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Sample records for percent hafnium tubing

  1. Effect of nitrogen on tensile properties and structures of T-111 (tantalum, 8 percent tungsten, 2 percent hafnium) tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Metroka, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of controlled nitrogen additions was evaluated on the mechanical properties of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) fuel pin cladding material proposed for use in a lithium-cooled nuclear reactor concept. Additions of 80 to 1125 ppm nitrogen resulted in increased strengthening of T-111 tubular section test specimens at temperatures of 25 to 1200 C. Homogeneous distributions of up to 500 ppm nitrogen did not seriously decrease tensile ductility. Both single and two-phase microstructures, with hafnium nitride as the second phase, were evaluated in this study.

  2. Thermomechanical and Thermochemical Behavior of a Hafnium-20 Percent Tantalum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the thermomechanical and thermochemical behavior of a high temperature, oxidation resistant, hafnium-20 percent tantalum alloy. The elastic and shear moduli of this alloy were determined in air up to 1000 C and in vacuum up to 2000 C using a mechanical resonance technique. The internal friction of the alloy was measured up to temperatures greater than 1400 C. Room temperature stress-strain behavior of the oxidized and unoxidized alloy was established. The effect of annealing on the elastic and shear moduli of the extruded rod material was investigated. The martensitic-type phase transformation occurring in the alloy was studied using hot stage metallography and electron microscopy. Static oxidation tests were conducted on the alloy at temperatures from 1000 C to 1700 C with weight gain measurements made as a function of time and temperatures. Surface morphology studies were conducted on the oxide coatings formed at the different temperatures using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  3. Sap volume flow as influenced by tubing diameter and slope percent

    Treesearch

    H. Clay Smith

    1971-01-01

    The amount of sugar maple sap that can move through plastic tubing is controlled by several factors. The most important are tubing diameter and slope percent. Estimates are given of the number of tapholes that can be used with combinations of these variables.

  4. Thermal expansion method for lining tantalum alloy tubing with tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Mattson, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    A differential-thermal expansion method was developed to line T-111 (tantalum - 8 percent tungsten - 2 percent hafnium) tubing with a tungsten diffusion barrier as part of a fuel element fabrication study for a space power nuclear reactor concept. This method uses a steel mandrel, which has a larger thermal expansion than T-111, to force the tungsten against the inside of the T-111 tube. Variables investigated include lining temperature, initial assembly gas size, and tube length. Linear integrity increased with increasing lining temperature and decreasing gap size. The method should have more general applicability where cylinders must be lined with a thin layer of a second material.

  5. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  6. Multistage depressed collector with efficiency of 90 to 94 percent for operation of a dual-mode traveling wave tube in the linear region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, P.; Fox, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    An axisymmetric, multistage, depressed collector of fixed geometric design was evaluated in conjunction with an octave bandwidth, dual mode traveling wave tube (TWT). The TWT was operated over a wide range of conditions to simulate different applications. The collector performance was optimized (within the constraint of fixed geometric design) over the range of TWT operating conditions covered. For operation of the TWT in the linear, low distortion range, 90 percent and greater collector efficiencies were obtained leading to TWT overall efficiencies of 20 to 35 percent, as compared with 2 to 5 percent with an undepressed collector. With collectors of this efficiency and minimized beam interception losses, it becomes practical to design dual mode TWT's such that the low mode can represent operation well below saturation. Consequently, the required pulse up in beam current can be reduced or eliminated, and this mitigates beam control and dual mode TWT circuit design problems. For operation of the dual mode TWT at saturation, average collector efficiencies in excess of 85 percent were obtained for both the low and high modes across an octave bandwidth, leading to a three to fourfold increase in the TWT overall efficiency.

  7. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  8. A simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for accurately and precisely determining the zirconium or hafnium content of molybdenum-base alloys. The procedure is based on the reaction of the reagent Arsenazo III with zirconium or hafnium in strong hydrochloric acid solution. The colored complexes of zirconium or hafnium are formed in the presence of molybdenum. Titanium or rhenium in the alloy have no adverse effect on the zirconium or hafnium complex at the following levels in the selected aliquot: Mo, 10 mg; Re, 10 mg; Ti, 1 mg. The spectrophotometric measurement of the zirconium or hafnium complex is accomplished without prior separation with a relative standard deviation of 1.3 to 2.7 percent.

  9. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.; Hutcheon, J.M.

    1956-08-21

    Substantially complete separation of zirconium from hafnium may be obtained by elution of ion exchange material, on which compounds of the elements are adsorbed, with an approximately normal solution of sulfuric acid. Preferably the acid concentration is between 0.8 N amd 1.2 N, amd should not exceed 1.5 N;. Increasing the concentration of sulfate ion in the eluting solution by addition of a soluble sulfate, such as sodium sulfate, has been found to be advantageous. The preferred ion exchange materials are sulfonated polystyrene resins such as Dowex 50,'' and are preferably arranged in a column through which the solutions are passed.

  10. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  11. Hafnium germanium telluride

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  12. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  13. Amphoteric Aqueous Hafnium Cluster Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goberna-Ferrón, Sara; Park, Deok-Hie; Amador, Jenn M; Keszler, Douglas A; Nyman, May

    2016-05-17

    Selective dissolution of hafnium-peroxo-sulfate films in aqueous tetramethylammonium hydroxide enables extreme UV lithographic patterning of sub-10 nm HfO2 structures. Hafnium speciation under these basic conditions (pH>10), however, is unknown, as studies of hafnium aqueous chemistry have been limited to acid. Here, we report synthesis, crystal growth, and structural characterization of the first polynuclear hydroxo hafnium cluster isolated from base, [TMA]6 [Hf6 (μ-O2 )6 (μ-OH)6 (OH)12 ]⋅38 H2 O. The solution behavior of the cluster, including supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonding is detailed via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The study opens a new chapter in the aqueous chemistry of hafnium, exemplifying the concept of amphoteric clusters and informing a critical process in single-digit-nm lithography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  15. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  16. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  17. THE FERROELECTRIC AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM OXIDE COMPOUNDS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES), (* FERROELECTRICITY , HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS), (*CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS), DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, HYSTERESIS... FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS, SOLID SOLUTIONS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CRYSTAL LATTICES, LOW TEMPERATURE, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, LEAD COMPOUNDS, BARIUM COMPOUNDS

  18. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Simmerman, S. G.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  19. Inhibition of urediniospore germination Puccinia hemerocallidis by Bacto Agar and changes in percent germination and germ-tube elongation on agarose over time.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of some gelling agents and pH on urediniospore germination and germ tube elongation of Puccinia hemerocallidis were investigated in vitro. Gelling agents significantly affected urediniospore germination. Very few urediniospores germinated on the substrates containing more than 0.5% Bacto...

  20. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, D.-C.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Burton, K.W.; Christensen, J.N.; Gunther, D.

    1999-01-01

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in 87Sr/86Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  1. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    PubMed

    Lee; Halliday; Hein; Burton; Christensen; Gunther

    1999-08-13

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in (87)Sr/(86)Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  2. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  3. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-08

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4–20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization P{sub r} of up to 10 μC cm{sup −2} as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 10{sup 5} cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  4. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous hafnium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L; Hunt, Rodney D; Montgomery, Frederick C

    2013-08-06

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide gels contain a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous hafnium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  5. The Hot-Pressing of Hafnium Carbide (Melting Point, 7030 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of the hot-pressing variables (temperature, pressure, and time) on the density and grain size of hafnium carbide disks. The purpose was to provide information necessary for the production of high-density test shapes for the determination of physical and mechanical properties. Hot-pressing of -325 mesh hafnium carbide powder was accomplished with a hydraulic press and an inductively heated graphite die assembly. The ranges investigated for each variable were as follows: temperature, 3500 to 4870 F; pressure, 1000 to 6030 pounds per square inch; and time, 5 to 60 minutes. Hafnium carbide bodies of approximately 98 percent theoretical density can be produced under the following minimal conditions: 4230 F, 3500 pounds per square inch, and 15 minutes. Further increases in temperature and time resulted only in greater grain size.

  6. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  7. Industrialization progress of high-purity hafnium for optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Jiandong; Chen, Yang; Peng, Jiaqing

    2016-03-01

    Hafnium oxide, hafnium crystal bar and high-purity hafnium were prepared using extraction separation, reduction, electrolytic refining, iodide refining and electron beam melting process by General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals. A hundreds-kilogram production line has been built. The purity of the high-purity hafnium was Zr/(Zr+Hf) <0.3wt% and Zr+Hf>99.99wt%, which enables a high laser induced damage threshold.

  8. Investigation of Melting Dynamics of Hafnium Clusters.

    PubMed

    Ng, Wei Chun; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2017-03-27

    Melting dynamics of hafnium clusters are investigated using a novel approach based on the idea of the chemical similarity index. Ground state configurations of small hafnium clusters are first derived using Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm in the parallel tempering mode, employing the COMB potential in the energy calculator. These assumed ground state structures are verified by using the Low Lying Structures (LLS) method. The melting process is carried out either by using the direct heating method or prolonged simulated annealing. The melting point is identified by a caloric curve. However, it is found that the global similarity index is much more superior in locating premelting and total melting points of hafnium clusters.

  9. Hafnium transistor process design for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses 1-D process simulations of Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures to design the threshold voltage of hafnium oxide based transistors used for neural recording. The methodology is comprised of 1-D analytical equations for threshold voltage specification, and doping profiles, and 1-D MIS Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) to design a process to implement a specific threshold voltage, which minimized simulation time. The process was then verified with a 2-D process/electrical TCAD simulation. Hafnium oxide films (HfO) were grown and characterized for dielectric constant and fixed oxide charge for various annealing temperatures, two important design variables in threshold voltage design.

  10. Diffusion of hydrogen in hafnium and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlinskii, V. M.; Kotlik, L. L.; Egorova, V. M.; Viktorova, A. M.

    1981-04-01

    We measured the coefficients of diffusion of hydrogen in the hydride phases of hafnium and titanium at 1073 1273°K on the basis of the solutions of Fick's second law for diffusion in a finite cylinder and in a sector of it.

  11. Percolation conductivity in hafnium sub-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Islamov, D. R. Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-29

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally that formation of chains and islands of oxygen vacancies in hafnium sub-oxides (HfO{sub x}, x < 2) leads to percolation charge transport in such dielectrics. Basing on the model of Éfros-Shklovskii percolation theory, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. Based on the percolation theory suggested model shows that hafnium sub-oxides consist of mixtures of metallic Hf nanoscale clusters of 1–2 nm distributed onto non-stoichiometric HfO{sub x}. It was shown that reported approach might describe low resistance state current-voltage characteristics of resistive memory elements based on HfO{sub x}.

  12. Calibration of the lutetium-hafnium clock.

    PubMed

    Scherer, E; Munker, C; Mezger, K

    2001-07-27

    Well-defined constants of radioactive decay are the cornerstone of geochronology and the use of radiogenic isotopes to constrain the time scales and mechanisms of planetary differentiation. Four new determinations of the lutetium-176 decay constant (lambda176Lu) made by calibration against the uranium-lead decay schemes yield a mean value of 1.865 +/- 0.015 x 10(-11) year(-1), in agreement with the two most recent decay-counting experiments. Lutetium-hafnium ages that are based on the previously used lambda176Lu of 1.93 x 10(-11) to 1.94 x 10(-11) year(-1) are thus approximately 4% too young, and the initial hafnium isotope compositions of some of Earth's oldest minerals and rocks become less radiogenic relative to bulk undifferentiated Earth when calculated using the new decay constant. The existence of strongly unradiogenic hafnium in Early Archean and Hadean zircons implies that enriched crustal reservoirs existed on Earth by 4.3 billion years ago and persisted for 200 million years or more. Hence, current models of early terrestrial differentiation need revision.

  13. Steps Towards Large Scale Production of High-Spin Hafnium Isomers by Spallation Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-25

    production and accumulation of the nuclear isomer 178m2 Hafnium by spallation of hafnium targets with high-energy protons. The Hafnium yield will be...E.P. SHABALIN , Production of long–lived hafnium isomers in reactor irradiations, High Energy Density Physics 2 (2006) 48; [25] M.B. CHADWICK AND P.G...YOUNG, Calculations of the production cross–sections of high–spin isomeric states in Hafnium , Nuclear Science and Engineering 108 (1991) 117; [26

  14. Percent Wetland Cover

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be indicate cleaner surface water. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  15. Hafnium transistor design for neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses the EKV model and the g(m)/I(D) biasing technique to design hafnium oxide field effect transistors that are suitable for neural recording circuitry. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is correlated to the structural properties of a Field Effect Transistor (FET) and a Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitor. This approach allows a transistor designer to use a design flow that starts with simple and intuitive 1-D equations for gain that can be verified in 1-D MIS capacitor TCAD simulations, before final TCAD process verification of transistor properties. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is optimized by using fast 1-D simulations and using slower, complex 2-D simulations only for verification. The 1-D equations are used to show that the increased dielectric constant of hafnium oxide allows a higher DC gain for a given oxide thickness. An additional benefit is that the MIS capacitor can be employed to test additional performance parameters important to an open gate transistor such as dielectric stability and ionic penetration.

  16. Internal dosimetry for inhalation of hafnium tritide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Inkret, W C; Schillaci, M E; Boyce, M K; Cheng, Y S; Efurd, D W; Little, T T; Miller, G; Musgrave, J A; Wermer, J R

    2001-01-01

    Metal tritides with low dissolution rates may have residence times in the lungs which are considerably longer than the biological half-time normally associated with tritium in body water, resulting in long-term irradiation of the lungs by low energy beta particles and bremsstrahlung X rays. Samples of hafnium tritide were placed in a lung simulant fluid to determine approximate lung dissolution rates. Hafnium hydride samples were analysed for particle size distribution with a scanning electron microscope. Lung simulant data indicated a biological dissolution half-time for hafnium tritide on the order of 10(5) d. Hafnium hydride particle sizes ranged between 2 and 10 microns, corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters of 5 to 25 microns. Review of in vitro dissolution data, development of a biokinetic model, and determination of secondary limits for 1 micron AMAD particles are presented and discussed.

  17. Nanoscale radiotherapy with hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maggiorella, Laurence; Barouch, Gilles; Devaux, Corinne; Pottier, Agnès; Deutsch, Eric; Bourhis, Jean; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    There is considerable interest in approaches that could improve the therapeutic window of radiotherapy. In this study, hafnium oxide nanoparticles were designed that concentrate in tumor cells to achieve intracellular high-energy dose deposit. Conventional methods were used, implemented in different ways, to explore interactions of these high-atomic-number nanoparticles and ionizing radiation with biological systems. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, these nanoparticles, when exposed to high-energy photons, were shown to demonstrate an approximately ninefold radiation dose enhancement compared with water. Importantly, the nanoparticles show satisfactory dispersion and persistence within the tumor and they form clusters in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Marked antitumor activity is demonstrated in human cancer models. Safety is similar in treated and control animals as demonstrated by a broad program of toxicology evaluation. These findings, supported by good tolerance, provide the basis for developing this new type of nanoparticle as a promising anticancer approach in human patients.

  18. Ferroelectricity in yttrium-doped hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.; Schröder, U.; Böscke, T. S.; Müller, I.; Böttger, U.; Wilde, L.; Sundqvist, J.; Lemberger, M.; Kücher, P.; Mikolajick, T.; Frey, L.

    2011-12-01

    Structural and electrical evidence for a ferroelectric phase in yttrium doped hafnium oxide thin films is presented. A doping series ranging from 2.3 to 12.3 mol% YO1.5 in HfO2 was deposited by a thermal atomic layer deposition process. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction of the 10 nm thick films revealed an orthorhombic phase close to the stability region of the cubic phase. The potential ferroelectricity of this orthorhombic phase was confirmed by polarization hysteresis measurements on titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal capacitors. For 5.2 mol% YO1.5 admixture the remanent polarization peaked at 24 μC/cm2 with a coercive field of about 1.2 MV/cm. Considering the availability of conformal deposition processes and CMOS-compatibility, ferroelectric Y:HfO2 implies high scaling potential for future, ferroelectric memories.

  19. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  20. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  1. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  2. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  3. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to...

  4. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to...

  5. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  6. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  7. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  8. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to...

  9. Ground-state structures of Hafnium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Wei Chun; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Hafnium (Hf) is a very large tetra-valence d-block element which is able to form relatively long covalent bond. Researchers are interested to search for substitution to silicon in the semi-conductor industry. We attempt to obtain the ground-state structures of small Hf clusters at both empirical and density-functional theory (DFT) levels. For calculations at the empirical level, charge-optimized many-body functional potential (COMB) is used. The lowest-energy structures are obtained via a novel global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering Monte-Carlo Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm (PTMBHGA). The virtue of using COMB potential for Hf cluster calculation lies in the fact that by including the charge optimization at the valence shells, we can encourage the formation of proper bond hybridization, and thus getting the correct bond order. The obtained structures are further optimized using DFT to ensure a close proximity to the ground-state.

  10. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  11. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  12. Some properties of RF sputtered hafnium nitride coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aron, P. R.; Grill, A.

    1982-01-01

    Hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering from a hafnium target in nitrogen and argon gas mixtures. The rate of deposition, composition, electrical resistivity and complex index of refraction were investigated as a function of target substrate distance and the fraction nitrogen, (fN2) in the sputtering atmosphere. The relative composition of the coatings is independent on fN2 for values above 0.1. The electric resistivity of the hafnium nitride films changes over 8 orders of magnitude when fN2 changes from 0.10 to 0.85. The index of refraction is almost constant at 2.8(1-0.3i) up to fN2 = 0.40 then decreases to 2.1(1 - 0.01i) for higher values of fN2.

  13. Use of Hafnium in Control Elements of Nuclear Reactors and Power Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikov, A. K.; Bocharov, O. V.; Arzhakova, V. M.; Bezumov, V. N.; Perlovich, Yu. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.

    2003-07-01

    The expedience in the use of hafnium for control elements of a nuclear reactor is considered. The requirements of various producers on the chemical composition and mechanical properties of nuclear-purity hafnium are presented. Results of studies of the strain resistance and ductility characteristics of hafnium are discussed depending on the temperature and the deformation rate. The dependence of the hafnium hardness on the degree of deformation and on the annealing mode is presented. Results of a texture analysis are used to judge the effect of deformation and heat treatment on the anisotropy in the properties of hafnium. The developed process is used for the production of hafnium parts at VNIINM, i.e. hafnium plates are fabricated for the attachment unit of automatic control assemblies (ACA) for VVÉR-440 reactors.

  14. Composition effects on mechanical properties of tungsten-rhenium-hafnium-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of rod and sheet fabricated from arc melted W-4Re-Hf-C alloys containing up to about 0.8 mol percent hafnium carbide (HfC) were evaluated in the as-worked condition. The DBTT's of electropolished bend and tensile specimens were independent of HfC content in this range but dependent on excess Hf or C above that required for stoichiometric HfC. Low temperature ductility was a maximum at Hf contents slightly in excess of stoichiometric. Variations in high temperature strength were also dependent on excess Hf and C. Maximum creep strengthening also occurred at Hf contents in excess of stoichiometric. Analysis of extracted second phase particles indicated that creep strength was reduced by increasing WC content in the HfC particles.

  15. Development and control of the process for the manufacture of zircaloy-4 tubing for LWBR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical requirements for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel elements (fuel rods) imposed certain unique requirements for the low hafnium Zircaloy-4 tubing used as fuel rod cladding. This report describes, in detail, the tube manufacturing process, the product and process controls used, the inspections and tests performed, and the efforts involved in refining a commercial tube reducing process to produce tubes that would satisfy the requirements for LWBR fuel rod cladding.

  16. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014.

  17. Neutron Detection Utilizing Gadolinium Doped Hafnium Oxide Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    emit low energy gamma rays, alpha particles, and neutron radiation . Many instruments capable of gamma detection have been available for decades...neutron detection because its interaction with neutrons creates fast electrons and gamma rays. Therefore, background gamma radiation causes a more...NEUTRON DETECTION UTILIZING GADOLINIUM DOPED HAFNIUM OXIDE FILMS THESIS Bryan D. Blasy, 2Lt

  18. Mineral resource of the month: zirconium and hafnium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are grouped in the same family as titanium on the periodic table. The two elements commonly occur in oxide and silicate minerals and have significant economic importance in everything from ink, ceramics and golf shoes to nuclear fuel rods.

  19. Discovery of gallium, germanium, lutetium, and hafnium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Percents Are Not Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults are prone to treating percents, one representational format of rational numbers, as novel cases of natural number. This suggests that percent values are not differentiated from natural numbers; a conceptual shift from the natural numbers to the rational numbers has not yet occurred. This is most surprising, considering people are inundated…

  1. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop…

  2. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop…

  3. Percents Are Not Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults are prone to treating percents, one representational format of rational numbers, as novel cases of natural number. This suggests that percent values are not differentiated from natural numbers; a conceptual shift from the natural numbers to the rational numbers has not yet occurred. This is most surprising, considering people are inundated…

  4. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  5. Effect of Copper Addition on Crystallization and Properties of Hafnium Containing HITPERM Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2190 EFFECT OF COPPER ADDITION ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM CONTAINING HITPERM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) L...SUBTITLE EFFECT OF COPPER ADDITION ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM CONTAINING HITPERM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Effect of copper addition on crystallization and properties of hafnium containing HITPERM alloys „invited

  6. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  7. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  8. Solvent extraction separation of hafnium with 4-methyl-3-pentene-2-one.

    PubMed

    Kalyanaraman, S; Khopkar, S M

    1978-07-01

    A new method for the extractive separation of hafnium from zirconium is presented. Zirconium is extracted with pure mesityl oxide from 4M nitric acid/4M sodium nitrate medium, followed by extraction of hafnium with mesityl oxide from 0.4M hydrochloric acid/2M ammonium thiocyanate medium. It is possible to accomplish clean separations of Hf from Zr in ratios from 1:20 to 1:200. The separation of hafnium from commonly associated elements such as scandium, yttrium, uranium, thorium, alkali and alkaline earth metals in 500:1 weight ratio to hafnium is also possible.

  9. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  10. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  11. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-07

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  12. Tunable electrical and optical properties of hafnium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, I. L.; Reeves, R. J.; Preston, A. R. H.; Ludbrook, B. M.; Downes, J. E.; Ruck, B. J.; Durbin, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    We report structural and electronic properties of epitaxial hafnium nitride films grown on MgO by plasma-assisted pulsed laser deposition. The electronic structure measured using soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is in excellent agreement with the results of a band structure calculation. We show that by varying the growth conditions we can extend the films' reflectance further toward the UV, and we relate this observation to the electronic structure.

  13. Phase transformations in some hafnium-tantalum-titanium-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Kapoor, D.

    1997-11-01

    Phase transformations in hafnium alloys are of interest as a means of achieving a material which exhibits flow softening and high localized strains during deformation at high strain rates. Hafnium transforms from a body-centered-cubic beta phase to a hexagonal alpha phase upon cooling below 1749{degrees}C. Hafnium-based alloys containing up to 17.5% Ti, up to 17.5% Ta, and up to 7.3% Zr by weight were button-arc melted and, in some cases, hot extruded to obtain a refined grain size. A number of alloys were shown to have beta solvus temperatures in the range of 1100 to 1300{degrees}C and showed evidence of a shear transformation upon water quenching. The Vickers microhardness of the quenched materials are typically above 350 HV as compared to 300 HV or less for materials with an alpha plus beta structure. Quenching dilatometry indicates a martensite start temperature of about 750{degrees}C for the Hf-7.5 Ta-10 Ti-1 Zr alloy and 800{degrees}C or more for the Hf-7.5 Ta-7.5 Ti-1 Zr alloy. Tensile tests at 1 s{sup {minus}1} strain rate show a constant ultimate tensile strength for temperatures up to 600{degrees}C for the above two alloys and a rapid decrease in strength with a further increase in temperature.

  14. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  15. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  16. Hafnium trifluoromethanesulfonate (hafnium triflate) as a highly efficient catalyst for chemoselective thioacetalization and transthioacetalization of carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Chao; Zhu, Jieping

    2008-12-05

    A range of carbonyl compounds including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones were converted to the corresponding thioacetals in high yields in the presence of a catalytic amount of hafnium trifluoromethanesulfonate (0.1 mol %, room temperature). The mild conditions tolerated various sensitive functional and protecting groups and were racemization-free when applied to alpha-aminoaldehydes. Transacetalization and chemoselective thioacetalization of aromatic aldehydes in the presence of aliphatic aldehydes and ketones were also documented.

  17. Fused salt process for purifying zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.D.

    1991-04-23

    This patent describes a fused salt process for continuously purifying zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachloride dissolved in a molten bath in a vessel. It comprises: maintaining a mass of a suitable mixture of salts, including zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachloride; heating the mixture of salts to a temperature at or immediately below the vaporization temperature of the zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachloride at which temperature the mixture of salts is fused to form a molten, tetrachloride-dissolving bath; continuously introducing into the dissolving bath a zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachloride powder; heating a portion of the dissolving bath in situ to a temperature higher than the vaporization temperature of the zirconium and/or hafnium tetrachloride so as to vaporize the tetrachloride; internally circulating the dissolving bath whereby the portion of the dissolving bath at the high temperature circulate with the bath at the lower temperature.

  18. Tubing vs. buckets: a cost comparison

    Treesearch

    Neil K. Huyler

    1975-01-01

    Equipment investment for tubing-vacuum systems was significantly less than that for bucket systems. Tubing-vacuum systems required about 22 percent less labor input, the major labor input being completed before sap-flow periods. Annual cost of operation was less for tubing-vacuum than the bucket system. Small tubing-vacuum operations showed more profit potential than...

  19. Hafnium carbamates and ureates: new class of precursors for low-temperature growth of HfO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian P; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Becker, Hans-Werner; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-04-21

    Novel volatile compounds of hafnium, namely tetrakis-N,O-dialkylcarbamato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)O(i)Pr)(4)] () and tetrakis-N,N,N'-trialkylureato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)N-(Me)Et)(4)] (), have been synthesized through the simple insertion reaction of isopropyl isocyanate into hafnium isopropoxide and hafnium ethylmethylamide, respectively; based on the promising thermal properties, compound has been evaluated as a precursor for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of HfO(2) thin films, which resulted in the growth of stoichiometric and crystalline layers with a uniform morphology at temperature as low as 250 degrees C.

  20. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  1. Percent Agriculture Adjacent to Streams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The type of vegetation along a stream influences the water quality in the stream. Intact buffer strips of natural vegetation along streams tend to intercept pollutants before they reach the stream. High percentages of agriculture along streams increase the likelihood of elevated nutrient, pesticide and sediment levels in the stream. Agricultural land cover along streams (RIPAG) is the percent of total stream length adjacent to agriculture. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  2. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  3. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  4. The abundances of zirconium and hafnium in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Papia, G. M.; Grossman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in the Orgueil, Murchison, Allende, Bruderheim, and Alais meteorites by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The mean Zr/Hf weight ratio in the first four of these meteorites is 31.3 (plus or minus 2.2), indicating no major fractionation of Zr from Hf. Alais contains anomalously high amounts of many refractory lithophile elements, including Zr and Hf. Orgueil contains 3.1 ppm Zr and 0.11 ppm Hf, corresponding to 9.0 and 0.16 atoms, respectively, relative to 1 million Si atoms.

  5. Phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böscke, T. S.; Teichert, St.; Bräuhaus, D.; Müller, J.; Schröder, U.; Böttger, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide (FE-Si:HfO2) by temperature dependent polarization and x-ray diffraction measurements. If heated under mechanical confinement, the orthorhombic ferroelectric phase reversibly transforms into a phase with antiferroelectric behavior. Without confinement, a transformation into a monoclinic/tetragonal phase mixture is observed during cooling. These results suggest the existence of a common higher symmetry parent phase to the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases, while transformation between these phases appears to be inhibited by an energy barrier.

  6. Radiochemical separation of zirconium and hafnium from other radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R B

    1972-11-01

    Radiozirconium and radiohafnium may be separated from all other radionuclides except scandium and protactinium by precipitation with mandelic acid from 5-10 M hydrochloric acid, using commercial zirconyl chloride as carrier. Scandium and protactinium are removed by dissolving the precipitate in sodium carbonate, then adding barium nitrate to precipitate barium carbonate which acts as a scavenger. Zirconium mandelate is finally reprecipitated and the sample weighed and counted in this form. The method was checked by analysing commercial zirconyl chloride and standard rock samples for zirconium and hafnium by neutron-activation analysis.

  7. Hafnium carbide structural foams synthesized from polymer precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haibo

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate a new low cost approach to produce Hafnium Carbide (HfC) structural foams through the thermolysis and pyrolysis of polymer precursors. Hafnium carbide has a melting point of over 3900 °C, the highest melting point of any known binary alloy. HfC structural foams can be fabricated into high temperature components or used as a thermal insulation material. Current available methods for creating HfC structural foams are time consuming, expensive or the material produced lacks mechanical strength. The objectives of this research were to produce HfC foam through the thermolysis and pyrolysis of Hf containing polymer mixture, optimize the properties of the HfC foam, and develop a knowledge base of acceptable process parameters. With the proposed method, HfC foam was produced by mixing a hafnium containing Macromolecular Metal Complex (MMC) and carbon source polymers, followed by heat treating the mixture under vacuum. XRD analysis showed that the produced foam was largely composed of HfC, with small amounts of hafnium oxide. The foam total porosity was measured to be over 85%. The HfC lattice parameter was found to range from 0.4613 nm to 0.4647 nm. The HfC conversion mechanism was investigated using Residual Gas Analysis, where it was observed that polymer decomposition occurred from 80 through 550 °C and HfC conversion started around 1100 °C. The HfC foam mechanical properties and microstructure were improved by optimizing the process methods and parameters. The initial research yielded an HfC foam with a compression strength of 15.16 +/- 4.66 MPa and evenly distributed foam cells with diameter sizes up to 50 mum. Continued research showed that HfC foams with total porosity of about 85% (density 1.9g/cm 3), and a foam compression strength of 212 +/- 25MPa were achievable. The proposed methodology for synthesizing HfC foam was found to be simple, inexpensive and require less production time. The process can be controlled to produce

  8. The thermodynamic properties of crystalline pentasodium hafnium tris(phosphate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asabina, E. A.; Pet'kov, V. I.; Markin, A. V.; Smirnova, N. N.

    2009-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of crystalline pentasodium hafnium tris(phosphate) was studied over the temperature range 6-650 K. The experimental data were used to calculate the thermodynamic functions of Na5Hf(PO4)3 from 0 to 650 K and the fractal dimension at 20-50 K. The standard entropy of formation from simple substances at 298.15 K was calculated from the absolute entropy value. The thermodynamic properties of Na5M(PO4)3 (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf) phosphates were compared.

  9. The abundances of zirconium and hafnium in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Papia, G. M.; Grossman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in the Orgueil, Murchison, Allende, Bruderheim, and Alais meteorites by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The mean Zr/Hf weight ratio in the first four of these meteorites is 31.3 (plus or minus 2.2), indicating no major fractionation of Zr from Hf. Alais contains anomalously high amounts of many refractory lithophile elements, including Zr and Hf. Orgueil contains 3.1 ppm Zr and 0.11 ppm Hf, corresponding to 9.0 and 0.16 atoms, respectively, relative to 1 million Si atoms.

  10. ROE Fish Faunal Percent Loss

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Percent reduction is based on the number of native species determined to be present as of 2015, compared with historical numbers documented prior to 1970. Data are displayed by 6-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC-6) watershed. A species is considered present if there is at least one record of its presence in any 8-digit HUC within the 6-digit HUC. This indicator presents a summary of data available from the NatureServe Explorer database (http://www.natureserve.org/conservation-tools/data-maps-tools/natureserve-explorer). The identity and status (current vs. historical) of all native fish species recorded in each 8-digit HUC are available from this database, along with species-by-species distribution maps at the 8-digit HUC level. Analyses based on these data have previously been reported in Master et al. (1998, 2003) and Stein et al. (2000). Data were provided by NatureServe.

  11. Simultaneous determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1968-01-01

    A neutron activation procedure suitable for the routine determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates is described. The irradiated sample is fused with sodium peroxide and leached, and the insoluble hydroxides are dissolved in dilute hydrofluoric acid-hydrochloric acid. After LaF3 and AgCl scavenges, tantalum and hafnium are separated by anion exchange. Tantalum is obtained radiochemically pure; 233Pa and 95Zr contaminants in the hafnium fraction are resolved by ??-ray spectrometry. The chemical yield of the procedure is detemined after counting by re-irradiation. Values for the 8 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are reported. ?? 1968.

  12. Structure and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline Hafnium Oxide Thin Films (PostPrint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0214 STRUCTURE AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOCRYSTALLINE HAFNIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) Neil R. Murphy AFRL...OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOCRYSTALLINE HAFNIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...publication is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optmat.2014.08.005 14. ABSTRACT Hafnium oxide (HfO2) films were grown by sputter-deposition by

  13. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  14. "Thermal Stability of Anodic Hafnium Oxide Nanotube Arrays"

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Howe, Jane Y; Mayer, Harry A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Tuncer, Enis

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability of highly ordered Hafnium oxide, HfO2 nanotube arrays prepared through electrochemical anodization approach in the presence of ammonium fluoride is investigated in a temperature range of room temperature to 900 C in flowing Argon atmosphere. The formation of the HfO2 nanotube arrays was monitored by current density transient characteristics during anodization of hafnium metal foil. Morphologies of the as grown and post-annealed HfO2 nanotube arrays were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although monoclinic HfO2 is thermally stable up to 2000K in bulk, the morphology HfO2 nanotube arrays degraded at 900 C. Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study revealed that the thermal treatment significantly impact the composition and chemical environment of the core elements (Hf, O and F) of HfO2. Possible reasons for the degradation of the nanotube morphology were discussed based on XPS study and possible future improvements were suggested briefly.

  15. Zirconium and hafnium Salalen complexes in isospecific polymerisation of propylene.

    PubMed

    Press, Konstantin; Venditto, Vincenzo; Goldberg, Israel; Kol, Moshe

    2013-07-07

    The activity of dibenzylzirconium and dibenzylhafnium Salalen complexes in polymerisation of propylene with MAO as a cocatalyst is described. Three Salalen ligand precursors combining a bulky alkyl group (1-adamantyl) on the imine-side phenol and electron withdrawing halo groups of different sizes on the amine-side phenol were explored. All metal complexes were obtained as single diastereomers. An X-ray crystallographic structure of a hafnium complex of an additional ligand carrying the combination of tert-butyl and chloro substituted phenolates, 4-Hf, revealed a fac-mer wrapping of the Salalen ligand around the metal centre. All complexes led to active catalysts in propylene polymerisation and to isotactic polypropylene of high regioregularity. The zirconium complexes led to polypropylene having molecular weights of Mw = 132,000-200,000 and isotacticities of [mmmm] = 65.7-75.0%. The hafnium complexes led to polypropylene of higher molecular weights of Mw = 375,000-520,000 and higher stereoregularities of [mmmm] = 80.6-89.3%, the highest isotacticity obtained with 3-Hf.

  16. Studies on Optical and Electrical Properties of Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Venkatachalam; Sagadevan, Suresh; Sudhakar, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles (HfO2 NPs) are analyzed and reported. The synthesis was carried out by the precipitation route by using hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4) as precursor material with potassium hydroxide (KOH) dissolved in Millipore water. In the precipitation technique, the chemical reaction is comparatively simple, low-cost and non-toxic compared to other synthetic methods. The synthesized HfO2 NPs were characterized by using powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Raman analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The monoclinic structure of the HfO2 NPs was resolved utilizing x-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties were studied from the UV-Vis absorption spectrum. The optical band gap of the HfO2NPs was observed to be 5.1 eV. The Raman spectrum shows the presence of HfO2 NPs. The HRTEM image showed that the HfO2 NPs were of spherical shape with an average particle size of around 28 nm. The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum obviously demonstrated the presence of HfO2 NPs. Analysis and studies on the dielectric properties of the HfO2 NPs such as the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and alternating current (AC) conductivity were carried out at varying frequencies and temperatures.

  17. Experimental Equation of State of Hafnium Metal to 210 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Yogesh; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy

    The equation of state of hafnium metal has been measured using a platinum pressure marker to 210 GPa. Beveled diamonds with 35 micron central flats were used to compress a sample consisting of a mixture of platinum and hafnium that was packed with 6 nm diamond powder. It was hoped that this geometry would provide an alternative method of creating a second-stage pressure region to reach multi-megabar pressures. Powder diffraction patterns were collected across the high-pressure region using an x-ray beam collimated to 1x2 microns in a grid with a spacing of 1 micron. At the highest loads, a pressure gradient of 90 GPa was observed across the sample. This gradient allows for the construction of an equation of state over this range from data collected in only 3 minutes of synchrotron x-ray time. A new analysis program suite employing a measurement of spectral overlap has been developed to identify the multiple structures present, fit lattice parameters, and analyze the newly available gradient information. This work was supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration under Grant Number DE-NA0002014.

  18. Studies on Optical and Electrical Properties of Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Venkatachalam; Sagadevan, Suresh; Sudhakar, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles (HfO2 NPs) are analyzed and reported. The synthesis was carried out by the precipitation route by using hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4) as precursor material with potassium hydroxide (KOH) dissolved in Millipore water. In the precipitation technique, the chemical reaction is comparatively simple, low-cost and non-toxic compared to other synthetic methods. The synthesized HfO2 NPs were characterized by using powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Raman analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The monoclinic structure of the HfO2 NPs was resolved utilizing x-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties were studied from the UV-Vis absorption spectrum. The optical band gap of the HfO2NPs was observed to be 5.1 eV. The Raman spectrum shows the presence of HfO2 NPs. The HRTEM image showed that the HfO2 NPs were of spherical shape with an average particle size of around 28 nm. The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum obviously demonstrated the presence of HfO2 NPs. Analysis and studies on the dielectric properties of the HfO2 NPs such as the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and alternating current (AC) conductivity were carried out at varying frequencies and temperatures.

  19. Damage fluence at 1054 nm and 351 nm of coatings made with hafnium oxide evaporated from metallic hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Anzellotti, J.F.; Schmid, A.W.

    1995-12-31

    Hafnium oxide can be reactively deposited by e-beam evaporation directly from a metallic hafnium melt. Films produced in this manner can have low absorptive losses, low defect densities, and high damage thresholds. Evaporation of hafnia, in this form allows for more precise control of rate and variation of the vapor plume. Thus, multilayer films of metal-converted hafnia and conventionally deposited silicon dioxide can be used for designs that require precise control of optical thickness and a high degree of uniformity. One such design, a polarizing beam splitter used for the OMEGA Upgrade, was produced using the hafnia/silica combination. These coatings have stringent optical requirements, are placed in the stages of the laser with the highest fluence at 1054 nm, and are required to have a low net stress to produce low wavefront distortion. Hafnia/silica coatings are also more stable than other film combinations such as tantala/silica. Hafnia/silica films were investigated for other applications. A triple wavelength (351, 527, and 1054 nm) antireflection coating was developed for calorimeter absorption glass. The metal-converted hafnia is also used on selected transport mirrors used at 351 nm and angles of incidence up to 45{degrees}. Damage test results for 1054 nm, 1 ns, and 351 nm, 0.7 ns will be presented.

  20. Enrichment/isolation of phosphorylated peptides on hafnium oxide prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, José G; Choi, Yong Seok; Vujcic, Stefan; Wood, Troy D; Colón, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (hafnia) exhibits unique enrichment properties towards phosphorylated peptides that are complementary to those of titanium oxide (titania) and zirconium oxide (zirconia) for use with mass spectrometric analysis in the field of proteomics.

  1. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ZIRCONIUM VALUES FROM HAFNIUM VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION WITH AN ALKYL PHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.

    1960-02-01

    A process of separating hafnium nitrate from zirconium nitrate contained in a nitric acid solution by selectively. extracting the zirconium nitrate with a water-immiscible alkyl phosphate is reported.

  2. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  3. Dose estimate of inhaled hafnium tritide using the ICRP 66 lung model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Yang-Sheng; Inkret, William C; Wermer, Joseph R

    2002-06-01

    Metal tritide is widely used for research, purification, compression, and storage of tritium. The current understanding of metal tritide and its radiation dosimetry for internal exposure is limited, and ICRP publications do not provide the tritium dosimetry for hafnium tritide. The current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritide particles (including hafnium tritide) are based on the assumption that their biological behavior is similar to tritiated water, which is completely absorbed by the body. However, the solubility of metal tritide particles depends on the chemical form of the material. The biological half-live of hafnium tritide particles and the dosimetry of an inhalation exposure to those particles could be quite different from tritiated water. This paper describes experiments on the dissolution rate of hafnium tritide particles in a simulated lung fluid. The results showed that less than 1% of the tritium was dissolved in the simulated lung fluid for hafnium tritide particles after 215 d. The short-term and long-term dissolution half times were 46 and 4.28 x 10(5) d, respectively. This indicates that hafnium tritide is an extremely insoluble material. Self-absorption of beta rays in the hafnium tritide particles was estimated by a numerical method. The dose coefficients were calculated as a function of particle size using in vitro solubility data and a calculated self-absorption factor. The dose coefficient decreased with aerodynamic diameters in the range of 0.25 to 10 microm, mainly because the self-absorption factor decreased with increasing particle size. For a particle 1 microm in aerodynamic diameter, the dose coefficient of a hafnium tritide particle was about 10 times higher than that of tritiated water but was about 1.4 times lower than that calculated by ICRP Publication 71 for Type S tritiated particles. The ICRP estimate did not include a self-absorption factor and thus might have overestimated the dose. This finding has significant

  4. Simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys.

    PubMed

    Dupraw, W A

    1972-06-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for determining zirconium or hafnium in molybdenum-base alloys by formation of the Arsenazo III complex of zirconium or hafnium in 9 M hydrochloric acid medium. The absorbance is measured at 670 nm. Molybdenum (10 mg), titanium (1 mg), and rhenium (10 mg) have no adverse effect. No prior separation is needed. The relative standard deviation is 1.3-2.7%.

  5. Tube supports

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, K.A.

    1989-01-10

    This patent describes an apparatus consisting of parallel tubes arranged in the form of a tube bundle having a first plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and a second plurality of parallel tube rows with lanes between adjacent rows and support structure for supporting the tubes. The support structure consists of at least a first baffle and a second baffle, wherein each baffle comprises an outer ring surrounding the tube bundle and at least one slat attached to the outer ring as a chord and extending through the tube bundle between adjacent rows in one of the parallel tube rows. At least one slat is characterized by corrugations or folds extending along its length for point contact with the tubes of the bundle, the slat in the first baffle extending in lanes between the first plurality of parallel tube rows, and the slat in the second baffle extending in lanes between the second plurality of parallel tube rows.

  6. Effect of hafnium concentration on nuclear performance of blanket materials containing zirconium: a sensitivity analysis of TBR to hafnium content in lithium metazirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepraga, D. G.; Panini, G.; Diamanti, D.; Cambi, G.; Costa, M.; Cavallone, G.; Bruzzi, L.

    1994-09-01

    The reduction of hafnium content in blanket materials containing zirconium is costly. Therefore, a sensitivity analysis was performed to estimate the impact of hafnium content on nuclear properties of lithium metazirconate, a promising breeder material candidate for fusion reactors. This paper summarises the results of extensive shielding neutronic analysis and transmutation-activation calculations aiming to evaluate the tritium breeding ratio, the inventories of various radionuclides, and the surface γ-dose rate. Attention has been mainly focused on the activation inventory variations resulting from hafnium content in lithium metazirconate breeding material. Different design configurations including homogenised solid breeder mixtures of Li 2ZrO 3 and structural materials and a separate beryllium multiplierr zone have been assessed. Hf contents up to 3% have been assessed, resulting in a TBR reduction up to 10%. The Hf content provokes a noticeable increase of the level of the equivalent contact dose.

  7. Pressure-stabilized hafnium nitrides and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Niu, Haiyang

    2017-01-01

    We report hafnium nitrides under pressure using first-principles evolutionary calculations. Metallic P 63/m m c -HfN (calculated Vickers hardness 23.8 GPa) is found to be more energetically favorable than NaCl-type HfN at zero and high pressure. Moreover, NaCl-type HfN actually undergoes a phase transition to P 63/m m c -HfN below 670 K at ambient pressure. HfN10, which simultaneously has infinite armchairlike polymeric N chains and N2 molecules in its crystal structure, is discovered to be stable at moderate pressure above 23 GPa and can be preserved as a metastable phase at ambient pressure. At ambient conditions (298 K, 0 GPa), the gravimetric energy densities and the volumetric energy densities of HfN10 are 2.8 kJ/g and 14.1 kJ/cm3, respectively.

  8. Hafnium zirconate gate dielectric for advanced gate stack applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, R. I.; Triyoso, D. H.; Samavedam, S. B.; White, B. E.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the development of a hafnium zirconate (HfZrO4) alloy gate dielectric for advanced gate stack applications. The HfZrO4 and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films were formed by atomic layer deposition using metal halides and heavy water as precursors. The HfZrO4 material properties were examined and compared with those of HfO2 by a wide variety of analytical methods. The dielectric properties, device performance, and reliability of HfZrO4 were investigated by fabricating HfZrO4/tantalum carbide (TaxCy) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor. The HfZrO4 dielectric film has smaller band gap, smaller and more uniform grains, less charge traps, and more uniform film quality than HfO2. The HfZrO4 dielectric films exhibited good thermal stability with silicon. Compared to HfO2, the HfZrO4 gate dielectric showed lower capacitance equivalent thickness value, higher transconductance, less charge trapping, higher drive current, lower threshold voltage (Vt), reduced capacitance-voltage (C-V ) hysteresis, lower interface state density, superior wafer level thickness uniformity, and longer positive bias temperature instability lifetime. Incorporation of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) into HfO2 enhances the dielectric constant (k ) of the resulting HfZrO4 which is associated with structural phase transformation from mainly monoclinic to tetragonal. The tetragonal phase increases the k value of HfZrO4 dielectric to a large value as predicted. The improved device characteristics are attributed to less oxygen vacancy in the fine grained microstructure of HfZrO4 films.

  9. The Algebra of the Cumulative Percent Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to help students avoid some pervasive reasoning errors in solving cumulative percent problems. Discusses the meaning of ."%+b%." the additive inverse of ."%." and other useful applications. Emphasizes the operational aspect of the cumulative percent concept. (KHR)

  10. Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165941.html Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC More patients also ... News) -- As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a ...

  11. A Conceptual Model for Solving Percent Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Albert B., Jr.; Nelson, L. Ted

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative method to teaching percent problems which uses a 10x10 grid to help students visualize percents. Offers a means of representing information and suggests different approaches for finding solutions. Includes reproducible student worksheet. (MKR)

  12. Beyond Marbles: Percent Change and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Flannery

    2013-01-01

    In the author's eighth year of teaching, she hit a wall teaching percent change. Percent change is one of the few calculations taught in math classes that shows up regularly in the media, and one that she often does in her head to make sense of the world around her. Despite this, she had been teaching percent change using textbook problems about…

  13. Beyond Marbles: Percent Change and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Flannery

    2013-01-01

    In the author's eighth year of teaching, she hit a wall teaching percent change. Percent change is one of the few calculations taught in math classes that shows up regularly in the media, and one that she often does in her head to make sense of the world around her. Despite this, she had been teaching percent change using textbook problems about…

  14. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ...

  15. High P-T phase transitions and P-V-T equation of state of hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Drozd, Vadym; Karbasi, Ali; Saxena, Surendra K.

    2016-07-29

    We measured the volume of hafnium at several pressures up to 67 GPa and at temperatures between 300 to 780 K using a resistively heated diamond anvil cell with synchrotron x-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured data allows us to determine the P-V-T equation of state of hafnium. The previously described [Xia et al., Phys. Rev. B 42, 6736-6738 (1990)] phase transition from hcp ({alpha}) to simple hexagonal ({omega}) phase at 38 GPa at room temperature was not observed even up to 51 GPa. The {omega} phase was only observed at elevated temperatures. Our measurements have also improved the experimental constraint on the high P-T phase boundary between the {omega} phase and high pressure bcc ({beta}) phase of hafnium. Isothermal room temperature bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium were measured to be B{sub 0} = 112.9{+-}0.5 GPa and B{sub 0}'=3.29{+-}0.05, respectively. P-V-T data for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium was used to obtain a fit to a thermodynamic P-V-T equation of state based on model by Brosh et al. [CALPHAD 31, 173-185 (2007)].

  16. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  17. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  18. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides: Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or - 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or - 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  19. Testing of Colorimetric Tubes for Nitrogen Dioxide and Monomethylhydrazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Philip

    Colorimetric tubes for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) were tested for accuracy and results indicate that at the levels checked the tubes' average deviation was plus or minus 20 percent. Tube NO2 concentrations all read lower than the analyzed concentrations. MMH tubes read much higher than the analyzed concentration of 0.28…

  20. Tracheostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Altobelli, Neila P

    2014-06-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in dimensions between tubes with the same inner diameter from different manufacturers are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed and may be fenestrated. Some tracheostomy tubes are designed with an inner cannula. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to appreciate the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient. The optimal frequency of changing a chronic tracheostomy tube is controversial. Specialized teams may be useful in managing patients with a tracheostomy. Speech can be facilitated with a speaking valve in patients with a tracheostomy tube who are breathing spontaneously. In mechanically ventilated patients with a tracheostomy, a talking tracheostomy tube, a deflated cuff technique with a speaking valve, or a deflated cuff technique without a speaking valve can be used to facilitate speech. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Methods Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. Results NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:24981953

  2. Oxidation Effect in Octahedral Hafnium Disulfide Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Tae Soo; Chung, Dong Seob; Na, Hyunyeong; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Hyun; Perello, David J; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-26

    Atomically smooth van der Waals materials are structurally stable in a monolayer and a few layers but are susceptible to oxygen-rich environments. In particular, recently emerging materials such as black phosphorus and perovskite have revealed stronger environmental sensitivity than other two-dimensional layered materials, often obscuring the interesting intrinsic electronic and optical properties. Unleashing the true potential of these materials requires oxidation-free sample preparation that protects thin flakes from air exposure. Here, we fabricated few-layer hafnium disulfide (HfS2) field effect transistors (FETs) using an integrated vacuum cluster system and study their electronic properties and stability under ambient conditions. By performing all the device fabrication and characterization procedure under an oxygen- and moisture-free environment, we found that few-layer AA-stacking HfS2-FETs display excellent field effect responses (Ion/Ioff ≈ 10(7)) with reduced hysteresis compared to the FETs prepared under ambient conditions. Oxidation of HfS2 occurs uniformly over the entire area, increasing the film thickness by 250% at a prolonged oxidation time of >120 h, while defects on the surface are the preferential initial oxidation sites. We further demonstrated that the stability of the device in air is significantly improved by passivating FETs with BN in a vacuum cluster.

  3. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    PubMed

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-06-30

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation.

  4. Scintillation Characterization of Doped Cesium Hafnium Chloride (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Emmanuel; Goodwin, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Pijush; Burger, Arnold; Stowe, Ashley; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The scintillators currently providing the best energy resolution lower than 2.6% at 662 keV and sizes larger than 1 in. dia. 1 in. height are LaBr3(Ce) and SrI2(Eu). Despite energy resolution and decay time performance of LaBr3(Ce), the intrinsic radioactivity, due to naturally occurring 138La isotope in the matrix is a limitation for low count rate applications such as radioisotope identification of weak sources. Cesium Hafnium Chloride (CHC) is a high effective atomic number (Zeff=58) moderate density (3.86 g/cm3) scintillator for gamma spectroscopy, offering a cubic crystal structure, no intrinsic radioactivity, and highly proportional light yield, without intentional doping. CHC boasts a cubic crystal structure that is isostructural to K2HfCl6 and analogous to calcium fluoride with cesium ions in the fluorine ion position and the [HfCl6]2- octahedral replacing calcium ions. The scintillation of CHC is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs, a light yield of up to 54,000 photons/MeV and energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV and we report on the effects of doping on the scintillation properties of CHC.

  5. Intrinsic Defect Ferromagnetism: The case of Hafnium Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Pemmaraju, Chaitanya

    2005-03-01

    In view of the recent experimental reports of intrinsic ferromagnetism in Hafnium Oxide (HfO2) thin film systems ootnotetextM. Venkatesan, C. B. Fitzgerald, J. M. D. Coey Nature 430, 630 (2004) Brief Communications, we carried out first principles investigations to look for magnetic structure in HfO2 possibly brought about by the presence of small concentrations of intrinsic point defects. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) show that isolated cation vacancy sites in HfO2 lead to the formation of high spin defect states which couple ferromagnetically to each other. Interestingly, these high spin states are observed in the low symmetry monoclinic and tetragonal phases while the highly symmetric cubic flourite phase exhibits a non-magnetic ground state. Detailed studies of the electronic structure of cation vacancies in the three crystalline phases of Hafnia show that symmetry leading to orbitally degenerate defect levels is not a pre-requsite for ferromagnetism and that the interplay between Kinetic, Coulomb and Exchange energy together with favourable coupling to the Crystalline environment can lead to high spin ferromagnetic ground states even in extreme low symmetry systems like monoclinic HfO2. These findings open up a much wider class of systems to the possibility of intrinsic defect ferromagnetism.

  6. Ultrafast laser-triggered emission from hafnium carbide tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealhofer, Catherine; Foreman, Seth M.; Gerlich, Stefan; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2012-07-01

    Electron emission from hafnium carbide (HfC) field emission tips induced by a sub-10-fs, 150-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser is studied. Two-photon emission is observed at low power with a moderate electric bias field applied to the tips. As the bias field and/or laser power is increased, the average current becomes dominated by thermally enhanced field emission due to laser heating: both the low thermal conductivity of HfC and the laser's high repetition rate can lead to a temperature rise of several hundred Kelvin at the tip apex. The contribution of current from a thermal transient at times shorter than the electron-phonon coupling time is considered in the context of the two-temperature model (TTM). Under the conditions of this experiment, the integrated current from the thermal transient is shown to be negligible in comparison with the two-photon emission. A finite element model of the laser heating and thermal conduction supports these conclusions and is also used to compare the nature of thermal effects in HfC, tungsten, and gold tips.

  7. Reinvestigation of high pressure polymorphism in hafnium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, K. K. Sharma, Surinder M.; Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Dey, G. K.; Somayazulu, M.; Sikka, S. K.

    2014-06-21

    There has been a recent controversy about the high pressure polymorphism of Hafnium (Hf). Unlike, the earlier known α→ω structural transition at 38 ± 8 GPa, at ambient temperature, Hrubiak et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 111, 112612 (2012)] did not observe it till 51 GPa. They observed this transition only at elevated temperatures. We have reinvestigated the room temperature phase diagram of Hf, employing x-ray diffraction (XRD) and DFT based first principles calculations. Experimental investigations have been carried out on several pure and impure Hf samples and also with different pressure transmitting media. Besides demonstrating the significant role of impurity levels on the high pressure phase diagram of Hf, our studies re-establish room temperature α→ω transition at high pressures, even in quasi-hydrostatic environment. We observed this transition in pure Hf with equilibrium transition pressure P{sub o} = 44.5 GPa; however, with large hysteresis. The structural sequence, transition pressures, the lattice parameters, the c/a ratio and its variation with compression for the α and ω phases as predicted by our ab-initio scalar relativistic (SR) calculations are found to be in good agreement with our experimental results of pure Hf.

  8. Thermal stability of an ultrathin hafnium oxide film on plasma nitrided Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaja, K.; Schönbohm, F.; Weier, D.; Lühr, T.; Keutner, C.; Berges, U.; Westphal, C.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the thermal stability of an ultrathin hafnium oxide film on a plasma nitrided Si(100) surface. The ultrathin silicon nitride buffer layer was produced by an ECR-plasma ion source. Onto this buffer layer a thin hafnium oxide film was prepared by electron beam evaporation. The thermal stability of the layer stack was checked by systematic annealing steps. A detailed angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the interfaces is presented. For chemical surface studies high-resolution spectra of the Si 2p and Hf 4f signals were taken. It is demonstrated that the thermal stability of hafnium oxide thin films can be increased by a smooth and homogenous buffer layer of silicon nitride.

  9. Cathodo- and photoluminescence increase in amorphous hafnium oxide under annealing in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. V. Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2015-04-15

    Cathodo- and photoluminescence of amorphous nonstoichiometric films of hafnium oxide are studied with the aim to verify the hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the luminescence. To produce oxygen vacancies, hafnium oxide was enriched in surplus metal during synthesis. To reduce the oxygen concentration, the film was annealed in oxygen. A qualitative control of the oxygen concentration was carried out by the refractive index. In the initial, almost stoichiometric films we observed a 2.7-eV band in cathodoluminescence. Annealing in oxygen results in a considerable increase in its intensity, as well as in the appearance of new bands at 1.87, 2.14, 3.40, and 3.6 eV. The observed emission bands are supposed to be due to single oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies in hafnium oxide. The luminescence increase under annealing in an oxygen atmosphere may be a result of the emission quenching effect.

  10. Contamination of silicon dioxide films by aqueous zirconium and hafnium species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowalekar, V.; Raghavan, S.; Pandit, V.; Parks, H. G.; Jeon, J.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium oxides and silicates have emerged as potential replacements for SiO2 as gate dielectric material. Patterning of these materials by wet etching in fabrication areas originally designed for SiO2 gates may give rise to contamination of SiO2 by aqueous zirconium and hafnium species. This paper summarizes the work carried out to characterize the adsorption behavior of aqueous zirconium and hafnium species onto thermally grown silicon dioxide. Electrokinetic and adsorption measurements were carried out to understand the extent and nature of interaction. The adsorption of both Zr and Hf species showed a maximum at pH 5.5. Significant reduction in the adsorption of both Zr and Hf occurred upon addition of fluoride ions to the solution. Using appropriate speciation diagrams, an adsorption model has been developed to explain the experimental data.

  11. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, A.V. Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-15

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf{sub 3}GeO{sub 8} by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 °C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. • The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. • Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. • Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds.

  12. Band gaps and dielectric constants of amorphous hafnium silicates: A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broqvist, Peter; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2007-02-01

    Electronic band gaps and dielectric constants are obtained for amorphous hafnium silicates using first-principles methods. Models of amorphous (HfO2)x(SiO2)1-x for varying x are generated by ab initio molecular dynamics. The calculations show that the presence of Hf gives rise to low-lying conduction states which explain the experimentally observed nonlinear dependence of the band gap on hafnium content. Static dielectric constants are found to depend linearly on x, supporting recent experimental data.

  13. Effect of substrate temperature on structural and electrical properties of RF sputtered hafnium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K. C.; Ghosh, S. P.; Tripathy, N.; Kar, J. P.; Bose, G.; Lee, T.; Myoung, J. M.

    2015-06-24

    In this work hafnium oxide thin films were deposited on p-type silicon substrate by Radio frequency magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperature ranging from room temperature to 300 °C. The structural and electrical properties of the sputtered films were investigated by x-ray diffraction, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements. The XRD results show the formation monoclinic structure of the hafnium oxide thin films. The shifting of C-V curves towards negative voltage side depicts the increase in positive oxide charges with the rise of substrate temperature. Leakage current was found increased, when temperature enhanced from room temperature to 300 °C.

  14. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  15. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  16. Hafnium(IV) chloride complexes with chelating β-ketiminate ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and volatility study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Siddappa A; Medina, Phillip A; Antic, Aleks; Ziller, Joseph W; Vohs, Jason K; Fahlman, Bradley D

    2015-09-05

    The synthesis and characterization of four new β-ketiminate hafnium(IV) chloride complexes dichloro-bis[4-(phenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4a), dichloro-bis[4-(4-methylphenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4b), dichloro-bis[4-(4-methoxyphenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4c), and dichloro-bis[4-(4-chlorophenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4d) are reported. All the complexes (4a-d) were characterized by spectroscopic methods ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR), and elemental analysis while the compound 4c was further examined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, revealing that the complex is monomer with the hafnium center in octahedral coordination environment and oxygens of the chelating N-O ligands are trans to each other and the chloride ligands are in a cis arrangement. Volatile trends are established for four new β-ketiminate hafnium(IV) chloride complexes (4a-d). Sublimation enthalpies (ΔHsub) were calculated from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data, which show that, the dependence of ΔHsub on the molecular weight (4a-c) and inductive effects from chlorine (4d). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Superconductivity, structure visualization, mechanical strength promotion and Raman spectra of hafnium-doped-123-YBCO synthesized via urea precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsabawy, Khaled M.

    2011-08-01

    The pure YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7) and its variant hafnium containing superconductors with general formula: Y1-xHfxBa2Cu3Oz, where x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mole, respectively, were synthesized by solution route using urea as precursor forming agent. X-ray measurements indicated that Hf4+ ions have a negligible effect on the main crystalline structure and substitute Y-sites successfully in lattice structure of 123-YBCO at low levels of hafnium doping (x = 0.1 → 0.2 mole). From SE-microscopy mapping and EDX elemental analysis Hf4+ was detected qualitatively with good approximation to the actual molar ratio but not observed at 123-YBCO grain boundaries which confirm that hafnium (IV) has diffused regularly into material bulk of superconducting 123-YBCO-phase at low levels of concentrations. Structure visualization of Hf-doped-123-YBCO was made to confirm success of hafnium substitutions inside crystal lattice on Y-sites of 123-YBCO superconductors. Hafnium dopings affected sharply on the main vibrating modes of YBCO regime particularly on the apical oxygen (O4) vibrational mode A1g. Magnetic susceptibility measurements proved that hafnium dopings have strong effect on the transport properties of YBCO-composites regime. Hafnium promotes mechanical tensile coefficient recording maxima 35.7 MPa for x = 0.4 mole.

  18. Cytotoxicity and physicochemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Field, James A; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Boitano, Scott A; Shadman, Farhang; Ratner, Buddy D; Barnes, Chris; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2011-09-01

    Nano-sized hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) particles are being considered for applications within the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about their cytotoxicity. The objective of this work was to assess several HfO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) samples for their acute cytotoxicity. Dynamic light scattering analysis of the samples indicated that the average particle size of the HfO(2) in aqueous dispersions was in the submicron range with a fraction of particles having nano-dimensions. The media used in the toxicity assays decreased or increased the average particle size of HfO(2) NPs due to dispersion or agglomeration. Static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) revealed numerous surface contaminants on the NPs. Only one HfO(2) sample caused moderate cytotoxicity to human cell lines. The inhibitory sample caused a 50% response in the Live/Dead assay with HaCaT skin cells at 2200 mg L(-1); and a 50% response in the mitochondrial toxicity test at 300 mg L(-1). A microbial inhibition assay based on methanogenic activity also revealed that another HFO(2) sample caused moderate inhibition. The difference in toxicity between samples could not be attributed to size. Instead the difference in toxicity was likely due to differences in the contaminants of the HfO(2). The ToF-SIMS analysis indicated unique signatures of Br and P in the sample toxic to human cell lines suggesting a distinct synthesis was used for that sample which may have been accompanied by inhibitory impurities. The results taken as a whole indicate that HfO(2) itself is relatively non-toxic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  20. Measurement of L(III) Subshell Absorption Jump Parameters of Hafnium.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, E; Saritas, N; Dogan, M; Koksal, O K; Karabulut, K; Apaydin, G; Tirasoglu, E

    2015-12-01

    The L(III) subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of hafnium have been measured using two different ways which are X-ray attenuation method and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique. The results obtained both ways have been compared with theoretical values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  1. "Decarbonization" of an imino N-heterocyclic carbene via triple benzyl migration from hafnium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An imino N-heterocyclic carbene underwent three sequential benzyl migrations upon reaction with tetrabenzylhafnium, resulting in complete removal of the carbene carbon from the ligand. The resulting eneamido-amidinato hafnium complex showed alkene polymerization activity comparable to that of a prec...

  2. Neodymium and hafnium boundary contributions to seawater along the West Antarctic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickli, Jörg; Gutjahr, Marcus; Vance, Derek; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Neodymium and hafnium isotopes and elemental concentrations (Sm, Nd, Hf, Zr) have been measured in three water column profiles south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in, and to the east of the Ross Sea, in conjunction with five bottom water samples from the Amundsen Sea Embayment.

  3. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 ..mu..m) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes /sup 90/Zr and /sup 180/Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer.

  4. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  5. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain persistent vomiting or diarrhea trouble passing gas or having a bowel movement pink-red tissue (called granulation tissue) coming out ...

  6. Predicting Percent Body Fat from Circumference Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    A268 695 DTIC ELECTE AUG 3 0 1993 dI I Public . MILITARY MEDICINE, 158, 1:026, 1993 A Predicting Percent Body Fat from Circumference Measurements LT...are required to meet percent Introduction body fat (%BF) standards as a condition of military service. Naval personnel who exceed standards for %BF...or 31-35.9% body fat (%BF), and with 22%BF or greater and women with 30%BF or greater. Val- obese as 26 or 36%BF or greater for men and women, respec

  7. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  8. Immobilization mechanisms of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to hafnium dioxide (HfO2) surfaces for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Rice, P Zachary; Bergkvist, Magnus; Deskins, N Aaron; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2012-10-24

    Immobilization of biomolecular probes to the sensing substrate is a critical step for biosensor fabrication. In this work we investigated the phosphate-dependent, oriented immobilization of DNA to hafnium dioxide surfaces for biosensing applications. Phosphate-dependent immobilization was confirmed on a wide range of hafnium oxide surfaces; however, a second interaction mode was observed on monoclinic hafnium dioxide. On the basis of previous materials studies on these films, DNA immobilization studies, and density functional theory (DFT) modeling, we propose that this secondary interaction is between the exposed nucleobases of single stranded DNA and the surface. The lattice spacing of monoclinic hafnium dioxide matches the base-to-base pitch of DNA. Monoclinic hafnium dioxide is advantageous for nanoelectronic applications, yet because of this secondary DNA immobilization mechanism, it could impede DNA hybridization or cause nonspecific surface intereactions. Nonetheless, DNA immobilization on polycrystalline and amorphous hafnium dioxide is predominately mediated by the terminal phosphate in an oriented manner which is desirable for biosensing applications.

  9. A rapid procedure for the simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium in high-temperature alloys by means of a spectrophotometric masking approach.

    PubMed

    Dulski, T R

    1982-06-01

    Data are presented for a refined spectrophotometric procedure for the simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium based on the combined effects of hydrogen peroxide, sodium sulphate, and excess of zirconium ion on the hafnium and zirconium complexes with Xylenol Orange in 0.2M perchloric acid. Isolation procedures for the hafnium/zirconium content of complex high-temperature alloys which result in an ionic substrate compatible with the spectrophotometric masking method were devised.

  10. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  11. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  12. 13 percent remain AIDS-free.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Researchers predict that approximately thirteen percent of homosexual/bisexual men infected with HIV at an early age will be long-term survivors, remaining free of disease for more than twenty years. Researchers with the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study based their predictions on data from the ongoing study of 1,809 HIV-positive men. Stable immune markers and no use of antiretrovirals were the criteria used to define long-term.

  13. Ultraviolet-assisted oxidation and nitridation of hafnium and hafnium aluminum alloys as potential gate dielectrics for metal oxide semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essary, Chad Robert

    The continued miniaturization of silicon-based complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices is pushing the limits of the silicon dioxide (SiO2) gate dielectric. As the channel widths are decreased to increase packing densities and functionality of new chips, proportional vertical scaling of the dielectric must be maintained to keep constant capacitances. Silicon dioxide is approaching its fundamental limit in which it can be used as the gate dielectric due to high leakage currents resulting from direct tunneling through the layer. In order for the continued use of current CMOS gate design, an alternative material with a higher dielectric constant must be found. Several materials have been proposed but are still not providing the electrical characteristics favorable for use in the devices due to problems with excessive leakage and hysteresis resulting from the quality of the film and oxygen defects. The goal of this study is to create higher quality films at lower processing temperatures with low leakage and less hysteresis than has been achieved with hafnium oxide films. This study first examines the formation of the interfacial layer in pulsed laser deposited hafnium oxide films to understand the kinetics behind its formation. The second section focuses on the oxidation of pulsed laser deposited (PLD) hafnium metal thin films using ultraviolet (UV) assisted post-deposition annealing. Another set of samples was deposited in an ammonia atmosphere in order to incorporate nitrogen into the films. Comparisons of microstructure and stoichiometry of oxidized hafnium and oxy-nitride films were made using x-ray photospectroscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, glancing angle x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy. Analysis of the interface between the films and the silicon substrate was carried out using x-ray reflectivity. The electrical characteristics of the films were characterized using capacitance-voltage and current

  14. Oxidation Characterization of Hafnium-Based Ceramics Fabricated by Hot Pressing and Electric Field-Assisted Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matt; Johnson, Sylvia; Marschall, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic borides, such as hafnium diboride (HfB2) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2), are members of a family of materials with extremely high melting temperatures referred to as Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs). UHTCs constitute a class of promising materials for use in high temperature applications, such as sharp leading edges on future-generation hypersonic flight vehicles, because of their high melting points. The controlled development of microstructure has become important to the processing of UHTCs, with the prospect of improving their mechanical and thermal properties. The improved oxidation resistance of HfB2 has also become important if this material is to be successfully used at temperatures above 2000 C. Furthermore, the use of UHTCs on the leading edges of vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds will mean exposure to a mixed oxidation environment comprised of both molecular and atomic oxygen. The current study has investigated the high-temperature oxidation behavior of HfB2-based materials in a pure O2 environment, as well as in environments containing different levels of dissociated oxygen (O/O2). Materials were processed by two techniques: conventional hot pressing (HP) and electric field-assisted sintering (FAS). Their oxidation behavior was evaluated in both a tube furnace at 1250 C for 3 hours and in a simulated re-entry environment in the Advanced Heating Facility (AHF) arcjet at NASA Ames Research Center, during a 10-minute exposure to a cold wall heat flux of 250W/sq cm and stagnation pressure of 0.1-0.2 atm. The microstructure of the different materials was characterized before and after oxidation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Effect of hafnium and titanium coated implants on several blood biochemical markers after osteosynthesis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Ashraf; Akhtyamov, Ildar; Shakirova, Faina; Zubairova, Lyaili; Gatina, Elmira; Aliev, Capital Ie Cyrilliclchin

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study comparing the dynamics of several biochemical markers before and after osteosynthesis, utilizing implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides and non-coated implants on rabbits' bones. The Study has been conducted on 30 rabbits of both sexes, at the age of 6-7 months, weighing 2526.5±74.4 gm. Animals underwent open osteotomy of the tibia in the middle third of the diaphysis followed by the intramedullary nailing. The level of alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, glucose, ALT and AST were monitored for 60 days. the use of implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides, which have high strength, thermal and chemical stability, was not accompanied by the development of additional negative reactive changes compared to non-coated implants. Nanotechnology used in manufacturing bioinert coatings for implants for osteosynthesis, has made the post-operative period less complicated as reflected by less expressed changing in the markers of bone metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

  16. Highly flexible resistive switching memory based on amorphous-nanocrystalline hafnium oxide films.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Ji, Zhenghui; Liu, Gang; Niu, Xuhong; Yi, Xiaohui; Pan, Liang; Zhan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Run-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Flexible and transparent resistive switching memories are highly desired for the construction of portable and even wearable electronics. Upon optimization of the microstructure wherein an amorphous-nanocrystalline hafnium oxide thin film is fabricated, an all-oxide based transparent RRAM device with stable resistive switching behavior that can withstand a mechanical tensile stress of up to 2.12% is obtained. It is demonstrated that the superior electrical, thermal and mechanical performance of the ITO/HfOx/ITO device can be ascribed to the formation of pseudo-straight metallic hafnium conductive filaments in the switching layer, and is only limited by the choice of electrode materials. When the ITO bottom electrode is replaced with platinum metal, the mechanical failure threshold of the device can be further extended.

  17. Switching Kinetics in Nanoscale Hafnium Oxide Based Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Mulaosmanovic, Halid; Ocker, Johannes; Müller, Stefan; Schroeder, Uwe; Müller, Johannes; Polakowski, Patrick; Flachowsky, Stefan; van Bentum, Ralf; Mikolajick, Thomas; Slesazeck, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in thin hafnium oxide films has led to a resurgence of interest in ferroelectric memory devices. Although both experimental and theoretical studies on this new ferroelectric system have been undertaken, much remains to be unveiled regarding its domain landscape and switching kinetics. Here we demonstrate that the switching of single domains can be directly observed in ultrascaled ferroelectric field effect transistors. Using models of ferroelectric domain nucleation we explain the time, field and temperature dependence of polarization reversal. A simple stochastic model is proposed as well, relating nucleation processes to the observed statistical switching behavior. Our results suggest novel opportunities for hafnium oxide based ferroelectrics in nonvolatile memory devices.

  18. Hafnium-an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure.

    PubMed

    Boelsma, C; Bannenberg, L J; van Setten, M J; Steinke, N-J; van Well, A A; Dam, B

    2017-06-05

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium oxide films for thermo and photoluminescence applications.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, J Guzmán; Frutis, M A Aguilar; Flores, G Alarcón; Hipólito, M García; Maciel Cerda, A; Azorín Nieto, J; Montalvo, T Rivera; Falcony, C

    2010-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) films were deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process. The films were synthesized from hafnium chloride as raw material in deionized water as solvent and were deposited on corning glass substrates at temperatures from 300 to 600 degrees C. For substrate temperatures lower than 400 degrees C the deposited films were amorphous, while for substrate temperatures higher than 450 degrees C, the monoclinic phase of HfO(2) appeared. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the film's surface resulted rough with semi-spherical promontories. The films showed a chemical composition close to HfO(2), with an Hf/O ratio of about 0.5. UV radiation was used in order to achieve the thermoluminescent characterization of the films; the 240 nm wavelength induced the best response. In addition, preliminary photoluminescence spectra, as a function of the deposition temperatures, are shown. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Waser, R.; Böttger, U.

    2014-05-01

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm2. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO2.

  1. Evidence for oxygen vacancies movement during wake-up in ferroelectric hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Starschich, S.; Böttger, U.; Menzel, S.

    2016-01-18

    The wake-up effect which is observed in ferroelectric hafnium oxide is investigated in yttrium doped hafnium oxide prepared by chemical solution deposition. It can be shown that not the amount of cycles but the duration of the applied electrical field is essential for the wake-up. Temperature dependent wake-up cycling in a range of −160 °C to 100 °C reveals a strong temperature activation of the wake-up, which can be attributed to ion rearrangement during cycling. By using asymmetrical electrodes, resistive valence change mechanism switching can be observed coincident with ferroelectric switching. From the given results, it can be concluded that redistribution of oxygen vacancies is the origin of the wake-up effect.

  2. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Böttger, U.; Waser, R.

    2014-05-19

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm{sup 2}. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO{sub 2}.

  3. The performance of hafnium and gadolinium self powered neutron detectors in the TREAT reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imel, G. R.; Hart, P. R.

    1996-05-01

    The use of gadolinium and hafnium self powered neutron detectors in a transient reactor is described in this paper. The detectors were calibrated to the fission rate of U-235 using calibrated fission chambers; the calibration factors were tested in two reactors in steady state and found to be consistent. Calibration of the detectors in transient reactor conditions was done by using uranium wires that were analyzed by radiochemistry techniques to determine total fissions during the transient. This was correlated to the time-integrated current of the detectors during the transient. A temperature correction factor was derived to account for self-shielding effects in the hafnium and gadolinium detectors. The dynamic response of the detectors under transient conditions was studied, and found to be excellent.

  4. Hafnium--an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boelsma, C.; Bannenberg, L. J.; van Setten, M. J.; Steinke, N.-J.; van Well, A. A.; Dam, B.

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  5. Properties of tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Historically, tungsten-25wt.% rhenium alloy has been manufactured into wire for the thermocouple market, but recent demands for high-temperature structural components have forced the development of novel processing techniques for tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide. With a melting temperature of 3,050°C, and a recrystallization temperature near 1,900°C, tungsten-rhenium alloys are being used in aerospace, temperature measuring, and friction stir welding applications. The mechanical properties and microstructures of tungsten-25wt.% rhenium and tungsten-25wt.% rhenium with hafnium carbide are reported at ambient temperature, 1,371°C, and 1,926°C, after processing by three methods: hot isostatic pressing, swaging, and extrusion.

  6. Electrodeposition of hafnium coatings from molten CsCl-HfCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1992-04-20

    The electrode processes in the CsCl-HfCl{sub 4} melt were examined by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic methods with the use of P-5827 and PI-50.1.1 potentiostats. The potential sweep rates were varied form 0.005 to 1.0 V/sec. The recorders were KSP-4 and LKD-4-003 potentiometers and a PO-5122 oscillographic polarograph. The electrochemical cell was the traditional one for electrochemical studies. The reference electrode was Ag/NaCl-KCl-AgCl (2 mass %). The mass loss in the hafnium anode was used to determine the anode current yield and the mean degree of oxidation for the hafnium ion entering the melt. The anode products were identified by X-ray methods with a DRON-2 diffractometer and also by thermographic and chemical analysis. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hafnium oxide thin films studied by time differential perturbed angular correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, C. C.; Dey, S.; Bedi, S. C.; Das, S. K.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the study of hafnium oxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition at various partial oxygen pressures by Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-)181Ta to determine the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI), and by x-ray diffraction. The samples were neutron activated and measured at room temperature as received as well as after annealing in air. All spectra exhibited two to three inequivalent probe sites, even after annealing. At 0.3 mbar oxygen partial pressure and annealing for 5 hs at 1073 K the majority (88%) of the sites exhibited NQI parameters as reported for the bulk monoclinic phase [ωQ = 125.4(2) Mrad/s, η = 0.335(5)]. We can exclude amorphous as well as cubic and tetragonal hafnium oxide phases in the annealed samples. There was no indication of room-temperature ferromagnetism.

  8. Evidence for oxygen vacancies movement during wake-up in ferroelectric hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starschich, S.; Menzel, S.; Böttger, U.

    2016-01-01

    The wake-up effect which is observed in ferroelectric hafnium oxide is investigated in yttrium doped hafnium oxide prepared by chemical solution deposition. It can be shown that not the amount of cycles but the duration of the applied electrical field is essential for the wake-up. Temperature dependent wake-up cycling in a range of -160 °C to 100 °C reveals a strong temperature activation of the wake-up, which can be attributed to ion rearrangement during cycling. By using asymmetrical electrodes, resistive valence change mechanism switching can be observed coincident with ferroelectric switching. From the given results, it can be concluded that redistribution of oxygen vacancies is the origin of the wake-up effect.

  9. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  10. Dose assessment for inhaling hafnium particles based on laboratory rats study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Cheng, Y S

    2003-04-01

    Internal radiation from inhalation of hafnium tritide aerosols may be a significant radiation protection problem encountered by nuclear facility workers. Based on experimental results of the rat intratracheally instilled with hafnium tritide particles and on a self-absorption factor of beta particles determined by a numerical method, a biokinetic model was developed for inhaled particles of hafnium tritide. Results show that lung burdens of the tritide are well represented by a two-component exponential equation; biological half-lives derived for the retention of 3H in lung were 4.9 d and 1,257 d for the short- and long-term clearance, respectively. The tritium clearance rate via urine or feces was described by bi-phase exponential components. At the end of the experiment (180 d after instillation), only approximately 30% of the initial lung burden of 3H had been eliminated, of which approximately 98% was excreted via feces and 2% in urine, but none through exhaled air. Results also showed that a large percentage (70%) of the hafnium tritide initially present in lung still remained in the organ 6 mo after the exposure. The calculation of the radiation dose indicates that the cumulative dose to the lung directly from the tritide particles was approximately 10(6) times the lung dose from the dissolved tritium in the lung region. The committed effective dose to the lung was estimated to be 5.41 x 10(-10) Sv Bq(-1), which is over 99% of that to the whole body. The dose to the liver was 6.00 x 10(-15) Sv Bq(-1). This information will be useful in developing new guidelines for radiation protection purposes.

  11. Investigation of the gate oxide leakage current of low temperature formed hafnium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelli, E.; Tsoukalas, D.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, low temperature physically deposited hafnium oxide films are investigated in terms of their electrical properties through measurements and analysis of leakage currents in order to understand the defect's behavior in this dielectric material. Two extreme conditions will be presented and discussed: the first one concerns the use of a nearly trap-free hafnium oxide layer, while the second one concerns the use of a hafnium oxide film with a very large amount of electrically active traps. Particular emphasis is given to the detection and comparison of the shallow and deep traps that are responsible for the room temperature leakage of these films. It is shown that by modifying the amount of traps in the hafnium oxide layer, achieved by changing the deposition conditions, the trap's energy location is heavily influenced. The nearly trap-free sample exhibits Ohmic conduction at low fields (with activation energies in the range 16-33 meV for low temperatures and 0.13-0.14 eV for higher than ambient temperatures), Poole-Frenkel conduction at high fields (trap depth in the range 0.23-0.38 eV), while at low temperatures and high fields, the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling is identified (estimated barrier height of 1.9 eV). The charge-trap sample on the other hand exhibits Ohmic conduction at low fields (activation energies in the range 0.26-0.32 eV for higher than ambient temperatures), space charge limited current conduction at intermediate fields (exponent n = 3), while at high fields the Poole-Frenkel conduction appears (trap depth in the range 1.63-1.70 eV).

  12. CO assisted N2 functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex: a DFT mechanistic exploration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuelu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Wenchao; Lei, Ming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, the reaction mechanisms of CO assisted N(2) cleavage and functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex are studied using a density function theory (DFT) method. Several key intermediates (Ia, Ib, Ic and Id) with axial/equatorial N=C=O coordination structures are found to be of importance along reaction pathways of CO assisted N(2) functionalization, which could provide a profound theoretical insight into the C-N bond formation and N-N bond cleavage. There are two different attack directions to insert the first CO molecule into the Hf-N bonds of the dinuclear hafnium complex, which lead to C-N bond formation. The calculated results imply that CO insertion into the Hf(1)-N(3) bond (Path A1) reacts more easily than that into the Hf(2)-N(3) bond (Path A3). But for the insertion of the second CO insertion to give 2A, there are two possibilities (Path A1 and Path A2) according to this insertion being after/before N-N bond cleavage. Two pathways (Path A1 and Path A2) are proved to be possible to form final dinitrogen functionalized products (oxamidide 2A, 2B and 2C) in this study, which explain the formation of different oxamidide isomers in CO assisted N(2) functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex.

  13. Radiation effects on the electrical properties of hafnium oxide based MOS capacitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, J. C.; McClory, J. W.; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Foster, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    Hafnium oxide-based MOS capacitors were investigated to determine electrical property response to radiation environments. In situ capacitance versus voltage measurements were analyzed to identify voltage shifting as a result of changes to trapped charge with increasing dose of gamma, neutron, and ion radiation. In situ measurements required investigation and optimization of capacitor fabrication to include dicing, cleaning, metalization, packaging, and wire bonding. A top metal contact of 200 angstroms of titanium followed by 2800 angstroms of gold allowed for repeatable wire bonding and proper electrical response. Gamma and ion irradiations of atomic layer deposited hafnium oxide on silicon devices both resulted in a midgap voltage shift of no more than 0.2 V toward less positive voltages. This shift indicates recombination of radiation induced positive charge with negative trapped charge in the bulk oxide. Silicon ion irradiation caused interface effects in addition to oxide trap effects that resulted in a flatband voltage shift of approximately 0.6 V also toward less positive voltages. Additionally, no bias dependent voltage shifts with gamma irradiation and strong oxide capacitance room temperature annealing after ion irradiation was observed. These characteristics, in addition to the small voltage shifts observed, demonstrate the radiation hardness of hafnium oxide and its applicability for use in space systems.

  14. Oxygen and nitrogen diffusion in α-hafnium from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-05-01

    We use a combination of density functional theory and multistate diffusion formalism to analyze the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen in technologically important hafnium metal. Comparing the local density approximation and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof version of the generalized gradient approximation, we find that a better description of the hafnium lattice in the latter results in the correct sequence of stable and transition states for oxygen interstitials leading to essentially quantitative agreement with experiment. For oxygen diffusion, we find an isotropic temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient of D =0.082e-2.04/kBTcm2s-1 utilizing interstitial sites with hexahedral and octahedral coordination. For the diffusivity of nitrogen, we find that an additional stable interstitial site, the crowdion site, exists and that the diffusion coefficient is D =0.15e-2.68/kBTcm2s-1. Our results also reproduce the experimental observation that nitrogen diffusivity is lower than that of oxygen in hafnium.

  15. X-Ray diffraction study of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals doped with hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. E. Verin, I. A.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Orlova, E. I.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2011-05-15

    Single crystals of KTi{sub 1-x}Hf{sub x}OPO{sub 4} (x = 0.015(2), 0.035(1), and 0.128(1) are reinvestigated by precision X-ray diffraction at room temperature. It is found that the implantation of hafnium atoms in the crystal structure of KTiOPO{sub 4} does not lead to significant changes in the framework and affects only the positions of the potassium atoms in the channel. Our studies reveal the displacements of the potassium atoms from their main and additional positions in the structure of pure KTP in all three structures studied. The largest displacements from the K1 Prime and K1 Double-Prime additional positions are observed in the structure with x = 0.035. At this hafnium concentration, the occupancy of the main positions of potassium atoms decreases and the occupancy of the additional positions increases in relation to those in KTP. This redistribution of potassium atoms enhances the nonuniformity of distribution of the electron density in the vicinity of their positions, which is probably responsible for the increase in the nonlinear susceptibility of KTP crystals that contain 3.5% hafnium in relation to crystals of pure KTP.

  16. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides as applied to 440C steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrate were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. Oxide was found at all interfaces with an interface width of at least 600 A for the oxidized substrates and at least 300 A for the unoxidized substrates. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C. Coatings of both nitrides deposited at 8 mtorr were found to have increased adhesion to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C over those deposited at 20 mtorr.

  17. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-09

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  18. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs. PMID:22230259

  19. On the phase formation of sputtered hafnium oxide and oxynitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Sarakinos, K.; Music, D.; Mraz, S.; Baben, M. to; Jiang, K.; Nahif, F.; Braun, A.; Zilkens, C.; Schneider, J. M.; Konstantinidis, S.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Munnik, F.

    2010-07-15

    Hafnium oxynitride films are deposited from a Hf target employing direct current magnetron sputtering in an Ar-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. It is shown that the presence of N{sub 2} allows for the stabilization of the transition zone between the metallic and the compound sputtering mode enabling deposition of films at well defined conditions of target coverage by varying the O{sub 2} partial pressure. Plasma analysis reveals that this experimental strategy facilitates control over the flux of the O{sup -} ions which are generated on the oxidized target surface and accelerated by the negative target potential toward the growing film. An arrangement that enables film growth without O{sup -} ion bombardment is also implemented. Moreover, stabilization of the transition sputtering zone and control of the O{sup -} ion flux without N{sub 2} addition is achieved employing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. Structural characterization of the deposited films unambiguously proves that the phase formation of hafnium oxide and hafnium oxynitride films with the crystal structure of HfO{sub 2} is independent from the O{sup -} bombardment conditions. Experimental and theoretical data indicate that the presence of vacancies and/or the substitution of O by N atoms in the nonmetal sublattice favor the formation of the cubic and/or the tetragonal HfO{sub 2} crystal structure at the expense of the monoclinic HfO{sub 2} one.

  20. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides as applied to 440C steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grill, A.; Aron, P.R.

    1984-03-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrate were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. Oxide was found at all interfaces with an interface width of at least 600 A for the oxidized substrates and at least 300 A for the unoxidized substrates. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C. Coatings of both nitrides deposited at 8 mtorr were found to have increased adhesion to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C over those deposited at 20 mtorr.

  1. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type. High amounts of agriculture on steep slopes can increase the amount of soil erosion leading to increased sediment in surface water. Agricultural land cover on steep slopes (AGSL) is the percent of agriculture on slopes greater than or equal to 9%. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  2. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  3. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  4. Development and characterization of ultrathin hafnium titanates as high permittivity gate insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min

    High permittivity or high-kappa materials are being developed for use as gate insulators for future ultrascaled metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Hafnium containing compounds are the leading candidates. Due to its moderate permittivity, however, it is difficult to achieve HfO2 gate structures with an EOT well below 1.0 nm. One approach to increase HfO2 permittivity is combining it with a very high-kappa material, such as TiO2. In this thesis, we systematically studied the electrical and physical characteristics of high-kappa hafnium titanates films as gate insulators. A series of HfxTi1-xO2 films with well-controlled composition were deposited using an MOCVD system. The physical properties of the films were analyzed using a variety of characterization techniques. X-ray micro diffraction indicates that the Ti-rich thin film is more immune to crystallization. TEM analysis showed that the thick stoichiometric HfTiO 4 film has an orthorhombic structure and large anisotropic grains. The C-V curves from the devices with the hafnium titanates films displayed relatively low hysteresis. In a certain composition range, the interfacial layer (IL) EOT and permittivity of HfxTi1-x O2 increases linearly with increasing Ti. The charge is negative for HfxTi1-xO2/IL and positive for Si/IL interface, and the magnitude increases as Hf increases. For ultra-thin films (less than 2 nm EOT), the leakage current increases with increasing HE Moreover, the Hf-rich sample has weaker temperature dependence of the current. In the MOSFET devices with the hafnium titanates films, normal transistor characteristics were observed, also electron mobility degradation. Next, we investigated the effects that different pre-deposition surface treatments, including HF dipping, NH3 surface nitridation, and HfO2 deposition, have on the electrical properties of hafnium titanates. Surface nitridation shows stronger effect than the thin HfO2 layer. The nitrided samples displayed a

  5. Low-voltage bendable pentacene thin-film transistor with stainless steel substrate and polystyrene-coated hafnium silicate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seunghyup; Yong, Kijung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-04-01

    The hafnium silicate and aluminum oxide high-k dielectrics were deposited on stainless steel substrate using atomic layer deposition process and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and polystyrene (PS) were treated improve crystallinity of pentacene grown on them. Besides, the effects of the pentacene deposition condition on the morphologies, crystallinities and electrical properties of pentacene were characterized. Therefore, the surface treatment condition on dielectric and pentacene deposition conditions were optimized. The pentacene grown on polystyrene coated high-k dielectric at low deposition rate and temperature (0.2-0.3 Å/s and R.T.) showed the largest grain size (0.8-1.0 μm) and highest crystallinity among pentacenes deposited various deposition conditions, and the pentacene TFT with polystyrene coated high-k dielectric showed excellent device-performance. To decrease threshold voltage of pentacene TFT, the polystyrene-thickness on high-k dielectric was controlled using different concentration of polystyrene solution. As the polystyrene-thickness on hafnium silicate decreases, the dielectric constant of polystyrene/hafnium silicate increases, while the crystallinity of pentacene grown on polystyrene/hafnium silicate did not change. Using low-thickness polystyrene coated hafnium silicate dielectric, the high-performance and low voltage operating (<5 V) pentacene thin film transistor (μ: ~2 cm(2)/(V s), on/off ratio, >1 × 10(4)) and complementary inverter (DC gains, ~20) could be fabricated.

  6. How I Love My 80 Percenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maturo, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Don't ever take your support staff for granted. By support staff, I mean the people in personnel, logistics, and finance; the ones who can make things happen with a phone call or a signature, or by the same token frustrate you to no end by their inaction; these are people you must depend on. I've spent a lot of time thinking about how to cultivate relationships with my support staff that work to the advantage of both of us. The most important thing that have learned working with people, any people--and I will tell you how I learned this in a minute--is there are some folks you just can't motivate, so forget it, don't try; others you certainly can with a little psychology and some effort; and the best of the bunch, what I call the 80 percenters, you don't need to motivate because they're already on the team and performing beautifully. The ones you can't change are rocks. Face up to it, and just kick them out of your way. I have a reputation with the people who don't want to perform or be part of the team. They don't come near me. If someone's a rock, I pick up on it right away, and I will walk around him or her to find someone better. The ones who can be motivated I take time to nurture. I consider them my projects. A lot of times these wannabes are people who want to help but don't know how. Listen, you can work with them. Lots of people in organizations have the mindset that all that matters are the regulations. God forbid if you ever work outside those regulations. They've got one foot on that regulation and they're holding it tight like a baby holds a blanket. What you're looking for is that first sign that their minds are opening. Usually you hear it in their vocabulary. What used to sound like "We can't do that ... the regulations won't allow it ... we have never done this before," well, suddenly that changes to "We have options ... let's take a look at the options ... let me research this and get back to you." The 80 percenters you want to nurture too, but

  7. 18-percent efficient terrestrial silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakers, A. W.; Green, M. A.; Jiqun, S.; Keller, E. M.; Wenham, S. R.; Godfrey, R. B.; Szpitalak, T.; Willison, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are described which operate at energy conversion efficiencies in excess of 18 percent under standard terrestrial test conditions (AM1.5, 100 mW/sq cm, 28 C). These are believed to be the most efficient silicon cells reported to date. The high efficiency is a result of the combination of high open-circuit voltage due to the careful attention paid to passivation of the top surface of the cell; high fill factors due to the high open-circuit voltage and low parasitic resistance losses; and high short-circuit current due to the use of shallow diffusions, a low grid coverage, and an optimized double-layer antireflection coating.

  8. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  9. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  10. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  11. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  12. Flow tube wall regenerator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decher, Reiner

    1990-07-01

    The performance of a regenerator processing a fluid in a reciprocating manner is described in terms of the fluid and the wall material characteristics as well as the geometry of the flow tubes through which the fluid is forced. It is shown that the effectiveness cannot exceed 50 percent and that it requires a wall material of low thermal heat capacity with good thermal contact between wall and fluid. Quantitative results are presented for a representative analysis model.

  13. A 20 GHz, 70 watt, 48 percent efficient space communications TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, M. A.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    A space qualifiable helix traveling wave tube capable of producing saturated output power levels above 70 watts at 48 percent total efficiency has been developed for 20 GHz satellite communications systems. The design approach stresses high reliability consistent with high power and efficiency. Advanced construction features incorporated into the design are a five stage collector, an M-type dispenser cathode, and a dynamic velocity tapered (DVT) helix.

  14. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - jejunostomy tube; G-J tube; J-tube; Jejunum tube ... Q-tip to clean the skin around the J-tube 1 to 3 times a day with ... To flush the J-tube, follow the instructions your nurse gave you. You will use the syringe to slowly push warm water into ...

  15. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... If your child has an NG tube, try to keep your child from touching or pulling on the tube. After your nurse teaches you how to flush the tube ...

  16. Percent area coverage through image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chung M.; Hong, Sung M.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    The notion of percent area coverage (PAC) has been used to characterize surface cleanliness levels in the spacecraft contamination control community. Due to the lack of detailed particle data, PAC has been conventionally calculated by multiplying the particle surface density in predetermined particle size bins by a set of coefficients per MIL-STD-1246C. In deriving the set of coefficients, the surface particle size distribution is assumed to follow a log-normal relation between particle density and particle size, while the cross-sectional area function is given as a combination of regular geometric shapes. For particles with irregular shapes, the cross-sectional area function cannot describe the true particle area and, therefore, may introduce error in the PAC calculation. Other errors may also be introduced by using the lognormal surface particle size distribution function that highly depends on the environmental cleanliness and cleaning process. In this paper, we present PAC measurements from silicon witness wafers that collected fallouts from a fabric material after vibration testing. PAC calculations were performed through analysis of microscope images and compare them to values derived through the MIL-STD-1246C method. Our results showed that the MIL-STD-1246C method does provide a reasonable upper bound to the PAC values determined through image analysis, in particular for PAC values below 0.1.

  17. Study on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide as dielectric layers.

    PubMed

    Ting, Guy G; Acton, Orb; Ma, Hong; Ka, Jae Won; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2009-02-17

    High dielectric constant (k) metal oxides such as hafnium oxide (HfO2) have gained significant interest due to their applications in microelectronics. In order to study and control the surface properties of hafnium oxide, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four different long aliphatic molecules with binding groups of phosphonic acid, carboxylic acid, and catechol were formed and characterized. Surface modification was performed to improve the interface between metal oxide and top deposited materials as well as to create suitable dielectric properties, that is, leakage current and capacitance densities, which are important in organic thin film transistors. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and simple metal-HfO2-SAM-metal devices were used to characterize the surfaces before and after SAM modification on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide. The alkylphosphonic acid provided the best monolayer formation on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide to generate a well-packed, ultrathin dielectric exhibiting a low leakage current density of 2x10(-8) A/cm2 at an applied voltage of -2.0 V and high capacitance density of 0.55 microF/cm2 at 10 kHz. Dialkylcatechol showed similar characteristics and the potential for using the catechol SAMs to modify HfO2 surfaces. In addition, the integration of this alkylphosphonic acid SAM/hafnium oxide hybrid dielectric into pentacene-based thin film transistors yields low-voltage operation within 1.5 V and improved performance over bare hafnium oxide.

  18. Strong influence of polymer architecture on the microstructural evolution of hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes upon ceramization.

    PubMed

    Papendorf, Benjamin; Nonnenmacher, Katharina; Ionescu, Emanuel; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Riedel, Ralf

    2011-04-04

    The present study focuses on the synthesis and ceramization of novel hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes as well as on their microstructure evolution at high temperatures. The synthesis of hafnia-modified polymer-derived SiCN ceramic nanocomposites is performed via chemical modification of a polysilazane and of a cyclotrisilazane, followed by cross-linking and pyrolysis in argon atmosphere. Spectroscopic investigation (i.e., NMR, FTIR, and Raman) shows that the hafnium alkoxide reacts with the N-H groups of the cyclotrisilazane; in the case of polysilazane, reactions of N-H as well as Si-H groups with the alkoxide are observed. Consequently, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the ceramic nanocomposites obtained from cyclotrisilazane and polysilazane exhibited markedly different microstructures, which is a result of the different reaction pathways of the hafnium alkoxide with cyclotrisilazane and with polysilazane. Furthermore, the two prepared ceramic nanocomposites are unexpectedly found to exhibit extremely different high-temperature behavior with respect to decomposition and crystallization; this essential difference is found to be related to the different distribution of hafnium throughout the ceramic network in the two samples. Thus, the homogeneous distribution of hafnium observed in the polysilazane-derived ceramic leads to an enhanced thermal stability with respect to decomposition, whereas the local enrichment of hafnium within the matrix of the cyclotrisilazane-based sample induces a pronounced decomposition upon annealing at high temperatures. The results indicate that the chemistry and architecture of the precursor has a crucial effect on the microstructure of the resulting ceramic material and consequently on its high-temperature behavior. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nonradiographic assessment of enteral feeding tube position.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A M; Clay, B; Grant, M J; Sanders, S V; Webster, H F; Reading, J C; Dean, J M; Witte, M K

    1997-12-01

    To determine whether a clinical, nonradiographic criterion can be used to predict when the tip of a blindly placed feeding tube is in the small intestine. Prospective sample. Pediatric intensive care unit at a tertiary care children's hospital. Critically ill children requiring transpyloric feeding. The small bowel was intubated, using a blind, bedside transpyloric feeding tube placement protocol. The feeding tube was considered to be in the small bowel when <2 mL of a 10- mL aliquot of insufflated air could be aspirated from the feeding tube. This clinical criterion was confirmed with an abdominal radiograph. Patient age ranged from 1 month to 19 yrs (median 6 months). Weight ranged from 2.2 to 60 kg (median 4.9). Median time to feeding tube placement was 10 mins (range 5 to 60). Eighty-nine percent of the patients were mechanically ventilated, while 28% of these patients were pharmacologically paralyzed. Seventy-five feeding tubes were inserted. There were no known complications. Ninety-nine (74/75) percent of the feeding tubes were positioned in the small bowel. The inability to aspirate insufflated air correctly predicted small bowel intubation with 99% certainty (Sequential Probability Ratio Test, p = .05 and power = .80). This test incorrectly predicted the position of only one feeding tube, the 26th, which was in the stomach. Of the 74 feeding tubes positioned in the small bowel, 13 feeding tubes were in the duodenum and 61 were in the jejunum. The inability to aspirate insufflated air confirms the transpyloric position of a feeding tube. Other clinical criteria did not successfully predict small bowel intubation. Use of this single test may obviate confirmatory abdominal radiographs in carefully selected patients and may lead to more cost-effective and timely initiation of enteral feedings.

  20. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-04

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  1. Characterization of hafnium based high-k thin films for solid state transistor gate application deposited by CVD and PECVD using hafnium(IV) tert-butoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Harish Babu

    Silicon dioxide, the standard gate oxide in MOS transistors for the last three decades, has reached its scaling limit due to an unacceptably high tunneling current at thicknesses < 1.0 nm. Hafnium oxide (HfO 2) and hafnium silicate (HfSixOy), based on their high dielectric constants and thermodynamic stability on Si, are the two most promising materials to replace SiO2 as a gate oxide. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of HfO2 and HfSixO y, and their characterization, has been studied to better understand their physical and chemical properties to suit their application as a high-kappa replacement to SiO2. Hafnium oxide and HfSixOy thin films were deposited in a custom built PECVD reactor on Si (100) using hafnium (IV) tert-butoxide (HTB), oxygen and silane at substrate temperatures of 30°, 150°, 250° and 410°C. The thermally and plasma deposited HfSixOy films showed a composition of (HfO2)0.84(SiO 2)0.16 and (HfO2)0.11(SiO2) 0.88, respectively. Plasma silicates demonstrated higher silicon (˜24 at.%) incorporation due to better dissociation of SiH4 and HTB. HfO2 and HfSixOy films were also deposited with different oxygen precursors (O2, N2O, H2O, O2 plasma, or N2O plasma). Thermally deposited HfSi xOy films using O2 and N2O showed precursor desorption at higher temperatures resulting in lower deposition rates, whereas the H2O deposited film showed a decrease in deposition rate with temperature, suggesting a different mechanism. In situ ATR-FTIR was conducted on adsorbed and liquid HTB to study the reaction pathway of the HTB molecule during CVD reaction. By comparing experimental ATR-FTIR spectra with theoretical frequencies calculated using density functional theory, it was concluded that the HTB molecule undergoes chemisorptive adsorption at 100°C and bridges to Si via a bidentate attachment. Angle-resolved XPS measurements were performed for HfO2/Si (100) samples placed in wet and dry environments to study the effect of H 2O on interface

  2. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  3. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  4. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  5. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  6. Inter-Diffusion of Copper and Hafnium as Studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Justin Seth

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interdiffusion of copper and hafnium. Thin films (thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 150 nm) of hafnium were deposited on a silicon substrate. About 80 nm of copper was then deposited on such samples. High purity samples have been used in this investigation. The deposition of the elements was done by the e-beam technique. The interfaces thus formed were annealed for a fixed time (30 minutes) at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300°C. The samples were characterized in situ by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. To carry out the depth profiling of these samples a controlled amount of the over layer was removed and the spectral data were acquired. The argon ion sputtering technique was used to sputter the layers away. Spectral data in the copper 2p and hafnium 4f regions were investigated. The atomic concentration of the constituents as a function of depth across the interface was determined by analyzing the areas under the curves. The depth profiling data thus obtained was analyzed by the Matano-Boltzmann's procedure. For this analysis the Matano plane was determined based on the criteria of equal area on each side of the interface. The Fick's Law second law was used to calculate the interdiffuison coefficient for each of these interfaces. The interdiffusion coefficient as a function of temperature was determined from these analyses. From these coefficients the activation energy and the pre-exponential factor was determined by using the Arrhenius plot. The activation energy was found to be 0.128 eV/atom and the pre-exponential factor was 3.33E-14 cm2/s. The results from this investigation will be useful in the application of Cu/Hf interface in design and fabrication of semiconductor devices.

  7. Prediction of stable hafnium carbides: Stoichiometries, mechanical properties, and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingfeng; Peng, Junhui; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Xie, Congwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Dong, Dong; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-12-01

    We have performed a search for stable compounds in the hafnium-carbon (Hf-C) system at ambient pressure using a variable-composition ab initio evolutionary algorithm implemented in the uspex code. In addition to the well-known HfC, we predicted two additional thermodynamically stable compounds Hf3C2 and Hf6C5. The structure of Hf6C5 with space group C2/m contains 22 atoms in the conventional cell, and this prediction revives the earlier proposal by Gusev and Rempel [Phys. Status Solidi A 135, 15 (1993), 10.1002/pssa.2211350102]. The stable structure of Hf3C2 also has space group C2/m and is more energetically favorable than the Immm ,P3¯m1,P2, and C2221 structures put forward by Gusev and Rempel [Phys. Status Solidi A 135, 15 (1993), 10.1002/pssa.2211350102]. The dynamical and mechanical stabilities of the newly predicted structures have been verified by calculations of their phonons and elastic constants. Structural vacancies are found in the ordered defective rock-salt-type HfC. Chemical bonding, band structure, and Bader charges are presented and are discussed. All three compounds are weak metals with increasing metallicity as the vacancy concentration increases. The mechanical properties of the hafnium carbides nonlinearly decrease with increasing vacancy concentration, indicating the defect tolerance of this refractory compound. It is, therefore, possible to tune the hardness, ductility, and electrical conductivity by varying the stoichiometry of the hafnium carbides.

  8. Zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-catalyzed highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-06-16

    In this report, zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 83% yield and up to 98% ee, while, for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 79% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclized tetrahydrofuran compounds could be obtained in most cases.

  9. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Epoxidation of Homoallylic and Bishomoallylic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    In this report, zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 81% yield and up to 98% ee, while for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 75% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclize compounds could be obtained in most cases. PMID:20481541

  10. Insights into electrical characteristics of silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dayu; Müller, J.; Xu, Jin; Knebel, S.; Bräuhaus, D.; Schröder, U.

    2012-02-01

    Silicon doped hafnium oxide thin films were recently discovered to exhibit ferroelectricity. In the present study, metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors with Si:HfO2 thin films as ferroelectric material and TiN as electrodes have been characterized with respect to capacitance and current density as functions of temperature and applied voltage. Polarity asymmetry of the frequency dependent coercive field was explained by interfacial effects. No ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition was observed at temperatures up to 478 K. Clear distinctions between current evolutions with or without polarization switching were correlated to the time competition between the measurement and the response of relaxation mechanisms.

  11. Effect of Hafnium Impurities on the Magnetoresistance of {YBa}2{Cu}3{O}_{7-δ }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, S. V.; Samoylov, A. V.; Kamchatnaya, S. N.; Goulatis, I. L.; Vovk, R. V.; Chroneos, A.; Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate the influence of the hafnium (Hf) impurities on the magnetoresistance of {YBa}2{Cu}3{O}_{7-δ } ceramic samples in the temperature interval of the transition to the superconducting state in constant magnetic field up to 12 T. The cause of the appearance of low- temperature "tails" (paracoherent transitions) on the resistive transitions, corresponding to different phase regimes of the vortex matter state is discussed. At temperatures higher than the critical temperature ( T > T_c), the temperature dependence of the excess paraconductivity can be described within the Aslamazov-Larkin theoretical model of the fluctuation conductivity for layered superconductors.

  12. Multimode resistive switching in nanoscale hafnium oxide stack as studied by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y. E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn; Celano, U.; Vandervorst, W.; Goux, L.; Degraeve, R.; Jurczak, M.; Liu, L. E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.

    2016-07-11

    The nanoscale resistive switching in hafnium oxide stack is investigated by the conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The initial oxide stack is insulating and electrical stress from the C-AFM tip induces nanometric conductive filaments. Multimode resistive switching can be observed in consecutive operation cycles at one spot. The different modes are interpreted in the framework of a low defect quantum point contact theory. The model implies that the optimization of the conductive filament active region is crucial for the future application of nanoscale resistive switching devices.

  13. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  14. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  15. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  16. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  17. Application of the Zr/Hf ratio in the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya Xuan; Li, Qing Xia; Ma, Na; Sun, Xiao Ling; Bai, Jin Feng; Zhang, Qin

    2014-12-02

    Hafnium content and its change are of significance in geochemistry and cosmochemistry; however, the determination of hafnium has always been problematic in analytical chemistry. In this paper, a new idea is proposed for the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples, including rocks, soils, and stream sediments. Through the comparison of two conventional open-type acid digestion methods (HF-HNO3-HClO4 and HF-HNO3-H2SO4), it was found that although neither of these methods could fully digest the zirconium and hafnium in a sample, the zirconium and hafnium digestion behaviors in one sample were consistent in the 60 experimental geochemical reference materials with different properties, so the experimentally determined Zr/Hf ratio in solution could be used to calculate the hafnium content in a sample. In addition, possible mass spectral interferences during the determination of zirconium and hafnium by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) were studied, and it was found that the mass spectral interferences of the selected isotopes (90)Zr and (178)Hf could be neglected. The mass spectral behaviors of (90)Zr and (178)Hf were also very consistent during the determination by HR-ICPMS. Since the hafnium content was calculated using the ratio value, all of the errors (including the errors in weighing process, the accidental errors during operation and the instrument fluctuation in the determination) of the Zr/Hf ratio could be effectively reduced or even eliminated. The relative standard deviation of the actual samples was lower than 3.2%, and the detection limit of the method (considering the dilution effect and matrix effect during measurement of the Zr/Hf ratio and zirconium content) was 0.04 μg/g. The proposed method could satisfy the requirement for the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples.

  18. Trapping of hydrogen in hafnium-based high kappa dielectric thin films for advanced CMOS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukirde, Vaishali

    In recent years, advanced high kappa gate dielectrics are under serious consideration to replace SiO2 and SiON in semiconductor industry. Hafnium-based dielectrics such as hafnium oxides, oxynitrides and Hf-based silicates/nitrided silicates are emerging as some of the most promising alternatives to SiO2/SiON gate dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Extensive efforts have been taken to understand the effects of hydrogen impurities in semiconductors and its behavior such as incorporation, diffusion, trapping and release with the aim of controlling and using it to optimize the performance of electronic device structures. In this dissertation, a systematic study of hydrogen trapping and the role of carbon impurities in various alternate gate dielectric candidates, HfO2/Si, HfxSi1-xO2/Si, HfON/Si and HfON(C)/Si is presented. It has been shown that processing of high kappa dielectrics may lead to some crystallization issues. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) for measuring oxygen deficiencies, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) for quantifying hydrogen and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantifying carbon, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for measuring degree of crystallinity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize these thin dielectric materials. ERDA data are used to characterize the evolution of hydrogen during annealing in hydrogen ambient in combination with preprocessing in oxygen and nitrogen.

  19. Evaluation of hafnium-carbide wafers for use in a solar calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Laug, K.K.

    1996-03-01

    The Solar Propulsion Group (SPG) at Phillips Laboratory will determine the efficiency of transferring heat from sunlight to a gas using carbon wafers. There will be a series of tests using a calorimeter containing porous carbon and hafnium carbide coated carbon wafers that will absorb the sunlight and transfer the heat to the gas passing through them. We had half the wafers coated with hafnium carbide to prevent carbon loss in a hydrogen rich atmosphere at high temperatures. They will degrade with each test if they are not suitably coated. We conducted a wafer bakeout test to determine if they were suitable for the calorimeter testing, and to develop a baseline for degradation checks to be conducted throughout the calorimeter test series. The preliminary results indicate that the wafers will be unaffected by the environment in the calorimeter. We developed a weight baseline to use in checking the integrity of the wafers throughout the calorimeter testing. The experiments talked about in this paper are not bi-modal in the strictest sense; a single unit supplying both power and propulsion to the spacecraft or satellite. However, in the future, we may find the solar/laser thermal propulsion system that the wafers fit into lends itself to both power and propulsion in a single unit. Therefore, the information is pertinent to this forum. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Microstructure and optical properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report on the evolution of the microstructure and photoluminescence properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate thin films as a function of annealing temperature (TA). The composition and microstructure of the films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and X-ray diffraction, while the emission properties have been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopies. It was observed that a post-annealing treatment favors the phase separation in hafnium silicate matrix being more evident at 950°C. The HfO2 phase demonstrates a pronounced crystallization in tetragonal phase upon 950°C annealing. Pr3+ emission appeared at TA = 950°C, and the highest efficiency of Pr3+ ion emission was detected upon a thermal treatment at 1,000°C. Analysis of the PLE spectra reveals an efficient energy transfer from matrix defects towards Pr3+ ions. It is considered that oxygen vacancies act as effective Pr3+ sensitizer. Finally, a PL study of undoped HfO2 and HfSiOx matrices is performed to evidence the energy transfer. PMID:23336520

  1. Effect of hafnium and titanium coated implants on several blood biochemical markers after osteosynthesis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Ashraf; Akhtyamov, Ildar; Shakirova, Faina; Zubairova, Lyaili; Gatina, Elmira; Aliev, Еlchin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: An experimental study comparing the dynamics of several biochemical markers before and after osteosynthesis, utilizing implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides and non-coated implants on rabbits’ bones. Materials and methods: The Study has been conducted on 30 rabbits of both sexes, at the age of 6-7 months, weighing 2526.5±74.4 gm. Animals underwent open osteotomy of the tibia in the middle third of the diaphysis followed by the intramedullary nailing. The level of alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, glucose, ALT and AST were monitored for 60 days. Results: the use of implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides, which have high strength, thermal and chemical stability, was not accompanied by the development of additional negative reactive changes compared to non-coated implants. Conclusion: Nanotechnology used in manufacturing bioinert coatings for implants for osteosynthesis, has made the post-operative period less complicated as reflected by less expressed changing in the markers of bone metabolism and hepatotoxicity. PMID:25419385

  2. Molecular structure, vibrational, HOMO-LUMO, MEP and NBO analysis of hafnium selenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankova, Rumyana; Genieva, Svetlana; Dimitrova, Ginka

    2017-08-01

    In hydrothermal condition hafnium selenite with estimated chemical composition Hf(SeO3)2·n(H2O) was obtained and characterized by powder X-Ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetrical analysis. The composition of the obtained crystalline phase was established as dihydrate of tetraaqua complex of the hafnium selenite [Hf(SeO3)2(H2O)4]·2H2O. The results of the thermogravimetrical analysis are shown that the two hydrated water molecules are released in the temperature interval 80-110°C, while the four coordinated water molecules - at 210-300°C. By DFT method, with Becke's three parameter exchange-functional combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr and 6-31G(d), 6-311 + G(d,p) basis sets and LANL2DZ for Hf atom were calculated the molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and thermodynamic properties of the structure. The UV-Vis spectra and electronic properties are presented. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory corresponds well with the experimental ones. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges was also calculated. The stability and intramolecular interactions are interpreted by NBO analysis.

  3. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on this ... you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or trach, ...

  4. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  5. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  6. Tube-shape verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. N.; Christ, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive apparatus checks accuracy of bent tubes. Assortment of slotted angles and clamps is bolted down to flat aluminum plate outlining shape of standard tube bent to desired configuration. Newly bent tubes are then checked against this outline. Because parts are bolted down, tubes can be checked very rapidly without disturbing outline. One verifier per tube-bending machine can really speed up production in tube-bending shop.

  7. Nearly 4 Percent of Americans Suffer from Food Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Nearly 4 Percent of Americans Suffer From Food Allergies Study finds most common allergy is to shellfish, ... shows. Approximately 4 percent of Americans have a food allergy, with women and Asians the most affected, the ...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator is...

  9. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator is...

  10. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator is...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator is...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal. 1852... 1852.219-76 NASA 8 percent goal. As prescribed in 1819.7003 insert the following clause: NASA 8 Percent... and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women. (b) The NASA Administrator is...

  13. Effect of hafnium doping on density of states in dual-target magnetron co-sputtering HfZnSnO thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun Fu, Yi-Zhou; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2015-11-23

    This study investigates the effect of hafnium doping on the density of states (DOSs) in HfZnSnO thin film transistors fabricated by dual-target magnetron co-sputtering system. The DOSs is extracted by temperature-dependent field-effect measurements, and they decrease from 1.1 × 10{sup 17} to 4.6 × 10{sup 16 }eV/cm{sup 3} with increasing the hafnium concentrations. The behavior of DOSs for the increasing hafnium concentration HfZnSnO thin film transistors can be confirmed by both the reduction of ΔV{sub T} under bias stress and the trapping charges calculated by capacitance voltage measurements. It suggests that the reduction in DOSs due to the hafnium doping is closely related with the bias stability and thermal stability.

  14. Guidance on Compatibility of UST Systems with Ethanol Blends Greater Than 10 Percent and Biodiesel Blends Greater Than 20 Percent

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA guidance on complying with the federal compatibility requirement for underground storage tank (UST) systems storing gasoline containing greater than 10 percent ethanol or diesel containing greater than 20 percent biodiesel.

  15. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  16. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  17. Improved Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Art; Tammaru, Ivo; Vaszari, John

    1988-01-01

    New space traveling-wave tube (TWT) provides coherent source of 75 watts of continuous-wave power output over bandwidth of 5 GHz at frequency of 65 GHz. Coupled-cavity TWT provides 50 dB of saturated gain. Includes thermionic emitter, M-type dispenser cathode providing high-power electron beam. Beam focused by permanent magnets through center of radio-frequency cavity structure. Designed for reliable operation for 10 years, and overall efficiency of 35 percent minimizes prime power input and dissipation of heat.

  18. Improved Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Art; Tammaru, Ivo; Vaszari, John

    1988-01-01

    New space traveling-wave tube (TWT) provides coherent source of 75 watts of continuous-wave power output over bandwidth of 5 GHz at frequency of 65 GHz. Coupled-cavity TWT provides 50 dB of saturated gain. Includes thermionic emitter, M-type dispenser cathode providing high-power electron beam. Beam focused by permanent magnets through center of radio-frequency cavity structure. Designed for reliable operation for 10 years, and overall efficiency of 35 percent minimizes prime power input and dissipation of heat.

  19. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  20. EC Tube Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-03-03

    In the design of the EC, the beam tube, through which the beam line travels, can be found in the IH tube which is centrally located in the IH module. However, also between the beam tube and the IH tube lie both the vacuum and inner tubes of the vacuum and inner vessels. It is the vacuum between these vessels which provides insulation between the ambient beam tube and liquid argon in the cryostat. while the vacuum tube is supported along its length with the inner tube as best as possible, the inner tube will only be supported at the ends. The beam tube will also be end-supported, but it will be allowed to rest directly on the inner surface of the vacuum tube. It is required that the beam tube be able to slide in and out of the vacuum tube with relative ease in order that the EC's can be moved away from the CC when necessary (repair work, etc.). Although the frequency of such a move is not known, it is hoped to be low, and it would therefore be desirable, for cost reasons, to be able to use stock tubing for the vacuum and beam tubes instead of using specially machined tubing.

  1. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  2. Tubing suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, P. C.; Brickman, E. L.

    1985-12-31

    A tubing suspension system for undersea well production operations employs a nonoriented tubing hanger having an inner body for supporting a tubing string and a landing collar for supporting the tubing hanger on a wellhead casing. The tubing hanger includes three co-operating concentric sleeve assemblies which are employed to lock and seal the tubing hanger to the wellhead housing. The outer sleeve assembly includes a locking actuator and a dual seal assembly and is separately retrievable from the remainder of the hanger assmebly. A nonorienting hydraulic set running tool is employed to run the tubing hanger, set the seals, lock the tubing hanger to the wellhead casing, retrieve either the outer sleeve assembly or the entire tubing hanger. The running tool includes a hydraulically controlled actuating sleeve which carries a latch dog assembly which locks with the tubing hanger.

  3. Dinitrogen cleavage and functionalization by carbon monoxide promoted by a hafnium complex.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Donald J; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N(2)) and carbon monoxide (CO) have the two strongest bonds in chemistry and present significant challenges in developing new transformations that exploit these two abundant feedstocks. At the core of this objective is the discovery of transition-metal compounds that promote the six-electron reductive cleavage of N(2) at ambient temperature and pressure and also promote new nitrogen-element bond formation. Here we show that an organometallic hafnium compound induces N(2) cleavage on the addition of CO, with a simultaneous assembly of new nitrogen-carbon and carbon-carbon bonds. Subsequent addition of a weak acid liberates oxamide, which demonstrates that an important agrochemical can be synthesized directly from N(2) and CO. These studies introduce an alternative paradigm for N(2) cleavage and functionalization in which the six-electron reductive cleavage is promoted by both the transition metal and the incoming ligand, CO, used for the new bond formations.

  4. Wake-up effects in Si-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dayu; Xu, Jin; Li, Qing; Guan, Yan; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Müller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schröder, Uwe

    2013-11-01

    Hafnium oxide based ferroelectric thin films have shown potential as a promising alternative material for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports the switching stability of a Si-doped HfO2 film under bipolar pulsed-field operation. High field cycling causes a "wake-up" in virgin "pinched" polarization hysteresis loops, demonstrated by an enhancement in remanent polarization and a shift of negative coercive voltage. The rate of wake-up is accelerated by either reducing the frequency or increasing the amplitude of the cycling field. We suggest de-pinning of domains due to reduction of the defect concentration at bottom electrode interface as origin of the wake-up.

  5. Calculations of the production cross sections of high-spin isomeric states in hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B. ); Young, P.G. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on the {sup 178}Hf(16{sup +}) isometric state that has a 31-yr half-life and could pose serious radioactive activation problems in nuclear fusion reactors if its production in 14-MeV neutron induced reactions is significant. The relatively high excitation energy (2.447 MeV) of this state causes it to lie in the continuum region. If rotational band members above this state were populated in a reaction, they would gamma cascade into it. While the existence of such levels can be justified theoretically, they have not been experimentally resolved; therefore, it is necessary to reconstruct the rotational levels built on the isomeric state. Using preequilibrium and compound nucleus theories, the cross sections for this and other hafnium isomeric states are calculated and compared with experimental measurements where available.

  6. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Arnold; Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A.

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  7. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of tungsten-hafnium-carbon-wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon - superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths calculated for 70 vol. % fiber composites based on test data at 1090C (2000F) were 420 and 280 MN/m2 (61,000 and 41,000 psi, respectively). The investigation indicated that, with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/m2 (82,000 and 54,000 psi, respectively), may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for 1000 hr or more at 1090C (2000F).

  8. Comparison of the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals in hafnium aluminum oxide and silicon oxide matrices.

    PubMed

    Chew, H G; Zheng, F; Choi, W K; Chim, W K; Fitzgerald, E A; Foo, Y L

    2009-02-01

    Growth of germanium (Ge) nanocrystals in silicon (Si) oxide and hafnium aluminum oxide (HfAlO) is examined. In Si oxide, nanocrystals were able to form at annealing temperatures of 800 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Nanocrystals formed at 800 degrees C were round and approximately 8 nm in diameter, at 900 degrees C they become facetted and at 1000 degrees C they become spherical again. In HfAlO, at 800 degrees C nanocrystals formed are relatively smaller (approximately 3 nm in diameter) and lower in density. While at 900 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, nanocrystals did not form due to out-diffusion of Ge. Different nanocrystal formation characteristics in the matrices are attributed to differences in their crystallization temperatures.

  9. Pyroelectric response in crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf 1- x Zr x O 2 ) thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, S. W.; Kitahara, A. R.; Rodriguez, M. A.; ...

    2017-02-13

    Pyroelectric coefficients were measured for 20 nm thick crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf1-xZrxO2) thin films across a composition range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Pyroelectric currents were collected near room temperature under zero applied bias and a sinusoidal oscillating temperature profile to separate the influence of non-pyroelectric currents. The pyroelectric coefficient was observed to correlate with zirconium content, increased orthorhombic/tetragonal phase content, and maximum polarization response. The largest measured absolute value was 48 μCm-2K-1 for a composition with x = 0.64, while no pyroelectric response was measured for compositions which displayed no remanent polarization (x = 0, 0.91, 1).

  10. Sub-10 nm low current resistive switching behavior in hafnium oxide stack

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y. E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn; Celano, U.; Xu, Z.; Vandervorst, W.; Goux, L.; Fantini, A.; Degraeve, R.; Youssef, A.; Jurczak, M.; Liu, L. E-mail: lfliu@pku.edu.cn; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.

    2016-03-21

    In this letter, a tip-induced cell relying on the conductive atomic force microscope is proposed. It is verified as a referable replica of an integrated resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. On the basis of this cell, the functionality of sub-10 nm resistive switching is confirmed in hafnium oxide stack. Moreover, the low current switching behavior in the sub-10 nm dimension is found to be more pronounced than that of a 50 × 50 nm{sup 2} device. It shows better ON/OFF ratio and low leakage current. The enhanced memory performance is ascribed to a change in the shape of the conductive filament as the device dimensions are reduced to sub-10 nm. Therefore, device downscaling provides a promising approach for the resistance optimization that benefits the RRAM array design.

  11. The effect of twinning on the work hardening behavior in Hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, E. K.; Gray, G. T. , III; Yablinsky, C.

    2004-01-01

    In many HCP metals, both twinning and slip are known to be important modes of deformation. However, the interaction of the two mechanisms and their effect on work hardening is not well understood. In hafnium, twinning and work hardening rates increase with increasing strain, increasing strain rate, and decreasing temperature. At low strains and strain rates and at higher temperatures, slip dominates deformation and rates of work hardening are relatively lower. To characterize the interaction of slip and twinning, Hf specimens were prestrained quasi-statically in compression at 77K, creating specimens that were heavily twinned. These specimens were subsequently reloaded at room temperature. Twinning within the microstructures was characterized optically and using transmission electron microscopy. The interaction of slip with the twins was investigated as a function of prestrain and correlated with the observed rates of work hardening.

  12. Pyroelectric response in crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf1-xZrxO2) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. W.; Kitahara, A. R.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Henry, M. D.; Brumbach, M. T.; Ihlefeld, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    Pyroelectric coefficients were measured for 20 nm thick crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf1-xZrxO2) thin films across a composition range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Pyroelectric currents were collected near room temperature under zero applied bias and a sinusoidal oscillating temperature profile to separate the influence of non-pyroelectric currents. The pyroelectric coefficient was observed to correlate with zirconium content, increased orthorhombic/tetragonal phase content, and maximum polarization response. The largest measured absolute value was 48 μCm-2 K-1 for a composition with x = 0.64, while no pyroelectric response was measured for compositions which displayed no remanent polarization (x = 0, 0.91, and 1).

  13. Characterization of a Novel Hafnium-Based X-ray Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thomas; Bauser, Marcus; Berger, Markus; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Jost, Gregor; Neis, Christian; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Riefke, Björn; Suelzle, Detlev; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of BAY-576, a new x-ray contrast agent which is not based on iodine, but rather on the heavy metal hafnium. Compared with iodine, hafnium provides better x-ray absorption in the energy range of computed tomography (CT) and allows images of comparable quality to be acquired at a significantly reduced radiation dose. A range of standard methods were used to explore the physicochemistry of BAY-576 as well as its tolerability in in vitro assays, its pharmacokinetics and toxicology in rats, and its performance in CT imaging in rabbits. BAY-576 is an extraordinarily stable chelate with a metal content of 42% (wt/wt) and with excellent water solubility. Formulations of 300 mg Hf/mL exhibited viscosity (3.3-3.6 mPa) and osmolality (860-985 mOsm/kg) in the range of nonionic x-ray agents. No relevant effects on erythrocytes, the coagulation, or complement system or on a panel of 87 potential biological targets were observed. The compound did not bind to plasma proteins of a number of species investigated. After intravenous injection in rats, it was excreted fast and mainly via the kidneys. Its pharmacokinetics was comparable to known extracellular contrast agents. A dose of 6000 mg Hf/kg, approximately 10 to 20 times the expected diagnostic dose, was well tolerated by rats with only moderate adverse effects. Computed tomography imaging in rabbits bearing a tumor in the liver demonstrated excellent image quality when compared with iopromide at the same contrast agent dose in angiography during the arterial phase. At 70% of the radiation dose, BAY-576 provided a contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumor, which was equivalent to iopromide at 100% radiation dose. The profile of BAY-576 indicates its potential as the first compound in a new class of noniodine x-ray contrast agents, which can contribute to the reduction of the radiation burden in contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

  14. Episodic growth of the Gondwana supercontinent from hafnium and oxygen isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Paterson, B A; Kinny, P D

    2006-02-02

    It is thought that continental crust existed as early as 150 million years after planetary accretion, but assessing the rates and processes of subsequent crustal growth requires linking the apparently contradictory information from the igneous and sedimentary rock records. For example, the striking global peaks in juvenile igneous activity 2.7, 1.9 and 1.2 Gyr ago imply rapid crustal generation in response to the emplacement of mantle 'super-plumes', rather than by the continuous process of subduction. Yet uncertainties persist over whether these age peaks are artefacts of selective preservation, and over how to reconcile episodic crust formation with the smooth crustal evolution curves inferred from neodymium isotope variations of sedimentary rocks. Detrital zircons encapsulate a more representative record of igneous events than the exposed geology and their hafnium isotope ratios reflect the time since the source of the parental magmas separated from the mantle. These 'model' ages are only meaningful if the host magma lacked a mixed or sedimentary source component, but the latter can be diagnosed by oxygen isotopes, which are strongly fractionated by rock-hydrosphere interactions. Here we report the first study that integrates hafnium and oxygen isotopes, all measured in situ on the same, precisely dated detrital zircon grains. The data reveal that crust generation in part of Gondwana was limited to major pulses at 1.9 and 3.3 Gyr ago, and that the zircons crystallized during repeated reworking of crust formed at these times. The implication is that the mechanisms of crust formation differed from those of crustal differentiation in ancient orogenic belts.

  15. Work functions of hafnium nitride thin films as emitter material for field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito Fujiwara, Sho; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-15

    The work functions of hafnium nitride thin films prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering were investigated in vacuum, before and after surface cleaning processes, with a view of improving the properties of as-fabricated field emitter arrays comprising hafnium nitride emitters. The measurement of the work function was first performed for the as-deposited films and then for films subjected to surface cleaning process, either thermal treatment or ion bombardment. Thermal treatment at a maximum temperature of 300 °C reduced the work function by 0.7 eV. Once the film was heated, the work function maintained the reduced value, even after cooling to room temperature. A little change in the work function was observed for the second and third thermal treatments. The ion bombardment was conducted by exposing the sample to a thin plasma for different sample bias conditions and processing times. When the sample was biased at −10 V, the work function decreased by 0.6 eV. The work function reduction became saturated in the early stage of the ion bombardment. When the sample was biased at −50 V, the work function exhibited different behaviors, that is, first it decreased rapidly and then increased in response to the increase in processing time. The lowest attainable work function was found to be 4.00 eV. It should be noted that none of the work function values reported in this paper were obtained using surfaces that were demonstrated to be free from oxygen contamination. The present results suggest that the current–voltage characteristics of a field emitter array can be improved by a factor of 25–50 by the examined postprocesses.

  16. Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Reversible Inhibitor of Pollen Tube Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, David B.; Cochran, Donna

    1968-01-01

    Five percent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) completely inhibited tube initiation, stopped tube growth and suppressed the high respiration associated with tube growth of lily pollen. The effect of DMSO on respiration was indirect because uncoupling concentrations of 2,4-dinitrophenol abolished the inhibition of respiration. Five percent DMSO did not inhibit rapid starch synthesis during the first 30 minutes of incubation, nor did DMSO inhibit the period of high respiration associated with rapid starch synthesis. DMSO did not cause permanent damage to the cells since normal pollen tube growth occurred after its removal. Dimethyl sulfoxide is not a general inhibitor of pollen metabolism, but it may be a specific inhibitor of a process required for tube growth. PMID:16656779

  17. Investigation of active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Kakimi, Yasuhiro; Matsubara, Yoichi

    An active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, which is a GM type pulse tube refrigerator, is described in this paper. Two or more buffers are connected at the hot end of the pulse tube through on/off valves. The main purpose of this method is to increase the efficiency. A numerical method is introduced to analyse the working process. To understand the basic mechanism, an ideal cycle is also introduced. With a prototype single stage active-buffer pulse tube refrigerator, a cooling capacity of 166 W and a percent Carnot of 13% at 80 K have been obtained.

  18. High-efficiency, 200 watt, 12-gigahertz traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Mcnary, B. D.; Sauseng, O.

    1974-01-01

    Design and performance of a highly efficient experimental 200-watt traveling wave tube for space communications are described. The tube uses a coupled cavity slow wave structure with periodic permanent magnet focusing. A two-step velocity taper is incorporated in the slow wave structure for velocity resynchronization with the modulated beam. The spent beam is reconditioned in a refocusing section before it is collected in a novel multistage depressed collector. The collector is radiation cooled and heat insulated from the tube body. At saturation the tube provides peak output power of 240 watts with a 35-db gain and an overall maximum efficiency of 56 percent.

  19. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  20. Development of clad boiler tubes extruded from bimetallic centrifugal castings

    SciTech Connect

    Sponseller, D.L.; Timmons, G.A.; Bakker, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Wrought tubes of T-11 steel, externally clad with SS310, have been produced by a new method. The alloys were united directly from the molten state by centrifugal casting. In the optimum process, temperatures are controlled to prevent meltback of the SS310 outer layer by the higher-melting T-11 stream. Hollow extrusion billets were prepared from the heavy-walled cast bimetallic tubes and successfully hot extruded (at a ratio of 13.4) to 3.3-inch OD x 2.5-inch ID tubes, and (at a ratio of 37.6) to 2-inch OD x 1.5-inch ID tubes. In all, ten castings were produced, and 12 billets were extruded to tubes. For the most part, thicknesses of the cladding and tube wall are rather uniform around the circumference and from end to end of the tubes. Hardness and tensile Properties of annealed 2-inch tubes are uniform from end to 6nd of a tube, and between tubes, and readily conform to ASTM A 213; tubes satisfy the flattening and flaring requirements of ASTM A 450. The cladding is metallurgically bonded to the base metal, as revealed by metallography, and by two tests developed for this study: a bond hear-strength test and a twist test. In the latter test, rings 0.125 inch in thickness are slotted and severely twisted with a special tool. In tubes made by the optimum process, minute fissures that form adjacent to some of the pressure points during twist testing just 2.7 percent of the bond-line length. Cost estimates OCCUPY for commercial production of 2-inch tubes via the centrifugal casting route suggest that such tubes should be considerably less expensive than conventionally clad tubes (extruded from composite billets assembled from heavy-walled wrought tubes).

  1. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    PubMed

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-30

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  2. The Texas Ten Percent Plan's Impact on College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Martorell, Paco; McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Texas Ten Percent Plan (TTP) provides students in the top 10 percent of their high-school class with automatic admission to any public university in the state, including the two flagship schools, the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M. Texas created the policy in 1997 after a federal appellate court ruled that the state's previous…

  3. Four Percent Fallacy Revisited: Urban and Rural Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, William H., III; Haas, Marilyn L.

    Cross sectional data indicate that about four percent of elderly persons reside in nursing homes. Yet many studies, some using death certificates, show actual risk of institutionalization is upwards of 25 percent. This paper presents a death registration study that examined all deaths in North Carolina and analyzed rural and urban differences. The…

  4. Aminopyridinate-FI hybrids, their hafnium and titanium complexes, and their application in the living polymerization of 1-hexene.

    PubMed

    Haas, Isabelle; Dietel, Thomas; Press, Konstantin; Kol, Moshe; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-10-11

    Based on two well-established ligand systems, the aminopyridinato (Ap) and the phenoxyimine (FI) ligand systems, new Ap-FI hybrid ligands were developed. Four different Ap-FI hybrid ligands were synthesized through a simple condensation reaction and fully characterized. The reaction of hafnium tetrabenzyl with all four Ap-FI hybrid ligands exclusively led to mono(Ap-FI) complexes of the type [(Ap-FI)HfBn2 ]. The ligands acted as tetradentate dianionic chelates. Upon activation with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, the hafnium-dibenzyl complexes led to highly active catalysts for the polymerization of 1-hexene. Ultrahigh molecular weights and extremely narrow polydispersities support the living nature of this polymerization process. A possible deactivation product of the hafnium catalysts was characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis and is discussed. The coordination modes of these new ligands were studied with the help of model titanium complexes. The reaction of titanium(IV) isopropoxide with ligand 1 led to a mono(Ap-FI) complex, which showed the desired fac-mer coordination mode. Titanium (IV) isopropoxide reacted with ligand 4 to give a complex of the type [(ApH-FI)2 Ti(OiPr)2 ], which featured the ligand in its monoanionic form. The two titanium complexes were characterized by X-ray crystal-structure analysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ion-bombardment-induced reduction in vacancies and its enhanced effect on conductivity and reflectivity in hafnium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Wang, Jiafu; Hu, Chaoquan; Zhang, Xiaobo; Dang, Jianchen; Zhang, Sam; Gao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of ion bombardment on electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity of transition metal nitrides films was reported previously, the results were controversial and the mechanism was not yet well explored. Here, we show that proper ion bombardment, induced by applying the negative bias voltage ( V b), significantly improves the electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity in rocksalt hafnium nitride films regardless of level of stoichiometry (i.e., in both near-stoichiometric HfN1.04 and over-stoichiometric HfN1.17 films). The observed improvement arises from the increase in the concentration of free electrons and the relaxation time as a result of reduction in nitrogen and hafnium vacancies in the films. Furthermore, HfN1.17 films have always much lower electrical conductivity and infrared reflectance than HfN1.04 films for a given V b, owing to more hafnium vacancies because of larger composition deviation from HfN exact stoichiometry (N:Hf = 1:1). These new insights are supported by good agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculations.

  6. Space-Qualified Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Krawczyk, Richard; Simons, Rainee N.; Williams, Wallace D.; Robbins, Neal R.; Dibb, Daniel R.; Menninger, William L.; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. Model 999HA traveling-wave tube (TWT), was developed for use as a high-power microwave amplifier for high-rate transmission of data and video signals from deep space to Earth (see figure). The 999HA is a successor to the 999H a non-space qualified TWT described in High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Traveling-Wave Tube (LEW-17900-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 32. Operating in the 31.8-to-32.3 GHz frequency band, the 999HA has been shown to generate 252 W of continuous- wave output power at 62 percent overall power efficiency a 75-percent increase in output power over the 999H. The mass of the 999HA is 35 percent less than that of the 999H. Moreover, taking account of the elimination of a Faraday cage that is necessary for operation of the 999H but is obviated by a redesign of high-voltage feed-throughs for the 999HA, the overall reduction in mass becomes 57 percent with an 82 percent reduction in volume. Through a series of rigorous tests, the 999HA has been qualified for operation aboard spacecraft with a lifetime exceeding seven years. Offspring of the 999HA will fly on the Kepler and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter missions.

  7. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  8. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  9. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  10. PEG tube insertion -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... shower or bathe. Keeping the PEG-tube in Place If the feeding tube comes out, the stoma ... eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 100. ...

  11. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NG - infants Images Feeding tube References Kim YS. Nasogastric and nasoenteric tube insertion. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap ...

  12. Eustachian tube patency

    MedlinePlus

    ... refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep the middle ear free of ...

  13. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  14. Tazarotene 0.1 percent cream plus clindamycin 1 percent gel versus tretinoin 0.025 percent gel plus clindamycin 1 percent gel in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Tanghetti, Emil; Dhawan, Sunil; Torok, Helen; Kircik, Leon

    2007-07-13

    Topical retinoids are the cornerstone of therapy for acne vulgaris. Nevertheless, the adjunctive use of other anti-acne agents can help enhance the efficacy of topical retinoids still further. Given that tazarotene 0.1 percent gel has previously shown significantly greater efficacy than tretinoin 0.025 percent gel, it is likely that tazarotene plus clindamycin offers superior efficacy to tretinoin plus clindamycin, which has recently become available as a combination product. A total of 150 patients with facial acne vulgaris were randomly assigned to receive either tazarotene 0.1 percent cream plus clindamycin 1 percent gel, or tretinoin 0.025 percent gel plus clindamycin 1 percent gel. Each medication was applied once daily in the evening (clindamycin followed by the retinoid 5-10 minutes later) for up to 12 weeks. At week 12, the reduction from baseline in lesion counts was greater with tazarotene/clindamycin than tretinoin/clindamycin for both the non-inflammatory lesion count (71% vs. 52%, p< or =.01) and the inflammatory lesion count (77% vs. 67%, P=.053). Tazarotene/clindamycin also resulted in a significantly higher incidence of patients achieving > or = 50 percent global improvement (incidence of 88% vs. 75% at week 12; p< or =.05). Both regimens were similarly well tolerated. In the treatment of facial acne vulgaris, tazarotene plus clindamycin offers significantly greater efficacy than tretinoin plus clindamycin and has comparable tolerability.

  15. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was subjected to fretting-wear exposures against uncoated Ti-6Al-4V as a baseline and against various coatings and surface treatments applied to Ti-6Al-4V. The coatings evaluated included plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide with 12 percent cobalt, aluminum oxide with 13 percent titanium oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum bronze with 10 percent aromatic polyester; polymer-bonded polyimide, polyimide with graphite fluoride, polyimide with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and methyl phenyl silicone bonded MoS2, preoxidation surface treatment, a nitride surface treatment, and a sputtered MoS2 coating. Results of wear measurements on both the coated and uncoated surfaces after 300,000 fretting cycles indicated that the polyimide coating was the most wear resistant and caused the least wear to the uncoated mating surface.

  16. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  17. 1992 tubing tables

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This paper is helpful to those designing oil well completions or purchasing tubing with proprietary or premium connections. Tables contain specifications and application data for over 100 different tubing joints, including those used with fiberglass pipe. The tables this year contain dimensional and performance data for coiled tubing.

  18. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jack C; Brown, Adam P; Shin, John S; Rogers, Kirsten M; Hoftman, Nir N

    2016-05-01

    Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient's face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed a high extubation risk

  19. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard®). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. METHODS: Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient’s face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. RESULTS: Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed

  20. Coaxial tube array space transmission line characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Colleen A.; Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The coaxial tube array tether/transmission line used to connect an SP-100 nuclear power system to the space station was characterized over the range of reactor-to-platform separation distances of 1 to 10 km. Characterization was done with respect to array performance, physical dimensions and masses. Using a fixed design procedure, a family of designs was generated for the same power level (300 kWe), power loss (1.5 percent), and meteoroid survival probability (99.5 percent over 10 yr). To differentiate between vacuum insulated and gas insulated lines, two different maximum values of the E field were considered: 20 kV/cm (appropriate to vacuum insulation) and 50 kV/cm (compressed SF6). Core conductor, tube, bumper, standoff, spacer and bumper support dimensions, and masses were also calculated. The results of the characterization show mainly how transmission line size and mass scale with reactor-to-platform separation distance.

  1. Internal correction of hafnium oxide spectral interferences and mass bias in the determination of platinum in environmental samples using isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castrillón, José Angel; Moldovan, Mariella; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2009-05-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of platinum by isotope dilution analysis, using enriched (194)Pt, in environmental samples containing comparatively high levels of hafnium without any chemical separation. The method is based on the computation of the contribution of hafnium oxide as an independent factor in the observed isotope pattern of platinum in the spiked sample. Under these conditions, the ratio of molar fractions between natural abundance and isotopically enriched platinum was independent of the amount of hafnium present in the sample. Additionally, mass bias was corrected by an internal procedure in which the regression variance was minimised. This was possible as the mass bias factor for hafnium oxide was very close to that of platinum. The final procedure required the measurement of three platinum isotope ratios (192/194, 195/194 and 196/194) to calculate the concentration of platinum in the sample. The methodology has been validated using the reference material "BCR-723 road dust" and has been applied to different environmental matrices (road dust, air particles, bulk wet deposition and epiphytic lichens) collected in the Aspe Valley (Pyrenees Mountains). A full uncertainty budget, using Kragten's spreadsheet method, showed that the total uncertainty was limited only by the uncertainty in the measured isotope ratios and not by the uncertainties of the isotopic composition of platinum and hafnium.

  2. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  5. Hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with ionizing radiation for lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hua; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Huang, Jian-Yuan; Li, Keng-Yuan; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. However, the optical approach of PDT is limited by tissue penetration depth of visible light. In this study, we propose that a ROS-enhanced nanoparticle, hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite (Hf:HAp), which is a material to yield large quantities of ROS inside the cells when the nanoparticles are bombarded with high penetrating power of ionizing radiation. Hf:HAp nanoparticles are generated by wet chemical precipitation with total doping concentration of 15mol% Hf(4+) relative to Ca(2+) in HAp host material. The results show that the HAp particles could be successfully doped with Hf ions, resulted in the formation of nano-sized rod-like shape and with pH-dependent solubility. The impact of ionizing radiation on Hf:HAp nanoparticles is assessed by using in-vitro and in-vivo model using A549 cell line. The 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) results reveal that after being exposed to gamma rays, Hf:HAp could significantly lead to the formation of ROS in cells. Both cell viability (WST-1) and cytotoxicity (LDH) assay show the consistent results that A549 lung cancer cell lines are damaged with changes in the cells' ROS level. The in-vivo studies further demonstrate that the tumor growth is inhibited owing to the cells apoptosis when Hf:HAp nanoparticles are bombarded with ionizing radiation. This finding offer a new therapeutic method of interacting with ionizing radiation and demonstrate the potential of Hf:HAp nanoparticles in tumor treatment, such as being used in a palliative treatment after lung surgical procedure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, the approach of PDT is usually limited to the treatment of systemic disease and deeper tumor, due to the limited tissue penetration depth of visible

  6. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  7. Telescoping tube assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturm, Albert J. (Inventor); Marrinan, Thomas E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An extensible and retractable telescoping tube positions test devices that inspect large stationary objects. The tube has three dimensional adjustment capabilities and is vertically suspended from a frame. The tube sections are independently supported with each section comprising U-shaped housing secured to a thicker support plate. Guide mechanisms preferably mounted only to the thicker plates guide each tube section parallel to a reference axis with improved accuracy so that the position of the remote end of the telescoping tube is precisely known.

  8. Pollen tube development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark A; Kost, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Pollen tubes grow rapidly in a strictly polarized manner as they transport male reproductive cells through female flower tissues to bring about fertilization. Vegetative pollen tube cells are an excellent model system to investigate processes underlying directional cell expansion. In this chapter, we describe materials and methods required for (1) the identification of novel factors essential for polarized cell growth through the isolation and analysis of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in pollen tube growth and (2) the detailed functional characterization of pollen tube proteins based on transient transformation and microscopic analysis of cultured tobacco pollen tubes.

  9. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  10. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  11. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. II. [in sun and late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal structure of the medium inside thin, vertical magnetic flux tubes embedded in a given external atmosphere is investigated, assuming cylindrical symmetry and a depth-independent plasma beta. The variation with tube radius of the temperature on the tube axis is computed and the temperature on the tube wall is estimated. The temperature variation across the flux tube is found to be due to the depth variation of the intensity and to the density stratification of the atmosphere. Since the temperature difference between the axis and the wall is small in thin flux tubes (of the order of 10 percent), the horizontal temperature gradient may often be neglected and the temperature in a tube of given radius may be described by a single function of depth. Thus, a more detailed numerical treatment of the radiative transfer within thin flux tubes can be substantially simplified by neglecting horizontal temperature differences within the flux tube proper.

  12. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A L David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory because of their favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physicochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  13. Carrier Transport at Metal/Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoungjun; Gil, Youngun; Choi, Youngran; Kim, Kyoung-Kook; Yun, Hyung Joong; Son, Byoungchul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the carrier transport mechanism at the metal/amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (a-HIZO) interface was investigated. The contact properties were found to be predominantly affected by the degree of interfacial reaction between the metals and a-HIZO; that is, a higher tendency to form metal oxide phases leads to excellent Ohmic contact via tunneling, which is associated with the generated donor-like oxygen vacancies. In this case, the Schottky-Mott theory is not applicable. Meanwhile, metals that do not form interfacial metal oxide, such as Pd, follow the Schottky-Mott theory, which results in rectifying Schottky behavior. The Schottky characteristics of the Pd contact to a-HIZO can be explained in terms of the barrier inhomogeneity model, which yields a mean barrier height of 1.40 eV and a standard deviation of 0.14 eV. The work function of a-HIZO could therefore be estimated as 3.7 eV, which is in good agreement with the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (3.68 eV). Our findings will be useful for establishing a strategy to form Ohmic or Schottky contacts to a-HIZO films, which will be essential for fabricating reliable high-performance electronic devices.

  14. Dinitrogen functionalization with bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of zirconium and hafnium.

    PubMed

    Chirik, Paul J

    2007-01-07

    The rich chemistry of substituted bis(cyclopentadienyl)zirconium and hafnium complexes bearing side-on coordinated dinitrogen ligands is highlighted in this Perspective. Our studies in this area were initially motivated by the desire to understand side-on vs. end-on dinitrogen coordination in bimetallic zirconocene and hafnocene N2 compounds. In the cases where eta2,eta2-dinitrogen compounds were isolated, both structural and computational data have established significant imido character in the metal-nitrogen bonds. This additional bonding interaction, which is diminished in end-on complexes bearing both terminal and bridging N2 ligands, facilitates dinitrogen functionalization by non-polar reagents including dihydrogen, carbon-hydrogen bonds and weak Brønsted acids such as water and ethanol. In hafnocene chemistry, where unwanted side-on, end-on isomerization is suppressed, cycloaddition of phenylisocyanate to coordinated N2 has also been accomplished. For N-H bond forming reactions involving H2, kinetic measurements, in addition to isotopic labelling and computational studies, are consistent with dinitrogen functionalization by 1,2-addition involving a highly ordered, four-centred transition structure.

  15. Fatigue mechanism of yttrium-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Chen, Xing; Liang, Xiao; Qin, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Taixing; Wang, Zhuo; Peng, Bo; Zhou, Peiheng; Lu, Haipeng; Zhang, Li; Deng, Longjiang; Liu, Ming; Liu, Qi; Tian, He; Bi, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Owing to their prominent stability and CMOS compatibility, HfO2-based ferroelectric films have attracted great attention as promising candidates for ferroelectric random-access memory applications. A major reliability issue for HfO2 based ferroelectric devices is fatigue. So far, there have been a few studies on the fatigue mechanism of this material. Here, we report a systematic study of the fatigue mechanism of yttrium-doped hafnium oxide (HYO) ferroelectric thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The influence of pulse width, pulse amplitude and temperature on the fatigue behavior of HYO during field cycling is studied. The temperature dependent conduction mechanism is characterized after different fatigue cycles. Domain wall pinning caused by carrier injection at shallow defect centers is found to be the major fatigue mechanism of this material. The fatigued device can fully recover to the fatigue-free state after being heated at 90 °C for 30 min, confirming the shallow trap characteristic of the domain wall pinning defects.

  16. Synthesis of cubic zirconium and hafnium nitride having Th3P4 structure.

    PubMed

    Zerr, Andreas; Miehe, Gerhard; Riedel, Ralf

    2003-03-01

    High-pressure synthesis is a powerful method for the preparation of novel materials with high elastic moduli and hardness. Additionally, such materials may exhibit interesting thermal, optoelectronic, semiconductuing, magnetic or superconducting properties. Here, we report on the high-pressure synthesis of zirconium and hafnium nitrides with the stoichiometry M3N4, where M = Zr, Hf. Synthesis experiments were performed in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 18 GPa and temperatures up to 3,000 K. We observed formation of cubic Zr3N4 and Hf3N4 (c-M3N4) with a Th3P4-structure, where M-cations are eightfold coordinated by N anions. The c-M3N4 phases are the first binary nitrides with such a high coordination number. Both compounds exhibit high bulk moduli around 250 GPa, which indicates high hardness. Moreover, the new nitrides, c-Zr3N4 and c-Hf3N4, may be the first members of a larger group of transition metal and/or lanthanide nitrides with interesting ferromagnetic or superconducting behaviour.

  17. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hafnium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Behl, Lovish; Lahiri, Debrupa; Dulikravich, George S.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-09-01

    Dry sliding wear behavior of hafnium-based bulk metallic glass was studied at two loads (5 and 15 N) and two temperatures (298 and 673 K) using aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ball as a wear counterpart. At 5 N load, wear reduced by ~71% on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. At a higher load of 15 N, the weight loss reduction was much lower (45%) on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. Decreased wear weight loss on increasing the temperature was attributed to the increased hardness of the Hf-based metallic glass at high temperatures. Micro-hardness of the alloy at 293 K was found to be 636 Hv, which gradually increased to 655 Hv on annealing at 673 K. Improvement in the hardness at elevated temperature is attributed to: (1) free volume annihilation, (2) surface oxide formation and (3) nano-crystallites precipitation. Reduced wear at elevated temperature resulted in smaller volume of debris generation that restricted three-body wear to obtain lower coefficient of friction (COF) (0.25-0.35) compared to COF (0.65-0.75) at room temperature.

  18. Optical reflectivity and hardness improvement of hafnium nitride films via tantalum alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Huang, Haihua; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Chaoquan

    2016-12-01

    It is found that incorporation of tantalum in a hafnium nitride film induces a tunable optical reflectivity and improves the hardness. The underlying mechanism can be illustrated by a combination of experiments and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the evolution of optical reflectivity and the increase in hardness arise from the formation of Hf1-xTaxN solid solutions and the resulting changes in the electronic structure. The increase in infrared reflectance originates from the increase in concentration of free electrons (n) because Ta (d3s2) has one more valence electron than Hf (d2s2). The sharp blue-shift in cutoff wavelength is attributed to the increase in n and the appearance of t2g → eg interband absorption. These results suggest that alloying of a second transition metal renders an effective avenue to improve simultaneously the optical and mechanical properties of transition metal nitride films. This opens up a door in preparing high-reflectance yet hard films.

  19. Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating electronic devices

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Zhigang; Kisslinger, Kim

    2015-06-17

    Thin films of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are widely used as the gate oxide in fabricating integrated circuits because of their high dielectric constants. In this paper, the authors report the growth of thin films of HfO2 using e-beam evaporation, and the fabrication of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using this HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide. The authors analyzed the thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, thereby demonstrating that the e-beam-evaporation-grown HfO2 film has a polycrystalline structure and forms an excellent interface with silicon. Accordingly, we fabricated 31-stage CMOS ring oscillator to test themore » quality of the HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide, and obtained excellent rail-to-rail oscillation waveforms from it, denoting that the HfO2 thin film functioned very well as the gate oxide.« less

  20. Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhigang; Kisslinger, Kim

    2015-06-17

    Thin films of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are widely used as the gate oxide in fabricating integrated circuits because of their high dielectric constants. In this paper, the authors report the growth of thin films of HfO2 using e-beam evaporation, and the fabrication of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using this HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide. The authors analyzed the thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, thereby demonstrating that the e-beam-evaporation-grown HfO2 film has a polycrystalline structure and forms an excellent interface with silicon. Accordingly, we fabricated 31-stage CMOS ring oscillator to test the quality of the HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide, and obtained excellent rail-to-rail oscillation waveforms from it, denoting that the HfO2 thin film functioned very well as the gate oxide.

  1. Arc Jet Testing of Hafnium Diboride Based Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Don; Beckman, Sarah; Irby, Edward; Squire, Tom; Olejniczak, Joe; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gusman, Michael; Gasch, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium Diboride (HFB,) based materials have shown promise for use in a number of high temperature aerospace applications, including rocket nozzles and as leading edges on hypersonic reentry vehicles. The stability of the materials in relevant environments is key to determining their suitability for a particular application. In this program we have been developing HfB2/SiC materials for use as sharp leading edges. The program as a whole included processing and characterization of the HfBJSiC materials. The specific work discussed here will focus on studies of the materials oxidation behavior in simulated reentry environments through arc jet testing. Four flat face models were tested to examine the influence of heat flux and stagnation pressure on the materials oxidation behavior. The results from arc jet testing of two HfB2/SiC cone models will also be discussed. Each cone model was run multiple times with gradually increasing heat fluxes. Total run times on a single cone model exceeded 80 minutes. For both the flat face and cone models surface temperatures well in excess of 2200 C were measured. Post test microstructural examination of the models and correlations with measured temperatures will be discussed.

  2. Tailoring the index of refraction of nanocrystalline hafnium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Mirella; Murphy, N. R.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-03-10

    Hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were grown by sputter-deposition by varying the growth temperature (T{sub s} = 25–700 °C). HfO{sub 2} films grown at T{sub s} < 200 °C were amorphous, while those grown at T{sub s} ≥ 200 °C were monoclinic, nanocrystalline with (1{sup ¯}11) texturing. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) analyses indicate that the film-density (ρ) increases with increasing T{sub s}. The index of refraction (n) profiles derived from spectroscopic ellipsometry analyses follow the Cauchy dispersion relation. Lorentz-Lorenz analysis (n{sub (λ)} = 550 nm) and optical-model adopted agree well with the XRR data/analyses. A direct T{sub s}-ρ-n relationship suggests that tailoring the optical quality is possible by tuning T{sub s} and the microstructure of HfO{sub 2} films.

  3. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  4. Extraction chromatographic separations of tantalum and tungsten from hafnium and complex matrix constituents.

    PubMed

    Snow, Mathew S; Finck, Martha R; Carney, Kevin P; Morrison, Samuel S

    2017-02-10

    Tantalum (Ta), hafnium (Hf), and tungsten (W) analyses from complex matrices require high purification of these analytes from each other and major/trace matrix constituents, however, current state-of-the-art Ta/Hf/W separations rely on traditional anion exchange approaches that show relatively similar distribution coefficient (Kd) values for each element. This work reports an assessment of three commercially available extraction chromatographic resins (TEVA, TRU, and UTEVA) for Ta/Hf/W separations. Batch contact studies show differences in Ta/Hf and Ta/W Kd values of up to 10(6) and 10(4) (respectively), representing an improvement of a factor of 100 and 300 in Ta/Hf and Ta/W Kd values (respectively) over AG1×4 resin. Variations in the Kd values as a function of HCl concentration for TRU resin show that this resin is well suited for Ta/Hf/W separations, with Ta/Hf, Ta/W, and W/Hf Kd value improvements of 10, 200, and 30 (respectively) over AG1×4 resin. Analyses of digested soil samples (NIST 2710a) using TRU resin and tandem TEVA-TRU columns demonstrate the ability to achieve extremely high purification (>99%) of Ta and W from each other and Hf, as well as enabling very high purification of Ta and W from the major and trace elemental constituents present in soils using a single chromatographic step.

  5. Separation of trace level hafnium from tungsten: a step toward solving an astronomical puzzle.

    PubMed

    Maji, Samir; Lahiri, Susanta; Wierczinski, Birgit; Korschinek, Gunther

    2006-04-01

    182Hf (T(1/2) = 9 x 10(6) y) is believed to be formed by pure r-process during a supernova explosion, and therefore, the search for minute traces of 182Hf in the earth's crust is of great interest. Only accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well suited for detecting such low levels of 182Hf. But any attempt to measure 182Hf by AMS must ensure that the sample is free from its naturally occurring stable isobar 182W. A simple method for separation of tungsten and hafnium has been developed using radiometric simulation followed by checking the decontamination of tungsten from Hf in a synthetic sample by AMS. The separation studies were performed by a liquid-liquid extraction technique using tri-n-octylamine (TOA) as the organic reagent. It has been found that a very high separation factor (1.6 x 10(6)) can be achieved when 0.3 M TOA diluted in cyclohexane is used as the organic phase and 6 M HCl (in the presence of small amount of H2O2) is used as the aqueous phase.

  6. Early history of Earth's crust-mantle system inferred from hafnium isotopes in chondrites.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, Martin; Baker, Joel A; Haack, Henning; Ulfbeck, David; Rosing, Minik

    2003-02-27

    The 176Lu to 176Hf decay series has been widely used to understand the nature of Earth's early crust-mantle system. The interpretation, however, of Lu-Hf isotope data requires accurate knowledge of the radioactive decay constant of 176Lu (lambda176Lu), as well as bulk-Earth reference parameters. A recent calibration of the lambda176Lu value calls for the presence of highly unradiogenic hafnium in terrestrial zircons with ages greater than 3.9 Gyr, implying widespread continental crust extraction from an isotopically enriched mantle source more than 4.3 Gyr ago, but does not provide evidence for a complementary depleted mantle reservoir. Here we report Lu-Hf isotope measurements of different Solar System objects including chondrites and basaltic eucrites. The chondrites define a Lu-Hf isochron with an initial 176Hf/177Hf ratio of 0.279628 +/- 0.000047, corresponding to lambda176Lu = 1.983 +/- 0.033 x 10-11 yr-1 using an age of 4.56 Gyr for the chondrite-forming event. This lambda176Lu value indicates that Earth's oldest minerals were derived from melts of a mantle source with a time-integrated history of depletion rather than enrichment. The depletion event must have occurred no later than 320 Myr after planetary accretion, consistent with timing inferred from extinct radionuclides.

  7. Temperature effect on electrospinning of nanobelts: the case of hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yurong; Lu, Bingan; Xie, Yizhu; Ma, Ziwei; Liu, Lixin; Zhao, Haiting; Zhang, Jia; Duan, Huigao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yuqing; Xie, Erqing

    2011-07-01

    Electrospinning is a convenient and versatile method for fabricating different kinds of one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanofibres, nanotubes and nanobelts. Environmental parameters have a great influence on the electrospinning nanostructure. Here we report a new method to fabricate hafnium oxide (HfO2) nanobelts. HfO2 nanobelts were prepared by electrospinning a sol-gel solution with the implementation of heating and subsequent calcination treatment. We investigate the temperature dependence of the products by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The heating temperature of spinning ambient is found to be crucial to the formation of HfO2 nanobelts. By tuning the temperature, the morphological transformation of HfO2 from nanowires to nanobelts was achieved. It was found that the rapid evaporation of solvent played an important role in the formation process of HfO2 nanobelts. It is shown that nanobelts can only be obtained with the temperature higher than 50 °C and they are in the high quality monoclinic phase. A possible growth mechanism of the nanobelts based on phase separation is proposed. The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of HfO2:Eu3 + nanobelts is also illustrated.

  8. Facing-target mid-frequency magnetron reactive sputtered hafnium oxide film: Morphology and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Jun; Wang, You-Nian; Choi, Chi Kyu; Zhou, Da-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous hafnium dioxide (HfO2) film was prepared on Si (100) by facing-target mid-frequency reactive magnetron sputtering under different oxygen/argon gas ratio at room temperature with high purity Hf target. 3D surface profiler results showed that the deposition rates of HfO2 thin film under different O2/Ar gas ratio remain unchanged, indicating that the facing target midfrequency magnetron sputtering system provides effective approach to eliminate target poisoning phenomenon which is generally occurred in reactive sputtering procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated that the gradual reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration and the densification of deposited film structure with the increase of oxygen/argon (O2/Ar) gas flow ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis suggested that the surface of the as-deposited HfO2 thin film tends to be smoother, the root-meansquare roughness (RMS) reduced from 0.876 nm to 0.333 nm while O2/Ar gas flow ratio increased from 1/4 to 1/1. Current-Voltage measurements of MOS capacitor based on Au/HfO2/Si structure indicated that the leakage current density of HfO2 thin films decreased by increasing of oxygen partial pressure, which resulted in the variations of pore size and oxygen vacancy concentration in deposited thin films. Based on the above characterization results the leakage current mechanism for all samples was discussed systematically.

  9. Compounds between the dioxides of hafnium and zirconium and the oxides of strontium and barium

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimyuk, G.I.; Lopato, L.M.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Zaitseva, Z.A.

    1985-12-01

    The goal of the paper is the synthesis and study of the properties of compounds in the system HfO/sub 2/ (ZrO2)-SrO(BaO). These compounds form in the region of high alkaline-earth content. The phase composition of the samples was studied by x-ray and petrographic analyses on a DRON-1.5 unit at room temperature. It was established from the studies that, independent of the means of sample preparation, there form on interaction of the dioxides of hafnium and zirconium with the oxides of strontium in the region of high SrO content the compounds Sr/sub 4/HF/sub 3/O/sub 10/, Sr/sub 4/Zr/sub 3/O/sub 10/, Sr/sub 3/Hf/sub 2/O/sub 7/, Sr/sub 3/Zr/sub 2/O/sub 7/, Sr/sub 2/HfO/sub 4/, and Sr/sub 2/ZrO/sub 4/. The unit-cell parameters and crystal-optical characteristics of the compounds synthesized were determined.

  10. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R. Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Due to the favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density., transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physiocochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  11. Novel synthesis of hafnium oxide nanoparticles by precipitation method and its characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang Jae

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► HfO{sub 2} NPs were prepared by precipitation method. ► XRD and Raman analysis revealed the presence of monoclinic phase. ► The average particle size of HfO{sub 2} NPs is 20 nm. ► The method is a simple, low cost and eco-friendly approach. -- Abstract: Hafnium oxide nanoparticles (HfO{sub 2} NPs) have been successfully synthesized by means of a novel precipitation method and were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and laser Raman spectroscopy. The XRD and Raman analysis revealed the presence of pure monoclinic HfO{sub 2} NPs. FESEM image showed that the HfO{sub 2} NPs were of spherical shape with an average particle size of about 20 nm. The optical band gap of the HfO{sub 2} NPs was found to be 6.12 eV. Advantages of this method were simple and low cost of synthesis of HfO{sub 2} NPs includes the small and narrow particle size distribution.

  12. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-11

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast-flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. Our purpose is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Thus, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. Furthermore, the ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  13. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    DOE PAGES

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-11

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast-flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. Our purpose is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Thus, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flashmore » analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. Furthermore, the ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.« less

  14. Highly effective electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by atomic layer deposited hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Wan, Yimao; Cui, Yanfeng; Chen, Yifeng; Verlinden, Pierre; Cuevas, Andres

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films to crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. Excellent passivation of both n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of thin HfO2 films prepared by atomic layer deposition. Effective surface recombination velocities as low as 3.3 and 9.9 cm s-1 have been recorded with 15 nm thick films on n- and p-type 1 Ω cm c-Si, respectively. The surface passivation by HfO2 is activated at 350 °C by a forming gas anneal. Capacitance voltage measurement shows an interface state density of 3.6 × 1010 cm-2 eV-1 and a positive charge density of 5 × 1011 cm-2 on annealed p-type 1 Ω cm c-Si. X-ray diffraction unveils a positive correlation between surface recombination and crystallinity of the HfO2 and a dependence of the crystallinity on both annealing temperature and film thickness. In summary, HfO2 is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of crystalline silicon solar cells.

  15. Ferroelectric transistors with monolayer molybdenum disulfide and ultra-thin aluminum-doped hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Wui Chung; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Jialun; Xia, Qiangfei; Zhu, Wenjuan

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate ferroelectric memory devices with monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the channel material and aluminum (Al)-doped hafnium oxide (HfO2) as the ferroelectric gate dielectric. Metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors with 16 nm thick Al-doped HfO2 are fabricated, and a remnant polarization of 3 μC/cm2 under a program/erase voltage of 5 V is observed. The capability of potential 10 years data retention was estimated using extrapolation of the experimental data. Ferroelectric transistors based on embedded ferroelectric HfO2 and MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition are fabricated. Clockwise hysteresis is observed at low program/erase voltages due to slow bulk traps located near the 2D/dielectric interface, while counterclockwise hysteresis is observed at high program/erase voltages due to ferroelectric polarization. In addition, the endurances of the devices are tested, and the effects associated with ferroelectric materials, such as the wake-up effect and polarization fatigue, are observed. Reliable writing/reading in MoS2/Al-doped HfO2 ferroelectric transistors over 2 × 104 cycles is achieved. This research can potentially lead to advances of two-dimensional (2D) materials in low-power logic and memory applications.

  16. The molecular frame electric dipole moment and hyperfine interactions in hafnium fluoride, HfF.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C; Skripnikov, Leonid; Titov, Anatoly V

    2013-03-28

    The (1,0) [17.9]2.5-X(2)Δ(3∕2) band of hafnium monofluoride (HfF) has been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. The field-free spectra of (177)HfF, (179)HfF, and (180)HfF were modeled to generate a set of fine and hyperfine parameter for the X(2)Δ(3∕2)(v = 0) and [17.9]2.5 (v = 1) states. The observed optical Stark shifts for the (180)HfF isotopologue were analyzed to produce the molecular frame electric dipole moments of 1.66(1) D and 0.419(7) D for the X(2)Δ(3∕2) and [17.9]2.5 state, respectively. Both the generalized effective core potential and all-electron four component approaches were used in ab initio calculations to predict the properties of ground state HfF including equilibrium distance, dipole moments, quadrupole coupling, and magnetic hyperfine constants.

  17. Percent body fat, fractures and risk of osteoporosis in women.

    PubMed

    Wyshak, G

    2010-06-01

    Globally, in an aging population, osteoporosis and fractures are emerging as major public health problems; accessible and affordable recognition, prevention and treatment strategies are needed. Percent body fat is known to be associated with bone mineral density and fractures. This paper uses an innovative, virtually cost-free method to estimate percent body fat from age, height and weight, and assesses its validity by examining the association between percent body fat and fractures among women 39 and older. An epidemiologic study. 3940 college alumnae, median age 53.6, participated by responding to a mailed questionnaire covering medical history, behavioral factors, birth date, weight and height. T-tests, chi-square and multivariable logistic regression. Percent body fat estimated from age, weight, height and gender. Associations of fractures with percent body fat are expressed as odds ratios: for osteoporotic (wrist, hip and/or x-ray confirmed vertebral), the adjusted OR = 2.41, 95% CI (1.65, 3.54), P < 0.0001; for wrist fractures, the adjusted OR = 2.56, 95% CI (1.65, 3.96), P < 0.0001; for x-ray confirmed vertebral fractures the adjusted OR = 4.69, 95% CI (2.05, 10.77), P=0.0003).; and for non-osteoporotic, he adjusted OR= 1.00, 95% CI (0.76 1.32), P=0.999. The findings are consistent with methods using DXA and/or other technologies that show percent body fat is associated with fractures of the wrist and vertebrae. Identification of risk factors is necessary for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. Estimation of percent body fat from age, height and weight may be a valid, cost-saving, and cost-effective alternative tool for screening and assessing risk of osteoporosis in settings where Dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or other radiological techniques are too costly or unavailable.

  18. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  19. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  20. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.

    1972-01-01

    Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  1. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  2. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  3. Kaumana lava tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1974-01-01

    The entrance to Kaumana Lava Tube is in a picnic ground next to Highway 20 (Kaumana Drive) about 6.5 km southwest of Hilo. The area is passed on the way to the Kona Coast via the Saddle Road and is identified by a Hawaii Visitors Bureau sign. Although it is not the largest lava tube in the islands, Kaumana Lava Tube is an interesting geological formation, displaying many of the features typical of lava tube interiors. It is accessible, relatively easy to walk through, and is in an excellent state of preservation. The tube developed in a historic lava flow (1881, from Mauna Loa), and many aspects of lava tube activity are observed.

  4. Early Warning Look Ahead Metrics: The Percent Milestone Backlog Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Stephen A.; Anderson, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    All complex development projects experience delays and corresponding backlogs of their project control milestones during their acquisition lifecycles. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Projects Directorate (FPD) teamed with The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) to develop a collection of Early Warning Look Ahead metrics that would provide GSFC leadership with some independent indication of the programmatic health of GSFC flight projects. As part of the collection of Early Warning Look Ahead metrics, the Percent Milestone Backlog metric is particularly revealing, and has utility as a stand-alone execution performance monitoring tool. This paper describes the purpose, development methodology, and utility of the Percent Milestone Backlog metric. The other four Early Warning Look Ahead metrics are also briefly discussed. Finally, an example of the use of the Percent Milestone Backlog metric in providing actionable insight is described, along with examples of its potential use in other commodities.

  5. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  6. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  7. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  8. Programming DNA tube circumferences.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Hariadi, Rizal F; Sahu, Sudheer; Choi, Harry M T; Park, Sung Ha; Labean, Thomas H; Reif, John H

    2008-08-08

    Synthesizing molecular tubes with monodisperse, programmable circumferences is an important goal shared by nanotechnology, materials science, and supermolecular chemistry. We program molecular tube circumferences by specifying the complementarity relationships between modular domains in a 42-base single-stranded DNA motif. Single-step annealing results in the self-assembly of long tubes displaying monodisperse circumferences of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, or 20 DNA helices.

  9. Tubing weld cracking test

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.

    1995-12-31

    A tubing weld cracking (TWC) test was developed for applications involving advanced austenitic alloys (such as modified 800H and 310HCbN). Compared to the Finger hot cracking test, the TWC test shows an enhanced ability to evaluate the crack sensitivity of tubing materials. The TWC test can evaluate the cracking tendency of base as well as filter materials. Thus, it is a useful tool for tubing suppliers, filler metal producers and fabricators.

  10. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  11. Tube-welder aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Simple tools assist in setting up and welding tubes. Welder aids can be easily made to fit given tube diameter. Finished set can be used repeatedly to fix electrode-to-weld gap and mark sleeve and joint positions. Tools are readily made in tube-manufacturing plants and pay for themselves in short time in reduced labor costs and quality control: Conventional measurements are too slow for mass production and are prone to errors.

  12. Retrograde gastrojejunostomy tube migration.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Adeleke; Rammohan, Guhan; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous enteral feeding tubes are placed about 250,000 times each year in the United States. Although they are relatively safe, their placement may be complicated by perforation, infection, bleeding, vomiting, dislodgment, and obstruction. There have been numerous reports of antegrade migration of gastrojejunostomy (G-J) tubes. We report a case of G-J tube regurgitation following protracted vomiting and discuss the management of this very rare entity.

  13. Development of high efficiency (14 percent) solar cell array module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.; Ling, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    Most effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. diameter) high efficiency (16.5 percent AM1, 28 C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5 percent). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of and optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices.

  14. Routes to new hafnium(IV) tetraaryl porphyrins and crystal structures of unusual phosphate-, sulfate-, and peroxide-bridged dimers.

    PubMed

    Falber, Alexander; Todaro, Louis; Goldberg, Israel; Favilla, Michael V; Drain, Charles Michael

    2008-01-21

    New routes for the synthesis of mono tetraaryl porphyrinato hafnium(IV) complexes, Hf(IV)Por(L)(2), are reported, where the secondary ligands, L, are determined by the method of purification. These synthetic routes cater to the solubility of the macrocycles and provide access to Hf(IV) complexes of meso tetraaryl porphyrins bearing diverse functional groups such as phenyl, tolyl, pyridyl, pentafluorophenyl, and carboxyphenyl. The latter three derivatives significantly expand the repertoire of hafnium porphyrinates. One route refluxes the porphyrin with HfCl(4) in 1-chloronaphthalene or in a mixed solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene and o-cresol. A second, solventless method is also reported wherein the porphyrin is mixed with Hf(cp)(2)Cl(2) and heated to give the metalated porphyrin in good yields. Simultaneous purification and formation of stable porphyrinato hafnium(IV) diacetate complexes, Hf(Por)OAc(2), is accomplished by elution over silica gel using 3-5% acetic acid in the eluent. Exchange of the acetate ligands for other oxo-bearing ligands can be nearly quantitative, such as p-aminobenzoate (PABA), pentanoate (pent), or octanoate (oct). Notably, we find that two to three of a variety of small multitopic dianions such as peroxo (O(2)(-2)), SO(4)(-2), and HPO(4)(-2) serve to bridge between two Hf(Por) moieties to form stable dimers. The crystal structures of this library of Hf(Por) complexes are reported, and we note that careful analysis of crystallography data reveals (Por)Hf(micro-eta(2)-O(2))(2)Hf(Por) rather than four bridging oxo or hydroxy ions.

  15. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  16. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  17. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, J.O.

    2000-05-23

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  18. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  19. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  20. Measurement of two-state energy landscapes on amorphous hafnium diboride surface by direct observation of dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew; Abelson, John; Girolami, Gregory; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Direct visualization of free energy landscape for individual Cooperatively Rearranging Regions (CRRs) is important in glassy dynamics, both for the bulk and the surface. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to track individual CRRs on amorphous hafnium diboride surface, temporally from microseconds to hours with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. CRRs have a diameter of ~5 atoms and mostly relax in a two-state fashion. From single cluster tunneling current traces, we can reconstruct local free energy landscapes, complete with energy difference, barrier height, a numerically defined reaction corrdinate and shape of the free energy minima.

  1. School Designed To Use 80 Percent Less Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The new Terraset Elementary School in Reston, Virginia, uses earth as a cover for the roof area and for about 80 percent of the wall area. A heat recovery system will be used with solar collectors playing a primary role in heating and cooling. (Author/MLF)

  2. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  3. 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna with 33 percent efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, T.-W.; Chang, K.

    1991-01-01

    A 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna (rectenna) has been developed using a microstrip dipole antenna and beam-lead mixer diode. Greater than 33 percent conversion efficiency has been achieved. The circuit should have applications in microwave/millimeter-wave power transmission and detection.

  4. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule of...

  5. Grieving: 22 to 30 Percent of All College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balk, David E.

    2008-01-01

    At any given time, 22 to 30 percent of college undergraduates are in the first twelve months of grieving the death of a family member or friend. This conclusion, startling to some but accepted by others, comes from a variety of sources at academic sites in the United States and Europe. Information about the prevalence rate resulted from clinical…

  6. Realities and Myths of the Top 10 Percent Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in Texas a baker's dozen years ago, educators look forward with every new legislative session to another round of discussion about the "top 10 percent rule," which guarantees admission to the state's public universities for these talented high school graduates. Originally passed as a way to increase enrollment of…

  7. Assessment of 2001 NLCD percent tree and impervious cover estimates

    Treesearch

    Eric Greenfield; David J. Nowak; Jeffrey T. Walton

    2009-01-01

    The 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) tree and impervious cover maps provide an opportunity to extract basic land-cover information helpful for natural resource assessments. To determine the potential utility and limitations of the 2001 NLCD data, this exploratory study compared 2001 NLCD-derived values of overall percent tree and impervious cover within...

  8. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  9. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  10. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  11. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48.508 Section 48.508 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Annuity § 48.508 Certain 100...

  12. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  13. Issues of Institutionalization: Five Percent Fallacies and Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Edwin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the "5 percent fallacy," which refers to the number of older people living in institutions at a given time, and the likelihood of an older person dying in an institution. Three articles discuss research methodology, data interpretation, and measuring techniques. (JAC)

  14. Modeling percent tree canopy cover: a pilot study

    Treesearch

    John W. Coulston; Gretchen G. Moisen; Barry T. Wilson; Mark V. Finco; Warren B. Cohen; C. Kenneth Brewer

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover is a fundamental component of the landscape, and the amount of cover influences fire behavior, air pollution mitigation, and carbon storage. As such, efforts to empirically model percent tree canopy cover across the United States are a critical area of research. The 2001 national-scale canopy cover modeling and mapping effort was completed in 2006,...

  15. Issues of Institutionalization: Five Percent Fallacies and Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Edwin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the "5 percent fallacy," which refers to the number of older people living in institutions at a given time, and the likelihood of an older person dying in an institution. Three articles discuss research methodology, data interpretation, and measuring techniques. (JAC)

  16. Electronic ampere-hour integrator is accurate to one percent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulkovich, J.

    1965-01-01

    Electronic ampere-hour integrator is based on current-to-frequency conversion. It operates on low power and is accurate to one percent. This device can measure the ampere-hour capacity of batteries and can be adapted for other functions.

  17. Creatine monohydrate supplementation on body weight and percent body fat.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Matthew R; Gunter, Michael J

    2003-11-01

    Seventeen active males (age 22.9 +/- 4.9 year) participated in a study to examine the effects of creatine monohydrate supplementation on total body weight (TBW), percent body fat, body water content, and caloric intake. The TBW was measured in kilograms, percent body fat by hydrostatic weighing, body water content via bioelectrical impedance, and caloric intake by daily food log. Subjects were paired and assigned to a creatine or placebo group with a double-blind research design. Supplementation was given for 4 weeks (30 g a day for the initial 2 weeks and 15 g a day for the final 2 weeks). Subjects reported 2 days a week for supervised strength training of the lower extremity. Significant increases before and after the study were found in TBW (90.42 +/- 14.74 to 92.12 +/- 15.19 kg) and body water content (53.77 +/- 1.75 to 57.15 +/- 2.01 L) for the creatine group (p = 0.05). No significant changes were found in percent body fat or daily caloric intake in the creatine group. No significant changes were noted for the placebo group. These findings support previous research that creatine supplementation increases TBW. Mean percent body fat and caloric intake was not affected by creatine supplementation. Therefore weight gain in lieu of creatine supplementation may in part be due to water retention.

  18. Tricky Times for the Top 10 Percent Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Both supporters and critics of Texas' Top 10 Percent law have been surprised at its popularity, but some UT officials and legislators would like to see the program scaled back. As a Texas state legislator, Jim McReynolds, D-Lufkin, knows a thing or two about influencing the voting positions of his colleagues. This past spring, when Texas House…

  19. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  20. Benzylene-linked [PNP] scaffolds and their cyclometalated zirconium and hafnium complexes.

    PubMed

    Sietzen, Malte; Batke, Sonja; Antoni, Patrick W; Wadepohl, Hubert; Ballmann, Joachim

    2017-05-09

    The benzylene-linked [PNP] scaffolds HN(CH2-o-C6H4PPh2)2 ([A]H) and HN(C6H4-o-CH2PPh2)2 ([B]H) have been used for the synthesis of zirconium and hafnium complexes. For both ligands, the dimethylamides [A]M(NMe2)3 ([A]1-M) and [B]M(NMe2)3 ([B]1-M) were prepared and converted to the iodides [A]MI3 ([A]2-M) and [B]MI3 ([B]2-M) (M = Zr, Hf). Starting from these iodides, the corresponding benzyl derivatives [A]MBn3 ([A]3-M) and [B]MBn3 ([B]3-M) (M = Zr, Hf) were obtained via reaction with Bn2Mg(OEt2)2. For zirconium, the benzylic ligand positions in [A]3-Zr and [B]3-Zr were found to cyclometalate readily, which led to the corresponding κ(4)-[PCNP]ZrBn2 complexes [A]4-Zr and [B]4-Zr. As these complexes failed to hydrogenate cleanly, cyclometalated derivatives with only one alkyl substituent were targeted and the mixed benzyl chlorides κ(4)-[PCNP]MBnCl ([B]5-M, M = Zr, Hf) were obtained in the case of ligand [B]. Upon hydrogenation of [B]5-Zr, the η(6)-tolyl complex [B]Zr(η(6)-C7H8)Cl ([B]6-Zr) was generated cleanly, but the corresponding hafnium complex [B]5-Hf was found to decompose unselectively in the presence of H2. Using a closely related carbazole-based [PNP] ligand, Gade and co-workers have shown recently that zirconium η(6)-arene complexes similar to [B]6-Zr may serve as zirconium(ii) synthons, namely when reacted with 2,6-Dipp-NC (L) or pyridine (py). Both these substrates were shown to react cleanly with [B]6-Zr, which led to the formation of the bis-isocyanide complex [B]ZrCl(L)2 ([B]7-Zr) and the 2,2'-bipyridine derivative [B]ZrCl(bipy) ([B]8-Zr), respectively. Upon reaction of [B]Zr(η(6)-C7H8)Cl ([B]6-Zr) with NaBEt3H, the cyclometalated derivative κ(4)-[PCNP]Zr(η(6)-C7H8) ([B]9-Zr) was isolated. In an attempt to synthesise terminal hydrides, complexes [A]MI3 ([A]2-M) were treated with KBEt3H, which led to the isolation of the cyclometalated hydrido complexes κ(4)-[PCNP]M(H)(κ(3)-Et3BH) ([A]10-M; M = Zr, Hf) featuring a κ(3)-bound triethyl

  1. Preparation of octahydro- and tetrahydro-[1,10]phenanthroline zirconium and hafnium complexes for olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Yeong; Park, Geun Ho; Lee, Chun Sun; Kang, Yi Young; Lee, Junseong; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2015-02-28

    Post-metallocenes were constructed for olefin polymerization using 1,2,3,4,7,8,9,10-octahydro[1,10]phenanthroline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthroline derivatives. A series of zirconium complexes - LZrCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (4), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (5), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (6), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (7)] - and hafnium complexes - LHfCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (8), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (9), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (10), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (11)] - were synthesized via the reaction of octahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines (2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2) with (Me2N)2MCl2 (DME). The reaction of 2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2 with (PhCH2)2ZrCl2 in the presence of a small amount of THF afforded a series of THF adduct analogs, i.e., LZrCl2(THF)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (12), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (13), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (14), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (15)]. The treatment of 12 and 13 with excess Me3Al resulted in the formation of unexpected complexes, i.e., (η(4)-LAlMe2)ZrCl2(Me) [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (16) and 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (17)], in which the Me2Al unit forms a five-membered ring through binding with the two nitrogen donors and the MeCl2Zr unit slips to an η(4)-binding mode containing the N-C-C-N fragment. The treatment of tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines [2,9-R2-C12NH9(NH)] with M(CH2Ph)4 afforded tribenzyl zirconium complexes LZr(CH2Ph)3 - [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (18) and 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (19)] - and hafnium complexes - LHf(CH2Ph)3 [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (20), 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (21), and 2,9-iPr2-C12NH9N (22)]. The structures of 4, 5, 12, 17, and 22 were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The newly prepared complexes were screened for ethylene/1-octene copolymerization activity: 12 and 16 were potent catalysts (activities of 74 × 10(6) g mol-Zr h(-1) at ∼120 °C under 30 bar ethylene) for the production of wax-like low-molecular weight polyethylene (Mn: ∼5000), which is widely used in industry.

  2. Mechanism of activation of a hafnium pyridyl-amide olefin polymerization catalyst: ligand modification by monomer.

    PubMed

    Froese, Robert D J; Hustad, Phillip D; Kuhlman, Roger L; Wenzel, Timothy T

    2007-06-27

    We have investigated the olefin polymerization mechanism of hafnium catalysts supported by a pyridyl-amide ligand with an ortho-metalated naphthyl group. Ethylene-alpha-olefin copolymers from these catalysts have broad molecular weight distributions that can be fit to a bimodal distribution. We propose a unique mechanism to explain this behavior involving monomer modification of the catalyst, which generates multiple catalyst species when multiple monomers are present. More specifically, we present evidence that the hafnium alkyl cation initially undergoes monomer insertion into the Hf-naphthyl bond, which permanently modifies the ligand to generate new highly active olefin polymerization catalysts. Under ethylene/octene copolymerization conditions, a plurality of new catalysts is formed in relative proportion to the respective monomer concentrations. Due to the asymmetry of the metal complex, two "ethylene-inserted" and eight "octene-inserted" isomers are possible, but it is a useful approximation to consider only one of each in the polymerization behavior. Consequently, gel permeation chromatography data for the polymers can be fit to a bimodal distribution having a continuous shift from a predominantly low molecular weight fraction to predominantly higher molecular weight fraction as [octene]/[ethylene] is increased. Theoretical calculations show that such insertions into the Hf-aryl bond have lower barriers than corresponding insertions into the Hf-alkyl bond. The driving forces for this insertion into the Hf-aryl bond include elimination of an eclipsing H-H interaction and formation of a stabilizing Hf-arene interaction. These new "monomer-inserted catalysts" have no beta-agostic interaction, very weak olefin binding, and olefin-insertion transition states which differ on the two sides by more than 4 kcal/mol. Thus, the barrier to site epimerization is very low and high polymerization rates are possible even when the chain wags prior to every insertion

  3. Matter power spectrum and the challenge of percent accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Aurel; Teyssier, Romain; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Onions, Julian; Reed, Darren S.; Smith, Robert E.; Springel, Volker; Pearce, Frazer R.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Future galaxy surveys require one percent precision in the theoretical knowledge of the power spectrum over a large range including very nonlinear scales. While this level of accuracy is easily obtained in the linear regime with perturbation theory, it represents a serious challenge for small scales where numerical simulations are required. In this paper we quantify the precision of present-day N-body methods, identifying main potential error sources from the set-up of initial conditions to the measurement of the final power spectrum. We directly compare three widely used N-body codes, Ramses, Pkdgrav3, and Gadget3 which represent three main discretisation techniques: the particle-mesh method, the tree method, and a hybrid combination of the two. For standard run parameters, the codes agree to within one percent at k<=1 h Mpc-1 and to within three percent at k<=10 h Mpc-1. We also consider the bispectrum and show that the reduced bispectra agree at the sub-percent level for k<= 2 h Mpc-1. In a second step, we quantify potential errors due to initial conditions, box size, and resolution using an extended suite of simulations performed with our fastest code Pkdgrav3. We demonstrate that the simulation box size should not be smaller than L=0.5 h-1Gpc to avoid systematic finite-volume effects (while much larger boxes are required to beat down the statistical sample variance). Furthermore, a maximum particle mass of Mp=109 h-1Msolar is required to conservatively obtain one percent precision of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, numerical simulations covering large survey volumes of upcoming missions such as DES, LSST, and Euclid will need more than a trillion particles to reproduce clustering properties at the targeted accuracy.

  4. Serum Predictors of Percent Lean Mass in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Price, Lori L; Phillips, Edward M; Kirn, Dylan R; Mills, John; Fielding, Roger A

    2016-08-01

    Lustgarten, MS, Price, LL, Phillips, EM, Kirn, DR, Mills, J, and Fielding, RA. Serum predictors of percent lean mass in young adults. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2194-2201, 2016-Elevated lean (skeletal muscle) mass is associated with increased muscle strength and anaerobic exercise performance, whereas low levels of lean mass are associated with insulin resistance and sarcopenia. Therefore, studies aimed at obtaining an improved understanding of mechanisms related to the quantity of lean mass are of interest. Percent lean mass (total lean mass/body weight × 100) in 77 young subjects (18-35 years) was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Twenty analytes and 296 metabolites were evaluated with the use of the standard chemistry screen and mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling, respectively. Sex-adjusted multivariable linear regression was used to determine serum analytes and metabolites significantly (p ≤ 0.05 and q ≤ 0.30) associated with the percent lean mass. Two enzymes (alkaline phosphatase and serum glutamate oxaloacetate aminotransferase) and 29 metabolites were found to be significantly associated with the percent lean mass, including metabolites related to microbial metabolism, uremia, inflammation, oxidative stress, branched-chain amino acid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, glycerolipid metabolism, and xenobiotics. Use of sex-adjusted stepwise regression to obtain a final covariate predictor model identified the combination of 5 analytes and metabolites as overall predictors of the percent lean mass (model R = 82.5%). Collectively, these data suggest that a complex interplay of various metabolic processes underlies the maintenance of lean mass in young healthy adults.

  5. Structural, optical and electrical properties of yttrium-doped hafnium oxide nanocrystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongu, Abhilash

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) has emerged as the most promising high-k dielectric for Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices and has been highlighted as the most suitable dielectric materials to replace silicon oxide because of its comprehensive performance. In the present research, yttrium-doped HfO2 (YDH) thin films were fabricated using RF magnetron sputter deposition onto Si (100) and quartz with a variable thickness. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy coupled with Filmetrics revealed that film thickness values range from 700 A° to 7500 A°. Electrical properties such as AC Resistivity and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of YDH films were studied. YDH films that were relatively thin (<1500 A°) crystallized in monoclinic phase while thicker films crystallized in cubic phase. The band gap (Eg) of the films was calculated from the optical measurements. The band gap was found to be ˜5.60 eV for monoclinic while it is ˜6.05 eV for cubic phase of YDH films. Frequency dependence of the electrical resistivity (rhoac) and the total conductivity of the films were measured. Resistivity decreased (by three orders of magnitude) with increasing frequency from 100 Hz to 1 MHz, attributed due to the hopping mechanism in YDH films. Whereas, while rhoac˜1O-m at low frequencies (100 Hz), it decreased to ˜ 104 O-cm at higher frequencies (1 MHz). Aluminum (Al) metal electrodes were deposited to fabricate a thin film capacitor with YDH layer as dielectric film thereby employing Al-YDH-Si capacitor structure. The results indicate that the capacitance of the films decrease with increasing film thickness. A detailed analysis of the electrical characteristics of YDH films is presented.

  6. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Girolami, Gregory S.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB2 glass surface, two-state hopping of 1-2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or "clusters" occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (<0.5 nm) imaging, scanning tunneling spectroscopy and voltage modulation, ruling out individual atoms, diffusing adsorbates, or pinned charges as the origin of the observed two-state hopping. Smaller clusters are more likely to hop, larger ones are more likely to be immobile. HfB2 has a very high bulk glass transition temperature Tg, and we observe no three-state hopping or sequential two-state hopping previously seen on lower Tg glass surfaces. The electronic density of states of clusters does not change when they hop up or down, allowing us to calibrate an accurate relative z-axis scale. By directly measuring and histogramming single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how "mixed" features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  7. Electronic States of Hafnium and Vanadium oxide in Silicon Gate Stack Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chiyu; Tang, Fu; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jialing; Nemanich, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Vanadium oxide (VO2) is a narrow band gap material with a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at less than 100C. Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is currently the preferred high-k material for gate dielectrics. To utilize VO2 in a charge storage device, it is necessary to understand the band relationships between VO2, HfO2, and Si substrate. In this study, a 2nm thick VO2 layer is embedded in a dielectric stack structure between an oxidized n-type Si(100) surface and a 2nm HfO2 layer. The in situ experiments are carried out in an UHV multi-chamber system. After each growth step, the surface is characterized using XPS and UPS. After the initial plasma cleaning and oxidation treatment the Si substrate displayed essentially flat bands at the surface. After deposition of the VO2 layer, the Si 2p peak shifted to lower binding energy, and the Si 2p associated with the SiO2 layer also was shifted, indicating an internal field in the SiO2. The VO2 valence band maximum (VBM) was identified at 0.6 eV below the Fermi level (EF). This ultra thin VO2 exhibits the metal-insulator transition at a temperature higher than thicker films. As a comparison, a 100nm thick film of VO2 on Si showed a MIT at 60C. After the HfO2 deposition, the Si 2p substrate feature returned to the initial value indicating a return to flat band conditions. The UPS indicated the VBM of HfO2 at 4.0 eV below EF. This work is supported by the NSF (DMR-0805353).

  8. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  9. Effects of trimethylaluminium and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium in the early stages of the atomic-layer-deposition of aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide on hydroxylated GaN nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    León-Plata, Paola A; Coan, Mary R; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-10-01

    We calculate the interactions of two atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactants, trimethylaluminium (TMA) and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH) with the hydroxylated Ga-face of GaN clusters when aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide, respectively, are being deposited. The GaN clusters are suitable as testbeds for the actual Ga-face on practical GaN nanocrystals of importance not only in electronics but for several other applications in nanotechnology. We find that TMA spontaneously interacts with hydroxylated GaN; however it does not follow the atomic layer deposition reaction path unless there is an excess in potential energy introduced in the clusters at the beginning of the optimization, for instance, using larger bond lengths of various bonds in the initial structures. TEMAH also does not interact with hydroxylated GaN, unless there is an excess in potential energy. The formation of a Ga-N(CH3)(CH2CH3) bond during the ALD of HfO2 using TEMAH as the reactant without breaking the Hf-N bond could be the key part of the mechanism behind the formation of an interface layer at the HfO2/GaN interface.

  10. Pyrotechnic Tubing Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J.; Yang, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Tool forms mechanical seal at joint without levers or hydraulic apparatus. Proposed tool intended for use in outer space used on Earth by heavily garbed workers to join tubing in difficult environments. Called Pyrotool, used with Lokring (or equivalent) fittings. Piston slides in cylinder when pushed by gas from detonating pyrotechnic charge. Impulse of piston compresses fittings, sealing around butting ends of tubes.

  11. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  12. Highly active and stereoselective zirconium and hafnium alkoxide initiators for solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Amanda J; Davidson, Matthew G; Frankis, Catherine J; Jones, Matthew D; Lunn, Matthew D

    2008-03-21

    Under solvent-free conditions (at 130 degrees C), zirconium and hafnium amine tris(phenolate) alkoxides are extremely active, well-controlled, single-site initiators for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide, yielding highly heterotactic polylactide.

  13. Gondwanan basement terranes of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen: Baltican, Saharan and West African hafnium isotopic fingerprints in Avalonia, Iberia and the Armorican Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bonnie J.; Collins, William Joseph; Murphy, James Brendan; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Hand, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Iberia, Avalonia and the "Armorican" terranes form key constituents of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen, but their Neoproterozoic origins along the northern Gondwanan margin continue to be strongly debated. Here, we present a new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf dataset from Neoproterozoic-Silurian sedimentary sequences in NW Iberia and Avalonia, in conjunction with the comprehensive existing datasets from potential source cratons, to demonstrate that the provenance of each terrane is relatively simple and can be traced back to three major cratons. The enigmatic Tonian-Stenian detrital zircons in autochthonous Iberian rocks were derived from the Saharan metacraton in the latest Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian. Avalonia is commonly considered to have been derived from the Amazonian margin of Gondwana, but the hafnium isotopic characteristics of the detrital zircon grains in early Neoproterozoic rocks bear much stronger similarities to Baltica. The hafnium isotopic array also suggests the early Avalonian oceanic arc was built on a sliver of "Grenvillian-type crust" (~ 2.0-1.0 Ga) possibly of Baltican affinity at ~ 800 Ma, prior to accretion with a continental margin at ~ 640 Ma. The Upper Allochthon of Iberia is frequently linked to the West African Craton in the late Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian, however the hafnium isotopic array presented here does not support this connection; rather it is more similar to the hafnium array from Avalonia. The Armorican terranes have strong detrital zircon isotopic links to the West African Craton during the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  14. Metal-Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Matthew J; Castillo-Martínez, Elizabeth; Wu, Yue; Lee, Jeongjae; Forse, Alexander C; Firth, Francesca C N; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Gaultois, Michael W; Hill, Joshua A; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Slater, Ben; Goodwin, Andrew L; Grey, Clare P

    2017-04-19

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed "double cluster" (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal-organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal-organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials.

  15. Metal–Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal–Organic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed “double cluster” (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal–organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal–organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials. PMID:28343394

  16. Synthesis of a base-free hafnium nitride from N2 cleavage: a versatile platform for dinitrogen functionalization.

    PubMed

    Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2013-07-31

    The synthesis and characterization of a metastable, base-free isocyanato dihafnocene μ-nitrido complex from CO-induced dinitrogen cleavage is described. The open coordination site at hafnium suggested the possibility of functionalization of the nitrogen atom by cycloaddition and insertion chemistry. Addition of the strained, activated alkyne, cyclooctyne, resulted in N-C bond formation by cycloaddition. The alkyne product is kinetically unstable engaging the terminal hafnocene isocyanate and promoting deoxygenation and additional N-C bond formation resulting in a substituted cyanamide ligand. Group transfer between hafnium centers was observed upon treatment with Me3SiCl resulting in bridging carbodiimidyl ligands. Amidinato-type ligands, [NC(R)N](3-) were prepared by addition of either cyclohexyl or isobutyronitrile to the base free dihafnocene μ-nitrido complex, which also engages in additional N-C bond formation with the terminal isocyanate to form bridging ureate-type ligands. Heterocummulenes also proved reactive as exposure of the nitride complex to CO2 resulted in deoxygenation and N-C bond formation to form isocyanate ligands. With substituted isocyanates, cycloaddition to the dihafnocene μ-nitrido was observed forming ureate ligands, which upon thermolysis isomerize to bridging carbodiimides. Taken together, these results establish the base free dihafnocene μ-nitrido as a versatile platform to synthesize organic molecules from N2 and carbon monoxide.

  17. Transformation Temperatures, Shape Memory and Magnetic Properties of Hafnium Modified Ti-Ta Based High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. Q.; Wang, Q.; Jin, X.

    2017-02-01

    In this study the modification effect of Hf content on the shape memory properties and magnetic permeability of a 75.5-77Ti-20Ta-3-4.5Hf alloy system has been systematically studied by DSC, three-point bend test, vector network analyzer and XRD. The martensitic transformation temperature, heat of reaction and recovery strain increases with the increase of hafnium and tantalum content. A stable high temperature shape memory effect was observed (Ms = 385-390 °C) during the two thermal cycles between 20 °C and 725 °C. Transformation temperatures and heats of reaction were determined by DSC measurements. Recovery strain was determined by three-point bend testing. Also an alloy, 70Ti-26Ta-4Hf, with higher tantalum content was produced to observe the effect of Ta on the shape memory properties. Permeability increases gradually from 1.671 to 1.919 with increasing content of hafnium modification and remains stable in the frequency range of 450 MHz to 1 GHz.

  18. High-temperature, gas-filled ceramic rectifiers, thyratrons, and voltage-reference tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, E. A.

    1969-01-01

    Thyratron, capable of being operated as a rectifier and a voltage-reference tube, was constructed and tested for 1000 hours at temperatures to 800 degrees C. With current levels at 15 amps and peak voltages of 2000 volts and frequencies at 6000 cps, tube efficiency was greater than 97 percent.

  19. Holder for Straightening Bent Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, A. R.; Polzien, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    One-piece holder restrains bent metal tube against further bending during straightening operation. Holder consists of handle 16 in. (41 cm) long welded to short, strong tube that fits around tube to be straightened.

  20. Percent Errors in the Estimation of Demand for Secondary Items.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    percent errors, and the program change factor (PCF) to predict item demana during the procurement *’ leadtime (PROLT) ior the item. The PCF accounts for...type of demand it was. It may"-- have been demanded over two years ago or it may nave been a non-recurring demana . Since CC b only retains two years of...observed distributions could be compared with negative binomial distributions. For each item the computed ratio of actual demana to expected demand was

  1. 28 percent efficient GaAs concentrator solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, H. F.; Hamaker, H. C.; Kaminar, N. R.; Kuryla, M. S.; Ladle Ristow, M.

    1988-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs heteroface solar concentrator cells which exhibit efficiencies in excess of 27 percent at high solar concentrations (over 400 suns, AM1.5D, 100 mW/sq cm) have been fabricated with both n/p and p/n configurations. The best n/p cell achieved an efficiency of 28.1 percent around 400 suns, and the best p/n cell achieved an efficiency of 27.5 percent around 1000 suns. The high performance of these GaAs concentrator cells compared to earlier high-efficiency cells was due to improved control of the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth conditions and improved cell fabrication procedures (gridline definition and edge passivation). The design parameters of the solar cell structures and optimized grid pattern were determined with a realistic computer modeling program. An evaluation of the device characteristics and a discussion of future GaAs concentrator cell development are presented.

  2. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  3. Optimization of pulse tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    1999-03-01

    The coefficient of performance (COP) of pulse tube coolers is mainly determined by irreversible processes in the regenerator. In this paper, a general and basic definition for the efficiency of regenerators is proposed. The efficiency of the regenerator, and consequently of the cooler as a whole, is affected by the system which is used to control the pressure in the tube. For a general pressure-wave form, it is shown that in the optimum situation, under certain conditions, the variation of the pressure in the tube is proportional to the variation of the pressure in the compressor. In that case the COP is independent of the form of the pressure wave.

  4. An experimental study of pulsatile flow through compliant tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Savas, Omer; Saloner, David

    2006-11-01

    An experimental investigation is made into transitional behaviors and instability of oscillatory input flows through elastic tubes, a problem with applications to hemodynamics and flows in the pulmonary system. Sinusoidal input flow is driven through a compliant silicone model in a series of experiments to investigate the effects of wall motion. A novel mechanism allows active control and feedback over the pressure on the tube exterior. By comparing the pressure within and outside of the tube and modifying the exterior pressure accordingly, the tube is inflated in a controlled manner without altering the input flow. In these experiments, the tube wall is deformed sinusoidally with an amplitude of approximately ten percent of its radius. Experiments are conducted using varying values of the parameters α= a √φν and β= δx √φν where a is the tube radius, φ the angular velocity of the input flow, ν the kinematic viscosity, and δx the cross-stream averaged periodic displacement of a fluid particle undergoing pulsatile motion. For a given α, it is found that indications of conditional turbulence appear in this flow through elastic tubes at far lower values of β - and thus at lower amplitudes of oscillation - than are reported in the literature for flows through rigid tubing.

  5. Evaluation of Length-of-Stain Gas Indicator Tubes for Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaubert, Earl C.; And Others

    Techniques for detection and measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in air are of interest and utility in many aspects of automotive safety. CO concentrations may range from less than 100 parts per million (ppm), or 0.01 percent, to about 10 percent by volume. Gas indicator tubes have been used for many years primarily as detectors of hazardous gases…

  6. Evaluation of Length-of-Stain Gas Indicator Tubes for Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaubert, Earl C.; And Others

    Techniques for detection and measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in air are of interest and utility in many aspects of automotive safety. CO concentrations may range from less than 100 parts per million (ppm), or 0.01 percent, to about 10 percent by volume. Gas indicator tubes have been used for many years primarily as detectors of hazardous gases…

  7. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    PubMed

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession.

  8. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  9. Hafnium in peralkaline and peraluminous boro-aluminosilicate glass, and glass subcomponents: a solubility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Linda L.; Darab, John G.; Qian, Maoxu; Zhao, Donggao; Palenik, Christopher S.; Li, Hong; Strachan, Denis M.; Li, Liyu

    2003-10-15

    A relationship between the solubility of hafnia (HfO2) and the host glass composition was explored by determining the solubility limits of HfO2 in peralkaline and peraluminous borosilicate glasses in the system SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-Na2O, and in glasses in the system SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3 in air at 1450 C. The only Hf-bearing phase to crystallize in the peralkaline borosilicate melts is hafnia, while in the boron-free melts sodium-hafnium silicates crystallize. All peraluminous borosilicate melts crystallize hafnia, but the slightly peraluminous glasses also have sector-zoned hafnia crystals that contain Al and Si. The more peraluminous borosilicate glasses also crystallize a B-containing mullite. The general morphology of the hafnia crystals changes as peralkalinity (Na2O/(Na2O+Al2O3)) decreases, as expected in melts with increasing viscosity. In all of the glasses with Na2O > Al2O3, the solubility of hafnia is linearly and positively correlated with Na2O/(Na2O + Al2O3) or Na2O - Al2O3 (excess sodium), despite the presence of 5 to 16 mol% B2O3. The solubility of hafnia is higher in the sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses than in the sodium-aluminosilicate glasses, suggesting that the boron is enhancing the effect that excess sodium has on the incorporation of Hf into the glass structure. The results of this solubility study are compared to other studies of high-valence cation solubility in B-free silicate melts. From this, for peralkaline B-bearing glasses, it is shown that, although the solubility limits are higher, the solution behavior of hafnia is the same as in B-free silicate melts previously studied. By comparison, also, it is shown that in peraluminous melts, there must be a different solution mechanism for hafnia: different than for peralkaline sodium-aluminum borosilicate glasses and different than for B-free silicate melts studied by others.

  10. Hafnium dioxide gate dielectrics, metal gate electrodes, and phenomena occurring at their interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, James Kenyon, III

    As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) gate lengths scale down below 45 nm, the gate oxide thickness approaches 1 nm equivalent oxide thickness. At this thickness, conventional silicon dioxide (SiO 2) gate dielectrics suffer from excessive gate leakage. Higher permittivity dielectrics are required to counter the increase in gate leakage. Hafnium dioxide (HfO2) has emerged as a promising dielectric candidate. HfO2 films deposited using metal organic chemical vapor deposition are being studied to determine the impact of process and annealing conditions on the physical and electrical properties of the gate dielectric. This study indicates that deposition and annealing temperatures influence the microstructure, density, impurity concentration, chemical environment of the impurities, and band-gap of the HfO2 dielectric. Correlations of the electrical and physical properties of the films indicate that impurities in the form of segregated carbon clusters, and low HfO2 density are detrimental to the leakage properties of the gate dielectric. Additionally, as the HfO2 thickness scales, the additional series capacitance due to poly-silicon depletion plays a larger roll in reducing the total gate capacitance. To solve this problem, high performance bulk MOSFETs will require dual metal gate electrodes possessing work functions near the silicon band edges for optimized drive current. This investigation evaluates TiN, Ta-Si-N, Ti-Al-N, WN, TaN, TaSi, Ir and IrO2 electrodes as candidate electrodes on HfO2 dielectrics. The metal-dielectric compatibility was studied by annealing the gate stacks at different temperatures. The physical stability and effective work functions of metal electrodes on HfO2 are discussed. Finally, Fermi level pinning of the metal is a barrier to identifying materials with appropriate threshold voltages. The contributions to the Fermi level pinning of platinum electrodes on HfO2 gate dielectrics are investigated by examining the

  11. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Duc; Girolami, Gregory S.; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-28

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB{sub 2} glass surface, two-state hopping of 1–2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or “clusters” occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (<0.5 nm) imaging, scanning tunneling spectroscopy and voltage modulation, ruling out individual atoms, diffusing adsorbates, or pinned charges as the origin of the observed two-state hopping. Smaller clusters are more likely to hop, larger ones are more likely to be immobile. HfB{sub 2} has a very high bulk glass transition temperature T{sub g}, and we observe no three-state hopping or sequential two-state hopping previously seen on lower T{sub g} glass surfaces. The electronic density of states of clusters does not change when they hop up or down, allowing us to calibrate an accurate relative z-axis scale. By directly measuring and histogramming single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how “mixed” features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  12. Corrosion resistant surface for vanadium nitride and hafnium nitride layers as function of grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, C. A.; Caicedo, J. C.; Aperador, W.

    2014-01-01

    In this research it was studied vanadium nitride (VN) and hafnium nitride (HfN) film, which were deposited onto silicon (Si (100)) and AISI 4140 steel substrates via r.f. magnetron sputtering technique in Ar/N2 atmosphere with purity at 99.99% for both V and Hf metallic targets. Both films were approximately 1.2±0.1 μm thick. The crystallography structures that were evaluated via X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) showed preferential orientations in the Bragg planes VN (200) and HfN (111). The chemical compositions for both films were characterized by EDX. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology; the results reveal grain sizes of 78±2 nm for VN and 58±2 nm for HfN and roughness values of 4.2±0.1 nm for VN and 1.5±0.1 nm for HfN films. The electrochemical performance in VN and HfN films deposited onto steel 4140 were studied by Tafel polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy methods (EIS) under contact with sodium chloride at 3.5 wt% solution, therefore, it was found that the corrosion rate decreased about 95% in VN and 99% for HfN films in relation to uncoated 4140 steel, thus demonstrating, the protecting effect of VN and HfN films under a corrosive environment as function of morphological characteristics (grain size). VN(grain size)=78±2.0 nm, VN(roughness)=4.2±0.1 nm, VN(corrosion rate)=40.87 μmy. HfN(grain size)=58±2.0 nm, HfN(roughness)=1.5±0.1 nm, HfN(corrosion rate)=0.205 μmy. It was possible to analyze that films with larger grain size, can be observed smaller grain boundary thus generating a higher corrosion rate, therefore, in this work it was found that the HfN layer has better corrosion resistance (low corrosion rate) in relation to VN film which presents a larger grain size, indicating that the low grain boundary in (VN films) does not restrict movement of the Cl- ion and in this way the corrosion rate increases dramatically.

  13. Hafnium isotopes in Jack Hills zircons and the formation of the Hadean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blichert-Toft, Janne; Albarède, Francis

    2008-01-01

    New bulk Hf and Pb isotope data were obtained for 63 leached single zircons from Jack Hills (JH), Western Australia, using solution chemistry and, respectively, MC-ICP MS and ICP-MS. With the exception of one "young" zircon at 3.32 Ga, the remainder of the selected grains were previously dated at > 3.9 Ga by ion-microprobe. This work extends and complements the solution chemistry data of Harrison et al. [Harrison, T.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Müller, W., Albarède, F., Holden, P., Mojzsis, S.J., 2005. Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust at 4.4 to 4.5 Ga. Science 310, 1947-1950.] but uses bulk rather than in situ Pb-Pb ages to interpret the Hf isotope data. This larger data set is used to explore whether the host rocks of the JH zircons formed as a succession of pulses or rather as a single event, and to calculate the age and assess the nature of their crustal protolith. We find that the parent granites of the JH zircons analyzed here formed during a single pulse 4.1 ± 0.1 Ga ago by the remelting of a 4.30-4.36 Ga old protolith. Monte Carlo modeling indicates that the 176Lu/ 177Hf ratios of this material (< 0.01) are unlike the ratios of modern-type oceanic crust and island arc rocks but rather fit a tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) source. TTGs themselves derived their inordinately enriched character from a basaltic progenitor which corresponds to the missing enriched reservoir identified by the 143Nd- 144Nd, 142Nd- 144Nd, and 176Hf/ 177Hf systematics of Archean rocks. We speculate that crystallization of the magma ocean in the presence of garnet left the upper mantle and an early basaltic crust enriched in incompatible elements. Reaction of this early crust with the overlying hydrosphere and subsequent foundering into the mantle gave rise at ˜ 4.3 Ga to the TTG protolith of the JH granites. Dating the onset of plate tectonics therefore depends on whether TTGs can be considered as subduction zone magmas or not.

  14. The Molecular Frame Electric Dipole Moment and Hyperfine Interactions in Hafnium Fluoride, HfF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.; Skripnikov, Leonid; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-06-01

    The identification of HfF^{+} as a possible candidate for a d_{e}} measurement has stimulated new interest in the spectroscopy of both HfF^{+} and neutral HfF. Studies of the neutral are relevant because photoionization schemes can be used to produce the cations. More importantly, computational methodologies used to predict the electronic wavefunction of HfF^{+} can be effectively assessed by making a comparison of predicted and experimental properties of the neutral, which are more readily determinable. The (1,0)[17.9]2.5 -X^{2}Δ_{3/2} band of hafnium monofluoride (HfF) has been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. The field-free spectra of ^{177}HfF, ^{179}HfF, and ^{180}HfF were model to generate a set of fine and hyperfine parameters for the X^{2}Δ_{3/2} (v=0) and [17.9]2.5 (v=1) states. The observed optical Stark shifts for the ^{180}HfF isotopologue were analyzed to produce the molecular frame electric dipole moments of 1.66(1)D and 0.419(7)D for the X^{2}Δ_{3/2} and [17.9]2.5 states, respectively. A two-step ab initio calculation consisting of a two-component generalized relativistic effective core potential calculation (GRECP) followed by a restoration of the proper four-component wavefunction was performed to predict the properties of ground state HfF. B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, J. Chem. Phys., 134, 201102 (2011). K. C. Cossel, D. N. Gresh, L. C. Sinclair, T. Coffey, L. V. Skripnikov, A. N. Petrov, N. S. Mosyagin, A. V. Titov, R. W. Field, E. R. Meyer, E. A. Cornell and J. Ye, Chem. Phys. Lett., 546, 1 (2012). M. Grau, A. E. Leanhardt, H. Loh, L. C. Sinclair, R. P. Stutz, T. S. Yahn, and E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spectroc., 272, 32 (2012). H. Loh, R. P. Stutz, T. S. Yahn, H. Looser, R. W. Field, and E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spectroc.,276-277, 49 (2012).

  15. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Review Date 8/5/2015 Updated by: Sumana Jothi ... Otolaryngology, NCHCS VA, SFVA, San Francisco, CA. Internal review and update on 09/01/2016 by David ...

  16. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  17. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  18. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    Air passing through vocal cords (larynx) causes them to vibrate, creating sounds and speech. A tracheostomy tube blocks most of the air from passing through your vocal cords. Instead, your breath (air) goes out ...

  19. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... written materials as well as DVDs on a range of topics of interest to tube feeders, including ... be caused by several things. Power failure/low battery. Pump charger parts aren’t fully connected. Pump ...

  20. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  1. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  2. Snorkeling and Jones tubes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lewis Y W; Weatherhead, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of tympanic membrane rupture during snorkeling in a 17-year-old young man who had previously undergone bilateral Jones tubes placed for epiphora. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported.

  3. Enteral nutrition by tube.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P J; Hand, M S; Frederick, G S

    1990-01-01

    When oral intake is unsatisfactory or contraindicated, maintenance of nutrition by tube feeding is an alternative to the parenteral route. A large volume of research data supports the decision to use the enteral route whenever possible. Entry of food into the alimentary tract is a stimulus to structural and functional maintenance of that tract. Enteral nutrition can be given via indwelling nasoesophageal, pharyngostomy, esophagostomy, percutaneous or surgical gastrostomy, or enterostomy tube. Use of an appropriate catheter, familiarity with the technique used, and careful patient selection and monitoring are important factors in successful tube feeding. Blenderized pet food diets should be fed whenever possible; commercially available liquid diets provide an alternative when tube caliber or patient factors preclude the use of blenderized foods.

  4. Bull Moose Tube Company

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Bull Moose Tube Company, a business located at 1819 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, MO, 63017, for alleged violations at the facility located at 406 East Industrial Drive,

  5. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  6. Gastrostomy tube placement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100125.htm Gastrostomy tube placement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. Building with Tubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eugenio, Terrance, Ed.

    Text and illustrations show how to assemble furniture and toys out of cardboard tubes and sheets. Basic directions are provided, and the tools and materials necessary to the assembly of specific items are described. (MLF)

  8. Using a nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Candy, C

    1986-09-01

    This discussion of the use of a nasogastric tube covers the equipment needed, the method, rehydration and feeding, prolonged nasogastric feeding, and stopping nasogastric feeding. A nasogastric tube is useful when children are unable to drink safely and in sufficient amounts for any of the following reasons: severe dehydration; if intravenous (IV) therapy is unavailable; low birth weight infants; or the child is drowsy or vomiting. Severely malnourished children may be fed initially in this way if they are too weak or anorexic to eat or drink normally. The following equipment is needed: nasogastric tube; lubricating fluid; a syringe; blue litmus paper, if available; adhesive tape; stethoscope if available; and fluid to be given. Explain to the child's parents and the child, if old enough to understand, what will be done; lie infants flat; measure the approximate length from the child's nostril to the ear lobe and then to the top of the abdomen with the tube and mark the position; clean the nostrils to remove the mucus, and lubricate the tip of the tube and gently insert into the nostril; give the child a drink of water if he or she is conscious; continue to pass the tube down until the position marked reaches the nostril; use the syringe to suck up some fluid and test with blue litmus paper to check that the tube is in the stomach; and inject 5-10 ml of fluid (saline or oral rehydration solution, not milk formula) by syringe if satisfied the tube is in the correct position. Where possible, give a continuous drip of fluid. If this is not possible, give frequent small amounts using the syringe as a funnel. If feeding continues for more than 24 hours, clean the nostrils daily with warm water and change the tube to the other nostril every few days. Also keep the mouth very clean with a dilute solution of 8% sodium bicarbonate, if available, or citrus fruit juice. To remove the tube, remove the adhesive tape, take the tube out gently and smoothly, and offer the child a

  9. A 200 watt traveling wave-tube for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the design, development, and test of experimental and production units of PPM focused traveling wave tube that produces 225 watts of CW RF power over 85 MHz centered at 12.080 GHz are presented. The tube uses a coupled cavity RF circuit with a velocity taper for greater than 26 percent basic efficiency. Overall efficiency of 50 percent is achieved by the incorporation of a multistage depressed collector designed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The collector is cooled by direct radiation to deep space. The tube was designed to be used for broadcasting power transmission from a satellite.

  10. Tubing crimping pliers

    DOEpatents

    Lindholm, G.T.

    1981-02-27

    The disclosure relates to pliers and more particularly to pliers for crimping two or more pieces of copper tubing together prior to their being permanently joined by brazing, soldering or the like. A die containing spring-loaded pins rotates within a cammed ring in the head of the pliers. As the die rotates, the pins force a crimp on tubing held within the pliers.

  11. Creep behaviour of Cu-30 percent Zn at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present, intermediate-temperature (573-823 K) range investigation of creep properties for single-phase Cu-30 percent Zn alpha-brass observed inverse, linear, and sigmoidal primary-creep transients above 573 K under stresses that yield minimum creep rates in the 10 to the -7th to 2 x 10 to the -4th range; normal primary creep occurred in all other conditions. In conjunction with a review of the pertinent literature, a detailed analysis of these data suggests that no clearly defined, classes M-to-A-to-M transition exists in this alloy notwithstanding the presence of both classes' characteristics under nominally similar stresses and temperatures.

  12. Congress approves 13 percent increase in AIDS spending.

    PubMed

    1996-10-18

    A Republican Congress voted for a significant increase in AIDS-related spending for the fiscal year 1996. Increases were granted in every major program, including the Ryan White CARE Act and the once-doomed Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program. Overall, discretionary spending for Federal AIDS programs rose by 13 percent. This increase includes an additional $94 million for AIDS-related research at the National Institute's of Health (NIH). Advocates call on policy-makers to develop a long-term strategy for providing drugs to those who lack private insurance and are not qualified for Medicaid.

  13. IET. Aerial view of project, 95 percent complete. Camera facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Aerial view of project, 95 percent complete. Camera facing east. Left to right: stack, duct, mobile test cell building (TAN-624), four-rail track, dolly. Retaining wall between mobile test building and shielded control building (TAN-620) just beyond. North of control building are tank building (TAN-627) and fuel-transfer pump building (TAN-625). Guard house at upper right along exclusion fence. Construction vehicles and temporary warehouse in view near guard house. Date: June 6, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1462 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes (Future)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type. High amounts of agriculture on steep slopes can increase the amount of soil erosion leading to increased sediment in surface water. Agricultural land cover on steep slopes (AGSL) is the percent of agriculture on slopes greater than or equal to 9%. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  15. Creep behaviour of Cu-30 percent Zn at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present, intermediate-temperature (573-823 K) range investigation of creep properties for single-phase Cu-30 percent Zn alpha-brass observed inverse, linear, and sigmoidal primary-creep transients above 573 K under stresses that yield minimum creep rates in the 10 to the -7th to 2 x 10 to the -4th range; normal primary creep occurred in all other conditions. In conjunction with a review of the pertinent literature, a detailed analysis of these data suggests that no clearly defined, classes M-to-A-to-M transition exists in this alloy notwithstanding the presence of both classes' characteristics under nominally similar stresses and temperatures.

  16. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length.

  17. Dynamic tube/support interaction in heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The supports for heat exchanger tubes are usually plates with drilled holes; other types of supports also have been used. To facilitate manufacture and to allow for thermal expansion of the tubes, small clearances are used between tubes and tube supports. The dynamics of tube/support interaction in heat exchangers is fairly complicated. Understanding tube dynamics and its effects is important for heat exchangers. This paper summarizes the current state of the art on this subject and to identify future research needs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed: dynamics of loosely supported tubes, tube/support gap dynamics, tube response in flow, tube damage and wear, design considerations, and future research needs. 55 refs., 1 fig.

  18. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  19. Coiled tubing operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworsky, A.S. II )

    1991-11-01

    Coiled tubing offers many advantages over conventional jointed tubing used for drilling in oil fields, including time savings, pumping flexibility, fluid placement, reduced formation damage and safety. The article gives an overview of coiled tubing history and development. Operating concepts are explained, along with descriptions of the major equipment and components associated with coiled tubing use in the oil field today.

  20. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow in smooth and longitudinal grooved tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitschke, P.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent flow in tubes with and without longitudinal grooves is examined. The discovery of fine grooves forming a sort of streamline pattern on the body of sharks led to the expectation that the grooves on a surface reduce the momentum change, and thus the drag. To test this thesis, drag law, velocity profile and the profile of the velocity fluctuation were determined. Results show that for moderate Reynolds numbers the drag coefficient for grooved tubes is about 3 percent smaller than that of the smooth tubes. At higher Reynolds numbers, however, the drag coefficient for grooved tubes becomes larger than that for smooth tubes. No significant differences in the velocity profiles between grooved tubes and smooth tubes are found.

  1. Formation and characterization of the oxygen-rich hafnium dioxygen complexes: OHf(eta2-O2)(eta2-O3), Hf(eta2-O2)3, and Hf(eta2-O2)4.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zhou, Mingfei

    2007-09-20

    Hafnium atom oxidation by dioxygen molecules has been investigated using matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. The ground-state hafnium atom inserts into dioxygen to form primarily the previously characterized HfO(2) molecule in solid argon. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and react with HfO(2) to form OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)), which is characterized as a side-on bonded oxo-superoxo hafnium ozonide complex. Under visible light (532 nm) irradiation, the OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)) complex either photochemically rearranges to a more stable Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(3) isomer, a side-on bonded di-superoxo hafnium peroxide complex, or reacts with dioxygen to form an unprecedented homoleptic tetra-superoxo hafnium complex: Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4). The Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4) complex is determined to possess a D(2d) geometry with a tetrahedral arrangement of four side-on bonded O(2) ligands around the hafnium atom, which thus presents an 8-fold coordination. These oxygen-rich complexes are photoreversible; that is, formation of Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(3) and Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4) is accompanied by demise of OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)) under visible (532 nm) light irradiation and vice versa with UV (266 nm) light irradiation.

  2. Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aeroelastic Tests of an Eight Percent Scale Saturn C-1 Block II. Buffet and flutter characteristics of Saturn Apollo mission were studied using a dynamically scaled model. The model was built around a central aluminum tube for scaled stiffness distribution and strength to resist loads imposed during testing. Styrofoam sections attached to the core provided the correct external contours. Lead weights were added for correct mass distribution. An electromagnetic shaker was used to excite the model in its flexible modes of vibration during portions of the test. The model was supported on a sting, mounted by leaf springs, cables and torsion bars. The support system provided for simulating the full scale rigid body pitch frequency with minimum restraint imposed on elastic deflections. Bending moments recorded by sensors on the aluminum tube. Several modified nose configurations were tested: The basic configuration was tested with and without a flow separator disk on the escape rocket motor, tests also were made with the escape tower and rocket motor removed completely. For the final test, the Apollo capsule was replaced with a Jupiter nose cone. The test program consisted of determining model response throughout the transonic speed range at angles of attack up to 6 degrees and measuring the aerodynamic damping over the same range for the basic model and the modified configurations. Signals from the model pickup were recorded on tape for later analysis. The data obtained were used to estimate bending moments that would be produced on the full-scale vehicle by aerodynamic forces due to buffeting. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030987. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  3. Breast percent density estimation from 3D reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakic, Predrag R.; Kontos, Despina; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2008-03-01

    Breast density is an independent factor of breast cancer risk. In mammograms breast density is quantitatively measured as percent density (PD), the percentage of dense (non-fatty) tissue. To date, clinical estimates of PD have varied significantly, in part due to the projective nature of mammography. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging modality in which cross-sectional images are reconstructed from a small number of projections acquired at different x-ray tube angles. Preliminary studies suggest that DBT is superior to mammography in tissue visualization, since superimposed anatomical structures present in mammograms are filtered out. We hypothesize that DBT could also provide a more accurate breast density estimation. In this paper, we propose to estimate PD from reconstructed DBT images using a semi-automated thresholding technique. Preprocessing is performed to exclude the image background and the area of the pectoral muscle. Threshold values are selected manually from a small number of reconstructed slices; a combination of these thresholds is applied to each slice throughout the entire reconstructed DBT volume. The proposed method was validated using images of women with recently detected abnormalities or with biopsy-proven cancers; only contralateral breasts were analyzed. The Pearson correlation and kappa coefficients between the breast density estimates from DBT and the corresponding digital mammogram indicate moderate agreement between the two modalities, comparable with our previous results from 2D DBT projections. Percent density appears to be a robust measure for breast density assessment in both 2D and 3D x-ray breast imaging modalities using thresholding.

  4. Application of principle component analysis-artificial neural network for simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium in real samples.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, A; Baramakeh, L

    2006-05-15

    Determination of zirconium and hafnium were done by applying singular value decomposition and a feed forward Neural Network Algorithm with back propagation of error. The determination of trace amounts of mixtures of Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) in various matrices (river, tap and industrial wastewater) were investigated by PC-ANN using the complexes formed between Alizarin Red S, Zr and Hf. The results showed that measurement is possible in the ranges of 0.03-3.4 and 0.2-7.0 microg ml-1 for Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), respectively. The detection limits were 0.02 and 0.08 microg ml-1 for Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), respectively. The results also show very good agreement between true and predicted concentration values and have the ability to use in routine analysis.

  5. Tetra­kis(8-quinolinolato-κ2 N,O)hafnium(IV) dimethyl­formamide solvate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Johannes A.; Visser, Hendrik G.; Roodt, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, [Hf(C9H6NO)]·C3H7NO·H2O, the hafnium(IV) atom is coordinated by four 8-quinolinolate (Ox) ligands, forming a slightly distorted square-anti­prismatic coordination polyhedron. The crystal packing is controlled by O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions and π–π inter­actions between quinoline ligands of neighbouring mol­ecules. The inter­planar distances vary between 3.150 (1) and 3.251 (2) Å, while centroid–centroid distances vary from 3.589 (1) to 4.1531 (1) Å. PMID:21579072

  6. Exchange coupling of a perpendicular ferromagnet to a half-metallic compensated ferrimagnet via a thin hafnium interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Kiril; Atcheson, Gwenaël; D'Arcy, Gavin; Lau, Yong-Chang; Coey, J. M. D.; Rode, Karsten

    2017-09-01

    A thin Hafnium film is shown to act both as an effective diffusion barrier for manganese at a thickness of 0.7 nm and as an effective exchange coupling layer in a sandwich structure with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The two magnetic layers are Co20Fe60B20 and the low moment ferrimagnet Mn2RuxGa (MRG). The relative orientation of the magnetic layers changes sign at the compensation temperature of MRG. The exchange energy reaches 0.11 mJ m-2 for the thinnest Hf interlayers. Ruthenium, the usual metal of choice for coupling ferromagnetic layers in thin film heterostructures, cannot be used with the zero-moment half metal MRG because of Ru interdiffusion. Due to its large coercivity near compensation, the MRG can potentially act as an effective source of exchange pinning.

  7. Selective-area growth of vertically oriented GaN nanostructures with a hafnium pre-orienting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.-Y.; Lekhal, K.; Lee, H.-J.; Mitsunari, T.; Min, J.-W.; Lee, D.-S.; Kushimoto, M.; Honda, Y.; Amano, H.

    2017-06-01

    Severe melt-back etching has forced the epitaxy of GaN on Si to use an AlN buffer layer for growing high-quality two-dimensional layers, despite its high resistivity. Herein, we report a metal-based pre-orienting layer (POL) for growing GaN nanostructures (NSs) to replace the traditional AlN buffer layer. Two metals, titanium (Ti) and hafnium (Hf), were evaluated as POLs. We succeeded in fabricating arrays of GaN NSs with highly preferred orientation using selective-area growth. The crystallographic phase of the POLs critically affected the evolved orientation of the crystals. Photoluminescence measurements revealed that GaN NSs with Hf-based POLs were of reasonably high quality. We believe that this result will facilitate broader III-V semiconductor applications using alternative substrates moving beyond conventional Si-based optoelectronics.

  8. A search for long-lived radionuclides produced by fast-neutron irradiations of copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Greenwood, L.R; Haight, R.C.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki )

    1989-01-01

    Identical sample packets, each containing samples of elemental copper, silver, europium, terbium, and hafnium, as well as titanium, iron and nickel as dosimeters, have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields as part of an interlaboratory research collaboration to search for the production of long-lived radionuclides for fusion waste disposal applications. This paper is a progress report on this project. To date, we have detected the following activities, and have obtained preliminary experimental cross section values for several of these: Ag-106m,108m,110m; Eu-150m,152g,154; Tb-158,160; and Hf-175,178m2,179m2,181. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Coexistence of bipolar and threshold resistive switching in TiO2 based structure with embedded hafnium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelakaki, Irini; Bousoulas, Panagiotis; Stathopoulos, Spyros; Boukos, Nikos; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    The coexistence of nonvolatile memory switching and volatile threshold switching in a single device is of importance for suppressing the sneak-path currents in crossbar resistive memory architectures. This study demonstrates that the combination of a thin film of TiO2 with hafnium nanoparticles in Au/Ti/TiO2/Hf nanoparticles/Au device configuration enables conversion between memory switching and volatile threshold switching by adjusting the current compliance through the materials stack. The presence of hexagonal closed packed Hf nanoparticles, a synthesis of which has not been reported before, is critical for the device operation that exhibits beneficial features as it is forming free and operates at low voltage and power consumption. Analysis of measured current-voltage (I-V) characteristics reveal a filamentary nature of switching phenomena and present operating similarities with electrochemical metallization cells suggesting that Hf metal atoms and not only oxygen vacancies are responsible for conductive filament formation.

  10. A Simplified Determination of Percent Oxygen in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chin-Hsiang

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified determination of the percent oxygen in air with simple and special designed apparatus. The method is based on a consumption of oxygen resulting in reduced pressure and causing water to be drawn in to the inverted flask. This experiment should be very safe, rapid, and simple. The experiment, the combustion of ethyl alcohol with oxygen in air, can either be demonstrated by chemistry teachers or be performed easily and exactly (overall average 20.77 to 20.81 % O2) by students in the student laboratory. In this way, a fountain will be produced, utilizing the siphoning effect of reducing the pressure in the inverted flask. The maximum volume of water, which is drawn into the inverted flask from the Erlenmeyer flask below by creating an interesting fountain, is reached in 5-10 minutes.

  11. Circle nephrostomy tube revisited

    PubMed Central

    Noureldin, Yasser A.; Diab, Christian; Valenti, David; Andonian, Sero

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There are few options for patients requiring chronic urinary drainage using nephrostomy tubes. Although circle nephrostomy tube (CNT) was invented in 1954, it is rarely used. Its advantages include longer indwelling time such that it is changed semi-annually when compared with the standard nephrostomy tube (SNT), which is changed monthly. However, there are no studies comparing indwelling times and costs with these two tubes. The aim of the present study was to compare CNT with SNT in terms of frequency of tube changes, reasons for earlier tube changes, and associated costs. Methods: Patients who had CNT inserted between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed. The indications for chronic indwelling nephrostomy tubes were tabulated. The frequency of tube changes was compared between CNT and SNT in the same patients. Furthermore, costs associated with insertion and exchange of CNT and SNT were analyzed. Results: Seven patients with mean age of 71.9 ± 7.6 years (range 43–96) had a total of 36 CNT changes. The mean number of CNT changes was four (range 2–5) at a mean interval of 168.3 ± 15.6 days (range 120–231). All patients had SNT prior to converting to CNT. When compared with the mean interval for SNT changes, the mean interval for CNT changes was significantly longer (44.8 ± 19.4 vs. 168.3 ± 41.3 days; p=0.028). Tube blockage and urinary leakage were the most common reasons for earlier than scheduled CNT changes. In our centre, CNT insertion and exchange cost $1965.48 and $923.96 compared with $1450.43 and $803.81 for SNT, respectively. There was an estimated cost savings of $46 861.10 (range $87 414.30 –$40 553.20) for the whole cohort by switching from SNTs to CNTs. Conclusions: Despite the small sample size as the main limitation, this study confirms that CNTs are associated with significantly fewer changes and lower cost when compared with SNTs for poor-surgical-risk patients requiring chronic NTs.

  12. Study of 42 and 85 GHz coupled cavity traveling-wave tubes for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. B.; Tammaru, I.; Wolcott, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Designs were formulated for four CW, millimeter wavelength traveling-wave tubes having high efficiency and long life. Three of these tubes, in the 42 to 44 GHz frequency region, develop power outputs of 100 to 300 watts with overall efficiencies of typically 45 percent. Another tube, which covers the frequency range of 84 to 86 GHz, provides a power output of 200 watts at 25 percent efficiency. The cathode current density in each design was 1A/sq cm. Each tube includes: metal-ceramic construction, periodic permanent magnet focusing, a two step velocity taper, an electron beam refocusing section, and a radiation cooled three-stage depressed collector. The electrical and mechanical design for each tube type is discussed in detail. The results of thermal and mechanical analyses are presented.

  13. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  14. Experimental and first-principles studies on the elastic properties of α-hafnium metal under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Baosheng

    2016-03-30

    Compressional and shear wave velocities of the α phase of hafnium have been measured up to 10.4 GPa at room temperature using ultrasonic interferometry in a multi-anvil apparatus. A finite strain equation of state analysis yielded Ks0 = 110.4 (5) GPa, G0 = 54.7(5) GPa,Ks0' = 3.7 and G0' = 0.6 for the elastic bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives at ambient conditions. Complementary to the experimental data, the single crystal elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and the unit cell axial ratio c/a of α-hafnium at high pressures were investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) based first principles calculations. A c/a value of 1.605 is predicted for α-Hf at 40 GPa, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results. The low-pressure derivative of the shear modulus observed in our experimental data up to 10 GPa was found to originate from the elastic constant C44 which exhibits negligible pressure dependence within the current experimental pressure range. At higher pressures (>10 GPa), C44 was predicted to soften and the shear wave velocity νS trended to decrease with pressure, which can be interpreted as a precursor to the α-ω transition similar to that observed in other group IV elements (titanium and zirconium). Here, the acoustic velocities, bulk and shear moduli, and the acoustic Debye temperature (θD = 240.1 K) determined from the current experiments were all compared well with those predicted by our theoretical DFT calculations.

  15. Experimental and first-principles studies on the elastic properties of α-hafnium metal under pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; ...

    2016-03-30

    Compressional and shear wave velocities of the α phase of hafnium have been measured up to 10.4 GPa at room temperature using ultrasonic interferometry in a multi-anvil apparatus. A finite strain equation of state analysis yielded Ks0 = 110.4 (5) GPa, G0 = 54.7(5) GPa,Ks0' = 3.7 and G0' = 0.6 for the elastic bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives at ambient conditions. Complementary to the experimental data, the single crystal elastic constants, elastic anisotropy and the unit cell axial ratio c/a of α-hafnium at high pressures were investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) based first principles calculations.more » A c/a value of 1.605 is predicted for α-Hf at 40 GPa, which is in excellent agreement with previous experimental results. The low-pressure derivative of the shear modulus observed in our experimental data up to 10 GPa was found to originate from the elastic constant C44 which exhibits negligible pressure dependence within the current experimental pressure range. At higher pressures (>10 GPa), C44 was predicted to soften and the shear wave velocity νS trended to decrease with pressure, which can be interpreted as a precursor to the α-ω transition similar to that observed in other group IV elements (titanium and zirconium). Here, the acoustic velocities, bulk and shear moduli, and the acoustic Debye temperature (θD = 240.1 K) determined from the current experiments were all compared well with those predicted by our theoretical DFT calculations.« less

  16. The interfacial orientation relationship of oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing oxide dispersion-strengthened austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Cui, Bai; Chen, Wei-Ying; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; McCreary, Virginia; Gross, David; Almer, Jonathan; Robertson, Ian M.; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-03-15

    This work reports comprehensive investigations on the orientation relationship of the oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened 316 stainless steel. The phases of the oxide nanoparticles were determined by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy–electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atom probe tomography and synchrotron X-ray diffraction to be complex Y–Ti–Hf–O compounds with similar crystal structures, including bixbyite Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, fluorite Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–HfO{sub 2} solid solution and pyrochlore (or fluorite) Y{sub 2}(Ti,Hf){sub 2−x}O{sub 7−x}. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the particle–matrix interfaces. Two different coherency relationships along with one axis-parallel relation between the oxide nanoparticles and the steel matrix were found. The size of the nanoparticles significantly influences the orientation relationship. The results provide insight into the relationship of these nanoparticles with the matrix, which has implications for interpreting material properties as well as responses to radiation. - Highlights: • The oxide nanoparticles in a hafnium-containing austenitic ODS were characterized. • The nanoparticles are Y–Hf–Ti–O enriched phases according to APT and STEM–EDS. • Two coherency and an axis-parallel orientation relationships were found by HR-TEM. • Particle size has a prominent effect on the orientation relationship (OR). • Formation mechanism of the oxide nanoparticles was discussed based on the ORs.

  17. Condensation in horizontal heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leyer, S.; Zacharias, T.; Maisberger, F.; Lamm, M.; Vallee, C.; Beyer, M.; Hampel, U.

    2012-07-01

    Many innovative reactor concepts for Generation III nuclear power plants use passive safety equipment for residual heat removal. These systems use two phase natural circulation. Heat transfer to the coolant results in a density difference providing the driving head for the required mass flow. By balancing the pressure drop the system finds its operational mode. Therefore the systems depend on a strong link between heat transfer and pressure drop determining the mass flow through the system. In order to be able to analyze these kind of systems with the help of state of the art computer codes the implemented numerical models for heat transfer, pressure drop or two phase flow structure must be able to predict the system performance in a wide parameter range. Goal of the program is to optimize the numerical models and therefore the performance of computer codes analyzing passive systems. Within the project the heat transfer capacity of a heat exchanger tube will be investigated. Therefore the tube will be equipped with detectors, both temperature and pressure, in several directions perpendicular to the tube axis to be able to resolve the angular heat transfer. In parallel the flow structure of a two phase flow inside and along the tube will be detected with the help of x-ray tomography. The water cooling outside of the tube will be realized by forced convection. It will be possible to combine the flow structure measurement with an angular resolved heat transfer for a wide parameter range. The test rig is set up at the TOPLFOW facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), so that it will be possible to vary the pressure between 5 and 70 bar. The steam mass content will be varied between 0 and 100 percent. The results will be compared to the large scaled Emergency Condenser Tests performed at the INKA test facility in Karlstein (Germany). The paper will explain the test setup and the status of the project will be presented. (authors)

  18. Tracheostomy tubes and related appliances.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R

    2005-04-01

    Tracheostomy tubes are used to administer positive-pressure ventilation, to provide a patent airway, to provide protection from aspiration, and to provide access to the lower respiratory tract for airway clearance. They are available in a variety of sizes and styles, from several manufacturers. The dimensions of tracheostomy tubes are given by their inner diameter, outer diameter, length, and curvature. Differences in length between tubes of the same inner diameter, but from different manufacturers, are not commonly appreciated but may have important clinical implications. Tracheostomy tubes can be angled or curved, a feature that can be used to improve the fit of the tube in the trachea. Extra proximal length tubes facilitate placement in patients with large necks, and extra distal length tubes facilitate placement in patients with tracheal anomalies. Several tube designs have a spiral wire reinforced flexible design and have an adjustable flange design to allow bedside adjustments to meet extra-length tracheostomy tube needs. Tracheostomy tubes can be cuffed or uncuffed. Cuffs on tracheostomy tubes include high-volume low-pressure cuffs, tight-to-shaft cuffs, and foam cuffs. The fenestrated tracheostomy tube has an opening in the posterior portion of the tube, above the cuff, which allows the patient to breathe through the upper airway when the inner cannula is removed. Tracheostomy tubes with an inner cannula are called dual-cannula tracheostomy tubes. Several tracheostomy tubes are designed specifically for use with the percutaneous tracheostomy procedure. Others are designed with a port above the cuff that allows for subglottic aspiration of secretions. The tracheostomy button is used for stoma maintenance. It is important for clinicians caring for patients with a tracheostomy tube to understand the nuances of various tracheostomy tube designs and to select a tube that appropriately fits the patient.

  19. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies.

  20. Experimental study of photon induced gamma emission of hafnium-178(m2) by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoita, Nicolae Catalin

    The induced release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers in the form of an incoherent gamma burst is of great scientific and technological importance. Powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation could be obtained, which would be an intermediary step to the development of a gamma-ray laser. High-energy nuclear isomers with very long lifetimes of the order of years and higher can serve as good active media. For instance, a macroscopic sample of 178Hfm2 isomer stores about 1 GJ/g as excitation energy of the isomeric state. Photonuclear reactions induced by real or virtual photons are the most promising mechanisms to release the energy stored by 178Hfm2 nuclei. The isomeric nucleus is excited to an intermediate level from which cascade to the ground state emitting gamma-photons. The nuclear level density approaches one per keV at those excitation energies. Experimental investigations by nuclear spectroscopy methods conducted in this work revealed that the decay of 178Hfm2 is accelerated when the energies of the incident photons were tuned at about 20,825 keV, 11.15 keV or near the L3 photoionization threshold of atomic hafnium at 9561 keV. In the first case, the presumed mechanism was the direct photoexcitation of the m2 isomeric nucleus to a trigger level at about 2466.9 keV. There was a strong decay branch from this trigger level to the 11- level of the 8 - band that caused the accelerated emission of gamma photons from many of the transitions detected in the unperturbed spontaneous decay. In the second case, a trigger level at about 2457.2 keV, that meant 11.15 keV above the 16+ isomeric level, was mediating the energy release. The direct transition from this level to ground state was observed. Other branches of its decay enhanced the gamma-emission of the ground state band (GSB) members. In the third case, complex electron bridging mechanisms were implied when incident X-ray photons were tuned at energies near the L3 photoionization threshold. Those

  1. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  2. The electrostatic storage tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An electrostatic camera system is discussed which is based on the electrostatic storage tube. The development of the system was begun following a series of experiments which indicated that the device offers signficantly improved performance over currently available devices. The approach used in developing the high performance camera involves: converting the input image to an electron image at low loss, applying a low noise gain process, and storing the resulting charge pattern in a low-loss target. The basic processes and elements of the electrostatic storage tube are illustrated and discussed. Graphs that depict the camera performance characteristics are included.

  3. Incidence and outcome of tube thoracostomy positioning in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Maybauer, Marc O; Geisser, Wolfgang; Wolff, Holger; Maybauer, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of use, placement site, success and misplacement rates, and need for intervention for tube thoracostomies (TTs), and the complications with endotracheal intubation associated with TT in the prehospital setting. We performed a five-year, retrospective study using the records of 1,065 patients who were admitted to the trauma emergency room at a university hospital and who had received chest radiographs or computed tomography (CT) scans within 30 minutes after admission. Seven percent of all patients received a TT (5% unilateral, 2% bilateral). Ninety-seven percent of all patients with a TT were endotracheally intubated. The success rate for correctly placed chest tubes was 78%. Twenty-two percent of the chest tubes were misplaced (i.e., too far in the chest, twisted, or bent); half of those had to be corrected, with one needing to be replaced. There were no statistical differences in the frequency of Monaldi or Bülau positions, or the frequency of left or right chest TT. In addition, the two positions did not differ in misplacement rates or the need for intervention. Helicopter emergency medical services physicians used the Monaldi position significantly more frequently than the Bülau position. In-hospital physicians performing interhospital transfer used the Bülau position significantly more frequently, whereas ground emergency medical physicians had a more balanced relationship between the two positions. Tube thoracostomy had no influence on endotracheal tube misplacement rates, and vice versa. Tube thoracostomy positioning mostly depends on the discretion of the physician on scene. The Monaldi and Bülau positions do not differ in misplacement or complication rates.

  4. Manufacturing SP-100 rhenium tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Edwin D.; Ruffo, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for producing high quality, thin walled, wrought, rhenium tubing was successfully developed and qualified in the SP-100 fuel fabrication program. Rhenium was selected for the fuel-cladding barrier versus tungsten because of the cold workability and nuclear characteristics of rhenium. Several tube fabricating processes including swaging, drawing, and extruding sintered tube shells and chemical vapor deposition were evaluated before a drawn tube made by forming and electron beam welding rhenium strip was selected as the most cost effective. The process for making the rhenium tubes is discussed in general and the tube, room temperature, tensile properties are compared favorably with the properties reported in the literature.

  5. Heat-shrink plastic tubing seals joints in glass tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Duca, B.; Downey, A.

    1968-01-01

    Small units of standard glass apparatus held together by short lengths of transparent heat-shrinkable polyolefin tubing. The tubing is shrunk over glass O-ring type connectors having O-rings but no lubricant.

  6. Salen complexes of zirconium and hafnium: synthesis, structural characterization, controlled hydrolysis, and solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters and lactides.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tanmoy Kumar; Ramkumar, Venkatachalam; Chakraborty, Debashis

    2011-04-04

    Dinuclear salen compounds of zirconium and hafnium are efficient initiators for the solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic ester monomers and lactides. There is a correlation between the theoretical and experimental number-average molecular weights (M(n)'s) in these polymerizations. Polymerization of β-butyrolactone gives poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with a good M(n) and molecular weight distribution.

  7. Observation by EPR of trivalent hafnium in LuPO/sub 4/, YPO/sub 4/, and ScPO/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, M.M.; Boatner, L.A.; Ramey, J.O.

    1985-09-15

    Recent EPR studies of the 4d/sup 1/ configuration ion Zr/sup 3 +/ in the tetragonal-symmetry orthophosphate hosts LuPO/sub 4/, YPO/sub 4/, and ScPO/sub 4/, have led to additional investigations of d/sup 1/ configuration ions associated with unusual valence states of other elements. Single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/, YPO/sub 4/, and ScPO/sub 4/ doped with hafnium were grown and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the 5d/sup 1/ ion Hf /sup 3 +/ was observed in all three cases. EPR signals due to trivalent hafnium were only observed, however, when the doped samples were gamma irradiated at 77 K and maintained at 77 K during the EPR observations. Since there are two odd isotopes of hafnium with different nuclear spins and different natural abundances, identification of the spectrum of Hf /sup 3 +/ was straightforward. Since Hf /sup 3 +/ represents such an unusual valence for hafnium in the solid state, however, this identification was unequivocally verified by preparing crystals doped with isotopically enriched /sup 179/Hf. The spectroscopic splitting factors, g/sub parallel/ and g/sub perpendicular/, and the parallel magnetic hyperfine constants A/sub parallel/ of /sup 177/Hf and /sup 179/Hf were obtained for Hf /sup 3 +/ in all three hosts. A determination of the hyperfine parameters with the applied magnetic field oriented in the perpendicular direction was not carried out due to quadrupole effects. As in the case of Zr/sup 3 +/, the observed electronic g values for Hf /sup 3 +/ could not be accounted for by the standard second-order equations which included the spin-orbit-induced admixture of some other excited orbital levels of the d/sup 1/ configuration into the ground orbital level.

  8. RSRM 10 percent Scale Model Drilled Hole Plate Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purinton, David C.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1996-01-01

    The RSRM 10% Scaled Model under design will make use of drilled hole liners to provide mass addition along the axial length of the model. The model will have two sets of liners in use at a time. The outer most liner is a flow distribution tube, the purpose of which is to help distribute the flow evenly over each model segment. The inner most liner will simulate the propellant burning surface at a burn time of 80 seconds. This liner will replicate as closely as possible the actual geometry of the full scale RSRM at the 80 second burn time. In order to obtain the correct mass flow rate for the burn time selected, it is necessary to determine the porosity of the holes drilled in each liner and the performance of those holes. The pressure drop across the liners directly effects the uniformity of the flow in the axial direction for a given model section. It is desired to have a pressure drop across the liners which is greater than the axial pressure drop in a given section. However, the pressure drop across the liner also has a bearing on the structural soundness of the model. The performance of the model was determined analytically, but there was some uncertainty as to the value of the discharge coefficient used. This uncertainty was the impetus for these drilled hole plate tests. Experimentally obtaining the discharge coefficients for sample plates of the porosity to be used in the model would increase the fidelity of the model design. These tests were developed in order to provide the required information with the least amount of testing time and hardware.

  9. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  10. Investigation of Pitot tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herschel, W H; Buckingham, E

    1917-01-01

    Report describes the principles of operation and characteristics of some of the instruments which have been devised or used to measure both low and high speeds of aeroplanes. Since the pitot tube is the instrument which has been most commonly used in the United States and Great Britain as a speedometer for aeroplanes, it is treated first and somewhat more fully than the others.

  11. Misdirected Minitracheostomy Tube

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Nanda, Chinmaya; Mehta, Yatin

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient who after an uneventful coronary artery bypass graft surgery and left ventricular aneurysmorrhaphy developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subsequently required minitracheostomy. Chest X-ray showed misdirected minitracheostomy tube facing upward toward the laryngeal opening which was repositioned using bronchoscope. PMID:28074805

  12. Misdirected minitracheostomy tube.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajmer; Nanda, Chinmaya; Mehta, Yatin

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient who after an uneventful coronary artery bypass graft surgery and left ventricular aneurysmorrhaphy developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subsequently required minitracheostomy. Chest X-ray showed misdirected minitracheostomy tube facing upward toward the laryngeal opening which was repositioned using bronchoscope.

  13. Tube welding and brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    Brochures outline the tools, equipment, materials, and techniques used for joining tubes by automatic and semiautomatic welding and brazing. A few of the metals being joined are stainless steels of various diameters and thickness. Techniques have been developed for on-site or work-bench repair.

  14. Snorkeling and Jones tubes

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lewis Y. W.; Weatherhead, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a case of tympanic membrane rupture during snorkeling in a 17-year-old young man who had previously undergone bilateral Jones tubes placed for epiphora. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported. PMID:27330470

  15. Flux Tube Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, O.

    2011-05-01

    This Fortran code computes magnetohydrostatic flux tubes and sheets according to the method of Steiner, Pneuman, & Stenflo (1986) A&A 170, 126-137. The code has many parameters contained in one input file that are easily modified. Extensive documentation is provided in README files.

  16. Tube Feeding Transition Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    2007-01-01

    The journey children make from tube feeding to oral feeding is personal for each child and family. There is a sequence of predictable plateaus that children climb as they move toward orally eating. By better understanding this sequence, parents and children can maximize the development, learning, enjoyment and confidence at each plateau. The…

  17. Boiling inside tubes: Post dry-out heat transfer in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    Methods are presented for calculating the heat transfer coefficient in the post dry-out region (that is when the critical heat flux is exceeded and the liquid no longer wets the tube walls) for upward flow in vertical tubes. The methods are restricted to high quality flow (that is when a large proportion of the fluid is vapor) and a test for the applicability of the methods is included. Two different methods are given, one for steam/water flows and one for other fluids. Detailed step-by-step calculation procedures are set out in both cases for the determination of either the wall temperature when the tube is subjected to know heat flux (for example, when electrically heated) or the heat flux when the tube is heated to a known temperature, and all four cases are illustrated by worked example calculations. The accuracy of the methods is discussed and for steam/water is stated to be better than 20 percent by comparison of predictions with some 2000 experimental values for which the ranges of the variables are also given. Results in the case of the method for other fluids were about the same, but were tested against 350 experimental points for four fluids. The ranges of the experimental data are again included. A method of taking account of radiation is also provided.

  18. Rubens Flame-Tube Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficken, George W.; Stephenson, Francis C.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates and explains the phenomenon associated with Rubens flame-tube demonstration, specifically the persistance of flames at regular intervals along the tube for few minutes after the gas is turned off. (GA)

  19. Tubing For Sampling Hydrazine Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Josh; Taffe, Patricia S.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    Report evaluates flexible tubing used for transporting such hypergolic vapors as those of hydrazines for quantitative analysis. Describes experiments in which variety of tubing materials, chosen for their known compatibility with hydrazine, flexibility, and resistance to heat.

  20. 31 CFR 363.144 - Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Can I redeem my zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.144 Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness? You can redeem...

  1. 31 CFR 363.144 - Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Can I redeem my zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.144 Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness? You can redeem...

  2. 31 CFR 363.141 - How do I purchase a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from the zero-percent certificate of indebtedness within five business days after the settlement date... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I purchase a zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent...

  3. 31 CFR 363.144 - Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Can I redeem my zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.144 Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness? You can redeem...

  4. 31 CFR 363.142 - When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When is a zero-percent certificate of... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.142 When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued? A zero...

  5. 31 CFR 363.141 - How do I purchase a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from the zero-percent certificate of indebtedness within five business days after the settlement date... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I purchase a zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent...

  6. 31 CFR 363.144 - Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Can I redeem my zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.144 Can I redeem my zero-percent certificate of indebtedness? You can redeem...

  7. 31 CFR 363.142 - When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When is a zero-percent certificate of... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.142 When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued? A zero...

  8. 31 CFR 363.142 - When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is a zero-percent certificate of... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.142 When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued? A zero...

  9. 31 CFR 363.142 - When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When is a zero-percent certificate of... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness § 363.142 When is a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness issued? A zero...

  10. 31 CFR 363.141 - How do I purchase a zero-percent certificate of indebtedness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from the zero-percent certificate of indebtedness within five business days after the settlement date... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I purchase a zero-percent... REGULATIONS GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Zero-Percent Certificate of Indebtedness Zero-Percent...

  11. Calibration of image dissector tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingman, E. E., III

    1976-01-01

    Technique employs computer-controlled light-emitting diode (LED), precision machined mask, and analog-to-digital coverter (ADC). Computer turns on LED which floods masked face of tube. Intensity pattern, generated as tube is electromagnetically swept, is fed to ADC which controls tube calibration.

  12. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  13. Collapse pressure of coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-09-01

    The collapse pressure is a measure of an external force required to collapse a tube in the absence of internal pressure. It is defined as the minimum pressure required to yield the tube in the absence of internal pressure. Coiled tubing is sometimes used in high-pressure wells. If the external pressure becomes too high, the coiled tubing will collapse. This could not only lead to serious well-control problems, but may result in extensive fishing operations. A reliable safety criterion of collapse pressure for the coiled tubing is needed by the coiled tubing operators. Theoretical models of collapse pressure are well developed for perfectly round coiled tubing but not for oval coiled tubing. Coiled tubing is initially manufactured with nearly perfect roundness, sometimes having a small ovality (typically {le} 0.5%). Perfectly round CT becomes oval owing to the plastic mechanical deformation of the coiled tubing as it spooled on and off the reel and over the gooseneck. As the cycling continues, the ovality usually increases. This ovality significantly decreases the collapse failure pressure as compared to perfectly round tubing. In this paper, an analytical model of collapse pressure for oval tubing under axial tension or compression is developed based on elastic instability theory and the von Mises criterion. The theoretical model shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  14. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  15. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho

    1993-07-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar{mu}s/cm{sup 2}. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/{mu}s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/{mu}s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/{mu}s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/{mu}s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/{mu}s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  16. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho.

    1993-01-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar[mu]s/cm[sup 2]. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/[mu]s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/[mu]s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/[mu]s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/[mu]s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/[mu]s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  17. Effects of Fuel Distribution on Detonation Tube Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Hugh Douglas

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation engine (PDE) uses a series of high frequency intermittent detonation tubes to generate thrust. The process of filling the detonation tube with fuel and air for each cycle may yield non-uniform mixtures. Lack of mixture uniformity is commonly ignored when calculating detonation tube thrust performance. In this study, detonation cycles featuring idealized non-uniform H2/air mixtures were analyzed using the SPARK two-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD code with 7-step H2/air reaction mechanism. Mixture non-uniformities examined included axial equivalence ratio gradients, transverse equivalence ratio gradients, and partially fueled tubes. Three different average test section equivalence ratios (phi), stoichiometric (phi = 1.00), fuel lean (phi = 0.90), and fuel rich (phi = 1.10), were studied. All mixtures were detonable throughout the detonation tube. It was found that various mixtures representing the same test section equivalence ratio had specific impulses within 1 percent of each other, indicating that good fuel/air mixing is not a prerequisite for optimal detonation tube performance.

  18. Tubing rotator reduces tubing wear in rod pumped wells

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. ); Brown, C. )

    1994-04-04

    Tubing failures are both expensive and time-consuming. The most common failure results from rod cutting, or, erosion of the tubing ID because of continuous, reciprocating contact with the rod string. Installation of tubing rotators has decreased tubing failures in West Texas waterflood sucker-rod pumped wells. Pumping unit movement powers the rotator system, turning the tubing string at about 1 revolution/day. The rotator system has both surface and subsurface components. A reduction gear box attached to the walking beam converts the pumping unit's reciprocating strokes into rotary motion. A drive line transfers this rotary motion to a gear-driven suspension mandrel in the rotating tubing hanger. Near the bottom of the tubing string, a rotating tubing anchor/catcher allows the entire tubing string, including the tail pipe, seating nipple, and gas and mud anchor to rotate. The rotator hanger suspends the weight of the tubing string on a bearing system. One model of the hanger has a load capacity of 135,000 lb. A surface swivel allows rotation below the pumping tee so that the flow lines remain stationary. Also included in the string is a safety shear coupling to prevent over torquing the tubing.

  19. Interdevice variability in percent fat estimates using the BOD POD.

    PubMed

    Ball, S D

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate interdevice reliability in body density (Db) and percent body fat (%BF) using air-displacement plethysmography, the BOD POD (BP) body composition system. Duplicate body composition tests were performed in immediate succession on 50 adults (26 M, 24 F; 21-53 y) using two BP units located in the same body composition laboratory. Mean Db and %BF between BP1 and BP2 did not differ significantly for men (DeltaDb = 0.0003+/-0.0008 g/ml, P = 0.632; Delta%BF = 0.1+/-1.3, P = 0.665), while for women, there were small but significant differences in Db and %BF between BP1 and BP2 (DeltaDb = 0.0018+/-0.0003 g/ml, P = 0.001; Delta%BF = 0.8+/-1.1, P = 0.001). The regression between %BF by BP1 and BP2 did not deviate significantly from the line of identity for both men and women (R2 = 0.95, standard error of estimate (s.e.e.) = 1.23 %BF for men; R2 = 0.97, s.e.e = 1.13 %BF for women). Individual variations in %BF estimates between the two BP units were within acceptable ranges (95% limits of agreement = -2.5-2.7 %BF for men; -1.4-3.0 %BF for women), and there was no trend in individual differences as %BF varied (r = -0.19, P = 0.359 for men; r = 0.09, P = 0.677 for women). Other subject characteristics, including age, body mass, height, and body mass index, did not significantly contribute to the differences in %BF estimates by the two BP units. No clinically significant differences in Db and %BF estimates exist between the BP units, and the interdevice variability of the BP has minimal impact on %BF estimates. Further, test-to-test reliability between BP units appears to be as good as within one unit.

  20. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  1. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  2. Tube coupling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William N. (Inventor); Hein, Leopold A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A first annular ring of a tube coupling device has a keyed opening sized to fit around the nut region of a male coupling, and a second annular ring has a keyed opening sized to fit around the nut of a female coupling. Each ring has mating ratchet teeth and these rings are biased together, thereby engaging these teeth and preventing rotation of these rings. This in turn prevents the rotation of the male nut region with respect to the female nut. For tube-to-bulkhead locking, one facet of one ring is notched, and a pin is pressed into an opening in the bulkhead. This pin is sized to fit within one of the notches in the ring, thereby preventing rotation of this ring with respect to the bulkhead.

  3. YouTube Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2012-09-01

    To date, this column has presented videos to show in class, Don Mathieson from Tulsa Community College suggested that YouTube could be used in another fashion. In Don's experience, his students are not always prepared for the mathematic rigor of his course. Even at the high school level, math can be a barrier for physics students. Walid Shihabi, a colleague of Don's, decided to compile a list of YouTube videos that his students could watch to relearn basic mathematics. I thought this sounded like a fantastic idea and a great service to the students. Walid graciously agreed to share his list and I have reproduced a large portion of it below.

  4. Joined concentric tubes

    DOEpatents

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  5. Gun Tube Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    researchers to use ingenious approximation techniques (Rapp 1990) and curve fitting to produce a history of tube heating during the interior ballistic cycle... Automotive Command U.S. Army Materiel Command ATTN: ASQNC-TAC-DIT (Technical ATTN: AMCAM Information Center) 5001 Eisenhower Avenue Warren, MI 48397-5000...36360 ATTN: ATRC-L, Mr. Cameron Fort Lee, VA 23801-6140 2 Program Manager U.S. Army Tank- Automotive Command 1 Commandant ATTN: AMCPM-ABMS, T. Dean (2

  6. A wandering tube.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe; Schattner, Ami

    2016-12-05

    The predominant causes of acute mechanical small bowel obstruction in geriatric patients are adhesions and hernias, which is not much different than in other adult age groups. Unusual etiologies may be encountered, such as volvulus or gallstone ileus, but a displaced feeding gastrostomy tube is a distinctly rare cause of intestinal obstruction which needs to be considered by emergency physicians as it may be increasingly encountered.

  7. [Patulous eustachian tube].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, D; Radosavljević, M; Jelesijević, J

    1995-01-01

    Patulous eustachian tube is a pathological condition which exists more often than we make a diagnosis, and a patient is not often aware of his disease. This disease can be manifested with various symptoms: respiratory synchrony noises in the ear, because of the penetration of the air current through the eustachian tube and with the movement of the eardrum outwards and inside, with autophony, reduction of the hearing, the buzzing, dizziness and disturbance of the balance. Two patients are presented. The first one was sick for many years from various chronics exhausted diseases: Jackson's epilepsy, temporary vascular brain disturbances, tuberculosis of lung, stomach ulcer, heart diseases, the patient is from low class, on one side, and also suffers from some local diseases: a paralysis of soft palate and palatal arcs, a chronic catarrhal rhinitis and sinusitis, a deviation of nasal dividing wall and hindered breathing through the nose, on the other side. Many years the patient didn't know for patological condition in the ears and in the eustachian tubes. After improving the hygienic conditions, the physical condition and local therapy, the patient felt much better. The second patient, with considerable shorter evolution of the disease and mild symptomatology, showed the amplified symptoms of the disease of the Eustachian tube in the course of the acute otitis. It is attained a satisfying calming of the manifestative symptoms by remedy therapie. Man must thing about possibility of the appearance of this pathology condition in various disease or conditions, which can take to the fast lost of the weight and physical and moral exhaustion of the patient, i.e. an adult, first as the protection of the appearance of the disease (condition) and afterwards, eventually early and regulary treatment in order to prevent various possible, above mentioned complications.

  8. Apparatus Splits Glass Tubes Longitudinally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ernest; Manahan, Robert O'neil

    1993-01-01

    Tubes split into half cylinders by hot-wire/thermal-shock method. Tube to be cut placed on notched jig in apparatus. Nichrome wire stretched between arms of pivoted carriage and oriented parallel to notch. Wire heated by electrical current while resting on tube. After heating for about 1 minute for each millimeter of thickness of glass, tube quenched in water and split by resulting thermal shock. Apparatus used to split tubes in sizes ranging from 3/8 in. in diameter by 1 in. long to 1 1/2 in. in diameter by 4 in. long.

  9. Tube bundle system

    PubMed Central

    Marchewka, W.; Mohamed, K.; Addis, J.; Karnack, F.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine PMID:26306052

  10. Concentric tube support assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  11. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  12. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  13. Reliability of steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kadokami, E.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents results on studies made of the reliability of steam generator (SG) tubing. The basis for this work is that in Japan the issue of defects in SG tubing is addressed by the approach that any detected defect should be repaired, either by plugging the tube or sleeving it. However, this leaves open the issue that there is a detection limit in practice, and what is the effect of nondetectable cracks on the performance of tubing. These studies were commissioned to look at the safety issues involved in degraded SG tubing. The program has looked at a number of different issues. First was an assessment of the penetration and opening behavior of tube flaws due to internal pressure in the tubing. They have studied: penetration behavior of the tube flaws; primary water leakage from through-wall flaws; opening behavior of through-wall flaws. In addition they have looked at the question of the reliability of tubing with flaws during normal plant operation. Also there have been studies done on the consequences of tube rupture accidents on the integrity of neighboring tubes.

  14. Hybrid endotracheal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakezles, Christopher Thomas

    Intubation involves the placement of a tube into the tracheal lumen and is prescribed in any setting in which the airway must be stabilized or the patient anesthetized. The purpose of the endotracheal tube in these procedures is to maintain a viable airway, facilitate mechanical ventilation, allow the administration of anesthetics, and prevent the reflux of vomitus into the lungs. In order to satisfy these requirements a nearly airtight seal must be maintained between the tube and the tracheal lining. Most conventional endotracheal tubes provide this seal by employing a cuff that is inflated once the tube is in place. However, the design of this cuff and properties of the material are a source of irritation and injury to the tracheal tissues. In fact, the complication rate for endotracheal intubation is reported to be between 10 and 60%, with manifestations ranging from severe sore throat to erosion through the tracheal wall. These complications are caused by a combination of the materials employed and the forces exerted by the cuff on the tracheal tissues. In particular, the abrasive action of the cuff shears cells from the lining, epithelium adhering to the cuff is removed during extubation, and normal forces exerted on the basement tissues disrupt the blood supply and cause pressure necrosis. The complications associated with tracheal intubation may be reduced or eliminated by employing airway devices constructed from hydrogel materials. Hydrogels are a class of crosslinked polymers which swell in the presence of moisture, and may contain more than 95% water by weight. For the current study, several prototype airway devices were constructed from hydrogel materials including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The raw hydrogel materials from this group were subjected to tensile, swelling, and biocompatibility testing, while the finished devices were subjected to extensive mechanical simulation and animal trials

  15. Percent recovery of low influent concentrations of microorganism surrogates in small sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, M. E.; Blaschke, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    In order to develop a dependable method to calculate the setback distance of a drinking water well from a potential point of microbiological contamination, surrogates are used to perform field tests to avoid using pathogenic micro-organisms. One such surrogate used to model the potential travel time of microbial contamination is synthetic microspheres. The goal of this study is to examine the effect of differing influent colloid concentrations on the percent recovery of microbial surrogates after passing through a soil column. Similar studies have been done to investigate blocking of ideal attachment sites using concentrations between 106 and 1010 particles ml-1. These high concentrations were necessary due to the detection limit of the measuring technique used; however, our measuring technique allows us to test input concentrations ranging from 101 to 106 particles ml-1. These low concentrations are more similar to the concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms present in nature. We have tested the enumeration of 0.5 μm microspheres using a solid-phase cytometer and evaluated their transport in small sand columns. Fluorescent microspheres were purchased for this study with carboxylated surfaces. The soil columns consist of Plexiglas tubes, 30 cm long and 7 cm in diameter, both filled with the same coarse sand. Bromide was used as a conservative tracer, to estimate pore-water velocity and dispersivity, and bromide concentrations were analysed using ion chromatography and bromide probes. Numerical modelling was done using CXTFIT and HYDRUS-1D software programs. The 0.5 μm beads were enumerated in different environmental waters using solid-phase cytometry and compared to counts in sterile water in order to confirm the accuracy of the method. The solid-phase cytometer was able to differentiate the 0.5 μm beads from naturally present autofluorescent particles and bacteria, and therefore, is an appropriate method to enumerate this surrogate.

  16. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency, and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines. This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under

  17. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Hastelloy-X tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Colantino, G. J.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Hastelloy-X tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1400 to 1650 F and internal helium pressures from 800 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 58 to 3600 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was from 20 to 40 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  18. Ni ion release, osteoblast-material interactions, and hemocompatibility of hafnium-implanted NiTi alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Yan; Zhao, Xinqing; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Tao

    2012-04-01

    Hafnium ion implantation was applied to NiTi alloy to suppress Ni ion release and enhance osteoblast-material interactions and hemocompatibility. The auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope results showed that a composite TiO(2)/HfO(2) nanofilm with increased surface roughness was formed on the surface of NiTi, and Ni concentration was reduced in the superficial surface layer. Potentiodynamic polarization tests displayed that 4 mA NiTi sample possessed the highest E(br) - E(corr), 470 mV higher than that of untreated NiTi, suggesting a significant improvement on pitting corrosion resistance. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry tests during 60 days immersion demonstrated that Ni ion release rate was remarkably decreased, for example, a reduction of 67% in the first day. The water contact angle increased and surface energy decreased after Hf implantation. Cell culture and methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium indicated that Hf-implanted NiTi expressed enhanced osteoblasts adhesion and proliferation, especially after 7 days culture. Hf implantation decreased fibrinogen adsorption, but had almost no effect on albumin adsorption. Platelets adhesion and activation were suppressed significantly (97% for 4 mA NiTi) and hemolysis rate was decreased by at least 57% after Hf implantation. Modified surface composition and morphology and decreased surface energy should be responsible for the improvement of cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mechanistic Studies of Hafnium-Pyridyl Amido-Catalyzed 1-Octene Polymerization and Chain Transfer Using Quench-Labeling Methods.

    PubMed

    Cueny, Eric S; Johnson, Heather C; Anding, Bernie J; Landis, Clark R

    2017-08-30

    Chromophore quench-labeling applied to 1-octene polymerization as catalyzed by hafnium-pyridyl amido precursors enables quantification of the amount of active catalyst and observation of the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of Hf-bound polymers via UV-GPC analysis. Comparison of the UV-detected MWD with the MWD of the "bulk" (all polymers, from RI-GPC analysis) provides important mechanistic information. The time evolution of the dual-detection GPC data, concentration of active catalyst, and monomer consumption suggests optimal activation conditions for the Hf pre-catalyst in the presence of the activator [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4]. The chromophore quench-labeling agents do not react with the chain-transfer agent ZnEt2 under the reaction conditions. Thus, Hf-bound polymeryls are selectively labeled in the presence of zinc-polymeryls. Quench-labeling studies in the presence of ZnEt2 reveal that ZnEt2 does not influence the rate of propagation at the Hf center, and chain transfer of Hf-bound polymers to ZnEt2 is fast and quasi-irreversible. The quench-label techniques represent a means to study commercial polymerization catalysts that operate with high efficiency at low catalyst concentrations without the need for specialized equipment.

  20. Tetra­kis(quinolin-8-olato-κ2 N,O)hafnium(IV) toluene disolvate

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, J. Augustinus; Visser, Hendrik G.; Roodt, Andreas; Steyn, Maryke

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Hf(C9H6NO)4]·2C7H8, the hafnium metal centre is coordinated by four N,O-donating bidentate quinolin-8-olate ligands arranged to give a square-anti­prismatic coordination polyhedron with a slightly distorted dodeca­hedral geometry. The average Hf—O and Hf—N distances are 2.096 (3) and 2.398 (3) Å, respectively, and the average O—Hf—N bite angle is 70.99 (11)°. The crystal packing is controlled by π–π inter­actions between quinoline ligands of neighbouring mol­ecules and hydrogen-bonding inter­actions. The inter­planar distances vary between 3.138 (1) and 3.208 (2) Å, while the centroid–centroid distances range from 3.576 (1) to 4.074 (1) Å. PMID:21578562