detected between XY and YY testis of yellow catfish. Here, solexa sequencing technology was further performed to compare mRNA expression between XY and YY testis. Compared with unigenes expressed in XY testis, 1146 and 1235 unigenes have significantly higher and lower expression in YY testis, respectively. 605 differentially expressed unigenes were annotated to 1604 GO terms with 319 and 286 genes having relative higher expression in XY and YY testis. KEGG analysis suggested different levels of PI3K-AKT and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways between XY and YY testis. Down-regulation of miR-141/429 in YY testis was speculated to promote testis development and maturation, and several factors in PI3K-AKT and GPCR signaling pathways were found as predicted targets of miR-141/429, several of which were confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assays. Our study provides a comparative transcriptome analysis between XY and YY testis, and reveals interactions between miRNAs and their target genes that are possibly involved in regulating testis development and spermatogenesis. PMID:26241040

  1. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes and Signaling Pathways between XY and YY Testis in Yellow Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjie; Xiong, Shuting; Jing, Jing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Weimin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Mei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    YY super-males have rarely been detected in nature and only been artificially created in some fish species including tilapia and yellow catfish (Pelteobagrusfulvidraco), which provides a promising model for testis development and spermatogenesis. In our previous study, significant differences in morphology and miRNA expression were detected between XY and YY testis of yellow catfish. Here, solexa sequencing technology was further performed to compare mRNA expression between XY and YY testis. Compared with unigenes expressed in XY testis, 1146 and 1235 unigenes have significantly higher and lower expression in YY testis, respectively. 605 differentially expressed unigenes were annotated to 1604 GO terms with 319 and 286 genes having relative higher expression in XY and YY testis. KEGG analysis suggested different levels of PI3K-AKT and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways between XY and YY testis. Down-regulation of miR-141/429 in YY testis was speculated to promote testis development and maturation, and several factors in PI3K-AKT and GPCR signaling pathways were found as predicted targets of miR-141/429, several of which were confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assays. Our study provides a comparative transcriptome analysis between XY and YY testis, and reveals interactions between miRNAs and their target genes that are possibly involved in regulating testis development and spermatogenesis. PMID:26241040

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes and Signaling Pathways between XY and YY Testis in Yellow Catfish.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjie; Xiong, Shuting; Jing, Jing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Weimin; Gui, Jian-Fang; Mei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    YY super-males have rarely been detected in nature and only been artificially created in some fish species including tilapia and yellow catfish (Pelteobagrusfulvidraco), which provides a promising model for testis development and spermatogenesis. In our previous study, significant differences in morphology and miRNA expression were detected between XY and YY testis of yellow catfish. Here, solexa sequencing technology was further performed to compare mRNA expression between XY and YY testis. Compared with unigenes expressed in XY testis, 1146 and 1235 unigenes have significantly higher and lower expression in YY testis, respectively. 605 differentially expressed unigenes were annotated to 1604 GO terms with 319 and 286 genes having relative higher expression in XY and YY testis. KEGG analysis suggested different levels of PI3K-AKT and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways between XY and YY testis. Down-regulation of miR-141/429 in YY testis was speculated to promote testis development and maturation, and several factors in PI3K-AKT and GPCR signaling pathways were found as predicted targets of miR-141/429, several of which were confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assays. Our study provides a comparative transcriptome analysis between XY and YY testis, and reveals interactions between miRNAs and their target genes that are possibly involved in regulating testis development and spermatogenesis.

  3. Gastrointestinal peptide levels in obese and anorexic females

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J.N.; Rice, R.L.; McCullough, S.S.; McKay, D.W.; Rayford, P.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal peptides in eating disorders has yet to be determined. Methods: In this study we examined plasma levels of gastrin (G), cholecystokinin (CCK), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) in adolescent anorexic, and obese female subjects hospitalized for feeding behavior disorders. Six anorexic, six obese and six control young females (ages 13-26) were studied after an overnight fast and after consuming a liquid test meal. The liquid test meal (Ensure, Ross Laboratories; Columbus OH) consisted of 14% calories as protein, 31.5% calories as fat and 54.5% calories as carbohydrate in a 240ml volume. Plasma levels of gastrointestinal peptides, G, CCK and PP were determined by specific radioimmunoassay. The data were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and the Student's t-test. Results: show that fasting levels of G were greater in control and obese groups than the anorexic subjects. Postprandial G levels for controls were higher than the anorexic, and obese groups respectively. When fasting and postprandial G levels were compared among the same groups only the controls increased after eating. Fasting CCK levels were lower in control and anorexic groups than the obese group. Postprandial CCK levels were higher among control patients compared to anorexic and obese subjects. When fasting and postprandial CCK levels were compared among groups, only control levels increased after eating. Fasting and postprandial PP levels were not different between groups. Postprandial PP levels increased over fasting PP levels only in controls.

  4. The hot corona of YY Mensae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guedel, M.; Guinan, E. F.; Skinner, S. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a long time series of Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pointings are reported on together with the first Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observation of the FK Comae-type star YY Mensae. This star reveals a hot dominant plasma of up to 3 keV, with less material at 0.7 keV.

  5. Cloning and identification of a YY-1 homolog as a potential transcription factor from Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangnan; Cheng, Minzhang; Xiang, Liang; Su, Jingtan; Zhou, Yujuan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Biomineralization is an important and ubiquitous process in organisms. The shell formation of mollusks is a typical biomineral physical activity and is used as a canonical model in biomineralization research. Most recent studies focused on the identification of matrix proteins involved in shell formation; however, little is known about their transcriptional regulation mechanism, especially the transcription factors involved in shell formation. In this study, we identified a homolog of the YY-1 transcriptional factor from Pinctada fucata, named Pf-YY-1, and characterized its expression pattern and biological functions. Pf-YY-1 has a typical zinc finger motif highly similar to those in humans, mice, and other higher organisms, which indicated its DNA-binding capability and its function as a transcription factor. Pf-YY-1 is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues, but at a higher level in the mantle, which suggested a role in biomineralization. The expression pattern of Pf-YY-1 during pearl sac development was quite similar to, and was synchronized with, those of Prisilkin-39, ACCBP, and other genes involved in biomineralization, which also suggested its function in biomineralization.

  6. Anticipatory and consummatory effects of (hedonic) chocolate intake are associated with increased circulating levels of the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and endocannabinoids in obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, Antonello E.; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Aveta, Teresa; Agosti, Fiorenza; De Col, Alessandra; Bini, Silvia; Cella, Silvano G.; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sartorio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Hedonic hunger refers to consumption of food just for pleasure and not to maintain energy homeostasis. Recently, consumption of food for pleasure was reported to be associated with increased circulating levels of both the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) in normal-weight subjects. To date, the effects of hedonic hunger, and in particular of chocolate craving, on these mediators in obese subjects are still unknown. Methods To explore the role of some gastrointestinal orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides and endocannabinoids (and some related congeners) in chocolate consumption, we measured changes in circulating levels of ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), anandamide (AEA), 2-AG, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) in 10 satiated severely obese subjects after consumption of chocolate and, on a separate day, of a non-palatable isocaloric food with the same bromatologic composition. Evaluation of hunger and satiety was also performed by visual analogic scale. Results The anticipatory phase and the consumption of food for pleasure were associated with increased circulating levels of ghrelin, AEA, 2-AG, and OEA. In contrast, the levels of GLP-1, PYY, and PEA did not differ before and after the exposure/ingestion of either chocolate or non-palatable foods. Hunger and satiety were higher and lower, respectively, in the hedonic session than in the non-palatable one. Conclusions When motivation to eat is generated by exposure to, and consumption of, chocolate a peripheral activation of specific endogenous rewarding chemical signals, including ghrelin, AEA, and 2-AG, is observed in obese subjects. Although preliminary, these findings predict the effectiveness of ghrelin and endocannabinoid antagonists in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26546790

  7. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  8. YY162 prevents ADHD-like behavioral side effects and cytotoxicity induced by Aroclor1254 via interactive signaling between antioxidant potential, BDNF/TrkB, DAT and NET.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yunsung; Shin, Eun-Joo; Shin, Seung Woo; Lim, Yong Kwang; Jung, Jong Ho; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ha, Jong Ryul; Chae, Jong Seok; Ko, Sung Kwon; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) has become the primary drug of choice for treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, its psychotropic effects severely hamper long-term clinical use. We evaluated the effects of YY162, which consists of terpenoid-strengthened Ginkgo biloba and ginsenoside Rg3, on the ADHD-like condition induced by Aroclor1254, because both components have been suggested to modulate oxidative stress, dopaminergic neurotransmission, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, which may be critical targets for understanding the pathogenesis of ADHD. YY162 attenuated the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in BDNF levels induced by Aroclor1254 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. YY162 significantly attenuated Aroclor1254-induced ADHD-like behavior and oxidative stress in ICR mice. Furthermore, YY162 attenuated reductions in p-TrkB, BDNF, dopamine transporter (DAT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression. These attenuating effects of YY162 were comparable to those of MP. Importantly, K252a, a TrkB antagonist, counteracted the protective effects of YY162. Our results suggest that YY162 possesses significant protective activities against ADHD-like conditions with negligible behavioral side effects, and that interactive signaling between antioxidant potential and BDNF/TrkB receptor for the positive modulation of the DAT and NET is important for YY162-mediated neuroprotective activity. PMID:24394491

  9. Nucleophosmin/B23 regulates PCNA promoter through YY1

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jing J.; Yung, Benjamin Y.M. . E-mail: byung@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2005-09-30

    Ectopic over-expression of nucleophosmin/B23 caused a marked up-regulation in the amounts of Yin Yang 1 (YY1) and proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins. Transfection with nucleophosmin/B23-targeting siRNA induced a decrease in the intracellular amounts of nucleophosmin/B23, YY1, and PCNA. PCNA expression and its promoter activity were attenuated either by nucleophosmin/B23-siRNA or YY1-siRNA. The ChIP assay showed that positive regulation of PCNA is achieved by binding of YY1 to the initiation site of PCNA promoter. The binding of YY1 to the PCNA promoter and histone H4 acetylation was significantly decreased in nucleophosmin/B23-siRNA-treated cells as compared to control vector-transfected cells. Mutation in YY1 binding site resulted in the loss of PCNA promoter activity and the binding of YY1 to the promoter. The results have indicated that YY1 binds to the initiation site of the PCNA promoter along with histone H4 acetylation, leading to transcriptional activity. We have demonstrated that nucleophosmin/B23 plays an important role in the regulation of PCNA through YY1.

  10. YY1-MIR372-SQSTM1 regulatory axis in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lifeng; Ma, Yanning; Sun, Jie; Shen, Qi; Liu, Leiming; Lu, Haiqi; Wang, Faliang; Yue, Yongfang; Li, Jiaqiu; Zhang, Shenjie; Lin, Xiaoying; Chu, Jue; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan

    2014-08-01

    Autophagy is a self-proteolytic process that degrades intracellular material to enable cellular survival under unfavorable conditions. However, how autophagy is activated in human carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Herein we report an epigenetic regulation of autophagy in human cancer cells. YY1 (YY1 transcription factor) is a well-known epigenetic regulator and is upregulated in many cancers. We found that YY1 knockdown inhibited cell viability and autophagy flux through downregulating SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1). YY1 regulated SQSTM1 expression through the epigenetic modulation of the transcription of MIR372 (microRNA 372) which was found to target SQSTM1 directly. During nutrient starvation, YY1 was stimulated to promote SQSTM1 expression and subsequent autophagy activation by suppressing MIR372 expression. Similar to YY1 depletion, MIR372 overexpression blocked autophagy activation and inhibited in vivo tumor growth. SQSTM1 upregulation and competent autophagy flux thus contributed to the oncogenic function of YY1. YY1-promoted SQSTM1 upregulation might be a useful histological marker for cancer detection and a potential target for drug development.

  11. YY1-MIR372-SQSTM1 regulatory axis in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lifeng; Ma, Yanning; Sun, Jie; Shen, Qi; Liu, Leiming; Lu, Haiqi; Wang, Faliang; Yue, Yongfang; Li, Jiaqiu; Zhang, Shenjie; Lin, Xiaoying; Chu, Jue; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-proteolytic process that degrades intracellular material to enable cellular survival under unfavorable conditions. However, how autophagy is activated in human carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Herein we report an epigenetic regulation of autophagy in human cancer cells. YY1 (YY1 transcription factor) is a well-known epigenetic regulator and is upregulated in many cancers. We found that YY1 knockdown inhibited cell viability and autophagy flux through downregulating SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1). YY1 regulated SQSTM1 expression through the epigenetic modulation of the transcription of MIR372 (microRNA 372) which was found to target SQSTM1 directly. During nutrient starvation, YY1 was stimulated to promote SQSTM1 expression and subsequent autophagy activation by suppressing MIR372 expression. Similar to YY1 depletion, MIR372 overexpression blocked autophagy activation and inhibited in vivo tumor growth. SQSTM1 upregulation and competent autophagy flux thus contributed to the oncogenic function of YY1. YY1-promoted SQSTM1 upregulation might be a useful histological marker for cancer detection and a potential target for drug development. PMID:24991827

  12. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  13. Plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides in patients receiving regular hemodialysis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Ekman, R

    1992-01-01

    The fasting plasma levels of 10 vasoactive regulatory peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 23 stable patients with chronic renal failure receiving regular hemodialysis treatment (RDT) and compared with those of healthy controls. The plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide, beta-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, motilin, neuropeptide Y, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were increased. The plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide was not statistically different from that of the controls. The plasma concentration of gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was lowered in the RDT-patients. The arterial blood pressure correlated with the plasma levels of motilin and neuropeptide Y. We conclude that patients with chronic renal failure receiving RDT have increased concentrations of 8 out of 10 measured vasoactive regulatory peptides. The elevated levels of vasoactive peptides may contribute to the adaptation of the cardiovascular system to impaired renal function.

  14. [Diagnostic Ability of Natriuretic Peptides for Heart Failure According to eGFR Level: Comparison between Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Amino-Terminal Probrain Natriuretic Peptide].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kimika; Ando, Yukichi; Matsunaga, Sachiko; Nishiura, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Although the influence of reduced kidney function on natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and amino terminal probrain natriuretic peptide [NT]) is clear, effect of kidney function on the difference of diagnostic ability for heart failure by these peptides is not obvious. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between natriuretic peptide concentrations and echocardiographic findings according to eGFR level of the patients. In addition, we compared diagnostic ability of BNP with that of NT according to eGFR level. The eGFR levels were classified by based on CKD stage (≥ 60, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, < 15 and on maintenance HD). Patients who underwent the measurements of BNP, NT and serum creatinine concentrations, as well as echocardiography between March and October in 2011 were enrolled (n = 1,297). The left ventricular mass index was greater in patients with eGFR < 60 than in those with eGFR ≥ 60, but EF (%) was not different among eGFR level (except eGFR30-44). The percentage of patients with heart failure in those with eGFR < 60 (16.0%) was more than eGFR ≥ 60 (5.8%). Median BNP and NT concentrations were elevated in association with decreasing eGFR level. Using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, the area under the ROC curve for BNP and NT that stratified subjects with or without heart failure was not different among eGFR level. In conclusion, BNP and NT levels are elevated depend on decreasing eGFR level, BNP and NT are comparable in the accuracy for diagnosing heart failure at every eGFR level. The cut-off value of BNP and NT should be established according to the eGFR level. PMID:27363216

  15. Orbital period changes of YY Coronae Borealis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun-Xia; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Xiao, Ting-Yu

    2015-06-01

    By using all available times of light minimum, the orbital period changes of a W UMa eclipsing binary YY CrB have been investigated. Two possible orbital period variations are found: (1) a secular period decrease with a rate of dP/dt = -6.727 × 10-7 d yr-1, on which a sinusoidal oscillation with a period of P = 12.68 yr is superposed, or (2) an abrupt period change with a sudden period decrease of -0.7862 s around the year 2005. The secular period decrease is discussed in terms of (1) the mass transfer from the more massive companion to the less massive one with a mass transfer rate of dM2/dt = 2.8096 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, and (2) the mass loss via stellar wind from the system. The sinusoidal oscillatory can be interpreted as a result of the magnetic activity cycles of the system. In addition, the abrupt period decrease of the system might be due to the sudden mass transfer between the components.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of the Astrocytic Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 1 (EAAT1) via NF-κB and Yin Yang 1 (YY1)*

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Kim, Clifford; Smith, Keisha; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytic glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) 1, also known as glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in rodents, is one of two glial glutamate transporters that are responsible for removing excess glutamate from synaptic clefts to prevent excitotoxic neuronal death. Despite its important role in neurophysiological functions, the molecular mechanisms of EAAT1 regulation at the transcriptional level remain to be established. Here, we report that NF-κB is a main positive transcription factor for EAAT1, supported by the following: 1) EAAT1 contains two consensus sites for NF-κB, 2) mutation of NF-κB binding sites decreased EAAT1 promoter activity, and 3) activation of NF-κB increased, whereas inhibition of NF-κB decreased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels. EGF increased EAAT1 mRNA/protein levels and glutamate uptake via NF-κB. The transcription factor yin yang 1 (YY1) plays a role as a critical negative regulator of EAAT1, supported by the following: 1) the EAAT1 promoter contains multiple consensus sites for YY1, 2) overexpression of YY1 decreased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels, and 3) knockdown of YY1 increased EAAT1 promoter activity and mRNA/protein levels. Manganese decreased EAAT1 expression via YY1. Epigenetic modifiers histone deacetylases (HDACs) served as co-repressors of YY1 to further decrease EAAT1 promoter activity, whereas inhibition of HDACs reversed manganese-induced decrease of EAAT1 expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that NF-κB is a critical positive regulator of EAAT1, mediating the stimulatory effects of EGF, whereas YY1 is a negative regulator of EAAT1 with HDACs as co-repressors, mediating the inhibitory effects of manganese on EAAT1 regulation. PMID:26269591

  17. Molecular level studies on binding modes of labeling molecules with polyalanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Niu, Lin; Zeng, Qindao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides.In this work, the binding modes of typical labeling molecules (thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) and copper(ii) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (PcCu(SO3Na)4)) on pentaalanine, which is a model peptide segment of amyloidpeptides, have been resolved at the molecular level by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In the STM images, ThT molecules are predominantly adsorbed parallel to the peptide strands and two binding modes could be identified. It was found that ThT molecules are preferentially binding on top of the peptide strand, and the mode of intercalated between neighboring peptides also exists. The parallel binding mode of CR molecules can be observed with pentaalaninepeptides. Besides the binding modes of labeling molecules, the CR and PcCu(SO3Na)4 display different adsorption affinity with the pentaalaninepeptides. The results could be beneficial for obtaining molecular level insight of the interactions between labeling molecules and peptides. Electronic

  18. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents. PMID:26466085

  19. Decreasing brain natriuretic peptide levels after treatment for hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Ata, Naim; Yalcin, Ahmet Arif; Kucukazman, Metin; Algul, Beyza; Dal, Kursad; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Deveci, Onur Sinan; Canbolat, Nihat; Ure, Oznur Sari; Tutal, Emre

    2009-01-01

    BNP are produced in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and secreted in response to volume expansion or pressure overload. The purpose of this study was to assess BNP levels in patients with hyperthyroidism before specific treatment for hyperthyroidism and after euthyroidism was achieved. The study was performed in a prospective design. The study population consisted of 48 consecutive newly diagnosed untreated overt hyper-thyroid patients who had not been treated any anti-thyroid medications before. All subjects underwent transt-horacic echocardiography. Levels of fT3, fT4, TSH and BNP were measured before the onset of the treatment and after euthyroidism was achieved. A significant decrease in BNP (102.5 (6.7-1769) ng/L vs. 5.0 (0.1-87.0) ng/L p< 0.001) levels were observed, after euthyroidism was achieved. The decrease in BNP levels was posi-tively correlated with the decrease in fT3 (r=0.298; p=0.049) and fT4 (r=0.313; p=0.030). There was no cor-relation between BNP levels and TSH levels (p=NS). We conclude that hyperthyroidism may cause high BNP measurements which can lead to misdiagnosis of congestive heart failure. We suggest that thyroid hormones should be checked in patients with high levels of BNP.

  20. Racial Differences in Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K; Claggett, Brian; Wells, Quinn; Cheng, Susan; Li, Man; Maruthur, Nisa; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth R; Mosley, Thomas; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron; Ballantyne, Christie M; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuretic peptides promote natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilation. Experimental deficiency of natriuretic peptides leads to hypertension (HTN) and cardiac hypertrophy, conditions more common among African Americans. Hospital-based studies suggest that African Americans may have reduced circulating natriuretic peptides, as compared to Caucasians, but definitive data from community-based cohorts are lacking. Methods and Results We examined plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels according to race in 9137 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants (22% African American) without prevalent cardiovascular disease at visit 4 (1996–1998). Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed adjusting for clinical covariates. Among African Americans, percent European ancestry was determined from genetic ancestry informative markers and then examined in relation to NTproBNP levels in multivariable linear regression analysis. NTproBNP levels were significantly lower in African Americans (median, 43 pg/mL; interquartile range [IQR], 18, 88) than Caucasians (median, 68 pg/mL; IQR, 36, 124; P<0.0001). In multivariable models, adjusted log NTproBNP levels were 40% lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −43, −36) in African Americans, compared to Caucasians, which was consistent across subgroups of age, gender, HTN, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity. African-American race was also significantly associated with having nondetectable NTproBNP (adjusted OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 4.22, 7.80). In multivariable analyses in African Americans, a 10% increase in genetic European ancestry was associated with a 7% (95% CI, 1, 13) increase in adjusted log NTproBNP. Conclusions African Americans have lower levels of plasma NTproBNP than Caucasians, which may be partially owing to genetic variation. Low natriuretic peptide levels in African Americans may contribute to the greater risk for HTN and its sequalae in

  1. Effect of opioid receptor antagonism on proopiomelanocortin peptide levels and gene expression in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, C E; Berkowitz, K M; Jaffe, S B; Wardlaw, S L

    1992-06-01

    In order to determine how brain beta-endorphin (beta-EP) and its precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC) adapt to chronic opioid blockade we have examined the effects of treatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (NTX) on POMC gene expression and peptide levels in the hypothalamus. Male rats were treated with NTX by daily injection or constant minipump infusion. RNA was isolated from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) after an aliquot was removed for peptide RIA and the amount of POMC mRNA was measured by solution hybridization SI nuclease protection assay. beta-EP and several other POMC-derived peptides including alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP) or gamma(3)-MSH were measured in the MBH and anterior hypothalamus (AH) by RIA. In an initial experiment POMC peptide levels were measured after 7 days of NTX (4.8 mg/day) infusion. There was a marked fall in the concentrations of beta-EP, alpha-MSH, and CLIP; levels in the MBH declined by more than 60% (P < 0.001). In the next experiment NTX (1 mg) was injected daily and POMC peptides and mRNA were measured after 2 and 5 days of treatment. (beta-EP) and alpha-MSH levels fell progressively in the MBH and AH and were significantly less than those of the controls by 5 days of treatment (P < 0.02). POMC mRNA levels, however, did not change after 2 or 5 days. When NTX was infused for 3 weeks there was a decrease in the concentrations of beta-EP, alpha-MSH, and gamma(3)-MSH in the MBH (P < 0.001). The concentration of POMC mRNA in the MBH, however, was significantly higher in the NTX-treated animals, 0.99 +/- 0.06 pg/mug RNA vs 0.81 +/- 0.05 pg/mug RNA (P < 0.05). Since NTX can affect LH and testosterone release, the study was repeated in castrated rats. POMC peptide levels again fell after 3 weeks of NTX. POMC mRNA levels were higher in the castrated rats than in the intact rats, 1.14 +/- 0.06 pg/mug RNA vs 0.85 +/- 0.09 pg/mug RNA (P < 0

  2. Stereospecific effects of morphine on plasma opioid peptide levels and nociception in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.L.; Morris, D.L.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    ..beta..-endorphin, (met)enkephalin, and (leu)enkephalin were quantitated in canine plasma by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after extraction of the peptides on Sep Pak C18 cartridges. Plasma samples were taken one hour after a 10 mg/kg s.c. injection of (-)-morphine SO/sub 4/ or (+)-morphine HBr. Antinociception, measured by a dog tail-flick test, and morphine-induced emesis, salivation, diarrhea, and ataxia were quantitated before sampling. Control levels for each dog were taken one week earlier at the same time of day after saline injections. Antinociception, morphine signs, and opioid peptide levels in plasma were significantly increased by (-)-morphine. Antinociception increased from zero to 83.54 +/- 11.0%. The number of morphine signs increased from zero to 2.9 +/- 0.28 per dog. ..beta..-endorphin levels increased from 44.52 +/- 4.25 to 90.6 +/- 7.38 pg/ml; (met)enkephalin levels increased from 253.56 +/- 22.04 to 497.1 +/- 58.12 pg/ml; (leu)-enkephalin increased from 141.65 +/- 12.9 to 313.24 +/- 35.95 pg/ml. None of these effects were observed in the dogs that received (+)-morphine. The conclude that morphine stereospecifically inhibits nociception, induces observable signs, and increases plasma opioid peptide levels in dogs.

  3. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  4. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  5. C-type natriuretic peptide plasma levels are reduced in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, S; Cabiati, M; Bianchi, V; Storti, S; Caselli, C; Prescimone, T; Clerico, A; Saggese, G; Giannessi, D; Federico, G

    2013-12-01

    The high prevalence of obesity in children may increase the magnitude of lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CD). At present, explicit data for recommending biomarkers as routine pre-clinical markers of CD in children are lacking. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is assuming increasing importance in CD; in adults with heart failure, its plasma levels are related to clinical and functional disease severity. We have previously reported five different reference intervals for blood CNP as a function of age in healthy children; however, data on plasma CNP levels in obese children are still lacking. Aim of this study was to assess CNP levels in obese adolescents and verify whether they differ from healthy subjects. Plasma CNP was measured in 29 obese adolescents (age: 11.8 ± 0.4 years; BMI: 29.8 ± 0.82) by radioimmunoassay and compared with the reference values of healthy subjects. BNP was also measured. Both plasma CNP and BNP levels were significantly lower in the obese adolescents compared to the appropriate reference values (CNP: 3.4 ± 0.2 vs 13.6 ± 2.3 pg/ml, p<0.0001; BNP: 18.8 ± 2.6 vs 36.9 ± 5.5 pg/ml, p=0.003). There was no significant difference between CNP values in males and females. As reported in adults, we observed lower plasma CNP and BNP levels in obese children, suggesting a defective natriuretic peptide system in these patients. An altered regulation of production, clearance and function of natriuretic peptides, already operating in obese adolescents, may possibly contribute to the future development of CD. Thus, the availability of drugs promoting the action of natriuretic peptides may represent an attractive therapeutic option to prevent CD.

  6. Effects of different metabolic states and surgical models on glucose metabolism and secretion of ileal L-cell peptides: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Alper; Dixon, John B; Pouwels, Sjaak; Celik, Bahri Onur; Karaca, Fatih Can; Gupta, Adarsh; Santoro, Sergio; Ugale, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are increasing worldwide, reaching pandemic proportions. The understanding of the role of functional restriction and gut hormones can be a beneficial tool in treating obesity and diabetes. However, the exact hormonal profiles in different metabolic states and surgical models are not known. Methods and analysis The HIPER-1 Study is a single-centre cross-sectional study in which 240 patients (in different metabolic states and surgical models) will receive an oral mixed-meal tolerance test (OMTT). At baseline and after 30, 60 and 120 min, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1 levels and glucose and insulin sensitivity will be measured. The primary end point of the study will be the area under the glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide YY curves after the OMTT. Secondary study end points will include examination of the difference in plasma levels of the distal ileal hormones in subjects with various health statuses and in patients who have been treated with different surgical techniques. Ethics and dissemination An independent ethics committee, the Institutional Review Board of Istanbul Sisli Kolan International Hospital, Turkey, has approved the study protocol. Dissemination will occur via publication, national and international conference presentations, and exchanges with regional, provincial and national stakeholders. Trial registration number NCT02532829; Pre-results. PMID:26975937

  7. Nucleon-Hyperon (and YY) Scattering on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2011-09-01

    Lattice QCD offers the chance to study the interactions of strange hadrons from the first principles of QCD. These NY (nucleon-hyperon) and YY (hyperon-hyperon) interactions are crucial to understanding the strange matter that may be created in extreme environments, such as the core of a neutron star. Since the fast decay of strange matter prevents experiments from providing strong constraints on the parameters of such interactions, direct theoretical calculations are especially valuable. In this presentation, I will report on the latest progress toward precision nucleon-hyperon and hyperon-hyperon scattering calculation in lattice QCD.

  8. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antoni G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05345.001 PMID:25860507

  9. Molecular-level understanding of the adsorption mechanism of a graphite-binding peptide at the water/graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Penna, M J; Mijajlovic, M; Tamerler, C; Biggs, M J

    2015-07-14

    The association of proteins and peptides with inorganic material has vast technological potential. An understanding of the adsorption of peptides at liquid/solid interfaces on a molecular-level is fundamental to fully realising this potential. Combining our prior work along with the statistical analysis of 100+ molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption of an experimentally identified graphite binding peptide, GrBP5, at the water/graphite interface has been used here to propose a model for the adsorption of a peptide at a liquid/solid interface. This bottom-up model splits the adsorption process into three reversible phases: biased diffusion, anchoring and lockdown. Statistical analysis highlighted the distinct roles played by regions of the peptide studied here throughout the adsorption process: the hydrophobic domain plays a significant role in the biased diffusion and anchoring phases suggesting that the initial impetus for association between the peptide and the interface may be hydrophobic in origin; aromatic residues dominate the interaction between the peptide and the surface in the adsorbed state and the polar region in the middle of the peptide affords a high conformational flexibility allowing strongly interacting residues to maximise favourable interactions with the surface. Reversible adsorption was observed here, unlike in our prior work focused on a more strongly interacting surface. However, this reversibility is unlikely to be seen once the peptide-surface interaction exceeds 10 kcal mol(-1).

  10. Changes in plasma levels of vasoactive peptides during sequential bicarbonate hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Mårtensson, L; Ekman, R; Boberg, U

    1993-01-01

    The hemodynamic response to isolated ultrafiltration (IUF) is characterized by a vasoconstriction, while there is no significant change in peripheral vascular resistance during isovolemic bicarbonate hemodialysis (IVHD). The present investigation was designed to study the plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides together with noradrenaline (NA) and plasma renin activity (PRA) in 11 patients during sequential hemodialysis (SQHD) - IUF for 60 min, followed by IVHD for 210 min. During IUF, the vasoconstrictors arginine vasopressin (AVP), gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 2-MSH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), NA and PRA increased. During IVHD, NPY and PRA remained unchanged on a higher level. A decrease in AVP below the baseline and in gamma 2-MSH and NA to the baseline levels occurred during IVHD. In the case of vasodilators, there were no changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide or motilin during SQHD. An increase in beta-endorphin (beta-END) occurred during IUF, followed by a decrease during IVHD. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were unchanged during IUF but decreased during IVHD. We conclude that SQHD is characterized by an increase in all the measured vasoconstrictors during IUF in response to loss of fluid, and by a decrease in some vasoconstrictors (AVP, gamma 2-MSH, NA) during IVHD. With the exception of beta-END, there were no changes or only minor ones in vasodilators during SQHD. There are changes in plasma levels of vasoactive substances during SQHD but the importance of these changes for the hemodynamic adaptation to ultrafiltration and dialysis needs to be studied further.

  11. Elapid Snake Venom Analyses Show the Specificity of the Peptide Composition at the Level of Genera Naja and Notechis

    PubMed Central

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Hildebrand, Diana; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Behnken, Henning; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir; Spencer, Patrick; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Elapid snake venom is a highly valuable, but till now mainly unexplored, source of pharmacologically important peptides. We analyzed the peptide fractions with molecular masses up to 10 kDa of two elapid snake venoms—that of the African cobra, N. m. mossambica (genus Naja), and the Peninsula tiger snake, N. scutatus, from Kangaroo Island (genus Notechis). A combination of chromatographic methods was used to isolate the peptides, which were characterized by combining complimentary mass spectrometric techniques. Comparative analysis of the peptide compositions of two venoms showed specificity at the genus level. Three-finger (3-F) cytotoxins, bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) and a bradykinin inhibitor were isolated from the Naja venom. 3-F neurotoxins, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors and a natriuretic peptide were identified in the N. venom. The inhibiting activity of the peptides was confirmed in vitro with a selected array of proteases. Cytotoxin 1 (P01467) from the Naja venom might be involved in the disturbance of cellular processes by inhibiting the cell 20S-proteasome. A high degree of similarity between BPPs from elapid and viperid snake venoms was observed, suggesting that these molecules play a key role in snake venoms and also indicating that these peptides were recruited into the snake venom prior to the evolutionary divergence of the snakes. PMID:24590383

  12. Elapid snake venom analyses show the specificity of the peptide composition at the level of genera Naja and Notechis.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Hildebrand, Diana; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Behnken, Henning; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir; Spencer, Patrick; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Elapid snake venom is a highly valuable, but till now mainly unexplored, source of pharmacologically important peptides. We analyzed the peptide fractions with molecular masses up to 10 kDa of two elapid snake venoms-that of the African cobra, N. m. mossambica (genus Naja), and the Peninsula tiger snake, N. scutatus, from Kangaroo Island (genus Notechis). A combination of chromatographic methods was used to isolate the peptides, which were characterized by combining complimentary mass spectrometric techniques. Comparative analysis of the peptide compositions of two venoms showed specificity at the genus level. Three-finger (3-F) cytotoxins, bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) and a bradykinin inhibitor were isolated from the Naja venom. 3-F neurotoxins, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors and a natriuretic peptide were identified in the N. venom. The inhibiting activity of the peptides was confirmed in vitro with a selected array of proteases. Cytotoxin 1 (P01467) from the Naja venom might be involved in the disturbance of cellular processes by inhibiting the cell 20S-proteasome. A high degree of similarity between BPPs from elapid and viperid snake venoms was observed, suggesting that these molecules play a key role in snake venoms and also indicating that these peptides were recruited into the snake venom prior to the evolutionary divergence of the snakes. PMID:24590383

  13. Elapid snake venom analyses show the specificity of the peptide composition at the level of genera Naja and Notechis.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Hildebrand, Diana; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Behnken, Henning; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir; Spencer, Patrick; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Elapid snake venom is a highly valuable, but till now mainly unexplored, source of pharmacologically important peptides. We analyzed the peptide fractions with molecular masses up to 10 kDa of two elapid snake venoms-that of the African cobra, N. m. mossambica (genus Naja), and the Peninsula tiger snake, N. scutatus, from Kangaroo Island (genus Notechis). A combination of chromatographic methods was used to isolate the peptides, which were characterized by combining complimentary mass spectrometric techniques. Comparative analysis of the peptide compositions of two venoms showed specificity at the genus level. Three-finger (3-F) cytotoxins, bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs) and a bradykinin inhibitor were isolated from the Naja venom. 3-F neurotoxins, Kunitz/basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-type inhibitors and a natriuretic peptide were identified in the N. venom. The inhibiting activity of the peptides was confirmed in vitro with a selected array of proteases. Cytotoxin 1 (P01467) from the Naja venom might be involved in the disturbance of cellular processes by inhibiting the cell 20S-proteasome. A high degree of similarity between BPPs from elapid and viperid snake venoms was observed, suggesting that these molecules play a key role in snake venoms and also indicating that these peptides were recruited into the snake venom prior to the evolutionary divergence of the snakes.

  14. Overexpression of YY1 increases the protein production in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tastanova, Aizhan; Schulz, Alexandra; Folcher, Marc; Tolstrup, Anne; Puklowski, Anja; Kaufmann, Hitto; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-10

    The production of therapeutic antibodies using mammalian cells remains a high-priority in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Bioengineers have targeted different cellular processes, including transcription, translation, secretion and post-translational modifications, to overcome the metabolic bottlenecks limiting production capacity and create high-producing mammalian cell lines. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins belong to a family of chromatin regulators with important roles in multicellular development. By overexpressing and screening genes from the PcG family, we have identified an epigenetic key player for biopharmaceutical manufacturing enhancement: the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). The overexpression of YY1 led to an increase in the production of several product genes (SEAP, VEGF165, IgG including Rituximab), provided that human YY1 (hYY1) was expressed in human cells (HeLa, HT-1080, HEK-293T, FreeStyle™ 293-F) and Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived YY1 (cYY1) was expressed in CHO cells (CHO-K1, CHO-easyC, FreeStyle™ CHO-S, CHO-B13-24, CHO-IgG1). Ectopic expression of cYY1 in the stable CHO-derived IgG producer cell lines CHO-B13-24 and CHO-IgG1 increased the antibody titer up to 6-fold, suggesting that epigenetic engineering of mammalian production cell lines could become a new strategy to improve the manufacturing of complex protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:26686315

  15. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic characters of naphtho-homologated yy-DNA bases and effect of methanol solution and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Li, Huifang; Li, Jilai; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogs, namely, yy-T, yy-C, yy-A, and yy-G, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states is discussed, and the results are compared with those from experiment and also with those of y-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet pipi* and npi* states were explored using the CIS method, and the effects of methanol solution and paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were examined. The calculated excitation and emission energies agree well with the measured data, where experimental results are available. In methanol solution, the fluorescence from yy-A and yy-G would be expected to occur around 539 and 562 nm, respectively, suggesting that yy-A is a green-colored fluorophore, whereas yy-G is a yellow-colored fluorophore. The methanol solution was found to red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima of yy-A, yy-T, and yy-C, but blue-shift those for yy-G. Generally, though base pairing has no significant effects on the absorption and fluorescence maxima of yy-A, yy-C, and yy-T, it blue-shifts those for yy-G.

  16. The Serum C Peptide Levels Among the Offsprings of the People with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gaurav; Kumar, Jayballabh; Khan, Farhan Ahmad; Kumar, Devesh; Malik, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Background: Insulin Resistance (IR) is a condition in which the cells of the body become resistant to the effect of insulin , that is, the normal response to a given amount of insulin is reduced. As a result, levels of insulin are needed in order for insulin to produce its effect. The incidence of diabetes in the offsprings of diabetic couples was more than the incidence of diabetes in the offsprings, of whom only a single parent was diabetic. Aims and Objectives: This study was done to assess the prevalence of insulin resistance in the offsprings of diabetic patients. Material and Methods: The present, cross sectional study conducted in the Teerthanker Mahaveer Medical College and Research Centre, Moradabad, U.P., india. The offsprings of diabetic subjects attended the General Medicine OPD and the Diabetic Clinic and they were also admitted in the indoor wards of the Department of Medicine. The study material consisted of 53 (35 males and 18 females) live offsprings of diabetics from 28 families. Results: The mean c-peptide level in the offsprings of biparental diabetics was significantly higher than that in the offsprings of monoparental diabetics (p<0.01) and in the offsprings of non-diabetics (p<0.01). The frequency of the high c-peptide level was 38.1% in the offsprings of biparental diabetics, it was 21.1% in the offsprings of monoparental diabetics and it was 7.7% in the offsprings of non-diabetics. Conclusion: This study revealed that during the young ages of the offsprings of biparental diabetics, insulin resistance was common and that insulin resistance was more common in the obese, female offsprings of biparental diabetics. PMID:23814721

  17. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction. PMID:27349817

  18. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction.

  19. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al. 2008 and 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knockout mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 hr), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 hr) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 hrs estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 hours after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription. PMID:23933204

  20. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  1. Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level Following Seizure and Syncope: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To explore the clinical feasibility of plasma brain-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) level to differentiate the two major causes of transient unconsciousness, seizure and vasovagal syncope (VVS) in adult patients. Methods: ProBNP levels were evaluated within 24 hours following attack in patients who had experienced a transient episode of unconsciousness. For confirmatory diagnosis, clinical history was reviewed thoroughly and several work-ups including electroencephalography and cerebral imaging and tilt-table test, were performed in cases of putative VVS, as a part of routine clinical approaches. Results: According to various relevant evaluations, 15 patients were diagnosed as seizure (age, 40.3±13.8 years) and 12 patients were VVS (age, 38.1±17.1 years). Plasma concentrations of pro-BNP were not different between two groups (p=0.714). Median level was 34.3 pg/mL (interquartile range: 12.9–91.1) in post-seizure group and 32.3 pg/mL (interquartile range 8.9–77.4) in post-VVS group. Additionally, it was not correlated with the sampling times within 24 hours after the episodes. Conclusions: The plasma level of pro-BNP has a limited clinical value in differentiating seizure and vasovagal syncope in adults. However, the more validated results with a large population should be sought in the future studies to confirm its value. PMID:24977125

  2. A prominent and conserved role for YY1 in Xist transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pablo; Neuillet, Damien; Rougeulle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of the non-coding RNA Xist on one X chromosome in female cells is a hallmark of X-chromosome inactivation in eutherians. Here, we uncovered an essential function for the ubiquitous autosomal transcription factor Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) in the transcriptional activation of Xist in both human and mouse. We show that loss of YY1 prevents Xist up-regulation during the initiation and maintenance of X-inactivation, and that YY1 binds directly the Xist 5′ region to trigger the activity of the Xist promoter. Binding of YY1 to the Xist 5′ region prior to X-chromosome inactivation competes with the Xist repressor REX1 while DNA methylation controls mono-allelic fixation of YY1 to Xist at the onset of X-chromosome inactivation. YY1 is thus the first autosomal activating factor involved in a fundamental and conserved pathway of Xist regulation that ensures the asymmetric transcriptional up-regulation of the master regulator of X-chromosome inactivation. PMID:25209548

  3. YY1 regulates the expression of snail through a distal enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Matthew B.; Majumder, Parimal; Cooper, John C.; Yoon, Hyesuk; Wade, Paul A.; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the snail gene is required for the epithelial-mesenchymal transitions that accompany mammalian gastrulation, neural crest migration, and organ formation. Pathological expression of snail contributes to the migratory capacity of invasive tumors, including melanomas. To investigate the mechanism of snail up regulation in human melanoma cells, a conserved enhancer located 3’ of the snail gene was analyzed. An overlapping Ets and YY1 consensus sequence, in addition to a SOX consensus sequence, were required for full enhancer activity. Proteins specifically binding these sequences were detected by EMSA. The Ets/YY1 binding activity was purified by DNA affinity chromatography and identified as YY1. Although ubiquitously expressed, YY1 was bound at the snail 3’ enhancer in vivo in snail-expressing cells but not in cells that did not express snail. Knockdown of YY1 in A375 cells led to decreased snail expression. These results identify a role for YY1 in regulating transcription of snail in melanoma cells through binding to the snail 3’ enhancer. PMID:19208738

  4. The rapid antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects of YY-21 involve enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission via activation of mTOR signaling in the mPFC.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Zhang, Bing; Fu, Zhiwen; Ma, Yuqin; Gao, Yu; Shen, Fuyi; Huang, Chenggang; Li, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Although antidepressants have been widely prescribed to treat patients with major depressive disease (MDD), there is little disagreement over the need for improved antidepressant therapeutics as the typical treatments have a slow therapeutic onset and moderate efficacy. In the present study, we assessed a novel compound, YY-21, from timosaponin B-III derived from sarsasapogenin of Anemarrhenae Rhizoma. From the initial results, we found that YY-21 obviously increased presynaptic glutamate release and enhanced long-term synaptic activity within 10min as determined by excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) and field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) slices, respectively. YY-21 demonstrated anxiolytic-like effects following acute administration in naïve animals and reversed the depressive-like and anxiety phenotypes induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS) with a relatively fast therapeutic onset. Furthermore, analysis of intracellular signaling pathways showed that YY-21 normalized the CMS-induced low protein levels of GluN2B, p-mTOR, synaptic-related proteins, such as BDNF, PSD-95 and GluA1. Pre-application of the mTOR-selective inhibitor rapamycin blocked YY-21-induced long-term synaptic enhancement. These findings suggest that the activation of BDNF-dependent mTOR signaling, which produces a rapid increase in the postsynaptic protein PSD-95 and GluA1 and further triggers the long-term enhancement of synaptic neurotransmission, may be the mechanism underlying the rapid antidepressant and anxiolytic effects induced by YY-21.

  5. Effect of C-peptide Alone or in Combination with Nicotinamide on Insulin Levels from Pancreatic Islets in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Ali Akbari, Fatemeh Ramezani; Moghadam, Hadi Fathi

    2016-01-01

    Background Both c-peptide and nicotinamide are known to increase blood insulin in diabetes. In the present study, we examined the effect of c-peptide alone or in combination with nicotinamide on insulin levels in pancreatic islets in mice. Methods This study was conducted with 60 adult male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMARI) mice weighing 25 to 30 g. Pancreatic islets from normal mice were isolated by the collagenase digestion method. Mice were divided into ten groups of six (n = 6): control, glyburide (1 and 10 μM), C-peptide (50 and 100 nM), nicotinamide (10, 25, and 100 mM), nicotinamide + C-peptide (100 mM and 100 nM), and buffer in different glucose concentrations (2.8, 5.6, and 16.7 mM). Insulin secretion was measured using insulin radioimmunoassay method. Results Insulin secretion significantly increased at 16.7 mM glucose concentration compared with 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations. Incubation of islets at 2.8 and 5.6 mM glucose concentrations and nicotinamide + C-peptide, nicotinamide 25 and 100 mM, and C-peptide 100 nM significantly increased insulin secretion compared with the control group. In addition, incubation of islets at 16.7 mM glucose with nicotinamide + C-peptide significantly increased insulin secretion. Glyburide at 10 μM concentration was more effective than nicotinamide at 10 and 100 mM, C-peptide 50 and 100 nM in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose concentration. However, the combination of nicotinamide + C-peptide was more effective than glyburide at a concentration of 10 μM in the presence of a 16.7 mM glucose concentration. Conclusions This paper suggests that c-peptide, nicotinamide, and the combination of c-peptide and nicotinamide in-creases insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. PMID:27540321

  6. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  7. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past. PMID:25864448

  8. Effect of a 4-week weight maintenance diet on circulating hormone levels: implications for clinical weight loss trials.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, A; Evans, I R; Wood, R E; Seimon, R V; King, N A; Hills, A P; Byrne, N M

    2015-04-01

    The majority of weight loss studies fail to standardize conditions such as diet and exercise via a weight maintenance period prior to commencement of the trial. This study aimed to determine whether a weight stabilization period is necessary to establish stable baseline hormone concentrations. Fifty-one obese male participants with a body mass index of 30-40 kg m(-2) and aged 25-54 years underwent 4 weeks on an energy balance diet that was designed to achieve weight stability. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state at commencement and completion of the 4-week period, and circulating concentrations of 18 commonly measured hormones were determined. During the 4-week weight maintenance period, participants achieved weight stability within -1.5 ± 0.2 kg (-1.4 ± 0.2%) of their initial body weight. Significant reductions in serum insulin (by 18 ± 6.5%) and leptin (by 21 ± 6.0%) levels occurred, but no significant changes were observed for gut-derived appetite-regulating hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY), nor thyroid, adrenal, gonadal or somatotropic hormones. There were no significant correlations between the change in body weight and the change in circulating concentrations of insulin or leptin over the 4-week period, indicating that the observed changes were not due to weight loss, albeit significant negative correlations were observed between the changes in body weight and plasma ghrelin and peptide YY levels. This study demonstrates the need for baseline weight maintenance periods to stabilize serum levels of insulin and leptin in studies specifically investigating effects on these parameters in the obese. However, this does not apply to circulating levels of gut-derived appetite-regulating hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY), nor thyroid, adrenal, gonadal or somatotropic hormones.

  9. A parallel semisynthetic approach for structure-activity relationship studies of peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, Louise; Østergaard, Søren; Paulsson, Johan F; Norrild, Jens Chr; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2013-09-01

    The gut hormone peptide YY (PYY) is postprandially secreted from enteroendocrine L cells and is involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. The N-terminal truncated version PYY(3-36) decreases food intake and has potential as an anti-obesity agent. The anorectic effect of PYY(3-36) is mediated through Y₂ receptors in the hypothalamus, vagus, and brainstem regions, and it is well known that the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence of PYY(3-36) is crucial for Y2 receptor activation. The aim of this work was to develop a semisynthetic methodology for the generation of a library of C-terminally modified PYY(3-36) analogues. By using an intein-based expression system, PYY(3-29) was generated as a C-terminal peptide α-thioester. Heptapeptides bearing an N-terminal cysteine and modifications at one of the four C-terminal positions were synthesized in a 96-well plate by parallel solid-phase synthesis. In the plate format, an array of [Ala30]PYY(3-36) analogues were generated by ligation, desulfurization, and subsequent solid-phase extraction. The generated analogues, in which either Arg33, Gln34, Arg35, or Tyr36 had been substituted with proteinogenic or non-proteinogenic amino acids, were tested in a functional Y₂ receptor assay. Generally, substitutions of Tyr36 were better tolerated than modifications of Arg33, Gln34, and Arg35. Two analogues showed significantly improved Y₂ receptor selectivity; therefore, these results could be used to design new drug candidates for the treatment of obesity.

  10. A multiwavelength study of the M dwarf binary YY Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, C. J.; Erkan, N.; Budding, E.; Doyle, J. G.; Foing, B.; Bromage, G. E.; Kellett, B. J.; Frueh, M.; Huovelin, J.; Brown, A.; Neff, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    We review the results of the 1988 multiwavelength campaign on the late-type eclipsing binary YY Geminorum. Observations include: broad-band optical and near-infrared photometry, simultaneous optical and ultraviolet (IUE) spectroscopy, X-ray (Ginga) and radio (VLA) data. From models fitted to the optical light curves, fundamental physical parameters have been determined together with evidence for transient maculations (spots) located near quadrature longitudes and intermediate latitudes. Eclipses were observed at optical, ultraviolet and radio wavelengths. Significant drops in 6 cm radio emission near the phases of both primary and secondary eclipse indicate relatively compact radio emitting volumes that may lie between the binary components. IUE observations during secondary eclipse are indicative of a uniform chromosphere saturated with Mg II emission and an extended volume of Lyα emission. Profile fitting of high-dispersion Hα spectra confirms the chromospheric saturation and indicates significant Hα opacity to heights of a few per cent of the photospheric radius. There is evidence for an enhanced Hα emission region visible near phase 0.25-0.35 which may be associated with a large spot on the primary and with two small optical flares which were also observed at other wavelengths: one in microwave radiation and the other in X-rays. For both flares, LX/Lopt is consistent with energy release in closed magnetic structures.

  11. Correlation between brain natriuretic peptide levels and the prognosis of patients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    GONG, HUI; WANG, XIN; SHI, YI-JUN; SHANG, WEN-JING; LING, YI; PAN, LI-JIAN; SHI, HAI-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and the prognosis of patients with left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction. A total of 708 inpatients with cardiovascular disease (mean age, 66 years; 395 males and 313 females) were grouped according to initial BNP and were followed-up for 20–51 months (average, 30.86 months) until endpoint events occurred. Endpoints were defined as mortality or readmission due to cardiovascular disease, or mortality due to any other reason. A total of 67 and 77 events were reported in the BNP ≤80 pg/ml and BNP >80 pg/ml groups, respectively. The occurrence rate of the endpoint was significantly higher in the BNP >80 pg/ml group, as compared with the BNP ≤80 pg/ml group (26.28 vs. 16.14%; relative risk=1.63). Furthermore, the durations of patient survival were significantly shorter in the BNP >80 pg/ml group, as compared with the BNP ≤80 pg/ml group (P=0.0006), and patient survival decreased as BNP levels rose (P=0.0074). Among the 708 patients, 677 underwent echocardiographic detection at the same time. No significant correlation was detected between BNP levels and survival time in 178 patients with normal LV diastolic function [mitral Doppler flow, early diastolic (E)/late diastolic (A)>1] (P=0.2165); whereas a negative correlation was determined in 499 patients with LVD dysfunction (E/A≤1) (Spearman's rho=−0.0899; P=0.0447). The prognoses of patients with elevated BNP levels were correspondingly worse in the present study and these correlations were demonstrated to be significant in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. Therefore, BNP levels may be used to predict the prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:27313677

  12. [C-peptide level as an early diagnostic marker of metabolic syndrome and predictor of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Beliakin, S A; Serebrennikov, V N; Shklovskiĭ, B L; Patsenko, M B

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship of C-peptide levels with insulin, resistance; components of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The study included 98 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, who were divided into two groups by the level of C-peptide. The first group consisted of 54 patients with elevated levels of C-peptide; the second group consisted of 44 patients with normal levels of C-peptide. Our study has shown a positive correlation between C-peptide levels and a body mass index (BMI), triglyceride levels and the triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein ratio. Correlation analysis also allowed identifying a statistically significant association of the HOMA-2-IR-C-peptide with a BMI, triglycerides and the triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein ratio. In the group of patients with elevated levels of C-peptide found in practically all components of metabolic syndrome, as well as a high incidence of arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease. The study shows that the detection of the C-peptide level is preferred in comparison with insulin for assessment of insulin resistance, presence of metabolic syndrome and can be used in type 2 diabetic patients for early detection of cardiovascular risk.

  13. MAXI/GSC detection of a possible X-ray flare from an dMe binary system YY Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2015-09-01

    MAXI/GSC observed a possible X-ray flare from a dMe binary system YY Gem. The MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on the flare-like event from the position consistent with the active binary system YY Gem during a scan transit at 01:29:00 UT on September 24th 2015.

  14. Genome-wide survey by ChIP-seq reveals YY1 regulation of lincRNAs in skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Leina; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaona; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lijun; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is orchestrated by a network of transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and non-coding RNAs. The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) silences multiple target genes in myoblasts (MBs) by recruiting Ezh2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homologue2). To elucidate genome-wide YY1 binding in MBs, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and found 1820 specific binding sites in MBs with a large portion residing in intergenic regions. Detailed analysis demonstrated that YY1 acts as an activator for many loci in addition to its known repressor function. No significant co-occupancy was found between YY1 and Ezh2, suggesting an additional Ezh2-independent function for YY1 in MBs. Further analysis of intergenic binding sites showed that YY1 potentially regulates dozens of large intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs), whose function in myogenesis is underexplored. We characterized a novel muscle-associated lincRNA (Yam-1) that is positively regulated by YY1. Yam-1 is downregulated upon differentiation and acts as an inhibitor of myogenesis. We demonstrated that Yam-1 functions through in cis regulation of miR-715, which in turn targets Wnt7b. Our findings not only provide the first genome-wide picture of YY1 association in muscle cells, but also uncover the functional role of lincRNA Yam-1. PMID:23942234

  15. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for T(reg)-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in T(reg) cells than T(conv) cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in T(reg) cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of T(reg) cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  16. Alcohol-Induced Changes in Opioid Peptide Levels in Adolescent Rats Are Dependent on Housing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Sara; Nylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous opioids are implicated in the mechanism of action of alcohol and alcohol affects opioids in a number of brain areas, although little is known about alcohol's effects on opioids in the adolescent brain. One concern, in particular when studying young animals, is that alcohol intake models often are based on single housing that may result in alcohol effects confounded by the lack of social interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate short- and long-term alcohol effects on opioids and the influence of housing conditions on these effects. Methods In the first part, opioid peptide levels were measured after one 24-hour session of single housing and 2-hour voluntary alcohol intake in adolescent and adult rats. In the second part, a model with a cage divider inserted during 2-hour drinking sessions was tested and the effects on opioids were examined after 6 weeks of adolescent voluntary intake in single-and pair-housed rats, respectively. Results The effects of single housing were age specific and affected Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP) in particular. In adolescent rats, it was difficult to distinguish between effects induced by alcohol and single housing, whereas alcohol-specific effects were seen in dynorphin B (DYNB), beta-endorphin (BEND), and MEAP levels in adults. Voluntary drinking affected several brain areas and the majority of alcohol-induced effects were not dependent on housing. However, alcohol effects on DYNB and BEND in the amygdala were dependent on housing. Housing alone affected MEAP in the cingulate cortex. Conclusions Age-specific housing- and alcohol-induced effects on opioids were found. In addition, prolonged voluntary alcohol intake under different housing conditions produced several alcohol-induced effects independent of housing. However, housing-dependent effects were found in areas implicated in stress, emotionality, and alcohol use disorder. Housing condition and age may therefore affect the reasons and

  17. A Micropolymorphism Altering the Residue Triad 97/114/156 Determines the Relative Levels of Tapasin Independence and Distinct Peptide Profiles for HLA-A*24 Allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Soumya; Blasczyk, Rainer; Huyton, Trevor; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2014-01-01

    While many HLA class I molecules interact directly with the peptide loading complex (PLC) for conventional loading of peptides certain class I molecules are able to present peptides in a way that circumvents the PLC components. We investigated micropolymorphisms at position 156 of HLA-A*24 allotypes and their effects on PLC dependence for assembly and peptide binding specificities. HLA-A*24:06156Trp and HLA-A*24:13156Leu showed high levels of cell surface expression while HLA-A*24:02156Gln was expressed at low levels in tapasin deficient cells. Peptides presented by these allelic variants showed distinct differences in features and repertoire. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated all the HLA-A*24/156 variants to associate at similar levels with tapasin when present. Structurally, HLA-A*24:02 contains the residue triad Met97/His114/Gln156 and a Trp156 or Leu156 polymorphism provides tapasin independence by stabilizing these triad residues, thus generating an energetically stable and a more peptide receptive environment. Micropolymorphisms at position 156 can influence the generic peptide loading pathway for HLA-A*24 by altering their tapasin dependence for peptide selection. The trade-off for this tapasin independence could be the presentation of unusual ligands by these alleles, imposing significant risk following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). PMID:25802875

  18. mTOR controls mitochondrial oxidative function through a YY1-PGC-1alpha transcriptional complex.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John T; Rodgers, Joseph T; Arlow, Daniel H; Vazquez, Francisca; Mootha, Vamsi K; Puigserver, Pere

    2007-11-29

    Transcriptional complexes that contain peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1alpha control mitochondrial oxidative function to maintain energy homeostasis in response to nutrient and hormonal signals. An important component in the energy and nutrient pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a kinase that regulates cell growth, size and survival. However, it is unknown whether and how mTOR controls mitochondrial oxidative activities. Here we show that mTOR is necessary for the maintenance of mitochondrial oxidative function. In skeletal muscle tissues and cells, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreased the gene expression of the mitochondrial transcriptional regulators PGC-1alpha, oestrogen-related receptor alpha and nuclear respiratory factors, resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial gene expression and oxygen consumption. Using computational genomics, we identified the transcription factor yin-yang 1 (YY1) as a common target of mTOR and PGC-1alpha. Knockdown of YY1 caused a significant decrease in mitochondrial gene expression and in respiration, and YY1 was required for rapamycin-dependent repression of those genes. Moreover, mTOR and raptor interacted with YY1, and inhibition of mTOR resulted in a failure of YY1 to interact with and be coactivated by PGC-1alpha. We have therefore identified a mechanism by which a nutrient sensor (mTOR) balances energy metabolism by means of the transcriptional control of mitochondrial oxidative function. These results have important implications for our understanding of how these pathways might be altered in metabolic diseases and cancer. PMID:18046414

  19. Neonatal androgenization increases vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in rat anterior pituitary: possible involvement of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the neonatal androgenization-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Sasaki, S; Takebe, K

    1991-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be a physiological PRL-releasing factor. In the present study, we examined a possible involvement of VIP in the neonatal androgenization (NA)-induced hyperprolactinemia. Twenty-four hours after birth, newborn female rats were injected sc with 1,000 micrograms of testosterone (NA) or with oil vehicle only (control). Both groups were sacrificed at 8 weeks of age. Compared to controls, NA rats showed significantly higher plasma PRL levels (7.3 fold), anterior pituitary (AP) PRL content (2.1 fold) and plasma estradiol levels (2.1 fold). AP VIP content was extremely higher (61 fold) in NA rats than in controls. However, NA did not affect VIP content in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus or median eminence. These results suggest that the NA-induced hyperprolactinemia may be mediated, at least in part, by paracrine and/or autocrine effects of the increased AP VIP on PRL secretion. However, since the potentiation by NA of the AP VIP content was extremely marked compared to those of the other parameters, the possibility was also raised that the increased AP VIP may be involved in other endocrine and/or nonendocrine events occurring in the AP. PMID:1802925

  20. Fast voxel-level dosimetry for (177)Lu labelled peptide treatments.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, E; Tenhunen, M; Sohlberg, A

    2015-09-01

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), voxel-level radiation absorbed dose calculations can be performed using several different methods. Each method has it strengths and weaknesses; however, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is presently considered the most accurate method at providing absorbed dose distributions. Unfortunately MC simulation is time-consuming and often impractical to carry out in a clinical practice. In this work, a fast semi-Monte Carlo (sMC) absorbed dose calculation method for (177)Lu PRRT dosimetry is presented. The sMC method is based on a local electron absorption assumption and fast photon MC simulations. The sMC method is compared against full MC simulation code built on PENELOPE (vxlPen) using digital phantoms to assess the accuracy of these assumptions.Due to the local electron absorption assumption of sMC, the potential errors in cross-fire dose from electrons and photons emitted by (177)Lu were first evaluated using an ellipsoidal kidney model by comparing vxlPen and sMC. The photon cross-fire dose from background to kidney and kidney to background with varying kidney-to-background activity concentration ratios were calculated. In addition, kidney to kidney photon and electron cross-dose with different kidney to kidney distances were studied. Second, extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were created with liver lesions and with realistic activity distributions and tissue densities. The XCAT phantoms were used to simulate SPECT projections and 3D activity distribution images were reconstructed using an OSEM algorithm. Image-based dose rate distributions were calculated using vxlPen and sMC. Total doses and dose rate volume histograms (DrVH) produced by the two methods were compared.The photon cross-fire dose from the kidney increased the background's absorbed dose by 5% or more up to 5.8 cm distance with 20 : 1 kidney to background activity concentration ratio. On the other hand, the photon cross-fire dose from the background to

  1. Fast voxel-level dosimetry for 177Lu labelled peptide treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippeläinen, E.; Tenhunen, M.; Sohlberg, A.

    2015-09-01

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), voxel-level radiation absorbed dose calculations can be performed using several different methods. Each method has it strengths and weaknesses; however, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is presently considered the most accurate method at providing absorbed dose distributions. Unfortunately MC simulation is time-consuming and often impractical to carry out in a clinical practice. In this work, a fast semi-Monte Carlo (sMC) absorbed dose calculation method for 177Lu PRRT dosimetry is presented. The sMC method is based on a local electron absorption assumption and fast photon MC simulations. The sMC method is compared against full MC simulation code built on PENELOPE (vxlPen) using digital phantoms to assess the accuracy of these assumptions. Due to the local electron absorption assumption of sMC, the potential errors in cross-fire dose from electrons and photons emitted by 177Lu were first evaluated using an ellipsoidal kidney model by comparing vxlPen and sMC. The photon cross-fire dose from background to kidney and kidney to background with varying kidney-to-background activity concentration ratios were calculated. In addition, kidney to kidney photon and electron cross-dose with different kidney to kidney distances were studied. Second, extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were created with liver lesions and with realistic activity distributions and tissue densities. The XCAT phantoms were used to simulate SPECT projections and 3D activity distribution images were reconstructed using an OSEM algorithm. Image-based dose rate distributions were calculated using vxlPen and sMC. Total doses and dose rate volume histograms (DrVH) produced by the two methods were compared. The photon cross-fire dose from the kidney increased the background’s absorbed dose by 5% or more up to 5.8 cm distance with 20 : 1 kidney to background activity concentration ratio. On the other hand, the photon cross-fire dose from the background to

  2. Fast voxel-level dosimetry for (177)Lu labelled peptide treatments.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, E; Tenhunen, M; Sohlberg, A

    2015-09-01

    In peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), voxel-level radiation absorbed dose calculations can be performed using several different methods. Each method has it strengths and weaknesses; however, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is presently considered the most accurate method at providing absorbed dose distributions. Unfortunately MC simulation is time-consuming and often impractical to carry out in a clinical practice. In this work, a fast semi-Monte Carlo (sMC) absorbed dose calculation method for (177)Lu PRRT dosimetry is presented. The sMC method is based on a local electron absorption assumption and fast photon MC simulations. The sMC method is compared against full MC simulation code built on PENELOPE (vxlPen) using digital phantoms to assess the accuracy of these assumptions.Due to the local electron absorption assumption of sMC, the potential errors in cross-fire dose from electrons and photons emitted by (177)Lu were first evaluated using an ellipsoidal kidney model by comparing vxlPen and sMC. The photon cross-fire dose from background to kidney and kidney to background with varying kidney-to-background activity concentration ratios were calculated. In addition, kidney to kidney photon and electron cross-dose with different kidney to kidney distances were studied. Second, extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were created with liver lesions and with realistic activity distributions and tissue densities. The XCAT phantoms were used to simulate SPECT projections and 3D activity distribution images were reconstructed using an OSEM algorithm. Image-based dose rate distributions were calculated using vxlPen and sMC. Total doses and dose rate volume histograms (DrVH) produced by the two methods were compared.The photon cross-fire dose from the kidney increased the background's absorbed dose by 5% or more up to 5.8 cm distance with 20 : 1 kidney to background activity concentration ratio. On the other hand, the photon cross-fire dose from the background to

  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels during glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced headache in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kruuse, C; Iversen, H K; Jansen-Olesen, I; Edvinsson, L; Olesen, J

    2010-04-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in migraine has been studied in the experimental glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-infusion headache model. We hypothesized that GTN-induced headache may activate the trigeminovascular system and be associated with increased levels of sensory neuropeptides, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin plasma levels were measured before and after placebo/sumatriptan injection and during GTN-induced headache. Following a double-blind randomized cross-over design, 10 healthy volunteers received subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg or placebo. This was succeeded by 20 min of GTN (0.12 µg kg(-1) min(-1)) infusion. At baseline no subject reported headache (using verbal rating scale from 0 to 10) and the jugular CGRP-like immunoreactivity (-LI) level was 18.6 ± 2.5 pmol/l. After a 20-min intravenous infusion of GTN 0.12 µg kg(-1) min(-1), median peak headache intensity was 4 (range 2-6) (P < 0.05), while jugular CGRP-LI levels were unchanged (19.0 ± 2.8 pmol/l; P > 0.05). There were no changes in VIP-, NPY- or somatostatin-LI. In conclusion, the NO donor GTN appears not to induce headache via immediate CGRP release.

  4. Effect of +Gz on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide, endothelin and renal function in pilots.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Dai, D; Wang, X; Xiao, L

    1998-02-01

    The effect of positive acceleration on plasma levels of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), and endothelin as well as renal function in pilots were observed in this study. 20 pilots were exposed to +2.5 Gz 10 s and +3.0 Gz 10 s with an interval of 5 min without anti-G suits. Samples of plasma and serum were taken 2Omin before and after exposure. Plasma levels of CGRP and endothelin after the exposure were significantly increased (P<0.01), but alkaline phosphatase(AKP), blood levels of beta 2-microglobulin(beta 2-MG), Ca2+ in serum showed no significant change (P>0.05) as compared with those before exposure. There was a correlation between CGRP and endothlin (r=0.772, P<0.01). It is concluded that positive acceleration(+2.5, +3.0Gz) could increase plasma levels of CGRP and endothlin but did not affect renal function.

  5. Peptide-level Robust Ridge Regression Improves Estimation, Sensitivity, and Specificity in Data-dependent Quantitative Label-free Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, Ludger J E; Gevaert, Kris; Clement, Lieven

    2016-02-01

    Peptide intensities from mass spectra are increasingly used for relative quantitation of proteins in complex samples. However, numerous issues inherent to the mass spectrometry workflow turn quantitative proteomic data analysis into a crucial challenge. We and others have shown that modeling at the peptide level outperforms classical summarization-based approaches, which typically also discard a lot of proteins at the data preprocessing step. Peptide-based linear regression models, however, still suffer from unbalanced datasets due to missing peptide intensities, outlying peptide intensities and overfitting. Here, we further improve upon peptide-based models by three modular extensions: ridge regression, improved variance estimation by borrowing information across proteins with empirical Bayes and M-estimation with Huber weights. We illustrate our method on the CPTAC spike-in study and on a study comparing wild-type and ArgP knock-out Francisella tularensis proteomes. We show that the fold change estimates of our robust approach are more precise and more accurate than those from state-of-the-art summarization-based methods and peptide-based regression models, which leads to an improved sensitivity and specificity. We also demonstrate that ionization competition effects come already into play at very low spike-in concentrations and confirm that analyses with peptide-based regression methods on peptide intensity values aggregated by charge state and modification status (e.g. MaxQuant's peptides.txt file) are slightly superior to analyses on raw peptide intensity values (e.g. MaxQuant's evidence.txt file).

  6. Synthetic peptides for efficient discrimination of anti-enterovirus antibodies at the serotype level.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Mavrouli, Maria D; Antonaki, Georgia; Spanakis, Nikolaos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-08-01

    Enteroviruses are important human pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases from minor common colds to fatal myocarditis. However, certain disease syndromes are caused by one or few serotypes. Serotype identification is difficult due to the laborious neutralization tests that lack of sensitivity, while in commercial ELISAs homotypic antibodies' activities are largely masked by the recognition of genera-specific epitopes by heterotypic antibodies. In the present study homotypic assays were developed with the ability to discriminate different enterovirus serotypes. Seventy-three children sera, positive for IgM antibodies against enterovirus genus and 49 healthy children were examined for the presence of antibodies against 14 synthetic peptides derived from a non-conserved region of the VP1 protein of coxsackieviruses B2, B3, B4, B5, A9, A16, A24, echoviruses 6, 7, 9, 11, 30, enterovirus 71 and parechovirus 1. 50% of the anti-enterovirus IgM positive sera (>150 BU) reacted with the peptides with the majority of them to preferentially recognize one of them, supporting the homotypic nature of our assay. Inhibition studies yielded homologous inhibition rates 67-95% suggesting that specific peptide recognition actually occurred. The diagnostic value of our assay was tested in blood samples drawn over a 1.5-year period from a 5-year old patient. The anti-enterovirus reactivity was clearly attributed to echovirus serotype 11. The IgM/IgG antibody ratio was reversed 4 months later and subsequently IgM antibodies dropped below the cutoff point. In this paper we demonstrate that our assay can be used to discriminate between antibodies targeting different enterovirus serotypes.

  7. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels.

    PubMed

    Cordeau, Emmanuelle; Arnaudguilhem, Carine; Bouyssiere, Brice; Hagège, Agnès; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Cantel, Sonia; Enjalbal, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC) associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP)/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se) was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully validated and

  8. Investigation of Elemental Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacology for Peptide Quantitation at Femtomolar Levels

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Emmanuelle; Arnaudguilhem, Carine; Bouyssiere, Brice; Hagège, Agnès; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Cantel, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    In the search of new robust and environmental-friendly analytical methods able to answer quantitative issues in pharmacology, we explore liquid chromatography (LC) associated with elemental mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to monitor peptides in such complex biological matrices. The novelty is to use mass spectrometry to replace radiolabelling and radioactivity measurements, which represent up-to now the gold standard to measure organic compound concentrations in life science. As a proof of concept, we choose the vasopressin (AVP)/V1A receptor system for model pharmacological assays. The capacity of ICP-MS to provide highly sensitive quantitation of metallic and hetero elements, whatever the sample medium, prompted us to investigate this technique in combination with appropriate labelling of the peptide of interest. Selenium, that is scarcely present in biological media, was selected as a good compromise between ICP-MS response, covalent tagging ability using conventional sulfur chemistry and peptide detection specificity. Applying selenium monitoring by elemental mass spectrometry in pharmacology is challenging due to the very high salt content and organic material complexity of the samples that produces polyatomic aggregates and thus potentially mass interferences with selenium detection. Hyphenation with a chromatographic separation was found compulsory. Noteworthy, we aimed to develop a straightforward quantitative protocol that can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a standard macrobore LC-ICP-MS system, in order to avoid time-consuming sample treatment or special implementation of instrumental set-up, while allowing efficient suppression of all mass interferences to reach the targeted sensitivity. Significantly, a quantification limit of 57 ng Se L-1 (72 femtomoles of injected Se) was achieved, the samples issued from the pharmacological assays being directly introduced into the LC-ICP-MS system. The established method was successfully validated and

  9. A Nascent Peptide Signal Responsive to Endogenous Levels of Polyamines Acts to Stimulate Regulatory Frameshifting on Antizyme mRNA*

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Martina M.; Wu, Cheng; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Sachs, Matthew S.; Atkins, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The protein antizyme is a negative regulator of cellular polyamine concentrations from yeast to mammals. Synthesis of functional antizyme requires programmed +1 ribosomal frameshifting at the 3′ end of the first of two partially overlapping ORFs. The frameshift is the sensor and effector in an autoregulatory circuit. Except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae antizyme mRNA, the frameshift site alone only supports low levels of frameshifting. The high levels usually observed depend on the presence of cis-acting stimulatory elements located 5′ and 3′ of the frameshift site. Antizyme genes from different evolutionary branches have evolved different stimulatory elements. Prior and new multiple alignments of fungal antizyme mRNA sequences from the Agaricomycetes class of Basidiomycota show a distinct pattern of conservation 5′ of the frameshift site consistent with a function at the amino acid level. As shown here when tested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian HEK293T cells, the 5′ part of this conserved sequence acts at the nascent peptide level to stimulate the frameshifting, without involving stalling detectable by toe-printing. However, the peptide is only part of the signal. The 3′ part of the stimulator functions largely independently and acts at least mostly at the nucleotide level. When polyamine levels were varied, the stimulatory effect was seen to be especially responsive in the endogenous polyamine concentration range, and this effect may be more general. A conserved RNA secondary structure 3′ of the frameshift site has weaker stimulatory and polyamine sensitizing effects on frameshifting. PMID:25998126

  10. The Human Factors YY1 and LSF Repress the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Long Terminal Repeat via Recruitment of Histone Deacetylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Coull, Jason J.; Romerio, Fabio; Sun, Jian-Min; Volker, Janet L.; Galvin, Katherine M.; Davie, James R.; Shi, Yang; Hansen, Ulla; Margolis, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Enigmatic mechanisms restore the resting state in activated lymphocytes following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, rarely allowing persistent nonproductive infection. We detail a mechanism whereby cellular factors could establish virological latency. The transcription factors YY1 and LSF cooperate in repression of transcription from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). LSF recruits YY1 to the LTR via the zinc fingers of YY1. The first two zinc fingers were observed to be sufficient for this interaction in vitro. A mutant of LSF incapable of binding DNA blocked repression. Like other transcriptional repressors, YY1 can function via recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDAC). We find that HDAC1 copurifies with the LTR-binding YY1-LSF repressor complex, the domain of YY1 that interacts with HDAC1 is required to repress the HIV-1 promoter, expression of HDAC1 augments repression of the LTR by YY1, and the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A blocks repression mediated by YY1. This novel link between HDAC recruitment and inhibition of HIV-1 expression by YY1 and LSF, in the natural context of a viral promoter integrated into chromosomal DNA, is the first demonstration of a molecular mechanism of repression of HIV-1. YY1 and LSF may establish transcriptional and virological latency of HIV, a state that has recently been recognized in vivo and has significant implications for the long-term treatment of AIDS. PMID:10888618

  11. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression. PMID:27598153

  12. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-09-03

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression.

  13. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression. PMID:27598153

  14. High environmental salinity induces memory enhancement and increases levels of brain angiotensin-like peptides in the crab Chasmagnathus granulatus.

    PubMed

    Delorenzi, A; Dimant, B; Frenkel, L; Nahmod, V E; Nässel, D R; Maldonado, H

    2000-11-01

    Previous work on the brackish-water crab Chasmagnathus granulatus demonstrated that an endogenous peptide similar to angiotensin II plays a significant role in enhancing long-term memory that involves an association between context and an iterative danger stimulus (context-signal memory). The present results show that this memory enhancement could be produced by moving crabs from brackish water to sea water (33.0%) and keeping them there for at least 4 days. The possibility that such a facilitatory effect is due to osmotic stress is ruled out. Coincidentally, the level of angiotensin-II-like peptides in crab brain, measured by radioimmunoassay, increases with the length of exposure to sea water, reaching a significantly different level at the fourth day. The presence of angiotensin-II-like immunoreactive material in neural structures of the supraoesophageal and eyestalk ganglia was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. The results are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that exposure to water of high salinity is an external cue triggering a process mediated by angiotensins that leads to enhanced memory in these crabs.

  15. YY v TURKEY: INFERTILITY AS A PRE-CONDITION FOR GENDER CONFIRMATION SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In YY v Turkey, the Second Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held that Turkey's refusal, over a period of many years, to authorise gender confirmation surgery because the applicant remained capable of procreating was a violation of the right to private life under Art. 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Second Chamber's judgment acknowledges, and gives practical effect to, the 'physical and moral security' of transgender persons. YY has the potential to revolutionise gender confirming health care in Europe and will hopefully ensure that, where individuals do seek to medically transition, they need only access to treatments that are both necessary and desired. The ECtHR's decision may also impact upon the legal recognition of transgender identities. While not the direct focus of the Second Chamber's assessment, legal gender recognition is a constant theme throughout the judgment, and many of the Court's arguments are equally applicable to legal schemes for acknowledging preferred gender.

  16. An EUV Study of the Eclipsing M-Dwarf Binary System YY GEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2000-01-01

    EUVE, SW, MW and LW spectra have been reduced and line fluxes measured. The Deep Survey data has been analyzed and light curves have been derived. The spectra around the HE II 304 region show some evidence of emission from the bright A companion star, Castor. Preliminary results for the metallicity of the corona of YY Gem were derived from the EUVE spectra and photometry and were presented at the AAS HEAD meeting; results are being finalized for publication in a referred journal.

  17. Spin correlation parameter C{sub yy} of p+{sup 3}He elastic backward scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Hatanaka, K.; Tameshige, Y.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, K.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Tamii, A.; Kobushkin, A. P.; Kawabata, T.; Sasamoto, Y.; Uesaka, T.; Suda, K.; Itoh, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Wakui, T.; Uchida, M.; Kudoh, T.; Sagara, K.; Wakasa, T.

    2007-10-15

    We measured the differential cross section and the spin correlation parameter C{sub yy} of the p-vector+{sup 3}He-vector elastic backward scattering at 200, 300, and 400 MeV at {theta}=180 deg. in the center-of-mass frame to study the mechanism of the reaction and to examine the validity of the {sup 3}He wave functions based on two different realistic two-body forces. This is the first measurement of the spin correlation parameter C{sub yy} of the p-vector+{sup 3}He-vector EBS at intermediate energies. The experimental results were compared with few-body calculations, including three reaction mechanisms: two-nucleon-pair exchange, pion exchange, and direct pp scattering. It was found that few-body calculations describe the differential cross-section data reasonably well. The spin correlation parameter C{sub yy} shows clear evidence for the two-nucleon-pair exchange processes in the reaction, demonstrating that the spin observables are helpful for deeper understanding of the reaction mechanism.

  18. Near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable YY Draconis

    SciTech Connect

    Mateo, M.; Szkody, P.; Garnavich, P. Washington Univ., Seattle )

    1991-03-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared (8100-8600 A) spectrophotometry and Johnson B-band CCD photometry of the cataclysmic binary YY Dra are presented. The spectra show the presence of the Na I doublet in absorption from the secondary, as well as sharp and broad Ca II emission lines. The sharp Ca II emission lines appear to originate on or near the secondary star because they are visible only during superior conjunction of the secondary star, their radial velocities vary in phase with the Na I absorption lines, and their K-velocity is considerably smaller than observed for the Na I lines. The radial velocity variation of the Na I near-infrared doublet yield an orbital period for YY Dra of P = 0.164988 + or - 0.00023 days. A spectral type of dM 4 + or - 1 for the secondary star is deduced based on the strength of its near-infrared spectral features. The distance to YY Dra is 155 + or - 35 pc based on an application of Bailey's method. 56 refs.

  19. GON4L Drives Cancer Growth through a YY1-Androgen Receptor-CD24 Axis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Dancik, Garrett M; Goodspeed, Andrew; Costello, James C; Owens, Charles; Duex, Jason E; Theodorescu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In principle, the inhibition of candidate gain-of-function genes defined through genomic analyses of large patient cohorts offers an attractive therapeutic strategy. In this study, we focused on changes in expression of CD24, a well-validated clinical biomarker of poor prognosis and a driver of tumor growth and metastasis, as a benchmark to assess functional relevance. Through this approach, we identified GON4L as a regulator of CD24 from screening a pooled shRNA library of 176 candidate gain-of-function genes. GON4L depletion reduced CD24 expression in human bladder cancer cells and blocked cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo Mechanistically, GON4L interacted with transcription factor YY1, promoting its association with the androgen receptor to drive CD24 expression and cell growth. In clinical bladder cancer specimens, expression of GON4L, YY1, and CD24 was elevated compared with normal bladder urothelium. This pathway is biologically relevant in other cancer types as well, where CD24 and the androgen receptor are clinically prognostic, given that silencing of GON4L and YY1 suppressed CD24 expression and growth of human lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells. Overall, our results define GON4L as a novel driver of cancer growth, offering new biomarker and therapeutic opportunities. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5175-85. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Nasal Levels of Antimicrobial Peptides in Allergic Asthma Patients and Healthy Controls: Differences and Effect of a Short 1,25(OH)2 Vitamin D3 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, Willemien; Janssen, Kirsten; van Schadewijk, Annemarie M.; Papapoulos, Socrates E.; le Cessie, Saskia; Middeldorp, Saskia; Melissant, Christian F.; Rabe, Klaus F.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergy is often accompanied by infections and lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Vitamin D has been shown to increase expression of selected AMPs. In this study we investigated whether antimicrobial peptide levels in nasal secretions of allergic asthma patients are lower than in healthy controls, and whether administration of the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) affects these antimicrobial peptide levels. Methods The levels of antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions were compared between 19 allergic asthma patients and 23 healthy controls. The effect of seven days daily oral treatment with 2 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 on antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions was assessed in a placebo-controlled cross-over clinical study. Results Levels of neutrophil α-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1–3; HNP1-3) and lipocalin 2 (LCN2; also known as NGAL) were significantly lower in asthmatics, but no differences in LL-37 and SLPI were detected. Treatment with a short-term 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a small increase in HNP1-3, but not when the asthma and control groups were analyzed separately. LL-37, LCN2 and SLPI did not change after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Conclusion Levels of the antimicrobial peptides HNP1-3 and LCN2 are lower in nasal secretions in asthmatics and are not substantially affected by a short-term treatment with active vitamin D. PMID:26545199

  1. Early-life patterns of plasma gut regulatory peptide levels in calves. Effects of age, weaning and feeding.

    PubMed

    Toullec, R; Chayvialle, J A; Guilloteau, P; Bernard, C

    1992-05-01

    1. The effects of age, weaning and feeding on the release of seven gut regulatory peptides [gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pancreatic polypeptide (PP), motilin and somatostatin] were studied in calves either exclusively milk-fed between birth and 91 days (P group) or weaned between 22-56 days of age (R group). 2. During the first 3 weeks, the basal plasma immunoreactive levels increased with age for secretin, CCK and PP, decreased for gastrin, motilin and somatostatin and were unaffected for VIP. The changes were particularly rapid for somatostatin and gastrin. After 3 weeks, no significant trend was observed with age in the P group. 3. Weaning resulted in an increase of basal gastrin, CCK, PP and VIP and in a decrease of basal secretin and somatostatin. 4. In the P group, the morning meal was followed 1 hr later by an increase of gastrin and CCK, and by a fall of secretin, PP, motilin and somatostatin, but no significant effect was observed in VIP. Weaning resulted in a reduction of the differences between the fasting and the post-feeding values. 5. These changes suggest a large involvement of endocrine cells in the adaptation of gut tissues, secretions and motility at birth, during the maintenance at the pre-ruminant stage and at weaning.

  2. Correlation of B-type natriuretic peptide levels and echocardiographic parameters in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Ah; Shin, Jeonghee; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Eun Hee; Son, Chang Sung; Lee, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the correlation, according to postnatal age, between plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and echocardiographic parameters for the assessment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants with respiratory distress. Methods We enrolled 42 preterm infants with respiratory distress who underwent serial echocardiographic evaluation with simultaneous plasma BNP measurements until ductal closure. The correlations between BNP levels and the following 4 representative echocardiographic parameters were studied: diameter of the ductus arteriosus (DA), ratio of the left atrial diameter to the aortic diameter (LA/Ao), ratio of the PDA diameter to the infant's left pulmonary artery diameter (PDA/LPA), and the antegrade diastolic flow of LPA (DFLPA). Results BNP levels were significantly correlated to the magnitude of the ductal shunt, comprising the DA diameter, PDA/LPA ratio, LA/Ao ratio, and antegrade DFLPA for the overall study period. The earliest significant correlation, starting from postnatal day 2, was observed between the LA/Ao ratio and BNP levels. The PDA/LPA ratio and the antegrade DFLPA showed significant correlations with BNP levels postnatal day 3 onward, and with the DA diameter, postnatal day 5 onward. Conclusion BNP levels and echocardiographic parameters showed a positive correlation, but the significance of the correlations differed according to the postnatal age, especially during the first few days of life. PMID:27186229

  3. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  4. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  5. Peptide models. XXXIII. Extrapolation of low-level Hartree-Fock data of peptide conformation to large basis set SCF, MP2, DFT, and CCSD(T) results. The Ramachandran surface of alanine dipeptide computed at various levels of theory.

    PubMed

    Perczel, András; Farkas, Odön; Jákli, Imre; Topol, Igor A; Csizmadia, Imre G

    2003-07-15

    At the dawn of the new millenium, new concepts are required for a more profound understanding of protein structures. Together with NMR and X-ray-based 3D-structure determinations in silico methods are now widely accepted. Homology-based modeling studies, molecular dynamics methods, and quantum mechanical approaches are more commonly used. Despite the steady and exponential increase in computational power, high level ab initio methods will not be in common use for studying the structure and dynamics of large peptides and proteins in the near future. We are presenting here a novel approach, in which low- and medium-level ab initio energy results are scaled, thus extrapolating to a higher level of information. This scaling is of special significance, because we observed previously on molecular properties such as energy, chemical shielding data, etc., determined at a higher theoretical level, do correlate better with experimental data, than those originating from lower theoretical treatments. The Ramachandran surface of an alanine dipeptide now determined at six different levels of theory [RHF and B3LYP 3-21G, 6-31+G(d) and 6-311++G(d,p)] serves as a suitable test. Minima, first-order critical points and partially optimized structures, determined at different levels of theory (SCF, DFT), were completed with high level energy calculations such as MP2, MP4D, and CCSD(T). For the first time three different CCSD(T) sets of energies were determined for all stable B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) minima of an alanine dipeptide. From the simplest ab initio data (e.g., RHF/3-21G) to more complex results [CCSD(T)/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)] all data sets were compared, analyzed in a comprehensive manner, and evaluated by means of statistics.

  6. PARP-1 and YY1 Are Important Novel Regulators of CXCL12 Gene Transcription in Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Jelena; Grdović, Nevena; Dinić, Svetlana; Karan-Djurašević, Teodora; Uskoković, Aleksandra; Arambašić, Jelena; Mihailović, Mirjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Poznanović, Goran; Vidaković, Melita

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12) transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the functional

  7. Promoter-region hypermethylation and expression downregulation of Yy1 (Yin yang 1) in preneoplastic liver lesions in a thioacetamide rat hepatocarcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hajime; Ogawa, Takashi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Morita, Reiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Thioacetamide (TAA) has been used to develop a rodent model for hepatocarcinogenesis. To determine the genes with epigenetic modifications in early hepatocarcinogenesis, we did a genome-wide scan for hypermethylated promoter regions using CpG island microarrays in TAA-promoted rat liver tissue. Eight genes were selected based on the microarray profile; of these, Yy1 and Wdr45b were confirmed to be hypermethylated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pyrosequencing and downregulated by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Non-neoplastic liver cells had nuclear Yy1 immunoreactivity, while preneoplastic foci with glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) immunoreactivity had decreased Yy1 immunoreactivity. The incidence of these foci was proportional to the dose of TAA administered. Co-expression analysis of gene products downstream of Yy1 revealed increased nuclear phospho-c-Myc{sup +} foci as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic p21{sup Cip1+} foci in Yy1{sup −} or GST-P{sup +} foci in response to TAA-promotion dose. Although the absolute number of cells was low, the incidence of death receptor 5{sup −} foci was increased in Yy1{sup −} foci in proportion to the TAA dose. Yy1{sup −}/GST-P{sup +} foci revealed a higher number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunoreactive cells than Yy1{sup +}/GST-P{sup +} foci, while cleaved caspase-3{sup +} cells were unchanged between Yy1{sup –}/GST-P{sup +} and Yy1{sup +}/GST-P{sup +} foci. In the case of Wdr45b, most GST-P{sup +} foci were Wdr45b{sup –} and were not increased by TAA promotion. These results suggest involvement of Yy1 in the epigenetic gene regulation at the early stages of TAA promoted cell proliferation and concomitant cell cycle arrest in preneoplastic lesions. - Highlights: • Epigenetically downregulated genes were searched in TAA-promnoted rat livers. • Yy1 and Wdr45b showed promoter-region hypermethylation and mRNA downregulation. • TAA promoted

  8. A Dual-Function Transcription Factor, AtYY1, Is a Novel Negative Regulator of the Arabidopsis ABA Response Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Wu, Xiu-Yun; Li, Hui; Song, Jian-Hui; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in plant growth and development, as well as in response to various environmental stresses. To date, many regulatory genes involved in the ABA response network have been identified; however, their roles have remained to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified AtYY1, an Arabidopsis homolog of the mammalian C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1), as a novel negative regulator of the ABA response. AtYY1 is a dual-function transcription factor with both repression and activation domains. The expression of AtYY1 was induced by ABA and stress conditions including high salt and dehydration. The yy1 mutant was more sensitive to ABA and NaCl than the wild-type, while overexpressing AtYY1 plants were less sensitive. AtYY1 loss also enhanced ABA-induced stomatal closing and drought resistance. Moreover, AtYY1 can bind the ABA REPRESSOR1 (ABR1) promoter and directly upregulate ABR1 expression, as well as negatively regulate ABA- and salt-responsive gene expression. Additional analysis indicated that ABA INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4) might positively regulate AtYY1 expression and that ABR1 can antagonize this regulation. Our findings provide direct evidence that AtYY1 is a novel negative regulator of the ABA response network and that the ABI4-AtYY1-ABR1 regulatory pathway may fine-tune ABA-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:26961720

  9. Peptide-Conjugated Gold Nanoprobe: Intrinsic Nanozyme-Linked Immunsorbant Assay of Integrin Expression Level on Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Liu, Meiqing; Ma, Guifu; Wang, Yaling; Zhao, Lina; Yuan, Qing; Gao, Fuping; Liu, Ru; Zhai, Jiao; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xueyun

    2015-11-24

    Precisely quantifying the membrane protein expression level on cell surfaces is of vital importance for early cancer diagnosis and efficient treatment. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticle bioconjugated by a rationally designed peptide as nanoprobe possesses selective labeling and accurate quantification capacity of integrin GPIIb/IIIa on the human erythroleukemia cell line. Through selective recognition and marking of integrin, two-photon photoluminescence of the nanoprobe is exploited for direct observation of protein spatial distribution on cell membrane. More importantly, utilizing intrinsic enzyme-like catalysis property of the nanoprobe, the expression level of integrin on human erythroleukemia cells can be quantitatively counted in an amplified and reliable colorimetric assay without cell lysis and protein extraction process. In addition, the analysis of the correlation between the gold nanoparticle and the membrane protein via relevant inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement verifies the reliability of the new analytical method. It is anticipated that this facile and efficient strategy holds a great promise for a rapid, precise, and reliable quantification of interested functional membrane proteins on the cell surface.

  10. Central and peripheral effects of sculpin pancreatic polypeptide and anglerfish peptide Y in rats.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, A; Rigel, D F; Chance, W T; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    Sculpin pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and anglerfish peptide Y (aPY-amide) are 36-residue peptide amides isolated from the pancreas of the respective species of fish. They are 86% homologous, and exhibit about 65% homology to porcine neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY). This homology to mammalian peptides suggests that the fish peptides may constitute a good model system for structure-activity investigations. We therefore synthesized sculpin PP and aPY-amide by the solid phase method and investigated their central and peripheral effects on feeding and blood pressure, respectively. These investigations revealed that both peptides, like NPY, increased blood pressure and induced feeding in rats, presumably by interacting with receptors of NPY. Although there were comparable responses to both peptides on feeding, aPY-amide exhibited a more potent pressor effect than sculpin PP. These observations suggest that the central and peripheral effects of NPY may be mediated by different subclasses of NPY receptors. PMID:1581637

  11. Impact of Preprocedural B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels on the Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Chakravarty, Tarun; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Lee, Chin; Cox, Justin; Sharma, Rahul P; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2015-12-15

    There are limited data on the effect of baseline B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We investigated the influence of baseline BNP levels on the short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after TAVI. During a 3-year period, 780 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI at our institute and had baseline BNP levels. We compared the high, mid, and low tertiles of BNP levels. TAVI end points, device success, and adverse events were considered according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions. Device success was significantly lower for patients with high BNP (98.1% vs 96.2% vs 91.9% for the low, mid, and high BNP tertiles, respectively; p = 0.003). All-cause mortality up to 30 days was 1.2% (3 of 260) versus 2.3% (6 of 260) versus 5% (13 of 260), respectively (p = 0.03). Six-month mortality rate was 4.1% (10 of 241) for the low BNP tertile, 5% (12 of 239) for the mid BNP tertile, and 17.1% (40 of 234) for the high BNP tertile (p <0.001). In the multivariate model, high tertile of baseline BNP was found to be significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.64 to 6.48; p = 0.001). In conclusion, elevated BNP levels are associated with increased short-term and midterm mortality after TAVI. We recommend measurement of baseline BNP as part of risk stratification models for TAVI. PMID:26602075

  12. Adiponectin corrects premature cellular senescence and normalizes antimicrobial peptide levels in senescent keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Taewon; Kim, Min Jeong; Heo, Won Il; Park, Kui Young; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Seong-Jin; Im, Myung; Moon, Nam Ju; Seo, Seong Jun

    2016-09-01

    Stress-induced premature senescence or aging causes dysfunction in the human somatic system. Adiponectin (Acrp30) plays a role in functional recovery, especially with adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). Acrp30 stimulation reduced the premature senescence positive ratio induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and restituted human β-defensin 2 (hBD-2) levels in senescent keratinocytes. Acrp30 recovered AMPK activity in senescent keratinocytes and increased SIRT1 deacetylation activity. As a result, FoxO1 and FoxO3 transcription activity was recovered. Additionally, Acrp30 stimulation suppresses NFκB p65, which induces abnormal expression of hBD-2 induced by H2O2. In the present study, we have shown that Acrp30 reduces premature senescence and recovers cellular function in keratinocytes. These results suggest a role for Acrp30 as an anti-aging agent to improve impaired skin immune barriers. PMID:27349869

  13. Correlation of Glypican-4 Level with Basal Active Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gwanpyo; Cho, Suk Ju; Yoo, So-Yeon; Chin, Sang Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported that glypican-4 (GPC4) regulates insulin signaling by interacting with insulin receptor and through adipocyte differentiation. However, GPC4 has not been studied with regard to its effects on clinical factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to identify factors associated with GPC4 level in T2DM. Methods Between January 2010 and December 2013, we selected 152 subjects with T2DM and collected serum and plasma into tubes pretreated with aprotinin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor to preserve active gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GPC4, active GLP-1, active GIP, and other factors were measured in these plasma samples. We performed a linear regression analysis to identify factors associated with GPC4 level. Results The subjects had a mean age of 58.1 years, were mildly obese (mean body mass index [BMI], 26.1 kg/m2), had T2DM of long-duration (mean, 101.3 months), glycated hemoglobin 7.5%, low insulin secretion, and low insulin resistance (mean homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], 1.2). Their mean GPC4 was 2.0±0.2 ng/mL. In multivariate analysis, GPC4 was independently associated with age (β=0.224, P=0.009), and levels of active GLP-1 (β=0.171, P=0.049) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; β=–0.176, P=0.043) after being adjusted for other clinical factors. Conclusion GPC4 was independently associated with age, active GLP-1, and AST in T2DM patients, but was not associated with HOMA-IR and BMI, which are well known factors related to GPC4. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms of the association between GPC4 and basal active GLP-1 levels. PMID:27704740

  14. [ASSOCIATION OF CYCLIC CITRULLINATED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES LEVEL WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS ACTIVITY BASED ON GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR GENE BBL1 POLYMORPHISM].

    PubMed

    Prystupa, L; Savchenko, O; Koroza, S

    2015-10-01

    The ambiguity of facts on connection between glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) Bcl1 polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its activity as well as lack of facts on its association with serological variants of the desease, makes ir reasonable to investigate its connections between cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodiss (ACCP) concentration and clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA (DAS 28 desease activity score, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) level based on GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism. Study involved 161 RA patients aged over 40 as well as 96 healthy individuals. Routine examination of RA diagnostics, anthropometric and molecular genetic methods were used in the research. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using SPSS-17 program. It has been proved that there is no significant difference in GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism distribution based on DAS 28 RA desease activity score, ACCP concentration and ESR level. However, we have found out that G/G genotype bearers have positive correlation relationship between ACCP titre and RA activity by laboratorial parameters (CRP, ESR),DAS 28 score and rheumatoid factor (RF) which has not been found in C/C and C/G genotype bearing patients. The above indicates the association of G/G genotype by GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism with clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA inflammatory activity. In course of the study we have identified the existance of correlation relationship between ACCP concentration and DAS 28 score of RA activity, CRP concentration and ESR level in individuals bearing G/G gene by GR gene Bcl11 polymorphism gene. The association between GR gene Bcl1 polymorphism and clinico-laboratorial parameters of RA inflammatory activity has not been found. PMID:26483373

  15. Plasma amino acid profiles are associated with insulin, C-peptide and adiponectin levels in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Jinzu, H; Nagao, K; Noguchi, Y; Shimba, N; Miyano, H; Watanabe, T; Iseki, K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Plasma-free amino acid (PFAA) profiles have been associated with a future risk of developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease in nondiabetic subjects. These PFAA alterations might predominantly result from the metabolic shift caused by insulin resistance and visceral fat deposition. The variety of PFAA profiles within diabetic subjects is not well researched. In this study, we focused on type 2 diabetic subjects and examined the association between PFAA profiles and insulin- and glucose-related variables. Methods: Fifty-one Japanese subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were recruited from an outpatient clinic. The plasma concentrations of 21 amino acids; glucose-related markers including glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycoalbumin and 1,5-anhydroglucitol; insulin-related markers including insulin, C-peptide, and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance; and adipocytokines including adiponectin and leptin were determined. The association of PFAA and other metabolic profiles were analyzed, and stratified analyses of the PFAAs and clinical characteristics were performed according to the fasting plasma insulin and HbA1c levels. In addition, the PFAA indices that correlate to visceral fat obesity were evaluated. Results: Although strong correlations between PFAAs and glucose-related markers were not observed, several amino acids (branched-chain amino acids, tryptophan, alanine, tyrosine, glutamate and proline) and PFAA indices that evaluate visceral obesity were highly correlated with insulin-related markers and adiponectin (P<0.001). In the group of diabetic patients with hyperinsulinemia, the amino acid levels were significantly increased, which generally demonstrated good concordance with insulin-related markers and adiponectin levels. Conclusions: The PFAA profiles in diabetic patients were strongly associated with hyperinsulinemia and hypoadiponectinemia, which might become risk evaluation factors for the development of

  16. YY v TURKEY: INFERTILITY AS A PRE-CONDITION FOR GENDER CONFIRMATION SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In YY v Turkey, the Second Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held that Turkey's refusal, over a period of many years, to authorise gender confirmation surgery because the applicant remained capable of procreating was a violation of the right to private life under Art. 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Second Chamber's judgment acknowledges, and gives practical effect to, the 'physical and moral security' of transgender persons. YY has the potential to revolutionise gender confirming health care in Europe and will hopefully ensure that, where individuals do seek to medically transition, they need only access to treatments that are both necessary and desired. The ECtHR's decision may also impact upon the legal recognition of transgender identities. While not the direct focus of the Second Chamber's assessment, legal gender recognition is a constant theme throughout the judgment, and many of the Court's arguments are equally applicable to legal schemes for acknowledging preferred gender. PMID:25975678

  17. Peptides from sesame cake extend healthspan of Caenorhabditis elegans via upregulation of skn-1 and inhibition of intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Ma, Xiaoli; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    The peptides from sesame cake (PSC) which are the main by-product of agricultural processing of sesame were prepared. To evaluate benefits of PSC for health and longevity, antioxidant activity and anti-aging effects were studied in vitro and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) model system. PSC exhibited antioxidant activity in vitro, and induced beneficial effects on lifespan and several health parameters of C.elegans, including pharyngeal pumping rate, locomotion and lipofuscin accumulation. In a mev-1 mutant, PSC increased lifespan, and it enhanced oxidative stress tolerance in wild-type nematodes. After treatment with PSC, SOD activity, GSH content, and GSH/GSSG ratio were increased, leading to low intracellular ROS levels in C. elegans. PSC up-regulated skn-1 mRNA, and its target gene gcs-1, and abolished the extension of lifespan in skn-1 mutant, indicating that PSC-mediated longevity is dependent on activation of the skn-1/Nrf-2 transcription factor. Current results warrant research into the use of PSC as nutraceuticals for overall health improvement.

  18. [Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide level and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Czekalski, S

    1990-12-01

    The aim of the study was the search for the correlation between the degree of impairment renal function (measured by creatinine clearance) and plasma concentration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal diseases. Forty seven patients were studied: 10 with diminished renal reserve (group I), 10 with renal insufficiency (group II), 27 with renal failure (group III) and 10 chronically haemodialysed before dialysis (group IV). Control group consisted of 27 healthy persons. All patients and controls were on the diet containing 100-120 mmol sodium daily. Plasma ANP levels were significantly higher in all groups of patients (I--16.5 +/- 5.7; II--40.7 +/- 18.6; III--86.2 +/- 49.9; IV--196.1 +/- 51.3 pmol/l, respectively) than in controls (10.8 +/- 6.0 pmol/l). A significant correlation (r = 0.85; p less than 0.01) between plasma ANP concentration and FENa was found when the patients from all groups were pooled together. The results confirm the important role of ANP in the adaptation of reduced kidney mass to the excretion of sodium load.

  19. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE.

  20. Identifying the Atomic-Level Effects of Metal Composition on the Structure and Catalytic Activity of Peptide-Templated Materials.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Nicholas A; McKee, Erik M; Merino, Kyle C; Drummy, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Naik, Rajesh R; Bedford, Nicholas M; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-12-22

    Bioinspired approaches for the formation of metallic nanomaterials have been extensively employed for a diverse range of applications including diagnostics and catalysis. These materials can often be used under sustainable conditions; however, it is challenging to control the material size, morphology, and composition simultaneously. Here we have employed the R5 peptide, which forms a 3D scaffold to direct the size and linear shape of bimetallic PdAu nanomaterials for catalysis. The materials were prepared at varying Pd:Au ratios to probe optimal compositions to achieve maximal catalytic efficiency. These materials were extensively characterized at the atomic level using transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and atomic pair distribution function analysis derived from high-energy X-ray diffraction patterns to provide highly resolved structural information. The results confirmed PdAu alloy formation, but also demonstrated that significant surface structural disorder was present. The catalytic activity of the materials was studied for olefin hydrogenation, which demonstrated enhanced reactivity from the bimetallic structures. These results present a pathway to the bioinspired production of multimetallic materials with enhanced properties, which can be assessed via a suite of characterization methods to fully ascertain structure/function relationships.

  1. Cilostazol Upregulates Autophagy via SIRT1 Activation: Reducing Amyloid-β Peptide and APP-CTFβ Levels in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a vital pathway for the removal of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the aggregated proteins that cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously found that cilostazol induced SIRT1 expression and its activity in neuronal cells, and thus, we hypothesized that cilostazol might stimulate clearances of Aβ and C-terminal APP fragment β subunit (APP-CTFβ) by up-regulating autophagy.When N2a cells were exposed to soluble Aβ1-42, protein levels of beclin-1, autophagy-related protein5 (Atg5), and SIRT1 decreased significantly. Pretreatment with cilostazol (10-30 μM) or resveratrol (20 μM) prevented these Aβ1-42 evoked suppressions. LC3-II (a marker of mammalian autophagy) levels were significantly increased by cilostazol, and this increase was reduced by 3-methyladenine. To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, N2aSwe cells (N2a cells stably expressing human APP containing the Swedish mutation) were cultured in medium with or without tetracycline (Tet+ for 48 h and then placed in Tet- condition). Aβ and APP-CTFβ expressions were increased after 12~24 h in Tet- condition, and these increased expressions were significantly reduced by pretreating cilostazol. Cilostazol-induced reductions in the expressions of Aβ and APP-CTFβ were blocked by bafilomycin A1 (a blocker of autophagosome to lysosome fusion). After knockdown of the SIRT1 gene (to ~40% in SIRT1 protein), cilostazol failed to elevate the expressions of beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3-II, indicating that cilostazol increases these expressions by up-regulating SIRT1. Further, decreased cell viability induced by Aβ was prevented by cilostazol, and this inhibition was reversed by 3-methyladenine, indicating that the protective effect of cilostazol against Aβ induced neurotoxicity is, in part, ascribable to the induction of autophagy. In conclusion, cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing the activation of SIRT1, and thereby enhances Aβ clearance and increases cell viability.

  2. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level inversely associates with metabolic syndrome in elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims Serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was lower in the general population with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between MetS and fasting serum NT-proBNP concentration in elderly persons. Methods Fasting blood samples were obtained from 84 elderly volunteers aged 65 years or older. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Results Thirty-eight elderly persons (45.2%) had MetS. Fasting NT-proBNP level was negatively correlated with MetS among elderly patients (p = 0.001). Univariate linear regression analysis showed that age (r = 0.338; p = 0.002) was positively correlated with fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels, while height (r = -0.253; p = 0.020), body weight (r = -0.238; p = 0.029), waist circumference (r = -0.270; p = 0.013), body fat mass (r = -0.356; p = 0.002) and triglyceride (r = -0.291; p = 0.007) were negatively correlated with fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels among the elderly persons. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis of the significant variables showed that age (R 2 change = 0.114, p = 0.011), triglyceride (R 2 change = 0.118, p < 0.001), body fat mass (R 2 change = 0.084, p < 0.001), and height (R 2 change = 0.101, p < 0.001) were the independent predictor of fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels in elderly persons. Conclusions NT-proBNP level is significantly reduced in elderly persons affected by MetS, and is significantly positively related to age, while negatively related to triglyceride, body fat mass, height in these subjects. PMID:24506889

  3. Brown Adipose YY1 Deficiency Activates Expression of Secreted Proteins Linked to Energy Expenditure and Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Soustek, Meghan S.; Hatting, Maximilian; Blättler, Sharon M.; McDonald, Devin; Barrow, Joeva J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative and thermogenic functions in brown and beige adipose tissues modulate rates of energy expenditure. It is unclear, however, how beige or white adipose tissue contributes to brown fat thermogenic function or compensates for partial deficiencies in this tissue and protects against obesity. Here, we show that the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in brown adipose tissue activates the canonical thermogenic and uncoupling gene expression program. In contrast, YY1 represses a series of secreted proteins, including fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), bone morphogenetic protein 8b (BMP8b), growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), angiopoietin-like 6 (Angptl6), neuromedin B, and nesfatin, linked to energy expenditure. Despite substantial decreases in mitochondrial thermogenic proteins in brown fat, mice lacking YY1 in this tissue are strongly protected against diet-induced obesity and exhibit increased energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in beige and white fat depots. The increased expression of secreted proteins correlates with elevation of energy expenditure and promotion of beige and white fat activation. These results indicate that YY1 in brown adipose tissue controls antagonistic gene expression programs associated with energy balance and maintenance of body weight. PMID:26503783

  4. The Polycomb Group Protein EED Interacts with YY1, and Both Proteins Induce Neural Tissue in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Satijn, David P. E.; Hamer, Karien M.; den Blaauwen, Jan; Otte, Arie P.

    2001-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric protein complexes which are involved in the heritable stable repression of genes. Previously, we identified two distinct human PcG protein complexes. The EED-EZH protein complex contains the EED and EZH2 PcG proteins, and the HPC-HPH PcG complex contains the HPC, HPH, BMI1, and RING1 PcG proteins. Here we show that YY1, a homolog of the Drosophila PcG protein pleiohomeotic (Pho), interacts specificially with the human PcG protein EED but not with proteins of the HPC-HPH PcG complex. Since YY1 and Pho are DNA-binding proteins, the interaction between YY1 and EED provides a direct link between the chromatin-associated EED-EZH PcG complex and the DNA of target genes. To study the functional significance of the interaction, we expressed the Xenopus homologs of EED and YY1 in Xenopus embryos. Both Xeed and XYY1 induce an ectopic neural axis but do not induce mesodermal tissues. In contrast, members of the HPC-HPH PcG complex do not induce neural tissue. The exclusive, direct neuralizing activity of both the Xeed and XYY1 proteins underlines the significance of the interaction between the two proteins. Our data also indicate a role for chromatin-associated proteins, such as PcG proteins, in Xenopus neural induction. PMID:11158321

  5. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  6. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  7. Genetic manipulation of sex ratio for the large-scale breeding of YY super-male and XY all-male yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco (Richardson)).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanqin; Guan, Bo; Xu, Jiang; Hou, Changchun; Tian, Hua; Chen, Hongxi

    2013-06-01

    Yellow catfish has become one of the most important freshwater aquaculture species in China. The mono-sex male yellow catfish has important application value in aquaculture because the male grows generally faster than the sibling females under the same conditions. This study has screened YY super-male and YY physiological female yellow catfish by sex reversal, gynogenesis, and progeny testing, which can help to achieve the large-scale production of YY super-male and XY all-male. From 2008 to 2010, about 123,000 YY super-male were produced, and about 81 million XY all-male fry were produced with 100% male rate by random sampling. Therefore, these results indicate that YY super-male and YY physiological female yellow catfish can be viable and fertile. We conclude that the mono-sex breeding technique by YY super-male yellow catfish is stable and reliable, which has great potential for application in yellow catfish aquaculture.

  8. Bioactive metabolites isolated from Penicillium sp. YY-20, the endophytic fungus from Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Jun-Mian; Xiao, Jian; Shao, Qi; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Six known metabolites, adenosine (1), methyl β-D-ribofuranoside (2), adenine (3), 2'-deoxyadenosine (4), 3-methylpiperazine-2,5-dione (5) and 2'-deoxyuridine (6), were isolated from the extracts of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. YY-20 isolated from the root of Ginkgo biloba, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant and growth-promoting activities of these compounds were first evaluated. The results indicated that compounds 1, 3 and 4 exhibited potential DPPH-scavenging activities compared with positive control. In addition, all the compounds (except 5) stimulated seed germination of Raphanus sativus, Brassica napus and Brassica chinensis but had weak stimulating effect on their root and hypocotyl growth. PMID:24144081

  9. Bioactive metabolites isolated from Penicillium sp. YY-20, the endophytic fungus from Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Jun-Mian; Xiao, Jian; Shao, Qi; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Six known metabolites, adenosine (1), methyl β-D-ribofuranoside (2), adenine (3), 2'-deoxyadenosine (4), 3-methylpiperazine-2,5-dione (5) and 2'-deoxyuridine (6), were isolated from the extracts of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. YY-20 isolated from the root of Ginkgo biloba, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant and growth-promoting activities of these compounds were first evaluated. The results indicated that compounds 1, 3 and 4 exhibited potential DPPH-scavenging activities compared with positive control. In addition, all the compounds (except 5) stimulated seed germination of Raphanus sativus, Brassica napus and Brassica chinensis but had weak stimulating effect on their root and hypocotyl growth.

  10. On the narrow emission line components of the LMC novae 2004 (YY Doradus) and 2009a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena; Munari, Ulisse

    2014-09-01

    We present early decline spectra of the two Large Magellanic Cloud novae: LMC 2004 (YY Dor) and LMC 2009a and discuss their spectral an line profile evolution with special emphasis on the existence and appearance of a sharp component. We show that the narrow component that characterizes the emission lines in the maximum spectra of nova LMC 2004 originates in the ejecta. The He ii 4686 Å narrow emission which appears at the onset of the nebular phase in both novae is somewhat controversial. Our observations suggest that the corresponding line forming region is physically separated from the rest of the ejecta (the broad line region) and environmentally different. However, the lack of late time observations covering the super-soft source (SSS) phase, the post-SSS phase and the quiescence state does not allow to securely establish any non-ejecta origin/contribution as, instead, in the case of U Sco and KT Eri.

  11. A ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist attenuates the rewarding properties of morphine and increases opioid peptide levels in reward areas in mice.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jörgen A; Nylander, Ingrid; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2015-12-01

    Gut-brain hormones such as ghrelin have recently been suggested to have a role in reward regulation. Ghrelin was traditionally known to regulate food intake and body weight homoeostasis. In addition, recent work has pin-pointed that this peptide has a novel role in drug-induced reward, including morphine-induced increase in the extracellular levels of accumbal dopamine in rats. Herein the effect of the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist, JMV2959, on morphine-induced activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system was investigated in mice. In addition, the effects of JMV2959 administration on opioid peptide levels in reward related areas were investigated. In the present series of experiment we showed that peripheral JMV2959 administration, at a dose with no effect per se, attenuates the ability of morphine to cause locomotor stimulation, increase the extracellular levels of accumbal dopamine and to condition a place preference in mice. JMV2959 administration significantly increased tissue levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg(6)Phe(7) in the ventral tegmental area, dynorphin B in hippocampus and Leu-enkephalin-Arg(6) in striatum. We therefore hypothesise that JMV2959 prevents morphine-induced reward via stimulation of delta receptor active peptides in striatum and ventral tegmental areas. In addition, hippocampal peptides that activate kappa receptor may be involved in JMV2959׳s ability to regulate memory formation of reward. Given that development of drug addiction depends, at least in part, of the effects of addictive drugs on the mesolimbic dopamine system the present data suggest that GHS-R1A antagonists deserve to be elucidated as novel treatment strategies of opioid addiction.

  12. Cilostazol Upregulates Autophagy via SIRT1 Activation: Reducing Amyloid-β Peptide and APP-CTFβ Levels in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a vital pathway for the removal of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the aggregated proteins that cause Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously found that cilostazol induced SIRT1 expression and its activity in neuronal cells, and thus, we hypothesized that cilostazol might stimulate clearances of Aβ and C-terminal APP fragment β subunit (APP-CTFβ) by up-regulating autophagy.When N2a cells were exposed to soluble Aβ1–42, protein levels of beclin-1, autophagy-related protein5 (Atg5), and SIRT1 decreased significantly. Pretreatment with cilostazol (10–30 μM) or resveratrol (20 μM) prevented these Aβ1–42 evoked suppressions. LC3-II (a marker of mammalian autophagy) levels were significantly increased by cilostazol, and this increase was reduced by 3-methyladenine. To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, N2aSwe cells (N2a cells stably expressing human APP containing the Swedish mutation) were cultured in medium with or without tetracycline (Tet+ for 48 h and then placed in Tet- condition). Aβ and APP-CTFβ expressions were increased after 12~24 h in Tet- condition, and these increased expressions were significantly reduced by pretreating cilostazol. Cilostazol-induced reductions in the expressions of Aβ and APP-CTFβ were blocked by bafilomycin A1 (a blocker of autophagosome to lysosome fusion). After knockdown of the SIRT1 gene (to ~40% in SIRT1 protein), cilostazol failed to elevate the expressions of beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3-II, indicating that cilostazol increases these expressions by up-regulating SIRT1. Further, decreased cell viability induced by Aβ was prevented by cilostazol, and this inhibition was reversed by 3-methyladenine, indicating that the protective effect of cilostazol against Aβ induced neurotoxicity is, in part, ascribable to the induction of autophagy. In conclusion, cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing the activation of SIRT1, and thereby enhances Aβ clearance and increases cell viability. PMID:26244661

  13. Acyclovir or Aβ42 peptides attenuate HSV-1-induced miRNA-146a levels in human primary brain cells.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J; Cui, Jian Guo; Yuan, Li Yuan; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Corkern, Madelyn; Clement, Christian; Kammerman, Eli M; Ball, M J; Zhao, Yuhai; Sullivan, Patrick M; Hill, James M

    2010-10-01

    Human brains harbor herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) DNA, which normally remains quiescent throughout many decades of life. HSV-1 is associated with viral encephalopathy and with the amyloid beta 42 (Abeta42) peptide-enriched lesions that characterize Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Here we report that infection of human neuronal-glial cells in primary co-culture with HSV-1 induces an irregular hypertrophy of human neuronal-glial cell bodies, an induction of HSV-1 DNA polymerase, and an up-regulation of micro-RNA-146a associated with altered innate-immune responses. Presence of the antiviral acyclovir or soluble Abeta42 peptide significantly attenuated these neuropathological responses. The inhibitory effects of Abeta42 peptide were also observed in an HSV-1-infected CV-1 cell-based viral plaque assay. The results suggest that soluble Abeta42 peptide can invoke non-pathological and anti-viral effects through inactivation of an HSV-1 challenge to human brain cells by simple viral sequestration, viral destruction, or by complex neurogenetic mechanisms.

  14. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  15. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  16. Hormone therapy with tamoxifen reduces plasma levels of NT-B-type natriuretic peptide but does not change ventricular ejection fraction after chemotherapy in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, F B; Romero, W G; Carvalho, A L R; Borgo, M V; Amorim, M H C; Gouvea, S A; Abreu, G R

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tamoxifen on the plasma concentration of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer and to correlate changes in NT-proBNP with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Over a period of 12 months, we followed 60 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The patients were separated into a group that received only chemotherapy (n=23), a group that received chemotherapy + tamoxifen (n=21), and a group that received only tamoxifen (n=16). Plasma levels of NT-proBNP were assessed at 0 (T0), 6 (T6), and 12 (T12) months of treatment, and echocardiography data were assessed at T0 and T12. Plasma NT-proBNP levels were increased in the chemotherapy-only group at T6 and T12, whereas elevated NT-proBNP levels were only found at T6 in the chemotherapy + tamoxifen group. At T12, the chemotherapy + tamoxifen group exhibited a significant reduction in the peptide to levels similar to the group that received tamoxifen alone. The chemotherapy-only group exhibited a significant decrease in LVEF at T12, whereas the chemotherapy + tamoxifen and tamoxifen-only groups maintained levels similar to those at the beginning of treatment. Treatment with tamoxifen for 6 months after chemotherapy significantly reduced the plasma levels of NT-proBNP and did not change LVEF in women with breast cancer.

  17. Candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Jenkins, Edmund C; Luchsinger, José A; Zigman, Warren B; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H

    2015-10-01

    We examined the contribution of candidates genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to individual differences in levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrom, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30-78 years of age. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race and/or ethnicity, and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels, the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence amyloid precursor protein processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1).

  18. Candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Jenkins, Edmund C; Luchsinger, José A; Zigman, Warren B; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H

    2015-10-01

    We examined the contribution of candidates genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to individual differences in levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrom, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30-78 years of age. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race and/or ethnicity, and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels, the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence amyloid precursor protein processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). PMID:26166206

  19. Capillary LC-MS2 at the attomole level for monitoring and discovering endogenous peptides in microdialysis samples collected in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haskins, W E; Wang, Z; Watson, C J; Rostand, R R; Witowski, S R; Powell, D H; Kennedy, R T

    2001-11-01

    Fused-silica capillary LC columns (25-microm i.d.) with 3-microm-i.d. integrated electrospray emitters interfaced to a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer were evaluated for high-sensitivity LC-MS2. Column preparation involved constructing frits by in situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, preparing the electrospray emitter by pulling the column outlet to a fine tip with a CO2 laser puller, and slurry-packing the column with 5-microm reversed-phase particles. Large-volume injections were facilitated by an automated two-pump system that allowed high-flow rates for sample loading and low-flow rates for elution. Small electrospray emitters, low elution flow rates, and optimization of gradient steepness allowed a detection limit of 4 amol, corresponding to 2 pM for 1.8 microL injected on-column, for a mixture of peptides dissolved in artificial cerebral spinal fluid. The system was coupled on-line to microdialysis sampling and was used to monitor and discover endogenous neuropeptides from the globus pallidus of anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. Time-segmented MS2 scans enabled simultaneous monitoring of Met-enkephalin, Leu-enkephalin, and unknown peptides. Basal dialysate levels of Met-enkephalin and Leu-enkephalin were 60 +/- 30 and 70 +/- 20 pM while K+-stimulated levels were 1,900 +/- 500 and 1,300 +/- 300 pM, respectively (n = 7). Data-dependent and time-segmented MS2 scans revealed several unknown peptides that were present in dialysate. One of the unknowns was identified as peptide I(1-10) (SPQLEDEAKE), a novel product of preproenkephalin A processing, using MS2, MS3, and database searching.

  20. A peptidome-based phylogeny pipeline reveals differential peptides at the strain level within Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are gut commensal microorganisms belonging to the Actinobacteria group. Some specific strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are used in functional foods as they are able to exert health-promoting effects in the human host. Due to the limited genetic variability within this subspecies, it is sometimes difficult for a manufacturer to properly track its strain once included in dairy products or functional foods. In this paper, we present a peptidome-based analysis in which the proteomes of a set of B. animalis subsp. lactis strains were digested in silico with human gut endopeptidases. The molecular masses were compared along all the strains to detect strain-specific peptides. These peptides may be interesting towards the development of methodologies for strain identification in the final product. PMID:27554155

  1. Ameliorative effects of a non-competitive BACE1 inhibitor TAK-070 on Aβ peptide levels and impaired learning behavior in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideki; Fukumoto, Hiroaki; Maeda, Ryouta; Terauchi, Jun; Kato, Kaneyoshi; Miyamoto, Masaomi

    2010-11-18

    We examined the effects of TAK-070, a novel non-competitive β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitor, on the levels of Aβ peptides and behavioral deficits in rats. TAK-070 reduced soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels of the cerebral cortex in a time- and dose-dependent manner in young rats. We found that the insoluble Aβ42 content increased significantly with aging from 22 months old without changing Aβ40 content. TAK-070 normalized the Aβ42 levels to those in young rats when they were fed chow containing TAK-070 starting at 19 months old for 6.5 months. Repeated administration of TAK-070 to aged rats for 2 weeks ameliorated the impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze task and reduced the levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ peptides at doses of 0.3-1mg/kg, (p.o.). Interestingly, TAK-070 significantly recovered the reduced brain synaptophysin levels in aged rats to those in young rats. Our findings support the idea that partial inhibition of BACE1 by TAK-070 exerts symptomatic as well as disease-modifying effects for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Antithetical regulation of α-myosin heavy chain between fetal and adult heart failure though shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular switches of myosin isoforms are known to occur in various conditions. Here, we demonstrated the result from fetal heart failure and its potential mechanisms. Fetal and adult heart failure rat models were induced by injections of isoproterenol as previously described, and Go6976 was given to heart failing fetuses. Real-time PCR and Western blot were adopted to measure the expressions of α-MHC, β-MHC and YY-1. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analysis whether YY-1 interacts with HDAC5. Besides, histological immunofluorescence assessment was carried out to identify the location of HDAC5. α-MHC was recorded elevated in fetal heart failure which was decreased in adult heart failure. Besides, YY-1 was observed elevated both in fetal and adult failing hearts, but YY-1 could co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC5 only in adult hearts. Nuclear localization of HDAC5 was identified in adult cardiomyocytes, while cytoplasmic localization was identified in fetuses. After Go6976 supplied, HDAC5 shuttled into nucleuses interacted with YY-1. The myosin molecular switches were reversed with worsening cardiac functions and higher mortalities. Regulation of MHC in fetal heart failure was different from adult which provided a better compensation with increased α-MHC. This kind of transition was involved with shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

  3. Expression of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K Is Enhanced by Cellular Transcription Factor YY1

    PubMed Central

    Knössl, Michael; Löwer, Roswitha; Löwer, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K, which resides in moderate copy numbers in the human genome, is expressed in a cell-type-specific manner, predominantly in teratocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed the regulatory potential of the 5′ enhancer of the HERV-K long terminal repeat. Protein extracts of HERV-K-expressing teratocarcinoma cell lines (GH and Tera2) and nonexpressing HeLa and HepG2 cells form different protein complexes on the enhancer sequence as detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using competition EMSAs, DNase I footprinting, and supershift experiments, we localized the binding site of these complexes to a 20-bp sequence within the enhancer and showed that the transcription factor YY1 is one component of the HERV-K enhancer complex. Replacement of the YY1 binding site with unrelated sequences reduced expression of the luciferase gene as a reporter in transient-transfection assays. PMID:9882329

  4. High-level production of lactostatin, a hypocholesterolemic peptide, in transgenic rice using soybean A1aB1b as carrier.

    PubMed

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Ekyo, Atsushi; Amari, Yoshiki; Kato, Naoki; Kuroda, Masaharu; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Takaiwa, Fumio; Utsumi, Shigeru; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, a form of cardiovascular disease, is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. Lactostatin (Ile-Ile-Ala-Glu-Lys), derived from β-lactoglobulin in cow's milk, is a bioactive peptide with hypocholesterolemic activity higher than sitosterol, a known anti-hypercholesterolemic drug. Here, we successfully developed a transgenic rice accumulating a much higher level of lactostatin by inserting 29 IIAEK sequences into the structurally flexible (nonconserved) regions of soybean seed storage protein, A1aB1b, and introducing it into LGC-1 (low glutelin content mutant 1) as host variety. A1aB1b containing 29 lactostatins was expressed in the endosperm of rice seed cells by using seed specific promoters and sorted into novel compartments distinct from normal PB-I (ER-derived protein body) and PB-II (protein storage vacuoles). Transgenic rice seeds accumulated approximately 2 mg of lactostatins/g of dry seeds, which is relatively high compared with previous reports. Our findings suggest that the introduction of a high copy number of bioactive peptide into seed storage proteins as carrier is one of the effective means in producing higher amounts of bioactive peptides in rice.

  5. [Reference the YY/T 0841-2011 standard to improve preventive maintenance of medical electrical equipment and experience].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Ge, Bin; Liu, Jinchu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we interpret the new YY/T 0841-2011 standard and contrast the difference between it and GB9706.1-2007 standard. Then, we improved the current preventive maintenance work. After the improvement, we not only have more effective detection of the electrical safety performance of all kinds of medical electrical equipment, but also reduce the workload of clinical engineers, improve efficiency, and reduce the risk of electrical shock.

  6. Free Enthalpy Differences between α-, π-, and 310-Helices of an Atomic Level Fine-Grained Alanine Deca-Peptide Solvated in Supramolecular Coarse-Grained Water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; Riniker, Sereina; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-03-12

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of peptides or proteins in aqueous solution are still limited to the multi-nanosecond time scale and multi-nanometer range by computational cost. Combining atomic solutes with a supramolecular solvent model in hybrid fine-grained/coarse-grained (FG/CG) simulations allows atomic detail in the region of interest while being computationally more efficient. We used enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to calculate the free enthalpy differences between different helical conformations, i.e., α-, π-, and 310-helices, of an atomic level FG alanine deca-peptide solvated in a supramolecular CG water solvent. The free enthalpy differences obtained show that by replacing the FG solvent by the CG solvent, the π-helix is destabilized with respect to the α-helix by about 2.5 kJ mol(-1), and the 310-helix is stabilized with respect to the α-helix by about 9 kJ mol(-1). In addition, the dynamics of the peptide becomes faster. By introducing a FG water layer of 0.8 nm around the peptide, both thermodynamic and dynamic properties are recovered, while the hybrid FG/CG simulations are still four times more efficient than the atomistic simulations, even when the cutoff radius for the nonbonded interactions is increased from 1.4 to 2.0 nm. Hence, the hybrid FG/CG model, which yields an appropriate balance between reduced accuracy and enhanced computational speed, is very suitable for molecular dynamics simulation investigations of biomolecules.

  7. Status of understanding the YN/YY-interactions Meson-exchange viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-04-01

    We analyze and discuss the extended-soft-core models ESC04 and ESC08, which at present are the most complete meson-exchange models for the baryon-baryon interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SU(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, special features are the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial-meson form-factors. Novel for the ESC08-versions is the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the P03 quark-pair-creation model (QPC), although in ESC08a,b a certain admixture of S13 quark-pair creation is present. This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F+D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are excellent. This is marked in particularly by the NN-results, namely χp.d.p.2=1.180 and 1.135 for respectively ESC08a and ESC08b. Also, we improved the Λ N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the Σp(S13,T=3/2)- and ΣN(S01,T=1/2)-channels.

  8. A Common Variant at the 14q32 Endometrial Cancer Risk Locus Activates AKT1 through YY1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jodie N; Kaufmann, Susanne; O'Mara, Tracy A; Hillman, Kristine M; Sivakumaran, Haran; Darabi, Hatef; Cheng, Timothy H T; Pearson, John; Kazakoff, Stephen; Waddell, Nicola; Hoivik, Erling A; Goode, Ellen L; Scott, Rodney J; Tomlinson, Ian; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; French, Juliet D; Salvesen, Helga B; Pollock, Pamela M; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B; Edwards, Stacey L

    2016-06-01

    A recent meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association and follow-up endometrial cancer case-control datasets identified a novel genetic risk locus for this disease at chromosome 14q32.33. To prioritize the functional SNP(s) and target gene(s) at this locus, we employed an in silico fine-mapping approach using genotyped and imputed SNP data for 6,608 endometrial cancer cases and 37,925 controls of European ancestry. Association and functional analyses provide evidence that the best candidate causal SNP is rs2494737. Multiple experimental analyses show that SNP rs2494737 maps to a silencer element located within AKT1, a member of the PI3K/AKT/MTOR intracellular signaling pathway activated in endometrial tumors. The rs2494737 risk A allele creates a YY1 transcription factor-binding site and abrogates the silencer activity in luciferase assays, an effect mimicked by transfection of YY1 siRNA. Our findings suggest YY1 is a positive regulator of AKT1, mediating the stimulatory effects of rs2494737 increasing endometrial cancer risk. Identification of an endometrial cancer risk allele within a member of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, more commonly activated in tumors by somatic alterations, raises the possibility that well tolerated inhibitors targeting this pathway could be candidates for evaluation as chemopreventive agents in individuals at high risk of developing endometrial cancer.

  9. Evolution of neuropeptide Y and its related peptides.

    PubMed

    Larhammar, D; Blomqvist, A G; Söderberg, C

    1993-11-01

    1. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of peptides includes also the gut endocrine peptide YY (PYY), tetrapod pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and fish pancreatic peptide-tyrosine (PY). All peptides are 36 amino acids long. 2. Sequences from many types of vertebrates show that NPY has remained extremely well conserved throughout vertebrate evolution with 92% identity between mammals and cartilaginous fishes. 3. PYY has 97-100% identity between cartilaginous fishes and bony fishes, but is less conserved in amphibians and mammals (83% identity between amphibians and sharks and 75% identity between mammals and sharks). 4. NPY and PYY share 70-80% identity in most species. 5. Both NPY and PYY were present in the early vertebrate ancestor because both peptides have been found in lampreys. 6. The tissue distribution appears to have been largely conserved between phyla, except that PYY has more widespread neuronal expression in lower vertebrates. 7. Pancreatic polypeptide has diverged considerably among tetrapods leaving only 50% identity between mammals, birds/reptiles and frogs. 8. Several lines of evidence suggest that the PP gene arose by duplication of the PYY gene, probably in the early evolution of the tetrapods. 9. The pancreatic peptide PY found in anglerfish and daddy sculpin may have resulted from an independent duplication of the PYY gene. 10. The relationships of the recently described mollusc and worm peptides NPF and PYF with the NPY family still appear unclear. PMID:7905810

  10. Isotopologue Distributions of Peptide Product Ions by Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Quantitation of Low Levels of Deuterium Incorporation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Anderson, David R.; Jia, Minghong; Previs, Stephen; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated molecular peptide ions and their product ions generated by tandem mass spectrometry appear as isotopologue clusters due to the natural isotopic variations of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. Quantitation of the isotopic composition of peptides can be employed in experiments involving isotope effects, isotope exchange, isotopic labeling by chemical reactions, and studies of metabolism by stable isotope incorporation. Both ion trap and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry are shown to be capable of determining the isotopic composition of peptide product ions obtained by tandem mass spectrometry with both precision and accuracy. Tandem mass spectra obtained in profile-mode of clusters of isotopologue ions are fit by non-linear least squares to a series of Gaussian peaks (described in the accompanying manuscript) which quantify the Mn/M0 values which define the isotopologue distribution (ID). To determine the isotopic composition of product ions from their ID, a new algorithm that predicts the Mn/M0 ratios is developed which obviates the need to determine the intensity of all of the ions of an ID. Consequently a precise and accurate determination of the isotopic composition a product ion may be obtained from only the initial values of the ID, however the entire isotopologue cluster must be isolated prior to fragmentation. Following optimization of the molecular ion isolation width, fragmentation energy and detector sensitivity, the presence of isotopic excess (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) is readily determined within 1%. The ability to determine the isotopic composition of sequential product ions permits the isotopic composition of individual amino acid residues in the precursor ion to be determined. PMID:17559791

  11. Surface imaging of late-type contact binaries I: AE Phoenicis and YY Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceroni, C.; Vilhu, O.; van't Veer, F.; van Hamme, W.

    1994-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the first application of Doppler Imaging to solar-type contact binaries. Our aim was to examine whether this technique can help discriminate between various types of surface inhomogeneities (dark vs. bright star-spots) which are produced by different physical processes and which affect not only the surface brightness distribution but also the system's secular evolution. Simultaneous high dispersion spectroscopy and photometry for the systems AE Phe and YY Eri were obtained at ESO using the Coude Auxiliary Telescope (CAT) and the 50 cm telescope. The observed light-curves were solved by means of the latest version of the Wilson-Devinney program. Doppler maps were constructed taking into account the effects of fast rotation and proximity of the system's components. Doppler maps reveal the presence of dark spots on both systems. For AE Phe, this result is in agreement with the light-curve solution. Indirect evidence of enhanced chromospheric emission is also found. This emission appears to be more intense on the primary components.

  12. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  13. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christina A.; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. PMID:26002894

  14. Antihypertensive peptides from food proteins.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of food proteins where they remain inactive until released by enzymatic hydrolysis. Once released from the parent protein, certain peptides have the ability to modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) because they decrease activities of renin or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the two main enzymes that regulate mammalian blood pressure. These antihypertensive peptides can also enhance the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels within vascular walls and promote vasodilation. The peptides can block the interactions between angiotensin II (vasoconstrictor) and angiotensin receptors, which can contribute to reduced blood pressure. This review focuses on the methods that are involved in antihypertensive peptide production from food sources, including fractionation protocols that are used to enrich bioactive peptide content and enhance peptide activity. It also discusses mechanisms that are believed to be involved in the antihypertensive activity of these peptides.

  15. Modulatory effect of the renin-angiotensin system on the plasma levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in normal man.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, F; Vergnani, L; Margutti, A; Ambrosio, M R; Bondanelli, M; Trasforini, G; Rossi, R; Degli Uberti, E C

    1993-09-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has positive chronotropic and inotropic effects in animals and humans, and produces the most potent vasodilation known for an endogenous peptide. Yet, a physiological role for CGRP in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure has not been demonstrated. We studied the effects of 1) assumption of the upright position and 2) iv infusion of angiotensin-II (sequential doses of 8, 16, and 32 ng/kg.min, each dose for 20 min) in eight normal subjects (four men). Serial venous blood samples were taken to determine the plasma CGRP, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and aldosterone levels and PRA. Blood pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored at the finger with a Finapres 2300 instrument. After assumption of the upright posture, a quick rise in plasma CGRP levels was observed together with the expected increases in plasma norepinephrine and aldosterone and PRA. A transient increment was also observed for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Angiotensin-II infusion caused dose-dependent increases in plasma CGRP and aldosterone concentrations, already significant at the lowest infusion rate and parallel with the blood pressure rise. Plasma catecholamines significantly increased only at higher infusion rates. Our data demonstrate that modifications of plasma CGRP concentrations are part of the normal response to postural and vasomotor changes. These findings suggest a physiological role for CGRP in regulation of the peripheral vascular tone and possibly blood pressure in man.

  16. Analysis of the genome sequence of the pathogenic Muscovy duck parvovirus strain YY reveals a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the inverted terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Genomic information about Muscovy duck parvovirus is still limited. In this study, the genome of the pathogenic MDPV strain YY was sequenced. The full-length genome of YY is 5075 nucleotides (nt) long, 57 nt shorter than that of strain FM. Sequence alignment indicates that the 5' and 3' inverted terminal repeats (ITR) of strain YY contain a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the stem of the palindromic hairpin structure in comparison to strain FM and FZ91-30. The deleted region contains one "E-box" site and one repeated motif with the sequence "TTCCGGT" or "ACCGGAA". Phylogenetic trees constructed based the protein coding genes concordantly showed that YY, together with nine other MDPV isolates from various places, clustered in a separate branch, distinct from the branch formed by goose parvovirus (GPV) strains. These results demonstrate that, despite the distinctive deletion, the YY strain still belongs to the classical MDPV group. Moreover, the deletion of ITR may contribute to the genome evolution of MDPV under immunization pressure. PMID:27344160

  17. Analysis of the genome sequence of the pathogenic Muscovy duck parvovirus strain YY reveals a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the inverted terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-09-01

    Genomic information about Muscovy duck parvovirus is still limited. In this study, the genome of the pathogenic MDPV strain YY was sequenced. The full-length genome of YY is 5075 nucleotides (nt) long, 57 nt shorter than that of strain FM. Sequence alignment indicates that the 5' and 3' inverted terminal repeats (ITR) of strain YY contain a 14-nucleotide-pair deletion in the stem of the palindromic hairpin structure in comparison to strain FM and FZ91-30. The deleted region contains one "E-box" site and one repeated motif with the sequence "TTCCGGT" or "ACCGGAA". Phylogenetic trees constructed based the protein coding genes concordantly showed that YY, together with nine other MDPV isolates from various places, clustered in a separate branch, distinct from the branch formed by goose parvovirus (GPV) strains. These results demonstrate that, despite the distinctive deletion, the YY strain still belongs to the classical MDPV group. Moreover, the deletion of ITR may contribute to the genome evolution of MDPV under immunization pressure.

  18. The Ubiquitin Carboxyl Hydrolase BAP1 Forms a Ternary Complex with YY1 and HCF-1 and Is a Critical Regulator of Gene Expression ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Helen; Mashtalir, Nazar; Daou, Salima; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Ross, Julie; Sui, Guangchao; Hart, Gerald W.; Rauscher, Frank J.; Drobetsky, Elliot; Milot, Eric; Shi, Yang; Affar, El Bachir

    2010-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor BAP1 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, although the molecular mechanisms governing its function remain poorly defined. BAP1 was recently shown to interact with and deubiquitinate the transcriptional regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1). Here we show that BAP1 assembles multiprotein complexes containing numerous transcription factors and cofactors, including HCF-1 and the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Through its coiled-coil motif, BAP1 directly interacts with the zinc fingers of YY1. Moreover, HCF-1 interacts with the middle region of YY1 encompassing the glycine-lysine-rich domain and is essential for the formation of a ternary complex with YY1 and BAP1 in vivo. BAP1 activates transcription in an enzymatic-activity-dependent manner and regulates the expression of a variety of genes involved in numerous cellular processes. We further show that BAP1 and HCF-1 are recruited by YY1 to the promoter of the cox7c gene, which encodes a mitochondrial protein used here as a model of BAP1-activated gene expression. Our findings (i) establish a direct link between BAP1 and the transcriptional control of genes regulating cell growth and proliferation and (ii) shed light on a novel mechanism of transcription regulation involving ubiquitin signaling. PMID:20805357

  19. Do Lactation-Induced Changes in Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1, and Peptide YY Influence Appetite and Body Weight Regulation during the First Postpartum Year?

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Meyer, D. Enette; Schueler, Jessica; Kyle, Erin; Austin, Kathleen J.; Hart, Ann Marie; Alexander, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether fasting and meal-induced appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with body weight retention after childbearing, we studied 24 exclusively breastfeeding women (BMI = 25.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2) at 4-5 weeks postpartum and 20 never-pregnant controls (BMI = 24.0 ± 3.1 kg/m2). Ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and appetite ratings were measured before/and 150 minutes after a standardized breakfast and 60 minutes after an ad libitum lunch. Body weight/composition were measured at 6 and 12 months. Fasting and area under-the-curve responses for appetite-regulating hormones did not differ between lactating and control groups; ghrelinacyl, however, tended to track higher after the standardized breakfast in lactating women and was higher (p < 0.05) after the ad libitum lunch despite a 24% higher energy intake (p < 0.05). By 12 months, lactating women lost 5.3 ± 2.2 kg (n = 18), whereas control women (n = 15) remained weight stable (p = 0.019); fifteen of the lactating women returned to within ±2.0 kg of prepregnancy weight but three retained >6.0 kg. The retainers had greater (p < 0.05) postmeal ghrelin rebound responses following breakfast. Overall these studies do not support the hypothesis that appetite-regulating hormones are altered during lactation and associated with postpartum weight retention. Altered ghrelin responses, however, deserve further exploration. PMID:27313876

  20. Amelioration of Cardiac Function and Activation of Anti-Inflammatory Vasoactive Peptides Expression in the Rat Myocardium by Low Level Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  1. Amelioration of cardiac function and activation of anti-inflammatory vasoactive peptides expression in the rat myocardium by low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  2. Positive correlation between circulating cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18/LL-37) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcription of the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is induced by binding of the bioactive form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, to the vitamin D receptor. Significant levels of the protein hCAP18/LL-37 are found in the blood and may protect against infection and/or sepsis. We hypothesized that serum vitamin D levels may modulate the circulating levels of hCAP18. Only three studies have shown a positive correlation between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and hCAP18 levels. Here we provide additional evidence for such a correlation in healthy, middle-aged adults. Findings Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and plasma levels of hCAP18 were determined in 19 healthy middle-aged (mean of 50.1 years) adult men and women. Plasma hCAP18 concentrations correlated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations in subjects with 25(OH)D levels ≤ 32 ng/ml (r = 0.81, p < 0.005) but not in subjects with concentrations > 32 ng/ml (r = 0.19, p = 0.63). Conclusions We conclude that plasma hCAP18 levels correlate with serum 25(OH)D levels in subjects with concentrations of 25(OH)D ≤ 32 ng/ml as opposed to those with concentrations > 32 ng/ml and that vitamin D status may regulate systemic levels of hCAP18/LL-37. PMID:23095332

  3. Binding of YY1 to a site overlapping a weak TATA box is essential for transcription from the uteroglobin promoter in endometrial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klug, J; Beato, M

    1996-01-01

    The gene for rabbit uteroglobin codes for a small calcium-, steroid-, and biphenyl metabolite-binding homodimeric protein which is expressed in a variety of epithelial cell types such as Clara cells (lung) and the glandular and luminal cells of the endometrium. One important region mediating its efficient transcription in a human endometrium-derived cell line, Ishikawa, is centered around a noncanonical TATA box. Two factors, TATA core factor (TCF), expressed in cell lines derived from uteroglobin-expressing tissues, and the ubiquitously expressed TATA palindrome factor, bind to the DNA major groove at two adjacent sites within this region. Here, we report the identification of the TATA palindrome factor as the transcription/initiation factor YY1 by microsequencing of the biochemically purified factor from HeLa cells. The binding site for YY1 within the uteroglobin gene is unique in its sequence and its location overlapping a weak TATA box (TACA). Binding of YY1 was required for efficient transcription in TCF-positive Ishikawa cells, which responded only weakly to a change of TACA to TATA, although in vitro binding affinity for the TATA-box-binding protein increased by 1 order of magnitude. In contrast, in CV-1 cells, lacking TCF, binding of YY1 was not required for transcription in the context of a wild-type TACA box, whereas a change from TACA to TATA led to significantly increased reporter gene expression. DNA binding data exclude a role of YY1 in stabilizing the interaction of the TATA-box-binding protein with the uteroglobin promoter. We conclude that cell lines derived from uteroglobin-expressing tissues overcome the weak TATA box with the help of auxiliary factors, one of them being YY1. PMID:8887668

  4. Timosaponin derivative YY-23 acts as a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist and exerts a rapid antidepressant-like effect in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Guo, Fei; Fu, Zhi-wen; Zhang, Bing; Huang, Cheng-gang; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor modulators have shown promising results as potential antidepressant agents, whereas timosaponins extracted from the Chinese herb Rhizoma Anemarrhenae exhibit antidepressant activities. In the present study we examined whether YY-23, a modified metabolite of timosaponin B-III, could affect NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal neurons in vitro, and evaluated its antidepressant-like effects in stressed mice. Methods: NMDA-induced currents were recorded in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons using a whole-cell recording technique. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a 6-week chronic mild stress (CMS) or a 10-d chronic social defeat stress (CSDS). The stressed mice were treated with YY-23 (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) or a positive-control drug, fluoxetine (10 mg·kg−1·d−1) for 3 weeks. Behavioral assessments were carried out every week. Results: In acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, YY-23 selectively and reversibly inhibited NMDA-induced currents with an EC50 value of 2.8 μmol/L. This inhibition of NMDA-induced currents by YY-23 was non-competitive, and had no features of voltage-dependency or use-dependency. Treatment of the stressed mice with YY-23 not only reversed CMS-induced deficiency of sucrose preference and immobility time, and CSDS-induced reduction of social interaction, but also had faster onset as compared to fluoxetine. Conclusion: YY-23 is a novel non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors with promising rapid antidepressant-like effects in mouse models of CMS and CSDS depression. PMID:26687936

  5. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  6. Genetic Variations in ABCA7 Can Increase Secreted Levels of Amyloid-β40 and Amyloid-β42 Peptides and ABCA7 Transcription in Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Bamji-Mirza, Michelle; Li, Yan; Najem, Dema; Liu, Qing Yan; Walker, Douglas; Lue, Lih-Fen; Stupak, Jacek; Chan, Kenneth; Li, Jianjun; Ghani, Mahdi; Yang, Ze; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zhang, Wandong

    2016-06-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. ABCA7 is highly expressed in the brain and a susceptibility gene for late-onset AD (LOAD). The minor alleles at two ABCA7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs3764650 (T>G; intron13) and rs3752246 at a predicted myristoylation site (C>G; exon33; p.Gly1527Ala), are significantly associated with LOAD risk; however, the mechanism of this association is unknown. Functional consequences of both SNPs were examined in HEK293 and CHO cells stably expressing AβPPSwe. Luciferase reporter assays in HEK293 cells suggested that intron13 carrying rs3764650 major T-allele (int13-T) possessed promoter-enhancing capabilities. Co-transfection experiments with hABCA7 and int13-T resulted in significantly increased ABCA7 protein level relative to that with int13-G. Expression of hABCA7 carrying rs3752246 risk allele led to increases in secreted Aβ40 and Aβ42 and β-secretase activity in CHO- and HEK-AβPPSwe cells. Hydroxymyristic acid treatment of cells expressing hABCA7 carrying the rs3752246 major G allele resulted in increased β-secretase activity and levels of Aβ, suggesting that lack of myristoylation contributes to the observed cell-phenotypes. Molecular weight determination, by gel-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, of hABCA7 peptides spanning position 1527 showed loss of post-translational modification in the risk-allele peptide. These results suggest that decreased expression, or impaired function, of ABCA7 may contribute to AD pathology. PMID:27314524

  7. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Elevated Levels of Type B Natriuretic Peptide in a Community-Based Sample of Women

    PubMed Central

    Ljunggren, Mirjam; Lindahl, Bertil; Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny; Lindberg, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One contributory factor may be hemodynamic stress due to the negative intrathoracic pressure during each episode of apnea. Type B natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted by the cardiac ventricles in response to volume expansion and pressure load and the authors hypothesized that there would be an association between indices of OSA during the night and levels of BNP in the morning. Setting: Community-based in Uppsala, Sweden. Participants: There were 349 women who participated. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent full-night polysomnography and anthropometric measurements, and answered questionnaires about medical conditions and current medication. The morning after the polysomnography, blood samples were drawn for analysis of plasma BNP, C-reactive protein, creatinine, and hemoglobin. There was an increase in mean BNP as the severity of sleep apnea increased, increasing from a mean value of 8.5 ng/L among women with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5 to 18.0 ng/L in women with an AHI ≥ 30. Elevated BNP levels (≥ 20 ng/L) were found in 29.8% of the women, whereas 70.2% had normal levels. The odds ratio was 2.2 for elevated BNP levels for women with an AHI of 5–14.9 in relation to women with an AHI < 5, 3.1 for women with an AHI of 15–29.9, and 4.6 for women with an AHI ≥ 30 after adjustment for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive drugs, and creatinine. Conclusions: There is a dose-response relationship in women between the severity of sleep apnea during the night and the levels of BNP in the morning. Citation: Ljunggren M; Lindahl B; Theorell-Haglöw J; Lindberg E. Association between obstructive sleep apnea and elevated levels of type B natriuretic peptide in a community-based sample of women. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1521-1527. PMID:23115401

  8. Addition of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels to electrocardiography criteria for detection of left ventricular hypertrophy: the ARIRANG study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Min-Soo; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Kim, Jang-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Park, Jong-Ku; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Eunhee

    2015-04-01

    The utility of electrocardiography (ECG) in screening for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in general populations is limited mainly because its low sensitivity. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is released due to the remodeling processes of LVH and could improve the diagnostic accuracy for the ECG criteria for LVH. We hypothesized that addition of BNP levels to ECG criteria could aid LVH detection compared with ECG alone in a general population. We enrolled consecutive 343 subjects from a community-based cohort. LVH was defined as LV mass index > 95 g/m(2) for females and > 115 g/m(2) for males according to echocardiography. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to detect LVH was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.61) in Sokolow-Lyon criteria and 0.53 (0.47-0.59) in the Cornell voltage criteria. After addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to the model, the corresponding areas under the ROC were 0.63 (0.58-0.69) and 0.64 (0.59-0.69), respectively. P values for the comparison in areas under the ROC for models with and without N-terminal-proBNP levels were < 0.001. These data suggest that addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to ECG criteria could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of LVH in general populations.

  9. Interleukin-7 Plasma Levels in Human Differentiate Anorexia Nervosa, Constitutional Thinness and Healthy Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Natacha; Viltart, Odile; Loyens, Anne; Bruchet, Céline; Nadin, Katia; Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine involved in energy homeostasis as demonstrated in rodents. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrained eating behavior despite adaptive orexigenic regulation profile including high ghrelin plasma levels. Constitutional thinness is a physiological condition of resistance to weight gain with physiological anorexigenic profile including high Peptide YY plasma level. Healthy obesity can be considered as a physiological state of resistance to weight loss with opposite appetite regulating profile to constitutional thinness including low Peptide YY plasma level. No studies in IL-7 are yet available in those populations. Therefore we evaluated circadian plasma levels of IL-7 in anorexia nervosa compared to constitutional thinness, healthy obese and control females. Materials and Methods 10 restrictive-type anorexia nervosa women, 5 bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa woman, 5 recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa women, 4 bulimic females, 10 constitutional thinness women, 7 healthy obese females, and 10 normal weight women controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, performed in endocrinology unit and academic laboratory. Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma IL-7 levels were measured in each subject. Results 24h mean IL-7 plasma levels (pg/ml, mean±SEM) were decreased in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (123.4±14.4, p<0.0037), bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa (24.2±5.6, p<0.001), recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa (64.2±16.1, p = 0.01) and healthy obese patients (51±3.2, p<0.001) compared to controls (187.7±28.6). Bulimic patients (197.4±42.7) and constitutional thinness patients (264.3±35.8) were similar to controls. Conclusions Low IL-7 is part of the adaptive profile in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa, confirming its difference with constitutional thinness. Healthy obesity, with low IL-7, is once again in mirror image of constitutional thinness with normal high IL-7. PMID:27611669

  10. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  11. Cadmium tolerance, cysteine and thiol peptide levels in wild type and chromium-tolerant strains of Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Elena; Gorbi, Gessica; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Di Toppi, Luigi Sanità; Corradi, Maria Grazia

    2004-07-14

    Two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different sensitivity to hexavalent chromium were compared for their tolerance of cadmium, by means of growth and recovery tests, and determination of cysteine, reduced glutathione and phytochelatin content, after short-term exposure to various cadmium concentrations (from 1.125 to 27 microM). Growth experiments showed that, after 7-day treatments with cadmium, the chromium-tolerant strain reached a significantly higher cell density and, after 24-h exposure to Cd, was able to resume growth significantly better than the wild type. Constitutive level of cysteine was higher in the chromium-tolerant strain, while glutathione levels were similar in the two strains. The higher content of cysteine and the maintenance of both reduced glutathione and phytochelatin high levels in the presence of cadmium, support the higher cadmium co-tolerance of the chromium-tolerant strain in comparison with the wild type one. PMID:15177949

  12. Coronal density diagnostics with Helium-like triplets: CHANDRA-LETGS observations of Algol, Capella, Procyon, epsilon Eri, alpha Cen A&B, UX Ari, AD Leo, YY Gem, and HR 1099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J.-U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Burwitz, V.; Mewe, R.; Raassen, A. J. J.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Predehl, P.; Brinkman, A. C.

    2002-11-01

    We present an analysis of ten cool stars (Algol, Capella, Procyon, epsilon Eri, alpha Cen A&B, UX Ari, AD Leo, YY Gem, and HR 1099) observed with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This sample contains all cools stars observed with the LETGS presently available to us with integration times sufficiently long to warrant a meaningful spectral analysis. Our sample comprises inactive, moderately active, and hyperactive stars and samples the bulk part of activity levels encountered in coronal X-ray sources. We use the LETGS spectra to carry out density and temperature diagnostics with an emphasis on the H-like and the He-like ions. We find a correlation between line flux ratios of the Lyalpha and He-like resonance lines with the mean X-ray surface flux. We determine densities using the He-like triplets. For all stars we find no significant deviations from the low-density limit for the ions of Ne, Mg, and Si, while the measured line ratios for the ions of C, N, and O do show evidence for departures from the low-density limit in the active stars, but not in the inactive stars. Best measurements can be made for the O VII triplet where we find significant deviations from the low-density limit for the stars Algol, Procyon, YY Gem, epsilon Eri, and HR 1099. We discuss the influence of radiation fields on the interpretation of the He-like triplet line ratios in the low-Z ions, which is relevant for Algol, and the influence of dielectronic satellite lines, which is relevant for Procyon. For the active stars YY Gem, epsilon Eri, and HR 1099 the low f/i ratios can unambiguously be attributed to high densties in the range 1-3*E10 cm-3 at O VII temperatures. We find our LETGS spectra to be an extremely useful tool for plasma diagnostics of stellar coronae.

  13. Relation of brain natriuretic peptide level to extent of left ventricular scarring in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Mehmet Kemal; Allen, Drew; Jaber, Wael A; Chuang, Hsuan-Hung; Taylor, David O; Yamani, Mohamad H

    2009-01-15

    Multiple factors influence brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) release in patients with heart failure. We hypothesized that extensive myocardial scarring could result in an attenuated BNP response. A total of 115 patients with New York Heart Association class III chronic heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy were evaluated for ischemia, hibernation, and myocardial scarring by dipyridamole-rubidium-positron emission tomographic scanning with fluorine-18, 2-fluoro-2-deoxyyglucose. Plasma BNP levels were determined within 2 weeks of the study. Left ventricular dimension and function were evaluated by echocardiography. Patients were categorized as having <33% myocardial scar (n=67) or>or=33% myocardial scar (n=48). BNP measurements were correlated with amount of myocardial scarring. Compared with patients with less scar, those with >or=33% scar had lower BNP levels (mean 317+/-364 vs 635+/-852 pg/ml, median 212 vs 357, p=0.016). Using multiple regression analysis, presence of scarring was associated with decreased BNP response (p=0.022). Further, patients with <33% scar in whom a higher BNP level was noted had more ischemia (51% vs 27%, p=0.01) and greater myocardial hibernation (22+/-14% vs 12+/-7%, p=0.02) compared with patients with >or=33% scar. In conclusion, in patients with chronic heart failure, a decreased BNP response indicated extensive myocardial scarring. PMID:19121444

  14. Sardine protein diet increases plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 levels and prevents tissue oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Madani, Zohra; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J; Dalila, Ait Yahia

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigated whether sardine protein mitigates the adverse effects of fructose on plasma glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and oxidative stress in rats. Rats were fed casein (C) or sardine protein (S) with or without high‑fructose (HF) for 2 months. Plasma glucose, insulin, GLP‑1, lipid and protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes were assayed. HF rats developed obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and oxidative stress despite reduced energy and food intakes. High plasma creatinine and uric acid levels, in addition to albuminuria were observed in the HF groups. The S‑HF diet reduced plasma glucose, insulin, creatinine, uric acid and homeostasis model assessment‑insulin resistance index levels, however increased GLP‑1 levels compared with the C‑HF diet. Hydroperoxides were reduced in the liver, kidney, heart and muscle of S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. A reduction in liver, kidney and heart carbonyls was observed in S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. Reduced levels of nitric oxide (NO) were detected in the liver, kidney and heart of the S‑HF fed rats compared with C‑HF fed rats. The S diet compared with the C diet reduced levels of liver hydroperoxides, heart carbonyls and kidney NO. The S‑HF diet compared with the C‑HF diet increased the levels of liver and kidney superoxide dismutase, liver and muscle catalase, liver, heart and muscle glutathione peroxidase and liver ascorbic acid. The S diet prevented and reversed insulin resistance and oxidative stress, and may have benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  15. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as electronic materials: An evaluation from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdim, Brahim; Pachter, Ruth; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-05-01

    In this letter, we report on the evaluation of diphenylalanine (FF), dityrosine (YY), and phenylalanine-tryptophan (FW) self-assembled peptide nanotube structures for electronics and photonics applications. Realistic bulk peptide nanotube material models were used in density functional theory calculations to mimic the well-ordered tubular nanostructures. Importantly, validated functionals were applied, specifically by using a London dispersion correction to model intertube interactions and a range-separated hybrid functional for accurate bandgap calculations. Bandgaps were found consistent with available experimental data for FF, and also corroborate the higher conductance reported for FW in comparison to FF peptide nanotubes. Interestingly, the predicted bandgap for the YY tubular nanostructure was found to be slightly higher than that of FW, suggesting higher conductance as well. In addition, the band structure calculations along the high symmetry line of nanotube axis revealed a direct bandgap for FF. The results enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of these material systems and will pave the way into their application in devices.

  16. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as electronic materials: An evaluation from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akdim, Brahim E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-05-04

    In this letter, we report on the evaluation of diphenylalanine (FF), dityrosine (YY), and phenylalanine-tryptophan (FW) self-assembled peptide nanotube structures for electronics and photonics applications. Realistic bulk peptide nanotube material models were used in density functional theory calculations to mimic the well-ordered tubular nanostructures. Importantly, validated functionals were applied, specifically by using a London dispersion correction to model intertube interactions and a range-separated hybrid functional for accurate bandgap calculations. Bandgaps were found consistent with available experimental data for FF, and also corroborate the higher conductance reported for FW in comparison to FF peptide nanotubes. Interestingly, the predicted bandgap for the YY tubular nanostructure was found to be slightly higher than that of FW, suggesting higher conductance as well. In addition, the band structure calculations along the high symmetry line of nanotube axis revealed a direct bandgap for FF. The results enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of these material systems and will pave the way into their application in devices.

  17. Urinary C-peptide levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) are related to party size and rank but not to mate competition.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Martin; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2015-05-01

    Within- and between-species variation in male mating strategies has been attributed to a multitude of factors including male competitive ability and the distribution of fertile females across space and time. Differences in energy balance across and within males allow for the identification of some of the trade-offs associated with certain social and mating strategies. Bonobos live in groups with a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, there is co-dominance between the sexes and a linear dominance hierarchy among males. Males compete over access to females, breeding is aseasonal, and females exhibit sexual swellings over extended time periods. In this study we use urinary C-peptide (UCP) levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) obtained from 260 urine samples from a wild bonobo community, to quantify male energy balance during mate competition and levels of gregariousness in the species. Although high ranking males are more aggressive, spend more time in proximity to maximally tumescent females, and have higher mating frequencies, we found no indication that mate guarding or mate competition affected male energy balance. Our results showed a positive correlation between monthly mean UCP levels and mean party size. When traveling in large parties, high ranking males had higher UCP levels than those of the low ranking males. These results support the hypothesis that patterns of fission-fusion dynamics in bonobos are either linked to energy availability in the environment or to the energetic costs of foraging. The finding of a rank-bias in UCP levels in larger parties could also reflect an increase in contest competition among males over access to food.

  18. Urinary C-peptide levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) are related to party size and rank but not to mate competition.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Martin; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2015-05-01

    Within- and between-species variation in male mating strategies has been attributed to a multitude of factors including male competitive ability and the distribution of fertile females across space and time. Differences in energy balance across and within males allow for the identification of some of the trade-offs associated with certain social and mating strategies. Bonobos live in groups with a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, there is co-dominance between the sexes and a linear dominance hierarchy among males. Males compete over access to females, breeding is aseasonal, and females exhibit sexual swellings over extended time periods. In this study we use urinary C-peptide (UCP) levels in male bonobos (Pan paniscus) obtained from 260 urine samples from a wild bonobo community, to quantify male energy balance during mate competition and levels of gregariousness in the species. Although high ranking males are more aggressive, spend more time in proximity to maximally tumescent females, and have higher mating frequencies, we found no indication that mate guarding or mate competition affected male energy balance. Our results showed a positive correlation between monthly mean UCP levels and mean party size. When traveling in large parties, high ranking males had higher UCP levels than those of the low ranking males. These results support the hypothesis that patterns of fission-fusion dynamics in bonobos are either linked to energy availability in the environment or to the energetic costs of foraging. The finding of a rank-bias in UCP levels in larger parties could also reflect an increase in contest competition among males over access to food. PMID:25870021

  19. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  20. Antihepatotoxic effect of corn peptides against Bacillus Calmette-Guerin/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Sun, Jie; He, Hui; Yu, Guo-Cai; Du, Jing

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis is a severe disease with a high incidence rate around the world [Hwang, J.M., Tseng, T.H., Tsai, Y.Y., Lee, H.J., Chou, F.P., Wang, C.J., Chu, C.Y., 2005. Protective effects of baicalein on tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hepatic toxicity in rat hepatocytes. J. Biomed. Sci. 12, 389-397]. Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of starch industry with abundant protein. However, the application of corn protein is limited because of its low solubility and short of essential amino acids such as lysine and tryptophan. The hepatoprotective activity of corn peptides (CP) from corn gluten meal hydrolysate was evaluated against Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immunological liver injury (ILI) in mice. Results showed that ILI was manifested by a significant increase in levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and liver malondialdehyde (MDA)/nitric oxide (NO) levels (p<0.01), and by a significant decrease in levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD)/glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione (GSH) in liver (p<0.01). Pretreatment of mice with CP reversed these altered parameters to normal values. The effect of CP was further demonstrated by histopathological examination of liver sections. The best hepatoprotective effect of CP treatment was observed at the dose of 600 mg/kg bw, which was evidenced from biochemical parameters and liver histopathological characters. Results of this study revealed that CP could afford a significant protection against BCG/LPS-induced hepatocellular injury. It will broaden the application and increase the value of corn gluten meal, byproduct from starch industry.

  1. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  2. Differential effects of "Advanced glycation endproducts" and beta-amyloid peptide on glucose utilization and ATP levels in the neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, B; Loske, C; Garcia De Arriba, S; Schinzel, R; Huber, J; Münch, G

    2004-03-01

    Beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and "Advanced glycation endproducts" (AGEs) are components of the senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. It has been proposed that both AGEs and Abeta exert many of their effects, which include the upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, through RAGE ("receptor for advanced glycation endproducts"). To investigate whether Abeta and AGEs cause similar or identical effects on cell survival and energy metabolism, we have compared the effects of a model-AGE and Abeta on cell viability, ATP level, glucose consumption and lactate production in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. The results show that AGEs and Abeta increase glucose consumption and decrease ATP levels in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, both compounds decrease mitochondrial activity measured by the MTT assay. However, only AGEs decrease the number of cells and significantly increase lactate production. These data indicate that both AGEs and Abeta can cause differential disturbances in neuronal metabolism, which may contribute to the pathophysiological findings in Alzheimer's disease. However, their signalling pathways are apparently quite distinct, a fact which should stimulate a more detailed investigation in this field, e.g. for the purpose of a rational design of potential "neuroprotective" RAGE antagonists. PMID:14991463

  3. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  4. Eclipsing cataclysmic variables. Deep eclipses in H0928+501. YY Draconis, the whirling dervish. New x ray pulsar candidates from HEAO-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The status report covering the period from 1 June 1992 to 31 May 1993 is included. Areas of research include: (1) eclipsing cataclysmic variables; (2) deep eclipses in H0928+501; (3) YY Draconis, the Whirling Dervish; and (4) new x ray pulsar candidates from HEAO-1.

  5. What Does f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] Greater than 0 "Really" Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartin, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This note presents geometric and physical interpretations of the sufficient condition for a critical point to be a strict relative extremum: f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] greater than 0. The role of the double derivative f[subscript xy] in this inequality will be highlighted in these interpretations. (Contains 14…

  6. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  7. Treatment of hypertension with perindopril reduces plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels, left ventricular mass, and improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Aksoy, F. G.; Muderrisoglu, H.; Sabah, I.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for cardiac deaths, and diastolic dysfunction is a usual finding during the course of this disease. HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic therapy with perindopril on left ventricular (LV) mass, left atrial size, diastolic function, and plasma level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with hypertension. METHODS: Twenty four patients who had not been previously taking any antihypertensive medication and without prior history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmias, valvular heart disease, or systemic illnesses received 4-8 mg/day of perindopril orally. Echocardiographic studies were acquired at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of therapy. RESULTS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 174 +/- 19.7 and 107.5 +/- 7.8 mmHg to 134 +/- 10.6 and 82 +/- 6.7 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Left ventricular mass decreased from 252.4 +/- 8.3 to 205.7 +/- 7.08 g and left atrial volume from 20.4 +/- 5.1 to 17.6 +/- 5.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Transmitral Doppler early and atrial filling velocity ratio (E/A) increased from 0.69 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.05 m/s and plasma ANP level decreased from 71.9 +/- 11.7 to 35.3 +/- 7.8 pg/ml (p < 0.001). Reduction of LV mass correlated positively with a reduction in ANP levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Perindopril caused a significant reduction of LV mass, left atrial volume, and plasma ANP levels, as well as improvement in Doppler parameters of LV filling in this group of patients with hypertension.

  8. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in older outpatients with heart failure is associated with physical frailty, especially with the slowness domain

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Nozaki, Yuma; Yamaji, Masayuki; Oya, Kanako; Hikita, Yuki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level in patients with heart failure (HF) and physical frailty as well as with each domain of physical frailty. Methods Two hundred and six outpatients of cardiovascular medicine aged 60 years and older who had been hospitalized for HF or had been given a prescription medication for HF were included. Physical frailty was assessed using the following five domains: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and shrinking, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study. Patients were divided into nonfrailty and frailty groups according to frailty scores. Plasma BNP level was measured. The 6-min walk test was performed to measure endurance. Results Plasma BNP was significantly different between the two groups (frailty group: 158.0 ± 214.7 pg/mL, nonfrailty group: 65.2 ± 88.0 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed log-transformed plasma BNP (Log BNP) was significantly associated with physical frailty (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.11–2.56), and Log BNP was significantly associated with the slowness domain (walking speed < 1.0 m/s) of physical frailty (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.15–2.67). Additionally, Log BNP was negatively correlated to the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) (ρ = −0.37, P < 0.01), while 6MWD was positively correlated to walking speed (ρ = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Plasma BNP level was related to physical frailty, especially in the slowness domain. Endurance may intervene in the associations between plasma BNP level and walking speed.

  9. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in older outpatients with heart failure is associated with physical frailty, especially with the slowness domain

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Nozaki, Yuma; Yamaji, Masayuki; Oya, Kanako; Hikita, Yuki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level in patients with heart failure (HF) and physical frailty as well as with each domain of physical frailty. Methods Two hundred and six outpatients of cardiovascular medicine aged 60 years and older who had been hospitalized for HF or had been given a prescription medication for HF were included. Physical frailty was assessed using the following five domains: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and shrinking, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study. Patients were divided into nonfrailty and frailty groups according to frailty scores. Plasma BNP level was measured. The 6-min walk test was performed to measure endurance. Results Plasma BNP was significantly different between the two groups (frailty group: 158.0 ± 214.7 pg/mL, nonfrailty group: 65.2 ± 88.0 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed log-transformed plasma BNP (Log BNP) was significantly associated with physical frailty (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.11–2.56), and Log BNP was significantly associated with the slowness domain (walking speed < 1.0 m/s) of physical frailty (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.15–2.67). Additionally, Log BNP was negatively correlated to the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) (ρ = −0.37, P < 0.01), while 6MWD was positively correlated to walking speed (ρ = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Plasma BNP level was related to physical frailty, especially in the slowness domain. Endurance may intervene in the associations between plasma BNP level and walking speed. PMID:27605942

  10. Combination of Urinary Sodium/Creatinine Ratio and Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level Predicts Successful Tolvaptan Therapy in Patients With Heart Failure and Volume Overload.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Dohi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Tanimura, Muneyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsushiro; Sugiura, Emiyo; Sugimoto, Tadafumi; Kumagai, Naoto; Ogura, Toru; Nakamori, Shiro; Fujimoto, Naoki; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term clinical and hemodynamic effects of tolvaptan therapy and to identify predictors of the therapeutic outcomes, we retrospectively recruited 60 consecutive hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients (70 ± 11 years) with volume overload. The subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of the changes in HF symptom scores and hemodynamic status assessed by right heart catheterization after tolvaptan therapy (median: 7 days). The majority of patients were successfully treated (group 1). However, 22% of patients (group 2) were unsuccessfully treated, in whom 1) the HF symptom score worsened or 2) there was a stationary HF symptom score ≥ 6 points, and mean PCWP > 18 mmHg and mean RAP > 10 mmHg, after tolvaptan therapy. HF symptom scores, hemodynamic parameters, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level improved in group 1, but all of these parameters remained unchanged in group 2. Lower urine sodium/creatinine ratio (UNa/UCr) and higher BNP level at baseline were independently associated with unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy, and UNa/UCr best predicts unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with a cut-off value of 46.5 mEq/g·Cr (AUC 0.847, 95% CI: 0.718-0.976, sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%, P < 0.01). Double-positive results of UNa/UCr < 46.5 mEq/g·Cr and plasma BNP level > 778 pg/mL predicted unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 54%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 89%, and accuracy 90%). In summary, short-term tolvaptan therapy ameliorated HF symptoms and provided hemodynamic improvement in the majority of patients, and UNa/UCr and BNP level strongly predicted the therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26973271

  11. BRCA1 protein level is not affected by peptide growth factors in MCF10A cell line.

    PubMed

    Aprelikova, O; Kuthiala, A; Bessho, M; Ethier, S; Liu, E T

    1996-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor on chromosome 17. We raised antibody against Ring-finger domain of BRCA1. The antibody recognizes a specific BRCA1 protein doublet of about 220 kD. The majority of BRCA1 protein is localized to the nuclear fraction of untreated MCF10A cells. Though BRCA1 is thought to be a growth suppressor gene, no change in BRCA1 protein level was found when MCF10A cells were arrested by growth factor deprivation or stimulation of cell proliferation by re-addition of growth factors. Furthermore the subcellular localization of the BRCA1 protein does not change throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that BRCA1 may not be directly involved in the regulation of the cell cycle of breast cancer cell line.

  12. Impact of restraint and disinhibition on PYY plasma levels and subjective feelings of appetite.

    PubMed

    Martins, C; Robertson, M D; Morgan, L M

    2010-10-01

    The impact of eating behaviours on circulating levels of appetite-regulating hormones remains largely unknown. The aims of this study were to assess the role of restraint and disinhibition on fasting/postprandial peptide YY (PYY) plasma levels and subjective feelings of appetite in normal-weight individuals and to determine whether the effect was energy load dependent. 33 participants (12 men) were classified as restrained/unrestrained and low/high in disinhibition based on Three Factor Eating Questionnaire-18R and Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. The impact of restraint/disinhibition on PYY plasma levels and feelings of appetite was measured, after a 500kcal and 1000kcal breakfast, using a randomised crossover design. Restraint did not impact on either fasting or postprandial PYY plasma levels, but participants with high disinhibition had a tendency towards a blunted postprandial PYY response. Moreover, restrained eaters reported lower ratings of prospective food consumption postprandially, and a tendency towards higher fullness/lower hunger. In conclusion, circulating PYY is unaffected by restrained eating behaviour, despite being associated with increased fullness and reduced hunger in the fed state. High levels of disinhibition tend to be associated with a blunted PYY response and this may contribute towards the susceptibility to overconsumption and increased risk of weight gain characteristic of this trait.

  13. NUTRALYS® pea protein: characterization of in vitro gastric digestion and in vivo gastrointestinal peptide responses relevant to satiety

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Joost; Guérin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Wils, Daniel; Lambers, Tim T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pea protein (from Pisum sativum) is under consideration as a sustainable, satiety-inducing food ingredient. Objective In the current study, pea-protein-induced physiological signals relevant to satiety were characterized in vitro via gastric digestion kinetics and in vivo by monitoring post-meal gastrointestinal hormonal responses in rats. Design Under in vitro simulated gastric conditions, the digestion of NUTRALYS® pea protein was compared to that of two dairy proteins, slow-digestible casein and fast-digestible whey. In vivo, blood glucose and gastrointestinal hormonal (insulin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin [CCK], glucagon-like peptide 1 [GLP-1], and peptide YY [PYY]) responses were monitored in nine male Wistar rats following isocaloric (11 kcal) meals containing 35 energy% of either NUTRALYS® pea protein, whey protein, or carbohydrate (non-protein). Results In vitro, pea protein transiently aggregated into particles, whereas casein formed a more enduring protein network and whey protein remained dissolved. Pea-protein particle size ranged from 50 to 500 µm, well below the 2 mm threshold for gastric retention in humans. In vivo, pea-protein and whey-protein meals induced comparable responses for CCK, GLP-1, and PYY, that is, the anorexigenic hormones. Pea protein induced weaker initial, but equal 3-h integrated ghrelin and insulin responses than whey protein, possibly due to the slower gastric breakdown of pea protein observed in vitro. Two hours after meals, CCK levels were more elevated in the case of protein meals compared to that of non-protein meals. Conclusions These results indicate that 1) pea protein transiently aggregates in the stomach and has an intermediately fast intestinal bioavailability in between that of whey and casein; 2) pea-protein- and dairy-protein-containing meals were comparably efficacious in triggering gastrointestinal satiety signals. PMID:25882536

  14. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels are poorly related to the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during symptom-limited exercise in low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Andreu; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Agulló, Luis; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; de León, Gustavo; Figueras, Jaume; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The usefulness of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) as a marker of ischemia is controversial. BNP levels have predicted arrhythmias in various settings, but it is unknown whether they are related to exercise-induced ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. Material and methods We analyzed in 63 patients (64 ±14 years, 65% male, 62% with known coronary disease) undergoing exercise stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the association between plasma BNP values (before and 15 min after exercise) and the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during the test. Results Exercise test (8.1 ±2.7 min, 7.4 ±8.1 metabolic equivalents, 82 ±12% of maximal predicted heart rate) induced reversible perfusion defects in 23 (36%) patients. Eight (13%) patients presented significant arrhythmias (≥ 7 ventricular premature complexes/min, couplets, or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia during exercise or in the first minute of recovery). Median baseline BNP levels were 17.5 (12.4–66.4) pg/ml in patients developing scintigraphic ischemia and 45.6 (13.2–107.4) pg/ml in those without ischemia (p = 0.137). The BNP levels increased after exercise (34.4 (15.3–65.4)% increment over baseline, p < 0.001), but the magnitude of this increase was not related to SPECT positivity (35.7 (18.8–65.4)% vs. 27.9 (5.6–64.0)% in patients with and without ischemia, respectively, p = 0.304). No significant association was found between BNP values (at baseline or their change during the test) and ventricular arrhythmias. Conclusions Plasma BNP values – at baseline or after exercise – were not associated with myocardial ischemia or with ventricular arrhythmia during exercise SPECT. These results highlight the limited usefulness of this biomarker to assess acute ischemia. PMID:27186178

  15. Tensor analyzing power {ital A}{sub {ital yy}} for {ital dp} breakup in the symmetric constant relative energy configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Witala, H.; Golak, J. |; Gloeckle, W.; Hueber, D.; Kamada, H.; Tornow, W. |; Stephenson, E.J.; Low, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The tensor analyzing power {ital A}{sub {ital yy}} in the symmetric constant relative energy geometry for the {ital dp} breakup reaction has been calculated using solutions of the three-nucleon Faddeev equations based on the Argonne AV14, AV18, Bonn-B, Nijm78, Nijm93, NijmI, NijmII, and Paris potentials, as well as the Bonn-B potential in conjunction with the Tucson-Melbourne three-nucleon interaction. The comparison with recent {ital dp} data at {ital E}{sub {ital d}}=94.5 MeV revealed a clear discrepancy in the region where the data exhibit a pronounced structure which is not present in the theoretical results.

  16. P144, a Transforming Growth Factor beta inhibitor peptide, generates antitumoral effects and modifies SMAD7 and SKI levels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Hau, Peter; Dotor, Javier; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor, accounting for 60-70% of all gliomas. Current median patient survival time is 14-16 months after diagnosis. Numerous efforts in therapy have not significantly altered the nearly uniform lethality of this malignancy. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a key role in GBM and is implicated in proliferation, invasion and therapy resistance. Several inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical trials or are under development. In this work, the therapeutic potential of P144, a TGF-β inhibitor peptide, was analyzed. P144 decreased proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity in vitro, whereas apoptosis and anoikis were significantly increased for GBM cell lines. SMAD2 phosphorylation was reduced, together with a downregulation of SKI and an upregulation of SMAD7 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, P144 was able to impair tumor growth and increase survival in an in vivo flank model. Our findings suggest a potential effect of P144 in vitro and in vivo that is mediated by regulation of transcriptional target genes of the TGF-β pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential of P144 for GBM treatment.

  17. P144, a Transforming Growth Factor beta inhibitor peptide, generates antitumoral effects and modifies SMAD7 and SKI levels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Oller, Gabriel; Vollmann-Zwerenz, Arabel; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Hau, Peter; Dotor, Javier; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-10-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor, accounting for 60-70% of all gliomas. Current median patient survival time is 14-16 months after diagnosis. Numerous efforts in therapy have not significantly altered the nearly uniform lethality of this malignancy. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a key role in GBM and is implicated in proliferation, invasion and therapy resistance. Several inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway have entered clinical trials or are under development. In this work, the therapeutic potential of P144, a TGF-β inhibitor peptide, was analyzed. P144 decreased proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity in vitro, whereas apoptosis and anoikis were significantly increased for GBM cell lines. SMAD2 phosphorylation was reduced, together with a downregulation of SKI and an upregulation of SMAD7 at both transcriptional and translational levels. Additionally, P144 was able to impair tumor growth and increase survival in an in vivo flank model. Our findings suggest a potential effect of P144 in vitro and in vivo that is mediated by regulation of transcriptional target genes of the TGF-β pathway, suggesting a therapeutic potential of P144 for GBM treatment. PMID:27473823

  18. Computational detection of allergenic proteins attains a new level of accuracy with in silico variable-length peptide extraction and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Soeria-Atmadja, D; Lundell, T; Gustafsson, M G; Hammerling, U

    2006-01-01

    The placing of novel or new-in-the-context proteins on the market, appearing in genetically modified foods, certain bio-pharmaceuticals and some household products leads to human exposure to proteins that may elicit allergic responses. Accurate methods to detect allergens are therefore necessary to ensure consumer/patient safety. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach a new level of accuracy in computational detection of allergenic proteins by presenting a novel detector, Detection based on Filtered Length-adjusted Allergen Peptides (DFLAP). The DFLAP algorithm extracts variable length allergen sequence fragments and employs modern machine learning techniques in the form of a support vector machine. In particular, this new detector shows hitherto unmatched specificity when challenged to the Swiss-Prot repository without appreciable loss of sensitivity. DFLAP is also the first reported detector that successfully discriminates between allergens and non-allergens occurring in protein families known to hold both categories. Allergenicity assessment for specific protein sequences of interest using DFLAP is possible via ulfh@slv.se.

  19. Association between serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels and characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Feng, Cong; Liu, Chunlei; Tian, Shuping; Song, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the association between the levels of serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) and the characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in patients with unstable angina (UA). A total of 202 patients (age range, 47–82 years) were divided into the following three groups: Non-cardiac disease group (57 patients); stable angina pectoris (SAP) group (62 patients); and UA group (83 patients). There were significant differences between the serum NT-pro BNP levels among the three groups (P=0.007). However, in multivariant diagnoses, NT-pro BNP level was not an independent risk factor for UA. The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were observed to be positively correlated with the number of vessels involved (r=0.462; P<0.001), SIS (r=0.475; P<0.001), segment-stenosis score (r=0.453; P<0.001), coronary calcification score (r=0.412; P=0.001), number of obstructive diseases (r=0.346; P<0.001), and the number of segments with non-calcified plaque (r=0.235; P=0.017), mixed plaque (r=0.234; P=0.017) and calcified plaque (r=0.431; P<0.001). The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were significantly higher in patients with UA and left main-left anterior descending (LM-LAD) disease, compared with UA patients without LM-LAD disease (P<0.001). In addition, serum NT-pro BNP was significantly higher in patients with obstructive disease and UA than in those without obstructive disease (P<0.001). The area under the curve of log(NT-pro BNP) was 0.656 (P=0.006; optimal cut-off value, 1.74; sensitivity, 77.6%; specificity, 51.9%). In conclusion, the levels of serum NT-pro BNP are associated with the burden and severity of coronary artery atherosclerotic disease in patients with UA, and may be helpful in risk stratification of patients with UA. PMID:27446259

  20. Cloning and tissue distribution of appetite-regulating peptides in pirapitinga (Piaractus brachypomus).

    PubMed

    Volkoff, H

    2015-10-01

    Pirapitinga (or red-bellied pacu, Piaractus brachypomus, Characiforme, Serrasalmidae) is an economically important South American fish for which the endocrine mechanism of the regulation of feeding has never been examined. To better understand these mechanisms, cDNAs encoding the appetite-regulating peptides orexin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), apelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), leptin and ghrelin were isolated in pirapitinga and their mRNA distributions examined in peripheral tissues and brain. When compared to other fish, the sequences obtained for all peptides were most similar to those of other Characiforme fish (i.e. Mexican cavefish) and Siluriformes (catfish) as well as Cypriniformes (i.e. goldfish, zebrafish). All peptides were widely expressed within the brain. With the exception of CART, which was only expressed in brain, the mRNAs of all peptides were present in several peripheral tissues, including gastrointestinal tract, kidneys and gills. The widespread and peptide-specific distributions suggest that each peptide might have distinct physiological actions in the brain and on peripheral tissues, in particular on the gastrointestinal tract, which include feeding regulation. This preliminary study opens new avenues for further functional studies on the endocrine regulation of feeding in Serrasalmidae fish, including pirapitinga. PMID:25846408

  1. Increased Epicardial Fat Thickness Correlates with Aortic Stiffness and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ibrahim; Unal, Yasemin; Basaran, Ozcan; Akin, Fatih; Emir, Gulser Karadaban; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Biteker, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Epicardial fat, a metabolically active tissue, has emerged as a risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated epicardial fat thickness in patients who had sustained an acute ischemic stroke, and we evaluated the relationship of epicardial fat thickness with other prognostic factors. We enrolled 61 consecutive patients (age, ≥18 yr) who had sustained a first acute ischemic stroke and had been admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. The control group comprised 82 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients free of past or current stroke who had been admitted to our cardiology clinics. Blood samples were taken for measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices and epicardial fat thickness were measured by means of transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 hours. In comparison with the control group, the patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly higher epicardial fat thickness (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.7 mm; P <0.001), lower aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.8 vs 3.4 ± 0.9 cm(2) ·dyn(-1); P <0.001) and lower aortic strain (5.5% ± 1.9% vs 6.4% ± 1.8%; P=0.003). We found a significant association between epicardial fat thickness, NT-proBNP levels, and arterial dysfunction in patients who had sustained acute ischemic stroke. Increased epicardial fat thickness might be a novel risk factor and might enable evaluation of subclinical target-organ damage in these patients.

  2. Increased Epicardial Fat Thickness Correlates with Aortic Stiffness and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Yasemin; Basaran, Ozcan; Akin, Fatih; Emir, Gulser Karadaban; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial fat, a metabolically active tissue, has emerged as a risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated epicardial fat thickness in patients who had sustained an acute ischemic stroke, and we evaluated the relationship of epicardial fat thickness with other prognostic factors. We enrolled 61 consecutive patients (age, ≥18 yr) who had sustained a first acute ischemic stroke and had been admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. The control group comprised 82 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients free of past or current stroke who had been admitted to our cardiology clinics. Blood samples were taken for measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices and epicardial fat thickness were measured by means of transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 hours. In comparison with the control group, the patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly higher epicardial fat thickness (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.7 mm; P <0.001), lower aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.8 vs 3.4 ± 0.9 cm2·dyn−1; P <0.001) and lower aortic strain (5.5% ± 1.9% vs 6.4% ± 1.8%; P=0.003). We found a significant association between epicardial fat thickness, NT-proBNP levels, and arterial dysfunction in patients who had sustained acute ischemic stroke. Increased epicardial fat thickness might be a novel risk factor and might enable evaluation of subclinical target-organ damage in these patients. PMID:27303237

  3. Evidence that atrial natriuretic peptide tissue extraction is not changed by large increases in its plasma levels induced by pacing in humans.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Vitek, F; Berti, S; Palmieri, C; Ravani, M; Sabatino, L; Manfredi, C; Del Chicca, M G; Biagini, A; Donato, L

    1997-03-01

    Atrial natiurectic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone with a very short plasma half-life, which plays an important role in a variety of clinical conditions associated with an increase in pressure and/or volume overload on the heart. The MCR of the hormone is considered to represent a stable parameter, reflecting the uptake and degradation rate of ANP by the periphery, only scarcely affected by rapid oscillations of circulating levels. To evaluate the extent to which MCR is affected by rapid and large variations of circulating levels of the hormone, we measured MCR in five patients with different degrees of myocardial function (from normal to severely impaired), in whom changes in ANP levels were induced by atrial and/or ventricular pacing. Cardiac output was simultaneously measured by thermodilution to calculate whole body extraction of ANP. During constant i.v. infusion of [125I]ANP, the hormone MCR was determined both under basal conditions (at tracer equilibration, 20-30 min after the start of infusion) and during atrial and ventricular pacing. Pacing maneuvers, begun 50 min after the start of infusion, induced a marked and rapid increase in endogenous plasma ANP values in all patients (on the average, 3,7-fold compared to basal values; range, 1.8-5.68), whereas corresponding values of [125I]ANP only minimally changed. The MCR of ANP (3.62 +/- 1.06 L/min, mean +/- SD) slightly decreased (by repeated measures ANOVA, P = 0.0458) during atrial and ventricular pacing procedures (3.35 +/- 1.03 and 3.15 +/- 0.74 L/min, respectively), reaching a mean value of 88.7 +/- 9.0% compared to basal. The small decrease in MCR could be almost completely ascribed to hemodynamic factors; indeed, basal cardiac output (5.76 +/- 1.70 L/min) was found, on the average, to be slightly decreased during atrial and ventricular pacing (5.28 +/- 1.46 and 5.16 +/- 1.33 L/min, respectively), and so whole body extraction of the hormone, measured before pacing (50.0 +/- 12%), remains stable

  4. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, Maria P.; Grimaldi, Luca; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Tramacere, Francesco; Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto; Pili, Giorgio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  5. Changes in the brain and plasma Aβ peptide levels with age and its relationship with cognitive impairment in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Izco, M; Martínez, P; Corrales, A; Fandos, N; García, S; Insua, D; Montañes, M; Pérez-Grijalba, V; Rueda, N; Vidal, V; Martínez-Cué, C; Pesini, P; Sarasa, M

    2014-03-28

    Double transgenic mice expressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe) and mutant presenilin 1 (PS1dE9) are a model of Alzheimer-type amyloidosis and are widely used in experimental studies. In the present work, the relationships between brain and plasma amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) levels and cognitive impairments were examined in male APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice at different ages. When compared with non-transgenic littermates, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice exhibited significant learning deficits from the age of 6months (M6), which were aggravated at later stages of life (M8 and M12). Sporadic brain amyloid plaques were observed in mice as early as M3 and progressively increased in number and size up to M12. A similar increase was observed in brain insoluble Aβ levels as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In particular, the levels of brain insoluble Aβ peptides rose steeply from M4 to M6. Interestingly, this pronounced amyloid deposition was accompanied by a temporary fall in the concentration of brain soluble and membrane-bound Aβ peptides at M6 that rose again at M8 and M12. The plasma levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 decreased with advancing age up to M8, when they stabilized at M12. This decrease in plasma Aβ levels coincided with the observed increase in insoluble brain Aβ levels. These results could be useful for developing plasma Aβ levels as possible biomarkers of the cerebral amyloidosis and provide advances in the knowledge of the Aβ peptide biochemical changes that occur in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients.

  6. How does serum brain natriuretic peptide level change under nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Msaad, Sameh; Marrakchi, Rim; Grati, Malek; Gargouri, Rahma; Kammoun, Samy; Jammoussi, Kamel; Yangui, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which can be improved by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, the pathophysiological links between the two kinds of disease and the mechanism of the CPAP effect remain incompletely understood. We aimed to inquire into the myocardial involvement in this relationship. We suggested that serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is sensitive enough to detect myocardial stress caused by OSAHS. Design and methods Sixty-four subjects without cardiovascular disease (21 controls, 24 normotensive OSAHS patients, and 19 hypertensive OSAHS patients) were analyzed for serum BNP at baseline and serially over 6 months. CPAP was applied to 23 patients with severe OSAHS. Results At baseline, the serum BNP levels were significantly higher (p=0.0001) in the OSAHS group (22.3±14.79 pg/ml) than in the control group (9.2±6.75 pg/ml). Increased serum BNP levels were significantly associated with mean transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) (p<0.0001), minimal SpO2 (p=0.002), oxygen desaturation index (p=0.001), and total sleep time spent with SpO2 lower than 90% (p=0.002). All patients with elevated BNP levels (≥37 pg/ml) had moderate or severe OSAHS (11/43 OSAHS patients). The more severe the OSAHS, the higher the BNP levels were. However, only the difference between severe and mild OSAHS was statistically significant (p=0.029). Hypertensive OSAHS patients had the highest baseline BNP levels (27.7±16.74 pg/ml). They were significantly higher (p=0.001) than in normotensive OSAHS patients (18±11.72 pg/ml) (p=0.039) and the controls (9.2±6.75 pg/ml). As compared with baseline, treatment with CPAP significantly decreased BNP levels in both hypertensive and normotensive OSAHS patients (respectively, from 36±16.10 to 29.7±14.29 pg/ml, p<0.001, and from 20±10.09 to 16±8.98 pg/ml, p<0.001). In contrast, the BNP levels slightly increased in

  7. The Prognostic Value of Serum Levels of Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Patients With Increased Levels of Amino-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Hun; Seo, Yiel Hea; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Kim, Kyung Hee; Seo, Ja Young; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Hwan Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background Amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a well-established prognostic factor in heart failure (HF). However, numerous causes may lead to elevations in NT-proBNP, and thus, an increased NT-proBNP level alone is not sufficient to predict outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of two acute response markers, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), in patients with an increased NT-proBNP level. Methods The 278 patients were classified into three groups by etiology: 1) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (n=62), 2) non-ACS cardiac disease (n=156), and 3) infectious disease (n=60). Survival was determined on day 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 60, 90, 120, and 150 after enrollment. Results H-FABP (P<0.001), NT-proBNP (P=0.006), hsCRP (P<0.001) levels, and survival (P<0.001) were significantly different in the three disease groups. Patients were divided into three classes by using receiver operating characteristic curves for NT-proBNP, H-FABP, and hsCRP. Patients with elevated NT-proBNP (≥3,856 pg/mL) and H-FABP (≥8.8 ng/mL) levels were associated with higher hazard ratio for mortality (5.15 in NT-proBNP and 3.25 in H-FABP). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed H-FABP was a better predictor of 60-day mortality than NT-proBNP. Conclusions The combined measurement of H-FABP with NT-proBNP provides a highly reliable means of short-term mortality prediction for patients hospitalized for ACS, non-ACS cardiac disease, or infectious disease. PMID:27374706

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  10. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, n-Terminal Fragment of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcidiol Are Independently Associated with the Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Reyes, Roberto; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Pello, Ana María; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Martínez-Milla, Juan; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Piñero, Antonio; Navarro, Felipe; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the relationship of the Syntax Score (SS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC), with plasma levels of biomarkers related to cardiovascular damage and mineral metabolism, as there is sparse information in this field. Methods We studied 270 patients with coronary disease that had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) six months before. Calcidiol, fibroblast growth factor-23, parathormone, phosphate and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, galectin-3, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP] levels, among other biomarkers, were determined. CAC was assessed by coronary angiogram as low-grade (0–1) and high-grade (2–3) calcification, measured with a semiquantitative scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (severe). For the SS study patients were divided in SS<14 and SS≥14. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results MCP-1 predicted independently the SS (RC = 1.73 [95%CI = 0.08–3.39]; p = 0.040), along with NT-proBNP (RC = 0.17 [95%CI = 0.05–0.28]; p = 0.004), male sex (RC = 4.15 [95%CI = 1.47–6.83]; p = 0.003), age (RC = 0.13 [95%CI = 0.02–0.24]; p = 0.020), hypertension (RC = 3.64, [95%CI = 0.77–6.50]; p = 0.013), hyperlipidemia (RC = 2.78, [95%CI = 0.28–5.29]; p = 0.030), and statins (RC = 6.12 [95%CI = 1.28–10.96]; p = 0.013). Low calcidiol predicted high-grade calcification independently (OR = 0.57 [95% CI = 0.36–0.90]; p = 0.013) along with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR = 0.38 [95%CI = 0.19–0.78]; p = 0.006), diabetes (OR = 2.35 [95%CI = 1.11–4.98]; p = 0.028) and age (OR = 1.37 [95%CI = 1.18–1.59]; p<0.001). During follow-up (1.79 [0.94–2.86] years), 27 patients developed ACS, stroke, or transient ischemic attack. A combined score using SS and CAC predicted independently the development of the outcome. Conclusions MCP-1 and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of SS, while low calcidiol plasma levels

  11. Swedish mutant APP-based BACE1 binding site peptide reduces APP β-cleavage and cerebral Aβ levels in Alzheimer’s mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Hou, Huayan; Mori, Takashi; Sawmiller, Darrell; Smith, Adam; Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanjiang; Giunta, Brian; Sanberg, Paul R.; Zhang, Sheqing; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    BACE1 initiates amyloid-β (Aβ) generation and the resultant cerebral amyloidosis, as a characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Thus, inhibition of BACE1 has been the focus of a large body of research. The most recent clinical trials highlight the difficulty involved in this type of anti-AD therapy as evidenced by side effects likely due to the ubiquitous nature of BACE1, which cleaves multiple substrates. The human Swedish mutant form of amyloid protein precursor (APPswe) has been shown to possess a higher affinity for BACE1 compared to wild-type APP (APPwt). We pursued a new approach wherein harnessing this greater affinity to modulate BACE1 APP processing activity. We found that one peptide derived from APPswe, containing the β-cleavage site, strongly inhibits BACE1 activity and thereby reduces Aβ production. This peptide, termed APPswe BACE1 binding site peptide (APPsweBBP), was further conjugated to the fusion domain of the HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) at the C-terminus to facilitate its biomembrane-penetrating activity. APPwt and APPswe over-expressing CHO cells treated with this TAT-conjugated peptide resulted in a marked reduction of Aβ and a significant increase of soluble APPα. Intraperitoneal administration of this peptide to 5XFAD mice markedly reduced β-amyloid deposits as well as improved hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:26091071

  12. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  13. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  15. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  16. Characterization and modulation of [125I]iberiotoxin-D19Y/Y36F binding in the guinea-pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Molinari, E J; Sullivan, J P; Wan, Y; Brioni, J D; Gopalakrishnan, M

    2000-01-28

    The radioligand binding characteristics of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel ligand [125I]iberiotoxin-D19Y/Y36F were examined in guinea-pig urinary bladder membranes. Saturation analysis revealed a single class of high affinity binding sites in the bladder with a K(D) value of 45.6 pM and a B(max) value of 112 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding was displaced by unlabeled iberiotoxin and penitrem A, but not by blockers of other classes of K(+) channels including alpha-dendrotoxin, margatoxin and apamin. The indole alkaloids, paxilline and verruculogen, significantly increased binding by 4.5- and 4.3-fold, respectively. Tetraacetic acid derivatives such as ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid enhanced specific [125I]iberiotoxin-D19Y/Y36F binding about 2.5-fold, which was not attributable to calcium chelation. This increase was due to a significant change in ligand binding affinity (K(D)=6.3 pM), but not due to a change in the B(max), indicating that these compounds may enhance toxin binding via allosteric interactions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the binding sites for [125I]iberiotoxin-D19Y/Y36F present in the urinary bladder shows a pharmacological profile typical of maxi-K(+) channels and can be modulated, not only by previously known indole alkaloids, but also by tetraacetic acid analogs. PMID:10666507

  17. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  18. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  19. Changes in the levels of phytochelatins and related metal-binding peptides in chickpea seedlings exposed to arsenic and different heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dharmendra K; Tohoyama, Hiroshi; Joho, Masanori; Inouhe, Masahiro

    2004-06-01

    Phytochelatin-related peptides were analyzed in chickpea plants exposed to six different heavy-metal ions. Cadmium and arsenic stimulated phytochelatin and homophytochelatin synthesis in roots but other metals did not. These metals, however, caused an overall increase in the precursors, glutathione, homoglutathione and cysteine. These changes may be different biochemical indexes for heavy-metal contamination.

  20. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ping-Huei; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Yi-Chia; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Lin, Jaw-Town; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD. Methods One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67), non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37), and Barrett’s esophagus (BE, n = 8). Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin) and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY)) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects. Results All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile), 80.1 (49.8–108.3) vs. 99.4 (65.8–131.9) pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0–120.8) vs. 32.8 (28.7–84.5) pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6–9.3) vs. 9.9 (9.6–10.6) μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1–9.2) vs. 9.2 (7.1–11.2) μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE. Conclusions Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD

  2. Comparison of Plasma Glucose and Gut Hormone Levels Between Drinking Enteral Formula Over a Period of 5 and 20 Minutes in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamiko, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Taguri, Masataka; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Background A fast eating speed is reportedly associated with obesity, fatty liver, and metabolic syndrome. As a comparison of postprandial glucose levels after eating quickly or slowly has not been previously reported for Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, we evaluated the impact of the fast or slow ingestion of an enteral formula (liquid meal) on glucose metabolism. Methods Ten Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who had been hospitalized at our hospital were enrolled. All the subjects received an enteral formula for breakfast. The study was performed over a 2-day period in each subject (day 1: enteral formula was consumed over a 5-minute period; day 2: enteral formula was consumed over a 20-minute period). The subjects were requested to fast for at least 12 hours before eating breakfast, and blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after the start of breakfast. Results The areas under the curve (AUCs) of the plasma glucose, serum insulin, plasma active ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), plasma total glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and serum total peptide YY (PYY) levels were not significantly changed by intake over a 5-minute or 20-minute period. Conclusions Eating quickly per se probably does not affect postprandial glucose excursions, but the increased energy intake resulting from eating quickly may increase the body weight and increase insulin resistance. Eating quickly may increase energy intake and worsen long-term metabolic parameters.

  3. Comparison of Plasma Glucose and Gut Hormone Levels Between Drinking Enteral Formula Over a Period of 5 and 20 Minutes in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamiko, Kazunari; Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Taguri, Masataka; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Background A fast eating speed is reportedly associated with obesity, fatty liver, and metabolic syndrome. As a comparison of postprandial glucose levels after eating quickly or slowly has not been previously reported for Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, we evaluated the impact of the fast or slow ingestion of an enteral formula (liquid meal) on glucose metabolism. Methods Ten Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who had been hospitalized at our hospital were enrolled. All the subjects received an enteral formula for breakfast. The study was performed over a 2-day period in each subject (day 1: enteral formula was consumed over a 5-minute period; day 2: enteral formula was consumed over a 20-minute period). The subjects were requested to fast for at least 12 hours before eating breakfast, and blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after the start of breakfast. Results The areas under the curve (AUCs) of the plasma glucose, serum insulin, plasma active ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), plasma total glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and serum total peptide YY (PYY) levels were not significantly changed by intake over a 5-minute or 20-minute period. Conclusions Eating quickly per se probably does not affect postprandial glucose excursions, but the increased energy intake resulting from eating quickly may increase the body weight and increase insulin resistance. Eating quickly may increase energy intake and worsen long-term metabolic parameters. PMID:27635181

  4. Temporal changes in bile acid levels and 12α-hydroxylation after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dutia, R; Embrey, M; O’Brien, S; Haeusler, RA; Agénor, KK; Homel, P; McGinty, J; Vincent, RP; Alaghband-Zadeh, J; Staels, B; le Roux, CW; Yu, J; Laferrère, B

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastric bypass surgery (GBP) leads to sustained weight loss and significant improvement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Bile acids (BAs), signaling molecules which influence glucose metabolism, are a potential mediator for the improvement in T2DM after GBP. This study sought to investigate the effect of GBP on BA levels and composition in individuals with T2DM. METHODS Plasma BA levels and composition and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19 levels were measured during fasting and in response to an oral glucose load before and at 1 month and 2 years post GBP in 13 severely obese women with T2DM. RESULTS A striking temporal change in BA levels and composition was observed after GBP. During the fasted state, BA concentrations were generally reduced at 1 month, but increased 2 years post GBP. Postprandial BA levels were unchanged 1 month post GBP, but an exaggerated postprandial peak was observed 2 years after the surgery. A significant increase in the 12α-hydroxylated/non12α-hydroxylated BA ratio during fasting and postprandially at 2 years, but not 1 month, post GBP was observed. Significant correlations between BAs vs FGF-19, body weight, the incretin effect and peptide YY (PYY) were also found. CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence that GBP temporally modifies the concentration and composition of circulating BAs in individuals with T2DM, and suggests that BAs may be linked to the improvement in T2DM after GBP. PMID:25599611

  5. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  6. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  7. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  8. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  9. Effects of fat, protein, and carbohydrate and protein load on appetite, plasma cholecystokinin, peptide YY, and ghrelin, and energy intake in lean and obese men.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Ixchel M; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Seimon, Radhika V; Otto, Bärbel; Horowitz, Michael; Wishart, Judith M; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2012-07-01

    While protein is regarded as the most satiating macronutrient, many studies have employed test meals that had very high and unsustainable protein contents. Furthermore, the comparative responses between lean and obese subjects and the relationships between energy intake suppression and gut hormone release remain unclear. We evaluated the acute effects of meals with modest variations in 1) fat, protein, and carbohydrate content and 2) protein load on gastrointestinal hormones, appetite, and subsequent energy intake in lean and obese subjects. Sixteen lean and sixteen obese men were studied on four occasions. Following a standardized breakfast, they received for lunch: 1) high-fat (HF), 2) high-protein (HP), 3) high-carbohydrate/low-protein (HC/LP), or 4) adequate-protein (AP) isocaloric test meals. Hunger, fullness, and gut hormones were measured throughout, and at t = 180 min energy intake at a buffet meal was quantified. In lean subjects, hunger was less and fullness greater following HF, HP, and AP compared with HC/LP meals, and energy intake was less following HF and HP compared with HC meals (P < 0.05). In the obese subjects, hunger was less following HP compared with HF, HC/LP, and AP meals, and energy intake was less following HP and AP compared with HF and HC meals (P < 0.05). There were no major differences in hormone responses to the meals among subject groups, but the CCK and ghrelin responses to HP and AP were sustained in both groups. In conclusion, HP meals suppress energy intake in lean and obese subjects, an effect potentially mediated by CCK and ghrelin, while obese individuals appear to be less sensitive to the satiating effects of fat.

  10. Isolation and structure of the second of two major peptide products from the precursor to an anglerfish peptide homologous to neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Dixon, J E

    1986-07-01

    The peptide hormone recently isolated from anglerfish endocrine pancreas (aPY) (Andrews, P. C., Hawke, D., Shively, J.E., and Dixon, J.E. (1985) Endocrinology 116, 2677-2681), is a member of a family of peptide hormones which includes pancreatic polypeptide, neuropeptide Y, and the gut peptide YY. A 30-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment of the precursor to aPY has been purified from anglerfish endocrine pancreas in two steps using both classical chromatographic methods and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. It was identified by sequence homology with the analogous peptide from human preproneuropeptide Y. The sequence was found by Edman degradation and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry to be SSPEEAVAWLLFKADPSQDIEPRLDDDNAW. The high yield of this fragment (6.5 nmol . g-1) is similar to that previously reported for aPY (7.9 nmol . g-1) and suggests that it is a major product of pro-aPY processing. The data indicate that pro-aPY is proteolytically processed into two major products: the 37-residue aPY and the 30-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment. PMID:3522578

  11. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  12. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  13. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization. PMID:26849676

  14. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  15. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine.

    PubMed

    Vicentini, Geraldo E; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R G; Martins, Heber A; Guarnier, Flávia A; Zanoni, Jacqueline N

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress.

  16. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST/EAAT1: a role for YY1.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sandra; Vargas, Miguel A; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-05-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain and its extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent excitotoxic effects. The Na(+)-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST/EAAT1 is regulated in the short and in the long term by glutamate. A receptors-independent change in its membrane translocation rate, accounts for an acute modulation in GLAST/EAAT1 transport. In contrast, activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate subtype of glutamate receptors represses the transcription of the chick glast gene. A glutamate responsive element has been mapped to the promoter region of this gene containing a bonafide binding site for the transcription factor Ying-Yang 1. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate elicited a time and dose-dependent increase in Ying-Yang 1 DNA binding consistent with the negative response generated in a reporter gene construct controlled for Ying-Yang 1. Over-expression of this transcription factor leads to a substantial reduction in GLAST/EAAT1 transporter uptake and an important decrease in mRNA levels, all associated with the transcriptional repression of the chick glast promoter activity. These results provide evidence for an involvement of Ying-Yang 1 in the transcriptional response to glutamate in glial cells and favor the notion of a relevant role of this factor in GLAST/EAAT1 transcriptional control.

  17. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  18. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa High-Level Resistance to Polymyxins and Other Antimicrobial Peptides Requires cprA, a Gene That Is Disrupted in the PAO1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Alina D.; Rodgers, Nicole S.; Park, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    The arn locus, found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, mediates resistance to polymyxins and other cationic antimicrobial peptides through 4-amino-l-arabinose modification of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, several two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) control the arn locus, which is necessary but not sufficient for these resistance phenotypes. A previous transposon mutagenesis screen to identify additional polymyxin resistance genes that these systems regulate implicated an open reading frame designated PA1559 in the genome of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. Resequencing of this chromosomal region and bioinformatics analysis for a variety of P. aeruginosa strains revealed that in the sequenced PAO1 strain, a guanine deletion at the end of PA1559 results in a frameshift and truncation of a full-length open reading frame that also encompasses PA1560 in non-PAO1 strains, such as P. aeruginosa PAK. Deletion analysis in the PAK strain showed that this full-length open reading frame, designated cprA, is necessary for polymyxin resistance conferred by activating mutations in the PhoPQ, PmrAB, and CprRS TCSs. The cprA gene was also required for PmrAB-mediated resistance to other cationic antimicrobial peptides in the PAK strain. Repair of the mutated cprA allele in the PAO1 strain restored polymyxin resistance conferred by an activating TCS mutation. The deletion of cprA did not affect the arn-mediated lipid A modification, indicating that the CprA protein is necessary for a different aspect of polymyxin resistance. This protein has a domain structure with a strong similarity to the extended short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family that comprises isomerases, lyases, and oxidoreductases. These results suggest a new avenue through which to pursue targeted inhibition of polymyxin resistance. PMID:26100714

  20. The aluminum-induced increase in blood-brain barrier permeability to delta-sleep-inducing peptide occurs throughout the brain and is independent of phosphorus and acetylcholinesterase levels.

    PubMed

    Banks, W A; Kastin, A J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of aluminum on levels of inorganic phosphorus and acetylcholinesterase in blood and brain and on permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in different regions of the brain to the neuropeptide delta-sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) was studied in adult rats. Aluminum (100 mg/kg) significantly increased the permeability of the BBB to intracarotid 125I-N-Tyr-DSIP so that levels of radioactivity in whole brain were 45% higher than in control animals. The pattern of regional distribution of radioactivity in the brain was, however, unaffected, demonstrating that the affect of aluminum occurs throughout the BBB. Aluminum also significantly decreased inorganic phosphorus levels in the serum by 19%, but this effect did not correlate with BBB permeability to DSIP. Aluminum did not decrease brain levels of phosphorus despite the drop in blood levels of phosphorus nor affect brain or blood levels of acetylcholinesterase. Experiments with radioactive 32P reinforced the finding that blood but not brain levels of phosphorus are reliably affected by aluminum. The lack of correlation between changes in BBB permeability and decreased levels of inorganic phosphorus in the blood suggests that the effect of aluminum may not be mediated by its effects on phosphorus metabolism. Also, the change in BBB permeability after administration of aluminum does not appear to depend on changes in brain cholinergic activity but does occur throughout the brain.

  1. Measurement of A{sub xx}, A{sub yy} and A{sub zz} for p+{rvec d}{r_arrow}{sup 3}He+{gamma} reaction at 17.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sagara, K.; Kiyoshi, H.; Ueno, S.; Nishimori, N.; Motoshima, A.; Koyasako, R.; Nakashima, K.; Fujita, T.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, H.; Nakashima, T.

    1995-05-10

    Angular distributions of tensor analyzing powers A{sub xx}, A{sub yy} and A{sub zz} of p+{rvec d}{r_arrow}{sup 3}He+{gamma} reaction at E{sub d}=17.5 MeV have been measured precisely. The experimental data on A{sub yy} agree with a Faddeev calculation based on a realistic NN potential. However, A{sub xx} and A{sub zz} show apparent disagreements with the calculation, and the inclusion of a three-nucleon force increases the disagreement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. B-type natriuretic peptide modulates ghrelin, hunger, and satiety in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Grimm, Gabriele; Resl, Michael; Heinisch, Birgit; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Clodi, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is accompanied by anorexia and increased release of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking heart failure and appetite regulation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of intravenous BNP administration on appetite-regulating hormones and subjective ratings of hunger and satiety in 10 healthy volunteers. Participants received in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, single-blinded study (subject) placebo once and 3.0 pmol/kg/min human BNP-32 once administered as a continuous infusion during 4 h. Circulating concentrations of appetite-regulating peptides were measured hourly. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. BNP inhibited the fasting-induced increase in total and acylated ghrelin concentrations over time (P = 0.043 and P = 0.038, respectively). In addition, BNP decreased the subjective rating of hunger (P = 0.009) and increased the feeling of satiety (P = 0.012) when compared with placebo. There were no significant changes in circulating peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide, leptin, and adiponectin concentrations. In summary, our results demonstrate that BNP exerts anorectic effects and reduces ghrelin concentrations in men. These data, taken together with the known cardiovascular properties of ghrelin, support the existence of a heart-gut-brain axis, which could be therapeutically targeted in patients with heart failure and obesity.

  3. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  4. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  5. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide and naloxone combination on urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase level and kidney histology of rats exposed to severe hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Akin, M Z; Tunçel, N; Gürer, F; Kural, N; Uslu, S

    1993-09-01

    Renal hypoperfusion which occurs in hemorrhagic shock creates an environment in which cellular injury and organ dysfunction can occur during the episode of shock as well as reoxygenation and reperfusion. At the same time, mast cell degranulation which is observed during hemorrhage may have an additional deleterious effect on the kidney. Twenty-two (Mus norvegicus albinos) rats (200-250 g) of either sex were used. The animals were divided into three groups. Group 1, the control group, was exposed to a 40% hemorrhage. Group 2 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage and then shed blood reperfused. Group 3 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage, and in addition to shed blood reperfusion 25 ng kg-1 vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) + 5 mg kg-1 naloxone (NLX) were given. At the end of the experiment the kidneys were evaluated either histologically or by measurement of the urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity. Shed blood reperfusion caused continuation of ischemic tissue damage and elevation of urinary NAG activity. Addition of VIP and NLX to the blood reperfusion caused a decrease in urinary NAG excretion, and the histology of renal tissue was almost normal.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) can reverse AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and S6 kinase (P70S6K) activities induced by fluctuations in glucose levels in hypothalamic areas involved in feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Carneiro, Verónica; Sanz, Carmen; Roncero, Isabel; Vazquez, Patricia; Blazquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2012-04-01

    The anorexigenic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), reduces glucose metabolism in the human hypothalamus and brain stem. The brain activity of metabolic sensors such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to changes in glucose levels. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), integrate nutrient and hormonal signals. The hypothalamic mTOR/p70S6K pathway has been implicated in the control of feeding and the regulation of energy balances. Therefore, we investigated the coordinated effects of glucose and GLP-1 on the expression and activity of AMPK and p70S6K in the areas involved in the control of feeding. The effect of GLP-1 on the expression and activities of AMPK and p70S6K was studied in hypothalamic slice explants exposed to low- and high-glucose concentrations by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and by the quantification of active-phosphorylated protein levels by immunoblot. In vivo, the effects of exendin-4 on hypothalamic AMPK and p70S6K activation were analysed in male obese Zucker and lean controls 1 h after exendin-4 injection to rats fasted for 48 h or after re-feeding for 2-4 h. High-glucose levels decreased the expression of Ampk in the lateral hypothalamus and treatment with GLP-1 reversed this effect. GLP-1 treatment inhibited the activities of AMPK and p70S6K when the activation of these protein kinases was maximum in both the ventromedial and lateral hypothalamic areas. Furthermore, in vivo s.c. administration of exendin-4 modulated AMPK and p70S6K activities in those areas, in both fasted and re-fed obese Zucker and lean control rats.

  7. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  8. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  9. Photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride)s for peptide delivery: Effect of oligomer hydrophobicity on PYY3-36 delivery.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Juha; Hakala, Risto A; Kovalainen, Miia; Korhonen, Harri; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Seppälä, Jukka V; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment for many diseases can be improved by developing more efficient peptide delivery technologies, for example, biodegradable polymers. In this work, photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride)s based on functionalized poly(ε-caprolactone) oligomers were investigated for their abilities to achieve controlled peptide delivery. The effect of oligomer hydrophobicity on erosion and peptide release from poly(ester anhydride)s was evaluated by developing a sustained subcutaneous delivery system for an antiobesity drug candidate, peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36). Oligomer hydrophobicity was modified with alkenylsuccinic anhydrides containing a 12-carbon alkenyl chain. PYY3-36 was mixed as a solid powder with methacrylated poly(ester anhydride) precursors, and this mixture was photocrosslinked at room temperature to form an implant for subcutaneous administration in rats. The oligomer hydrophobicity controlled the polymer erosion and PYY3-36 release as the increased hydrophobicity via the alkenyl chain prolonged polymer erosion in vitro and sustained in vivo release of PYY3-36. In addition, photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride)s increased the bioavailability of PYY3-36 by up to 20-fold in comparison with subcutaneous administration of solution, evidence of remarkably improved delivery. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the suitability of photocrosslinked poly(ester anhydride)s for use in peptide delivery.

  10. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  11. Optimizing fluid management in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF): the emerging role of combined measurement of body hydration status and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberto; Aspromonte, Nadia; Milani, Loredano; Peacock, Frank W; Maisel, Alan S; Santini, Massimo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The study tests the hypothesis that in patients admitted with acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF), achievement of adequate body hydration status with intensive medical therapy, modulated by combined bioelectrical vectorial impedance analysis (BIVA) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement, may contribute to optimize the timing of patient's discharge and to improve clinical outcomes. Three hundred patients admitted for ADHF underwent serial BIVA and BNP measurement. Therapy was titrated to reach a BNP value of <250 pg/ml, whenever possible. Patients were categorized as early responders (rapid BNP fall below 250 pg/ml); late responders (slow BNP fall below 250 pg/ml, after aggressive therapy); and non-responders (BNP persistently >250 pg/ml). Worsening of renal function (WRF) was evaluated during hospitalization. Death and rehospitalization were monitored with a 6-month follow-up. BNP value on discharge of ≤250 pg/ml led to a 25% event rate within 6 months (Group A: 17.4%; Group B: 21%, Chi2; n.s.), whereas a value >250 pg/ml (Group C) was associated with a far higher percentage (37%). At discharge, body hydration was 73.8 ± 3.2% in the total population and 73.2 ± 2.1, 73.5 ± 2.8, 74.1 ± 3.6% in the three groups, respectively. WRF was observed in 22.3% of the total. WRF occurred in 22% in Group A, 32% in Group B, and 20% in Group C (P = n.s.). Our study confirms the hypothesis that combined BNP/BIVA sequential measurements help to achieve adequate fluid balance status in patients with ADHF and can be used to drive a "tailored therapy," allowing clinicians to identify high-risk patients and possibly to reduce the incidence of complications secondary to fluid management strategies.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  13. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  14. A peptide's perspective of water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Hochstrasser, Robin M

    2011-11-18

    This Perspective is focused on amide groups of peptides interacting with water. The 2D IR spectroscopy has already enabled structural aspects of the peptide backbone to be determined through its ability to measure the coupling between different amide-I modes. Here we describe why nonlinear IR is emerging as the method of choice to examine the fast components of the water dynamics near peptides and how isotopically edited peptide links can be used to probe the local water at a residue level in proteins. This type of research necessarily involves an intimate mix of theory and experiment. The description of the results is underpinned by relatively well established quantum-statistical theories that describe the important manifestations of peptide vibrational frequency fluctuations. PMID:22844177

  15. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Creating functional peptide architectures at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew

    2001-03-01

    Short peptide sequences, derived from whole proteins, can be useful synthetic agents for conferring a specific biological function to a material surface. Their ability to do this depends on delivering them to the surface in a biologically recognizable form, that is in a spatial configuration that is not too different from that adopted by the peptide in the whole protein. Most functional proteins have secondary and tertiary levels of structure that are essential to their activities; peptides have simpler but no less important structures. In our work, we have focussed on peptides derived from extracellular matrix proteins. We have found that attaching synthetic lipid tails to peptides fragments gives them two very useful properties for surface modification. The hydrophobic tails give rise to a self-assembly capacity enabling these molecules to organize into membrane, monolayer and bilayer structures. Less expected is that this level of self-assembly induces a second level in the peptide headgroup. Peptides from alpha-helical and triple-helical regions of protein are induced by the lipid tails to form protein-like secondary structures and therefore to have more effective biological activity.

  17. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  18. Effect of low and high doses of nitrous oxide on preproenkephalin mRNA and its peptide methionine enkephalin levels in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R K; Kugel, G; Karuri, A; Gwosdow, A R; Kumar, M S

    1996-08-19

    The effect of exposure to nitrous oxide (N2O) on the levels of preproenkephalin mRNA in the hypothalamus of rats was examined. In the first experiment, rats were exposed to 1000 ppm N2O for 8 h a day over 4 days. Compared with controls (which were exposed to air over the same duration), the N2O exposed animals exhibited significant elevations in preproenkephalin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus. In a second experiment, rats were exposed to 60% N2O or air for 12, 24 and 48 h duration, and hypothalamic levels of preproenkephalin mRNA as well as methionine enkephalin were analyzed. Compared with controls, N2O exposed rats exhibited significant elevations in preproenkephalin mRNA levels. The levels on preproenkephalin mRNA were significantly higher after 48 h of N2O exposure than after 12 h of N2O exposure. Similarly, the concentration of methionine enkephalin was significantly higher after 24 and 48 h of exposure of N2O than after exposure to 12 h of N2O or air. These results indicate that (a) exposure to N2O results in significant elevations in preproenkephalin mRNA levels, (b) the increased preproenkephalin mRNA levels appear to be proportional to the concentration of N2O exposure as well as the duration of N2O exposure, and (c) N2O-induced elevation in preproenkephalin mRNA levels is associated with corresponding increase in tissue concentrations of methionine enkephalin. In total, these results suggest that N2O selectively stimulates synthesis of methionine enkephalin in the diencephalic region of the brain.

  19. Analysis of serum β-amyloid peptides, α2-macroglobulin, complement factor H, and clusterin levels in APP/PS1 transgenic mice during progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dejiang; Di, Xiangjun; Fu, Lu; Li, Yingnan; Han, Xiao; Wu, Hui; Cai, Linjun; Meng, Xiangyu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Su, Weiheng

    2016-10-19

    As a progressive age-related neurodegenerative disorder, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global health concern. Despite the availability of psychological testing, neuroimaging, genetic testing, and biochemical assays of cerebrospinal fluid, convenient and accurate blood biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and preclinical studies of AD are still lacking. The present study aims to longitudinally evaluate the feasibility of β-amyloid proteins, α2-macroglobulin (α-2M), complement factor H (CFH), and clusterin as blood biomarkers of AD. Using APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice, cognitive impairment and amyloid plaque counts in the brain were evaluated over a range of ages using the Morris water maze test and immunohistochemistry methods, respectively. Serum Aβ40, Aβ42, α-2M, CFH, and clusterin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and correlated with progression of AD. APP/PS1 transgenic mice presented progressive AD characteristics at the ages of 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Serum Aβ42 levels and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios increased significantly in transgenic 3- and 6-month-old mice compared with controls. Serum CFH levels decreased significantly in 3- and 6-month-old transgenic mice compared with controls. Meanwhile, serum clusterin levels increased significantly in 12-month-old transgenic mice compared with controls. The α-2M level was not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type mice. The APP/PS1 transgenic mouse is a model of familial AD. The present study indicated that the serum Aβ42 level, Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, and CFH level are potential biomarkers in preclinical and early stages of AD, whereas serum clusterin level is a potential biomarker in the late stage of AD. PMID:27541273

  20. Structural and intrinsic Josephson properties of Bi2Sr2Ca1-yYyCu2O8+δ single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, K.; Murata, K.; Irie, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, Bi2Sr2Ca1-yYyCu2O8+δ (BSCYCO) single crystals with yttrium doping content of y = 0-0.30 were synthesized by a self-flux method. The critical temperature and c-axis lattice constant of BSCYCO were controlled by the substitution of yttrium at the calcium site. A 290 × 90 × 0.4 μm3 mesa structure was fabricated using photolithography and argon-ion milling. A multibranch structure in current-voltage characteristics was successfully observed for mesas of BSCYCO (y = 0-0.10). The critical current of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) in BSCYCO mesas was systematically investigated.

  1. Crocin Upregulates CX3CR1 Expression by Suppressing NF-κB/YY1 Signaling and Inhibiting Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Microglial Activation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bochang; Huo, Fuquan; Zhu, Zhongqiao; Xu, Zhiguo; Dang, Xiaojie; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Xinguang

    2016-08-01

    Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and optic nerve fibers. Microglial activation has been shown to be deleterious to RGCs and may participate in the progression of glaucoma. Crocin, one of the major active ingredients in saffron, has been found to inhibit microglial activation. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether crocin can inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and to clarify the mechanisms involved. The influence of crocin on primary RGCs and LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells survival was determined by the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays, or by flow cytometry. BV2 cells were pretreated with various concentrations of crocin for 2 h followed by 1 μg/mL LPS stimulation. Microglial markers and pro-inflammatory mediators were assessed by real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA. Furthermore, CX3CR1 expression was detected and the underlying mechanism was examined. The concentrations of crocin ranged from 0.1 to 1 μM, and did not show any cytotoxicity in RGC and BV2 cells. After crocin pretreatment, the expression of microglial markers (CD11b and Iba-1) and pro-inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, and TNF-α) induced by LPS were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, CX3CR1 expression was remarkably increased by crocin via the suppression of NF-κB/Yin Yang 1 (YY1) signaling in BV2 cells. In conclusion, crocin effectively suppresses microglial activation and upregulates CX3CR1 expression by suppressing NF-κB/YY1 signaling. PMID:27084772

  2. A new stable GIP-Oxyntomodulin hybrid peptide improved bone strength both at the organ and tissue levels in genetically-inherited type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Sity Aishah; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Flatt, Peter R; Bouvard, Beatrice; Chappard, Daniel; Irwin, Nigel; Mabilleau, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) progress worldwide with detrimental effects on several physiological systems including bone tissue mainly by affecting bone quality. Several gut hormones analogues have been proven potent in ameliorating bone quality. In the present study, we used the leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice as a model of obesity and severe T2DM to assess the extent of bone quality alterations at the organ and tissue levels. We also examined the beneficial effects of gut hormone therapy in this model by using a new triple agonist ([d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm) active at the GIP, GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. As expected, db/db mice presented with dramatic alterations of bone strength at the organ level associated with deterioration of trabecular and cortical microarchitectures and an augmentation in osteoclast numbers. At the tissue level, these animals presented also with alterations of bone strength (reduced hardness, indentation modulus and dissipated energy) with modifications of tissue mineral distribution, collagen glycation and collagen maturity. The use of [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm considerably improved bone strength at the organ level with modest effects on trabecular microarchitecture. At the tissue level, [d-Ala(2)]GIP-Oxm ameliorated bone strength reductions with positive effects on collagen glycation and collagen maturity. This study provides support for including gut hormone analogues as possible new therapeutic strategies for improving bone quality in bone complications associated to T2DM. PMID:27062994

  3. [Usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 1, MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1, hyaluronic acid and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and patients with arthritic complaints].

    PubMed

    Czeczuga, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disease that can affect skin, nervous system, heart and joints. Lyme arthritis can develope in about 60% of "not treated" Lyme disease patients, 10% of patients may develope chronic arthritis. Lyme arhritis symptoms (especially chronic arthritis) is similar to rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to establish the usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), hialuronic acid (HA) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with arthritic complaints. Plasma levels of MMP-3, HA and anti-CCP were significantly higher in RA group than in Lyme arthritis group and patients with arthritic complaints. There were no significant differences in serum levels of MMP-3, MMP-9, TIMP-1, HA, anti-CCP between Lyme arthritis patients and patients with arthritic complaints and these parameters are not usefull in differential diagnoses of Lyme arthritis.

  4. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  5. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  6. The prediction of in-hospital mortality by amino terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels and other independent variables in acutely ill patients with suspected heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kellett, John

    2005-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Amino terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurement can detect and assess heart failure. However, compared with traditional clinical parameters, its value in predicting the in-hospital mortality of patients with suspected heart disease has not been reported. METHODS: We examined the ability of 11 continuous and 21 categorical variables, including NT-proBNP levels measured at the time of admission, to predict in-hospital mortality. The setting was a small Irish rural hospital where 342 consecutive patients with suspected heart disease were admitted as acute medical emergencies. RESULTS: The 31 patients who died while in hospital had significantly higher NT-proBNP levels on admission than patients discharged alive (11,548+/-13,531 vs. 3805+/-6914 pg/mL, p<0.0001). Patients who died in-hospital were older, had significantly higher white cell counts, blood urea and modified early warning (MEW) scores, and lower temperatures, blood pressures and oxygen saturation. Four variables were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality: a systolic blood pressure equal to or below 100 mm Hg, a urea level above 13 mmol/L, a white cell count greater than 13*10(9)/L and a NT-proBNP level greater than or equal to 11,500 pg/mL. The presence of three of these variables was associated with an in-hospital mortality rate of 54%. CONCLUSIONS: Four variables (i.e. hypotension, elevated urea, leukocytosis and elevated NT-proBNP levels) are comparable independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

  7. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W; Komives, Elizabeth A; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-04-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC-Cd and glutathione-Cd complexes. PMID:18208526

  8. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W; Komives, Elizabeth A; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-04-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC-Cd and glutathione-Cd complexes.

  9. Identification of high levels of phytochelatins, glutathione and cadmium in the phloem sap of Brassica napus. A role for thiol-peptides in the long-distance transport of cadmium and the effect of cadmium on iron translocation

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Butko, Emerald; Springer, Franziska; Torpey, Justin W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Kehr, Julia; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that function in heavy metal detoxification in plants and certain fungi. Recent research in Arabidopsis has shown that PCs undergo long-distance transport between roots and shoots. However, it remains unknown which tissues or vascular systems, xylem or phloem, mediate PC translocation and whether PC transport contributes to physiologically relevant long-distance transport of cadmium (Cd) between shoots and roots. To address these questions, xylem and phloem sap were obtained from Brassica napus to quantitatively analyze which thiol species are present in response to Cd exposure. High levels of PCs were identified in the phloem sap within 24 h of Cd exposure using combined mass spectrometry and fluorescence HPLC analyses. Unexpectedly, the concentration of Cd was more than four-fold higher in phloem sap compared to xylem sap. Cadmium exposure dramatically decreased iron levels in xylem and phloem sap whereas other essential heavy metals such as zinc and manganese remained unchanged. Data suggest that Cd inhibits vascular loading of iron but not nicotianamine. The high ratios [PCs]/[Cd] and [glutathione]/[Cd] in the phloem sap suggest that PCs and glutathione (GSH) can function as long-distance carriers of Cd. In contrast, only traces of PCs were detected in xylem sap. Our results suggest that, in addition to directional xylem Cd transport, the phloem is a major vascular system for long-distance source to sink transport of Cd as PC–Cd and glutathione–Cd complexes. PMID:18208526

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  11. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  12. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  13. PFR peptide, one of the antimicrobial peptides identified from the derivatives of lactoferrin, induces necrosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Shi, Yue; Zhou, Han-Wei; Chen, Qi; Wei, Bu-Yun; Wang, Xi; Yang, Tian-Xin; Chinn, Y. Eugene; Kang, Jian; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    LF11-322 (PFWRIRIRR-NH2) (PFR peptide), a nine amino acid-residue peptide fragment derived from human lactoferricin, possesses potent cytotoxicity against bacteria. We report here the discovery and characterization of its antitumor activity in leukemia cells. PFR peptide inhibited the proliferation of MEL and HL-60 leukemia cells by inducing cell death in the absence of the classical features of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, Annexin V staining, Caspase activation and increase of abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins. Instead, necrotic cell death as evidenced by increasing intracellular PI staining and LDH release, inducing membrane disruption and up-regulating intracellular calcium level, was observed following PFR peptide treatment. In addition to necrotic cell death, PFR peptide also induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, PFR peptide exhibited favorable antitumor activity and tolerability in vivo. These findings thus provide a new clue of antimicrobial peptides as a potential novel therapy for leukemia. PMID:26860588

  14. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  15. Human IgG response to a salivary peptide, gSG6-P1, as a new immuno-epidemiological tool for evaluating low-level exposure to Anopheles bites

    PubMed Central

    Poinsignon, Anne; Cornelie, Sylvie; Ba, Fatou; Boulanger, Denis; Sow, Cheikh; Rossignol, Marie; Sokhna, Cheikh; Cisse, Badara; Simondon, François; Remoue, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background Human populations exposed to low malaria transmission present particular severe risks of malaria morbidity and mortality. In addition, in a context of low-level exposure to Anopheles vector, conventional entomological methods used for sampling Anopheles populations are insufficiently sensitive and probably under-estimate the real risk of malaria transmission. The evaluation of antibody (Ab) responses to arthropod salivary proteins constitutes a novel tool for estimating exposure level to insect bites. In the case of malaria, a recent study has shown that human IgG responses to the gSG6-P1 peptide represented a specific biomarker of exposure to Anopheles gambiae bites. The objective of this study was to investigate if this biomarker can be used to estimate low-level exposure of individuals to Anopheles vector. Methods The IgG Ab level to gSG6-P1 was evaluated at the peak and at the end of the An. gambiae exposure season in children living in Senegalese villages, where the Anopheles density was estimated to be very low by classical entomological trapping but where malaria transmission occurred during the studied season. Results Specific IgG responses to gSG6-P1 were observed in children exposed to very low-level of Anopheles bites. In addition, a significant increase in the specific IgG Ab level was observed during the Anopheles exposure season whereas classical entomological data have reported very few or no Anopheles during the studied period. Furthermore, this biomarker may also be applicable to evaluate the heterogeneity of individual exposure. Conclusion The results strengthen the hypothesis that the evaluation of IgG responses to gSG6-P1 during the season of exposure could reflect the real human contact with anthropophilic Anopheles and suggest that this biomarker of low exposure could be used at the individual level. This promising immuno-epidemiological marker could represent a useful tool to assess the risk to very low exposure to malaria vectors

  16. Measurement of the Tensor A{sub yy} and Vector A{sub y} Analyzing Powers of the Deuteron Inelastic Scattering of Beryllium at 5.0 GeV/c and 178 mrad

    SciTech Connect

    Azhgirey, L.S.; Afanasiev, S.V.; Isupov, A.Yu.; Ivanov, V.I.; Khrenov, A.N.; Ladygin, V.P.; Ladygina, N.B.; Litvinenko, A.G.; Peresedov, V.F.; Zhmyrov, V.N.; Zolin, L.S.; Yudin, N.P.

    2005-06-01

    Tensor A{sub yy} and vector A{sub y} analyzing powers in the inelastic scattering of deuterons with a momentum of 5.0 GeV/c on beryllium at an angle of 178 mrad in the vicinity of the excitation of baryonic resonances with masses up to {approx}1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} have been measured. The A{sub yy} data are in good agreement with the previous data obtained at 4.5 and 5.5 GeV/c. The results of the experiment are compared with the predictions of the plane-wave impulse approximation and {omega}-meson-exchange models.

  17. Elevated plasma levels of B-type natriuretic Peptide but not C-reactive protein are associated with higher red cell distribution width in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Seiji; Saeki, Tomoaki; Asada, Kaoru; Wakami, Kazuaki; Kimura, Genjiro

    2009-05-01

    Although higher red cell distribution width (RDW) has recently been reported to be associated with increased mortality independent of anemia in patients with heart failure and those with coronary artery disease (CAD), the mechanism underlying this association is unknown. We hypothesized that higher RDW may reflect neurohumoral activation and a chronic inflammatory state that each contribute to adverse clinical outcomes in these populations. We measured RDW and plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in 226 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for CAD (age, 67 +/- 8 years; males, 77%; RDW, 45.8 +/- 3.3 fL; hemoglobin, 13.2 +/- 1.4 g/dL; BNP, median [interquartile range], 26.0 [9.0-58.4] pg/mL; hs-CRP, 679 [345-1920] ng/mL). Plasma BNP (r = 0.21, P < 0.01) but not hs-CRP (r = 0.04, P > 0.1) levels correlated with RDW. After adjustment for potential confounders including age, gender, body mass index, glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, and known hemodynamic determinants of BNP, including elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and volume and slow left ventricular relaxation, RDW was independently predicted by BNP (r(2) = 0.058, P < 0.001). In conclusion, elevated BNP levels are independently associated with higher RDW in patients with CAD. Neurohumoral activation may be a mechanistic link between increased RDW and adverse clinical outcomes in this population. PMID:19506334

  18. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  19. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B

    2012-08-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  1. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  2. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment.

  3. The diagnostic significance of signal peptide-complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1-epidermal growth factor domain-containing protein-1 levels in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Dirican, Nigar; Duman, Ali; Sağlam, Gülcan; Arslan, Akif; Ozturk, Onder; Atalay, Sule; Bircan, Ahmet; Akkaya, Ahmet; Cakir, Munire

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially life-threatening disorder. Patients with PE often have nonspecific symptoms, and the diagnosis is often delayed. AIM: The aim of our study was to investigate the role of signal peptide-complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, and Bmp1-epidermal growth factor domain-containing protein 1 (SCUBE1) used in the diagnosis of PE. METHODS: The study was designed prospectively. A total of 57 patients who were admitted to emergency service with clinically suspected PE were included in the study. The patients diagnosed with PE were defined as PE group (n = 32), and the patients with undetectable embolism on computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography were defined as non-PE group (n = 25). Twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy cases were chosen for the study. Routine biochemical analysis, complete blood count, D-dimer, SCUBE1, and arterial blood gas analysis were performed early after admission. RESULTS: Mean SCUBE1 levels were higher in the PE group (0.90 ng/mL) than in the non-PE (0.38 ng/mL) and control groups (0.47 ng/mL) (P < 0.01). A cutoff point of 0.49 ng/mL for SCUBE1 indicated 100% sensitivity and 64% specificity in patients with PE. Mean D-dimer levels were not different between PE and non-PE groups (P = 0.591). A multivariable logistic regression analysis (with dichotomous PE groups as the response variable; age, gender, chest pain, syncope, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, D-dimer, neutrophil-lymphocytes ratio, and SCUBE1 variables as predictors) showed that the significant and independent predictors of PE diagnosis were SCUBE1 and chest pain. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that serum SCUBE1 measurement might be used as a diagnostic biomarker in PE. PMID:27803754

  4. Peptides regulate cortical thymocytes differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Polyakova, V O; Linkova, N S; Dudkov, A V; Kvetnoy, I M

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells.

  5. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavinson, V. Kh.; Polyakova, V. O.; Linkova, N. S.; Dudkov, A. V.; Kvetnoy, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells. PMID:22312461

  6. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  7. Detecting small plant peptides using SPADA (Small Peptide Alignment Discovery Application)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small peptides encoded as one- or two-exon genes in plants have recently been shown to affect multiple aspects of plant development, reproduction and defense responses. However, popular similarity search tools and gene prediction techniques generally fail to identify most members belonging to this class of genes. This is largely due to the high sequence divergence among family members and the limited availability of experimentally verified small peptides to use as training sets for homology search and ab initio prediction. Consequently, there is an urgent need for both experimental and computational studies in order to further advance the accurate prediction of small peptides. Results We present here a homology-based gene prediction program to accurately predict small peptides at the genome level. Given a high-quality profile alignment, SPADA identifies and annotates nearly all family members in tested genomes with better performance than all general-purpose gene prediction programs surveyed. We find numerous mis-annotations in the current Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula genome databases using SPADA, most of which have RNA-Seq expression support. We also show that SPADA works well on other classes of small secreted peptides in plants (e.g., self-incompatibility protein homologues) as well as non-secreted peptides outside the plant kingdom (e.g., the alpha-amanitin toxin gene family in the mushroom, Amanita bisporigera). Conclusions SPADA is a free software tool that accurately identifies and predicts the gene structure for short peptides with one or two exons. SPADA is able to incorporate information from profile alignments into the model prediction process and makes use of it to score different candidate models. SPADA achieves high sensitivity and specificity in predicting small plant peptides such as the cysteine-rich peptide families. A systematic application of SPADA to other classes of small peptides by research communities will greatly

  8. Co-delivery of a hydrophobic small molecule and a hydrophilic peptide by porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongfei; Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Villanova, Francesca; Kaasalainen, Martti; Herranz-Blanco, Barbara; Caramella, Carla M; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Salonen, Jarno; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2013-09-10

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems offer remarkable opportunities for clinical treatment. However, there are several challenges when they are employed to deliver multiple cargos/payloads, particularly concerning the synchronous delivery of small molecular weight drugs and relatively larger peptides. Since porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (NPs) can easily contain high payloads of drugs with various properties, we evaluated their carrier potential in multi-drug delivery for co-loading of the hydrophobic drug indomethacin and the hydrophilic human peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36). Sequential loading of these two drugs into the PSi NPs enhanced the drug release rate of each drug and also their amount permeated across Caco-2 and Caco-2/HT29 cell monolayers. Regardless of the loading approach used, dual or single, the drug permeation profiles were in good correlation with their drug release behaviour. Furthermore, the permeation studies indicated the critical role of the mucus intestinal layer and the paracellular resistance in the permeation of the therapeutic compounds across the intestinal wall. Loading with PYY3-36 also greatly improved the cytocompatibility of the PSi NPs. Conformational analysis indicated that the PYY3-36 could still display biological activity after release from the PSi NPs and permeation across the intestinal cell monolayers. These results are the first demonstration of the promising potential of PSi NPs for simultaneous multi-drug delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene. Identification of a repressor element and its transcription factors Hes-1 and YY1.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Heus, J; Lu, N; Nichols, R C; Raben, N; Plotz, P H

    2001-01-19

    Acid alpha-glucosidase, the product of a housekeeping gene, is a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycogen. A deficiency of this enzyme is responsible for a recessively inherited myopathy and cardiomyopathy, glycogenesis type II. We have previously demonstrated that the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene expression is regulated by a silencer within intron 1, which is located in the 5'-untranslated region. In this study, we have used deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and footprint analysis to further localize the silencer to a 25-base pair element. The repressive effect on the TK promoter was about 50% in both orientations in expression plasmid, and two transcriptional factors were identified with antibodies binding specifically to the element. Mutagenesis and functional analyses of the element demonstrated that the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split (Hes-1) binding to an E box (CACGCG) and global transcription factor-YY1 binding to its core site function as a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, the overexpression of Hes-1 significantly enhanced the repressive effect of the silencer element. The data should be helpful in understanding the expression and regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene as well as other lysosomal enzyme genes.

  10. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ashutosh; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-03-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a site-directed targeted therapeutic strategy that specifically uses radiolabeled peptides as biological targeting vectors designed to deliver cytotoxic levels of radiation dose to cancer cells, which overexpress specific receptors. Interest in PRRT has steadily grown because of the advantages of targeting cellular receptors in vivo with high sensitivity as well as specificity and treatment at the molecular level. Recent advances in molecular biology have not only stimulated advances in PRRT in a sustainable manner but have also pushed the field significantly forward to several unexplored possibilities. Recent decades have witnessed unprecedented endeavors for developing radiolabeled receptor-binding somatostatin analogs for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors, which have played an important role in the evolution of PRRT and paved the way for the development of other receptor-targeting peptides. Several peptides targeting a variety of receptors have been identified, demonstrating their potential to catalyze breakthroughs in PRRT. In this review, the authors discuss several of these peptides and their analogs with regard to their applications and potential in radionuclide therapy. The advancement in the availability of combinatorial peptide libraries for peptide designing and screening provides the capability of regulating immunogenicity and chemical manipulability. Moreover, the availability of a wide range of bifunctional chelating agents opens up the scope of convenient radiolabeling. For these reasons, it would be possible to envision a future where the scope of PRRT can be tailored for patient-specific application. While PRRT lies at the interface between many disciplines, this technology is inextricably linked to the availability of the therapeutic radionuclides of required quality and activity levels and hence their production is also reviewed.

  11. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  12. [The clinical utility of C-peptide measurement in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Otto-Buczkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    C-peptide is produced in equal amounts to insulin and is the best measure of endogenous insulin secretion in patients with diabetes. Measurement of insulin secretion using C-peptide can be helpful in clinical practice: differences in insulin secretion are fundamental to different requirements in the treatment of diabetes. An important clinical role of C-peptide is differentiating between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Low basal C-peptide can be considered as criterion for transferring the patients, initially diagnosed as type 2 diabetes, in the type 1 diabetes group. C-peptide level may be a good predictor of the clinical partial remission during the first year of type 1 diabetes. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a special form of diabetes that is clinically similar to type 2 diabetes but with positivity for pancreatic autoantibodies and lower C-peptide levels. The measurement of C-peptide level and of immunological markers may represent important additional tools for establishing the correct diagnosis. The natural course of these patients shows that C-peptide will decrease with time in parallel with the curve for C-peptide in classical type 1 diabetic patients. Persistence of C-peptide is an important clinical feature of MODY. It is particularly important to identify these patients as they are commonly misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes and treated with insulin, C-peptide can be used to assist in patient selection for islet cell transplantation and post-transplant monitoring. High uncorrected fasting C-peptid in the presence of hyperglycemia may suggest insulin resistance.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  14. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  15. Ovarian expression of insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) and its receptor (RXFP2) during development of bovine antral follicles and corpora lutea and measurement of circulating INSL3 levels during synchronized estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Leanne; Glister, Claire; Bleach, Emma C; Glencross, Richard G; Bicknell, Andrew B; Dai, Yanzhenzi; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Ivell, Richard; Knight, Philip G

    2013-05-01

    Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), a major product of testicular Leydig cells, is also expressed by the ovary, but its functional role remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified expression of INSL3 and its receptor RXFP2 in theca interna cell (TIC) and granulosa cell compartments of developing bovine antral follicles and in corpora lutea (CL). INSL3 and RXFP2 mRNA levels were much higher in TIC than granulosa cell and increased progressively during follicle maturation with INSL3 peaking in large (11-18 mm) estrogen-active follicles and RXFP2 peaking in 9- to 10-mm follicles before declining in larger (11-18 mm) follicles. Expression of both INSL3 and RXFP2 in CL was much lower than in TIC. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry confirmed abundant expression of INSL3 mRNA and protein in TIC. These observations indicate follicular TIC rather than CL as the primary site of both INSL3 production and action, implying a predominantly autocrine/paracrine role in TIC. To corroborate the above findings, we showed that in vitro exposure of TIC to a luteinizing concentration of LH greatly attenuated expression of both INSL3 and its receptor while increasing progesterone secretion and expression of STAR and CYP11A1. Moreover, in vivo, a significant cyclic variation in plasma INSL3 was observed during synchronized estrous cycles. INSL3 and estradiol-17β followed a similar pattern, both increasing after luteolysis, before falling sharply after the LH surge. Thus, theca-derived INSL3, likely from the dominant preovulatory follicle, is detectable in peripheral blood of cattle, and expression is down-regulated during luteinization induced by the preovulatory LH surge. Collectively, these findings underscore the likely role of INSL3 as an important intrafollicular modulator of TIC function/steroidogenesis, while raising doubts about its potential contribution to CL function. PMID:23546605

  16. Molecular tools for the construction of peptide-based materials.

    PubMed

    Ramakers, B E I; van Hest, J C M; Löwik, D W P M

    2014-04-21

    Proteins and peptides are fundamental components of living systems where they play crucial roles at both functional and structural level. The versatile biological properties of these molecules make them interesting building blocks for the construction of bio-active and biocompatible materials. A variety of molecular tools can be used to fashion the peptides necessary for the assembly of these materials. In this tutorial review we shall describe five of the main techniques, namely solid phase peptide synthesis, native chemical ligation, Staudinger ligation, NCA polymerisation, and genetic engineering, that have been used to great effect for the construction of a host of peptide-based materials.

  17. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-05-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  18. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-02-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  19. Screening Nonspecific Interactions of Peptides without Background Interference

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Caldwell, Kyle; Nowinski, Ann K.; White, Andrew D.; Thakkar, Amit; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    The need to discover new peptide sequences to perform particular tasks has lead to a variety of peptide screening methods: phage display, yeast display, bacterial display and resin display. These are effective screening methods because the role of background binding is often insignificant. In the field of nonfouling materials, however, a premium is placed on chemistries that have extremely low levels of nonspecific binding. Due to the presence of background binding, it is not possible to use traditional peptide screening methods to select for nonfouling chemistries. Here, we developed a peptide screening method, as compared to traditional methods, that can successfully evaluate the effectiveness of nonfouling peptide sequences. We have tested the effect of different peptide lengths and chemistries on the adsorption of protein. The order of residues within a single sequence was also adjusted to determine the effect of charge segregation on protein adsorption. PMID:23246063

  20. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  1. Lattice modulation effect of liquid-solid interface on peptide assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Hou, Jingfei; Yu, Lanlan; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    We illustrate the single molecule level analysis of the commensurability of the peptide assemblies with the graphite lattice at liquid-solid interface. The pristine peptide assembly was observed to display commensurate registration to graphite lattice, while the introduction of chaperone molecules induces a slight mismatch of the peptide and graphite lattices leading to Moiré patterns. The detailed analysis of the Moiré pattern could provide information of the structural changes of the peptide assembly and the involved peptide-peptide interactions.

  2. The production of S-equol from daidzein is associated with a cluster of three genes in Eggerthella sp. YY7918.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Yuika; Yokoyama, Shinichiro; Yanase, Emiko; Niwa, Toshio; Suzuki, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Daidzein (DZN) is converted to equol (EQL) by intestinal bacteria. We previously reported that Eggerthella sp. YY7918, which is found in human feces, is an EQL-producing bacterium and analyzed its whole genomic sequence. We found three coding sequences (CDSs) in this bacterium that showed 99% similarity to the EQL-producing enzymes of Lactococcus sp. 20-92. These identified CDSs were designated eqlA, eqlB, and eqlC and thought to encode daidzein reductase (DZNR), dihydrodaidzein reductase (DHDR), and tetrahydrodaidzein reductase (THDR), respectively. These genes were cloned into pColdII. Recombinant plasmids were then introduced into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and DZNR, DHDR, and THDR were expressed and purified by 6×His-Tag chromatography. We confirmed that these three enzymes were involved in the conversion of DZN to EQL. Purified DZNR converted DZN to dihydrodaizein (DHD) in the presence of NADPH. DHDR converted DHD to tetrahydrodaizein (THD) in the presence of NADPH. Neither enzyme showed activities with NADH. THDR converted THD in the absence of cofactors, NAD(P)H, and also produced DHD as a by-product. Thus, we propose that THDR is not a reductase but a new type of dismutase. The GC content of these clusters was 64%, similar to the overall genomic GC content for Eggerthella and Coriobacteriaceae (56-60%), and higher than that for Lactococcus garvieae (39%), even though the gene cluster showed 99% similarity to that in Lactococcus sp. 20-92. Taken together, our results indicate that the gene cluster associated with EQL production evolved in high-GC bacteria including Coriobacteriaceae and was then laterally transferred to Lactococcus sp. 20-92. PMID:27508112

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  4. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  6. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions.

  7. Peptides and aging: Their role in anorexia and memory.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E

    2015-10-01

    The rapid aging of the world's population has led to a need to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of the factors leading to frailty and cognitive decline. Peptides have been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of frailty and cognitive decline. Weight loss is a major component of frailty. In this review, we demonstrate a central role for both peripheral peptides (e.g., cholecystokinin and ghrelin) and neuropeptides (e.g., dynorphin and alpha-MSH) in the pathophysiology of the anorexia of aging. Similarly, peripheral peptides (e.g., ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and cholecystokinin) are modulators of memory. A number of centrally acting neuropeptides have also been shown to modulate cognitive processes. Amyloid-beta peptide in physiological levels is a memory enhancer, while in high (pathological) levels, it plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  9. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A.; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf. PMID:27096600

  10. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions.

    PubMed

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf.

  11. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research.

  12. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  13. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  14. Designer self-assembling peptide materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shuguang

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of macromolecular materials at the molecular level is becoming increasingly important for a new generation of nanomaterials for nanobiotechnology and other disciplines, namely, the design, synthesis, and fabrication of nanodevices at the molecular scale from bottom up. Basic engineering principles for microfabrication can be learned through fully grasping the molecular self-assembly and programmed assembly phenomena. Self- and programmed-assembly phenomena are ubiquitous in nature. Two key elements in molecular macrobiological material productions are chemical complementarity and structural compatibility, both of which require weak and non-covalent interactions that bring building blocks together during self-assembly. Significant advances have been made during the 1990s at the interface of materials chemistry and biology. They include the design of helical ribbons, peptide nanofiber scaffolds for three-dimensional cell cultures and tissue engineering, peptide surfactants for solubilizing and stabilizing diverse types of membrane proteins and their complexes, and molecular ink peptides for arbitrary printing and coating surfaces as well as coiled-coil helical peptides for multi-length scale fractal structures. These designer self-assembling peptides have far reaching implications in a broad spectrum of applications in biology, medicine, nanobiotechnology, and nanobiomedical technology, some of which are beyond our current imaginations. [image: see text

  15. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  16. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  17. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  18. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  19. A psyllium fiber-enriched meal strongly attenuates postprandial gastrointestinal peptide release in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Karhunen, Leila J; Juvonen, Kristiina R; Flander, Sanna M; Liukkonen, Kirsi-Helena; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Siloaho, Maritta; Laaksonen, David E; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Uusitupa, Matti I; Poutanen, Kaisa S

    2010-04-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) and protein are essential constituents of a healthy diet and are well known for their high satiety impact. However, little is known about their influence on postprandial gastrointestinal (GI) peptide release. Our aim in this single-blind, randomized, cross-over study was to investigate the effects of DF and/or protein enrichments on satiety-related metabolic and hormonal responses. Sixteen healthy, nonobese volunteers participated in the study and ingested 1 of 5 isoenergetic test meals in a randomized order on separate days. The test meals were as follows: 1) low in protein (2.8 g) and fiber (7.6 g); 2) low in protein (2.6 g) and high in soluble fiber (psyllium, 23.0 g); 3) high in protein (soy, 19.7 g) and low in fiber (6.2 g); 4) high in protein (18.4 g) and fiber (23.0 g); and 5) white wheat bread. Serum insulin and plasma glucose, ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY (PYY) concentrations were determined for 2 h following the meals. In addition, hunger and satiety ratings were collected. Postprandial glucose, insulin, ghrelin, GLP-1, and PYY responses all differed among the meals (P

  20. Measurement of the tensor (A{sub yy}) and vector (A{sub y}) analyzing powers in the fragmentation of a 9-GeV/c deuteron on hydrogen and carbon nuclei at high proton transverse momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Azhgirey, L. S.; Afanasiev, S. V.; Borzounov, Yu. T.; Golovanov, L. B.; Zhmyrov, V. N.; Zolin, L. S.; Ivanov, V. I.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Ladygin, V. P. Litvinenko, A. G.; Reznikov, S. G.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenova, I. A.; Khrenov, A. N.

    2008-02-15

    Data on the tensor and vector analyzing powers (A{sub yy} and A{sub y}, respectively) in the fragmentation of a 9-GeV/c deuteron on hydrogen and carbon nuclei at high proton transverse momenta are presented. These data are compared with the results of relevant calculations performed within light-front dynamics by using various deuteron wave functions. The best description of the data is attained with the relativistic deuteron wave function derived within field-theory light-front dynamics.

  1. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  2. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  3. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  4. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  5. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  6. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  7. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  8. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  9. Helix Bundle Quaternary Structure from [alpha]/[beta]-Peptide Foldamers

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Keck, James L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-11-18

    The function of a protein generally depends on adoption of a specific folding pattern, which in turn is determined by the side chain sequence along the polypeptide backbone. Here we show that the sequence-encoded structural information in peptides derived from yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 can be used to prepare hybrid {alpha}/{beta}-peptide foldamers that adopt helix bundle quaternary structures. Crystal structures of two hybrid {alpha}/{beta}-peptides are reported along with detailed structural comparison to {alpha}-peptides of analogous side chain sequence. There is considerable homology between {alpha}- and {alpha}/{beta}-peptides at the level of helical secondary structure, with modest but significant differences in the association geometry of helices in the quaternary structure.

  10. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  11. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM.

  12. Multifunctional hybrid networks based on self assembling peptide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Sameer

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to achieve a comprehensive correlation between the molecular level changes in primary amino acid sequences of amphiphilic beta-hairpin peptides and their consequent solution-assembly properties and bulk network hydrogel behavior. This has been accomplished using two broad approaches. In the first approach, amino acid substitutions were made to peptide sequence MAX1 such that the hydrophobic surfaces of the folded beta-hairpins from the peptides demonstrate shape specificity in hydrophobic interactions with other beta-hairpins during the assembly process, thereby causing changes to the peptide nanostructure and bulk rheological properties of hydrogels formed from the peptides. Steric lock and key complementary hydrophobic interactions were designed to occur between two beta-hairpin molecules of a single molecule, LNK1 during beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of LNK1. Experimental results from circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology collectively indicate that the molecular design of the LNK1 peptide can be assigned the cause of the drastically different behavior of the networks relative to MAX1. The results indicate elimination or significant reduction of fibrillar branching due to steric complementarity in LNK1 that does not exist in MAX1, thus supporting the original hypothesis. As an extension of the designed steric lock and key complementarity between two beta-hairpin molecules of the same peptide molecule. LNK1, three new pairs of peptide molecules LP1-KP1, LP2-KP2 and LP3-KP3 that resemble complementary 'wedge' and 'trough' shapes when folded into beta-hairpins were designed and studied. All six peptides individually and when blended with their corresponding shape complement formed fibrillar nanostructures with non-uniform thickness values. Loose packing in the assembled structures was observed in all the new peptides as compared to the uniform tight packing in MAX1 by SANS analysis. This

  13. Multifunctional hybrid networks based on self assembling peptide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Sameer

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to achieve a comprehensive correlation between the molecular level changes in primary amino acid sequences of amphiphilic beta-hairpin peptides and their consequent solution-assembly properties and bulk network hydrogel behavior. This has been accomplished using two broad approaches. In the first approach, amino acid substitutions were made to peptide sequence MAX1 such that the hydrophobic surfaces of the folded beta-hairpins from the peptides demonstrate shape specificity in hydrophobic interactions with other beta-hairpins during the assembly process, thereby causing changes to the peptide nanostructure and bulk rheological properties of hydrogels formed from the peptides. Steric lock and key complementary hydrophobic interactions were designed to occur between two beta-hairpin molecules of a single molecule, LNK1 during beta-sheet fibrillar assembly of LNK1. Experimental results from circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology collectively indicate that the molecular design of the LNK1 peptide can be assigned the cause of the drastically different behavior of the networks relative to MAX1. The results indicate elimination or significant reduction of fibrillar branching due to steric complementarity in LNK1 that does not exist in MAX1, thus supporting the original hypothesis. As an extension of the designed steric lock and key complementarity between two beta-hairpin molecules of the same peptide molecule. LNK1, three new pairs of peptide molecules LP1-KP1, LP2-KP2 and LP3-KP3 that resemble complementary 'wedge' and 'trough' shapes when folded into beta-hairpins were designed and studied. All six peptides individually and when blended with their corresponding shape complement formed fibrillar nanostructures with non-uniform thickness values. Loose packing in the assembled structures was observed in all the new peptides as compared to the uniform tight packing in MAX1 by SANS analysis. This

  14. Effect on components of the intestinal microflora and plasma neuropeptide levels of feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and inulin to adult and elderly rats.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Naughton, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 x 10(9) CFU of each strain g(-1) of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals.

  15. Effect on components of the intestinal microflora and plasma neuropeptide levels of feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and inulin to adult and elderly rats.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Naughton, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 x 10(9) CFU of each strain g(-1) of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals. PMID:17021202

  16. Effect on Components of the Intestinal Microflora and Plasma Neuropeptide Levels of Feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Inulin to Adult and Elderly Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D.; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Naughton, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 × 109 CFU of each strain g−1 of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals. PMID:17021202

  17. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Pasquinelli, R.; Ataai, M.; Koepsel, R.R.; Kortes, R.A.; Shepherd, R.E.

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His){sub 6} (HHHHHH) to [Pd{sup II}(mida)(D{sub 2}O)] (mida{sup 2{minus}} = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by {sup 1}H NMR as model reactions for Cu{sup II}(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H{sub 1}, H{sub 3}, and H{sub 4} of (His){sub 6} and H{sub 3} and H{sub 4} of SPHHGG was detected by {sup 1}H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [Cu{sup II}(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] complex are representative: g{sub zz} = 2.31; g{sub yy} = 2.086; g{sub xx} = 2.053; A{sub {vert_bar}{vert_bar}} = 161 G; A{sub N} = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida{sup 2{minus}} in the order 19 G (H{sub 2}O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5--7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7--8 in agreement with the [Pd{sup II}(mida)L] derivatives which form the two

  18. Phage Display Selection of Cyclic Peptides That Inhibit Andes Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Hjelle, Brian; Njus, Hadya; Ye, Chunyan; Bondu-Hawkins, Virginie; Brown, David C.; Kilpatrick, Kathleen A.; Larson, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Specific therapy is not available for hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome caused by Andes virus (ANDV). Peptides capable of blocking ANDV infection in vitro were identified using antibodies against ANDV surface glycoproteins Gn and Gc to competitively elute a cyclic nonapeptide-bearing phage display library from purified ANDV particles. Phage was examined for ANDV infection inhibition in vitro, and nonapeptides were synthesized based on the most-potent phage sequences. Three peptides showed levels of viral inhibition which were significantly increased by combination treatment with anti-Gn- and anti-Gc-targeting peptides. These peptides will be valuable tools for further development of both peptide and nonpeptide therapeutic agents. PMID:19515773

  19. Graphene Symmetry Amplified by Designed Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela; Kim, Yong Ho; Zhang, Jian; DeGrado, William F; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-06-01

    We present a strategy for designed self-assembly of peptides into two-dimensional monolayer crystals on the surface of graphene and graphite. As predicted by computation, designed peptides assemble on the surface of graphene to form very long, parallel, in-register β-sheets, which we call β-tapes. Peptides extend perpendicularly to the long axis of each β-tape, defining its width, with hydrogen bonds running along the axis. Tapes align on the surface to create highly regular microdomains containing 4-nm pitch striations. Moreover, in agreement with calculations, the atomic structure of the underlying graphene dictates the arrangement of the β-tapes, as they orient along one of six directions defined by graphene's sixfold symmetry. A cationic-assembled peptide surface is shown here to strongly adhere to DNA, preferentially orienting the double helix along β-tape axes. This orientational preference is well anticipated from calculations, given the underlying peptide layer structure. These studies illustrate how designed peptides can amplify the Ångstrom-level atomic symmetry of a surface onto the micrometer scale, further imparting long-range directional order onto the next level of assembly. The remarkably stable nature of these assemblies under various environmental conditions suggests applications in enzymelike catalysis, biological interfaces for cellular recognition, and two-dimensional platforms for studying DNA-peptide interactions. PMID:27276268

  20. Pronase E-Based Generation of Fluorescent Peptide Fragments: Tracking Intracellular Peptide Fate in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Emilie R; Dobes, Nicholas C; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2015-08-01

    The ability to track intracellular peptide proteolysis at the single cell level is of growing interest, particularly as short peptide sequences continue to play important roles as biosensors, therapeutics, and endogenous participants in antigen processing and intracellular signaling. We describe a rapid and inexpensive methodology to generate fluorescent peptide fragments from a parent sequence with diverse chemical properties, including aliphatic, nonpolar, basic, acidic, and non-native amino acids. Four peptide sequences with existing biochemical applications were fragmented using incubation with Pronase E and/or formic acid, and in each case a complete set of fluorescent fragments was generated for use as proteolysis standards in chemical cytometry. Fragment formation and identity was monitored with capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to confirm the presence of all sequences and yield fragmentation profiles across Pronase E concentrations which can readily be used by others. As a pilot study, Pronase E-generated standards from an Abl kinase sensor and an ovalbumin antigenic peptide were then employed to identify proteolysis products arising from the metabolism of these sequences in single cells. The Abl kinase sensor fragmented at 4.2 ± 4.8 zmol μM(-1) s(-1) and the majority of cells possessed similar fragment identities. In contrast, an ovalbumin epitope peptide was degraded at 8.9 ± 0.1 zmol μM(-1) s(-1), but with differential fragment formation between individual cells. Overall, Pronase E-generated peptide standards were a rapid and efficient method to identify proteolysis products from cells. PMID:26171808

  1. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  2. Data on the peptide mapping and MS identification for phosphorylated peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tu, Zong-Cai; Liu, Guang-Xian; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This article contains peptides mapping, mass spectrometry and processed data related to the research "Identification and quantification of the phosphorylated ovalbumin by high resolution mass spectrometry under dry-heating treatment" [1]. Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) was used to investigate the specific phosphorylation sites and the degree of phosphorylation (DSP) at each site. Specifically, phosphorylated peptides were monitored through mass shift on the FTICR MS spectrum. DSP was evaluated through the relative abundance levels of the FTICR MS spectrometry. From these data, the calculation method of DSP was exemplified. PMID:27274527

  3. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  4. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  5. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  6. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  7. Discovery of Novel Peptides Regulating Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Kim, Jeong Nam; Seaton, Kinda

    2014-01-01

    A MarR-like transcriptional repressor (RcrR) and two predicted ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) encoded by a single operon were recently shown to be dominant regulators of stress tolerance and development of genetic competence in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Here, we focused on polar (ΔrcrR-P) and nonpolar (ΔrcrR-NP) rcrR mutants, which are hyper- and nontransformable, respectively, to dissect the mechanisms by which these mutations impact competence. We discovered two open reading frames (ORFs) in the 3′ end of the rcrQ gene that encode peptides of 27 and 42 amino acids (aa) which are also dramatically upregulated in the ΔrcrR-NP strain. Deletion of, or start codon mutations in, the ORFs for the peptides in the ΔrcrR-NP background restored competence and sensitivity to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to levels seen in the ΔrcrR-P strain. Overexpression of the peptides adversely affected competence development. Importantly, overexpression of mutant derivatives of the ABC exporters that lacked the peptides also resulted in impaired competence. FLAG-tagged versions of the peptides could be detected in S. mutans, and FLAG tagging of the peptides impaired their function. The competence phenotypes associated with the various mutations, and with overexpression of the peptides and ABC transporters, were correlated with the levels of ComX protein in cells. Collectively, these studies revealed multiple novel mechanisms for regulation of competence development by the components of the rcrRPQ operon. Given their intimate role in competence and stress tolerance, the rcrRPQ-encoded peptides may prove to be useful targets for therapeutics to diminish the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:25135217

  8. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  9. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  10. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  11. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  12. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  13. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  14. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  15. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  16. In Vitro Amyloidogenic Peptides of Galectin-7

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Koji; Fujimoto, Eita; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Akiyama, Minoru; Satoh, Takahiro; Maeda, Hiroki; Fujii, Noriko; Tajima, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis (PLCA) is unclear, but pathogenic relationship to keratinocyte apoptosis has been implicated. We have previously identified galectin-7, actin, and cytokeratins as the major constituents of PLCA. Determination of the amyloidogenetic potential of these proteins by thioflavin T (ThT) method demonstrated that galectin-7 molecule incubated at pH 2.0 was capable of binding to the dye, but failed to form amyloid fibrils. When a series of galectin-7 fragments containing β-strand peptides were prepared to compare their amyloidogenesis, Ser31-Gln67 and Arg120-Phe136 were aggregated to form amyloid fibrils at pH 2.0. The rates of aggregation of Ser31-Gln67 and Arg120-Phe136 were dose-dependent with maximal ThT levels after 3 and 48 h, respectively. Their synthetic analogs, Phe33-Lys65 and Leu121-Arg134, which are both putative tryptic peptides, showed comparable amyloidogenesis. The addition of sonicated fibrous form of Ser31-Gln67 or Phe33-Lys65 to monomeric Ser31-Gln67 or Phe33-Lys65 solution, respectively, resulted in an increased rate of aggregation and extension of amyloid fibrils. Amyloidogenic potentials of Ser31-Gln67 and Phe33-Lys65 were inhibited by actin and cytokeratin fragments, whereas those of Arg120-Phe136 and Leu121-Arg134 were enhanced in the presence of Gly84-Arg113, a putative tryptic peptide of galectin-7. Degraded fragments of the galectin-7 molecule produced by limited trypsin digestion, formed amyloid fibrils after incubation at pH 2.0. These results suggest that the tryptic peptides of galectin-7 released at neutral pH, may lead to amyloid fibril formation of PLCA in the intracellular acidified conditions during keratinocyte apoptosis via regulation by the galectin-7 peptide as well as actin and cytokeratins. PMID:25172508

  17. Use of Cation Exchange Chromatography for Human C-peptide Isotope Dilution – Mass Spectrometric Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanov, Alexander V.; Rohlfing, Curt L.; Connolly, Shawn; Roberts, Matthew L.; Nauser, Christopher L.; Little, Randie R.

    2016-01-01

    An application of ion exchange chromatography for C-peptide analysis is described here. At the stage of C-peptide isolation, a strong cation exchanger (SP HP or MonoS) was used to purify the analyte from ballast proteins and peptides. The conditions of ion-exchange chromatographic separations were optimized using theoretical modeling of the net surface electric charge of the peptide as a function of pH. The purified and concentrated sample was further subjected to LC-MS/MS. In order to improve the reliability of analysis, two fragment ions were monitored simultaneously both for native C-peptide and internal standard, isotopically labeled C-peptides analogues (fragments with m/z of 927.7 and 147.2). Using ion-exchange chromatography, it became possible to process larger sample volumes, important for testing patients with very low C peptide levels, compared to currently used solid phase extraction methods. PMID:22098929

  18. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  19. Expression and differential regulation of natriuretic peptides in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, A M; Schulz, R

    1995-01-01

    The coexpression of the natriuretic peptides ANP, BNP and CNP as well as their differential regulation in mouse macrophages was demonstrated by quantitative PCR, HPLC analysis, and specific radioimmunoassays. Exposure of peritoneal- and bone marrow-derived macrophages to various immunomodulators revealed that bacterial LPS strikingly increases (up to 300-fold) the mRNA coding for CNP as does zymosan (up to 15-fold). In this respect, neither the phorbol ester PMA nor the glucocorticoid dexamethasone had any effect. Examination of macrophages for ANP mRNA showed a similar response to LPS and zymosan, though only a three- to sixfold increase, confirming previous data. In contrast, the concentration of mRNA coding for brain natriuretic peptide in these cells was reduced by dexamethasone (up to twofold) as well as LPS (two- to fivefold). No change was observed upon challenge with zymosan or PMA. The findings at the mRNA level are complemented by their corresponding peptide products. Incubation of macrophages with LPS resulted in a two- and fivefold elevation of intracellular ANP and CNP immunoreactivity, respectively. The amount of peptides released from cells under these conditions was found increased for ANP (threefold) and CNP (10-fold). No changes were observed for both intra- and extracellular brain natriuretic peptide. The coexpression of natriuretic peptides in macrophages as well as their different regulations by immunomodulators suggest discrete functions of these peptides within the immune system. Images PMID:7769089

  20. Peptides@mica: from affinity to adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, A; John, T; Gladytz, T; Hassert, R; Pagel, M; Risselada, H J; Naumov, S; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Abel, B

    2016-09-14

    Investigating the adsorption of peptides on inorganic surfaces, on the molecular level, is fundamental for medicinal and analytical applications. Peptides can be potent as linkers between surfaces and living cells in biochips or in implantation medicine. Here, we studied the adsorption process of the positively charged pentapeptide RTHRK, a recently identified binding sequence for surface oxidized silicon, and novel analogues thereof to negatively charged mica surfaces. Homogeneous formation of monolayers in the nano- and low micromolar peptide concentration range was observed. We propose an alternative and efficient method to both quantify binding affinity and follow adhesion behavior. This method makes use of the thermodynamic relationship between surface coverage, measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the concomitant free energy of adhesion. A knowledge-based fit to the autocorrelation of the AFM images was used to correct for a biased surface coverage introduced by the finite lateral resolution of the AFM. Binding affinities and mechanisms were further explored by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The combination of well validated MD simulations with topological data from AFM revealed a better understanding of peptide adsorption processes on the atomistic scale. We demonstrate that binding affinity is strongly determined by a peptide's ability to form salt bridges and hydrogen bonds with the surface lattice. Consequently, differences in hydrogen bond formation lead to substantial differences in binding affinity despite conservation of the peptide's overall charge. Further, MD simulations give access to relative changes in binding energy of peptide variations in comparison to a lead compound. PMID:27491508

  1. Design of cocktail peptide vaccine against Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabaei, Samira; Mashkani, Baratali; Esmaili, Arezoo; Karimi, Reza; Jamehdar, Saeid Amel

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a major morbidity and mortality cause in immuno suppressed patients. Therefore, significant effort has been made towards the development of a vaccine. In this study, the expression of the pp65 and gB fusion peptides and Fc domain of mouse IgG2a as a novel delivery system for selective uptake of antigens by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in Pichia pastoris yeast system were studied. Materials and Method: In this study, four immune dominant sequences in pp65 protein and 3 immuno dominant sequences in gB protein were selected according to literature review. Peptide linker -GGGGS- was used for construction of fusion peptide. This fusion peptide was cloned in the pPICZαA expression vector and transfected into P. pastoris host cells. Results: Dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) techniques showed that a high level of pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide was expressed. Conclusion: This CMV pp65-gB-Fc fusion peptide could be a promising candidate for the development of a novel peptide vaccine. PMID:27279990

  2. Biopanning of endotoxin-specific phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Celestine J; Sharma, Shilpi; Kumar, Gyanendra; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2003-07-18

    Systemic bacterial infections frequently lead to a plethora of symptoms termed "endotoxic shock" or "sepsis." Characterized by hypotension, coagulation abnormalities, and multiple organ failure, treatment of sepsis still remains mostly supportive. Of the various experimental therapeutic interventional strategies, neutralization of endotoxin by peptides or proteins is becoming popular recently. Hence, design of endotoxin binding peptides is gaining currency as their structural complexity and mode of recognition of endotoxin precludes mounting of resistance against them by the susceptible bacteria by genetic recombination, mutation, etc. Earlier work from our laboratory had shown that the amphiphilic cationic peptides are good ligands for endotoxin binding. In this study, we report the results of studies with the 12 selected lipid A binding phage displayed peptides by biopanning of a repertoire of a random pentadecapeptide library displayed on the filamentous M-13 phage. A comparison of the sequences revealed no consensus sequence between the 12 selected peptides suggesting that the lipid A binding motif is not sequence specific which is in accord with the sequence variation seen with the naturally occurring anti-microbial and/or endotoxin binding peptides. Thus, the flexibility of the peptides coupled with their plasticity in recognizing the lipid A moiety, explains their tight binding to endotoxin. At a structural level, asymmetric distribution of the charged polar residues on one face of the helix and non-polar residues on the opposite face appears to correlate with their activity.

  3. Multiple Factors Related to the Secretion of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XingChun; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 is secreted by intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. It regulates the secretion and sensitivity of insulin while suppressing glucagon secretion and decreasing postprandial glucose levels. It also improves beta-cell proliferation and prevents beta-cell apoptosis induced by cytotoxic agents. Additionally, glucagon-like peptide-1 delays gastric emptying and suppresses appetite. The impaired secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 has negative influence on diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance related diseases. Thus, glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) are now well accepted in the management of type 2 diabetes. The levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 are influenced by multiple factors including a variety of nutrients. The component of a meal acts as potent stimulants of glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. The levels of its secretion change with the intake of different nutrients. Some drugs also have influence on GLP-1 secretion. Bariatric surgery may improve metabolism through the action on GLP-1 levels. In recent years, there has been a great interest in developing effective methods to regulate glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. This review summarizes the literature on glucagon-like peptide-1 and related factors affecting its levels. PMID:26366173

  4. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity.

  5. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  6. Vector analyzing power A y and tensor analyzing powers A yy , A xx , and A xz in the reaction ěc d d → 3H p at the energy of 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilkin, A. K.; Saito, T.; Ladygin, V. P.; Uesaka, T.; Hatano, M.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Janek, M.; Kato, H.; Ladygina, N. B.; Maeda, Y.; Malakhov, A. I.; Nishikawa, J.; Ohnishi, T.; Okamura, H.; Reznikov, S. G.; Sakai, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakoda, S.; Satou, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Suda, K.; Tamii, A.; Uchigashima, N.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Yako, K.

    2015-11-01

    Data on the vector analyzing power A y and the tensor analyzing powers A yy , A xx , and A xz in the reaction ěc d d → 3H p at the deuteron energy of 200 MeV are presented over a full angular range in the c.m. frame. The signs of the tensor analyzing powers for forward and backward scattering are found to be sensitive to the D/ S wave ratio in 3H and in the deuteron. High-precision experimental data are compared with the results of theoretical calculations performed on the basis of the multiple-scatteringmodel by using standard wave functions for the three-nucleon bound states and for the deuteron.

  7. Biochemistry and physiology of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Johanne; Desjardins, Richard; Hum, David; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GC) exist as soluble and particulate, membrane-associated enzymes which catalyse the conversion of GTP to cGMP, an intracellular signalling molecule. Several membrane forms of the enzyme have been identified up to now. Some of them serve as receptors for the natriuretic peptides, a family of peptides which includes atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), three peptides known to play important roles in renal and cardiovascular physiology. These are transmembrane proteins composed of a single transmembrane domain, a variable extracellular natriuretic peptide-binding domain, and a more conserved intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) and catalytic domain. GC-A, the receptor for ANP and BNP, also named natriuretic peptide receptor-A or -1 (NPR-A or NPR- 1), has been studied widely. Its mode of activation by peptide ligands and mechanisms of regulation serve as prototypes for understanding the function of other particulate GC. Activation of this enzyme by its ligand is a complex process requiring oligomerization, ligand binding, KHD phosphorylation and ATP binding. Gene knockout and genetic segregation studies have provided strong evidence for the importance of GC-A in the regulation of blood pressure and heart and renal functions. GC-B is the main receptor for CNP, the latter having a more paracrine role at the vascular and venous levels. The structure and regulation of GC-B is similar to that of GC-A. This chapter reviews the structure and roles of GC-A and GC-B in blood pressure regulation and cardiac and renal pathophysiology. PMID:11952095

  8. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  9. Thermolysin: a peptide forming enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A V

    1991-02-01

    Thermolysin, a thermostable endopeptidase, is recognised as a potential peptide bond forming enzyme. The importance of structural properties and its stereospecific nature towards peptide bond formation is described. Thermolysin's use in the keystep of the preparation of an artificial sweetener 'aspartame' is highlighted.

  10. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  12. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  13. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese. PMID:26409967

  14. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Małgorzata; Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  15. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  16. Towards AB Initio Calculation of the Circular Dichroism of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, E.; Onida, G.; Tiana, G.

    2012-08-01

    In this work we plan to use ab initio spectroscopy calculations to compute circular dichroism (CD) spectra of peptides. CD provides information on protein secondary structure content; peptides, instead, remain difficult to address, due to their tendency to adopt multiple conformations in equilibrium. Therefore peptides are an interesting test-case for ab initio calculation of CD spectra. As a first application, we focus on the (83-92) fragment of HIV-1 protease, which is known to be involved in the folding and dimerization of this protein. As a preliminary step, we performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in order to obtain a set of representative conformers of the peptide. Then, on some of the obtained conformations, we calculated absorption spectra at the independent particle, RPA and TDLDA levels, showing the presence of charge transfer excitations, and their influence on spectral features.

  17. Glucagon-like peptides activate hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M

    1987-07-13

    Piscine (anglerfish, catfish, coho salmon) glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), applied at 3.5 nM, stimulate (1.1-1.9-fold) flux through gluconeogenesis above control levels in isolated trout and salmon hepatocytes. Human GLP-1 and GLP-2 also activate gluconeogenesis, but to a lesser degree than their piscine counterparts. Minor increases of substrate oxidation are noticed at times of peak gluconeogenic activation through GLPs. These hormones, which are derived from the same precursor peptide as glucagon are more potent activators of gluconeogenesis than glucagon when applied at equimolar concentrations, and do not appear to employ cAMP or cGMP as the intracellular messenger in hepatic tissue. PMID:3109952

  18. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here. PMID:26265354

  19. Antibacterial peptides isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L

    2000-10-01

    Insects are amazingly resistant to bacterial infections. To combat pathogens, insects rely on cellular and humoral mechanisms, innate immunity being dominant in the latter category. Upon detection of bacteria, a complex genetic cascade is activated, which ultimately results in the synthesis of a battery of antibacterial peptides and their release into the haemolymph. The peptides are usually basic in character and are composed of 20-40 amino acid residues, although some smaller proteins are also included in the antimicrobial repertoire. While the proline-rich peptides and the glycine-rich peptides are predominantly active against Gram-negative strains, the defensins selectively kill Gram-positive bacteria and the cecropins are active against both types. The insect antibacterial peptides are very potent: their IC50 (50% of the bacterial growth inhibition) hovers in the submicromolar or low micromolar range. The majority of the peptides act through disintegrating the bacterial membrane or interfering with membrane assembly, with the exception of drosocin, apidaecin and pyrrhocoricin which appear to deactivate a bacterial protein in a stereospecific manner. In accordance with their biological function, the membrane-active peptides form ordered structures, e.g. alpha-helices or beta-pleated sheets and often cast permeable ion-pores. Their cytotoxic properties were exploited in in vivo studies targeting tumour progression. Although the native peptides degrade quickly in biological fluids other than insect haemolymph, structural modifications render the peptides resistant against proteases without sacrificing biological activity. Indeed, a pyrrhocoricin analogue shows lack of toxicity in vitro and in vivo and protects mice against experimental Escherichia coli infection. Careful selection of lead molecules based on the insect antibacterial peptides may extend their utility and produce viable alternatives to the conventional antimicrobial compounds for mammalian therapy.

  20. Mucosal immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to a peptide or multiple-antigen peptide containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Klopfenstein, C; Klein, J P; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D

    1995-01-01

    In this study we investigated the mucosal and systemic responses to two T-cell-independent polysaccharides, a serogroup f polysaccharide (formed of rhamnose glucose polymers [RGPs]) from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 and a mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, covalently conjugated either to a linear peptide (peptide 3) or to a multiple-antigen peptide (MAP), both derived from S. mutans protein SR, an adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci. Peptide 3 and MAP, which contained at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, were tested as carriers for the polysaccharides and as protective immunogens. Intragastric intubation of rats with the conjugates (RGPs-peptide 3, RGPs-MAP, mannan-peptide 3, and mannan-MAP) associated with liposomes produced salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies which reacted with RGPs or mannan, peptide 3 or MAP, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae cells. Administration of conjugate boosters to the animals showed that both carriers conjugated to the polysaccharides were able to induce, in immunized animals, a salivary antipolysaccharide IgA memory. In contrast, animals primed and challenged with unconjugated polysaccharide showed no anamnestic response. Rats orally immunized with the conjugates also developed systemic primary antipolysaccharide and antipeptide IgM antibody responses which were characterized by a switch from IgM to IgG during the course of the secondary response. Data presented here demonstrated that both peptide 3 and the MAP construct can act as good carriers for orally administered polysaccharides. Unexpectedly, the use of a MAP did not further improve the immunogenicity of polysaccharides at the mucosal level; nevertheless, such a construct should be of great interest in overcoming the problem of genetic restriction induced by linear peptides. PMID:7790080

  1. Single-assay combination of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) EBNA1- and viral capsid antigen-p18-derived synthetic peptides for measuring anti-EBV immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody levels in sera from nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: options for field screening.

    PubMed

    Fachiroh, J; Paramita, D K; Hariwiyanto, B; Harijadi, A; Dahlia, H L; Indrasari, S R; Kusumo, H; Zeng, Y S; Schouten, T; Mubarika, S; Middeldorp, J M

    2006-04-01

    Assessment of immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses to various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigen complexes, usually involving multiple serological assays, is important for the early diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Through combination of two synthetic peptides representing immunodominant epitopes of EBNA1 and viral capsid antigen (VCA)-p18 we developed a one-step sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the specific detection of EBV reactive IgG and IgA antibodies in NPC patients (EBV IgG/IgA ELISA). Sera were obtained from healthy donors (n = 367), non-NPC head and neck cancer patients (n = 43), and biopsy-proven NPC patients (n = 296) of Indonesian and Chinese origin. Higher values of optical density at 450 nm for EBV IgG were observed in NPC patients compared to the healthy EBV carriers, but the large overlap limits its use for NPC diagnosis. Using either EBNA1 or VCA-p18 peptides alone IgA ELISA correctly identified 88.5% and 79.8% of Indonesian NPC patients, with specificities of 80.1% and 70.9%, whereas combined single-well coating with both peptides yielded sensitivity and specificity values of 90.1 and 85.4%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) for the combined EBNA1 plus VCA EBV IgA ELISA were 78.7% and 93.9%, respectively. In the Indonesia panel, the level of EBV IgA reactivity was not associated with NPC tumor size, lymph node involvement, and metastasis stage, sex, and age group. In the China panel the sensitivity/specificity values were 86.2/92.0% (EBNA1 IgA) and 84.1/90.3% (VCA-p18 IgA) for single-peptide assays and 95.1/90.6% for the combined VCA plus EBNA1 IgA ELISA, with a PPV and an NPV for the combined EBV IgA ELISA of 95.6 and 89.3%, respectively. Virtually all NPC patients had abnormal anti-EBV IgG diversity patterns as determined by immunoblot analysis. On the other hand, healthy EBV carriers with positive EBV IgA ELISA result showed normal IgG diversity patterns

  2. Highly Angiogenic Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Kang, Marci K.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of current tissue regeneration approaches using artificial scaffolds are fibrous encapsulation, lack of host cellular infiltration, unwanted immune responses, surface degradation preceding biointegration, and artificial degradation byproducts. Specifically, for scaffolds larger than 200 500 μm, implants must be accompanied by host angiogenesis in order to provide adequate nutrient/waste exchange in the newly forming tissue. In the current work, we design a peptide-based self-assembling nanofibrous hydrogel containing cell-mediated degradation and proangiogenic moieties that specifically address these challenges. This hydrogel can be easily delivered by syringe, is rapidly infiltrated by cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, and rapidly forms an extremely robust mature vascular network. scaffolds show no signs of fibrous encapsulation and after 3 weeks are resorbed into the native tissue. These supramolecular assemblies may prove a vital paradigm for tissue regeneration and specifically for ischemic tissue disease. PMID:25584521

  3. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  4. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  5. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P < 0.01) and more vascular smooth muscle cells (4.8 ± 0.6% versus 2.4 ± 0.3% positive area; P < 0.01). Finally, lipid deposition measured by Oil-red-O staining in the aortic arch was significantly higher in the C-peptide group compared with controls. Our results demonstrate that elevated C-peptide levels promote inflammatory cell infiltration and lesion development in ApoE-deficient mice without having metabolic effects. These data obtained in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  6. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  7. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  8. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules.

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  10. Immunological evaluation of peptide vaccination for cancer patients with the HLA-A26 allele

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Matsueda, Satoko; Takamori, Shinzo; Toh, Uhi; Noguchi, Masanori; Yutani, Shigeru; Yamada, Akira; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Teppei; Suekane, Shigetaka; Kawano, Kouichiro; Sasada, Tetsuro; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2015-01-01

    To develop a peptide vaccine for cancer patients with the HLA-A26 allele, which is a minor population worldwide, we investigated the immunological responses of HLA-A26+/A26+ cancer patients to four different CTL epitope peptides under personalized peptide vaccine regimens. In personalized peptide vaccine regimens, two to four peptides showing positive peptide-specific IgG responses in pre-vaccination plasma were selected from the four peptide candidates applicable for HLA-A26+/A26+ cancer patients and administered s.c. Peptide-specific CTL and IgG responses along with cytokine levels were measured before and after vaccination. Cell surface markers in PBMCs and plasma cytokine levels were also measured. In this study, 21 advanced cancer patients, including seven lung, three breast, two pancreas, and two colon cancer patients, were enrolled. Their HLA-A26 genotypes were HLA-A26:01 (n = 24), HLA-A26:03 (n = 10), and HLA-A26:02 (n = 8). One, 14, and 6 patients received two, three, and four peptides, respectively. Grade 1 or 2 skin reactions at the injection sites were observed in the majority of patients, but no severe adverse events related to the vaccination were observed. Peptide-specific CTL responses were augmented in 39% or 22% of patients after one or two cycles of vaccination, respectively. Notably, peptide-specific IgG were augmented in 63% or 100% of patients after one or two cycles of vaccination, respectively. Personalized peptide vaccines with these four CTL epitope peptides could be feasible for HLA-A26+ advanced cancer patients because of their safety and higher rates of immunological responses. PMID:26212219

  11. Urinary C-peptide tracks seasonal and individual variation in energy balance in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Emery Thompson, Melissa; Muller, Martin N; Wrangham, Richard W; Lwanga, Jeremiah S; Potts, Kevin B

    2009-02-01

    C-peptide of insulin presents a promising new tool for behavioral ecologists that allows for regular, non-invasive assessment of energetic condition in wild animals. C-peptide is produced on an equimolar basis with insulin, thus is indicative of the body's response to available glucose and, with repeated measurement, provides a biomarker of energy balance. As yet, few studies have validated the efficacy of C-peptide for monitoring energy balance in wild animals. Here, we assess seasonal and interindividual variation in urinary C-peptide concentrations of East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii). We assayed 519 urine samples from 13 adult male chimpanzees in the Kanyawara community of Kibale National Park, Uganda. C-peptide levels were significantly predicted by the total amount of fruit and the amount of preferred fruit in the diet. However, chimpanzees had very low C-peptide titers during an epidemic of severe respiratory illness, despite highly favorable feeding conditions. Kanyawara males had significantly lower C-peptide levels than males at Ngogo, a nearby chimpanzee community occupying a more productive habitat. Among Kanyawara males, low-ranking males had consistently higher C-peptide levels than dominant males. While counterintuitive, this result supports previous findings of costs associated with dominance in male chimpanzees. Our preliminary investigations demonstrate that C-peptide has wide applications in field research, providing an accessible tool for evaluating seasonal and individual variation in energetic condition, as well as the costs of processes such as immune function and reproduction. PMID:19084530

  12. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  13. Hierarchical organization of ferrocene-peptides.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Samaneh; Martić, Sanela; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2012-07-16

    Hierarchical self-assembly of disubstituted ferrocene (Fc)-peptide conjugates that possess Gly-Val-Phe and Gly-Val-Phe-Phe peptide substituents leads to the formation of nano- and micro-sized assemblies. Hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions provide directionality to the assembly patterns. The self-assembling behavior of these compounds was studied in solution by using (1)H NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. In the solid state, attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods were used. Spontaneous self-assembly of Fc-peptides through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions induces supramolecular assemblies, which further associate and give rise to fibers, large fibrous crystals, and twisted ropes. In the case of Fc[CO-Gly-Val-Phe-OMe](2) (1), molecules initially interact to form pleated sheets that undergo association into long fibers that form bundles and rectangular crystalline cuboids. Molecular offsets and defects, such as screw dislocations and solvent effects that occur during crystal growth, induce the formation of helical arrangements, ultimately leading to large twisted ropes. By contrast, the Fc-tetrapeptide conjugate Fc[CO-Gly-Val-Phe-Phe-OMe](2) (2) forms a network of nanofibers at the supramolecular level, presumably due to the additional hydrogen-bonding and hydrophobic interactions that stem from the additional Phe residues.

  14. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  15. Antimicrobial peptide resistance in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Stephens, David S

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an important role as a host defense against microbial pathogens and are key components of the human innate immune response. Neisseria meningitidis frequently colonizes the human nasopharynx as a commensal but also is a worldwide cause of epidemic meningitis and rapidly fatal sepsis. In the human respiratory tract, the only known reservoir of N. meningitidis, meningococci are exposed to human endogenous AMPs. Thus, it is not surprising that meningococci have evolved effective mechanisms to confer intrinsic and high levels of resistance to the action of AMPs. This article reviews the current knowledge about AMP resistance mechanisms employed by N. meningitidis. Two major resistance mechanisms employed by meningococci are the constitutive modification of the lipid A head groups of lipooligosaccharides by phosphoethanolamine and the active efflux pump mediated excretion of AMPs. Other factors influencing AMP resistance, such as the major porin PorB, the pilin biogenesis apparatus, and capsular polysaccharides, have also been identified. Even with an inherently high intrinsic resistance, several AMP resistance determinants can be further induced upon exposure to AMPs. Many well-characterized AMP resistance mechanisms in other Gram-negative bacteria are not found in meningococci. Thus, N. meningitidis utilizes a limited but highly effective set of molecular mechanisms to mediate antimicrobial peptide resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  16. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  17. Small Peptides Derived from Penetratin as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Oscar; Somlai, Csaba; Andujar, Sebastián A; Garro, Adriana D; Lima, Beatriz; Tapia, Alejandro; Feresin, Gabriela; Perczel, Andras; Tóth, Gabor; Cascales, Javier López; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-04-01

    The synthesis, in vitro evaluation and conformational study of several small-size peptides acting as antibacterial agents are reported. Among the compounds evaluated, the peptides Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Trp-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2 , Arg-Gln-Ile-Lys-Ile-Arg-Arg-Met-Lys-Trp-Arg-NH2 , and Arg-Gln-Ile-Trp-Trp-Trp-Trp-Gln-Arg-NH2 exhibited significant antibacterial activity. These were found to be very active antibacterial compounds, considering their small molecular size. In order to better understand the antibacterial activity obtained for these peptides, an exhaustive conformational analysis was performed, using both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations using two different media (water and trifluoroethanol/water) were employed. The results of these theoretical calculations were corroborated by experimental circular dichroism measurements. A brief discussion on the possible mechanism of action of these peptides at molecular level is also presented. Some of the peptides reported here constitute very interesting structures to be used as starting compounds for the design of new small-size peptides possessing antibacterial activity. PMID:26972341

  18. Data-driven synthesis of proteolysis-resistant peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Prothiwa, Michaela; Syed, Ismail; Huising, Mark O; van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Trauger, Sunia A; Kahn, Barbara B; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-12-24

    Peptide hormones are key physiological regulators, and many would make terrific drugs; however, the therapeutic use of peptides is limited by poor metabolism including rapid proteolysis. To develop novel proteolysis-resistant peptide hormone analogs, we utilize a strategy that relies on data from simple mass spectrometry experiments to guide the chemical synthesis of proteolysis-resistant analogs (i.e., data-driven synthesis). Application of this strategy to oxyntomodulin (OXM), a peptide hormone that stimulates insulin secretion from islets and lowers blood glucose in vivo, defined the OXM cleavage site in serum, and this information was used to synthesize a proteolysis-resistant OXM analog (prOXM). prOXM and OXM have similar activity in binding and glucose stimulated-insulin secretion assays. Furthermore, prOXM is also active in vivo. prOXM reduces basal glucose levels and improves glucose tolerance in mice. The discovery of prOXM suggests that proteolysis-resistant variants of other important peptide hormones can also be found using this strategy to increase the number of candidate therapeutic peptides. PMID:25496053

  19. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  20. Multifunctional cationic peptide fractions from flaxseed protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the multifunctional properties of flaxseed protein-derived cationic peptide fractions. Alcalase hydrolysis of flaxseed protein fractions liberated cationic peptides, which were separated into two major fractions (FI and FII) by chromatography using a cation-exchange column. Due to their cationic property, the peptide fractions bound and inactivated calmodulin (CaM, a negatively charged enzyme activator protein) with concomitant inhibition of CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase (CaMPDE); this activity was substantially reduced as CaM concentration increased. Enzyme kinetics studies showed competitive inhibition of CaMPDE by FI and FII with enzyme-inhibitor dissociation constants of 0.0202 and 0.0511 mg/ml, respectively. Only the FII peptides showed multifunctional activities by inhibiting CaMPDE, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin. Separation of FII peptides by reverse phase HPLC resulted in eight fractions (FII-2 to FII-9) that inhibited the activities of CaMPDE, ACE, and renin but this multifunctional activity was more pronounced in FII-6. From LC-MS analysis, identified peptides present in FII fraction had molecular size range of 330-735 Da, which suggests potential for increased absorption. Potential peptide sequences were identified for each of the HPLC fractions and shown to contain either lysine or arginine as the positively charged amino acid residue. The multifunctional properties of the cationic peptide fractions can potentially enhance their use in targeting multiple symptoms of cardiovascular disease, considering that the excessive levels of CaM, CaMPDE, renin and ACE play important roles in enhancing progression and intensity of chronic human diseases. PMID:22327315

  1. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin analogues in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Nicolas, Guillaume; Forrer, Flavio

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors with variable malignant behavior. The majority of NETs express increased levels of somatostatin (SST) receptors, particularly SST2 receptors. Radiolabeled peptides specific for the SST2 receptors may be used for diagnosis of NETs and for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). [(111)In-DTPA(0)]-octreotide has been the first peptide used for PRRT. This radiolabeled peptide, emitting Auger electrons, often induced symptomatic relief, but objective morphological responses were rarely documented. After the introduction of the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) other peptides, primarily [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) and [DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC) were labeled with (90)Y or (177)Lu and used for therapy applications. The rate of objective response obtained with these radiolabeled peptides ranges between 6% and 46%, owing to differences in inclusion criteria adopted in different studies, length and type of therapy, and criteria of evaluation of the response. The present data in the literature do not allow defining the most suitable peptide and radionuclide for the treatment of NETs. Instead emerging evidence indicates that a combination of nuclides with different physical characteristics might be more effective than the use of a single nuclide. Kidney and bone marrow toxicity are the limiting factors for PRRT. Mild toxicity is often encountered while severe toxicity is rarer. Toxicity could be reduced and therapeutic efficacy enhanced by patient-specific dosimetry. Future directions include different issues of PRRT, such as defining the most suitable treatment scheme, evaluation of new peptides with different affinity profiles to other SST receptor subtypes, and reduction of toxicity. PMID:22292758

  2. [Amphibian skin as a source of therapeutic peptides].

    PubMed

    Amiche, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The search for new bioactive molecules that could be used in therapeutics is a major public health issue, particularly in the treatment of certain diseases such as cancer. In this context the exploration of the venom of animals (snakes, amphibians, cones, scorpions, insects...) that produce molecules of various structures and biological activities, is a very promising direction. Research in this area led to the discovery of neuropeptides, hormones, toxins, antimicrobial peptides and other extremely potent mediators. These are now used in many areas both in fundamental research and in translational research, respectively, to understand biochemical and physiological mechanisms, or to use as medical diagnostic tools and for therapeutic purposes. Pr. V. Erspamer is the first researcher to have shown, in the 1930s, that in addition to biogenic amines and alkaloids, granular glands from the skin of amphibians also produced huge amounts of peptides with various structures and biological activities. He also showed that these peptides had their counterparts, most often in the form of identical or similar peptides